Science.gov

Sample records for government research labs

  1. Reflections on Three Corporate Research Labs: Bell Labs, HP Labs, Agilent Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2008-03-01

    This will be a personal reflection on corporate life and physics-based research in three industrial research labs over three decades, Bell Labs during the 1980's, HP Labs during the 1990's, and Agilent Labs during the 2000's. These were times of great change in all three companies. I'll point out some of the similarities and differences in corporate cultures and how this impacted the research and development activities. Along the way I'll mention some of the great products that resulted from physics-based R&D.

  2. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2005-06-05

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed.

  3. Governing Methods: Policy Innovation Labs, Design and Data Science in the Digital Governance of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Policy innovation labs are emerging knowledge actors and technical experts in the governing of education. The article offers a historical and conceptual account of the organisational form of the policy innovation lab. Policy innovation labs are characterised by specific methods and techniques of design, data science, and digitisation in public…

  4. Governing Methods: Policy Innovation Labs, Design and Data Science in the Digital Governance of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Policy innovation labs are emerging knowledge actors and technical experts in the governing of education. The article offers a historical and conceptual account of the organisational form of the policy innovation lab. Policy innovation labs are characterised by specific methods and techniques of design, data science, and digitisation in public…

  5. Research governance: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Slowther, Anne; Boynton, Petra; Shaw, Sara

    2006-02-01

    Healthcare research is haunted by a history of unethical studies in which profound harm was caused to vulnerable individuals. Official systems for gaining ethical approval for research, designed to prevent a repetition of these shameful examples, can prove bureaucratic and inflexible in practice. The core ethical principles of respect for autonomy, prevention of harm, promotion of benefit, and justice (which form the basis of professional codes of research conduct) must be applied flexibly to take account of contextual, methodological, personal and practical considerations. Ensuring that the design and conduct of all research is ethically sound is the responsibility of all involved-including researchers, research institutions, ethics review committees and regulatory bodies. PMID:16449779

  6. The NASA Langley Isolator Dynamics Research Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Humphreys, William M.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2010-01-01

    The Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) is under construction at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A unique test apparatus is being fabricated to support both wall and in-stream measurements for investigating the internal flow of a dual-mode scramjet isolator model. The test section is 24 inches long with a 1-inch by 2-inch cross sectional area and is supplied with unheated, dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The test section is being fabricated with two sets (glass and metallic) of interchangeable sidewalls to support flow visualization and laser-based measurement techniques as well as static pressure, wall temperature, and high frequency pressure measurements. During 2010, a CFD code validation experiment will be conducted in the lab in support of NASA s Fundamental Aerodynamics Program. This paper describes the mechanical design of the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab test apparatus and presents a summary of the measurement techniques planned for investigating the internal flow field of a scramjet isolator model.

  7. The Portable Usability Testing Lab: A Flexible Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Michael E.; And Others

    A group of faculty at the University of Georgia obtained funding for a research and development facility called the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory (LPSL). One of the LPSL's primary needs was obtaining a portable usability lab for software testing, so the facility obtained the "Luggage Lab 2000." The lab is transportable to any site…

  8. Understanding Horizontal Governance. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal governance is an umbrella term that covers a range of approaches to policy development, service delivery issues, and management practices. A horizontal initiative may take place across levels of government, across boundaries between units of a single department or agency or among multiple departments or agencies, or across public,…

  9. Roadmapping Future E-Government Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicking, Melanie

    Global electronic markets, virtual organisations, virtual identities, virtual products and services, and Internet-related crime are growing in prominence and importance. In a world that is increasingly non-physical and borderless, what are government's roles, responsibilities and limitations? The Internet plays a central role within the transformation process from traditional governments towards modern and innovative government that the requirements of an Information Society. Based on the findings of the eGovRTD2020 project, that aims at identifying key research challenges and at implementing a model for a holistic government with horizon 2020, this paper explains the necessity to investigate and understand the Internet and in particular government's role and responsibilities in it. Furthermore, the paper provides a research roadmap that details how to address certain issue related research questions.

  10. Bethune-Cookman University STEM Research Lab. DOE Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Herbert W.

    2012-03-31

    DOE funding was used to renovate 4,500 square feet of aging laboratories and classrooms that support science, engineering, and mathematics disciplines (specifically environmental science, and computer engineering). The expansion of the labs was needed to support robotics and environmental science research, and to better accommodate a wide variety of teaching situations. The renovated space includes a robotics laboratory, two multi-use labs, safe spaces for the storage of instrumentation, modern ventilation equipment, and other “smart” learning venues. The renovated areas feature technologies that are environmentally friendly with reduced energy costs. A campus showcase, the laboratories are a reflection of the University’s commitment to the environment and research as a tool for teaching. As anticipated, the labs facilitate the exploration of emerging technologies that are compatible with local and regional economic plans.

  11. Negotiating Peer Mentoring Roles in Undergraduate Research Lab Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky W.; Marciano, Vincenza N.; Payne, Jessica M.; Bledzki, Leszek A.; Woodard, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate research is viewed as an important catalyst for educational engagement and persistence, with an emphasis on the faculty mentoring relationship. Despite the common practice of having multi-tiered lab teams composed of newer undergraduates and more seasoned undergraduates serving as peer mentors, less is understood about the experience…

  12. Negotiating Peer Mentoring Roles in Undergraduate Research Lab Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky W.; Marciano, Vincenza N.; Payne, Jessica M.; Bledzki, Leszek A.; Woodard, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate research is viewed as an important catalyst for educational engagement and persistence, with an emphasis on the faculty mentoring relationship. Despite the common practice of having multi-tiered lab teams composed of newer undergraduates and more seasoned undergraduates serving as peer mentors, less is understood about the experience…

  13. The Berkeley Lab's Intensive Research Institute 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Peggy; Mike, Martin; Norman, Eric; Otto, Roland; Smith, Al

    2004-05-01

    The LBNL Center for Science and Engineering Education - with funding from the Department of Energy's Preservice Science Teacher (PST) program - piloted an Intensive Research Institute in the Summer of 2003. Six preservice math and science teachers from the Cal State University at Fresno Center for Mathematics and Science Education took part in the 10-week program along with an experienced high-school teacher who acted as mentor. Four scientists presented successive two-week workshops designed to provide the students with 1) first hand experience with scientific instruments and research methods, 2) subject matter knowledge related to the workshop activities, and 3) an opportunity to tie their activities to middle and high school math and science standards. The workshops presented were Nuclear Science and Neutron Activation Analysis, Natural Terrestrial Radioactivity, Cosmic Ray Detection and Fingerprint Analysis at the Infrared Beam Line at the ALS. The institute was very successful and will be expanded in 2004 to include inservice teachers.

  14. eCAT: Online electronic lab notebook for scientific research

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background eCAT is an electronic lab notebook (ELN) developed by Axiope Limited. It is the first online ELN, the first ELN to be developed in close collaboration with lab scientists, and the first ELN to be targeted at researchers in non-commercial institutions. eCAT was developed in response to feedback from users of a predecessor product. By late 2006 the basic concept had been clarified: a highly scalable web-based collaboration tool that possessed the basic capabilities of commercial ELNs, i.e. a permissions system, controlled sharing, an audit trail, electronic signature and search, and a front end that looked like the electronic counterpart to a paper notebook. Results During the development of the beta version feedback was incorporated from many groups including the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research, Uppsala University, Children's Hospital Boston, Alex Swarbrick's lab at the Garvan Institute in Sydney and Martin Spitaler at Imperial College. More than 100 individuals and groups worldwide then participated in the beta testing between September 2008 and June 2009. The generally positive response is reflected in the following quote about how one lab is making use of eCAT: "Everyone uses it as an electronic notebook, so they can compile the diverse collections of data that we generate as biologists, such as images and spreadsheets. We use to it to take minutes of meetings. We also use it to manage our common stocks of antibodies, plasmids and so on. Finally, perhaps the most important feature for us is the ability to link records, reagents and experiments." Conclusion By developing eCAT in close collaboration with lab scientists, Axiope has come up with a practical and easy-to-use product that meets the need of scientists to manage, store and share data online. eCAT is already being perceived as a product that labs can continue to use as their data management and sharing grows in scale and complexity. PMID:20334629

  15. Cyberinfrastructure to Support Collaborative Research Within Small Ecology Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laney, C.; Jaimes, A.; Cody, R. P.; Kassin, A.; Salayandia, L.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, ecological research programs addressing complex challenges are driving technological innovations that allow the acquisition and analysis of data collected over larger spatial scales and finer temporal resolutions. Many research labs are shifting from deploying technicians or students into the field to setting up automated sensors. These sensors can cost less on an individual basis, provide continuous and reliable data collection, and allow researchers to spend more time analyzing data and testing hypotheses. They can provide an enormous amount of complex information about an ecosystem. However, the effort to manage, analyze, and disseminate that information can be daunting. Small labs unfamiliar with these efforts may find their capacity to publish at competitive rates hindered by information management. Such labs would be well served by an easy to manage cyberinfrastructure (CI) that is organized in a modular, plug-and-play design and is amenable to a wide variety of data types. Its functionality would permit addition of new sensors and perform automated data analysis and visualization. Such a system would conceivably enhance access to data from small labs through web services, thereby improving the representation of smaller labs in scientific syntheses and enhancing the spatial and temporal coverage of such efforts. We present a CI that is designed to meet the needs of a small but heavily instrumented research site located within the USDA ARS Jornada Experimental Range in the northern Chihuahuan Desert. This site was constructed and is operated by the Systems Ecology Lab at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), a relatively small and young lab. Researchers at the site study land-atmosphere carbon, water, and energy fluxes at a mixed creosote (Larrea tridentata) - mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) shrubland. The site includes an eddy covariance tower built to AmeriFlux and FLUXNET specifications, a robotic cart that measures hyperspectral reflectance from a fixed rail system, an 8-node network of SpecNet phenostations, phenology cameras, and transects where the phenology of key plant species are monitored. In all, this single research site has continuous data streams from >80 sensors in addition to traditional field work. Pressures to integrate and synthesize data across platforms, carry over 'corporate memory' between graduate students, and publish results in a timely fashion make automated data documentation and management systems appealing. The CI currently under collaborative development with UTEP's CyberShare Center of Excellence aids researchers with a visually appealing website featuring a dynamic mapping application, data search and display tools, and interfaces to backend databases and in-house developed provenance-tracking modules. We provide an overview of this CI with live demonstrations of the various tools that comprise it. Surveys on potential user preferences and ideas will also be circulated to conduct research on the CI and informatics needs of other small ecological research labs to aid module development and prioritization.

  16. Instrumentation and Equipment for Three Independent Research Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Darlene Roth

    2012-03-29

    Completed in 2011, Albright's new Science Center includes three independent student and faculty research labs in Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, and Physics (separate from teaching labs). Providing independent research facilities, they eliminate disruptions in classrooms and teaching labs, encourage and accommodate increased student interest, and stimulate advanced research. The DOE grant of $369,943 enabled Albright to equip these advanced labs for 21st century science research, with much instrumentation shared among departments. The specialty labs will enable Albright to expand its student-faculty research program to meet growing interest, help attract superior science students, maximize faculty expertise, and continue exceeding its already high rates of acceptance for students applying for postgraduate education or pharmaceutical research positions. Biology instrumentation/equipment supports coursework and independent and collaborative research by students and faculty. The digital shaker, CO{sub 2} and water bath incubators (for controlled cell growth), balance, and micropipettes support cellular biology research in the advanced cell biology course and student-faculty research into heavy metal induction of heat shock proteins in cultured mammalian cells and the development of PCR markers from different populations of the native tree, Franklinia. The gravity convection oven and lyophilizer support research into physical and chemical analysis of floodplain sediments used in assessment of riparian restoration efforts. The Bio-Rad thermocycler permits fast and accurate DNA amplification as part of research into genetic diversity in small mammal populations and how those populations are affected by land-use practices and environmental management. The Millipore water deionizing system and glassware washer provide general support of the independent research lab and ensure quality control of coursework and interdisciplinary research at the intersection of biology, chemistry, and toxicology. Grant purchases support faculty and students working in the areas of plant cellular biology, landscape ecology and wildlife management, wetland restoration, and ecotoxicology of aquatic invertebrates. Chemistry/BioChemistry instrumentation supports a wide range of research and teaching needs. The Dell quad core Xeon processors and Gaussian 09 support computational research efforts of two of our faculty. The computational work of one of these groups is part of close collaboration with one organic chemist and provides support info for the synthetic work of this professor and his students. Computational chemistry studies were also introduced into the physical chemistry laboratory course for junior chemistry concentrators. The AKTA plus system and superdex columns, Thermoscientific Sorvall RC-6 plus superspeed centrifuge, Nanodrop spectrometer, Eppendorf microfuge, Homogenizer and Pipetman pipetters were incorporated into a research project involving purification and characterization of a construct of beta 2-microglobulin by one of our biochemists. The vacuum system (glove box, stand, and pump) makes a significant contribution to the research of our inorganic chemist, the newest department member, working on research projects with four students. The glove box provides the means to carry out their synthetic work in an oxygenless atmosphere. Supporting basic research pursued by faculty and students, the remaining items (refrigerator/freezer units for flammable storage, freezer, refrigerated water bath, rotary evaporator system, vacuum oven, analytical and top-loading balances) were distributed between our biochemistry and chemistry research labs. The Nanodrop spectrometer, Sorvall centrifuge, and rotary evaporator system are used in several junior/senior lab courses in both biochemistry and chemistry. To date, 14 undergraduate research students have been involved in projects using the new instrumentation and equipment provided by this grant. Physics equipment acquired is radically transforming Albright research and teaching capabilities. The two main purchases are an atomic force microscope (AFM) and a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). These two devices allow us to view surfaces at much higher resolution than ever before, even to the level of individual atoms. Already the AFM has been incorporated into courses for advanced physics and biology students, allowing them to view at high resolution material such as carbon nanotubes, cell structure, and proteins. These devices offer possibilities for interdisciplinary collaboration among students and faculty in various departments that have barely begun to be tapped. Additional equipment, such as software, optical tables, lasers, and other support equipment, is also strengthening our research and teaching capabilities in optics-related areas.

  17. VR/IS Lab Virtual Actor research overview

    SciTech Connect

    Shawver, D.M.; Stansfield, S.

    1995-06-22

    This overview presents current research at Sandia National Laboratories in the Virtual Reality and Intelligent Simulation Lab. Into an existing distributed VR environment which we have been developing, and which provides shared immersion for multiple users, we are adding virtual actor support. The virtual actor support we are adding to this environment is intended to provide semi-autonomous actors, with oversight and high-level guiding control by a director/user, and to allow the overall action to be driven by a scenario. We present an overview of the environment into which our virtual actors will be added in Section 3, and discuss the direction of the Virtual Actor research itself in Section 4. We will briefly review related work in Section 2. First however we need to place the research in the context of what motivates it. The motivation for our construction of this environment, and the line of research associated with it, is based on a long-term program of providing support, through simulation, for situational training, by which we mean a type of training in which students learn to handle multiple situations or scenarios. In these situations, the student may encounter events ranging from the routine occurance to the rare emergency. Indeed, the appeal of such training systems is that they could allow the student to experience and develop effective responses for situations they would otherwise have no opportunity to practice, until they happened to encounter an actual occurance. Examples of the type of students for this kind of training would be security forces or emergency response forces. An example of the type of training scenario we would like to support is given in Section 4.2.

  18. Global warming, global research, and global governing

    SciTech Connect

    Preining, O.

    1997-12-31

    The anticipated dangers of Global Warming can be mitigated by reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, especially CO{sub 2}. To reach acceptable, constant levels within the next couple of centuries it might be necessary to accept stabilization levels higher than present ones, The annual CO{sub 2} emissions must be reduced far below today`s values. This is a very important result of the models discussed in the 1995 IPCC report. However, any even very modest scenario for the future must take into account a substantial increase in the world population which might double during the 21st century, There is a considerable emission reduction potential of the industrialized world due to efficiency increase, However, the demand for energy services by the growing world population will, inspite of the availability of alternative energy resources, possibly lead to a net increase in fossil fuel consumption. If the climate models are right, and the science community believes they are, we will experience a global warming of the order of a couple of degrees over the next century; we have to live with it. To be prepared for the future it is essential for us to use new research techniques embracing not only the familiar fields of hard sciences but also social, educational, ethical and economic aspects, We must find a way to build up the essential intellectual capacities needed to deal with these kinds of general problems within all nations and all societies. But this is not Although, we also have to find the necessary dynamical and highly flexible structures for a global governing using tools such as the environmental regime. The first step was the Framework Convention On Climate Change, UN 1992; for resolution of questions regarding implementations the Conference of the Parties was established.

  19. Government: Senate Generous on Agency Research Budgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Janice

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the senate's 1981 research and development appropriations. The senate has approved research funding levels higher than both the amount requested by the House and the Administration except in the case of the Environmental Protection Agency. Research agencies discussed are NASA, Energy, NSF, Commerce, and ERA. (Author/DS)

  20. Can the Federal Government Improve Education Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Brian Aaron; Ludwig, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Will recent federal policy changes succeed in improving the quality of education policy research? One explanation for the limited supply to date of high-quality evaluation evidence in education is limited demand, owing perhaps, in part, to market failure for both education outcomes and education research. In the market for education outcomes, the…

  1. Government-University-Industry-Research Roundtable

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    Roundtable projects active during 1993 are described in this section. Projects completed in prior years are not included here, but publications resulting from them are included in the list of publications which are attached. Such prior projects include nurturing science and engineering talent, research facility financing, multidisciplinary research and education, university-industry-federal laboratory partnerships, and federal-state cooperation in science and technology.

  2. Preparing students for experimental research through instructional labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowski, Heather

    2015-03-01

    Preparing undergraduate physics majors for future careers in experimental science is one of the main goals of our current physics education system. At the University of Colorado, we have been working to transform our upper-division laboratory courses to better prepare students for future undergraduate, industrial, or graduate experimental work. Through this process, we have developed learning goals, curricular materials, and assessments for two upper-division lab courses. The transformation process and measured outcomes will be presented.

  3. Performance-Based Pay in the Federal Government. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Performance-Based Pay in the Federal Government"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Steve Nelson discusses the evolution of employee pay systems in the federal government, from the inception of the General Schedule to continuing interest in creating more…

  4. Research Politics: Some Issues in Conducting Research for Government as a Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diko, Nolutho; Bantwini, Bongani D.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers are guided by their ideological and ethical viewpoints when conducting research. Doing research for government challenges them to confront these ideals head-on. This article explores the uncertain terrain researchers sometimes have to negotiate when conducting research for government, and discusses relations between researchers and…

  5. Research Governance and the Role of Evaluation: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molas-Gallart, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Through a comparative study of the United Kingdom and Spain, this article addresses the effect of different research governance structures on the functioning and uses of research evaluation. It distinguishes three main evaluation uses: distributive, improvement, and controlling. Research evaluation in the United Kingdom plays important…

  6. Research Governance and the Role of Evaluation: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molas-Gallart, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Through a comparative study of the United Kingdom and Spain, this article addresses the effect of different research governance structures on the functioning and uses of research evaluation. It distinguishes three main evaluation uses: distributive, improvement, and controlling. Research evaluation in the United Kingdom plays important…

  7. Suggested drilling research tasks for the Federal Government

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    A brief summary discussion of drilling, drilling research and the role of the government in drilling research is presented. Specific research and development areas recommended for federal consideration are listed. The technical nature of the identified tasks is emphasized. The Appendices present the factual basis for the discussion and recommendations. Numerous references are noted in the Appendices.

  8. Governing solar geoengineering research as it leaves the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andy

    2014-12-28

    One of the greatest controversies in geoengineering policy concerns the next stages of solar radiation management research, and when and how it leaves the laboratory. Citing numerous risks and concerns, a range of prominent commentators have called for field experiments to be delayed until there is formalized research governance, such as an international agreement. As a piece of pragmatic policy analysis, this paper explores the practicalities and implications of demands for 'governance before research'. It concludes that 'governance before research' is a desirable goal, but that a delay in experimentation-a moratorium-would probably be an ineffective and counterproductive way to achieve it. Firstly, it is very unlikely that a moratorium could be imposed. Secondly, even if it were practicable it seems that a temporary ban on field experiments would have at best a mixed effect addressing the main risks and concerns, while blocking and stigmatizing safe research and delaying the development of good governance practices from learning by doing. The paper suggests a number of steps to ensure 'governance before research' that can be taken in the absence of an international agreement or national legislation, emphasizing the roles of researchers and research funders in developing and implementing good practices. PMID:25404686

  9. (De)Constructing the Undergraduate Research Experience in an Environmental Geochemistry Lab (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Maintaining a productive research lab at the undergraduate level requires a savvy combination of internal organization, high (but realistic) expectations, and adaptation of one's research interests into semester- and summer-length projects. Several key strategies can help achieve the goal of building a lab culture that both enriches students' academic experiences and advances one's own scholarly research and visibility. Foremost among these is the need to maintain momentum and preserve institutional knowledge in an environment where undergraduate students' lifetime in an individual lab may only last a year or two. Examples from the Environmental Geochemistry Lab at Chapman University (www.chapman.edu/envgeo) developed over several years and with 40+ undergraduate students will be presented which can be transferable to other faculty research labs in the earth sciences. Approaches to writing successful external research grant proposals at a primarily undergraduate institution (PUI) and strategies for both personal and institutional time management/savings will also be discussed, with a focus on new models at Chapman offered to further incentivize faculty involvement in undergraduate research.

  10. Big projects could threaten weapons labs` research base

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1996-05-24

    Every few seconds, a mushroom cloud explodes on Paul Cunningham`s Computer screen. The unsettling image is a screen saver in the office of the chief of nuclear materials and stockpile management at Los Alamos National Laboratory - and a wry reminder of the radical changes underway at the three US weapons labs. Now that the US has renounced underground nuclear testing, simulations are becoming the weapons designers chief tool for ensuring that the nuclear arsenal is reliable. The new approach to testing, stockpile stewardship, has triggered a fierce debate within the defense community. At issue is how to keep a balance between financing such new and costly stewardship projects as the $1.1 billion National Ignition Facility, which will simulate the conditions of nuclear detonation, and maintaining a critical mass of experienced weapons designers. This artical describes the debate and funding and political problems which go with it.

  11. Research Using Government Data Sets: An Underutilised Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipe, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The use of existing data for education research activities can be a valuable resource. Improvement in statistical analysis and data management and retrieval techniques, as well as access to government data bases, has expanded opportunities for researchers seeking to investigate issues that are institutional in nature, such as participation…

  12. Research Using Government Data Sets: An Underutilised Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipe, Sally

    2011-01-01

    The use of existing data for education research activities can be a valuable resource. Improvement in statistical analysis and data management and retrieval techniques, as well as access to government data bases, has expanded opportunities for researchers seeking to investigate issues that are institutional in nature, such as participation…

  13. Strategic investments in non-communicable diseases (NCD) research in Africa: the GSK Africa NCD Open Lab.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matthew D; Dufton, Ann M; Katso, Roy M; Gatsi, Sally A; Williams, Pauline M; Strange, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    In March 2014, GSK announced a number of new strategic investments in Africa. One of these included investment of up to 25 million Pounds Sterling (£25 million) to create the world's first R&D Open Lab to increase understanding of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Africa. The vision is to create a new global R&D effort with GSK working in partnership with major funders, academic centres and governments to share expertise and resources to conduct high-quality research. The Africa NCD Open Lab will see GSK scientists collaborate with scientific research centres across Africa. An independent advisory board of leading scientists and clinicians will provide input to develop the strategy and selection of NCD research projects within a dynamic and networked open-innovation environment. It is hoped that these research projects will inform prevention and treatment strategies in the future and will enable researchers across academia and industry to discover and develop new medicines to address the specific needs of African patients. PMID:25962942

  14. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  15. Online Statistics Labs in MSW Research Methods Courses: Reducing Reluctance toward Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, William; Choi, Eunhee; Friedline, Terri

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results from an evaluation of an online statistics lab as part of a foundations research methods course for master's-level social work students. The article discusses factors that contribute to an environment in social work that fosters attitudes of reluctance toward learning and teaching statistics in research methods…

  16. Research Animal Holding Facility Prevents Space Lab Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Jahns, G. C.; Dalton, B. P.; Hogan, R. P.; Wray, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Healthy environment for both rodents and human researchers maintained. Research animal holding facility (RAHF) and rodent cage prevent solid particles (feces, food bits, hair), micro-organisms, ammonia, and odors from escaping into outside environment during spaceflight. Rodent cage contains compartments for two animals. Provides each drinking-water dispenser, feeding alcove, and activity-monitoring port. Feeding and waste trays removable.

  17. The "Paradox of Interdisciplinarity" in Australian Research Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelert, Peter; Millar, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies what can be called the "paradox of interdisciplinarity" (Weingart 2000) in Australian higher education research governance and explores some of its constitutive dimensions. In the Australian context, the paradox of interdisciplinarity primarily concerns the proliferation of a programmatic discourse of…

  18. Build your own social network laboratory with Social Lab: a tool for research in social media.

    PubMed

    Garaizar, Pablo; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2014-06-01

    Social networking has surpassed e-mail and instant messaging as the dominant form of online communication (Meeker, Devitt, & Wu, 2010). Currently, all large social networks are proprietary, making it difficult to impossible for researchers to make changes to such networks for the purpose of study design and access to user-generated data from the networks. To address this issue, the authors have developed and present Social Lab, an Internet-based free and open-source social network software system available from http://www.sociallab.es . Having full availability of navigation and communication data in Social Lab allows researchers to investigate behavior in social media on an individual and group level. Automated artificial users ("bots") are available to the researcher to simulate and stimulate social networking situations. These bots respond dynamically to situations as they unfold. The bots can easily be configured with scripts and can be used to experimentally manipulate social networking situations in Social Lab. Examples for setting up, configuring, and using Social Lab as a tool for research in social media are provided. PMID:24061930

  19. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  20. Of Mice and Meth: A New Media-Based Neuropsychopharmacology Lab to Teach Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Daniel L.; Zschau, Tony; Hays, Arthur; McAllister, Kristin; Harrison, Michelle; Cate, Kelly L.; Shanks, Ryan A.; Lloyd, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an innovative neuropsychopharmacology laboratory that can be incorporated into any research methods class. The lab consists of a set of interconnected modules centered on observations of methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes in mice and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to acquire basic skills…

  1. Island Explorations: Discovering Effects of Environmental Research-Based Lab Activities on Analytical Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasik, Janice Hall; LeCaptain, Dale; Murphy, Sarah; Martin, Mary; Knight, Rachel M.; Harke, Maureen A.; Burke, Ryan; Beck, Kara; Acevedo-Polakovich, I. David

    2014-01-01

    Motivating students in analytical chemistry can be challenging, in part because of the complexity and breadth of topics involved. Some methods that help encourage students and convey real-world relevancy of the material include incorporating environmental issues, research-based lab experiments, and service learning projects. In this paper, we…

  2. Of Mice and Meth: A New Media-Based Neuropsychopharmacology Lab to Teach Research Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Daniel L.; Zschau, Tony; Hays, Arthur; McAllister, Kristin; Harrison, Michelle; Cate, Kelly L.; Shanks, Ryan A.; Lloyd, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an innovative neuropsychopharmacology laboratory that can be incorporated into any research methods class. The lab consists of a set of interconnected modules centered on observations of methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes in mice and is designed to provide students with an opportunity to acquire basic skills…

  3. On the Role of ExperienceLab in Professional Domain Ambient Intelligence Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loenen, Evert; van de Sluis, Richard; De Ruyter, Boris; Aarts, Emile

    Concept development for professional domain AmI solutions involves different stakeholders than those for consumer products, and puts different requirements on experience test methods and facilities. Philips ExperienceLab facility for experience research is described, as well as trends and lessons learned from its use in the two domains.

  4. Faculty Perceptions of Students in Life and Physical Science Research Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyo, Claire P.; Cantwell, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study involved interviews of 32 faculty principle investigators at three research institutions and explored how they view the role of students within physical and life science labs. We used socialization theory and student engagement literature to analyze faculty views, which can contribute to student investment in STEM fields.…

  5. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2012-04-09

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  6. Faculty Perceptions of Students in Life and Physical Science Research Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonyo, Claire P.; Cantwell, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study involved interviews of 32 faculty principle investigators at three research institutions and explored how they view the role of students within physical and life science labs. We used socialization theory and student engagement literature to analyze faculty views, which can contribute to student investment in STEM fields.…

  7. Industrial Research and Development Labs: How They Inform Science and Technology Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Marc J.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between science and technology in industrial research laboratories, comparing the lab as "ivory tower" with the customer-oriented science approach. Describes similar patterns in science and technology curricula. Concludes that mutual commitment and shared project work would benefit integration of science and…

  8. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2013-07-19

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  9. Open Innovation Labs for Physics Undergraduate Independent Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsmith, Duncan

    2014-03-01

    The open undergraduate laboratory Garage Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is home to a variety of independent physics and multidisciplinary research projects. Its maker-style environment encourages innovation and entrepreneurship. Experience establishing and staffing the laboratory will be described.

  10. CHANGES AT THE BEE RESEARCH LAB IN BELTSVILLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beekeepers in the U. S. are faced with pests and diseases that challenge their ability to maintain healthy bee colonies for pollination and honey production. These stakeholders are aided by the research generated at the USDA-ARS laboratories that work on honey bees. A recent change has occurred in...

  11. SoftLab: A Soft-Computing Software for Experimental Research with Commercialization Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarzadeh-T, M.-R.; Shaikh, T. S.; Ren, J.; Hubbell, Rob; Kumbla, K. K.; Jamshidi, M

    1998-01-01

    SoftLab is a software environment for research and development in intelligent modeling/control using soft-computing paradigms such as fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms, and genetic programs. SoftLab addresses the inadequacies of the existing soft-computing software by supporting comprehensive multidisciplinary functionalities from management tools to engineering systems. Furthermore, the built-in features help the user process/analyze information more efficiently by a friendly yet powerful interface, and will allow the user to specify user-specific processing modules, hence adding to the standard configuration of the software environment.

  12. Easy research data handling with an OpenEarth DataLab for geo-monitoring research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderfeesten, Maurice; van der Kuil, Annemiek; Prinčič, Alenka; den Heijer, Kees; Rombouts, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    OpenEarth DataLab is an open source-based collaboration and processing platform to enable streamlined research data management from raw data ingest and transformation to interoperable distribution. It enables geo-scientists to easily synchronise, share, compute and visualise the dynamic and most up-to-date research data, scripts and models in multi-stakeholder geo-monitoring programs. This DataLab is developed by the Research Data Services team of TU Delft Library and 3TU.Datacentrum together with coastal engineers of Delft University of Technology and Deltares. Based on the OpenEarth software stack an environment has been developed to orchestrate numerous geo-related open source software components that can empower researchers and increase the overall research quality by managing research data; enabling automatic and interoperable data workflows between all the components with track & trace, hit & run data transformation processing in cloud infrastructure using MatLab and Python, synchronisation of data and scripts (SVN), and much more. Transformed interoperable data products (KML, NetCDF, PostGIS) can be used by ready-made OpenEarth tools for further analyses and visualisation, and can be distributed via interoperable channels such as THREDDS (OpenDAP) and GeoServer. An example of a successful application of OpenEarth DataLab is the Sand Motor, an innovative method for coastal protection in the Netherlands. The Sand Motor is a huge volume of sand that has been applied along the coast to be spread naturally by wind, waves and currents. Different research disciplines are involved concerned with: weather, waves and currents, sand distribution, water table and water quality, flora and fauna, recreation and management. Researchers share and transform their data in the OpenEarth DataLab, that makes it possible to combine their data and to see influence of different aspects of the coastal protection on their models. During the project the data are available only for the researchers involved. After the project a large part of the data and scripts will be published with DOI in the Data Archive of 3TU.Datacentrum for reuse in new research. For the 83 project members of the Sand Motor, the OpenEarth DataLab is available on www.zandmotordata.nl. The OpenEarth DataLab not only saves time and increases quality, but has the potential to open new frontiers for exploring cross-domain analysis and visualisations, revealing new scientific insights.

  13. Dissemination of information about the technologies of the Vision Research Lab through the World Wide Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorais, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    The Vision Research Lab at NASA John Glenn Research Center is headed by Dr. Rafat Ansari. Dr. Ansari and other researchers have developed technologies that primarily use laser and fiber optics to non-invasively detect different ailments and diseases of the eye. One of my goals as a LERCIP intern and ACCESS scholar for the 2004 summer is to inform other NASA employees, researchers and the general public about these technologies through the development of a website. The website incorporates the theme that the eye is a window to the body. Thus by investigating the processes of the eye, we can better understand and diagnosis different ailments and diseases. These ailments occur in not only earth bound humans, but astronauts as well as a result of exposure to elevated levels of radiation and microgravity conditions. Thus the technologies being developed at the Vision Research Lab are invaluable to humans on Earth in addition to those astronauts in space. One of my first goals was to research the technologies being developed at the lab. The first several days were spent immersing myself in the various articles, journals and reports about the theories behind Dynamic Light Scattering, Laser Doppler Flowmetry, Autofluoresence, Raman Spectroscopy, Polarimetry and Oximetry. Interviews with the other researchers proved invaluable to help understand these theories as well gain hands on experience with the devices being developed using these technologies. The rest of the Vision Research Team and I sat down and discussed how the overall website should be presented. Combining this information with the knowledge of the theories and applications of the hardware being developed, I worked out different ideas to present this information. I quickly learned Paint Shop Pro 8 and FrontPage 2002, as well as using online tutorials and other resources to help design an effective website. The Vision Research Lab website incorporates the anatomy and physiology of the eye, different diseases that affect the eye and the technologies being develop at the lab to help diagnosis these diseases. It also includes background information on Dr. Ansari as well as other researchers involved in the lab and it includes segments on patents, awards and achievements. There are links to help viewers navigate to internal and external websites to further investigate different ideas and hrther understand the implications of these technologies at being developed.

  14. Connecting Lab-Based Attosecond Science with FEL research

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-28

    In the last few years laboratory-scale femtosecond laser-based research using XUV light has developed dramatically following the successful development of attosecond laser pulses by means of high-harmonic generation. Using attosecond laser pulses, studies of electron dynamics on the natural timescale that electronic processes occur in atoms, molecules and solids can be contemplated, providing unprecedented insight into the fundamental role that electrons play in photo-induced processes. In my talk I will briefly review the present status of the attosecond science research field in terms of present and foreseen capabilities, and discuss a few recent applications, including a first example of the use of attosecond laser pulses in molecular science. In addition, I will discuss very recent results of experiments where photoionization of dynamically aligned molecules is investigated using a high-harmonics XUV source. Photoionization of aligned molecules becomes all the more interesting if the experiment is performed using x-ray photons. Following the absorption of x-rays, ejected photoelectrons can be used as a probe of the (time-evolving) molecular structure, making use of intra-molecular electron diffraction. This amounts, as some have stated, to “illuminating the molecule from within”. I will present the present status of our experiments on this topic making use of the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg. Future progress in this research field not only depends on the availability of better and more powerful light sources, but also requires sophisticated detector strategies. In my talk I will explain how we are trying to meet some of the experimental challenges by using the Medipix family of detectors, which we have already used for time- and space-resolved imaging of electrons and ions.

