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Sample records for gp patient survey

  1. The Opinions of GP's Patients About Suicide, Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Suicide Prevention: An Italian Survey.

    PubMed

    Poma, Stefano Zanone; Vicentini, Silvia; Siviero, Francesca; Grossi, Antonello; Toniolo, Emanuele; Baldo, Vincenzo; De Leo, Diego

    2015-08-01

    A survey about opinions on end-of-life issues of a population represented by 1,171 people in the waiting room of general practitioners' surgeries was conducted in a province of northern Italy. Most subjects did not consider suicide as a reasonable option even in cases of a serious and incurable disease. Moreover, subjects did not consider euthanasia as a possible option either; however, they did express an opposite attitude when considering euthanasia in a third-person perspective. People with a personal history of suicidal behavior appear to present as a different population, overall expressing more open attitudes. PMID:25382548

  2. International variation in GP treatment strategies for subclinical hypothyroidism in older adults: a case-based survey

    PubMed Central

    den Elzen, Wendy PJ; Lefèbre-van de Fliert, Anne A; Virgini, Vanessa; Mooijaart, Simon P; Frey, Peter; Kearney, Patricia M; Kerse, Ngaire; Mallen, Christian D; McCarthy, Vera JC; Muth, Christiane; Rosemann, Thomas; Russell, Audrey; Schers, Henk; Stott, David J; de Waal, Margot WM; Warner, Alex; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Rodondi, Nicolas; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence about the impact of treatment for subclinical hypothyroidism, especially among older people. Aim To investigate the variation in GP treatment strategies for older patients with subclinical hypothyroidism depending on country and patient characteristics. Design and setting Case-based survey of GPs in the Netherlands, Germany, England, Ireland, Switzerland, and New Zealand. Method The treatment strategy of GPs (treatment yes/no, starting-dose thyroxine) was assessed for eight cases presenting a woman with subclinical hypothyroidism. The cases differed in the patient characteristics of age (70 versus 85 years), vitality status (vital versus vulnerable), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration (6 versus 15 mU/L). Results A total of 526 GPs participated (the Netherlands n = 129, Germany n = 61, England n = 22, Ireland n = 21, Switzerland n = 262, New Zealand n = 31; overall response 19%). Across countries, differences in treatment strategy were observed. GPs from the Netherlands (mean treatment percentage 34%), England (40%), and New Zealand (39%) were less inclined to start treatment than GPs in Germany (73%), Ireland (62%), and Switzerland (52%) (P = 0.05). Overall, GPs were less inclined to start treatment in 85-year-old than in 70-year-old females (pooled odds ratio [OR] 0.74 [95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.63 to 0.87]). Females with a TSH of 15 mU/L were more likely to get treated than those with a TSH of 6 mU/L (pooled OR 9.49 [95% CI = 5.81 to 15.5]). Conclusion GP treatment strategies of older people with subclinical hypothyroidism vary largely by country and patient characteristics. This variation underlines the need for a new generation of international guidelines based on the outcomes of randomised clinical trials set within primary care. PMID:25624308

  3. Reasons for elderly patients GP visits: results of a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Thomas; Mahlmeister, Jarmila; Deutsch, Tobias; Sandholzer, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to describe the frequency of reasons for elderly patients visits to a general practice (GP) setting. Subjects and methods Cross-sectional data from 8,877 randomly selected patients were assessed during a 1-year period by 209 GPs in the German federal state of Saxony. The reasons for visits, performed procedures, and results of visits were documented. In this study, the data of patients aged 65 years and older are analyzed and the procedural and nonprocedural reasons for visits are described. Results In all, 2,866 patients aged 65 years and older were included. The majority of patients (1,807) were female. A total of 4,426 reasons for visits were found, distributed on 363 International Classification of Primary Care-2 codes. In the mean, there were 1.5 reasons for a GP visit from each patient. The top five nonprocedural reasons for visiting the GP were: cough (1.8%), back complaints (1.6%), shoulder complaints (1.3%), knee complaints (1.1%), and dyspnea (1.0% of all reasons for visit). The top five procedural reasons for visiting the GP included follow-up investigations of cardiovascular or endocrine disorders and immunizations. The top 30 nonprocedural reasons for visits covered 21.9% of all reasons for visiting. The top 30 procedural reasons covered 54.3% of all reasons for visits. Conclusion The current work indicates that people aged 65 years and older consult the GP more frequently for procedural than for nonprocedural reasons. The top 30 procedural and nonprocedural reasons for visits cover ~75% of all reasons for visits in these patients. PMID:26893549

  4. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M; Henning, Steven W; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2016-05-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited dilution cloning, amplified cells were subjected to reverse transcription and 5' RACE to identify the variable TCRα and TCRβ subunit sequences. The full-length sequence was cloned into a retroviral vector separating both subunits by a P2A slippage sequence and introduced into Jurkat cells and primary T cells. Cytokine secreted by transduced cells in response to cognate peptide and gp100-expressing targets signifies that we have successfully cloned a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from actively depigmenting skin. PMID:26824221

  5. Surveying young patients.

    PubMed

    Foster, Theresa; Maillardet, Victoria

    2010-03-01

    The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (the Trust) was keen to engage young patients and to encourage them to give feedback about the service they had received. The standard Trust satisfaction survey was modified for use with young patients, and this had the effect of increasing the response rate from this patient group by 8%, and increasing the percentage of young patients aged 5-10 years completing the survey themselves by 29%. The vast majority of parents/guardians were happy for the Trust to survey their child, but the age of the child affected to whom they would like the survey sent. The Trust subsequently altered patient survey practice to write to parents/guardians of patients aged <12 years and directly to all patients aged > or = 12 years. PMID:20304894

  6. Qualitative study of depression management in primary care: GP and patient goals, and the value of listening

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Olwyn; Kumar, Satinder; Kendall, Kathleen; Peveler, Robert; Gabbay, John; Kendrick, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines for depression management have been developed but little is known about GP and patient goals, which are likely to influence treatment offers, uptake, and adherence. Aim To identify issues of importance to GPs, patients, and patients' supporters regarding depression management. GP and patient goals for depression management became a focus of the study. Design of study Grounded theory-based qualitative study. Setting GPs were drawn from 28 practices. The majority of patients and supporters were recruited from 10 of these practices. Method Sixty-one patients (28 depressed, 18 previously depressed, 15 never depressed), 18 supporters, and 32 GPs were interviewed. Results GPs described encouraging patients to view depression as separate from the self and ‘normal’ sadness. Patients and supporters often questioned such boundaries, rejecting the notion of a medical cure and emphasising self-management. The majority of participants who were considering depression-management strategies wanted to ‘get out’ of their depression. However, a quarter did not see this as immediately relevant or achievable. They focused on getting by from day to day, which had the potential to clash with GP priorities. GP frustration and uncertainty could occur when depression was resistant to cure. Participants identified the importance of GPs listening to patients, but often felt that this did not happen. Conclusion Physicians need greater awareness of the extent to which their goals for the management of depression are perceived as relevant or achievable by patients. Future research should explore methods of negotiating agreed strategies for management. PMID:17976282

  7. Staff perceptions on patient motives for attending GP-led urgent care centres in London: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Geva; Ignatowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Bucktowonsing, Medhavi; Ladbrooke, Tim; Millington, Hugh; Car, Josip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives General practitioner (GP)-led urgent care centres were established to meet the growing demand for urgent care. Staff members working in such centres are central in influencing patients’ choices about which services they use, but little is known about staff perceptions of patients’ motives for attending urgent care. We hence aimed to explore their perceptions of patients’ motives for attending such centres. Design A phenomenological, qualitative study, including semistructured interviews. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Setting 2 GP-led urgent care centres in 2 academic hospitals in London. Participants 15 staff members working at the centres including 8 GPs, 5 emergency nurse practitioners and 2 receptionists. Results We identified 4 main themes: ‘Confusion about choices’, ‘As if increase of appetite had grown; By what it fed on’, ‘Overt reasons, covert motives’ and ‘A question of legitimacy’. The participants thought that the centres introduce convenient and fast access for patients. So convenient, that an increasing number of patients use them as a regular alternative to their community GP. The participants perceived that patients attend the centres because they are anxious about their symptoms and view them as serious, cannot get an appointment with their GP quickly and conveniently, are dissatisfied with the GP, or lack self-care skills. Staff members perceived some motives as legitimate (an acute health need and difficulties in getting an appointment), and others as less legitimate (convenience, minor illness, and seeking quicker access to hospital facilities). Conclusions The participants perceived that patients attend urgent care centres because of the convenience of access relative to primary care, as well as sense of acuity and anxiety, lack self-care skills and other reasons. They perceived some motives as more legitimate than others. Attention to unmet needs in primary care can help in