  15. Connecting Lab-Based Attosecond Science with FEL research

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    In the last few years laboratory-scale femtosecond laser-based research using XUV light has developed dramatically following the successful development of attosecond laser pulses by means of high-harmonic generation. Using attosecond laser pulses, studies of electron dynamics on the natural timescale that electronic processes occur in atoms, molecules and solids can be contemplated, providing unprecedented insight into the fundamental role that electrons play in photo-induced processes. In my talk I will briefly review the present status of the attosecond science research field in terms of present and foreseen capabilities, and discuss a few recent applications, including a first example of the use of attosecond laser pulses in molecular science. In addition, I will discuss very recent results of experiments where photoionization of dynamically aligned molecules is investigated using a high-harmonics XUV source. Photoionization of aligned molecules becomes all the more interesting if the experiment is performed using x-ray photons. Following the absorption of x-rays, ejected photoelectrons can be used as a probe of the (time-evolving) molecular structure, making use of intra-molecular electron diffraction. This amounts, as some have stated, to ?illuminating the molecule from within?. I will present the present status of our experiments on this topic making use of the FLASH free electron laser in Hamburg. Future progress in this research field not only depends on the availability of better and more powerful light sources, but also requires sophisticated detector strategies. In my talk I will explain how we are trying to meet some of the experimental challenges by using the Medipix family of detectors, which we have already used for time- and space-resolved imaging of electrons and ions.

  16. Shared-resource computing for small research labs.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J

    1982-04-01

    A real time laboratory computer network is described. This network is composed of four real-time laboratory minicomputers located in each of four division laboratories and a larger minicomputer in a centrally located computer room. Off the shelf hardware and software were used with no customization. The network is configured for resource sharing using DECnet communications software and the RSX-11-M multi-user real-time operating system. The cost effectiveness of the shared resource network and multiple real-time processing using priority scheduling is discussed. Examples of utilization within a medical research department are given. PMID:6803065

  17. US Government mandates for clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Jonathan J

    2012-02-01

    This commentary is germane for clinical and translational researchers. Basic scientists may face different obstacles to developing their research careers. Over the past several years, the federal government has seen reductions in funding for extramural research. It seems that under the adverse economic forecasts, things are going to get worse. It might seem logical for the federal government to stretch whatever limited resources exist, by asking the institutions to cost-share greater fractions of the actual research costs, and as an incentive, avoid the imposition of unfunded mandates. But alas, although well intended, there have been expensive requirements imposed by the government, making it difficult for investigators and institutions to adequately fund and conduct their research and for scientific journals to maintain paying subscribers. Five prominent and costly changes, which are the focus of this commentary are (1) HIPAA, (2) http://ClinicalTrials.Gov, (3) Clinical and Translational Science Awards, (4) Upcoming rule changes for IRBs, and (5) PubMedCentral, each of which will be discussed in the ensuing paragraphs. PMID:22376263

  18. 63 FR 47325 - Eastman Kodak Company, Kodak Park and Elmgrove, and Kodak Office and Research Labs, Rochester...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-09-04

    ..., New York. The notice was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 1998 (63 FR 33958). At the... Research Labs, Rochester, New York; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility to Apply for Worker... show that workers at the Kodak Office and Research Labs located in Rochester, New York,...

  19. Chip in a lab: Microfluidics for next generation life science research

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic circuits are characterized by fluidic channels and chambers with a linear dimension on the order of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Components of this size enable lab-on-a-chip technology that has much promise, for example, in the development of point-of-care diagnostics. Micro-scale fluidic circuits also yield practical, physical, and technological advantages for studying biological systems, enhancing the ability of researchers to make more precise quantitative measurements. Microfluidic technology has thus become a powerful tool in the life science research laboratory over the past decade. Here we focus on chip-in-a-lab applications of microfluidics and survey some examples of how small fluidic components have provided researchers with new tools for life science research. PMID:23460772

  20. Governing the postmortem procurement of human body material for research.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Kristof; Capitaine, Laura; Pennings, Guido; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2015-03-01

    Human body material removed post mortem is a particularly valuable resource for research. Considering the efforts that are currently being made to study the biochemical processes and possible genetic causes that underlie cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, it is likely that this type of research will continue to gain in importance. However, post mortem procurement of human body material for research raises specific ethical concerns, more in particular with regard to the consent of the research participant. In this paper, we attempt to determine which consent regime should govern the post mortem procurement of body material for research. In order to do so, we assess the various arguments that could be put forward in support of a duty to make body material available for research purposes after death. We argue that this duty does in practice not support conscription but is sufficiently strong to defend a policy of presumed rather than explicit consent. PMID:25843120

  1. From global bioethics to ethical governance of biomedical research collaborations.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, Ayo; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret; Lu, Guangxiu; Döring, Ole; Cong, Yali; Laska-Formejster, Alicja; He, Jing; Chen, Haidan; Gottweis, Herbert; Rose, Nikolas

    2013-12-01

    One of the features of advanced life sciences research in recent years has been its internationalisation, with countries such as China and South Korea considered 'emerging biotech' locations. As a result, cross-continental collaborations are becoming common generating moves towards ethical and legal standardisation under the rubric of 'global bioethics'. Such a 'global', 'Western' or 'universal' bioethics has in turn been critiqued as an imposition upon resource-poor, non-Western or local medical settings. In this article, we propose that a different tack is necessary if we are to come to grips with the ethical challenges that inter-continental biomedical research collaborations generate. In particular we ask how national systems of ethical governance of life science research might cope with increasingly global research collaborations with a focus on Sino-European collaboration. We propose four 'spheres' - deliberation, regulation, oversight and interaction - as a helpful way to conceptualise national systems of ethical governance. Using a workshop-based mapping methodology (workshops held in Beijing, Shanghai, Changsha, Xian, Shenzen and London) we identified three specific ethical challenges arising from cross-continental research collaborations: (1) ambiguity as to which regulations are applicable; (2) lack of ethical review capacity not only among ethical review board members but also collaborating scientists; (3) already complex, researcher-research subject interaction is further complicated when many nationalities are involved. PMID:23623168

  2. 48 CFR 1545.309 - Providing Government production and research property under special restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... production and research property under special restrictions. 1545.309 Section 1545.309 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Providing Government Property to Contractors 1545.309 Providing Government production and research property...

  3. 48 CFR 1545.309 - Providing Government production and research property under special restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... production and research property under special restrictions. 1545.309 Section 1545.309 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Providing Government Property to Contractors 1545.309 Providing Government production and research property...

  4. Government funding of health research in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Reid, Ian R; Joyce, Peter; Fraser, John; Crampton, Peter

    2014-02-14

    An analysis of levels of government health research funding carried out in 2008 demonstrated that funding in New Zealand, after adjustment for population size, was less than one-third of that in Australia, less than one-fifth of that in the United Kingdom, and about 10% of that in the United States. This was perceived to be a major obstacle to the recruitment and retention of clinical and academic staff in our hospitals and universities. We have now repeated these analyses to determine the current state of these comparisons. From 2009 to the present funds for direct funding of research through the Health Research Council (HRC) have remained static at $54m. As a result of inflation of research costs (principally salaries) this represents a decrease of approximately one-quarter in the quantum of research funded by the HRC over the last 4 years. Current funding rates in the comparator countries, population-adjusted and converted to NZ$, are 3.4-fold higher in Australia, 4.5-fold higher in the United Kingdom, and 9.7-fold higher in the United States. Urgent and sustained action is needed to correct these major disparities in government health research funding if the quality of academic and clinical staff in our public institutions is to be maintained. PMID:24548954

  5. NASA's GreenLab Research Facility: A Guide for a Self-Sustainable Renewable Energy Ecosystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bomani, B. M. McDowell; Hendricks, R. C.; Elbuluk, Malik; Okon, Monica; Lee, Eric; Gigante, Bethany

    2011-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The sustainability of humanity, as we know it, directly depends on the ability to secure affordable fuel, food, and freshwater. NASA Glenn Research Center (Glenn) has initiated a laboratory pilot study on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as utilizing wind and solar technology as alternative renewable energy resources. The GreenLab Research Facility focuses on optimizing biomass feedstock using algae and halophytes as the next generation of renewable aviation fuels. The unique approach in this facility helps achieve optimal biomass feedstock through climatic adaptation of balanced ecosystems that do not use freshwater, compete with food crops, or use arable land. In addition, the GreenLab Research Facility is powered, in part, by alternative and renewable energy sources, reducing the major environmental impact of present electricity sources. The ultimate goal is to have a 100 percent clean energy laboratory that, when combined with biomass feedstock research, has the framework in place for a self-sustainable renewable energy ecosystem that can be duplicated anywhere in the world and can potentially be used to mitigate the shortage of food, fuel, and water. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility at Glenn and its power and energy sources, and provides recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the facility s concept.

  6. Governance of dual-use research: an ethical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Scenarios where the results of well-intentioned scientific research can be used for both good and harmful purposes give rise to what is now widely known as the 'dual-use dilemma'. There has been growing debate about the dual-use nature of life science research with implications for making biological weapons. This paper reviews several controversial publications that have been the focus of debates about dual-use life science research and critically examines relevant policy developments, particularly in the United States of America. Though the dual-use dilemma is inherently ethical in nature, the majority of debates about dual-use research have primarily involved science and security experts rather than ethicists. It is important that there is more ethical input into debates about the governance of dual-use research. PMID:19784453

  7. Governance of dual-use research: an ethical dilemma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Scenarios where the results of well-intentioned scientific research can be used for both good and harmful purposes give rise to what is now widely known as the “dual-use dilemma”. There has been growing debate about the dual-use nature of life science research with implications for making biological weapons. This paper reviews several controversial publications that have been the focus of debates about dual-use life science research and critically examines relevant policy developments, particularly in the United States of America. Though the dual-use dilemma is inherently ethical in nature, the majority of debates about dual-use research have primarily involved science and security experts rather than ethicists. It is important that there is more ethical input into debates about the governance of dual-use research. PMID:19784453

  8. Experiences with Lab-on-a-chip Technology in Support of NASA Supported Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Microgravity Sciences and Application Department at Marshall Space Flight Center, we have custom designed and fabricated a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device, along with Caliper Technologies, for macromolecular crystal growth. The chip has been designed to deliver specified proportions of up-to five various constituents to one of two growth wells (on-chip) for crystal growth. To date, we have grown crystals of thaumatin, glucose isomerase and appoferitin on the chip. The LOC approach offered many advantages that rendered it highly suitable for space based hardware to perform crystal growth on the International Space Station. The same hardware that was utilized for the crystal growth investigations, has also been used by researchers at Glenn Research Center to investigate aspects of microfluidic phenomenon associated with two-phase flow. Additionally, our LOCAD (Lab-on-a-chip Application Development) team has lent its support to Johnson Space Center s Modular Assay for Solar System Exploration project. At present, the LOCAD team is working on the design and build of a unique lab-on-a-chip breadboard control unit whose function is not commercially available. The breadboard can be used as a test bed for the development of chip size labs for environmental monitoring, crew health monitoring assays, extended flight pharmacological preparations, and many more areas. This unique control unit will be configured for local use and/or remote operation, via the Internet, by other NASA centers. The lab-on-a-chip control unit is being developed with the primary goal of meeting Agency level strategic goals.

  9. Craniux: A LabVIEW-Based Modular Software Framework for Brain-Machine Interface Research

    PubMed Central

    Degenhart, Alan D.; Kelly, John W.; Ashmore, Robin C.; Collinger, Jennifer L.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Weber, Douglas J.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents “Craniux,” an open-access, open-source software framework for brain-machine interface (BMI) research. Developed in LabVIEW, a high-level graphical programming environment, Craniux offers both out-of-the-box functionality and a modular BMI software framework that is easily extendable. Specifically, it allows researchers to take advantage of multiple features inherent to the LabVIEW environment for on-the-fly data visualization, parallel processing, multithreading, and data saving. This paper introduces the basic features and system architecture of Craniux and describes the validation of the system under real-time BMI operation using simulated and real electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals. Our results indicate that Craniux is able to operate consistently in real time, enabling a seamless work flow to achieve brain control of cursor movement. The Craniux software framework is made available to the scientific research community to provide a LabVIEW-based BMI software platform for future BMI research and development. PMID:21687575

  10. 67 FR 63107 - Lilly Research Labs et al.; Withdrawal of Approval of 16 New Drug Applications and 30 Abbreviated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-10-10

    ... of April 30, 1984 (49 FR 18357), this NDA was never withdrawn and remained active until 1999... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Lilly Research Labs et al.; Withdrawal of Approval of 16 New..., Columbus, OH 43216- 6532. ANDA 75-230 Ketorolac Tromethamine Bedford Labs, 300 Injection USP, 15...

  11. Research on Implementation of E-Government Integrated Information Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuedong; Shang, Xianli; Fan, Kun

    In order to meet the needs of developing E-government, E-government integrated information services are proposed in this paper. First, we define E-government integrated information services. Second, we explore E-government integrated information service patterns. Third, we construct an E-government integrated information service platform. Finally, we give some suggestions on developing E-government integrated information services. This paper enriches the notion of E-government integrated information services, improves E-government information services and provides a practical solution for government applications.

  12. The mammalian olivocochlear system--a legacy of non-cerebellar research in the Mugnaini lab.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Douglas E

    2015-10-01

    Although the major emphasis of Enrico Mugnaini's research has been on investigations of the cerebellum, a significant amount of work over a relatively short span of time was also done in his lab on a number of other brain systems. These centered on sensory systems. One of these extra-cerebellar systems that he embraced was the auditory system. Portions of the cochlear nucleus, the first synaptic relay station along the central auditory pathways, possess a cerebellar-like circuitry and neurochemistry, and this no doubt lured Enrico into the auditory field. As new tools became available to pursue neuroanatomical research in general, which included a novel antibody to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), Enrico's lab soon branched out into investigating many other brain structures beyond the cerebellum, with an overall goal of producing a map illustrating GAD expression in the brain. In collaboration with long-term colleagues, one of these many non-cerebellar regions he took an interest in was an efferent pathway originating in the superior olive and projecting to the cochlea, the peripheral end organ for hearing. There was a need for a more complete neurochemical map of this olivocochlear efferent system, and armed with new antibodies and well-established tract tracing tools, together we set out to further explore this system. This short review describes the work done with Enrico on the olivocochlear system of rodents, and also continues the story beyond Enrico's lab to reveal how the work done in his lab fits into the larger scheme of current, ongoing research into the olivocochlear system. PMID:25592068

  13. The All-Asteroids Lab Course: Kepler's Laws, Collisions, And Authentic Undergraduate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, Andrew W.; Rector, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a 12-week undergraduate laboratory sequence based entirely on asteroids and the hazards they pose. This curriculum has been designed primarily for use in an introductory Solar System Astronomy course, but it can be broken into smaller segments for a variety of course scenarios and educational goals. The course begins with a four-lab sequence based on our new online Java applet OrbitMaster, (adapted from AstroArts’ OrbitViewer under the GNU General Public License). OrbitMaster allows the user to alter an asteroid's orbital parameters and monitor its position and speed relative to both Sun and Earth. It also detects close approaches and collisions with Earth, and calculates revised speeds due to Earth's gravity. Students are able to confirm Kepler's laws, examine orbital properties that produce impacts, discover the kinetic energy-crater size relationship, understand the regional/global consequences of impacts, and experiment with deflection strategies. A three-lab sequence follows that examines the orbit-refinement and changing impact odds of 2007 WD5, which briefly had a 4% chance of hitting Mars in 2008. These labs introduce software that allows students to make astrometric measurements, fit orbital parameters, and predict future positions and uncertainties. They then use these tools in a four-lab research project to improve their own asteroids’ orbits, using images from the SDSS and WIYN 0.9-meter telescopes. Their work culminates in a presentation to their peers and submission of their astrometric measurements to the Minor Planet Center for publication. This effort is part of our NSF CCLI grant to develop Research Based Science Education (RBSE) curricula for non-majors. We have designed six projects that allow students to learn science by actually doing science. These projects are now being tested at six institutions around the country, and will eventually be distributed to a national audience.

  14. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab: 12 GeV and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2002-09-01

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade are illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed. Finally, a conceptual design of a future upgrade which combines a 25 GeV fixed-target facility and an electron-ion collider facility at a luminosity of up to 10{sup 35}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and a CM energy of over 40 GeV.

  15. Governance Strategies for Conducting Text Messaging Interventions in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nicholas; Morrison, Caitlin; Griffin, Jonathan; Reiter, William; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Edwards, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in medical text messaging interventions being used to achieve positive patient outcomes across a range of clinical research and health practice environments. Short messaging service (SMS) is a low-cost tool that provides an easy communication route to engage potentially broad populations through text messaging, and is part of the growing social trend toward increased adoption of personal communication technologies by patient populations. Testing the effectiveness and impact of various communication strategies requires navigation of a complex web of clinical and research regulations and oversight mechanisms. We describe a case study of the implementation of SMS to provide bidirectional communications between physicians and patients involved in routine care reminders to illustrate the review processes and governance structures needed. By mapping the regulatory and approval processes required to manage and steward a research study across clinical and community boundaries, we provide a guide for other translational health researchers who may utilize similar kinds of personally owned technology interventions as research tools. PMID:24774328

  16. Future Secretariat: an innovation research coordination and governance structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, D. S.; Johan, R.; Cramer, W.; Fukushi, K.; Allard, S.

    2014-12-01

    Future Earth, an emerging global sustainability research program, will be managed by a novel, internationally distributed secretariat spanning the globe and providing a platform for co-design, co-production, and co-delivery of knowledge to support research on the earth system, global development and transformation toward sustainability. The Future Earth secretariat has an innovative structure consisting of five global hubs functioning as a single entity; these hubs are located in Canada, Japan, France, Sweden, and the United States. The secretariat's reach is extended through a set of regional hubs covering Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, with the potential to expand to additional areas. This secretariat will operate under the auspices of the Future Earth Governing Council The Future Earth Secretariat will support and enable the implementation of knowledge-sharing between research and stakeholder communities to enable society to cope with and to alter global environmental trends, and to transition society toward sustainability. The secretariat will provide coordination support to over 25 global environmental core projects and committees; coordinate scientific work across the whole Future Earth agenda; develop and implement innovative mechanisms for bottom-up inputs, synthesis and integration. Future Earth, as a research program, aims to support global transformations toward sustainability through partnerships among scientific and stakeholder communities worldwide. It brings together existing international environmental research core projects associated with DIVERSITAS, the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, the International Human Dimensions Programme, and the World Climate Research Programme—to support coordinated, interdisciplinary research that can be used by decision makers seeking to reduce their impact and provide more sustainable products and services. USGCRP partners with Future Earth through scientific participation in and annual funding for its constituent programs.

  17. The Just War Theory and the ethical governance of research.

    PubMed

    Malsch, Ineke

    2013-06-01

    This article analyses current trends in and future expectations of nanotechnology and other key enabling technologies for security as well as dual use nanotechnology from the perspective of the ethical Just War Theory (JWT), interpreted as an instrument to increase the threshold for using armed force for solving conflicts. The aim is to investigate the relevance of the JWT to the ethical governance of research. The analysis gives rise to the following results. From the perspective of the JWT, military research should be evaluated with different criteria than research for civil or civil security applications. From a technological perspective, the boundaries between technologies for civil and military applications are fuzzy. Therefore the JWT offers theoretical grounds for making clear distinctions between research for military, civil security and other applications that are not obvious from a purely technological perspective. Different actors bear responsibility for development of the technology than for resorting to armed force for solving conflicts or for use of weapons and military technologies in combat. Different criteria should be used for moral judgment of decisions made by each type of actor in each context. In addition to evaluation of potential consequences of future use of the weapons or military technologies under development, the JWT also prescribes ethical evaluation of the inherent intent and other foreseeable consequences of the development itself of new military technologies. PMID:22371034

  18. Research and Teaching. Effects of a Research-Based Ecology Lab Course: A Study of Nonvolunteer Achievement, Self-Confidence, and Perception of Lab Course Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloser, Matthew J.; Brownell, Sara E.; Shavelson, Richard J.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate biology lab courses have long been criticized for engaging students in "cookbook" experiences in which students follow a given protocol to collect data that help answer a predetermined question. Recent reform documents in biology education have suggested that students should engage in lab courses that provide more authentic…

  19. Research and Teaching. Effects of a Research-Based Ecology Lab Course: A Study of Nonvolunteer Achievement, Self-Confidence, and Perception of Lab Course Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloser, Matthew J.; Brownell, Sara E.; Shavelson, Richard J.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate biology lab courses have long been criticized for engaging students in "cookbook" experiences in which students follow a given protocol to collect data that help answer a predetermined question. Recent reform documents in biology education have suggested that students should engage in lab courses that provide more authentic…

  20. The Rise of Basic Research at tha Bell Labs: Young Turks and Younger Turks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip

    2004-03-01

    ABSTRACT Even before World War II, a certain amount of fundamental physics research came out of the Bell Labs. Already in the 20's, before the Labs were five years old, the discoveries of electron diffraction by Davisson and Germer, and of thermal noise by Johnson and Nyquist, had come as byproducts of wide-ranging technological studies. By the late '30's, there was a small group of broadly-trained scientists who formed a nucleus around which the "young turks" in management --J B Fisk, M J Kelly, W Shockley, perhaps others--formed the postwar physical research department, comprising at first perhaps 50 people with a mandate to do exploratory but "relevant" research. This talk will diiscuss how some of the generation of postwar hires, with the cooperation of enlightened managers like W O Baker and A H White, further tested and enlarged their freedom to do basic, curiosity-driven research in an academic atmosphere. I call this group, consisting of individuals like B T Matthias, G H Wannier, R G Shulman, P A Wolff, myself , and a number of others, the "younger Turks".

  1. High-Resolution Satellite Data Open for Government Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neigh, Christopher S. R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Nickeson, Jaime E.

    2013-01-01

    U.S. satellite commercial imagery (CI) with resolution less than 1 meter is a common geospatial reference used by the public through Web applications, mobile devices, and the news media. However, CI use in the scientific community has not kept pace, even though those who are performing U.S. government research have access to these data at no cost.Previously, studies using multiple CI acquisitions from IKONOS-2, Quickbird-2, GeoEye-1, WorldView-1, and WorldView-2 would have been cost prohibitive. Now, with near-global submeter coverage and online distribution, opportunities abound for future scientific studies. This archive is already quite extensive (examples are shown in Figure 1) and is being used in many novel applications.

  2. Strengthening research governance for sustainable research: experiences from three Zimbabwean universities.

    PubMed

    Mashaah, Thokozile; Hakim, James; Chidzonga, Midion; Kangwende, Rugare A; Naik, Yogeshkumar; Federspiel, Nancy; Fiorillo, Suzanne; Scott, Jim; Gomo, Exnevia

    2014-08-01

    A robust research system requires a robust governance framework. As part of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative, three Zimbabwean universities partnered with two U.S. universities in a project to strengthen research governance in the Zimbabwean universities. The project aimed at (1) developing research policies, (2) strengthening central research management offices, (3) developing a research administration curriculum, and (4) enhancing awareness about the role and relevance of research administration in other universities and research institutions in Zimbabwe. Through the efforts of the partners, a generic research policy was developed and successfully adapted by the institutions. A curriculum was drafted, and module development experts are helping to finalize the curriculum to meet university requirements for accreditation of training research administrators. The Association of Research Managers of Zimbabwe was established to promote information sharing and professionalize research administration. The consortium approach enabled rapid and smooth development and adoption of research policies in the institutions. It also helped researchers and managers accept research administration as an essential structure and function. The experiences and lessons learned are reported here to benefit other institutions and consortia. PMID:25072583

  3. Toward a Rb MOT for Undergrad Research and Advanced labs at Bridgewater State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward

    2015-03-01

    The seminal paper for the undergraduate MOT appeared in AJP (63 (4), 1995) by C. Wieman, G. Flowers and S. Gilbert; `Inexpensive laser cooling and trapping experiment for undergraduate laboratories'. They wrote: ``Because of this visual appeal and the current research excitement in this area, we felt that it was highly desirable to develop an atom trapping apparatus that could be incorporated into the undergraduate laboratory classes.'' From our observations, it seems that while there are extraordinary examples of MOTs thriving in a few undergraduate labs, MOT experiments have yet to be widely incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum - likely because they are, in fact, not trivial to make. With the benefit of 20 years evolution since this 1st undergraduate MOT paper, we report the progress at BSU of constructing a 85Rb MOT that incorporates significant simplifications and straightforward techniques that include: using a single ECDL laser for both trapping and re-pumping (using an EOM to add FM sidebands) and combining a purchased stabilized HeNe with the ECDL in a Fabry-Perot Interferometer to correct and sufficiently stabilize the ECDL for trapping. When completed we will revisit the question of do-ability for the undergraduate research/advanced lab. The BSU MOT was planned with and is currently being built with the help and guidance of David DeMille and his research group at Yale University [including J. Barry Thesis, Yale].

  4. Business Models of E-Government: Research on Dynamic E-Government Based on Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Jiumin

    Government transcends all sectors in a society. It provides not only the legal, political and economic infrastructure to support other sectors, but also exerts significant influence on the social factors that contribute to their development. With its maturity of technologies and management, e-government will eventually enter into the time of 'one-stop' services. Among others, the technology of Web services is the major contributor to this achievement. Web services provides a new way of standard-based software technology, letting programmers combine existing computer system in new ways over the Internet within one business or across many, and would thereby bring about profound and far-reaching impacts on e-government. This paper introduced the business modes of e-government, architecture of dynamic e-government and its key technologies. Finally future prospect of dynamic e-government was also briefly discussed.

  5. 48 CFR 1545.309 - Providing Government production and research property under special restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... production and research property under special restrictions. 1545.309 Section 1545.309 Federal Acquisition... Government Property to Contractors 1545.309 Providing Government production and research property under special restrictions. Government production and research property, other than foundations and...

  6. 77 FR 64952 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; State Government Research and Development (R&D...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... plan to continue to conduct the biennial State Government Research and Development Survey (SGRD) to... surveys of research and development since 1953, including since 2006 the State Government R&D Survey. The... and private persons and agencies.'' The State Government Research and Development Survey is the...

  7. NIH partners with industry to create new ‘Living Lab’ for research into molecular structures that can affect disease

    Cancer.gov

    A new type of lab has been created to utilize near-atomic resolution microscopy and other structural biology technologies to help accelerate important medical discoveries relating to global health challenges, such as cancer and HIV/AIDS. The Living Lab Structural Biology Center was formed through a cooperative research and development agreement between the National Institutes of Health and FEI, Hillsboro, Ore., a scientific instruments company.

  8. Effects of government spending on research workforce development: evidence from biomedical postdoctoral researchers.

    PubMed

    Hur, Hyungjo; Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Hawley, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We examine effects of government spending on postdoctoral researchers' (postdocs) productivity in biomedical sciences, the largest population of postdocs in the US. We analyze changes in the productivity of postdocs before and after the US government's 1997 decision to increase NIH funding. In the first round of analysis, we find that more government spending has resulted in longer postdoc careers. We see no significant changes in researchers' productivity in terms of publication and conference presentations. However, when the population is segmented by citizenship, we find that the effects are heterogeneous; US citizens stay longer in postdoc positions with no change in publications and, in contrast, international permanent residents (green card holders) produce more conference papers and publications without significant changes in postdoc duration. Possible explanations and policy implications of the analysis are discussed. PMID:25932942

  9. Constructing Inexpensive, Flexible, and Versatile Microdialysis Probes in an Undergraduate Microdialysis Research Lab

    PubMed Central

    Steffes, Sally; Sandstrom, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Several challenges await new assistant professors setting up a neuroscience lab, and obtaining sufficient research help is typically a top priority. A secondary, but no less daunting, challenge is juggling accuracy and reliability with costs and limited start-up funds. These concerns are particularly crucial for those engaging technically sophisticated measurements, such as microdialysis. We have developed straightforward procedures that our undergraduate students have utilized to successfully construct high-quality, low-cost microdialysis probes. Students mastering the various steps involved have also gained valuable insight into their use, troubleshooting, and the implications of data obtained from these constructed probes. These procedures are explained here to foster increased use in neuroscience labs that involve undergraduates, along with pointers about teaching the technique to newcomers. Students who master the techniques can pass them on to new students easily. These procedures train students in the overall research technique of microdialysis more thoroughly than when manufactured probes are used, they save money, and will eventually save the principal investigator time when students develop independence with troubleshooting and repairs. PMID:23493044

  10. Novel Forms of Research Governance and Their Possible Impact on the Future of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pataki, Gyöngyvér

    2015-01-01

    This article sets out to contribute to the current debate on the transformation of educational research with regard to global transitions and challenges. Nation-centred hierarchical organizations in Europe have increasingly failed to address emergent processes. And in contrast novel forms of governance have gained prevalence in controlling…

  11. Novel Forms of Research Governance and Their Possible Impact on the Future of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pataki, Gyöngyvér

    2015-01-01

    This article sets out to contribute to the current debate on the transformation of educational research with regard to global transitions and challenges. Nation-centred hierarchical organizations in Europe have increasingly failed to address emergent processes. And in contrast novel forms of governance have gained prevalence in controlling…

  12. Applying Neurological Learning Research to an Intro Astronomy Online Lab Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Gene G.; Byrd, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The neurological research used the 'Tower of London', a well-tested puzzle requiring multi-step planning toward a solution. Four and five year-olds are starting multistep reasoning and provide good puzzle subjects. Preschoolers who talked to themselves about future moves had greatly improved performance over those who did not. Adults given preplanning time prior to solving the same puzzle showed more neural activation during preplanning, especially in brain areas which serve higher level thinking. Applying these results to teaching astronomy, we modified an online introductory lab course in which students take a multiple choice final exam. We composed questions related to the learning objectives of the course modules (LOQs). Students could 'talk to themselves' by discursively answering these for extra credit prior to the final. Results were compared to an otherwise identical previous unmodified class. Modified classes showed statistically much better final exam average scores (78% vs. 66%). This modification helped those students who most need help. Students in the lower third of the class preferentially answered the LOQs to improve their scores and the class average on the exam. These results also show the effectiveness of relevant extra credit work. For more details plus an application to a lecture course, see Byrd and Byrd http://www.ncolr.org/issues/jiol/v12/n2/3 (Journal of Interactive Online Learning). The online lab course emphasized real photographic and quantitative astronomical observations. We also discuss and show equipment found to be most useful for the online lab course, including a 'pin-hole protractor', telescope kit and "AL-henge" telescope mount..

  13. Research to Practice: The Future of the Regional Educational Labs. Brown Center Letters on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover J.

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of creating evidence-based practice bedevils a number of fields. In education, the federal government has historically placed substantial responsibility for translational research in the hands of the Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs), which were established in 1966 as part of the original Elementary and Secondary Education Act…

  14. Research to Practice: The Future of the Regional Educational Labs. Brown Center Letters on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover J.

    2010-01-01

    The challenge of creating evidence-based practice bedevils a number of fields. In education, the federal government has historically placed substantial responsibility for translational research in the hands of the Regional Educational Laboratories (RELs), which were established in 1966 as part of the original Elementary and Secondary Education Act…

  15. Supporting Information Governance through Records and Information Management. Research Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaczmarek, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The expanding scope of IT initiatives in higher education institutions now goes well beyond basic desktop and enterprise applications. IT is often asked to focus on efforts to establish good information-governance practices. The many aspects of information governance are often found in a records and information management (RIM) program, but not…

  16. Governing through community-based research: lessons from the Canadian HIV research sector.

    PubMed

    Guta, Adrian; Strike, Carol; Flicker, Sarah; Murray, Stuart J; Upshur, Ross; Myers, Ted

    2014-12-01

    The "general public" and specific "communities" are increasingly being integrated into scientific decision-making. This shift emphasizes "scientific citizenship" and collaboration between interdisciplinary scientists, lay people, and multi-sector stakeholders (universities, healthcare, and government). The objective of this paper is to problematize these developments through a theoretically informed reading of empirical data that describes the consequences of bringing together actors in the Canadian HIV community-based research (CBR) movement. Drawing on Foucauldian "governmentality" the complex inner workings of the impetus to conduct collaborative research are explored. The analysis offered surfaces the ways in which a formalized approach to CBR, as promoted through state funding mechanisms, determines the structure and limits of engagement while simultaneously reinforcing the need for finer grained knowledge about marginalized communities. Here, discourses about risk merge with notions of "scientific citizenship" to implicate both researchers and communities in a process of governance. PMID:25074512

  17. JouleLabs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00301

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, D.

    2010-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Joule Labs Inc. (Joule Labs) will collaborate on creating a software platform for the development and distribution of renewable energy and energy efficiency analysis tools.

  18. Reinventing government

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.J.; Lepkowski, W.; Long, J.R.; Zurer, P.S.

    1993-10-11

    Both Clinton and Vice President Al Gore are committed to reinventing the federal government. To do so they will need more than a little help from Congress. But, if they succeed in turning the report's recommendations into reality, substantial change will occur in the way the federal government interacts with the chemical community in areas such as environmental and safety and health regulation, science and technology policy, education, and research priority setting. The report is the result of a six-month effort by the National Performance Review (NPR), a group led by Gore. It contains some 400 specific recommendations for changing the ways the federal government operates. These recommendations, if enacted the report claims, would produced savings of $108 billion over five years and reduce the size of the civilian, nonpostal work force by 12%, 252 positions, over the same period. The Department of Energy is the target of eight NPR recommendations. But the one with the most direct relevance to R and D calls for directing its national laboratories to pursue post-Cold War research priorities. Efforts to shift the labs away from their defense orientation began during the Carter presidency, when all of the labs began establishing stronger research programs in environmental science and technology and biology.

  19. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in "G" a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn "G". Without going into details here, "G" incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the "perfect environment in which to teach computer-based research skills." With this goal in mind, he has succeeded admirably. Advanced LabVIEW Labs presents a series of chapters devoted to not only introducing the reader to LabVIEW, but also to the concepts necessary for writing a successful computer pro- gram. Each chapter is an assignment for the student and is suitable for a ten week course. The first topic introduces the while loop and waveform chart VI'S. After learning how to launch LabVIEW, the student then leans how to use LabVIEW functions such as sine and cosine. The beauty of thk and subsequent chapters, the student is introduced immediately to computer-based instruction by learning how to display the results in graph form on the screen. At each point along the way, the student is not only introduced to another LabVIEW operation, but also to such subjects as spread sheets for data storage, numerical integration, Fourier transformations', curve fitting algorithms, etc. The last few chapters conclude with the purpose of the learning module, and that is, com- puter-based instrumentation. Computer-based laboratory projects such as analog-to-digital con- version, digitizing oscilloscopes treated. Advanced Lab VIEW Labs finishes with a treatment on GPIB interfacing and finally, the student is asked to create an operating VI for temperature con- trol. This is an excellent text, not only as an treatise on LabVIEW but also as an introduction to computer programming logic. All programmers, who are struggling to not only learning how interface computers to instruments, but also trying understand top down programming and other programming language techniques, should add Advanced Lab-VIEW Labs to their computer library.

  20. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in G a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn G . Without going into details here, G incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the perfect environment in which to teach computer-based research skills. With this goal in mind, he has succeeded admirably. Advanced LabVIEW Labs presents a series of chapters devoted to not only introducing the reader to LabVIEW, but also to the concepts necessary for writing a successful computer pro- gram. Each chapter is an assignment for the student and is suitable for a ten week course. The first topic introduces the while loop and waveform chart VI'S. After learning how to launch LabVIEW, the student then leans how to use LabVIEW functions such as sine and cosine. The beauty of thk and subsequent chapters, the student is introduced immediately to computer-based instruction by learning how to display the results in graph form on the screen. At each point along the way, the student is not only introduced to another LabVIEW operation, but also to such subjects as spread sheets for data storage, numerical integration, Fourier transformations', curve fitting algorithms, etc. The last few chapters conclude with the purpose of the learning module, and that is, com- puter-based instrumentation. Computer-based laboratory projects such as analog-to-digital con- version, digitizing oscilloscopes treated. Advanced Lab VIEW Labs finishes with a treatment on GPIB interfacing and finally, the student is asked to create an operating VI for temperature con- trol. This is an excellent text, not only as an treatise on LabVIEW but also as an introduction to computer programming logic. All programmers, who are struggling to not only learning how interface computers to instruments, but also trying understand top down programming and other programming language techniques, should add Advanced Lab-VIEW Labs to their computer library.