  8. Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by ratio of antibodies to gp41 and p24.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Wethers, J; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1989-01-01

    Antibody responses of 85 patients to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigens were quantitated by densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays. All patients had been classified into the following three clinical categories: asymptomatic (ASY), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC), or AIDS. Fifty of the patients were monitored for 6 to 29 months. The gp41/p24 antibody ratio was examined in three studies. In the first study, initial specimens from each patient were analyzed. The mean gp41/p24 antibody ratios were 1.5 (ASY), 3.2 (ARC), and 5.4 (AIDS). Of ASY patients, 79% had antibody ratios of less than 2.0. In contrast, 72% of patients with AIDS had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. In the second study, serially obtained specimens from ASY, ARC, and AIDS patients were analyzed. These patients were further grouped according to progression of their clinical condition. Of ASY patients whose clinical condition progressed to ARC, 80% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of ARC patients whose clinical condition progressed to AIDS, 71% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of AIDS patients who died during the study, 100% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. No patients were treated with azidothymidine during the first two studies. In the third study, AIDS patients were monitored before and during treatment with azidothymidine. During treatment, ratios stabilized or improved transiently in five of seven patients. In these three studies, a gp41/p24 antibody ratio of less than 2.0 correlated with a benign clinical state and a ratio of greater than or equal to 2.0 correlated with AIDS or progression to AIDS. Images PMID:2501350

  9. Effect of the delegation of GP-home visits on the development of the number of patients in an ambulatory healthcare centre in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The AGnES-concept (AGnES: GP-supporting, community-based, e-health-assisted, systemic intervention) was developed to support general practitioners (GPs) in undersupplied regions. The project aims to delegate GP-home visits to qualified AGnES-practice assistants, to increase the number of patients for whom medical care can be provided. This paper focuses on the effect of delegating GP-home visits on the total number of patients treated. First, the theoretical number of additional patients treated by delegating home visits to AGnES-practice assistants was calculated. Second, actual changes in the number of patients in participating GP-practices were analyzed. Methods The calculation of the theoretical increase in the number of patients was based on project data, data which were provided by the Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians, or which came from the literature. Setting of the project was an ambulatory healthcare centre in the rural county Oberspreewald-Lausitz in the Federal State of Brandenburg, which employed six GPs, four of which participated in the AGnES project. The analysis of changes in the number of patients in the participating GP-practices was based on the practices’ reimbursement data. Results The calculated mean capacity of AGnES-practice assistants was 1376.5 home visits/year. GPs perform on average 1200 home visits/year. Since home visits with an urgent medical reason cannot be delegated, we included only half the capacity of the AGnES-practice assistants in the analysis (corresponding to a 20 hour-work week). Considering all parameters in the calculation model, 360.1 GP-working hours/year can be saved. These GP-hours could be used to treat 170 additional patients/quarter year. In the four participating GP-practices the number of patients increased on average by 133 patients/quarter year during the project period, which corresponds to 78% of the theoretically possible number of patients. Conclusions The empirical