  1. How to Influence Government Policy with Your Research: Tips from Practicing Political Scientists in Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Government policymakers rarely consult with academic experts before formulating policy positions. When policymakers do seek out academics, they are often attempting to justify a position they already hold, not searching for objective analysis. Academics could add much to the policy debate if they were more meaningfully engaged in the discussion.

  2. Student Involvement in International Research -- The IRES Program at MAMI and MAX-lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William; O'Rielly, Grant; Benmouna, Nawal

    2010-02-01

    Students associated with The George Washington University, Montgomery College, and the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth have the opportunity to participate in an international collaborative research at the Mainzer Mikrotron (MAMI) at the Johannes Gutenberg Universit"at in Mainz, Germany or MAX-lab at the Lund University in Lund, Sweden. This project supports up to six undergraduate students and two beginning graduate students each year. The student researchers are involved with all aspects of the experiments performed at the two laboratories. These experiments investigate the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon and its excitations through the study of meson photoproduction off the nucleon. Along with the US co-PIs, members of the international collaborations contribute to the training and mentoring of the students. This program provides students with international research experiences that prepare them to operate successfully in a global environment and encourages them to stay in areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that are crucial for our modern, technology-dependent society. We will present a history, goals and outcomes of this program. )

  3. Undergraduate Student Involvement in International Research - The IRES Program at MAX-lab, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William; O'Rielly, Grant; Fissum, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Undergraduate students associated with The George Washington University and UMass Dartmouth have had the opportunity to participate in nuclear physics research as a part of the PIONS@MAXLAB Collaboration performing experiments at MAX-lab at Lund University in Sweden. This project has supported thirteen undergraduate students during 2009 - 2011. The student researchers are involved with all aspects of the experiments performed at the laboratory, from set-up to analysis and presentation at national conferences. These experiments investigate the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon through the study of pion photoproduction off the nucleon and high-energy Compton scattering. Along with the US and Swedish project leaders, members of the collaboration (from four different countries) have contributed to the training and mentoring of these students. This program provides students with international research experiences that prepare them to operate successfully in a global environment and encourages them to stay in areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that are crucial for our modern, technology-dependent society. We will present the history, goals and outcomes in both physics results and student success that have come from this program. This work supported by NSF OISE/IRES award 0553467.

  4. Career Opportunities for Geoscientists in the Petroleum Service Sector: A Perspective from an Industrial Research Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, P.; Schwartz, L.

    2001-05-01

    The petroleum service sector provides client oil and gas companies with the measurements and services necessary to find and extract hydrocarbons from subsurface reservoirs. These services encompass a range of geophysical and petrophysical measurements ranging from the well bore to seismic scale. As the easily extracted oil and gas reserves are being depleted, new technologies allow geoscientists to tap reservoirs that were previously economically unattractive. Much of the industrial research that leads to these new technologies stems not from the oil companies themselves, but from the oilfield service companies. Schlumberger has traditionally been a leader of developing new technology for hydrocarbon exploitation, exemplified by its strong commitment to supporting research and development through the ups and downs in the oil industry. As a recent hire in a petroleum industry research lab, I will provide the perspective of a fairly recent graduate on careers in the petroleum industry. Specific attention will be given to significant industry trends that will shape the careers of petroleum geoscientists in the future and the skills and attitudes necessary to be successful.

  5. Governance of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: Tailoring Infrastructures to Fit the Research Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, E.; Pedersen, H.; Clémenceau, A.; Evans, R.

    2012-04-01

    The legal and governance structures of a pan-European large scale research infrastructure (RI) are critical. They shape the very operation of the undertaking - decision making processes, allocation of tasks and resources, and the relationships amongst the various interested parties - and its eventual success is crucially dependent on choosing these structures wisely. The experience of several examples is used to illustrate how legal and governance schemes for pan-European Research Infrastructures can be used as vehicles to tailor the infrastructure according to its scientific objectives. Indeed, the chosen model can: 1) foster multi-disciplinary research by having representatives of different communities deciding on joint programs; 2) better coordinate scattered communities, both geographically and thematically, increasing their cooperation; 3) implement an innovative Research organization; 4) leverage additional funding; 5) develop a strong identity and elevate international visibility for the communities served; 6) clarify responsibilities, accountability and authority. The ESFRI roadmap has extended the "classical" concept of single-sited RIs (as exemplified in the field of physics by facilities such as CERN) to that of distributed and virtual infrastructures but these raise new issues, especially regarding data exchange and management. As this concept of infrastructure at a European level is relatively new to the major part of the science community, it is especially important that governance models are thoroughly discussed and carefully adapted to fit the specific needs of each of these new distributed facilities. Alongside the legal frameworks which have previously been used for existing infrastructures, the European Commission has established a new legal vehicle, the European Research Infrastructure Consortium or "ERIC", to meet the requirements of the pan-European facilities. It will be shown that this flexible model can be used in a "customized" way to meet the varying demands of different projects.

  6. Governance

    Cancer.gov

    The programs in the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) are led and coordinated by a project team comprised of health scientists with expertise in basic and applied research, regulatory science, clinical assay development, bioinformatics, therapeutics, and clinical chemistry at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Click here to view brief biographies of the team members.

  7. Back to Practice, a Decade of Research in E-Government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assar, Saïd; Boughzala, Imed; Boydens, Isabelle

    E-government is a multidisciplinary field of research based initially on empirical insights from practice. Efforts to theoretically found the field have opened perspectives from multiple research domains. The goal of this chapter is to review evolution of the e-government field from an institutional and an academic point of view. Our position is that e-government is an emergent multidisciplinary field of research in which focus on practice is a prominent characteristic. Each chapter of the book is then briefly presented and is positioned according to a vision of the e-government domain of research.

  8. An Innovative Lab-Based Training Program to Help Patient Groups Understand Their Disease and the Research Process

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Marion; Hammond, Constance; Karlin, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genuine partnership between patient groups and medical experts is important but challenging. Our training program meets this challenge by organizing hands-on, lab-based training sessions for members of patient groups. These sessions allow “trainees” to better understand their disease and the biomedical research process, and strengthen links between patients and local researchers. Over the past decade, we and our partner institutes have received more than 900 French patients, with the participation of over 60 researchers and clinicians. PMID:25668201

  9. On Commodification and the Governance of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Merle

    2009-01-01

    The new prominence given to science for economic growth and industry comes with an increased policy focus on the promotion of commodification and commercialization of academic science. This paper posits that this increased interest in commodification is a new steering mechanism for governing science. This is achieved by first outlining what is…

  10. Implementation of a research-based lab module in a high school chemistry curriculum: A study of classroom dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarz, Matthew

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was modified and implemented in two high school settings. This module consisted of four phases: Skill Building, Experimental Design, Independent Research, and Results and Poster Presentation. Classroom dynamics were studied by considering the students' and teachers' perceptions of their experiences during the completion of the module and by examining the interactions between students and teachers that took place throughout the module. The results reveal that there are shifts in classroom dynamics throughout the four phases of the module. In the Skill Building phase there was a great deal of dependence on the teacher for help in completing tasks. However, there is a slight contrast to what the students and teachers reported about their experiences during this phase. The teachers describe the students as being very dependent on them and asking questions constantly during the Skill Building experiments. The students report that they tried to figure out their problems with their lab partners and students in other lab groups before asking the teacher for help. The teachers perceived that students came to them immediately for help and did not realize that students were coming to them as sort of a last resort when they could not solve problems on their own. In the Experimental Design phase the students and teachers both report that the lab groups were working together as groups to design their experiments, and rarely had interactions with anyone outside of their lab group. For the Independent Research phase both students and teachers report that lab groups worked very independently of any outside assistance and that they began to use a division of labor strategy within their group to complete tasks. This also is the case for the Results and Poster Presentation phase of the module. In examination of the student-student and student-teacher interactions, a comparison is made between the Skill Building and Independent Research phases of the module. During the Skill Building phase, students tend to be less confident in their work and their lab partners work as compared to the Independent Research phase. Lab groups also tended to be more dependent on seeking help from outside of their lab group when completing experiments in the Skill Building phase as compared to the Independent Research phase. One finding that contrasts these is that students are dependent on their teacher for help when completing data analysis calculations. The overall results show that classroom dynamics shift throughout the completion of a research-based lab module and that a community develops in the classroom that mirrors the scientific community.

  11. The Effect of LAB Silage Inoculants on the Rumen Environment--Current Research Status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants containing mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are the most common additives used in making silage. Their function is to promote intensive production of lactic acid and rapid decrease in pH and so minimize fermentation losses. Some LAB inoculants reduce aerobic spoilage. In addition, feedin...

  12. 75 FR 33587 - Local Redevelopment Authority and Available Surplus Buildings and Land at Air Force Research Labs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... Force Research Labs (AFRL) Mesa, Located in Maricopa County, AZ SUMMARY: This notice provides information regarding the surplus property at AFRL Mesa in Maricopa County, Arizona and information about ] the local redevelopment authority that has been established to plan the reuse of the AFRL...

  13. A new LabVIEW-based control system for the Naval Research Laboratory Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    DeTurck, T. M.; Treacy, D. J. Jr.; Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Knoll, C.; Kennedy, C. A.; Hubler, G. K.

    1999-06-10

    A new LabVIEW-based control system for the existing tandem accelerator and new AMS components has been implemented at the Trace Element Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (TEAMS) facility at the Naval Research Laboratory. Through the use of Device Interfaces (DIs) distributed along a fiber optic network, virtually every component of the accelerator system can be controlled from any networked computer terminal as well as remotely via modem or the internet. This paper discusses the LabVIEW-based control software, including remote operation, automatic calculation of ion optical component parameters, beam optimization, and data logging and retrieval.

  14. The use of concept maps for knowledge management: from classrooms to research labs.

    PubMed

    Correia, Paulo Rogério Miranda

    2012-02-01

    Our contemporary society asks for new strategies to manage knowledge. The main activities developed by academics involve knowledge transmission (teaching) and production (research). Creativity and collaboration are valuable assets for establishing learning organizations in classrooms and research labs. Concept mapping is a useful graphical technique to foster some of the disciplines required to create and develop high-performance teams. The need for a linking phrase to clearly state conceptual relationships makes concept maps (Cmaps) very useful for organizing our own ideas (externalization), as well as, sharing them with other people (elicitation and consensus building). The collaborative knowledge construction (CKC) is supported by Cmaps because they improve the communication signal-to-noise ratio among participants with high information asymmetry. In other words, we can identify knowledge gaps and insightful ideas in our own Cmaps when discussing them with our counterparts. Collaboration involving low and high information asymmetry can also be explored through peer review and student-professor/advisor interactions, respectively. In conclusion, when it is used properly, concept mapping can provide a competitive advantage to produce and share knowledge in our contemporary society. To map is to know, as stated by Wandersee in 1990. PMID:22278075

  15. Chemical Atmosphere-Snow-Sea Ice Interactions: defining future research in the field, lab and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The air-snow-sea ice system plays an important role in the global cycling of nitrogen, halogens, trace metals or carbon, including greenhouse gases (e.g. CO2 air-sea flux), and therefore influences also climate. Its impact on atmospheric composition is illustrated for example by dramatic ozone and mercury depletion events which occur within or close to the sea ice zone (SIZ) mostly during polar spring and are catalysed by halogens released from SIZ ice, snow or aerosol. Recent field campaigns in the high Arctic (e.g. BROMEX, OASIS) and Antarctic (Weddell sea cruises) highlight the importance of snow on sea ice as a chemical reservoir and reactor, even during polar night. However, many processes, participating chemical species and their interactions are still poorly understood and/or lack any representation in current models. Furthermore, recent lab studies provide a lot of detail on the chemical environment and processes but need to be integrated much better to improve our understanding of a rapidly changing natural environment. During a 3-day workshop held in Cambridge/UK in October 2013 more than 60 scientists from 15 countries who work on the physics, chemistry or biology of the atmosphere-snow-sea ice system discussed research status and challenges, which need to be addressed in the near future. In this presentation I will give a summary of the main research questions identified during this workshop as well as ways forward to answer them through a community-based interdisciplinary approach.

  16. Government Research and Development Summaries: Mechanical Project Briefs. Monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical Project Briefs describe the status of all R and D programs submitted to the Power Information Center by the government sponsors in energy conversion to mechanical hydraulic, and pneumatic energy, including working fluids, materials, heat transfer processes, heat transfer and storage equipment, and other components of mechanical conversion systems. The document is not to be reproduced, in whole or in part, for dissemination outside your own organization nor may it be reproduced for advertising or sales promotion purposes.

  17. Tele-Presence Microscopy/LabSpace: An interactive collaboratory for use in education and research

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    Computerized control of scientific instrumentation has been successfully implemented in recent years to facilitate the indirect operation or remote observation of a wide variety of equipment including the full range of electron microscopes. The concept is, however, usually applied in it`s simplest sense, namely - the direct one-to-one functional replacement of {open_quotes}local operation{close_quotes} of equipment by a remote workstation. While the microscope is clearly central to the our research, real collaboration will not be achieved simply by creating a networked interface to a microscope for remote scientists. This is merely a simple exercise in computer programming and digital control. For true distributed collaboration (either in research and/or teaching) to be successful, all of the aspects of the research/teaching environment must be considered. For example, the investigators must be able to talk to and see each other while running an instrument, and they should be able to do everything else they would normally do if they were in the same laboratory. This includes sharing experimental data, review previous experiments, write papers, talk over coffee and even visiting each other in their office to plan current and/or future work. The TelePresence Microscopy (TPM)/LabSpace project attempts to bridge the gap between simple {open_quotes}remote microscopy{close_quotes} and true collaboration, by integrating protocols, tools, and interactive links to instrumentation, data (real-time as well as archived), and audio-visual communications. The initial goal of this project has been to create a virtual space, accessible via the Internet, where microscopists and their colleagues, who are distributed across the nation of the world, can meet, talk, plan their research, and also run their experiments.

  18. Imaging performance of LabPET APD-based digital PET scanners for pre-clinical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Tétrault, Marc-André; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Leroux, Jean-Daniel; Fontaine, Réjean; Lecomte, Roger

    2014-02-01

    The LabPET is an avalanche photodiode (APD) based digital PET scanner with quasi-individual detector read-out and highly parallel electronic architecture for high-performance in vivo molecular imaging of small animals. The scanner is based on LYSO and LGSO scintillation crystals (2×2×12/14 mm3), assembled side-by-side in phoswich pairs read out by an APD. High spatial resolution is achieved through the individual and independent read-out of an individual APD detector for recording impinging annihilation photons. The LabPET exists in three versions, LabPET4 (3.75 cm axial length), LabPET8 (7.5 cm axial length) and LabPET12 (11.4 cm axial length). This paper focuses on the systematic characterization of the three LabPET versions using two different energy window settings to implement a high-efficiency mode (250-650 keV) and a high-resolution mode (350-650 keV) in the most suitable operating conditions. Prior to measurements, a global timing alignment of the scanners and optimization of the APD operating bias have been carried out. Characteristics such as spatial resolution, absolute sensitivity, count rate performance and image quality have been thoroughly investigated following the NEMA NU 4-2008 protocol. Phantom and small animal images were acquired to assess the scanners' suitability for the most demanding imaging tasks in preclinical biomedical research. The three systems achieve the same radial FBP spatial resolution at 5 mm from the field-of-view center: 1.65/3.40 mm (FWHM/FWTM) for an energy threshold of 250 keV and 1.51/2.97 mm for an energy threshold of 350 keV. The absolute sensitivity for an energy window of 250-650 keV is 1.4%/2.6%/4.3% for LabPET4/8/12, respectively. The best count rate performance peaking at 362 kcps is achieved by the LabPET12 with an energy window of 250-650 keV and a mouse phantom (2.5 cm diameter) at an activity of 2.4 MBq ml-1. With the same phantom, the scatter fraction for all scanners is about 17% for an energy threshold of 250 keV and 10% for an energy threshold of 350 keV. The results obtained with two energy window settings confirm the relevance of high-efficiency and high-resolution operating modes to take full advantage of the imaging capabilities of the LabPET scanners for molecular imaging applications.

  19. The management of research institutions: A look at government laboratories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, H.; Levine, A.

    1984-01-01

    Technology development; project management; employment patterns; research productivity; legal status of support services; functions of senior executives; the role of the sponsoring agency; research diversification; obstacles to technical innovation; organizational structures; and personnel management are addressed.

  20. Governance in the Digital Age: A Research and Action Framework for an Uncertain Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Sharon S.

    2009-01-01

    Research into relationships among government, society and technology has grown substantially over the past 30 years. However, most research and most advances in practice address narrowly defined categories of concern such as government organization, citizen services, interoperability, or personal privacy. By contrast, the future presents complex…

  1. Governance in the Digital Age: A Research and Action Framework for an Uncertain Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawes, Sharon S.

    2009-01-01

    Research into relationships among government, society and technology has grown substantially over the past 30 years. However, most research and most advances in practice address narrowly defined categories of concern such as government organization, citizen services, interoperability, or personal privacy. By contrast, the future presents complex…

  2. Garfden variety {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl research at prime lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, P.; Elmore, D.; Knies, D.

    1995-12-01

    Beryllium-10 and chlorine-36 are produced in the atmosphere by spallation reactions induced by cosmic rays on nitrogen and oxygen and argon. {sup 10}Be is attached to aerosols whereas {sup 36}Cl is believed to be in gaseous phase. These cosmogenic radionuclides are transported down via precipitation and subsequently they get incorporated into ice, soils, sediments and nodules. Results will be presented on the following research projects currently underway at PRIME Lab: (1) {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl in precipitation in Lafayette, IN, for studying relationships between cosmogenic radionuclides concentrations, storm type, air mass history, and season, (2) {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl in ice from Antarctica for studying past variations in {sup 10}Be and {sup 36}Cl depositions, (3) {sup 10}Be distribution in Fincastle soil cores from Lafayette, IN, for determining soil loss tolerance, (4) depth distribution of {sup 10}Be in a sediment core from Murderkill salt marsh, DE, for deciphering past erosional events on the east coast of USA, (5) {sup 10}Be daring of Arctic ocean sediments: implications for studying closing and opening of ice sheets, and (6) Growth history of a ferromanganese crust from Hawaiian Archipelago, Pacific ocean.

  3. In Situ Teaching: Fusing Labs & Lectures in Undergraduate Science Courses to Enhance Immersion in Scientific Research

    PubMed Central

    Round, Jennifer; Lom, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate courses in the life sciences at most colleges and universities are traditionally composed of two or three weekly sessions in a classroom supplemented with a weekly three-hour session in a laboratory. We have found that many undergraduates can have difficulty making connections and/or transferring knowledge between lab activities and lecture material. Consequently, we are actively developing ways to decrease the physical and intellectual divides between lecture and lab to help students make more direct links between what they learn in the classroom and what they learn in the lab. In this article we discuss our experiences teaching fused laboratory biology courses that intentionally blurred the distinctions between lab and lecture to provide undergraduates with immersive experiences in science that promote discovery and understanding. PMID:26240531

  4. Utilizing the US Lab Nadir Research Window for Remote Sensing Operations with The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Richard; Barley, Bryan; Gilbert, Paul A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) is an ISPR-based rack facility designed to take advantage of the high optical quality US Lab Nadir research window. The WORF is based on the ISS Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) rack mechanical structure and electronic systems. The WORF has a unique payload volume located at the center of the rack that provides access to the window. The interior dimensions of the payload volume are 34-in. (86.36 cm) wide by 33-in. (83.82 cm) high by 23-in. (58.42 cm) deep. This facility supports the deployment of payloads such as 9 in. aerial photography cameras and 12 in. diameter optical equipment. The WORF coupled with the optical quality of the United States Lab window support the deployment of various payload disciplines. The WORF provides payloads with power, data command and control, air cooling, water cooling, and video processing. The WORF's payload mounting surfaces and interfaces include the interior payload mounting shelf and the interior and exterior aircraft-like seat tracks. The payload mounting shelf is limited to a maximum mass of 136 kg (299 pounds). The WORF can accommodate large payloads such as the commonly used Leica-Heerbrug RC-30 aerial photography camera (whose dimensions are 53.3 cm (21-in.) wide by 50.8 cm (20-in.) deep by 76.2 cm (30-in.) long). The performance characteristics of the WORF allow it to support an array of payload disciplines. The WORF provides a maximum of 3 Kw at 28 Vdc and has a maximum data rate of 10 Mbps. The WORF's unique payload volume is designed to be light-tight, down to 2.8 x 10(exp -11) Watts/cm2/steradian, and have low-reflective surfaces. This specially designed WORF interior supports payload investigations that observe low-light-level phenomenon such as aurora. Although the WORF rack does not employ any active rack isolation (i.e., vibration dampening) technology, the rack provides a very stable environment for payload operations (on the order of X microradians). The facility's software is capable of being updated during its period of deployment. The WORF project also includes a Suitcase Simulator to allow for a payload developer to verify data interfaces at his development site, a trainer rack for astronauts to learn how to operate the WORF prior to flight, and the use of the EXPRESS Functional Checkout Units to allow for payload checkout at the KSC prior to launch.

  5. Service Learning Through Internships and Research for State Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Harlan T.

    1977-01-01

    Applications of academic values in productive service activities are exemplified by public service internships in Georgia and policy research in Texas. Described are Jimmy Carter's Georgia Intern Program and the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs. (Editor/LBH)

  6. Patient Informed Governance of Distributed Research Networks: Results and Discussion from Six Patient Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Mamo, Laura A.; Browe, Dennis K.; Logan, Holly C.; Kim, Katherine K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients’ views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes. PMID:24551383

  7. Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, AIDS: A Selected Bibliography of Federal Government Publications. Research Guide 90 104.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Margaret

    This research guide presents a selected bibliography of federal government publications about the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). These documents are listed in five categories: (1) Bibliographies (7); (2) Congressional Publications (69 hearings and reports); (3) Executive Branch Publications (43 reports); (4) Federal Government…

  8. University--Government--International Donor Community Cooperation in Research, Teaching and Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwaniki, M.

    2010-01-01

    World geo-economics of the last two decades have seriously impacted on governments' capability to finance university teaching, research and community engagement, especially in the developing world. Over the same period however, the demands and expectations exerted on universities by government and society have increased phenomenally. To meet these…

  9. Towards Principles-Based Approaches to Governance of Health-related Research using Personal Data.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Graeme; Sethi, Nayha

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances in the quality, availability and linkage potential of health data for research make the need to develop robust and effective information governance mechanisms more pressing than ever before; they also lead us to question the utility of governance devices used hitherto such as consent and anonymisation. This article assesses and advocates a principles-based approach, contrasting this with traditional rule-based approaches, and proposes a model of principled proportionate governance. It is suggested that the approach not only serves as the basis for good governance in contemporary data linkage but also that it provides a platform to assess legal reforms such as the draft Data Protection Regulation. PMID:24416087

  10. Clinical research data warehouse governance for distributed research networks in the USA: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, John H; Elliott, Thomas E; Brown, Jeffrey S; Raebel, Marsha A; Davidson, Arthur; Nelson, Andrew F; Chung, Annie; La Chance, Pierre; Steiner, John F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the published, peer-reviewed literature on clinical research data warehouse governance in distributed research networks (DRNs). Materials and methods Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and INSPEC were searched for relevant documents published through July 31, 2013 using a systematic approach. Only documents relating to DRNs in the USA were included. Documents were analyzed using a classification framework consisting of 10 facets to identify themes. Results 6641 documents were retrieved. After screening for duplicates and relevance, 38 were included in the final review. A peer-reviewed literature on data warehouse governance is emerging, but is still sparse. Peer-reviewed publications on UK research network governance were more prevalent, although not reviewed for this analysis. All 10 classification facets were used, with some documents falling into two or more classifications. No document addressed costs associated with governance. Discussion Even though DRNs are emerging as vehicles for research and public health surveillance, understanding of DRN data governance policies and procedures is limited. This is expected to change as more DRN projects disseminate their governance approaches as publicly available toolkits and peer-reviewed publications. Conclusions While peer-reviewed, US-based DRN data warehouse governance publications have increased, DRN developers and administrators are encouraged to publish information about these programs. PMID:24682495

  11. The Astrogeology Mapping, Remote-Sensing, Cartography, Technology, and Research (MRCTR) GIS Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, T. M.; Skinner, J. A.; Fortezzo, C. M.; Tanaka, K. L.; Nava, R. A.

    2012-03-01

    This year we have formalized the MRCTR, as in “Mercator”, GIS Lab, a concept we have initiated as a means to support digital mapping and development of GIS tools. We will focus on creating a technical foundation prior to the retirement of PIGWAD.

  12. Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Results from the Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study involves collaboration of four national laboratories/centers of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as scientists from universities and water utilities, and is termed the ‘Four Lab Study’. The purpose of this study is to address concerns related to...

  13. The Floating Lab Research Project: An Approach to Evaluating Field Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.

    This report explains an evaluative study of the conceptual and affective development of students associated with the Floating Lab Program, an experiential field project sponsored by the University of New Hampshire and the Maine Sea Grant Program. The field program involved an opportunity for students to have hands-on experiences aboard a 65-foot…

  14. Creating Field Research in the Lab: Simulation as Communicating and Organizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Linda L.

    Laboratory simulations combine the strengths of lab experiments and field studies while avoiding many of their liabilities. They permit the emotional involvement, the time needed for development of norms and interlocked systems of interaction, and the broad range of variables typical of field settings, yet allow for experimental controls and…

  15. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Renee; Cunniff, Lori

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power generation accessible for public viewing on an interactive kiosk located in the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s lobby where visitors can review “real time” power generation, cost savings and environmental benefits of the system. Site commissioning with the software program was delayed due to Internal Security Software issues within Orange County that needed to be resolved, therefore the “real time” capture of the production data for the solar array using the software program commenced on May 1, 2015. In addition an educational flyer was developed and is available in the Orange County Education Center’s main lobby. The project completed under this grant award assisted Orange County in demonstrating leadership by installing the application of a renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs for the Orange County University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center, and helping Orange County citizens and visitors move towards the goals of greater energy independence and climate protection. The addition of the new Solar Demonstration and Research Facility has advanced the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s mission of extending, educating and providing research-based information to residents and visitors of Orange County by demonstrating the application of renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs, and helping Orange County move towards the goal of greater energy independence and climate protection. In 2014, the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center hosted nearly 10,800 visitors to their on-site Exploration Gardens plus 12,686 walk-in visitors to their office plant clinic and other services. The Education Center held 2,217 educational events that were attended by 46,434 adults and youth, but about half of those events occurred off-site. Based on the visitation numbers in 2014 the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center Education is a vital partner to Orange County’s continued outreach and education efforts concerning renewable energy technologies and greenhouse gas emission reduction well in the current 2015 year and future years of operation of the solar array to the future visitors of the Center which help stimulate market demand that will continue to advance the commercialization and the widespread application and use of renewable energy technologies in Orange County and the state of Florida. The project period performance date for this grant was November 1, 2009 through March 1, 2015. The Final Project costs to complete the project as reported in the FINAL SF 425 were $195,512.50 (50% recipient cost share was satisfied as required by grant terms and conditions).

  16. Lab architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 – just two years after the Stata Center officially opened – the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  17. The GreenLab Research Facility: A Micro-Grid Integrating Production, Consumption and Storage of Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell Bomani, Bilal Mark; Elbuluk, Malik; Fain, Henry; Kankam, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    There is a large gap between the production and demand for energy from alternative fuel and alternative renewable energy sources. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated a laboratory-pilot study that concentrates on using biofuels as viable alternative fuel resources for the field of aviation, as well as, utilizing wind and solar technologies as alternative renewable energy resources, and in addition, the use of pumped water for storage of energy that can be retrieved through hydroelectric generation. This paper describes the GreenLab Research Facility and its power and energy sources with .recommendations for worldwide expansion and adoption of the concept of such a facility

  18. [Beyond the criticism addressed to research ethics committees: a choice of governance].

    PubMed

    Legault, Georges A; Patenaude, Johane

    2007-12-01

    In 1998 in Canada and Quebec, two policies regarding research ethics transformed the evaluation approach of clinical research following the Code of Nuremberg and subsequent Declarations of the World Medical Association. Even after almost ten years of implementation, these policies still arouse debate in the research milieu. If for many, these debates essentially reflect the inherent difficulties in any implementation process, in which resistance to change and the modification of policies and action plans, we believe that there is a more fundamental stake, rarely mentioned or debated, that of the choice of governance. In this article we start by proposing a classification of the different modes of governance: professional deontology, and ethical and administrative rights. Secondly, we show how the debates and criticisms addressed to the Research Ethics Committee of Quebec and Canada attains their full meaning in light of this basic stake: the divergence of the mode of governance to favour ethics in research. PMID:18464580

  19. Microbes in Mascara: Hypothesis-Driven Research in a Nonmajor Biology Lab †

    PubMed Central

    Burleson, Kathryn M.; Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory exercise, students were taught concepts of microbiology and scientific process through an everyday activity — cosmetic use. The students’ goals for the lab were to develop a hypothesis regarding microbial contamination in cosmetics, learn techniques to culture and differentiate microorganisms from cosmetics, and propose best practices in cosmetics use based on their findings. Prior to the lab, students took a pretest to assess their knowledge of scientific hypotheses, microbiology, and cosmetic safety. In the first week, students were introduced to microbiological concepts and methodologies, and cosmetic terminology and safety. Students completed a hypothesis-writing exercise before formulating and testing their own hypotheses regarding cosmetic contamination. Students provided a cosmetic of their own and, in consultation with their lab group, chose one product for testing. Samples were serially diluted and plated on a variety of selective media. In the second week, students analyzed their plates to determine the presence and diversity of microbes and if their hypotheses were supported. Students completed a worksheet of their results and were given a posttest to assess their knowledge. Average test scores improved from 5.2 (pretest) to 7.8 (posttest), with p-values < 0.0001. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of students correctly identified hypotheses that were not falsifiable or lacked variables, and 89% of students improved their scores on questions concerning safe cosmetic use. Ninety-one percent (91%) of students demonstrated increased knowledge of microbial concepts and methods. Based on our results, this lab is an easy, yet effective, way to enhance knowledge of scientific concepts for nonmajors, while maintaining relevance to everyday life. PMID:23653761

  20. Reviewing HIV-Related Research in Emerging Economies: The Role of Government Reviewing Agencies.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Patrina; Hui, Katrina; Hanrahan, Donna; Barnes, Mark; Sugarman, Jeremy; London, Alex John; Klitzman, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Little research has explored the possible effects of government institutions in emerging economies on ethical reviews of multinational research. We conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 15 researchers, Research Ethics Committees (RECs) personnel, and a government agency member involved in multinational HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) research in emerging economies. Ministries of Health (MOH) or other government agencies often play pivotal roles as facilitators or barriers in the research ethics approval process. Government agency RECs reviewing protocols may face particular challenges, as they can lack resources, be poorly organized, have inconsistent review processes and limited expertise, and use differing definitions of national interests, including upholding national reputation and avoiding potential exploitation and stigma of the country's population. The MOH/governmental review body may be affected by power dynamics and politics in study reviews; may consider issues both related and unrelated to research ethics as understood elsewhere; and may prioritize particular diseases, treatments, or interventions over other topics/types of research. Poor communication and deeply-rooted tensions may exist between sponsor and host countries, impeding optimal interactions and reviews. Investigators must understand and plan for the potential effects of governmental agencies on multinational collaborative research, including preserving adequate time for agency review, and contacting these agencies beforehand to address issues that may arise. Better understanding of these issues can aid and advance appropriate global scientific collaboration. PMID:25388003

  1. 40 CFR 11.6 - Access by historical researchers and former Government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access by historical researchers and former Government officials. 11.6 Section 11.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL SECURITY CLASSIFICATION REGULATIONS PURSUANT TO EXECUTIVE ORDER 11652 § 11.6 Access by historical researchers and former...

  2. The Changing Nature of Governance in the Public Research University: Untangling the Web of Faculty Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudt, Angela Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Public research universities continue to be challenged on a number of fronts--declining state revenues, increasing enrollment, calls for accountability and transparency from the public, and increasing scrutiny by governing boards. In addition, the composition of faculty at public research universities is changing. Understanding the impact that…

  3. A Case of Social Scholarship for Multi-Player Research in Government Information Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabina, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This paper presents the results of an experiment in using participatory research methods in a classroom among ten students taking an advanced master's level course in library and information science. The project goals were motivated by the course content, an advanced course in research using official government documents. Method: Ten…

  4. 22 CFR 171.24 - Access by historical researchers and certain former government personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access by historical researchers and certain former government personnel. 171.24 Section 171.24 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC Executive Order 12958 Provisions § 171.24 Access by historical researchers and...

  5. The Changing Nature of Governance in the Public Research University: Untangling the Web of Faculty Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yudt, Angela Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Public research universities continue to be challenged on a number of fronts--declining state revenues, increasing enrollment, calls for accountability and transparency from the public, and increasing scrutiny by governing boards. In addition, the composition of faculty at public research universities is changing. Understanding the impact that…

  6. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L.; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  7. The Government Finance Database: A Common Resource for Quantitative Research in Public Financial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Kawika; Hand, Michael L; Thompson, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative public financial management research focused on local governments is limited by the absence of a common database for empirical analysis. While the U.S. Census Bureau distributes government finance data that some scholars have utilized, the arduous process of collecting, interpreting, and organizing the data has led its adoption to be prohibitive and inconsistent. In this article we offer a single, coherent resource that contains all of the government financial data from 1967-2012, uses easy to understand natural-language variable names, and will be extended when new data is available. PMID:26107821

  8. Diamond Research Overview and a Model for Lab Experiments Using Oxyacetylene Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Rustum

    1996-01-01

    High pressure synthetic diamonds have now been a commercial product for over 40 years. Russian scientists invented the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process 30 years ago, while the Japanese followed 10 years later and the U.S. was introduced to it 10 years after that. The new syntheses focus is on liquid and solid phase approaches. There are three CVD processes: microwave plasma, hot filament, and oxy-acetylene torch. The oxy-acetylene torch is an excellent materials synthesis lab experiment, emphasizing the simplicity of the science.

  9. Research jobs for recent college graduates: A comparison between traditional lab technician positions and NIH’s postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship.

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, J. Taylor

    2003-01-01

    The features that distinguish the Postbaccalaureate IRTA experience from a normal lab tech job are the enhanced educational opportunities, greater independence, more organized social outlets and networking opportunities, life in the DC Metro area, and the NIH itself. Also, research experience looks great on a CV when applying for research jobs or graduate schools, and the NIH name and Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship are impressive to potential employers and admissions committees. On the other hand, lab tech jobs often require fewer commitments outside of a normal 9-to-5 work day and usually have better pay and benefits than the Postbaccalaureate IRTA fellowship. In addition, working at a specific university often carries the benefit of being closer to one’s family, friends, and/or significant others. Someone who does not like cities can choose to work at a university that has ready access to the beach, mountains, or regions of the country that are more personally appealing than the Washington, DC, area. Lab tech jobs also usually require at least a two year commitment, whereas the Postbac IRTA fellowship is generally a one year commitment (possibly two). Regardless of which option you choose, you should be active in searching for a job that lets you fulfill the goals you set for yourself in the years between graduating and starting graduate or medical school. Whether those goals are to publish, get experience, save money, or just enjoy yourself, with careful questioning and circumspection, you should be able to maximize the possibility that you will meet your goals. PMID:23741203

  10. The Study Team for Early Life Asthma Research (STELAR) consortium 'Asthma e-lab': team science bringing data, methods and investigators together.

    PubMed

    Custovic, Adnan; Ainsworth, John; Arshad, Hasan; Bishop, Christopher; Buchan, Iain; Cullinan, Paul; Devereux, Graham; Henderson, John; Holloway, John; Roberts, Graham; Turner, Steve; Woodcock, Ashley; Simpson, Angela

    2015-08-01

    We created Asthma e-Lab, a secure web-based research environment to support consistent recording, description and sharing of data, computational/statistical methods and emerging findings across the five UK birth cohorts. The e-Lab serves as a data repository for our unified dataset and provides the computational resources and a scientific social network to support collaborative research. All activities are transparent, and emerging findings are shared via the e-Lab, linked to explanations of analytical methods, thus enabling knowledge transfer. eLab facilitates the iterative interdisciplinary dialogue between clinicians, statisticians, computer scientists, mathematicians, geneticists and basic scientists, capturing collective thought behind the interpretations of findings. PMID:25805205

  11. Research of color distribution index in CIE L*a*b* color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Wei-De; Huang, Ting-Wei; Mang, Ou-Yang; Lee, Tsang-Hsing; Hsieh, Yao-Fang; Kuo, Yi-Ting

    2010-08-01

    The index for evaluating the ability of color reproduction is required. The color distribution index (CDI) was proposed to comment the display ability of color distribution of reproduction in CIE Lu'v' color space. A cell of Just Noticeable Difference (JND) for luminance and chromaticity (u'v') was proposed to qualify whether the reproduced colors are in some region of color volume of display. Human eye can perceive fewer colors at low luminance, however, the scalar of chromaticity (u'v') JND at low luminance was the same with the one at other luminance. CDI will be distorted at low luminance. In this paper, regarding perceptible vision at low luminance, we try to use chromaticity (a*b*) JND to replace chromaticity (u'v') JND. The color distribution will be discussed in CIE La*b* color space. We find that CDI at low luminance in CIE L*a*b* color space is higher than in CIE Lu'v' color space, as well as different gamma curves and different bit depths affect CDI. The displays are going to keep approaching 100% true color reproduction; hence the index for evaluating the ability of color reproduction is required.

  12. NASA Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, Reactivated to Support the U.S. Army Research Laboratory T700 Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltran, Luis R.; Griffin, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Vehicle Technology Directorate at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been directed by their parent command, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL), to demonstrate active stall technology in a turboshaft engine as the next step in transitioning this technology to the Army and aerospace industry. Therefore, the Vehicle Technology Directorate requested the reactivation of Glenn's Engine Components Research Lab, Cell 2B, (ECRL 2B). They wanted to test a T700 engine that had been used previously for turboshaft engine research as a partnership between the Army and NASA on small turbine engine research. ECRL 2B had been placed in standby mode in 1997. Glenn's Testing Division initiated reactivation in May 2002 to support the new research effort, and they completed reactivation and improvements in September 2003.

  13. Clinical governance and research ethics as barriers to UK low-risk population-based health research?

    PubMed Central

    van Teijlingen, Edwin R; Douglas, Flora; Torrance, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Background Since the Helsinki Declaration was introduced in 1964 as a code of practice for clinical research, it has generally been agreed that research governance is also needed in the field of public health and health promotion research. Recently, a range of factors led to the development of more stringent bureaucratic procedures, governing the conduct of low-risk population-based health research in the United Kingdom. Methods Our paper highlights a case study of the application process to medical research ethics committees in the United Kingdom for a study of the promotion of physical activity by health care providers. The case study presented here is an illustration of the challenges in conducting low-risk population-based health research. Results Our mixed-methods approach involved a questionnaire survey of and semi-structured interviews with health professionals (who were all healthy volunteers). Since our study does not involve the participation of either patients or the general population, one would expect the application to the relevant research ethics committees to be a formality. This proved not to be the case! Conclusion Research ethics committees could be counter-productive, rather than protecting the vulnerable in the research process, they can stifle low-risk population-based health research. Research ethics in health services research is first and foremost the responsibility of the researcher(s), and we need to learn to trust health service researchers again. The burden of current research governance regulation to address the perceived ethical problems is neither appropriate nor adequate. Senior researchers/academics need to educate and train students and junior researchers in the area of research ethics, whilst at the same time reducing pressures on them that lead to unethical research, such as commercial funding, inappropriate government interference and the pressure to publish. We propose that non-invasive low-risk population-based health studies such as face-to-face interviews with health and social care professionals or postal questionnaire studies with patients on non-sensitive topics are given a waiver or a light touch review. We suggest that this can be achieved through a two-staged ethics application process. The first stage starts with a one or two-page outline application which ethics committees can use as the basis to grant a waiver or request a full application. PMID:19040750

  14. IRM National Reference Series: Japan: An evaluation of government-sponsored energy conservation research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, C.D.

    1987-07-01

    Despite the recent drop in world oil prices, the Japanese government is continuing to stress energy conservation, because Japan relies on imports for 85% of its total energy requirements and virtually 100% of its petroleum. Japan stresses long-term developments and sees conservation as an integral part of its 50- to 100-year transition from fossil fuels to nuclear and renewable sources of energy. The Japanese government is targeting new materials, biotechnology, and electronics technologies as the foundation of Japan's economy in the 21st century. Most government research programs in Japan are governed by aggressive timetables and fixed technical goals and are usually guaranteed funding over a 5- to 10-year period. Of the major energy conservation research programs, the best known is the Moonlight Project, administered by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), and oriented towards end-use technologies such as Stirling engines and advanced heat pumps. Parts of MITI's Basic Technologies for Future Industries Program involve research in new materials and bioreactors. The Science and Technology Agency's Exploratory Research in Advanced Technologies (ERATO) Program is also investigating these technologies while emphasizing basic research. Other ministries supporting research related to energy conservation are the Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture and the Ministry of Construction. For 1985, government spending for energy conservation research was at least $50 million. Private sector funding of energy conservation research was $500 million in 1984. A brief outline of major programs and key participants is included for several of the most relevant technologies. An overview of Japan's experience in international scientific collaboration is also included.

  15. Data governance requirements for distributed clinical research networks: triangulating perspectives of diverse stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Katherine K; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Holm, Roberta; Hack, Lori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    There is currently limited information on best practices for the development of governance requirements for distributed research networks (DRNs), an emerging model that promotes clinical data reuse and improves timeliness of comparative effectiveness research. Much of the existing information is based on a single type of stakeholder such as researchers or administrators. This paper reports on a triangulated approach to developing DRN data governance requirements based on a combination of policy analysis with experts, interviews with institutional leaders, and patient focus groups. This approach is illustrated with an example from the Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research, which resulted in 91 requirements. These requirements were analyzed against the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protected versus non-protected health information. The requirements addressed all FIPPs, showing how a DRN's technical infrastructure is able to fulfill HIPAA regulations, protect privacy, and provide a trustworthy platform for research. PMID:24302285

  16. Data governance requirements for distributed clinical research networks: triangulating perspectives of diverse stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Katherine K; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Holm, Roberta; Hack, Lori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    There is currently limited information on best practices for the development of governance requirements for distributed research networks (DRNs), an emerging model that promotes clinical data reuse and improves timeliness of comparative effectiveness research. Much of the existing information is based on a single type of stakeholder such as researchers or administrators. This paper reports on a triangulated approach to developing DRN data governance requirements based on a combination of policy analysis with experts, interviews with institutional leaders, and patient focus groups. This approach is illustrated with an example from the Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research, which resulted in 91 requirements. These requirements were analyzed against the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protected versus non-protected health information. The requirements addressed all FIPPs, showing how a DRN's technical infrastructure is able to fulfill HIPAA regulations, protect privacy, and provide a trustworthy platform for research. PMID:24302285

  17. Medical Universities Educational and Research Online Services: Benchmarking Universities’ Website Towards E-Government

    PubMed Central

    Farzandipour, Mehrdad; Meidani, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Websites as one of the initial steps towards an e-government adoption do facilitate delivery of online and customer-oriented services. In this study we intended to investigate the role of the websites of medical universities in providing educational and research services following the E-government maturity model in the Iranian universities. Methods: This descriptive and cross- sectional study was conducted through content analysis and benchmarking the websites in 2012. The research population included the entire medical university website (37). Delivery of educational and research services through these university websites including information, interaction, transaction, and Integration were investigated using a checklist. The data were then analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and using SPSS software. Results: Level of educational and research services by websites of the medical universities type I and II was evaluated medium as 1.99 and 1.89, respectively. All the universities gained a mean score of 1 out of 3 in terms of integration of educational and research services. Conclusions: Results of the study indicated that Iranian universities have passed information and interaction stages, but they have not made much progress in transaction and integration stages. Failure to adapt to e-government in Iranian medical universities in which limiting factors such as users’ e-literacy, access to the internet and ICT infrastructure are not so crucial as in other organizations, suggest that e-government realization goes beyond technical challenges. PMID:25132713

  18. Recent progress in quantum well infrared photodetector research and development at Jet Propulsion Lab.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Liu, John K.; Pool, Frederick S.; Sengupta, Deepak K.; Shott, C. A.; Carralejo, Ronald J.; Stetson, Norman B.

    1998-04-01

    One of the simplest device realizations of the classic particle-in-the-box problem of basic quantum mechanics is the quantum well IR photodetector (QWIP). In this paper we discuss the optimization of the detector design, material growth and processing that has culminated in realization of 15 micron cutoff 128 X 128 QWIP focal plane array camera, hand-held and palmsize 256 X 256 long wavelength QWIP cameras and 648 X 480 long-wavelength cameras, holding forth great promise for myriad applications in 6-25 micron wavelength range in science, medicine, defense and industry. In addition, we present the recent developments in broadband QWIPs and mid-wave long-wave dualband QWIPs at Jet Propulsion Lab for various NASA and DOD applications.

  19. Ethics, emergencies and Ebola clinical trials: the role of governments and communities in offshored research

    PubMed Central

    Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Peterson, Kristin; Kombe, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa has stimulated investments in EVD research. While these research efforts are most welcome, we are concerned about the potential to ignore effective community ethics engagement programmes and critical government regulatory agencies in light of the urgency to conduct clinical trials for EVD therapies and vaccines. We discuss the reasons why community engagement with various research stakeholders is essential, how community engagement should be conducted, and the potential consequences of failing to engage both communities and regulatory agencies by drawing on past experiences in the field of HIV research. We highlight the importance of a) capacity building to enable local researchers design and implement EVD research for future epidemics, b) the need to support community research literacy, and c) the need to build the competency of research regulatory agencies on the continent to address EVD therapy and vaccine research. PMID:26740838

  20. Human Brains Engaged in Rat Brains: Student-driven Neuroanatomy Research in an Introductory Biology Lab Course

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Stephanie M.; Adedokun, Omolola A.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Inquiry-based laboratory instruction has been shown to actively engage students in the content and skills being taught. These courses are further intended to teach students not only what is known, but also the process by which investigators come to know it. We sought to take this approach one step further and incorporate novel research questions into an inquiry-based laboratory model early in the undergraduate course of study. In this research-based introductory laboratory course, first-year students acquired basic lab skills not just for their own sake, but rather within the context of a research question of a member of the faculty. Student projects investigated potential neuroanatomical changes in animal models of dyslexia and aging and included measurements of neuron numbers and levels and distribution of neuronal proteins. Students played an active role in designing and implementing an experimental plan, explored data analysis techniques, and reflected on the results that they obtained in scholarly forms such as research papers and a departmental poster session. Student feedback on this approach has been extremely positive, and the data collected were research quality preliminary data that are being actively pursued for further study. Based on our encouraging experiences, we conclude that designing an introductory course around novel research, including some assessments modeled after scholarly practices, provides motivation and excitement for the students, instills good scientific habits, and can potentially benefit departmental research. PMID:23626490

  1. Governments and Universities as the Main Drivers of Enhanced Australian University Research Commercialisation Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Grant; Harman, Kay

    2004-01-01

    In building capacity in research commercialisation and science-based entrepreneurship, Australia has adopted neither the Swedish top-down approach depending on government initiative, nor the American bottom-up approach depending on incentive systems related to university ownership of intellectual property and a highly competitive and…

  2. Partnering for a Prosperous & Secure Future: The Federal Government and Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    With the Presidential election two months away, this paper presents a set of actions the Association of American Universities (AAU) believes the President and his Administration can take to advance the partnership between the federal government and research universities--as well as actions that universities themselves need to take to ensure that…

  3. 15 CFR 734.11 - Government-sponsored research covered by contract controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... covered by contract controls. (a) If research is funded by the U.S. Government, and specific national... permission for publication; restrictions on prepublication dissemination of information to non-U.S. citizens or other categories of persons; or restrictions on participation of non-U.S. citizens or...

  4. 15 CFR 734.11 - Government-sponsored research covered by contract controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... covered by contract controls. (a) If research is funded by the U.S. Government, and specific national... permission for publication; restrictions on prepublication dissemination of information to non-U.S. citizens or other categories of persons; or restrictions on participation of non-U.S. citizens or...

  5. 15 CFR 734.11 - Government-sponsored research covered by contract controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Government-sponsored research covered by contract controls. 734.11 Section 734.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...

  6. Managing Oppositional Masculinity Politics: The Gendering of a Government-Commissioned Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Martino, Wayne; Mills, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we draw on pro-feminist, anti-essentialist espistemological and theoretical frameworks, in conjunction with adopting autoethnographic narratives, both to provide critical insight into and contextualize the particular testimony and witnessing of our own personal involvement in the gendering of a government-commissioned research…

  7. A qualitative study on clinical research in Finland: fragmented governance and volume in the 2000s

    PubMed Central

    Hemminki, Elina; Veerus, Piret; Virtanen, Jorma; Lehto, Juhani

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Although concerns over clinical research have been expressed, the governance of clinical research has been little studied. The aim was to describe research policy, volume, funding and concerns over clinical research in Finland. Design A qualitative study and the data were collected from various sources, including documents, statistics and semistructured expert interviews. Setting Finland. Results We found no national policy for clinical research. Many actors were responsible for facilitating, directing, regulating and funding clinical research, but no actor had the main responsibility. Health professionals were the main drivers for clinical research. The role of the health ministry was small. The ministry distributed state money for clinical research in health services (EVO-money), but did not use it to direct research. Municipalities responsible for health services or national health insurance had little interest in clinical research. The Academy of Finland had had initiatives to promote clinical research, but they had not materialised in funding. Clinical research was common and internationally competitive, but its volume had declined relatively in the 2000s. Industry was an important private funder, mainly supporting drug trials made for licensing purposes. Drug trials without an outside sponsor (academic projects) declined between 2002 and 2010. The funding and its targeting and amount were no one's responsibility. Concerns over clinical research were similar as in other countries, but it had appeared late. Conclusions Our results suggest fragmented governance and funding in clinical research. The unsystematic research environment has not prevented clinical research from flourishing, but the public health relevance of the research carried out and its sustainability are unclear. PMID:23408074

  8. The Governance of Solar Radiation Management Research: The Need for Innovative Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J. C.; Winickoff, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent policy failures to control reduction of green house gas emissions have spurred interest in the potential of deliberate large-scale intervention in the Earth's climate system, so-called "geoengineering," in order to reduce global warming. However, many of the ideas that have been proposed to date, notably the injection of sulphate aerosols into the stratosphere, a technique often referred to as solar radiation management (SRM), involve significant risks and uncertainties. Because of the potential risks of this research, and its controversial nature, there is broad agreement that it should be conducted, if at all, in accordance with appropriate governance. But what exactly is appropriate governance, and what are the bounds of political accountability? The research, particularly any field experiments, will have to be governed by institutions that are both effective and credible. Institutions might be public bodies, or they might systems of norms. We define "effective" to mean sufficiently protective of human and environmental health, and "credible" to mean trusted by the public and affected parties. Neither effective nor credible governance can be achieved by scientific elites alone. Designing such institutions will be a major challenge given the scope of the problem, the inherited political landscape, and the bars to discussion posed by technical content. Task force on Climate Remediation at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington has recently recommended that the US begin research on a wide variety of technologies to see if any hold promise for ameliorating the extreme effects of climate change. As members of that task force, we will present some of its ideas for institutionalizing governance over that research, and add detail to recommendations therein, especially concerning the creation of new kinds of institutions. Past experiences with the governance of controversial technologies -- such as GMOs, pharmaceuticals, and nuclear energy -- provide important comparative case studies. Governing institutions have the important role of developing societal capacity to deliberate about SRM within the context of the larger climate problem. Overall, governance must enable good decisions about how risky research is conducted and to create the conditions under which new knowledge can be

  9. Effects of Government Spending on Research Workforce Development: Evidence from Biomedical Postdoctoral Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyungjo; Ghaffarzadegan, Navid; Hawley, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    We examine effects of government spending on postdoctoral researchers’ (postdocs) productivity in biomedical sciences, the largest population of postdocs in the US. We analyze changes in the productivity of postdocs before and after the US government’s 1997 decision to increase NIH funding. In the first round of analysis, we find that more government spending has resulted in longer postdoc careers. We see no significant changes in researchers’ productivity in terms of publication and conference presentations. However, when the population is segmented by citizenship, we find that the effects are heterogeneous; US citizens stay longer in postdoc positions with no change in publications and, in contrast, international permanent residents (green card holders) produce more conference papers and publications without significant changes in postdoc duration. Possible explanations and policy implications of the analysis are discussed. PMID:25932942

  10. The Scottish Government's Rural and Environmental Science and Analytical Services Strategic Research Progamme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Lorna; Bestwick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    The Strategic Research Programme focuses on the delivery of outputs and outcomes within the major policy agenda areas of climate change, land use and food security, and to impact on the 'Wealthier', 'Healthier' and 'Greener' strategic objectives of the Scottish Government. The research is delivered through two programmes: 'Environmental Change' and 'Food, Land and People'; the core strength of which is the collaboration between the Scottish Government's Main Research Providers-The James Hutton Institute, the Moredun Research Institute, Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health University of Aberdeen, Scotland's Rural College, Biomathematics and Statistics Scotland and The Royal Botanic Gardens Edinburgh. The research actively seeks to inform and be informed by stakeholders from policy, farming, land use, water and energy supply, food production and manufacturing, non-governmental organisations, voluntary organisations, community groups and general public. This presentation will provide an overview of the programme's interdisciplinary research, through examples from across the programme's themes. Examples will exemplify impact within the Strategic Programme's priorities of supporting policy and practice, contributing to economic growth and innovation, enhancing collaborative and multidisciplinary research, growing scientific resilience and delivering scientific excellence. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Research/About/EBAR/StrategicResearch/future-research-strategy/Themes/ http://www.knowledgescotland.org/news.php?article_id=295

  11. Soil bed reactor work of the Environmental Research Lab. of the University of Arizona in support of the research and development of Biosphere 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Research at the Environmental Research Lab in support of Biosphere 2 was both basic and applied in nature. One aspect of the applied research involved the use of biological reactors for the scrubbing of trace atmospheric organic contaminants. The research involved a quantitative study of the efficiency of operation of Soil Bed Reactors (SBR) and the optimal operating conditions for contaminant removal. The basic configuration of a SBR is that air is moved through a living soil that supports a population of plants. Upon exposure to the soil, contaminants are either passively adsorbed onto the surface of soil particles, chemically transformed in the soil to usable compounds that are taken up by the plants or microbes as a metabolic energy source and converted to CO2 and water.

  12. Government can regulate food advertising to children because cognitive research shows that it is inherently misleading.

    PubMed

    Graff, Samantha; Kunkel, Dale; Mermin, Seth E

    2012-02-01

    The childhood obesity crisis has prompted repeated calls for government action to curb the marketing of unhealthy food to children. Food and entertainment industry groups have asserted that the First Amendment prohibits such regulation. However, case law establishes that the First Amendment does not protect "inherently misleading" commercial speech. Cognitive research indicates that young children cannot effectively recognize the persuasive intent of advertising or apply the critical evaluation required to comprehend commercial messages. Given this combination--that government can prohibit "inherently misleading" advertising and that children cannot adequately understand commercial messages--advertising to children younger than age twelve should be considered beyond the scope of constitutional protection. PMID:22323170

  13. Concentration, Chlorination, and Chemical Analysis of Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Health Effects Research: U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s “Four Lab Study” involved participation of researchers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from the water industry and academia. The study evaluated toxicological...

  14. Concentration, Chlorination, and Chemical Analysis of Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Health Effects Research: U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s “Four Lab Study” involved participation of researchers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from the water industry and academia. The study evaluated toxicological...

  15. Towards government-funded special biomedical research programs to combat rare diseases in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Yao, Lan; Liu, Zhiyong

    2015-04-01

    Rare diseases are rarely conditions that are often debilitating and even life-threatening, which was identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) with a prevalence of 0.65-1‰. 5,000-7,000 rare diseases are thought to exist, which account for around 10% of diseases for individuals worldwide. It is estimated that over 10 million people were patients with rare disease in China. During the past years, public awareness of rare diseases has in fact heightened with the launching of campaigns by patients' organizations and spontaneous efforts by members of the public, not only in developed countries and regions including United States of America (USA), the European Union (EU), and in Japan, but also in China. However, the features of missed or delayed diagnosis, shortage of effective drugs, and the high cost of currently available drugs for rare diseases make it an important public health issue and a challenge to medical care worldwide. To combat rare disease, the government should assume the responsibility of taking on the important task of promoting the sustained development of a system of medical care for and research into rare diseases. Government-funded special biomedical research programs in the USA, EU, and Japan may serve as a reference for China coping with rare diseases. The government-funded special biomedical research programs consisting of leading clinicians and researchers to enhance basic and applied research on rare diseases were expected to be launched in China. PMID:25902953

  16. Life's Lessons in the Lab: A Summer of Learning from Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Warner, Don; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REUs) seek to increase the participating students' knowledge and perceptions of scientific research through engagement in laboratory research and related activities. Various REU outcomes have been investigated including influence on participants' content knowledge, career plans, and general perceptions of…

  17. Life's Lessons in the Lab: A Summer of Learning from Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Warner, Don; Brown, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REUs) seek to increase the participating students' knowledge and perceptions of scientific research through engagement in laboratory research and related activities. Various REU outcomes have been investigated including influence on participants' content knowledge, career plans, and general perceptions of…

  18. An international comparison of government expenditures for energy conservation research and development:

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, S.C.

    1988-03-01

    This study provides a comparison of US and foreign government spending for energy conservation research and development (R and D). The countries included in this analysis are: the United States, United Kingdom, France, Sweden, West Germany, and Japan. The approach of this paper was to compare the research program of each country at a high level of aggregation with the US Department of Energy (DOE) program structure. This paper does not allow for differences in the way each country defines or accounts for research.

  19. Governing through community allegiance: a qualitative examination of peer research in community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Guta, Adrian; Flicker, Sarah; Roche, Brenda

    2013-12-01

    The disappointing results of many public health interventions have been attributed in part to the lack of meaningful community engagement in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of these initiatives. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an alternative research paradigm that directly involves community members in all aspects of the research process. Their involvement is often said to be an empowering experience that builds capacity. In this paper, we interrogate these assumptions, drawing on interview data from a qualitative study investigating the experiences of 18 peer researchers (PRs) recruited from nine CBPR studies in Toronto, Canada. These individuals brought to their respective projects experience of homelessness, living with HIV, being an immigrant or refugee, identifying as transgender, and of having a mental illness. The reflections of PRs are compared to those of other research team members collected in separate focus groups. Findings from these interviews are discussed with an attention to Foucault's concept of 'governmentality', and compared against popular community-based research principles developed by Israel and colleagues. While PRs spoke about participating in CBPR initiatives to share their experience and improve conditions for their communities, these emancipatory goals were often subsumed within corporatist research environments that limited participation. Overall, this study offers a much-needed theoretical engagement with this popular research approach and raises critical questions about the limits of community engagement in collaborative public health research. PMID:24273389

  20. Governing through community allegiance: a qualitative examination of peer research in community-based participatory research

    PubMed Central

    Guta, Adrian; Flicker, Sarah; Roche, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    The disappointing results of many public health interventions have been attributed in part to the lack of meaningful community engagement in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of these initiatives. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has emerged as an alternative research paradigm that directly involves community members in all aspects of the research process. Their involvement is often said to be an empowering experience that builds capacity. In this paper, we interrogate these assumptions, drawing on interview data from a qualitative study investigating the experiences of 18 peer researchers (PRs) recruited from nine CBPR studies in Toronto, Canada. These individuals brought to their respective projects experience of homelessness, living with HIV, being an immigrant or refugee, identifying as transgender, and of having a mental illness. The reflections of PRs are compared to those of other research team members collected in separate focus groups. Findings from these interviews are discussed with an attention to Foucault's concept of ‘governmentality’, and compared against popular community-based research principles developed by Israel and colleagues. While PRs spoke about participating in CBPR initiatives to share their experience and improve conditions for their communities, these emancipatory goals were often subsumed within corporatist research environments that limited participation. Overall, this study offers a much-needed theoretical engagement with this popular research approach and raises critical questions about the limits of community engagement in collaborative public health research. PMID:24273389

  1. Governing the research-care divide in clinical biobanking: Dutch perspectives.

    PubMed

    Boeckhout, Martin; Douglas, Conor M W

    2015-01-01

    Biobanking, the large-scale, systematic collection of data and tissue for open-ended research purposes, is on the rise, particularly in clinical research. The infrastructures for the systematic procurement, management and eventual use of human tissue and data are positioned between healthcare and research. However, the positioning of biobanking infrastructures and transfer of tissue and data between research and care is not an innocuous go-between. Instead, it involves changes in both domains and raises issues about how distinctions between research and care are drawn and policed. Based on an analysis of the emergence and development of clinical biobanking in the Netherlands, this article explores how processes of bio-objectification associated with biobanking arise, redefining the ways in which distinctions between research and clinical care are governed. PMID:26246123

  2. StemBANCC: Governing Access to Material and Data in a Large Stem Cell Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Michael; Klein, Christine; Clemann, Nicole; Collier, David A; Hardy, John; Heisserer, Barbara; Cader, M Zameel; Graf, Martin; Kaye, Jane

    2015-10-01

    This paper makes the case for implementing an internal governance framework for sharing materials and data in stem cell research consortia. A governance framework can facilitate a transparent and accountable system while building trust among partner institutions. However, avoiding excessive bureaucracy is essential. The development and implementation of a governance framework for materials and data access in the Stem cells for Biological Assays of Novel drugs and prediCtive toxiCology (StemBANCC) consortium is presented as a practical example. The StemBANCC project is a multi-partner European research consortium, which aims to build a resource of 1,500 well characterised induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines for in vitro disease modelling and toxicology studies. The project governance framework was developed in two stages. A small working group identified key components of a framework and translated the project legal agreements into a draft policy document. The second phase allowed input from all consortium partners to shape the iterative development of a final policy document that could be agreed by all parties. Careful time management strategies were needed to manage the duration of this component. This part of the process also served as an exploratory space where different options could be proposed, potential gaps in planning identified, and project co-ordination activities specified. PMID:26024842

  3. Legal Agreements and the Governance of Research Commons: Lessons from Materials Sharing in Mouse Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amrita

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Omics research infrastructure such as databases and bio-repositories requires effective governance to support pre-competitive research. Governance includes the use of legal agreements, such as Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs). We analyze the use of such agreements in the mouse research commons, including by two large-scale resource development projects: the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC). We combine an analysis of legal agreements and semi-structured interviews with 87 members of the mouse model research community to examine legal agreements in four contexts: (1) between researchers; (2) deposit into repositories; (3) distribution by repositories; and (4) exchanges between repositories, especially those that are consortium members of the IKMC and IMPC. We conclude that legal agreements for the deposit and distribution of research reagents should be kept as simple and standard as possible, especially when minimal enforcement capacity and resources exist. Simple and standardized legal agreements reduce transactional bottlenecks and facilitate the creation of a vibrant and sustainable research commons, supported by repositories and databases. PMID:24552652

  4. Legal agreements and the governance of research commons: lessons from materials sharing in mouse genomics.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amrita; Bubela, Tania

    2014-04-01

    Omics research infrastructure such as databases and bio-repositories requires effective governance to support pre-competitive research. Governance includes the use of legal agreements, such as Material Transfer Agreements (MTAs). We analyze the use of such agreements in the mouse research commons, including by two large-scale resource development projects: the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC). We combine an analysis of legal agreements and semi-structured interviews with 87 members of the mouse model research community to examine legal agreements in four contexts: (1) between researchers; (2) deposit into repositories; (3) distribution by repositories; and (4) exchanges between repositories, especially those that are consortium members of the IKMC and IMPC. We conclude that legal agreements for the deposit and distribution of research reagents should be kept as simple and standard as possible, especially when minimal enforcement capacity and resources exist. Simple and standardized legal agreements reduce transactional bottlenecks and facilitate the creation of a vibrant and sustainable research commons, supported by repositories and databases. PMID:24552652

  5. One stop or full stop? The continuing challenges for researchers despite the new streamlined NHS research governance process

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obtaining the necessary approvals and permission for clinical research requires successful negotiation of the ethical and R&D layers of the NHS. Differences in structure and governance frameworks feature between the constituent nations of the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), which adds complexity to cross-national studies. Difficulties in carrying out research in the NHS in the UK due to bureaucratic and time-consuming governance processes have led to the development of a new system of application and co-ordination from 2009. This paper illustrates how this new system fails to be consistent and streamlined and is unlikely to become so unless changes are made to the implementation and management of the governance processes. Methods We present a case study of the research governance process at the survey stage of an investigation into the use, preferences and need for information by people making choices or decisions about health care. The method involved home-based, face-to-face interviewing in a questionnaire survey in relation to decisions about lymphoma treatment, Down's syndrome screening in pregnancy, and caring for people with dementia. Results Our experience of the ethics stage was very positive, noting an efficient process of application and a speedy decision, both in relation to the initial application and to subsequent substantial amendments. By contrast, the R&D stages were very slow, most with unexplained delays, but some offering contradictory advice and exhibiting a lack of clear guidance and training for NHS staff. The R&D arrangements in Scotland were far quicker and more likely to be successful than in England. Overall, the delays were so severe that substantial parts of the research could not be delivered as planned within the funding timescale. Conclusions If high-quality research in the NHS, particularly in England, is to be delivered in a timely and cost-effective way, R&D processes for gaining research governance approval need improvement. Attention is needed in process implementation and management, particularly in relation to staff training, as well as clarity in guidance and communication within and between organisations. PMID:20465819

  6. FAIR - the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research: the Universe in the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissbach, F.

    2015-11-01

    As of the year 2018 the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will offer access to exotic ion beams and beams of antiproton of unprecedented luminosity. The facility currently under construction in Darmstadt, Germany, adjacent to the existing accelerator at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy-Ion Research, will serve several collaborations and fields simultaneously: atomic, hadron, nuclear, and plasma physics.

  7. Lab to Farm: Applying Research on Plant Genetics and Genomics to Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ronald, Pamela C.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 300 years, plant science research has provided important knowledge and technologies for advancing the sustainability of agriculture. In this Essay, I describe how basic research advances have been translated into crop improvement, explore some lessons learned, and discuss the potential for current and future contribution of plant genetic improvement technologies to continue to enhance food security and agricultural sustainability. PMID:24915201

  8. Qualitative Data Analysis of Issue Interrelations and Interdependencies for E-Government Research Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Maria A.; Bicking, Melanie

    Science and technology roadmapping is currently a popular method to develop long-term strategies for e-government. In the scope of the EC-co-funded research project eGovRTD2020, an innovative methodology has been developed, which combines scenarios and roadmapping to support long-term strategic policy-making for e-government research. This approach bases on systematically analyzing qualitative data throughout the whole roadmapping process based on individual issues and their interrelations. The paper explores the complex analysis of the network of relations and interdependencies between these issues. We introduce a concept for the systematic analysis of interlinks between single issues, which helps improving the quality of analysis and advances the consolidation of results to form well grounded strategic policy-making. A case example extracted from the project serves as proof of concept.

  9. Government-University-Industry-Research Roundtable. Annual report, June 14, 1991--June 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The major accomplishment of the past year in the Roundtable`s continuing work on issues of concern to the academic enterprise is the preparation of two documents - Science and Technology in the Academic Enterprise: Status, Trends, and Issues and Perspectives on Financing Academic Research Facilities: A Resource for Policy Formulation. The significance of these two publications is that they both organize a large amount of complex and often controversial material in a way that is useful for further discussions and, in some cases, action by the government and higher education communities. The test for the Roundtable now is whether it can stimulate these follow-on activities. The model in this regard is the Federal Demonstration Project, where the Roundtable stimulated specific government-university joint actions in streamlining research grant administration. All of these activities are described below in greater detail.

  10. Health research and systems' governance are at risk: should the right to data protection override health?

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, C T; Carinci, F; Oderkirk, J

    2014-07-01

    The European Union (EU) Data Protection Regulation will have profound implications for public health, health services research and statistics in Europe. The EU Commission's Proposal was a breakthrough in balancing privacy rights and rights to health and healthcare. The European Parliament, however, has proposed extensive amendments. This paper reviews the amendments proposed by the European Parliament Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and their implications for health research and statistics. The amendments eliminate most innovations brought by the Proposal. Notably, derogation to the general prohibition of processing sensitive data shall be allowed for public interests such as the management of healthcare services,but not health research, monitoring, surveillance and governance. The processing of personal health data for historical, statistical or scientific purposes shall be allowed only with the consent of the data subject or if the processing serves an exceptionally high public interest, cannot be performed otherwise and is legally authorised. Research, be it academic, government,corporate or market research, falls under the same rule.The proposed amendments will make difficult or render impossible research and statistics involving the linkage and analysis of the wealth of data from clinical,administrative, insurance and survey sources, which have contributed to improving health outcomes and health systems performance and governance; and may illegitimise efforts that have been made in some European countries to enable privacy-respectful data use for research and statistical purposes. If the amendments stand as written, the right to privacy is likely to override the right to health and healthcare in Europe. PMID:24310171

  11. International comparative study of systems for the government advancement of research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripke, M.; Foerst, R.

    1984-01-01

    The reorganization, structure and instruments of government advancement of research in three countries was compared: France, Sweden and the USA. In France the powers are centralized; in Sweden and the USA, decentralized. Assistance to projects is provided with grants and contracts in all three countries. France and Sweden also give loans with conditional waiving of reimbursement in case of failure. In all three countries indirect assistance is provided only with small tax breaks.

  12. 77 FR 36606 - Pipeline Safety: Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development Forum, Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... a Government/Industry Pipeline Research and Development (R&D) Forum. The R&D Forums are held.... DATES: The R&D Forum will be held July 18, 2012, from 8:00 a.m. until approximately 5:00 p.m. EDT and... your hotel reservation, please use the Room Block Name: ``DOT R&D Forum.'' There will be a room rate...

  13. Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches.