  10. Structures of Ebola virus GP and sGP in complex with therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Jesper; Murin, Charles D; de Val, Natalia; Cottrell, Christopher A; Hastie, Kathryn M; Turner, Hannah L; Fusco, Marnie L; Flyak, Andrew I; Zeitlin, Larry; Crowe, James E; Andersen, Kristian G; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Ward, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus (EBOV) GP gene encodes two glycoproteins. The major product is a soluble, dimeric glycoprotein (sGP) that is secreted abundantly. Despite the abundance of sGP during infection, little is known regarding its structure or functional role. A minor product, resulting from transcriptional editing, is the transmembrane-anchored, trimeric viral surface glycoprotein (GP). GP mediates attachment to and entry into host cells, and is the intended target of antibody therapeutics. Because large portions of sequence are shared between GP and sGP, it has been hypothesized that sGP may potentially subvert the immune response or may contribute to pathogenicity. In this study, we present cryo-electron microscopy structures of GP and sGP in complex with GP-specific and GP/sGP cross-reactive antibodies undergoing human clinical trials. The structure of the sGP dimer presented here, in complex with both an sGP-specific antibody and a GP/sGP cross-reactive antibody, permits us to unambiguously assign the oligomeric arrangement of sGP and compare its structure and epitope presentation to those of GP. We also provide biophysical evaluation of naturally occurring GP/sGP mutations that fall within the footprints identified by our high-resolution structures. Taken together, our data provide a detailed and more complete picture of the accessible Ebolavirus glycoprotein landscape and a structural basis to evaluate patient and vaccine antibody responses towards differently structured products of the GP gene. PMID:27562261

  11. Pre-referral GP consultations in patients subsequently diagnosed with rarer cancers: a study of patient-reported data

    PubMed Central

    Mendonca, Silvia C; Abel, Gary A; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with cancer experience multiple pre-diagnostic consultations in primary care, leading to longer time intervals to specialist investigations and diagnosis. Patients with rarer cancers are thought to be at higher risk of such events, but concrete evidence of this is lacking. Aim To examine the frequency and predictors of repeat consultations with GPs in patients with rarer cancers. Design and setting Patient-reported data on pre-referral consultations from three English national surveys of patients with cancer (2010, 2013, and 2014), pooled to maximise the sample size of rarer cancers. Method The authors examined the frequency and crude and adjusted odds ratios for ≥3 (versus 1–2) pre-referral consultations by age, sex, ethnicity, level of deprivation, and cancer diagnosis (38 diagnosis groups, including 12 rarer cancers without prior relevant evidence). Results Among 7838 patients with 12 rarer cancers, crude proportions of patients with ≥3 pre-referral consultations ranged from >30.0% to 60.0% for patients with small intestine, bone sarcoma, liver, gallbladder, cancer of unknown primary, soft-tissue sarcoma, and ureteric cancer. The range was 15.0–30.0% for patients with oropharyngeal, anal, parotid, penile, and oral cancer. The overall proportion of responders with any cancer who had ≥3 consultations was 23.4%. Multivariable logistic regression indicated concordant patterns, with strong evidence for variation between rarer cancers (P <0.001). Conclusion Patients with rarer cancers experience pre-referral consultations at frequencies suggestive of middle-to-high diagnostic difficulty. The findings can guide the development of new diagnostic interventions and ‘safety-netting’ approaches for symptomatic presentations encountered in patients with rarer cancers. PMID:26917657

  12. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  13. Service factors causing delay in specialist assessment for TIA and minor stroke: a qualitative study of GP and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew; Coleby, Dawn; Regen, Emma; Phelps, Kay; Windridge, Kate; Willars, Janet; Robinson, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand how service factors contribute to delays to specialist assessment following transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or minor stroke. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews, analysis by constant comparison. Setting Leicester, UK. Participants Patients diagnosed with TIA or minor stroke, at hospital admission or in a rapid-access TIA clinic (n=42), general practitioners (GPs) of participating patients if they had been involved in the patients’ care (n=18). Data Accounts from patients and GPs of factors contributing to delay following action to seek help from a healthcare professional (HCP). Results The following categories of delay were identified. First, delay in assessment in general practice following contact with the service; this related to availability of same day appointments, and the role of the receptionist in identifying urgent cases. Second, delays in diagnosis by the HCP first consulted, including GPs, optometrists, out-of-hours services, walk-in centres and the emergency department. Third, delays in referral after a suspected diagnosis; these included variable use of the ABCD2 (Age, Blood pressure, Clinical features, Duration, Diabetes) risk stratification score and referral templates in general practice, and referral back to the patients’ GP in cases where he/she was not the first HCP consulted. Conclusions Primary and emergency care providers need to review how they can best handle patients presenting with symptoms that could be due to stroke or TIA. In general practice, this may include receptionist training and/or triage by a nurse or doctor. Mechanisms need to be established to enable direct referral to the TIA clinic when patients whose symptoms have resolved present to other agencies. Further work is needed to improve diagnostic accuracy by non-specialists. PMID:27188815