    PubMed

    Embi, Peter J; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

  14. Parent perspectives on privacy and governance for a pediatric repository of non-biological, research data.

    PubMed

    Manhas, Kiran P; Page, Stacey; Dodd, Shawn X; Letourneau, Nicole; Ambrose, Aleta; Cui, Xinjie; Tough, Suzanne C

    2015-02-01

    Research data repositories (RDRs) are data storage entities where data can be submitted, stored, and subsequently accessed for purposes beyond the original intent. There is little information relating to non-biological RDRs, nor considerations regarding pediatric data storage and re-use. We examined parent perspectives on pediatric, non-biological RDRs. Qualitative, descriptive methods including both interviews and focus groups were used. Purposive sampling of adult participants in two provincial birth cohorts yielded 19 interviewees and 18 focus group participants (4 groups). Transcripts were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Parent research participants strongly supported the sharing of their own, and their child's, non-biological research data. Four themes emerged: that altruism has limits, that participants have ongoing privacy concerns, that some participants need the assurance of congruent values between themselves and researchers/research questions, and that opinions diverge for some governance issues. The establishment of RDRs is important and maximizes participants', researchers', and funders' investments. Participants as data donors have concerns relating to privacy, relationships, and governance that must be considered in RDR development. PMID:25742670

  15. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). 

  16. Frederick National Lab and the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Award Fellowships for KRAS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) recently formed a partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) to award a one-year fellowship to two scientists whose research will help lead to new therapies for pancreatic cancer. The scientists will focus on KRAS, a gene in the RAS family that is mutated in 95 percent of pancreatic cancers, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI). 

  17. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  18. Government-industry-uUniversity and rResearch lLaboratories cCoordination for new product development: Session 2. Government research laboratory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1997-09-01

    This talk is the second in an expanded series of presentations on the Government-Industry-University and Research Laboratories Coordination for new product development, which is a timely and important public policy issue. Such interactions have become particularly timely in light of the present decline in funding for research and development (R&D) in the nation`s budget and in the private sector. These interactions, at least in principle, provide a means to maximize benefits for the greater good of the nation by pooling the diminishing resources. National laboratories, which traditionally interacted closely with the universities in educational training, now are able to also participate closely with industry in joint R&D thanks to a number of public laws legislated since the early 80s. A review of the experiences with such interactions at Argonne National Laboratory, which exemplifies the national laboratories, shows that, despite differences in their traditions and the missions, the national laboratory-industry-university triangle can work together.

  19. 22 CFR 63.6 - Assignment of United States Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. 63.6 Section 63.6... Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. An employee of the United States Government who has been assigned for service abroad to consult,...

  20. 22 CFR 63.6 - Assignment of United States Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. 63.6 Section 63.6... Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. An employee of the United States Government who has been assigned for service abroad to consult,...

  1. 22 CFR 63.6 - Assignment of United States Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. 63.6 Section 63.6... Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. An employee of the United States Government who has been assigned for service abroad to consult,...

  2. [Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Energy Diversification Research Lab.]. Business plan, 1996--1999

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The CANMET Energy Diversification Research Laboratory does applied research and development and technology transfer in energy efficiency and renewable energy. Emphasis is on such technologies as heat pumps, chemical reactors, heat transfer and storage, process analysis and integration, expert systems, and modelling tools. This report presents the Laboratory`s vision, mission, and mandate, and the strategic directions planned for the next few years. Issues being addressed and strategies are discussed, and objectives, tasks, due dates, name of responsible person, and success criteria are listed for the action plans under each strategic direction.

  3. Concentration, Chlorination, and Chemical Analysis of Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Health Effects Research: U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ‘Four Lab Study’, involved participation of scientists and engineers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from water industry and academia. The study evaluated tox...

  4. Concentration, Chlorination, and Chemical Analysis of Drinking Water for Disinfection Byproduct Mixtures Health Effects Research: U.S. EPA’s Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ‘Four Lab Study’, involved participation of scientists and engineers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from water industry and academia. The study evaluated tox...

  5. Campus: "Lab" and "Window" for Sustainable Design Research and Education--The DECOS Educational Network Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vezzoli, Carlo; Penin, Lara

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to diffuse the concept of a multi-lateral learning process as a means to promote experimental didactics and research (and the cross-fertilization between these two activities) in the field of design of sustainable product-service systems (PSSs) and to consider the university campus as the locus for the design,…

  6. METHODS DEVELOPMENT AT THE NEAR LAB ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH AREA (NLERA) LOCATED IN THE NEUSE RIVER BASIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task supports the Agency's efforts on developing a proper risk assessment tools to address Ecological and eventually Human exposures. The Agency needs to be able to identify, measure and estimate ecosystem exposure to multiple stressors. The research under this task suppor...

  7. Campus: "Lab" and "Window" for Sustainable Design Research and Education--The DECOS Educational Network Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vezzoli, Carlo; Penin, Lara

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to diffuse the concept of a multi-lateral learning process as a means to promote experimental didactics and research (and the cross-fertilization between these two activities) in the field of design of sustainable product-service systems (PSSs) and to consider the university campus as the locus for the design,…

  8. LabTrove: A Lightweight, Web Based, Laboratory “Blog” as a Route towards a Marked Up Record of Work in a Bioscience Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Milsted, Andrew J.; Hale, Jennifer R.; Frey, Jeremy G.; Neylon, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Background The electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) has the potential to replace the paper notebook with a marked-up digital record that can be searched and shared. However, it is a challenge to achieve these benefits without losing the usability and flexibility of traditional paper notebooks. We investigate a blog-based platform that addresses the issues associated with the development of a flexible system for recording scientific research. Methodology/Principal Findings We chose a blog-based approach with the journal characteristics of traditional notebooks in mind, recognizing the potential for linking together procedures, materials, samples, observations, data, and analysis reports. We implemented the LabTrove blog system as a server process written in PHP, using a MySQL database to persist posts and other research objects. We incorporated a metadata framework that is both extensible and flexible while promoting consistency and structure where appropriate. Our experience thus far is that LabTrove is capable of providing a successful electronic laboratory recording system. Conclusions/Significance LabTrove implements a one-item one-post system, which enables us to uniquely identify each element of the research record, such as data, samples, and protocols. This unique association between a post and a research element affords advantages for monitoring the use of materials and samples and for inspecting research processes. The combination of the one-item one-post system, consistent metadata, and full-text search provides us with a much more effective record than a paper notebook. The LabTrove approach provides a route towards reconciling the tensions and challenges that lie ahead in working towards the long-term goals for ELNs. LabTrove, an electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) system from the Smart Research Framework, based on a blog-type framework with full access control, facilitates the scientific experimental recording requirements for reproducibility, reuse, repurposing, and redeployment. PMID:23935832

  9. A versatile university-grade research lab in a high school setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randall; McBride, Carol

    2014-03-01

    Early experiences with physics at the advanced level of active research are feasible in a high school setting. A versatile and modular framework for supporting such experiences across a large school district is located in a free-standing building next to Gateway High School in Aurora, Colorado. Called the Innovation Hyperlab, this facility provides the technical infrastructure of 52 different technologies ranging from materials to electronics to optics to microtechnology. A modular curriculum supports learning ``on demand'' as projects proceed. Elements of this curriculum are also being integrated into mainstream daytime coursework for high school students, including regular physics courses and a new set of courses on biomedical instrumentation. An Innovation Academy provides a weekend venue for students to go beyond normal classwork and pursue active research and technical innovation mentored by teachers and university undergraduates.

  10. Research in Undergraduate Instruction: A Biotech Lab Project for Recombinant DNA Protein Expression in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockman, Mark; Ordman, Alfred B.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1996-06-01

    In the sophomore-level Molecular Biology and Biotechnology course at Beloit College, students learn basic methods in molecular biology in the context of pursuing a semester-long original research project. We are exploring how DNA sequence affects expression levels of proteins. A DNA fragment encoding all or part of the guanylate monokinase (gmk) sequence is cloned into pSP73 and expressed in E. coli. A monoclonal antibody is made to gmk. The expression level of gmk is determined by SDS gel elctrophoresis, a Western blot, and an ELISA assay. Over four years, an increase in enrollment in the course from 9 to 34 students, the 85% of majors pursuing advanced degrees, and course evaluations all support the conclusion that involving students in research during undergraduate courses encourages them to pursue careers in science.

  11. Special Spotlight: Increasing Diversity in Cancer Research: One Lab at a Time

    Cancer.gov

    When it comes to scientific research and guiding the careers of young investigators from underrepresented backgrounds, Dinah S. Singer, Ph.D., Director of NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology (DCB), believes that life’s limitations are only bound by one’s imagination. Being open to opportunity and never living too close to one’s comfort zone provides inspiration for her and how she approaches the many students and fellows with whom she interacts and mentors.

  12. From Banking to International Governance: Fostering Innovation in Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell banks are increasingly recognized as an essential resource of biological materials for both basic and translational stem cell research. By providing transnational access to quality controlled and ethically sourced stem cell lines, stem cell banks seek to foster international collaboration and innovation. However, given that national stem cell banks operate under different policy, regulatory and commercial frameworks, the transnational sharing of stem cell materials and data can be complicating. This paper will provide an overview of the most pressing challenges regarding the governance of stem cell banks, and the difficulties in designing regulatory and commercial frameworks that foster stem cell research. Moreover, the paper will shed light on the numerous international initiatives that have arisen to help harmonize and standardize stem cell banking and research processes to overcome such challenges. PMID:21904557

  13. Iconicity in the lab: a review of behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging research into sound-symbolism.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Gwilym; Dingemanse, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This review covers experimental approaches to sound-symbolism-from infants to adults, and from Sapir's foundational studies to twenty-first century product naming. It synthesizes recent behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging work into a systematic overview of the cross-modal correspondences that underpin iconic links between form and meaning. It also identifies open questions and opportunities, showing how the future course of experimental iconicity research can benefit from an integrated interdisciplinary perspective. Combining insights from psychology and neuroscience with evidence from natural languages provides us with opportunities for the experimental investigation of the role of sound-symbolism in language learning, language processing, and communication. The review finishes by describing how hypothesis-testing and model-building will help contribute to a cumulative science of sound-symbolism in human language. PMID:26379581

  14. Iconicity in the lab: a review of behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging research into sound-symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Gwilym; Dingemanse, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This review covers experimental approaches to sound-symbolism—from infants to adults, and from Sapir’s foundational studies to twenty-first century product naming. It synthesizes recent behavioral, developmental, and neuroimaging work into a systematic overview of the cross-modal correspondences that underpin iconic links between form and meaning. It also identifies open questions and opportunities, showing how the future course of experimental iconicity research can benefit from an integrated interdisciplinary perspective. Combining insights from psychology and neuroscience with evidence from natural languages provides us with opportunities for the experimental investigation of the role of sound-symbolism in language learning, language processing, and communication. The review finishes by describing how hypothesis-testing and model-building will help contribute to a cumulative science of sound-symbolism in human language. PMID:26379581

  15. Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

    1996-10-01

    Prosperity Games{trademark} are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games, Prosperity Games{trademark} are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education, and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions specific industries. All Prosperity Games{trademark} are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark} conducted under the sponsorship of the Industry Advisory Boards of the national labs, the national labs, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the University of California. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved including government, industry, labs, and academia. The primary objectives of this game were to: (1) explore ways to optimize the role of the multidisciplinary labs in serving national missions and needs; (2) explore ways to increase collaboration and partnerships among government, laboratories, universities, and industry; and (3) create a network of partnership champions to promote findings and policy options. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning the future of the labs.

  16. Science Update on the Hawaii Undersea Research Lab's Deep Submergence Operations in 2006 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Orange, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory (HURL), the NOAA Undersea Research Program (NURP) Center for Hawaii and the Western Pacific, is one of six regional NURP Centers specializing in providing scientists with the tools and expertise they need to investigate the undersea environment, including HOVs, ROVs, and other cutting edge technologies. Established at the University of Hawaii 26 years ago, HURL's mission is to study deep water marine processes in the Pacific Ocean through a competitive proposal and review process. The dual Pisces IV and Pisces V 2000-meter HOV, an RCV-150 900-meter ROV, and multibeam equipped support ship R/V Ka`imikai-o-Kanaloa (KoK) have been continuously upgraded and adapted to carry out cutting edge scientific expeditions. Following a successful far ranging five month program to the South Pacific in 2005, a complete overhaul for Pisces IV was carried out in the first half of 2006 with science dives in the main Hawaiian Islands taking place from August to December. Sixty Pisces dives are being performed for over 25 principal investigators and senior scientists in 10 projects. These projects include studies of deep-water benthic algae, the ecology of submarine canyons, paleo-sea level study, explosive volcanism on Loihi Seamount, drowned reefs off the northeastern coast of the Big Island of Hawaii, followed by several dive series with multiple biological, reef, and fisheries PIs working off Oahu, Molokai, Maui, and Lanai on bottomfish, artificial reef, precious coral, and invasive species assessments. Complete overhaul of Pisces V will be done in 2007, after which a fall program in the newly designated Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument is expected. Following that, preparations will begin in earnest for the FY 2008 expedition to the North Pacific. This expedition is anticipated to be six months in length and involve over 80 HOV dives. It will cover the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Emperor Seamounts, and the coasts of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California. It will be HURL's longest expedition surpassing the 2005 South Pacific Expedition by more than one month and a joint RFP will be advertised between NURP, Ocean Exploration, and Marine Sanctuaries.

  17. Undergraduate Biology Lab Courses: Comparing the Impact of Traditionally Based "Cookbook" and Authentic Research-Based Courses on Student Lab Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Kloser, Matthew J.; Fukami, Tadishi; Shavelson, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, several reports have recommended a shift in undergraduate biology laboratory courses from traditionally structured, often described as "cookbook," to authentic research-based experiences. This study compares a cookbook-type laboratory course to a research-based undergraduate biology laboratory course at a Research 1…

  18. Undergraduate Biology Lab Courses: Comparing the Impact of Traditionally Based "Cookbook" and Authentic Research-Based Courses on Student Lab Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownell, Sara E.; Kloser, Matthew J.; Fukami, Tadishi; Shavelson, Rich

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, several reports have recommended a shift in undergraduate biology laboratory courses from traditionally structured, often described as "cookbook," to authentic research-based experiences. This study compares a cookbook-type laboratory course to a research-based undergraduate biology laboratory course at a Research

  19. Rat maintenance in the Research Animal Holding Facility during the flight of Space Lab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, T.; Grindeland, R.; Kraft, L.; Ruder, M.; Vasques, M.

    1985-01-01

    To test the husbandry capabilities of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) during space flight, 24 male rats were flown on Spacelab 3 for 7 days. Twelve large rats (400 g, LF), 5 of which had telemetry devices implanted (IF), and 12 small rats (200 g, SF) were housed in the RAHF. Examination 3 hr after landing (R + 3) revealed the rats to be free of injury, well nourished, and stained with urine. At R + 10 the rats were lethargic and atonic with hyperemia of the extremities and well groomed except for a middorsal area stained with urine and food. Both LF and SF rats showed weight gains comparable to their IG controls; IF rats grew less than controls. Food and water consumption were similar for flight and control groups. Plasma concentrations of total protein, sodium, albumin and creatinine did not differ between flight and control groups. LF and SF rats had elevated plasma glucose, and SF rats had increased blood urea nitrogen, potassium and glutamic pyruvic transaminase. These observations indicate that rats maintained in the RAHF were healthy, well nourished and experienced minimal stress; physiological changes in the rats can thus be attributed to the effects of space flight.

  20. Underwater lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The University of Southern California's Catalina Marine Science Center (CMSC) has announced plans to build an underwater marine research laboratory near Santa Catalina Island off the California coast. The project, which will take 2 years to build, will be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The laboratory will be similar in concept to the U.S. Navy Sea Lab III, which was canceled some time ago.The project's purpose is to give divers access to a laboratory without having to surface. The project leader, Andrew Pilmanis, of the University of Southern California, stated recently (Industrial Research and Development, July 1983): “By the nature of the work, scientists require a lot of bottom time, and to do it by scuba isn't practical…. The only way to do that is with saturation diving. Once the diver is saturated with inert gas, whether the individual stays a few days or for months, only one decompression is required.” Divers will typically stay in the laboratory for 7-10 days. The laboratory will initially be placed at a depth of 20 m, later to be refloated and located at depths to 37 m.

  1. Public Engagement and the Governance of Gain-of-Function Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The White House recently called for a “robust and broad deliberative process” to assess the risks and benefits of select gain-of-function studies, pausing current experiments and further grants until new federal policy on research funding and oversight is developed. At issue is whether and under what conditions laboratory studies that enhance the transmissibility and/or virulence of potential pandemic pathogens such as the H5N1 avian influenza virus should go forward. To date, professionals from medicine, public health, and the life sciences have dominated the debate, and each side of the controversy has cited the public's well-being as the principal motivator for their position. A major stakeholder, the general public, has not yet actively and systematically weighed in on the matter. This commentary considers in what form and with what benefit public participation may materialize in the current debate regarding the governance of gain-of-function research. PMID:25813979

  2. The US government and global environmental change research: Ideas and agendas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-10

    As issues like global warming, ozone depletion, and deforestation -- collectively called ``global change`` -- rose to scientific prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, scientists began to imagine research programs so ambitious that the workings of the planet itself would be brought within reach of understanding and prediction. Global change posed the scientific challenge of understanding the earth as a fantastically complicated dynamic system, with each part -- climate, weather, atmosphere, oceans, the solid earth, plants and animals, human activities, and more -- potentially affecting each part. New Ideas and new technology held out hope that such a grand view might be possible; new problems, global warming chief among them made attempting it seem imperative, on both scientific and policy grounds. By the mid-1980s, ideas for global change research programs, several of them floated by agencies of the US government, had become well advanced. This report discusses the history to and formation of the committee on earth sciences. The charter is included.

  3. Preventing biological weapon development through the governance of life science research.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Gerald L

    2012-03-01

    The dual-use dilemma in the life sciences-that illicit applications draw on the same science and technology base as legitimate applications-makes it inherently difficult to control one without inhibiting the other. Since before the September 11 attacks, the science and security communities in the United States have struggled to develop governance processes that can simultaneously minimize the risk of misuse of the life sciences, promote their beneficial applications, and protect the public trust. What has become clear over that time is that while procedural steps can be specified for assessing and managing dual-use risks in the review of research proposals, oversight of ongoing research, and communication of research results, the actions or decisions to be taken at each of these steps to mitigate dual-use risk defy codification. Yet the stakes are too high to do nothing, or to be seen as doing nothing. The U.S. government should therefore adopt an oversight framework largely along the lines recommended by the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity almost 5 years ago-one that builds on existing processes, can gain buy-in from the scientific community, and can be implemented at modest cost (both direct and opportunity), while providing assurance that a considered and independent examination of dual-use risks is being applied. Without extraordinary visibility into the actions of those who would misuse biology, it may be impossible to know how well such an oversight system will actually succeed at mitigating misuse. But maintaining the public trust will require a system to be established in which reasonably foreseeable dual-use consequences of life science research are anticipated, evaluated, and addressed. PMID:22455676

  4. National Labs, at your service

    SciTech Connect

    Brody, H.

    1985-07-01

    While nuclear weapons still constitute much of their work, these labs are increasingly being enlisted to fight civilian battles. During the '70s the enemies were pollution and the energy shortage. The latest crusade: moving lab technology into the private sector to help restore the country's industrial competitiveness. The battle is being waged on several fronts. Patent policies, commonly cited as a major hindrance to commercialization of government technology, are loosening up. The labs now welcome private sponsorship for proprietary product development. A new exchange program lets companies send their technical people to work shoulder to shoulder with their colleagues at national labs, while the government picks up much of the tab. The labs are also being enlisted to apply their resources to aid struggling basic industries, like steel. And, in a curious reversal of conventional practice, small companies in joint-venture arrangements now seek the aid of the big government lab. The partnership pays the lob for use of its staff during regular, hours and hires lab scientists as consultants after hours.

  5. Government-promoted collective research and development in Japan: Analyses of the organization through case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hane, G.J.

    1990-06-01

    A study was commissioned by the Energy Conservation and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to better understand the strategies used for cooperative and joint-venture research and development (R D) overseas. The study evaluates the organization and management of several different types of cooperative R D programs in Japan that are sponsored under the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) Program, Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) Program, and the Key Technology Center (KTC) Program. The ERATO Program grew out of a concern over revising the government's approach to supporting research and technology development. The program was initiated to address what was regarded as a lack of creativity in areas at the forefront of science. The program recruits young researchers and allows them flexibility to explore multi-disciplinary areas at the forefront of science. It has been organized to allow for individual creativity but at the same time to benefit from the combined knowledge of an assembly of researchers. Because the plan is such a radical departure from conventional Japanese philosophy, it has met with certain bureaucratic obstacles. Visits to four ERATO projects are described. The third program, the KTC Program, focuses on getting private firms to venture into risky areas of advanced technology to pave the way for future industries. Its goal is to encourage a shift of resources in the private sector toward areas that are considered essential for the competitive development of future industries. The principal philosophy behind the KTC is that the private sector is in the best position to identify promising technical challenges and to weigh their commercial potential against research uncertainties. Three KTC research joint ventures are briefly described. 13 refs., 9 figs., 35 tabs.

  6. Federal Government Funding of Research in Universities in Nigeria, the University of Benin as a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osagie, Roseline O.

    2012-01-01

    It is increasingly evident that research is extremely critical and important if universities are to serve as engines of development in their areas of locations. For a knowledge-driven world, investment in research and development (R&D) is a sine qua non for a nation. Few studies have examined the federal government's investment in research in…

  7. 22 CFR 63.6 - Assignment of United States Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. 63.6 Section 63.6... Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. An..., teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills, may be entitled to any or all of the...

  8. 22 CFR 63.6 - Assignment of United States Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. 63.6 Section 63.6... Government employees to consult, lecture, teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills. An..., teach, engage in research, or demonstrate special skills, may be entitled to any or all of the...

  9. Computer Lab

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS geologists Peter Triezenberg and William Danforth sit with WHOI/LDEO Computer Technician Tom Bolmer in the Healy computer lab. This was during a scientific expedition to map the Arctic seafloor....

  10. Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program, a government-industry research partnership

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The 21st Century Truck Program has been established as a government-industry research partnership to support the development and implementation of commercially viable technologies that will dramatically cut fuel use and emissions of commercial trucks and buses while enhancing their safety and affordability as well as maintaining or enhancing performance. The innovations resulting from this program will reduce dependence on foreign oil, improve our nation's air quality, provide advanced technology for military vehicles, and enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. truck and bus industry while ensuring safe and affordable freight and bus transportation for the nation's economy. This Technology Roadmap for the 21st Century Truck Program has been prepared to guide the development of the technical advancements that will enable the needed improvements in commercial truck fuel economy, emissions, and safety.

  11. Government regulation of subsidence due to underground coal mining and its impact on future subsidence research

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.; Peng, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    In this work the authors describe government regulation of subsidence and its impact on future research. They describe litigation surrounding the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, signed in 1977 and promulgated in 1979. The regulations developed included a subsidence control plan, provisions for establishing performance standards for subsidence control, and prohibition of mining under various conditions. In 1980 the courts ruled against industry challenges and again, after a second appeal, upheld the subsidence regulation. These regulations consists of two parts: a control plan and substantive provisions establishing performance standards. The authors conclude that to satisfy the requirements for mine planning and permit application, a subsidence prediction technology which is accurate enough to determine the location, magnitude, and time of various components of ground movement for damage correlation would have to be available.

  12. Decommissioning of German Nuclear Research Facilities under the Governance of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research

    SciTech Connect

    Weigl, M.

    2008-07-01

    Since the announcement of the first nuclear program in 1956, nuclear R and D in Germany has been supported by the Federal Government under four nuclear programs and later on under more general energy R and D programs. The original goal was to help German industry to achieve safe, low-cost generation of energy and self-sufficiency in the various branches of nuclear technology, including the fast breeder reactor and the fuel cycle. Several national research centers were established to host or operate experimental and demonstration plants. These are mainly located at the sites of the national research centers at Juelich and Karlsruhe. In the meantime, all these facilities were shut down and most of them are now in a state of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D). Meanwhile, Germany is one of the leading countries in the world in the field of D and D. Two big demonstration plants, the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant (KKN) a heavy-water cooled pressure tube reactor with carbon-dioxide cooling and the Karlstein Superheated Steam Reactor (HDR) a boiling light water reactor with a thermal power of 100 MW, are totally dismantled and 'green field' is reached. For two other projects the return to 'green field' sites will be reached by the end of this decade. These are the dismantling of the Multi-Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) and the Compact Sodium Cooled Reactor (KNK) both located at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Within these projects a lot of new solutions und innovative techniques were tested, which were developed at German universities and in small and medium sized companies mostly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). For example, high performance underwater cutting technologies like plasma arc cutting and contact arc metal cutting. (authors)

  13. Decommissioning of German Research Reactors Under the Governance of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research - 12154

    SciTech Connect

    Weigl, M.

    2012-07-01

    Since 1956, nuclear research and development (R and D) in Germany has been supported by the Federal Government. The goal was to help German industry to become competitive in all fields of nuclear technology. National research centers were established and demonstration plants were built. In the meantime, all these facilities were shut down and are now in a state of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D). Meanwhile, Germany is one of the leading countries in the world in the field of D and D. Two big demonstration plants, the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant (KKN) a heavy-water cooled pressure tube reactor with carbon-dioxide cooling and the Karlstein Superheated Steam Reactor (HDR) a boiling light water reactor with a thermal power of 100 MW, are totally dismantled and 'green field' is reached. Another big project was finished in 2008. The Forschungs-Reaktor Juelich 1 (FRJ1), a research reactor with a thermal power of 10 MW was completely dismantled and in September 2008 an oak tree was planted on a green field at the site, where the FRJ1 was standing before. This is another example for German success in the field of D and D. Within these projects a lot of new solutions and innovative techniques were tested, which were developed at German universities and in small and medium sized companies mostly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Some examples are underwater-cutting technologies like plasma arc cutting and contact arc metal cutting. This clearly shows that research on the field of D and D is important for the future. Moreover, these research activities are important to save the know-how in nuclear engineering in Germany and will enable enterprises to compete on the increasing market of D and D services. The author assumes that an efficient decommissioning of nuclear installations will help stabilize the credibility of nuclear energy. Some critics of nuclear energy are insisting that a return to 'green field sites' is not possible. The successful completion of two big D and D projects (HDR and KKN), which reached green field conditions, are showing quite the contrary. Moreover, research on D and D technologies offers the possibility to educate students on a field of nuclear technology, which will be very important in the future. In these days D and D companies are seeking for a lot of young engineers and this will not change in the coming years. (authors)

  14. Research and Teaching: Statistics across the Curriculum Using an Iterative, Interactive Approach in an Inquiry-Based Lab Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remsburg, Alysa J.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    How can science instructors prepare students for the statistics needed in authentic inquiry labs? We designed and assessed four instructional modules with the goals of increasing student confidence, appreciation, and performance in both experimental design and data analysis. Using extensions from a just-in-time teaching approach, we introduced…

  15. Research and Teaching: Statistics across the Curriculum Using an Iterative, Interactive Approach in an Inquiry-Based Lab Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remsburg, Alysa J.; Harris, Michelle A.; Batzli, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    How can science instructors prepare students for the statistics needed in authentic inquiry labs? We designed and assessed four instructional modules with the goals of increasing student confidence, appreciation, and performance in both experimental design and data analysis. Using extensions from a just-in-time teaching approach, we introduced…

  16. Meeting in San Francisco: Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Results from the Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study involves the collaboration of the four national laboratories of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as other scientists from universities and water utilities, and is termed the ‘Four Lab Study’. The purpose of this study is to address concerns rela...

  17. Meeting in San Francisco: Integrated Disinfection By-Products Mixtures Research: Results from the Four Lab Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study involves the collaboration of the four national laboratories of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as other scientists from universities and water utilities, and is termed the ‘Four Lab Study’. The purpose of this study is to address concerns rela...

  18. Employing Earned Value Management in Government Research and Design - Lessons Learned from the Trenches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Tom

    2009-01-01

    To effectively manage a project, the project manager must have a plan, understand the current conditions, and be able to take action to correct the course when challenges arise. Research and design projects face technical, schedule, and budget challenges that make it difficult to utilize project management tools developed for projects based on previously demonstrated technologies. Projects developing new technologies by their inherent nature are trying something new and thus have little to no data to support estimates for schedule and cost, let alone the technical outcome. Projects with a vision for the outcome but little confidence in the exact tasks to accomplish in order to achieve the vision incur cost and schedule penalties when conceptual solutions require unexpected iterations or even a reinvention of the plan. This presentation will share the project management methodology and tools developed through trial and error for a NASA research and design project combining industry, academia, and NASA inhouse work in which Earned Value Management principles were employed but adapted for the reality of the government financial system and the reality of challenging technology development. The priorities of the presented methodology are flexibility, accountability, and simplicity to give the manager tools to help deliver to the customer while not using up valuable time and resources on extensive planning and analysis. This presentation will share the methodology, tools, and work through failed and successful examples from the three years of process evolution.

  19. School Processes, Local Governance and Community Participation: Understanding Access. Create Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Mairead; Akyeampong, Kwame; Humphreys, Sara

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to provide an overview of the research that has explored aspects of access that surround formal state schooling. The specific focus of this review concerns research on the relations within and between schools, communities and local governance institutions and their combined influence on access within local contexts.…

  20. University-Government Partnerships and High Risk Research: The Last Stronghold for New Thinking About Coping with Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easterling, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    The repurposing of Bell Laboratories by new owner Lucent Technologies to become a mission-focused applied research facility effectively terminated fundamental, high-risk research everywhere but in research universities. The now almost ten year old NAS study that produced the watershed report Rising Above the Gathering Storm warned that the US research establishment encompassing industry, government, academia and nongovernment organizations has lost its way in promoting fundamental high-risk research of the kind that has historically led to the transformational scientific breakthroughs that radically changed and improved our quality of life for more than a century. Low-risk, incremental research dominates industry and most government funding agendas, including NSF (and including NSF's "transformational research" agenda!). Unprecedented challenges such as understanding and dealing with the consequences of climate change will require fundamental new ideas and technologies that do not exist. Adapting future ecosystems and human systems to climate variability and change needs new social models of cooperation, new biotechnologies and new environmental mangement strategies that do not now exist. A case can be made that history provides no strong templates for such a future. I argue that research universities, working in close partnerships with government, provides a fertile seedbed for the kinds of scientific knowledge and thinking that could produce "game changing" strategies for dealing with climate change. Government has the resources and the ability to convert and scale new ideas into usable knowledge, research universities have the ingenuity and disciplinary spectra to think up new ideas and test them for proof of concept. Co-locating a government presence within a research university has the potential to integrate a research enterprise that is not afraid to fail a few times before potentially hitting paydirt with an institution that can accelerate the translation of fundamental scientific breakthroughs into new usable information. Examples of how this has worked in other scientific settings will be presented to show the potential of this type of collaboration for dealing with climate change.

  1. Impact of Corporate Governance on Research and Development Investment in the Pharmaceutical Industry in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of the corporate governance of pharmaceutical companies on research and development (R&D) investment. Methods The period of the empirical analysis is from 2000 to 2012. Financial statements and comments in general, and internal transactions were extracted from TS-2000 of the Korea Listed Company Association. Sample firms were those that belong to the medical substance and drug manufacturing industries. Ultimately, 786 firm-year data of 81 firms were included in the sample (unbalanced panel data). Results The shareholding ratio of major shareholders and foreigners turned out to have a statistically significant influence on R&D investment (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found in the shareholding ratio of institutional investors and the ratio of outside directors. Conclusion The higher the shareholding ratio of the major shareholders, the greater the R&D investment. There will be a need to establish (or switch to) a holding company structure. Holding companies can directly manage R&D in fields with high initial risks, and they can diversify these risks. The larger the number of foreign investors, the greater the R&D investment, indicating that foreigners directly or indirectly impose pressure on a manager to make R&D investments that bring long-term benefits. PMID:26473092

  2. Mining industry and US government cooperative research: Lessons learned and benefits to mining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W.; Phillips, W.S.; Martin, R.; Anderson, D.P.

    1997-09-01

    Since 1994, various mines in the US have cooperated with research scientists at the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories to address issues related to verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The CTBT requires that no country may conduct any nuclear explosion in the future. While the CTBT is a significant step toward reducing the global nuclear danger, verifying compliance with the treat requires that the monitoring system be able to detect, locate and identify much larger numbers of smaller amplitude seismic events than had been required previously. Large mining blasts conducted world-wide will be of sufficient amplitude to trigger the monitoring system at the lower threshold. It is therefore imperative that research into the range various blasting practices employed, the relationship of yield to seismic magnitude, and identification of anomalous blasting results be performed. This paper will describe a suite of experiments funded by the Department of Energy and conducted by the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in cooperation with the US mining industry. Observations of cast blasting, underground long wall generated coal bumps, stoping, and explosively induced collapse of room and pillar panels will be presented. Results of these dual use experiments which are of interest to the mining community will be discussed. These include (1) variation of amplitude of seismic energy at various azimuths from cast blasts, (2) identification of the extent of back failure following explosive removal of pillars, and (3) the use of single fired shots for calibration of the monitoring system. The wealth of information and discovery described in this paper is a direct result of mutual cooperation between the US Government and the US Mining Industry.

  3. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  4. Materials Lab Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The photo shows one of the waveguide setups in the Electromaganetic Properties Measurements Lab (EPML). This setup is for measuring permittivity and permeability of the materials at the L-band frequencies (1.12-1.7 ghz). The EMPL is in the Elecromagnetics Research Branch at NASA Langley.

  5. In the National Interest: The Federal Government and Research-Intensive Universities. A Report from the Ad Hoc Working Group on Research-Intensive Universities and the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology, Washington, DC.

    This report looks at the relationship between the federal government and research intensive universities (RIUs), identifies critical trends and issues that are affecting their relationship, and offers principles and recommendations for the future. Following an introduction, the origins and characteristics of the relations between the federal…

  6. The New Zealand framework for government and private sector research, and its operation with respect to the upstream petroleum industry

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    The New Zealand government has replaced its science bureaucracy with ten Crown Research Institutes, which are structured as government-owned limited-liability companies. Government research funding is allocated by a Foundation, while a small Ministry has been retained to deal exclusively with science policy. As a Crown Research Institute, the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences gains approximately 70% of its revenues from contracts with the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, and the remainder from a wide range of consultancy services to several industries. Petroleum exploration and development is a particular focus, and applied research and consultancy activities in basin analysis, source rock and reservoir systems, thermal modelling etc. are underpinned by research programmes in related fundamental areas such as paleontology and deep crustal structure. Situated on an active plate boundary with a complex configuration and history of development, New Zealand serves as a natural laboratory in which to develop and test models of deformation and depositional systems. The Institute`s private-sector research funding, in many cases in collaboration with international partners, addresses such topics as Quaternary sequence stratigraphy, deep-water depositional systems, basin thermal modelling and charge prediction (including distribution of inert gases). The results of this research are applicable world-wide. Insights from active tectonic and depositional processes in New Zealand improve the effectiveness of exploration and development in older or less understood basins which have developed in complex subduction and strike-slip tectonic settings.

  7. Geodetic positioning of the Aerospace Electronics Research Lab (ERL) Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) using the GPS NAVSTAR Block I satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Anthony S.

    1990-01-01

    Aerospace has routinely processed the Osborne Time Transfer Receiver (TTR) data for the purpose of monitoring the performance of ground and GPS atomic clocks in near real-time with on-line residual displays and characterizing clock stability with Allan Variance calculations. Recently, Aerospace added the ability to estimate the TTR's location by differentially correcting the TTR's location in the WGS84 reference system. This new feature is exercised on a set of TTR clock phase data and Sub-meter accurate station location estimates of the TTR at the Aerospace Electronic Research Lab (ERL) are obtained.

  8. The research and implementation of a unified identity authentication in e-government network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhou

    Current problem existing in e-government network is that the applications of information system are developed independently by various departments, and each has its own specific set of authentication and access control mechanism. To build a comprehensive information system in favor of sharing and exchanging information, a sound and secure unified e-government authentication system is firstly needed. The paper, combining with practical development of e-government network, carries out a thorough discussion on how to achieve data synchronization between unified authentication system and related application systems.

  9. Organizational Governance and the Production of Academic Quality: Lessons from Two Top U.S. Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoenig, Jean-Claude; Paradeise, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Does organizational governance contribute to academic quality? Two top research universities are observed in-depth: Berkeley and the MIT. Three key factors are listed that help generate consistent and lasting high performance. Priority is allocated to self-evaluation and to the development of talent. Values and norms such as community membership,…

  10. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND... Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). ACTION: Notice; request for.... Jones, Assistant Director--Chemical and Biological Countermeasures, Office of ] Science and...

  11. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 197 - Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes E Appendix E to Part 197 National Defense Department of... THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. E Appendix E to Part...

  12. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 197 - Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes E Appendix E to Part 197 National Defense Department of... THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. E Appendix E to Part...

  13. Organizational Governance and the Production of Academic Quality: Lessons from Two Top U.S. Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoenig, Jean-Claude; Paradeise, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Does organizational governance contribute to academic quality? Two top research universities are observed in-depth: Berkeley and the MIT. Three key factors are listed that help generate consistent and lasting high performance. Priority is allocated to self-evaluation and to the development of talent. Values and norms such as community membership,…

  14. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 197 - Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Form Letter-Conditions Governing Access to Official Records for Historical Research Purposes E Appendix E to Part 197 National Defense Department of... THE FILES OF THE OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (OSD) Pt. 197, App. E Appendix E to Part...

  15. Sponsored research agreements, university and government licensing, and clinical trial agreements: special contractual and intellectual property rights considerations.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jeffrey P

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses contractual and intellectual property considerations that frequently arise in the drafting and negotiation of sponsored research agreements ("SRAs"), license agreements with universities (and other non-profit organizations) and the federal government, and clinical trial agreements. Each of these subjects is addressed separately, but most of the article is devoted to sponsored research, which is the driver for much of the innovation in the medical and life sciences industries. PMID:15072054

  16. Alternatives to Traditional Labs: a Discovery Lab Based on Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liff, Mark I.

    2006-12-01

    In search for alternatives to traditional labs, it is worthwhile to turn to the creativity research. Analogy is believed by many to be at the heart of creativity. A discovery lab that requires use of analogy had been developed. A basis of the lab is a re-discovery of Gough-Joule effect of contraction of stretched rubber upon heating. The difficulties of designing an analogybased lab are discussed. The students' reaction to the unusual lab is analyzed. The data suggest that the students need to be provided with the base for analogy use. They also need to be given directions for the search of solution by changing and modification of analogies, and weeding out the misleading ones and selectively retaining productive analogies. This study shows that thought processes of divergent nature--commonly accessible only to experts--can be employed under the discussed conditions by novices as well.

  17. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab…

  18. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators. PMID:25464784

  19. [Research on the range of motion measurement system for spine based on LabVIEW image processing technology].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofang; Deng, Linhong; Lu, Hu; He, Bin

    2014-08-01

    A measurement system based on the image processing technology and developed by LabVIEW was designed to quickly obtain the range of motion (ROM) of spine. NI-Vision module was used to pre-process the original images and calculate the angles of marked needles in order to get ROM data. Six human cadaveric thoracic spine segments T7-T10 were selected to carry out 6 kinds of loads, including left/right lateral bending, flexion, extension, cis/counterclockwise torsion. The system was used to measure the ROM of segment T8-T9 under the loads from 1 Nm to 5 Nm. The experimental results showed that the system is able to measure the ROM of the spine accurately and quickly, which provides a simple and reliable tool for spine biomechanics investigators. PMID:25508415

  20. New Research on the Relationships between Philadelphians' Educational Attainment and Their Employment, Earnings and Contributions to Government and Society. Research Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Youth Network, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Three recently-released research reports commissioned through Project U-Turn and funded by the William Penn Foundation and the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry offer analyses that shed new light on the relationships between Philadelphians' educational attainment and their earnings, employment and contributions to government and…

  1. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 29: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R and D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the U.S. government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace research and development in a conceptual framework of the federal government as a producer of scientific and technical information. The article summarizes current literature and research and discusses U.S. government technical report use and the importance of using data obtained from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. The authors make a case for changing existing U.S. technology policy and present a research agenda for the U.S. government technical report.

  2. 76 FR 64237 - Access by Historical Researchers and Certain Former Government Personnel; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph W. Lambert, (703) 613-1379. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY... AGENCY: Central Intelligence Agency. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: On September 23, 2011,...

  3. Evaluation in the Context of the Government Market Place: Implications for the Evaluation of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della-Piana, Connie Kubo; Della-Piana, Gabriel M.

    2007-01-01

    While the current debate in the evaluation community has concentrated on examining and explicating implications of the choice of methods for evaluating federal programs, the authors of this paper address the challenges faced by the government in the selection of funding mechanisms for supporting program evaluation efforts. The choice of funding…

  4. Information on Child Abuse: A Selected Bibliography of Federal Government Publications. Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Timothy

    The overall topic of this annotated bibliography, directed to users of the Auburn University libraries, is child abuse. It contains 63 federal government publications in 4 major areas: (1) definitions and prevalence of child abuse, including child pornography and pedophilia, family violence, abductions, and emotional abuse; (2) recent legislation,…

  5. Putting teachers-to-be in the field and the lab: Hands-on research at the American Museum of Natural History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, P. A.; Ebel, D. S.; Harlow, G. E.; Landman, N. H.; Pagnotta, A.; Sessa, J.; Shara, M.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Webster, J. D.; Blair, D.; Shumer, M.

    2013-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) is halfway through a pilot program designed to prepare Earth Science teachers for grades 7-12 in high-needs schools in New York. The program was implemented to address a critical shortage of qualified Earth Science teachers throughout the state as well as to reach student populations that traditionally have limited science exposure and hands-on learning opportunities. This Master of Arts in Teaching is unique amongst teacher preparation programs, not only in that it is housed at a world-class research museum and places the teacher candidates in a year-long teaching residency, but also in that it accepts only students with a strong background in Earth Science via a degree in geology, meteorology, oceanography, astronomy, or a related discipline. Following a year of graduate courses in science and pedagogy, as well as teaching residencies, and only months before embarking on teaching career, candidates begin a seven-week science practicum. This exercise combines field and lab work under the tutelage of AMNH science curators and postdoctoral research fellows to provide experience with the scientific process, from field work and data collection to interpretation and public presentation of results. In the science practicum, teaching candidates begin by selecting one of four topics on which to focus their research: astrophysics, experimental petrology, mineralogy, or paleontology. An introduction to lab materials, techniques, and instrumentation is followed by two weeks in the field, both upstate and in New York City, where rocks of all types are encountered and discussed. Nights are devoted to astronomical observing and data collection to supplement the geology-oriented daytime sessions. Following the trips, candidates are back at AMNH analyzing data and samples in preparation for a short, scientific-style manuscript and presentation of results in an AGU-style talk. Three research groups have already discovered potentially publishable results from candidate-oriented lab work. Here we report on the practicum experiences of the first cohort of teacher candidates. Teacher preparation programs such as this will be increasingly valuable in coming years as a result of the recently released national Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). These new standards shift emphasis from students memorizing scientific content to understanding the practice of science. While NGSS have not yet been adopted in New York State, they likely will be in the near future, making this program at AMNH highly relevant to the current state of science education in the United States.

  6. Lab-Corps: Creating Market Pathways for Laboratory Research; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    The Lab-Corps program is a specialized training curriculum aimed at accelerating the transfer of clean energy technologies from national laboratories into the commercial marketplace. Administered by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE's) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Lab-Corps is a new model of engagement as a part of the Lab Impact Initiative. In addition to Lab-Corps, the Lab Impact Initiative utilizes the Small Business Voucher and Technologist-in-Residence programs to increase and enhance laboratory-private sector relationships, streamline access to national laboratory capabilities, and demonstrate the value of laboratory-developed science and technology.

  7. Models and Mechanisms for Evaluating Government-Funded Research: An International Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coryn, Chris L. S.; Hattie, John A.; Scriven, Michael; Hartmann, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This research describes, classifies, and comparatively evaluates national models and mechanisms used to evaluate research and allocate research funding in 16 countries. Although these models and mechanisms vary widely in terms of how research is evaluated and financed, nearly all share the common characteristic of relating funding to some measure…

  8. Research on the implementation mechanism of spatial data services in land resources e-government platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Hongchao; Ye, Wei; Chen, Zhijian; Ling, Haifeng; Chen, Genhan

    2006-10-01

    The integration of OA, business examining and approving procedure and spatial data operations has been a long-term difficulty for the various land resources management information systems which are developed based on the single computer mode or C/S mode. This article proposes a method of developing a land resources e-government system based on the concept of platform development, emphatically discusses, under the support of the land resources e-government platform, the implementation mechanism of spatial data services during the business examining and approving procedure based on B/S structure, and then test the feasibility by taking the prejudication procedure of the construction land in the land resources plan of Dongguan as an example.

  9. Internet Research, Uncensored

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a computer program called Psiphon which bypasses government filters undetected. The University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, a research center for digital media and politics, designed Psiphon for technology-savvy activists. Some technology-savvy activists use other open-source software, like Tor (which relies on…

  10. Internet Research, Uncensored

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Sam

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses a computer program called Psiphon which bypasses government filters undetected. The University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, a research center for digital media and politics, designed Psiphon for technology-savvy activists. Some technology-savvy activists use other open-source software, like Tor (which relies on…

  11. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  12. Teaching and Learning Coastal Processes through Research in a Non-Lab Science Course and Having Fun at the Same Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, J.

    2014-12-01

    At Nassau Community College students are required to take one lab science and one non-lab science. These two science courses will probably be the only sciences courses they'll take in their college career. What are they looking for in a science course? "Is it easy?" "Will we have fun?" I can try for "fun" but "easy" and "science" seem to be oxymorons. I've found that they don't notice the difficulty when they're having fun. With this is mind I set out to create a course that would fulfill this requirement but also challenge them to learn science through hands-on, real-life, placed based activities and projects. Beaches and Coasts is essentially a coastal processes course that requires a full term research project along with other hands-on activities. We live on an island (Long Island, NY). The state of our shoreline impacts all of us - something we saw during Superstorm Sandy. Long Island's shorelines vary tremendously. Our north shore is glacially controlled and irregular with many harbors and bays; our south shore is an Atlantic Ocean coastline with many barrier islands and lagoons that contain many inlets and marshes. Many municipalities have small natural beaches along this coastline. For their project students choose a shoreline, with input from the instructor, and take "ownership" of it for at least one moon cycle. They collect data on tides, currents, waves, offshore sediment transport and anthropogenic structures and then study the impact of these factors on their section of shoreline. They also collect sediment from their beach to analyze later in the lab. They are given a rubric with the specific requirements and then make a PowerPoint presentation that includes all their data, charts and graphs as well as their photos that they took while doing their research. Students love doing this project. They can't believe they get credits for going to the beach - something they do anyway (the "fun" factor). They all say that they'll never go to the beach the same way again. They take their family and friends taking pleasure in teaching them what they're learning. This course has become so popular that several sections of it run each term and is offered for all three summer sessions and our winterim session (during January break) each section filling almost immediately. At present an online version of this course is being developed.

  13. The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Annual reports for 1997, 1998, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-31

    The Roundtable was created in 1984 to provide a unique forum for dialog among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas regarding issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. These annual reports begin by describing the purpose, structure, and mode of operation of the Roundtable. There follow sections devoted to the council activities, major projects, and follow-up planning, and the activities of the Roundtable working groups. Meeting agendas and publications lists are also included.

  14. Decisions Shape a Lab (Lab Notes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Bernajean

    1992-01-01

    Offers questions to guide both initial and ongoing development of a computer writing lab. Discusses ways mobile workstations (consisting of a computer, printer, overhead, and a LCD projection unit) will extend the writing lab. (SR)

  15. Lab Extraordinaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Julie Ann; Fox, Jeffrey L.

    1983-01-01

    Highlights activities and scientific accomplishments at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. Includes comments by staff scientists about their current research endeavors. (JN)

  16. Giving raw data a chance to talk: a demonstration of exploratory visual analytics with a pediatric research database using Microsoft Live Labs Pivot to promote cohort discovery, research, and quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Nagisetty, Naga Satya V Rao

    2014-01-01

    Secondary use of large and open data sets provides researchers with an opportunity to address high-impact questions that would otherwise be prohibitively expensive and time consuming to study. Despite the availability of data, generating hypotheses from huge data sets is often challenging, and the lack of complex analysis of data might lead to weak hypotheses. To overcome these issues and to assist researchers in building hypotheses from raw data, we are working on a visual and analytical platform called PRD Pivot. PRD Pivot is a de-identified pediatric research database designed to make secondary use of rich data sources, such as the electronic health record (EHR). The development of visual analytics using Microsoft Live Labs Pivot makes the process of data elaboration, information gathering, knowledge generation, and complex information exploration transparent to tool users and provides researchers with the ability to sort and filter by various criteria, which can lead to strong, novel hypotheses. PMID:24808811

  17. Lab Coats or Trench Coats? Detective Sleuthing as an Alternative to Scientifically Based Research in Indigenous Educational Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaomea, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Amidst late 19th-century efforts to emphasize modern medicine's transition to a more scientific approach, physicians seeking to represent themselves as scientists began wearing white laboratory coats. Today educational researchers are likewise urged to don metaphorical white coats as scientifically based research is held up as the cure-all…

  18. Lab Coats or Trench Coats? Detective Sleuthing as an Alternative to Scientifically Based Research in Indigenous Educational Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaomea, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Amidst late 19th-century efforts to emphasize modern medicine's transition to a more scientific approach, physicians seeking to represent themselves as scientists began wearing white laboratory coats. Today educational researchers are likewise urged to don metaphorical white coats as scientifically based research is held up as the cure-all…

  19. EERA: A Participant or an Agent in European Research Policy? A Governance Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin to frame a discussion of the educational research space that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) has been given and aims to take. The educational space is not merely a geographical phenomenon, but rather refers to the networks, flows and scapes that form the foundation for the construction of…

  20. EERA: A Participant or an Agent in European Research Policy? A Governance Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin to frame a discussion of the educational research space that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) has been given and aims to take. The educational space is not merely a geographical phenomenon, but rather refers to the networks, flows and scapes that form the foundation for the construction of…

  1. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  2. Analyzing the contributions of a government-commissioned research project: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It often remains unclear to investigators how their research contributes to the work of the commissioner. We initiated the ‘Risk Model’ case study to gain insight into how a Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) project and its knowledge products contribute to the commissioner’s work, the commissioner being the Health Care Inspectorate. We aimed to identify the alignment efforts that influenced the research project contributions. Based on the literature, we expected interaction between investigators and key users to be the most determining factor for the contributions of a research project. Methods In this qualitative case study, we analyzed the alignment efforts and contributions in the Risk Model project by means of document analysis and interviews according to the evaluation method Contribution Mapping. Furthermore, a map of the research process was drafted and a feedback session was organized. After the feedback session with stakeholders discussing the findings, we completed the case study report. Results Both organizations had divergent views on the ownership of the research product and the relationship between RIVM and the Inspectorate, which resulted in different expectations. The RIVM considered the use of the risk models to be problematic, but the inspectors had a positive opinion about its contributions. Investigators, inspectors, and managers were not aware of these remarkably different perceptions. In this research project, we identified six relevant categories of both horizontal alignment efforts (between investigators and key users) as well as vertical alignment efforts (within own organization) that influenced the contributions to the Inspectorate’s work. Conclusions Relevant alignment efforts influencing the contributions of the project became manifest at three levels: the first level directly relates to the project, the second to the organizational environment, and the third to the formal and historical relationship between the organizations. Both external and internal alignments influence the contributions of a research project. Based on the findings, we recommend that research institutes invest in a reflective attitude towards the social aspects of research projects at all levels of the organization and develop alignment strategies to enhance the contributions of research. PMID:24498894

  3. Governing biological material at the intersection of care and research: the use of dried blood spots for biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Conor M.W.; van El, Carla G.; Faulkner, Alex; Cornel, Martina C.

    2012-01-01

    A series of governance issues currently surrounds the multiple uses and multiple users of dried blood spots (DBS) for research purposes. Internationally there is a discussion on storing DBS resulting from newborn screening for public health and using them as the basis for large biobank-like collections to facilitate biomedical research. If such a transformation were to be formalized, then DBS would sit at the intersection of care (ie, public health) and research, with the mechanisms through which such a collection could be managed not totally self-evident. What is more, a DBS collection raises questions about the fuzzy boundaries between privacy and anonymity; how to control or define quality control uses of DBS; medical vs nonmedical uses; as well as benefit sharing and stakeholder involvement. Our goal here is to explore some of the key questions relating to DBS governance by way of the bio-objects and bio-objectification concepts. By embracing – rather than resisting to – the blurring of boundaries and problems in categorization that have come to characterize bio-objects and bio-objectification processes recently described in this journal, we attempt to highlight some issues that might not be currently considered, and to point to some possible directions to go (or avoid). Building from our knowledge of the current DBS situation in the Netherlands, we outline questions concerning the uses, management, collection, and storage of DBS. PMID:22911534

  4. Review: a narrative review of the published ethical debates in palliative care research and an assessment of their adequacy to inform research governance.

    PubMed

    Duke, Sue; Bennett, Helen

    2010-03-01

    The quality of research, and the resulting quality of evidence available to guide palliative care, is dependent on the ethical decisions underpinning its design, conduct and report. Whilst much has been published debating the ethics of palliative care research, an assessment of the quality and synthesis of the central debates is not available. Such a review is timely to inform research governance. The methodology of this study is based on the principles of systematic reviews. Fifty-seven papers were reviewed following a thorough search, and were critically appraised for their literary quality, the knowledge on which they drew and the research standards they addressed. The debates identified address vulnerability, moral appropriateness, consent, gate-keeping and inclusion and research culture. The quality of debate and the sources of knowledge varied. The debate was rich in quality and knowledge with respect to the protection of the dignity, rights and safety of research participants, but less developed in relation to those of researchers and other staff. There is also little debate about the ethics of reporting of research and the ethics underpinning research leadership. A framework is offered that reconciles the ethical issues raised with potential methodological strategies identified from the review. PMID:19965950

  5. Research and Teaching: Published Freshman Lab Exercises as Indicators of Level of Awareness and Adoption of Instructional Practices Grounded in Discipline-Based Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Carew, Jenna; Stains, Marilyne

    2014-01-01

    The discipline-based education research (DBER) report from the National Research Council (2012) highlighted the existence of a research-practice gap in science instruction in higher education and the need to identify strategies to close it. This study hypothesizes that one potential factor is instructors' access to research-based…

  6. Research and Teaching: Published Freshman Lab Exercises as Indicators of Level of Awareness and Adoption of Instructional Practices Grounded in Discipline-Based Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Carew, Jenna; Stains, Marilyne

    2014-01-01

    The discipline-based education research (DBER) report from the National Research Council (2012) highlighted the existence of a research-practice gap in science instruction in higher education and the need to identify strategies to close it. This study hypothesizes that one potential factor is instructors' access to research-based…

  7. The German government's global health strategy – a strategy also to support research and development for neglected diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Angela; Razum, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Neglected tropical infectious diseases as well as rare diseases are characterized by structural research and development (R&D) deficits. The market fails for these disease groups. Consequently, to meet public health and individual patient needs, political decision makers have to develop strategies at national and international levels to make up for this R&D deficit. The German government recently published its first global health strategy. The strategy underlines the German government's commitment to strengthening global health governance. We find, however, that the strategy lacks behind the international public health endeavors for neglected diseases. It fails to make reference to the ongoing debate on a global health agreement. Neither does it outline a comprehensive national strategy to promote R&D into neglected diseases, which would integrate existing R&D activities in Germany and link up to the international debate on sustainable, needs-based R&D and affordable access. This despite the fact that only recently, in a consensus-building process, a National Plan of Action for rare diseases was successfully developed in Germany which could serve as a blueprint for a similar course of action for neglected diseases. We recommend that, without delay, a structured process be initiated in Germany to explore all options to promote R&D for neglected diseases, including a global health agreement. PMID:25079287

  8. Government financial support for civil aircraft research, technology and development in four European countries and the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, B.; Golaszewski, R.; Patten, C.; Rudman, B.; Scott, R.

    1980-01-01

    Data on the levels of government financial support for civil aircraft airframe and engine (CAAE) research and technology (R&T) in the United States and Europe (United Kingdom, West Germany, France and The Netherlands) and means of comparing these levels are provided. Data are presented for the years 1974-1977. European R&T expenditure data were obtained through visits to each of the four European countries, to the Washington office of the European Communities, and by a search of applicable literature. CAAE R&T expenditure data for the United States were obtained from NASA and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  9. The Continuing Growth of Global Cooperation Networks in Research: A Conundrum for National Governments.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Caroline S; Park, Han Woo; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2015-01-01

    Global collaboration continues to grow as a share of all scientific cooperation, measured as coauthorships of peer-reviewed, published papers. The percent of all scientific papers that are internationally coauthored has more than doubled in 20 years, and they account for all the growth in output among the scientifically advanced countries. Emerging countries, particularly China, have increased their participation in global science, in part by doubling their spending on R&D; they are increasingly likely to appear as partners on internationally coauthored scientific papers. Given the growth of connections at the international level, it is helpful to examine the phenomenon as a communications network and to consider the network as a new organization on the world stage that adds to and complements national systems. When examined as interconnections across the globe over two decades, a global network has grown denser but not more clustered, meaning there are many more connections but they are not grouping into exclusive 'cliques'. This suggests that power relationships are not reproducing those of the political system. The network has features an open system, attracting productive scientists to participate in international projects. National governments could gain efficiencies and influence by developing policies and strategies designed to maximize network benefits-a model different from those designed for national systems. PMID:26196296

  10. The Continuing Growth of Global Cooperation Networks in Research: A Conundrum for National Governments

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Park, Han Woo; Leydesdorff, Loet

    2015-01-01

    Global collaboration continues to grow as a share of all scientific cooperation, measured as coauthorships of peer-reviewed, published papers. The percent of all scientific papers that are internationally coauthored has more than doubled in 20 years, and they account for all the growth in output among the scientifically advanced countries. Emerging countries, particularly China, have increased their participation in global science, in part by doubling their spending on R&D; they are increasingly likely to appear as partners on internationally coauthored scientific papers. Given the growth of connections at the international level, it is helpful to examine the phenomenon as a communications network and to consider the network as a new organization on the world stage that adds to and complements national systems. When examined as interconnections across the globe over two decades, a global network has grown denser but not more clustered, meaning there are many more connections but they are not grouping into exclusive ‘cliques’. This suggests that power relationships are not reproducing those of the political system. The network has features an open system, attracting productive scientists to participate in international projects. National governments could gain efficiencies and influence by developing policies and strategies designed to maximize network benefits—a model different from those designed for national systems. PMID:26196296

  11. Research governance: where did it come from, what does it mean?

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Sara; Boynton, Petra M; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2005-01-01

    For a variety of historical and social reasons, research has become increasingly formalized and regulated. This change has potential benefits (reduction in fraud and misconduct, protection of vulnerable groups, financial probity) but also disadvantages (increased paperwork, time delays, constraints on research freedom). The terms ‘research’ and ‘governance’ mean different things in different contexts. Even with explicit guidance, ambiguities must be resolved by human judgement. Variation in the nature and outcome of approval decisions is therefore a fact of life. The type of approval needed for a research study depends on the official remit of the approval body, the question to be addressed; the methods to be used; the context in which the work will take place; the level of analysis and interpretation; and the plans for how the findings will be presented and used. PMID:16260798

  12. Funding options for research: facing the market as well as government.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G; Nossal, G

    1999-06-01

    Parasitology is a challenge. At one level, the structural and genetic complexities of parasites provide ample technical challenges in regard to an understanding of parasite variability and adaptability, epidemiological diversity, drug resistance, etc. The intricacies of host parasite relationships including the immunology of parasitism will continually surprise yet frustrate the vaccine developer and keep the bravest immunoparasitologist busy and creative for decades. As if the technical considerations were not challenging enough, we see difficulties arising in sustaining a research endeavour and preserving a critical mass of researchers through the generation of high-level, long-term funding support. Contributing to this situation is the fact that most parasitic diseases of major impact in humans are largely centred around the rural poor in tropical, less industrially-developed countries and therefore of little or of fickle interest to the strictly commercially oriented. Moreover, the focus in the rural industries has moved away from aspects of on-farm production with lower priority given to studies on even the 'economically-important' parasites of livestock. It is contended that this may change again with pressures and clear marketing advantages to preserving a 'clean and green' image for Australia's primary industries. Overall, the extraordinary technical and conceptual advances in recent times have been tempered by uncertainties in research funding and severe cuts from some traditional sources for both fundamental and strategic/applied research in Parasitology. Several have highlighted the fact that deliverables in terms of new methods of disease control have been sparse and some claims made in the past have certainly been exaggerated. Yet the prospects and achievements at the front end of the long R&D pathway have never been brighter. In this article we examine the merits of a 'portfolio approach' to generating research funds in Parasitology and Science and Technology in Australia more generally, with an emphasis on strategies that, through welding good science with clear, medium-term product objectives, increase research funding opportunities. PMID:10480719

  13. OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S FOUR LAB STUDY: TOXICOLOGICCAL AND CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF COMPLEX MIXTURES OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBPS) AND QUALITY ASSURANCE ACTIVITIES FOR A LARGE U. S. EPA MULTILABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Office of Research and Development's Four Lab Study: Toxicological and Chemical Evaluation of Complex Mixtures of Disinfection By-Products (DBPs), and Quality Assurance Activities for a Large U.S. EPA Multilaboratoty Study

    Thomas J. Hughes, Project and QA Manager, Expe...

  14. Educating the Educator: U.S. Government Statistical Sources for Geographic Research and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryman, James F.; Wilkinson, Patrick J.

    Appropriate for college geography students and researchers, this paper briefly introduces basic federal statistical publications and corresponding finding aids. General references include "Statistical Abstract of the United States," and three complementary publications: "County and City Data Book,""State and Metropolitan Area Data Book," and…

  15. Physical Education PLC: Neoliberalism, Curriculum and Governance. New Directions for PESP Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian

    2014-01-01

    How might Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) communities in the UK, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere go about researching the implications of neoliberalism and increasing privatisation of Education for the entitlements of young people to a common, comprehensive, high quality, equitable Physical Education (PE)? Our analyses suggest that…

  16. Governing the Modern, Neoliberal Child through ICT Research in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valero, Paola; Knijnik, Gelsa

    2015-01-01

    Research on the pedagogical uses of ICT for the learning of mathematics formulates cultural thesis about the desired subject of education and society, and thereby contribute to fabricate the rational, Modern, self­-regulated, entrepreneurial neoliberal child. Using the Foucauldian notion of governmentality, the section Technology in the…

  17. Governing the Modern, Neoliberal Child through ICT Research in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valero, Paola; Knijnik, Gelsa

    2015-01-01

    Research on the pedagogical uses of ICT for the learning of mathematics formulates cultural thesis about the desired subject of education and society, and thereby contribute to fabricate the rational, Modern, self­-regulated, entrepreneurial neoliberal child. Using the Foucauldian notion of governmentality, the section Technology in the…

  18. 76 FR 76743 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity: Chemotoxins for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Research Opportunity: Chemotoxins for Targeted Treatment of Diseased Cells AGENCY: National Institutes of... preferentially and specifically eliminate chemokine receptor-expressing cells. The method uses the natural... to specifically target immune cells to increase immunogenicity for malignant tumors using SPANX-B...

  19. Moving at the Speed of Government: VIVO Implementation at EPA's Office of Research and Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    VIVO is a research and expertise discovery tool that supports collaboration across disciplines, geographic locations and organizational structures. This poster reviews the steps taken to set up an EPA/ORD VIVO instance including customization of the theme, data ingest and develop...

  20. Governing by Network in Europe: Associations, Educational Research and Social Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The coincident arrival of a European policy space in education and a European Educational Research Association [EERA], and their subsequent relation, will be the subject of this paper. EERA is a hybrid organization--it supports scientific networking, it is a social partner in EU policy, it is a first level social space for networking, and…

  1. The "Economy of Memory": Publications, Citations, and the Paradox of Effective Research Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    More recent advancements in digital technologies have significantly alleviated the dissemination of new scientific ideas as well as the storing, searching and retrieval of large amounts of published research findings. While not denying the benefits of this novel "economy of memory," this paper endeavors to shed light on the ways in which…

  2. Sport Physiology Research and Governing Gender in Sport--A Power-Knowledge Relation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to show how physiological knowledge about sex/gender relates to power issues within sport. The sport physiology research at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (Swedish acronym: GIH) during the twentieth century is analysed in relation to the political rationality concerning gender at GIH and within the Swedish…

  3. 76 FR 66728 - Government-Owned Inventions; Licensing and Collaborative Research Opportunity for PANVAC-Cancer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ...) was approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. The development of the TRICOM... announced for PROSTVAC\\TM\\ (prostate cancer vaccine), based on the same TRICOM technology platform as PANVAC... Research Opportunity for PANVAC--Cancer Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Colorectal...

  4. The "Economy of Memory": Publications, Citations, and the Paradox of Effective Research Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelert, Peter

    2013-01-01

    More recent advancements in digital technologies have significantly alleviated the dissemination of new scientific ideas as well as the storing, searching and retrieval of large amounts of published research findings. While not denying the benefits of this novel "economy of memory," this paper endeavors to shed light on the ways in which…

  5. Sport Physiology Research and Governing Gender in Sport--A Power-Knowledge Relation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsson, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to show how physiological knowledge about sex/gender relates to power issues within sport. The sport physiology research at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (Swedish acronym: GIH) during the twentieth century is analysed in relation to the political rationality concerning gender at GIH and within the Swedish…

  6. 48 CFR 45.303 - Use of Government property on independent research and development programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research and development (IR&D) program, if— (a) Such use will not conflict with the primary use of the...; and (c) A rental charge for the portion of the contractor's IR&D program cost allocated to commercial...'s IR&D costs....

  7. The Missing Link in Vision and Governance: Foreign Language Acquisition Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramsch, Claire J.

    1987-01-01

    Foreign language acquisition research (concerned with the theoretical and practical issues related to socialization into and literacy in another language and culture) can help integrate language, literature, and culture in foreign language departments because it draws on insights gained from such diverse fields as anthropology, sociology,…

  8. Automated generation of massive image knowledge collections using Microsoft Live Labs Pivot to promote neuroimaging and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Massive datasets comprising high-resolution images, generated in neuro-imaging studies and in clinical imaging research, are increasingly challenging our ability to analyze, share, and filter such images in clinical and basic translational research. Pivot collection exploratory analysis provides each user the ability to fully interact with the massive amounts of visual data to fully facilitate sufficient sorting, flexibility and speed to fluidly access, explore or analyze the massive image data sets of high-resolution images and their associated meta information, such as neuro-imaging databases from the Allen Brain Atlas. It is used in clustering, filtering, data sharing and classifying of the visual data into various deep zoom levels and meta information categories to detect the underlying hidden pattern within the data set that has been used. Method We deployed prototype Pivot collections using the Linux CentOS running on the Apache web server. We also tested the prototype Pivot collections on other operating systems like Windows (the most common variants) and UNIX, etc. It is demonstrated that the approach yields very good results when compared with other approaches used by some researchers for generation, creation, and clustering of massive image collections such as the coronal and horizontal sections of the mouse brain from the Allen Brain Atlas. Results Pivot visual analytics was used to analyze a prototype of dataset Dab2 co-expressed genes from the Allen Brain Atlas. The metadata along with high-resolution images were automatically extracted using the Allen Brain Atlas API. It is then used to identify the hidden information based on the various categories and conditions applied by using options generated from automated collection. A metadata category like chromosome, as well as data for individual cases like sex, age, and plan attributes of a particular gene, is used to filter, sort and to determine if there exist other genes with a similar characteristics to Dab2. And online access to the mouse brain pivot collection can be viewed using the link http://edtech-dev.uthsc.edu/CTSI/teeDev1/unittest/PaPa/collection.html (user name: tviangte and password: demome) Conclusions Our proposed algorithm has automated the creation of large image Pivot collections; this will enable investigators of clinical research projects to easily and quickly analyse the image collections through a perspective that is useful for making critical decisions about the image patterns discovered. PMID:21884637

  9. 78 FR 52802 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambridge Isotope Lab... 01, 2013, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  10. 77 FR 38086 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Cambridge Isotope Lab... 7, 2012, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road, Andover, Massachusetts 01810, made application...

  11. Concentration, chlorination, and chemical analysis of drinking water for disinfection byproduct mixtures health effects research: U.S. EPA's Four Lab Study.

    PubMed

    Pressman, Jonathan G; Richardson, Susan D; Speth, Thomas F; Miltner, Richard J; Narotsky, Michael G; Hunter, E Sidney; Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; McDonald, Anthony; Parvez, Shahid; Krasner, Stuart W; Weinberg, Howard S; McKague, A Bruce; Parrett, Christopher J; Bodin, Nathalie; Chinn, Russell; Lee, Chih-Fen T; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2010-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's "Four Lab Study" involved participation of researchers from four national Laboratories and Centers of the Office of Research and Development along with collaborators from the water industry and academia. The study evaluated toxicological effects of complex disinfection byproduct (DBP) mixtures, with an emphasis on reproductive and developmental effects that have been associated with DBP exposures in some human epidemiologic studies. This paper describes a new procedure for producing chlorinated drinking water concentrate for animal toxicology experiments, comprehensive identification of >100 DBPs, and quantification of 75 priority and regulated DBPs. In the research reported herein, complex mixtures of DBPs were produced by concentrating a natural source water with reverse osmosis membranes, followed by addition of bromide and treatment with chlorine. By concentrating natural organic matter in the source water first and disinfecting with chlorine afterward, DBPs (including volatiles and semivolatiles) were formed and maintained in a water matrix suitable for animal studies. DBP levels in the chlorinated concentrate compared well to those from EPA's Information Collection Rule (ICR) and a nationwide study of priority unregulated DBPs when normalized by total organic carbon (TOC). DBPs were relatively stable over the course of the animal studies (125 days) with multiple chlorination events (every 5-14 days), and a significant portion of total organic halogen was accounted for through a comprehensive identification approach. DBPs quantified included regulated DBPs, priority unregulated DBPs, and additional DBPs targeted by the ICR. Many DBPs are reported for the first time, including previously undetected and unreported haloacids and haloamides. The new concentration procedure not only produced a concentrated drinking water suitable for animal experiments, but also provided a greater TOC concentration factor (136×), enhancing the detection of trace DBPs that are often below detection using conventional approaches. PMID:20496936

  12. Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City

    ScienceCinema

    Banerjee, Sanjoy; Shmukler, Michael; Martin, Cheryl

    2014-01-10

    Urban Electric Power, a startup formed by researchers from the City University of New York (CUNY) Energy Institute, is taking breakthroughs in battery technology from the lab to the market. With industry and government funding, including a grant from the Energy Department, Urban Electric Power developed a zinc-nickel oxide battery electrolyte that circulates constantly, eliminating dendrite formation and preventing battery shortages. Their new challenge is to take this technology to the market, where they can scale up the batteries for reducing peak energy demand in urban areas and storing variable renewable electricity.