  14. Comparison of Predicted Scaffold-Compatible Sequence Variation in the Triple-Hairpin Structure of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 with Patient Data

    PubMed Central

    Boutonnet, Nathalie; Janssens, Wouter; Boutton, Carlo; Verschelde, Jean-Luc; Heyndrickx, Leo; Beirnaert, Els; van der Groen, Guido; Lasters, Ignace

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the ectodomain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 (e-gp41), involved in HIV entry into the target cell, exists in at least two conformations, a pre-hairpin intermediate and a fusion-active hairpin structure. To obtain more information on the structure-sequence relationship in e-gp41, we performed in silico a full single-amino-acid substitution analysis, resulting in a Fold Compatible Database (FCD) for each conformation. The FCD contains for each residue position in a given protein a list of values assessing the energetic compatibility (ECO) of each of the 20 natural amino acids at that position. Our results suggest that FCD predictions are in good agreement with the sequence variation observed for well-validated e-gp41 sequences. The data show that at a minECO threshold value of 5 kcal/mol, about 90% of the observed patient sequence variation is encompassed by the FCD predictions. Some inconsistent FCD predictions at N-helix positions packing against residues of the C helix suggest that packing of both peptides may involve some flexibility and may be attributed to an altered orientation of the C-helical domain versus the N-helical region. The permissiveness of sequence variation in the C helices is in agreement with FCD predictions. Comparison of N-core and triple-hairpin FCDs suggests that the N helices may impose more constraints on sequence variation than the C helices. Although the observed sequences of e-gp41 contain many multiple mutations, our method, which is based on single-point mutations, can predict the natural sequence variability of e-gp41 very well. PMID:12097573

  15. General practice ethics: text messages and boundaries in the GP-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Mintzker, Yishai; Rogers, Wendy

    2015-08-01

    Virtual forms of communication (eg texting) can support patients and may contribute to better care. However, these informal communication methods may intrude on the doctor’s leisure time and undermine standards of care if they replace face-to-face consultations.Texting may cross boundaries in potentially unprofessional ways, especially when particular patients are favoured with this privilege. It may disadvantage patients who are not favoured or who are not comfortable using mobile technology. We also note that GPs cannot control the distribution of their number or recall it without the inconvenience of changing the number once it has been disclosed.Virtual communication is an integral part of the way we live, despite the potential pitfalls. Each form (social media, electronic messaging systems, video consultations, mobile phones, etc) has its advantages and disadvantages. This makes it important for practices to develop policies supporting the responsible use of virtual communication. Such policies should:clarify (for patients and GPs) when its use is appropriate accommodate doctors’ individual preferences regarding technology provide guidance regarding GPs’ duties, especially for interactions that do not allow full evaluation of patients.GPs may wish to have specific criteria for providing patients with this degree of access, set very clear indications and contraindications to its use, explain the potential pitfalls, and ensure that text messages augment good care rather than replace it. PMID:26510150

  16. Exploring Self-Efficacy in Australian General Practitioners Managing Patient Obesity: A Qualitative Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, Freya; Sturgiss, Elizabeth; Haesler, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Australian community, and general practitioners (GPs) are commonly approached by patients for assistance in losing weight. Previous studies have shown that GPs have low self-efficacy and low outcome expectation when it comes to managing overweight and obese patients, which affects their willingness to initiate and continue with weight counselling. This qualitative survey study aimed to explore the factors influencing confidence and behaviour in obesity management in GPs. Method. Twelve GPs recruited to deliver a pilot of an obesity management program participated in semistructured interviews, and interpretive analysis underpinned by social cognitive theory was performed on the transcripts. Results. Analysis identified five main themes: (1) perceived knowledge and skills, (2) structure to management approach, (3) the GP-patient relationship, (4) acknowledged barriers to weight loss and lifestyle change, and (5) prior experience and outcome expectation. Conclusions. GPs are likely to welcome tools which provide a more structured approach to obesity management. Shifting away from weight and BMI as sole yardsticks for success or failure and emphasising positive lifestyle changes for their own sake may improve GP self-efficacy and allow for a more authentic GP-patient interaction. PMID:27274872