  13. Taking Battery Technology from the Lab to the Big City

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sanjoy; Shmukler, Michael; Martin, Cheryl

    2013-07-29

    Urban Electric Power, a startup formed by researchers from the City University of New York (CUNY) Energy Institute, is taking breakthroughs in battery technology from the lab to the market. With industry and government funding, including a grant from the Energy Department, Urban Electric Power developed a zinc-nickel oxide battery electrolyte that circulates constantly, eliminating dendrite formation and preventing battery shortages. Their new challenge is to take this technology to the market, where they can scale up the batteries for reducing peak energy demand in urban areas and storing variable renewable electricity.

  14. Reducing Bureaucratic Accretion in Government and University Procedures for Sponsored Research. New Approaches in Process and Additional Areas for Attention. Proceedings of a Hearing, June 5, 1985. Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC. Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable.

    On June 5, 1985, the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable conducted a hearing designed to be the first step in what will be a continuing process by the Research Roundtable of seeking ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the sponsored research system. The goal of the hearing was to identify ways to simplify the system…

  15. Characteristics of individuals with high information potential in government research and development organizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    In order to study focal individuals within informal communications networks, a special variable was constructed: information potential (IP) was defined as the information-source value placed on an individual by his colleagues. Four hypotheses involving IP were tested in three R&D organizations using questionnaires and pencil-and-paper tests. Results indicated that the individual with high IP used more and different sources of technical information, was seen to be a credible information source and to have a strong ability to associate seemingly unrelated ideas, and was as approachable as the other members of his organization. Four tentative conclusions may be drawn from this study concerning the person with high IP. He is (1) an identifiable individual in several different kinds of organizations; (2) a distinctive information transceiver (transmitter and receiver); (3) both a producer and a catalyst in his own organization; and (4) an extender and an amplifier of information search. To affect the efficiency of informal information flow, the research manager's best hope for positively influencing informal networks lies in the identification and motivation of the special communicators in his organization.

  16. M.I.T. and the Federal Government. An Examination of the Effects of Government Regulation and Research Support on Selected Parts of M.I.T.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvin, David

    A self-study was undertaken at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) to examine the impact of the federal government on it. M.I.T. is a large institution with an enrollment of 8,000, a faculty of 950, and a total teaching staff of 1,700. Of its operating expenses by far the largest source of funds in recent years has been sponsored…

  17. Needing a New Approach to Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In America's Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science, a National Research Council (NRC) committee found that labs have the potential to help students master science subject matter, develop scientific reasoning skills, increase interest in science, and achieve other important science learning goals. High school graduates who attain these…

  18. Summary report of NIST's Industry-Government Consortium Research Program on flowmeter installation effects: The 45 degree elbow. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, T.T.; Mattingly, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The report presents recent results obtained in a consortium-sponsored research program on flowmeter installation effects being conducted at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-Gathersburg, MD, presented at the meeting of consortium participants in November 1992. This project is supported by an industry-government consortium and has been underway for several years. This piping element tested and reported here is the conventional 45 degree elbow; the conventional 19- and 7-tube concentric tube bundle flow conditioners were also tested. The LDV velocity measurements are reported for the pipeflows produced downstream of the 45 degree elbow with and without the 19-tube tube bundles. The performance characteristics of a range of orifice meters with various pressure tap geometries and a specific turbine meter are obtained downstream of the 45 degree elbow with and without the 19- and 7-tube bundle flow conditioners.

  19. Performance enhancement, elite athletes and anti doping governance: comparing human guinea pigs in pharmaceutical research and professional sports.

    PubMed

    Camporesi, Silvia; McNamee, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In light of the World Anti Doping Agency's 2013 Code Revision process, we critically explore the applicability of two of three criteria used to determine whether a method or substance should be considered for their Prohibited List, namely its (potential) performance enhancing effects and its (potential) risk to the health of the athlete. To do so, we compare two communities of human guinea pigs: (i) individuals who make a living out of serial participation in Phase 1 pharmacology trials; and (ii) elite athletes who engage in what is effectively 'unregulated clinical research' by using untested prohibited or non-prohibited performance enhancing substances and methods, alone or in combination. Our comparison sheds light on norms of research ethics that these practices exacerbate with respect to the concepts of multiplicity, visibility, and consistency. We argue for the need to establish a proper governance framework to increase the accountability of these unregulated research practices in order to protect the human guinea pigs in elite sports contexts, and to establish reasonable grounds for the performance enhancing effects, and the risks to the health of the athlete, of the methods and substances that might justify their inclusion on the Prohibited List. PMID:24499536

  20. Performance enhancement, elite athletes and anti doping governance: comparing human guinea pigs in pharmaceutical research and professional sports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In light of the World Anti Doping Agency’s 2013 Code Revision process, we critically explore the applicability of two of three criteria used to determine whether a method or substance should be considered for their Prohibited List, namely its (potential) performance enhancing effects and its (potential) risk to the health of the athlete. To do so, we compare two communities of human guinea pigs: (i) individuals who make a living out of serial participation in Phase 1 pharmacology trials; and (ii) elite athletes who engage in what is effectively 'unregulated clinical research’ by using untested prohibited or non-prohibited performance enhancing substances and methods, alone or in combination. Our comparison sheds light on norms of research ethics that these practices exacerbate with respect to the concepts of multiplicity, visibility, and consistency. We argue for the need to establish a proper governance framework to increase the accountability of these unregulated research practices in order to protect the human guinea pigs in elite sports contexts, and to establish reasonable grounds for the performance enhancing effects, and the risks to the health of the athlete, of the methods and substances that might justify their inclusion on the Prohibited List. PMID:24499536

  1. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab…

  2. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Deciphering Your Lab Report Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... responsibility. You may encounter complex test results on lab reports and will need to recognize that there ...

  3. NIGMS's Living Labs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues NIGMS's Living Labs Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Harmless roundworms found in soil now live in lab dishes, helping scientists discover fundamental mechanisms involved in ...

  4. The Wilderness Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Janet W.

    1984-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of wilderness labs as a medium for developing management skills. Wilderness labs involve taking managers out of the corporate comfort zone into the outdoors to confront physical challenges. (JOW)

  5. Fraud strikes top genome lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1996-11-08

    Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

  6. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  7. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  8. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  9. A career in government: my experiences working for the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agricultural sector provides highly diverse career opportunities that include private companies, academic institutions, non-government organizations, and government agencies. One possible career path is with the Federal government which is one of the largest employers of scientists and engineers...

  10. What is a Baseline for Effective Information Technology Governance for Higher Education Institutions that are Members of Research University CIO Conclave in United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohseni, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    This research study provides the findings of a modified Delphi methodology conducted to define components and baseline for effective information technology governance for higher education institutions member of the Research University CIO Conclave (RUCC) in United States. The participating experts are Chief Information Officers (CIOs) of…

  11. What is a Baseline for Effective Information Technology Governance for Higher Education Institutions that are Members of Research University CIO Conclave in United States?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohseni, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    This research study provides the findings of a modified Delphi methodology conducted to define components and baseline for effective information technology governance for higher education institutions member of the Research University CIO Conclave (RUCC) in United States. The participating experts are Chief Information Officers (CIOs) of…

  12. A "Language Lab" for Architectural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Arch; And Others

    This paper discusses a "language lab" strategy in which traditional studio learning may be supplemented by language lessons using computer graphics techniques to teach architectural grammar, a body of elements and principles that govern the design of buildings belonging to a particular architectural theory or style. Two methods of teaching Frank…

  13. Report on findings from the industry and government co-sponsored workshop on pre-competitive research in the basic science of commercial light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Gough, A.B.; Waymouth, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    An industry and government co-sponsored workshop to develop strategies for pre-competitive research in the basic sciences of commercial light sources to achieve major breakthroughs in light source performance and efficiency was held in March 1995. Qualified researchers in the basic sciences related to light source technologies were brought together with world-wide experts now working in light source research to discuss, plan and prioritize the sustained research programs needed to achieve the major breakthrough. This paper highlights the findings and subsequent precompetitive research plans that have been developed by the sponsors group during 1995. The outcome of the workshop is expected to lead in 1996 and future years to multiple sourcing of funds for the targeted research from both private industries as well as from interested government agencies.

  14. The Role of Institutional Research in Institutional Governance. Proceedings, Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (8th, Wrightsville, North Carolina, November 12-24, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1980 meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research, which focused on the role of institutional research in institutional governance, are presented. Contents are as follows: "The Role of Institutional Research in Academic Program Evaluation: An Overview" (Dennis R. Hengstler); "The Role of Institutional…

  15. Evolution of different dual-use concepts in international and national law and its implications on research ethics and governance.

    PubMed

    Rath, Johannes; Ischi, Monique; Perkins, Dana

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the various dual-use concepts applied in national and international non-proliferation and anti-terrorism legislation, such as the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention, the Chemical Weapons Convention and United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540, and national export control legislation and in relevant codes of conduct. While there is a vast literature covering dual-use concepts in particular with regard to life sciences, this is the first paper that incorporates into such discussion the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540. In addition, recent developments such as the extension of dual-use export control legislation in the area of human rights protection are also identified and reviewed. The discussion of dual-use concepts is hereby undertaken in the context of human- and/or national-security-based approaches to security. This paper discusses four main concepts of dual use as applied today in international and national law: civilian versus military, peaceful versus non-peaceful, legitimate versus illegitimate and benevolent versus malevolent. In addition, the usage of the term to describe positive technology spin-offs between civilian and military applications is also briefly addressed. Attention is also given to the roles civil society and research ethics may play in the governance of dual-use sciences and technologies. PMID:24497004

  16. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  17. The Golden Age of Radio: Solid State's Debt to the Rad Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joseph D.

    2011-03-01

    While MIT's Radiation Laboratory is rightly celebrated for its contributions to World War II radar research, its legacy extended beyond the war. The Rad Lab provided a model for interdisciplinary collaboration that continued to influence research at MIT in the post-war decades. The Rad Lab's institutional legacy--MIT's interdepartmental laboratories--drove the Institute's postwar research agenda. This talk examines how solid state physics research at MIT was shaped by a laboratory structure that encouraged cross-disciplinary collaboration. As the sub-discipline of solid state physics emerged through the late-1940s and 1950s, MIT was unique among universities in its laboratory structure, made possible by a large degree of government and military funding. Nonetheless, the manner in which MIT research groups from physics, chemistry, engineering, and metallurgy interfaced through the medium of solid state physics exemplified how the discipline of solid state physics came to be structured in the rest of the country. Through examining the Rad Lab's institutional legacy, I argue that World War II radar research, by establishing precedent for a particular mode of interdisciplinary collaboration, shaped the future structure of solid state research in the United States. Research supported by a grant-in-aid from the Friends of the Center for the History of Physics, American Institute of Physics.

  18. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 35: The US government technical report and aerospace knowledge diffusion: Results of an on-going investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Khan, A. Rahman; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded (U.S.) R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this paper, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from two surveys (one of five studies) of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into the use of the U.S. government technical report as a rhetorical device for transferring federally funded aerospace R&D.

  19. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  20. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  1. (Re)inventing Government-Industry R and D Collaboration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned in developing and operating a large-scale strategic alliance whose organization and coordination is U.S. Government-led using new means for R&D collaboration. Consortia in the United States counter a century of 1884 Sherman Anti-Trust Law-based governmental and legal policy and a longstanding business tradition of unfettered competition. Success in public-private collaboration in America requires compelling vision and motivation by both partners to reinvent our ways of doing business. The foundations for reinventing government and alliance building were laid in 1994 with Vice President Al Gore's mandates for Federal Lab Reviews and other examinations of the roles and missions for the nation's more than 700 government labs. In addition, the 1984 National Cooperative Research Act (NCRA) set in motion the abilities for U.S. companies to collaborate in pre-competitive technology development. The budget realities of the 1990's for NASA and other government agencies demand that government discover the means to accomplish its mission by leveraging resources through streamlining as well as alliances. Federal R&D investments can be significantly leveraged for greater national benefit through strategic alliances with industry and university partners. This paper presents early results from one of NASA's first large-scale public/private joint R&D ventures.

  2. Vocations: The Link between Post-Compulsory Education and the Labour Market. What the Research Says For... Government & Policy-Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Buchanan, John; Yu, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This summary brings together the relevant key findings for government and policy-makers from the research program "Vocations: The Link between Post-Compulsory Education and the Labour Market." The program was comprised of three different strands: (1) pathways from VET in Schools, (2) pathways within and between vocational education and…

  3. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that is not…

  4. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that is not…

  5. Living Labs: Arbiters of Mid- and Ground-Level Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almirall, Esteve; Wareham, Jonathan

    We perform a comparative case analysis of four working Living Labs to identify their common functions. Theoretically, we ground our analysis in terms of how they function, their processes of exploration and exploitation, where they work in the innovation strata, how new socially negotiated meanings are negotiated and diffused. Our research highlights four novel insights: first, Living Labs function at the low and mid level innovation strata; second, Living Labs are technologically agnostic; third, Living Labs use context based experience to surface new, socially constructed meanings for products and services; and finally, Living Labs are equally focused on exploration and exploitation.

  6. School Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This article talks about the declining state of many school science laboratories. The author describes how school districts are renovating their science labs to improve student learning. The author also offers tips from those who have already renovated their school science labs.

  7. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  8. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  9. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  10. Reforming Cookbook Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Erin

    2005-01-01

    Deconstructing cookbook labs to require the students to be more thoughtful could break down perceived teacher barriers to inquiry learning. Simple steps that remove or disrupt the direct transfer of step-by-step procedures in cookbook labs make students think more critically about their process. Through trials in the author's middle school…

  11. Operating a Math Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    The rationale behind the use of mathematics laboratories is stated, then directions for organizing and implementing a math lab are given. Topics such as housekeeping, keeping an inventory, noise level, record keeping and assignments, giving grades, correlating textbooks with a math lab, and finding meaningful laboratory problems are each discussed…

  12. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  13. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  14. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  15. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  16. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  17. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab activities are frequently based on recipe-like, step-by-step instructions ("cookbook style"), which do not motivate students to engage cognitively. Consequently, students put the emphasis on "task completion" or "manipulating equipment."2

  18. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  19. A European Perspective on New Modes of University Governance and Actorhood. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.17.11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krucken, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Higher education systems in Europe are currently undergoing profound transformations. At the macro-level, there is an increase in the number of students enrolled, subjects of study offered, and university missions that have gained legitimacy over time. At the second level changes are evident at the level of university governance. New Public…

  20. Minorities and Women in State and Local Governments. 1974. Volume VI--Special Districts. Research Report No. 52-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Winston O., Jr.

    One of six volumes summarizing through narrative and statistical tables data collected by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in its 1974 survey, this sixth volume details the employment status of minorities and women in special district governments (excluding school districts), by examining the general governmental activities they…

  1. Academic Work within a Mode of Mixed Governance: Perspectives of University Professors in the Research Context of Western China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linlin; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Chinese higher education institutions have been subjected to the intensive bureaucratic governance led by the central authorities since 1949. Since the new public management has been a burgeoning social discourse, some reforms have been conducted recently, centering on the competitive contract-centered employment of staff, integration of…

  2. Academic Work within a Mode of Mixed Governance: Perspectives of University Professors in the Research Context of Western China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Linlin; Lai, Manhong; Lo, Leslie N. K.

    2013-01-01

    Chinese higher education institutions have been subjected to the intensive bureaucratic governance led by the central authorities since 1949. Since the new public management has been a burgeoning social discourse, some reforms have been conducted recently, centering on the competitive contract-centered employment of staff, integration of…

  3. Physics Labs with Flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among teachers of a projectile motion lab where students are graded based on their ability to predict the range of the projectile. I describe here several additional laboratory exercises in which students are required to predict results of the experiment. I also discuss an essential element of these exercises which I call "recurrent study."

  4. LIVING LAB: User-Driven Innovation for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liedtke, Christa; Welfens, Maria Jolanta; Rohn, Holger; Nordmann, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the LIVING LAB design study, a project within the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union. The aim of this project was to develop the conceptual design of the LIVING LAB Research Infrastructure that will be used to research human interaction with, and stimulate…

  5. LIVING LAB: User-Driven Innovation for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liedtke, Christa; Welfens, Maria Jolanta; Rohn, Holger; Nordmann, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the LIVING LAB design study, a project within the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union. The aim of this project was to develop the conceptual design of the LIVING LAB Research Infrastructure that will be used to research human interaction with, and stimulate…

  6. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  7. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  8. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-05-22

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  9. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budil, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    The DOE national laboratories, and in particular the three NNSA national security laboratories, have long supported a broad suite of national nuclear security missions for the U.S. government. The capabilities, infrastructure and base of expertise developed to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile have been applied to such challenges as stemming nuclear proliferation, understanding the nuclear capabilities of adversaries, and assessing and countering nuclear threats including essential support to nuclear emergency response. This talk will discuss the programs that are underway at the laboratories and the essential role that science and technology plays therein. Nuclear scientists provide expertise, fundamental understanding of nuclear materials, processes and signatures, and tools and technologies to aid in the identification and mitigation of nuclear threats as well as consequence management. This talk will also discuss the importance of direct engagement with the response community, which helps to shape research priorities and to enable development of useful tools and techniques for responders working in the field. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response.

  10. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  11. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2014-06-04

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  12. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  13. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education. XXXX

  14. A research experiment on facilitation and formation of joint research and development programs between government, industry, and universities: Overview, preliminary findings, and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariq, Syed Z.

    1992-01-01

    Presented is an overview of an experiment to explore the free-market approach to public-private collaboration through the development and implementation of a joint venture mechanism to enable formation of R&D projects between government, industry and academia. Some preliminary results related to time-to-commercialization and economic competitiveness are discussed.

  15. Japanese Government Policies in Education, Science, Sports and Culture, 1997. Scientific Research: Opening the Door to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Science, and Culture, Tokyo (Japan).

    This document outlines the basic philosophy and policies of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MESSC) about the promotion of scientific research for the future benefits of society. Promoting scientific research in universities and affiliated research institutions, as well as the science and technology deriving from…

  16. How federal government and university policies need to change to achieve more and better research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Carl

    2011-04-01

    The Obama administration has repeatedly emphasized that the economic future of the country will depend heavily on the future success of both its scientific research and its science education. Research universities play a vital role in both of these activities. Unfortunately, universities are facing increasing difficulties in maintaining and enhancing the quality of their research and educational activities. There are some particularly notable unmet opportunities for improving science education. I will offer some ideas for how federal and university policies on research funding and education might be modified in tandem to enhance both research and educational outputs.

  17. Outreach Science Education: Evidence-Based Studies in a Gene Technology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, outreach labs are important informal learning environments in science education. After summarizing research to goals outreach labs focus on, we describe our evidence-based gene technology lab as a model of a research-driven outreach program. Evaluation-based optimizations of hands-on teaching based on cognitive load theory (additional…

  18. Outreach Science Education: Evidence-Based Studies in a Gene Technology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, outreach labs are important informal learning environments in science education. After summarizing research to goals outreach labs focus on, we describe our evidence-based gene technology lab as a model of a research-driven outreach program. Evaluation-based optimizations of hands-on teaching based on cognitive load theory (additional…

  19. Utilising Enterprise Risk Management Strategies to Develop a Governance and Operations Framework for a New Research Complex: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde-Smith, Jodi

    2014-01-01

    Enterprise risk management strategies were used to develop a regulatory and operational framework for a new multi-partner Research Institute that will house up to 900 staff from four different institutions in Queensland, Australia. The Institute will operate in a business environment while functioning as a research resource for the higher…

  20. Utilising Enterprise Risk Management Strategies to Develop a Governance and Operations Framework for a New Research Complex: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde-Smith, Jodi

    2014-01-01

    Enterprise risk management strategies were used to develop a regulatory and operational framework for a new multi-partner Research Institute that will house up to 900 staff from four different institutions in Queensland, Australia. The Institute will operate in a business environment while functioning as a research resource for the higher…

  1. The NOAO Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  2. Coordinating Cryopreservation Research Projects: Minimizing Lab to Lab Variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The administration of large scale projects that involve multiple laboratories requires careful coordination in order to produce valid data. Due to the variability of laboratory practices it is necessary to have clear and precise protocols and ensure that they are followed by every participant. Our ...

  3. Psychiatric governance, völkisch corporatism, and the German Research Institute of Psychiatry in Munich (1912-26). Part 1.

    PubMed

    Engstrom, Eric J; Burgmair, Wolfgang; Weber, Matthias M

    2016-03-01

    This is the first of two articles exploring in depth some of the early organizational strategies that were marshalled in efforts to found and develop the German Research Institute of Psychiatry (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Psychiatrie) in 1917. After briefly discussing plans for a German research institute before World War I, the article examines the political strategies and networks that Emil Kraepelin used to recruit support for the institute. It argues that his efforts at psychiatric governance can best be understood as a form of völkisch corporatism which sought to mobilize and coordinate a group of players in the service of higher biopolitical and hygienic ends. The article examines the wartime arguments used to justify the institute, the list of protagonists actively engaged in recruiting financial and political support, the various social, scientific and political networks that they exploited, and the local contingencies that had to be negotiated in order to found the research institute. PMID:26823087

  4. Strategic Design of an Interactive Video Learning Lab (IVL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Ralph V., Jr.; Switzer, Jamie S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a study that researched elements necessary for the design of an interactive video learning (IVL) lab for business courses. Highlights include a review of pertinent literature; guidelines for the use of an IVL lab; IVL systems integration; system specifications; hardware costs; and system software. (five references) (LRW)

  5. The Living Labs: Innovation in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Nathan; Bartle, Gamin; Romine, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The living lab (LL) is an open innovation ecosystem serving to provide opportunities for local stakeholders to practice research and to experiment with meaningful improvements for cities and other organizations. Living labs aim at involving the user as a cocreator. In this article the relationship between the LLs and a variety of stakeholders is…

  6. The Living Labs: Innovation in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Nathan; Bartle, Gamin; Romine, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The living lab (LL) is an open innovation ecosystem serving to provide opportunities for local stakeholders to practice research and to experiment with meaningful improvements for cities and other organizations. Living labs aim at involving the user as a cocreator. In this article the relationship between the LLs and a variety of stakeholders is…

  7. Labs at Elementary Level Help Bring Science Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    State and district science standards typically call for students to take part in hands-on labs and experiments in the elementary grades. The 1996 National Science Education Standards, which were written by the National Research Council and serve as a reference for many states, emphasize similar activities. Yet the use of even simple labs and…

  8. A guide to mentoring undergraduates in the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeman, Philip S.

    2013-11-01

    Mentoring undergraduates in a research laboratory requires a different set of skills and approaches than for other lab members. However, if a mentor -- be it a faculty member, postdoc or graduate student -- can adopt these methods, it can lead to a significantly improved lab experience for everyone involved.

  9. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  10. Lab with Dad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  11. Science Labs: Beyond Isolationism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    A national study released in 2005 concluded that most high school students are not exposed to high quality science labs because of these reasons: (a) poor school facilities and organizations; (b) weak teacher preparation; (c) poor design; (d) cluttered state standards; (e) little representation on state tests; and (f) scarce evidence of what…

  12. Lab with Dad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  13. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  14. The Crime Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  15. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  16. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  17. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  18. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  19. Writing Better Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Rhiannon; Guarienti, Kristy; Brydon, Barbara; Robb, Jeanine; Royston, Ann; Painter, Heidi; Sutherland, Alex; Passmore, Cynthia; Smith, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    As science teachers at a suburban California high school, the authors were concerned about the lab report conclusions written by their upper-level chemistry, biology, and ecology students--which were consistently of poor quality. Their work lacked inferences derived from data and support for their concluding statements. Working as part of a…

  20. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  1. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  2. Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Copper Calculator WDA Publications Copper Connection Newsletter Stories Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator Serum Copper (mcg/dl) ... Michael Schilsky, we are pleased to offer the Lab Tracker in two convenient formats. We recommend that ...

  3. Labs That Are a Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that use a simple homemade apparatus called "the cannon" to demonstrate Newton's Third Law. Reviews the chemistry concepts behind the ignition of the cannon and presents the Momentum Lab and the Projectile Motion Lab. (JRH)

  4. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Ivan Berry

    2013-06-24

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  5. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  6. The Internationalization of Canadian University Research: A Global Higher Education Matrix Analysis of Multi-Level Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glen A.; Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    To date, much of the research on internationalization and globalization of higher education has focused on the institution or higher education system as the unit of analysis. Institution based studies have focused on the analysis of institutional practices and policies designed to further internationalization. System-level studies focus on state…

  7. 48 CFR 1852.245-80 - Use of Government production and research property on a no-charge basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... production and research property on a no-charge basis. 1852.245-80 Section 1852.245-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND... property on a no-charge basis. As prescribed in 1845.106-70(k), insert the following clause: Use...

  8. University Reforms and Academic Governance Reconsidered: Report of the Six-Nation Higher Education Research Project. RIHE International Publication Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira, Ed.

    This report contains papers from the Six Nation Higher Education Research Project, an initiative that has focused on making a comparative study of the reform of higher education at the stage of postmassification in six countries: China, Germany, Singapore, Switzerland, the United States, and Japan. The papers are: (1) The Six Nation Higher…

  9. Public Attitudes toward Low-Income Families and Children: Circumstances Dictate Public Views of Government Assistance. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Mary Clare; Appelbaum, Lauren D.; Aber, J. Lawrence; McCaskie, Katherine

    This study examined public attitudes toward the most vulnerable of the poor--those who experience significant personal or situational problems that can create obstacles to employment. Using both a factorial survey methodology and a general attitude survey, researchers gathered information about public opinion toward people in need, low-income…

  10. Governance and Administrative Infrastructure in New York City Charter Schools. Going Charter Year Three Findings. Charter School Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol; Echazarreta, Juan; Jacobowitz, Robin; McBride, Yolanda; Troy, Tammi

    In this final report of a 3-year evaluation, researchers explored the developing infrastructure in New York City charter schools and identified areas in which school stakeholders--private partners, boards of trustees, school leaders, parents, and teachers--needed support to help charter schools succeed. The study was based on monthly visits to…

  11. Nonproliferation through international lab-to-lab technology cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, W H

    1998-09-10

    At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) one of the fastest growing programs as a result of the end of the Cold War is the Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and International Security Directorate (NAI). Since the early 1990's NAI types of programs have grown from a small percentage of LLNL's budget to constitute one of its major programs. NAI's work includes developing instruments to detect chemicals and radiation, analyzing complex national defense problems, anticipating threats to the US, and providing personnel to support national and international efforts in crisis management and arms control. These functions support the US government in dealing with weapons-of-mass-destruction challenges- proliferation, terrorism, and nuclear-state instability. To combat the rapidly emerging chem-bio-terrorism threats, NAI is drawing on LLNL's advanced technologies in bioscience, microfabrication, and computations to help the Department of Energy (DOE )provide major support to the US government. Half of NAI's effort is directed toward preventing proliferation before it starts, which is the mission of the Proliferation Prevention and Arms Control Program (PPAC). Until recently, our emphasis was on arms control. Now, arms control continues to be an important component while international cooperation and fissile material control are our dominant activities for the Department of Energy. Many of the post-Cold-War changes are highly visible, such as the elimination of nuclear testing by the United States, Russia, China and other major powers; agreements and continuing negotiations to dramatically reduce numbers of nuclear weapons; and increasing international focus on nonproliferation and counterterrorism. Other changes are less highly publicized but are no less significant. One such area is the increasing interactions between DOE Laboratory scientists and their counterparts in the nuclear weapons institutes of the former Soviet Union. Although the large majority of these Lab-to- Lab activities are currently with the FSU, that experience is leading to important and productive interactions with other countries and regions, most significantly, China and the Middle East. In contrast to the Cold War years, when most technologies developed at LLNL were solely for the US national defense efforts and therefore classified, many of NAI's new technologies and tools are unclassified and designed for use in a multilateral security environment. PPAC is the proliferation "Prevention" element of NAI's four-element "Prevention-Reversal-Response-Avoid Surprise" program. We direct some twenty different projects. which have realized about a factor of ten growth in the last four years.

  12. Reinventing Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout all levels of American government, a shift is taking place from the rigid, wasteful, centralized bureaucracies of the industrial era to the more flexible, entrepreneurial, decentralized government needed to succeed in today's world. This shift has been brought about by an unprecedented, ongoing fiscal crisis that has created a sudden…

  13. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  14. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2014-06-03

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  15. Economic Model For a Return on Investment Analysis of United States Government High Performance Computing (HPC) Research and Development (R & D) Investment

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Earl C.; Conway, Steve; Dekate, Chirag

    2013-09-30

    This study investigated how high-performance computing (HPC) investments can improve economic success and increase scientific innovation. This research focused on the common good and provided uses for DOE, other government agencies, industry, and academia. The study created two unique economic models and an innovation index: 1 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in economic advancements in the form of ROI in revenue (GDP), profits (and cost savings), and jobs. 2 A macroeconomic model that depicts the way HPC investments result in basic and applied innovations, looking at variations by sector, industry, country, and organization size.  A new innovation index that provides a means of measuring and comparing innovation levels. Key findings of the pilot study include: IDC collected the required data across a broad set of organizations, with enough detail to create these models and the innovation index. The research also developed an expansive list of HPC success stories.

  16. Establishing and Governing e-Mental Health Care in Australia: A Systematic Review of Challenges and A Call For Policy-Focussed Research

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Janni; Hall, Wayne; Head, Brian W; Whiteford, Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Background Growing evidence attests to the efficacy of e-mental health services. There is less evidence on how to facilitate the safe, effective, and sustainable implementation of these services. Objective We conducted a systematic review on e-mental health service use for depressive and anxiety disorders to inform policy development and identify policy-relevant gaps in the evidence base. Methods Following the PRISMA protocol, we identified research (1) conducted in Australia, (2) on e-mental health services, (3) for depressive or anxiety disorders, and (4) on e-mental health usage, such as barriers and facilitators to use. Databases searched included Cochrane, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, ProQuest Social Science, and Google Scholar. Sources were assessed according to area and level of policy relevance. Results The search yielded 1081 studies; 30 studies were included for analysis. Most reported on self-selected samples and samples of online help-seekers. Studies indicate that e-mental health services are predominantly used by females, and those who are more educated and socioeconomically advantaged. Ethnicity was infrequently reported on. Studies examining consumer preferences found a preference for face-to-face therapy over e-therapies, but not an aversion to e-therapy. Content relevant to governance was predominantly related to the organizational dimensions of e-mental health services, followed by implications for community education. Financing and payment for e-services and governance of the information communication technology were least commonly discussed. Conclusions Little research focuses explicitly on policy development and implementation planning; most research provides an e-services perspective. Research is needed to provide community and policy-maker perspectives. General population studies of prospective treatment seekers that include ethnicity and socioeconomic status and quantify relative preferences for all treatment modalities are necessary. PMID:26764181

  17. HIGH RESOLTUION GEOELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS OF BIODEGRADATION AND SURFACTANT REMEDIATION: LAB AND FIELD STUDES AND A NEW CHARACTERIZATION TEST CELL FIELD RESEARCH SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory and field high vertical resolution geophysical research has shown that geoelectrical measurements can detect and monitor the natural attenuation of petroleum hydrocarbons. These results have lead to the continued development and refinement of the conductive model for h...

  18. Renewing governance.

    PubMed

    Loos, Gregory P

    2003-01-01

    Globalization's profound influence on social and political institutions need not be negative. Critics of globalization have often referred to the "Impossible Trinity" because decision-making must 1. respect national sovereignty, 2. develop and implement firm regulation, and 3. allow capital markets to be as free as possible. To many, such goals are mutually exclusive because history conditions us to view policy-making and governance in traditional molds. Thus, transnational governance merely appears impossible because current forms of governance were not designed to provide it. The world needs new tools for governing, and its citizens must seize the opportunity to help develop them. The rise of a global society requires a greater level of generality and inclusion than is found in most policy bodies today. Politicians need to re-examine key assumptions about government. States must develop ways to discharge their regulatory responsibilities across borders and collaborate with neighboring jurisdictions, multilateral bodies, and business. Concepts such as multilateralism and tripartism show great promise. Governments must engage civil society in the spirit of shared responsibility and democratic decision-making. Such changes will result in a renewal of the state's purpose and better use of international resources and expertise in governance. PMID:17208717

  19. Research and development of methods/utilities and rules for managing cooperation for performance improvement in government offices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    On September 1, 1991, Defense Programs (DP) within the US Department of Energy entered into a research grant with Management Systems Laboratories (MSL) of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), to study Tools, Methods, and Rules for Managing Cooperation for Performance Improvement. Continuous performance improvement is a gradual, systematic process. The idea is to do a little better each day by knowing where you are, where you want to be, what you have to do to get there, whether or not you have done it, and how to resolve problems doing it. And, although many management decisions are made along direct lines of authority, much of the work of an organization can be achieved only through cooperation (people sharing information and coordinating effort). Therefore, continuous performance improvement requires working cooperatively to do a little better each day. We are researching the most effective configuration of tools working through what we believe is a closed set of nine methods. These methods are: setting expectations, charting, defining indicators and standards, collecting and logging data, converting data to information, organizing and presenting information, reviewing status and progress, self-management, and appraising. We believe that these methods form a closed set because they reflect the management activities of formulation (planning),execution (doing), and verification (evaluating). If these activities are carried out effectively through the methods, the manager can achieve visibility and control.

  20. 78 FR 12102 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Pharmagra Labs, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Pharmagra Labs, Inc... December 3, 2012, Pharmagra Labs, Inc., 158 McLean Road, Brevard, North Carolina 28712, made application...

  1. 75 FR 11938 - BG Labs, Binghamton, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration BG Labs, Binghamton, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation... a petition filed on May 26, 2009 by a company official on behalf of workers of BG Labs,...

  2. 62 FR 36291 - Efficient Labs, Inc.; Blas Reyes-Reyes; Analysis To Aid Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Efficient Labs, Inc.; Blas Reyes-Reyes; Analysis To Aid Public Comment AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission... Federal Trade Commission has accepted an agreement to a proposed consent order from Efficient Labs,...

  3. 59 FR- Clay-Park Labs, Inc.; Withdrawal of Approval of Three Abbreviated Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Clay-Park Labs, Inc.; Withdrawal of Approval of Three Abbreviated Applications AGENCY... applications (ANDA's) held by Clay-Park Labs, Inc., 1700 Bathgate Ave., Bathgate Industrial Park, Bronx,...

  4. 74 FR 28283 - BG Labs, a Subsidiary of Standex, Binghamton, NY; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2009-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration BG Labs, a Subsidiary of Standex, Binghamton, NY; Notice of Termination of... May 5, 2009 in response to a petition filed by a company official on behalf of workers of BG Labs,...

  5. 80 FR 7635 - Bulk Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Application: Cambridge IsotoPE LAB

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-02-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Bulk Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Application: Cambridge IsotoPE LAB....33(a), this is notice that on August 12, 2014, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50 Frontage Road,...

  6. 80 FR 61470 - Bulk Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Application: Cambridge Isotope Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Bulk Manufacturer of Controlled Substances Application: Cambridge Isotope Lab... accordance with 21 CFR 1301.33(a), this is notice that on August 7, 2015, Cambridge Isotope Lab, 50...

  7. 80 FR 73830 - Importer of Controlled Substances Application: VHG Labs DBA LGC Standards Warehouse

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances Application: VHG Labs DBA LGC Standards Warehouse..., 2014, VHG Labs DBA LGC Standards Warehouse, 3 Perimeter Road, Manchester, New Hampshire 03103...

  8. 80 FR 4334 - Proposed Information Collection (Audience Feedback Questionnaire-PACT Demo Lab VISN 4); Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Audience Feedback Questionnaire--PACT Demo Lab VISN 4); Comment... the auspices of the VISN 4 Demonstration Lab, which was funded by Patient Care Services to assess...

  9. Incorporating a Literature-Based Learning Approach into a Lab Course to Increase Student Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Beth A.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Swanson, Karen V.; Smith, Ann C.

    2010-01-01

    Scientific literature was used to give a research oriented context to our immunology lab course. Immunology lab, a senior level course (60 students/year) was formerly taught in a traditional mode, with exercises aimed at learning lab protocols. To engage students in understanding we connected the protocols to their use as reported in research…

  10. Can Graduate Teaching Assistants Teach Inquiry-Based Geology Labs Effectively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryker, Katherine; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of teaching strategies by graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in inquiry-based introductory geology labs at a large research university. We assess the degree of inquiry present in each Physical Geology lab and compare and contrast the instructional practices of new and experienced GTAs teaching these labs. We…

  11. Can Graduate Teaching Assistants Teach Inquiry-Based Geology Labs Effectively?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryker, Katherine; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the implementation of teaching strategies by graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in inquiry-based introductory geology labs at a large research university. We assess the degree of inquiry present in each Physical Geology lab and compare and contrast the instructional practices of new and experienced GTAs teaching these labs. We…

  12. Research and development of methods/utilities and rules for managing cooperation for performance improvement in government offices

    SciTech Connect

    Kurstedt, H.A.

    1993-03-01

    Purpose is to help managers approach their responsibilities proactively, so that they can anticipate problems and take actions to alleviate or eliminate those problems. Continuous performance improvement, the philosophy behind total quality management, requires working cooperatively to do a little better each day. The most effective tools are working through a closed set of 9 methods: setting expectations, charting, defining indicators and standards, collecting and logging data, converting data to information, organizing and presenting information, reviewing status and progress, self-management, and appraising. In addition, there are 8 rules: focus on what you can do, supply physical evidence of progress, pay attention to detail, inspect (don't expect), review progress routinely and frequently, face ''success/fail'' squarely, communicate crisply, and conduct honest, open appraisals. Scope and plans of the draft research plan (study areas) are described.

  13. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A

    2008-12-12

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  14. 63 FR 45095 - Lab Test On Kennedy Assassination Evidence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Lab Test On Kennedy Assassination Evidence AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) will work with the...

  15. Clinical governance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J

    Clinical governance has marked a significant shift towards involving clinicians in the assurances of both quality and accountability in healthcare delivery. The White Paper (Department of Health (DoH), 1997) stated that: 'The Government will require every NHS trust to embrace the concept of clinical governance, so that quality is at the core, both of their responsibilities as organizations, and of each of their staff as individual professionals.' In order to achieve this the Government will bring forward legislation to give NHS trusts a new duty for maintaining quality care. Under these arrangements, chief executives will carry ultimate responsibility for assuring the quality of the services provided by their NHS trust, just as they are already accountable for the proper use of resources. In 'A First Class Service Quality in the NHS' (DoH, 1998), clinical governance is defined as 'a framework through which NHS organizations are accountable for continuously improving the quality of their services and safeguarding high standards of care by creating an environment in which excellence in clinical care will flourish'. The principles of clinical governance apply to all those who provide or manage patient care services in the NHS. It requires staff to work in partnerships, breaking down boundaries by providing integrated care within health and social care teams (Wilson, 1996), and between practitioners and managers and between the NHS, patients and the public. PMID:9830912

  16. Summary report of NIST's industry-government consortium research program on flowmeter installation effects with emphasis on the research period, January-September 1991: The reducer

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, G.E.; Yeh, T.T.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents recent results obtained in a consortium-sponsored research program on flowmeter installation effects being conducted at NIST-Gaithersburg, MD. The objective of this research program is to produce improved flowmeter performance when meters are installed in non-ideal conditions. Ideal meter installation conditions are those where long straight lengths of constant diameter piping precede the meter locations. Actual installations seldom conform to these conditions. This research effort has also included experimental studies of the flow into and out of several tube bundle flow conditioners. These results have produced, for the first time, detailed descriptions of the effects these devices have on swirling pipe flows. Specifically, this report contains measurements of the pipeflows produced downstream of the conventional reducer. Results are given for the performance characteristics of a range of orifice meter geometries and a specific turbine meter in these pipe flows. Also included are the velocity profile measurements downstream of the tee used as an elbow and several arrangements of tube bundles installed downstream of the single elbow and the tee used as an elbow.

  17. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  18. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  19. Research and development of methods and tools for achieving and maintaining consensus processes in the face of change within and among government oversight agencies: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This progress report summarizes our research activities under our consensus grant. In year four of the grant, we continued to capitalize on and benefit from historical events which drove our early emphasis on group process studies. Following our work on various procedures for bringing together groups such as the State and Tribal Government Working Group and the Stakeholders' Forum (both of which provide input to the Five-Year Waste Plan), we continue to observe these groups and collect data. We also began a configuration study involving the complex modeling of DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Related to group process studies is the issue of the information requirements for individuals making decisions in consensus groups. Our information studies examined the requirements for decision-related information, frameworks for such information, and the effectiveness of information portrayed for decision making. However, we were able not only to continue studying consensus groups in action and related information issues, but also to focus considerable attention on the fundamental side of our research. The fundamental or basic research conducted in year four included: (1) expanding our literature database; (2) beginning the writing of the literature review summary document and the consensus guide; (3) developing frameworks and models such as the Environmental Trilogy model and a structural equations model of the consensus process; and (4) conducting laboratory studies concerning the effects of the presence of an expert, met expectations, opportunity to express views, incentive structure and conflict type (competitive versus collaborative) on consensus outcomes.

  20. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4–5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented. PMID:25060862

  1. Routing cancer immunology and immunotherapy from the lab to the clinic 4-5 th March 2014, Center for Applied Medical Research and University Clinic, Pamplona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M Ángela; Melero, Ignacio; Quetglas, José I

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to generate effective anticancer responses by either inducing immune responses or inhibiting immunosuppression are under development to improve efficacy in patients. On March 4-5th, 2014, a symposium was held in Pamplona, Spain, to report the new strategies showing preclinical and clinical results regarding translational research efforts on the topic. Participants interacted through oral presentations of 15 speakers and further discussions on topics that included novel therapeutic agents for cancer immunotherapy, viral vectors and interferon-based approaches, experimental tumor imaging and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies. Promising agents to target cancer cells and therapeutic approaches that are under translation from bench to patients were presented. PMID:25060862

  2. Results Outbrief from the 2014 CombustionLab Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2015-01-01

    On October 24-25, 2014, NASA Headquarters and the NASA Glenn Research Center sponsored the CombustionLab Workshop in Pasadena, CA as part of the 30th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research. The two-day event brought together scientists and engineers from academia, industry, other government agencies, and international space agencies. The goal of the workshop was to identify key engineering drivers and research priorities, and to provide overall recommendations for the development of the next generation of combustion science experiments for the International Space Station (ISS). The workshop was divided in to 6 topical areas: Droplets, Sprays and Aerosols; Non-Premixed Flames; Premixed Flames; High Pressure and Supercritical Reacting Systems; Fire Safety; Heterogeneous Reaction Processes. Each of these areas produced summary findings which were assembled into a report and were integrated into the NASA budget planning process. The summary results of this process are presented with implementation plans and options for the future.

  3. DOSAR/CalLab Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program Calibration Laboratory (CalLab), referred to formerly as the Radiation Calibration Laboratory. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments.

  4. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  5. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. NASA GeneLab Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Terri; Gibbs, Kristina; Rask, Jon; Coughlan, Joseph; Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    NASA's GeneLab aims to greatly increase the number of scientists that are using data from space biology investigations on board ISS, emphasizing a systems biology approach to the science. When completed, GeneLab will provide the integrated software and hardware infrastructure, analytical tools and reference datasets for an assortment of model organisms. GeneLab will also provide an environment for scientists to collaborate thereby increasing the possibility for data to be reused for future experimentation. To maximize the value of data from life science experiments performed in space and to make the most advantageous use of the remaining ISS research window, GeneLab will apply an open access approach to conducting spaceflight experiments by generating, and sharing the datasets derived from these biological studies in space.Onboard the ISS, a wide variety of model organisms will be studied and returned to Earth for analysis. Laboratories on the ground will analyze these samples and provide genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic data. Upon receipt, NASA will conduct data quality control tasks and format raw data returned from the omics centers into standardized, annotated information sets that can be readily searched and linked to spaceflight metadata. Once prepared, the biological datasets, as well as any analysis completed, will be made public through the GeneLab Space Bioinformatics System webb as edportal. These efforts will support a collaborative research environment for spaceflight studies that will closely resemble environments created by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and other institutions in additional areas of study, such as cancer and environmental biology. The results will allow for comparative analyses that will help scientists around the world take a major leap forward in understanding the effect of microgravity, radiation, and other aspects of the space environment on model organisms. These efforts will speed the process of scientific sharing, iteration, and discovery.

  8. The Government as Publisher: An Historical Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiflett, Orvin Lee

    1982-01-01

    Reviews literature on the history of the federal government's publishing activities, focusing on the importance of the history of government publishing, general histories published, relationship of libraries to government publications, problems in texts of government publications, research on printing and printers, and areas of needed research

  9. Perspectives on Industrial Innovation from Agilent, HP, and Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is the life blood of technology companies. I will give perspectives gleaned from a career in research and development at Bell Labs, HP Labs, and Agilent Labs, from the point of view of an individual contributor and a manager. Physicists bring a unique set of skills to the corporate environment, including a desire to understand the fundamentals, a solid foundation in physical principles, expertise in applied mathematics, and most importantly, an attitude: namely, that hard problems can be solved by breaking them into manageable pieces. In my experience, hiring managers in industry seldom explicitly search for physicists, but they want people with those skills.

  10. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the support of the literature and the readiness of the IAD administration and teachers, a recommendation to implement virtual labs into the curriculum can be made.

  11. Berkeley Lab: A Place of Wonder, Spring 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    Video produced in early 2006. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has been a leader in science and engineering research for more than 75 years. The Lab conducts a wide range of scientific research with key efforts in fundamental studies of the universe, quantitative biology, nanoscience, new energy systems and environmental solutions, and the use of computing as a tool for discovery. Located on a 200 acre site in the hills above the University of California's Berkeley campus, adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, Berkeley Lab holds the distinction of being the oldest of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Eleven Nobel laureates are associated with Berkeley Lab. It is managed by the University of California.

  12. In Brief: Russian lab added to Arctic observatory program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-05-01

    A research laboratory in Tiksi, Russia, has been added to five existing Arctic labs that comprise NOAA's Arctic Atmospheric Observatory Program. The lab's location, a few kilometers to the northwest of the new Tiksi weather station in north-central Siberia, was chosen for its clean and clear air that will allow good measurement of aerosols, air chemistry, cloud properties, ozone, solar radiation, temperature, water vapor, and winds. The Tiksi lab was formed through a partnership of NOAA, the U.S. National Science Foundation, and the Russian Federal Service for Hydrometeorology and Environment Monitoring. Alexander MacDonald, director of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, said, ``The development of the facility is an excellent example of cooperation between Russia and the [United States] and will help to strengthen international collaboration in science, recognizing the importance of addressing environmental issues of common concern.'' The other labs are located in Canada, Greenland, Norway, Russia, and the United States.

  13. More Government in R and D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, John

    1972-01-01

    An analysis of the Rothschild and Dainton report in Great Britain, entitled A Framework for Government Research and Development, that suggests there is no basis for decisions about government research. (Editor/PG)

  14. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  15. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  16. TQM in a Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.; Phillips, Julie A.

    At the Purdue University School of Technology (PST) at Columbus, Indiana, the Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophy was used in the computer laboratories to better meet student needs. A customer satisfaction survey was conducted to gather data on lab facilities, lab assistants, and hardware/software; other sections of the survey included…

  17. GeoLab: A Geological Workstation for Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Li, Zheng; Tong, Shuo; Zhong, Ye; Dahiwala, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance theThe GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance the early scientific returns from future missions and ensure that the best samples are selected for Earth return. The facility was also designed to foster the development of instrument technology. Since 2009, when GeoLab design and construction began, the GeoLab team [a group of scientists from the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at JSC] has progressively developed and reconfigured the GeoLab hardware and software interfaces and developed test objectives, which were to 1) determine requirements and strategies for sample handling and prioritization for geological operations on other planetary surfaces, 2) assess the scientific contribution of selective in-situ sample characterization for mission planning, operations, and sample prioritization, 3) evaluate analytical instruments and tools for providing efficient and meaningful data in advance of sample return and 4) identify science operations that leverage human presence with robotic tools. In the first year of tests (2010), GeoLab examined basic glovebox operations performed by one and two crewmembers and science operations performed by a remote science team. The 2010 tests also examined the efficacy of basic sample characterization [descriptions, microscopic imagery, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses] and feedback to the science team. In year 2 (2011), the GeoLab team tested enhanced software and interfaces for the crew and science team (including Web-based and mobile device displays) and demonstrated laboratory configurability with a new diagnostic instrument (the Multispectral Microscopic Imager from the JPL and Arizona State University). In year 3 (2012), the GeoLab team installed and tested a robotic sample manipulator and evaluated robotic-human interfaces for science operations.

  18. Activities at iThemba LABS Cyclotron Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bark, R. M.; Cornell, J.; Lawrie, J. J.; Vilakazi, Z. Z.

    iThemba Laboratory for Acceleratory Based Sciences (iThemba LABS) is a multi-disciplinary cyclotron facility. Chief among its activities is the operation of a k=200 sepparate sector cyclotron (SSC) which provides proton beams of energies up to 200 MeV. These beams are used for fundamental nuclear physics research in the intermediate energy region, isotope production and medical physics applications. Details on developments regarding the new flagship project at iThemba LABS are also presented.

  19. RiskLab - a joint Teaching Lab on Hazard and Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruffini, Mi.; Baruffini, Mo.; Thuering, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the future natural disasters are expected to increase due to climatic changes that strongly affect environmental, social and economical systems. For this reason and because of the limited resources, governments require analytical risk analysis for a better mitigation planning. Risk analysis is a process to determine the nature and extent of risk by estimating potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that could pose a potential threat or harm to people, property, livelihoods and environment. This process has become a generally accepted approach for the assessment of cost-benefit scenarios; originating from technical risks it is being applied to natural hazards for several years now in Switzerland. Starting from these premises "Risk Lab", a joint collaboration between the Institute of Earth Sciences of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and the Institute for Economic Research of the University of Lugano, has been started in 2006, aiming to become a competence centre about Risk Analysis and Evaluation. The main issue studied by the lab concerns the topic "What security at what price?" and the activities follow the philosophy of the integral risk management as proposed by PLANAT, that defines the process as a cycle that contains different and interrelated phases. The final aim is to change the population and technician idea about risk from "defending against danger" to "being aware of risks" through a proper academic course specially addressed to young people. In fact the most important activity of the laboratory consists in a degree course, offered both to Engineering and Architecture students of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and Economy Students of the University of Lugano. The course is structured in two main parts: an introductive, theoretical part, composed by class lessons, where the main aspects of natural hazards, risk perception and evaluation and risk management are presented and analyzed, and a second part, composed by practical activities, where students can learn specific statistical methods and test and use technical software. Special importance is given to seminars held by experts or members of Civil Protection and risk management institutes. Excursions are often organized to directly see and study practical case studies (Eg. The city of Locarno and the lake Maggiore inundations). The course is organized following a "classical" structure (it's mainly held in a class or in an informatics lab), but students can also benefit from a special web portal, powered by "e.coursers" , the official USI/SUPSI Learning Management System , where they can find issues and documents about natural hazards and risk management. The main pedagogical value is that students can attend a course which is entirely devoted to dealing with natural and man-made hazards and risk, allowing them to resume geological, space planning and economic issues and to face real case studies in a challenging and holistic environment. The final aim of the course is to provide students an useful and integrated "toolbox", essential to cope with and to resolve the overwhelming problems due to vulnerability and danger increase of the present-day society. The course has by now reached the third academic year and the initial results are encouraging: beyond the knowledge and expertise acquired, the graduate students, that are now for the most part working in engineering studies or private companies, have shown to have acquired a mentality devoted to understanding and managing risk. REFERENCES PLANAT HTTP://WWW.CENAT.CH/INDEX.PHP?USERHASH=79598753&L=D&NAVID=154 ECOURSES HTTP://CORSI.ELEARNINGLAB.ORG/ NAHRIS HTTP://WWW.NAHRIS.CH/

  20. The Problem with Organic Chemistry Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrig, Jerry R.

    2004-01-01

    The problem with organic chemistry labs is that the educational objectives of lab instructions are often vague and seldom stated. The great majority of organic chemistry labs in American colleges and universities are based on verification experiments.

  1. Home - Nanotechnology Characterization Lab

    Cancer.gov

    Eliminating suffering and death from cancer requires an unprecedented collaborative effort that leverages resources from government, industry, and academia. Working in concert with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established the Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory to perform preclinical efficacy and toxicity testing of nanoparticles.

  2. Vested Interests in Addiction Research and Policy Alcohol policies out of context: drinks industry supplanting government role in alcohol policies in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Øystein; Endal, Dag

    2010-01-01

    Background In this paper, we describe an analysis of alcohol policy initiatives sponsored by alcohol producer SABMiller and the International Center on Alcohol Policies, an alcohol industry-funded organization. In a number of sub-Saharan countries these bodies have promoted a ‘partnership’ role with governments to design national alcohol policies. Methodology A comparison was conducted of four draft National Alcohol Policy documents from Lesotho, Malawi, Uganda and Botswana using case study methods. Findings The comparison indicated that the four drafts are almost identical in wording and structure and that they are likely to originate from the same source. Conclusions The processes and the draft policy documents reviewed provide insights into the methods, as well as the strategic and political objectives of the multi-national drinks industry. This initiative reflects the industry's preferred version of a national alcohol policy. The industry policy vision ignores, or chooses selectively from, the international evidence base on alcohol prevention developed by independent alcohol researchers and disregards or minimizes a public health approach to alcohol problems. The policies reviewed maintain a narrow focus on the economic benefits from the trade in alcohol. In terms of alcohol problems (and their remediation) the documents focus upon individual drinkers, ignoring effective environmental interventions. The proposed policies serve the industry's interests at the expense of public health by attempting to enshrine ‘active participation of all levels of the beverage alcohol industry as a key partner in the policy formulation and implementation process’. PMID:20078460

  3. Biology and the Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Roger D.

    1969-01-01

    Emphasizes the social implications of biological knowledge and discusses two main government roles in biology: (1) a creative and supportive role, including support of education and research, (2) control, regulation and protection related to the applications of biological knowledge. Public control is considered necessary in areas such as food and…

  4. Biography as Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Joakim

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the increasing interest of Swedish schools to construct, analyze, assess and control the individual progression and social integration of students using biographical registers. I argue that this tendency--involving biography as a form of governance--can be seen as a revision of early 20th-century biographical research by the…

  5. Avian Disease & Oncology Lab (ADOL) Research Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Employing Genomics, Epigenetics, and Immunogenetics to Control Diseases Induced by Avian Tumor Viruses - Gene expression is a major factor accounting for phenotypic variation. Taking advantage of allele-specific expression (ASE) screens, we found the use of genetic markers was superior to traditiona...

  6. Biomedical engineering research at DOE national labs

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    Biomedical Engineering is the application of principles of physics, chemistry, nd engineering to problems of human health. The National Laboratories of the U.S. Department of Energy have been leaders in this scientific field since 1947. This inventory of their biomedical engineering projects was compiled in January 1999.

  7. Renewing the compact between science and government

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    The historical relationship between science and government was profoundly changed by World War II and the vast nature of government sponsored research which continued in the post-war era but is now by threatened government budget deficits. The concepts advanced by the scientific community to justify continued government support are examined and compared to specific research and development program funding decisions. The use-inspired basic research justification is addressed in detail as an approach to strengthen the bridge between science and government. Some methodology to institutionalizing a new compact for government funded research is presented in detail. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The effect of lab sequence in science instruction: The consequences of shifting labs to the beginning of learning units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas R.

    This study examined the relationship between activity sequence and student outcomes in science instruction. Traditionally sequenced teacher learning units with lab activities late in activity sequence were compared to learning units with labs first in their activity sequence. A mixed-methods, quasi-experimental approach was used to test the effectiveness of a lab-first lesson approach suggested by the literature. Quantitative methods were used to assess content achievement; and qualitative methods were used to assess perception. No statistically significant difference was found between the approaches, although the researcher interpreted the results as suggesting some learning advantage for a lab-first approach. Although the teacher thought lab-first appeared to enhance learning, and students seemed to notice no difference during instruction, students preferred and thought they learned best with a lab-last approach. The teacher's view of the lab-first approach was positive; and he is inclined to continue to use it in his practice following the study.

  9. NADA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 19: The US government technical report and the transfer of federally funded aerospace R/D: An analysis of five studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the 'NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project'. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reprts and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from five studies of our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report and close with a brief overview of on-going research into the use of the U.S. government technical report as a rhetorical device for transferring federally funded aerospace R&D.

  10. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  11. 76 FR 10925 - Bio-Life Labs, Inc., BSI2000, Inc., Calais Resources, Inc., EGX Funds Transfer, Inc., Great...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Bio-Life Labs, Inc., BSI2000, Inc., Calais Resources, Inc., EGX Funds Transfer, Inc., Great... there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Bio-Life Labs,...

  12. 79 FR 73698 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel RV SEA LAB; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel RV SEA LAB... of the vessel RV SEA LAB is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Charter six passengers for...

  13. 80 FR 11517 - In the Matter of Agent155 Media Corp., QSound Labs, Inc., STEN Corp., and Wind Energy America...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2015-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of Agent155 Media Corp., QSound Labs, Inc., STEN Corp., and Wind Energy America, Inc... concerning the securities of QSound Labs, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the...

  14. 65 FR 46907 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Kirtland Area Office-Sandia National Lab

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Kirtland Area Office--Sandia National Lab AGENCY... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Kirtland Area Office-Sandia National Lab....

  15. 79 FR 11869 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel RV SEA LAB; Invitation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-03-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel RV SEA LAB... of the vessel RV SEA LAB is: Intended Commercial Use of Vessel: ``Charter six passengers for...

  16. 63 FR 59952 - Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); Program Announcement LAB NE-99-1 Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-11-06

    ... Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); Program Announcement LAB NE-99-1 Nuclear Energy Research... Program Announcement LAB NE-99-1. SUMMARY: The Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, U.S..., responding to Program Announcement LAB NE-99-1 should be received by DOE by 4:30 P.M. P.S.T. November...

  17. Commerce Lab - A program of commercial flight opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J.; Atkins, H. L.; Williams, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Commerce Lab is conceived as an adjunct to the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) by providing a focal point for commercial missions which could utilize existing NSTS carrier and resource capabilities for on-orbit experimentation in the microgravity sciences. In this context, the Commerce Lab program provides mission planning for private sector involvement in the space program, in general, and the commercial exploitation of the microgravity environment for materials processing research and development. It is expected that Commerce Lab will provide a logical transition between currently planned NSTS missions and future microgravity science and commercial R&D missions centered around the Space Station. The present study identifies candidate Commerce Lab flight experiments and their development status and projects a mission traffic model that can be used in commercial mission planning.

  18. Bacteriophage as instructional organisms in introductory biology labs

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Designing lab exercises for introductory biology classes requires balancing the need for students to obtain results with a desire to provide unpredictable outcomes to better approximate actual research. Bacteriophage are particularly well suited for this as many species are well-understood but, with their hosts, represent a relatively complex interacting system. I have designed a seven week series of lab exercises that allow students to select bacteriophage resistant mutant hosts, isolate and sequence the corresponding receptor gene to identify the specific bacterial mutation from a large number of potential mutations. I also examined the possibility of collecting useful mutant strains for other studies. After two semesters, the lab series is working well with over 90% of students successfully isolating mutant bacteria and about half identifying the specific mutation. Here I discuss the advantages of using bacteriophage in an introductory class, the specific labs in this series and future plans. PMID:24478938

  19. Lab-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  20. Energy Efficient Buildings and Appliances: From Berkeley Lab to the Marketplace (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Rosenfeld, Art [Commissioner, California Energy Commission

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Art Rosenfeld, an appointee to the California Energy Commission and one of the architects of energy efficiency research at Berkeley Lab in the 1970s, discusses what it takes to shepherd innovative energy efficiency research from the lab to the real world.

  1. Lab and Imaging Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Center of Research Program RTFCCR/LLS Patient-Focused Immunotherapy Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology ... Center of Research Program RTFCCR/LLS Patient-Focused Immunotherapy Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology ...

  2. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  3. State of the Lab 2012

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  4. First Day in Organic Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Christine K. F.

    1996-09-01

    This experiment is designed to introduce students to the techniques of reflux, distillation, gas chromatography, and the determination of boiling point and melting point during one lab period. This lab is written so that it can be performed during the first day of lab in organic chemistry, without the students necessarily knowing any organic chemistry. The students answer questions, based upon their observation of the reflux and distillation apparatus, which are already assembled and in operation upon the students' arrival in the lab. Melting points and boiling points are performed by the students on unknown samples, and these unknowns were identified by comparison to a limited list of possibilities. A mixture of alcohols is analyzed by the students. Each student injects a sample under supervision, obtains a chromatogram, and from this, calculates peak area.

  5. A Survey of LTR Program Industry Partner Satisfaction at Oak Ridge National Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.L.; Kniel, C.

    2000-02-01

    As a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) participates in the Laboratory Technology Research (LTR) Program. The mission of the LTR Program is to advance science and technology, in support of DOE missions, toward innovative applications through cost-shared partnerships with the private sector. The benefits to industry participants include gaining access to world-class researchers and facilities, while the benefits to the ORNL researchers includes leveraging the declining government-provided funds. Thus, the importance placed upon industry partner satisfaction is large, especially if the LTR Program is to be sustained during episodes of government budget constraints. Realizing the critical nature of partner satisfaction, in 1998 the DOE-SC National Laboratories surveyed industrial partners to assess their satisfaction with the cooperative research projects in which they were involved. This paper will describe the survey methodology including development of the questionnaire and a summary of the responses (particularly those which are germane to the ORNL.) The results of the survey will be categorized as follows: (1) Desire to partner again with ORNL; (2) Benefits obtained by the company from the partnership; and (3) LTR Program ratings assigned in 11 key areas (i.e., quality of work, expertise, protection of intellectual property, value, facilities, understanding company needs, reliability of funding, schedule responsiveness, project management, contract negotiation, and contract administration.) More information about the LTR Program can be found at http://www.er.doe.gov/production/octr/aentr/aeptrnr.html.

  6. GridLAB-D/SG

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-08-30

    GridLAB-D is a new power system simulation tool that provides valuable information to users who design and operate electric power transmission and distribution systems, and to utilities that wish to take advantage of the latest smart grid technology. This special release of GridLAB-D was developed to study the proposed Smart Grid technology that is used by Battelle Memorial Institute in the AEP gridSMART demonstration project in Northeast Columbus, Ohio.

  7. Optimize Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies for Government Agencies, Industrial Facilities, and Military Installations: NREL Offers Proven Tools and Resources to Reduce Energy Use and Improve Efficiency (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Lab provides expertise, facilities, and technical assistance to campuses, facilities, and government agencies to apply renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies.

  8. OpenLabNotes - An Electronic Laboratory Notebook Extension for OpenLabFramework.

    PubMed

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are more accessible and reliable than their paper based alternatives and thus find widespread adoption. While a large number of commercial products is available, small- to mid-sized laboratories can often not afford the costs or are concerned about the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also be advantageous if an ELN was integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to OpenLabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively closes the gap between research documentation and sample management, thus making Open-LabFramework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management. PMID:26673790

  9. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  10. Dancing Around My Technology Classroom Box (My Second RET Lab)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory the author had been assigned for his RET (Research Experience for Teachers) at Vanderbilt University is new and different from the one he had previously experienced. This summer he was assigned to the Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-chip laboratory to help research dielectrophoresis. As this is an emerging technology, there was not a lot…

  11. Dancing Around My Technology Classroom Box (My Second RET Lab)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory the author had been assigned for his RET (Research Experience for Teachers) at Vanderbilt University is new and different from the one he had previously experienced. This summer he was assigned to the Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-chip laboratory to help research dielectrophoresis. As this is an emerging technology, there was not a lot…

  12. Berkeley's Advanced Labs for Undergraduate Astronomy Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, C.

    1998-12-01

    We currently offer three advanced laboratory courses for undergraduate majors: optical, IR, and radio. These courses contain both intellectual and practical content; in this talk we focus on the radio lab as a representative example. The first half of the semester concentrates on fundamentals of microwave electronics and radio astronomy techniques in four formal laboratory exercises which emphasize hands-on use of microwave devices, laboratory instruments, and computer-controlled data taking. The second half of the course emphasizes astronomy, using a horn with ~ 1 m(2) aperture to map the HI in the Galaxy and a two-element interferometer composed of ~ 1 m diameter dishes on a ~ 10 m baseline to measure accurate positions of radio sources and accurate diameters for the Sun and Moon. These experiments and observations offer ideal opportunities for teaching coordinates, time, rotation matrices, data reduction techniques, least squares, signal processing, image processing, Fourier transforms, and laboratory and astronomical instrumentation. The students can't get along without using computers as actually used by astronomers. We stay away from packaged software such as IRAF, which are ``black boxes''; rather, students learn far more by writing their own software, usually for the first time. They use the IDL language to take and reduce data and prepare them for the lab reports. We insist on quality reports---including tables, postscript graphs and images, correct grammar, spelling, and all the rest---and we strongly urge (successfully!) the students to use LATEX. The other two lab courses have the same emphasis: the guiding spirit is to place the students in a real-life research-like situation. There is too much to do, so students perform the work in small groups of 3 or 4 and groups are encouraged to share their knowledge. Lab reports are written individually. These courses are very demanding, requiring an average of 20 hours per week from the students (and probably more from the instructors). Everybody loves it!

  13. Installation and use of LabKey Server for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Eckels, Joshua; Hussey, Peter; Nelson, Elizabeth K; Myers, Tamra; Rauch, Adam; Bellew, Matthew; Connolly, Brian; Law, Wendy; Eng, Jimmy K; Katz, Jonathan; McIntosh, Martin; Mallick, Parag; Igra, Mark

    2011-12-01

    LabKey Server (formerly CPAS, the Computational Proteomics Analysis System) provides a Web-based platform for mining data from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomic experiments. This open source platform supports systematic proteomic analyses and secure data management, integration, and sharing. LabKey Server incorporates several tools currently used in proteomic analysis, including the X! Tandem search engine, the ProteoWizard toolkit, and the PeptideProphet and ProteinProphet data mining tools. These tools and others are integrated into LabKey Server, which provides an extensible architecture for developing high-throughput biological applications. The LabKey Server analysis pipeline acts on data in standardized file formats, so that researchers may use LabKey Server with other search engines, including Mascot or SEQUEST, that follow a standardized format for reporting search engine results. Supported builds of LabKey Server are freely available at http://www.labkey.com/. Documentation and source code are available under the Apache License 2.0 at http://www.labkey.org. PMID:22161569

  14. Metrology - Beyond the Calibration Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    We rely on data from measurements every day; a gas-pump, a speedometer, and a supermarket weight scale are just three examples of measurements we use to make decisions. We generally accept the data from these measurements as "valid." One reason we can accept the data is the "legal metrology" requirements established and regulated by the government in matters of commerce. The measurement data used by NASA, other government agencies, and industry can be critical to decisions which affect everything from economic viability, to mission success, to the security of the nation. Measurement data can even affect life and death decisions. Metrology requirements must adequately provide for risks associated with these decisions. To do this, metrology must be integrated into all aspects of an industry including research, design, testing, and product acceptance. Metrology, the science of measurement, has traditionally focused on the calibration of instruments, and although instrument calibration is vital, it is only a part of the process that assures quality in measurement data. For example, measurements made in research can influence the fundamental premises that establish the design parameters, which then flow down to the manufacturing processes, and eventually impact the final product. Because a breakdown can occur anywhere within this cycle, measurement quality assurance has to be integrated into every part of the life-cycle process starting with the basic research and ending with the final product inspection process. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of metrology in the various phases of a product's life-cycle. For simplicity, the cycle will be divided in four broad phases, with discussions centering on metrology within NASA. .

  15. An Overview of Dark Matter Experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    James Boyce

    2012-09-01

    Dark Matter research at Jefferson Lab started in 2006 with the LIght Pseudoscalar and Scalar Search (LIPSS) collaboration to check the validity of results reported by the PVLAS collaboration. In the intervening years interest in dark matter laboratory experiments has grown at Jefferson Lab. Current research underway or in planning stages probe various mass regions covering 14 orders of magnitude: from 10{sup -6} eV to 100 MeV. This presentation will be an overview of our dark matter efforts, three of which focus on the hypothesized A' gauge boson.

  16. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 17: The relationship between seven variables and the use of US government technical reports by US aerospace engineers and scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.; Glassman, Nanci; Demerath, Loren

    1991-01-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the use of U.S. government technical reports by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists and seven selected sociometric variables. Data were collected by means of a self-administered mail survey which was distributed to a randomly drawn sample of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) members. Two research questions concerning the use of conference meeting papers, journal articles, in-house technical reports, and U.S. government technical reports were investigated. Relevance, technical quality, and accessibility were found to be more important determinants of the overall extent to which U.S. government technical reports and three other information products were used by U.S. aerospace engineers and scientists.

  17. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-28

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  18. Painless dental laser - Keith Murry in lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA inventor Keith Murray checks out laser technology that promises to make painless dental lasers affordable for dentists and their patients. Developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., the dual-wavelength laser can be electronically switched between the two laser frequencies important to dentists. Co-inventors of the technology are Murray, Norman Barnes, also of Langley, and Ralph Hutcheson of Scientific Materials Corp., Bozeman, Montana. The technology was originally developed for studies of atmospheric wind change. Photographed in building 1202, laser lab.

  19. NTAL/LAB/LAT2

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Shoko; Jensen, Bettina M.; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.

    2007-01-01

    NTAL (non-T cell activation linker)/LAB (linker for activation of B cells), now officially termed LAT2 (linker for activation of T cells 2) is a 25-30 kD transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP) associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane fractions (GEMs; lipid raft) in specific cell types of hematopoietic lineage. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NTAL/LAB/LAT2 is induced by FcεRI aggregation and Kit dimerization in mast cells, FcγRI aggregation in monocytes, and BCR aggregation in B cells. NTAL/LAB/LAT2 is also expressed in resting NK cells but, unlike the related TRAP, LAT, not in resting T cells. As demonstrated in monocytes and B cells, phosphorylated NTAL/LAB/LAT2 recruits signaling molecules such as Grb2, Gab1 and c-Cbl into receptor-signaling complexes. Although gene knock out and knock down studies have indicated that NTAL/LAB/LAT2 may function as both a positive and negative regulator of mast cell activation, its precise role in the activation of these and other hematopoietic cells remains enigmatic. PMID:17118694

  20. 1974 State Education Legislation and Activity: General Governance and Administration. A survey of the States. Research Brief, Vol. 3, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayas, Denise Kale; Ross, Doris M.

    This report, fifth in a series, is a collection of information on 1974 state education legislation and activity. The raw data information, rapidly processed for early release, includes 700 legislative items related to general governance and administration of elementary and secondary schools. The legislation from all 50 states reported has been…