  17. GP Participation and Recruitment of Patients to RCTs: Lessons from Trials of Acupuncture and Exercise for Low Back Pain in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bell-Syer, Sally E. M.; Thorpe, Lucy N.; Thomas, Kate; MacPherson, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with general practitioner (GP) participation and the recruitment of people to trials in primary care, based on data from two trials of interventions for treating chronic low back pain. The study was based on data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs), one involving exercise, the other acupuncture, and subsequent reporting by GPs in a postal questionnaire. The exercise trial achieved 62% recruitment whereas the acupuncture trial achieved 100% recruitment. In both trials GPs most efficient at referring patients were those with a special interest in the subject area, and those known personally to the research team. A follow-up GP questionnaire found that both trials had maintained a high profile with over 80% of GPs, and successful recruitment strategies included project reminder letters, updates and personal contacts. Achieving target recruitment of patients in the acupuncture trial was aided by the deliberate application of lessons learned in the exercise trial, in particular the need to keep initial study entry criteria broad, with subsequent filtering undertaken by the study researcher. In addition the use of effective methods of maintaining the trial profile, the involvement of a GP advisor, the decision to maximize the recruitment of GPs early in the trial and the direct recruitment of interested individual GPs. The successful recruitment of patients to trials in primary care requires careful planning and continuous monitoring from the outset. Prior to starting recruitment, it is useful to identify previous trials in a similar environment in order to learn from their experience and optimize patient recruitment. PMID:18955352

  18. Patient-reported areas for quality improvement in general practice: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko; Mazza, Danielle; Yoong, Serene; Grady, Alice; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Background GPs are often a patient’s first point of contact with the health system. The increasing demands imposed on GPs may have an impact on the quality of care delivered. Patients are well placed to make judgements about aspects of care that need to be improved. Aim To determine whether general practice patients perceive that the care they receive is ‘patient-centred’ across eight domains of care, and to determine the association between sociodemographic, GP and practice characteristics, detection of preventive health risks, and receipt of patient-centred care. Design and setting Cross-sectional survey of patients attending Australian general practice clinics. Method Patients completed a touchscreen survey in the waiting room to rate the care received from their GP across eight domains of patient-centred care. Patients also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and self-reported health risk factors. GPs completed a checklist for each patient asking about the presence of health risk factors. Results In total 1486 patients and 51 GPs participated. Overall, 83% of patients perceived that the care they received was patient-centred across all eight domains. Patients most frequently perceived the ‘access to health care when needed’ domain as requiring improvement (8.3%). Not having private health insurance and attending a practice located in a disadvantaged area were significantly associated with perceived need for improvements in care (P<0.05). Conclusion Patients in general practice report that accessibility is an aspect of care that could be improved. Further investigation of how indicators of lower socioeconomic status interact with the provision of patient-centred care and health outcomes is required. PMID:25918336

  19. Functional characteristics of the natural polymorphisms of HIV-1 gp41 in HIV-1 isolates from enfuvirtide-naïve Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Shin, YoungHyun; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Yang, Hyo-Jin; Lim, Hoyong; Choi, Byeong-Sun; Kim, Sung Soon; Kang, Chun

    2016-06-01

    HIV-1 gp41 plays a key role in viral entry. The insertion of Thr at position 4 and Met/Val/Phe substitutions at position 7 are frequently observed in the fusion peptide (FP) motif of gp41 without major enfuvirtide resistance associated with mutation in heptad repeats 1/2 (HR1/2) of HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. Here, the influence of these mutations on their biological function was evaluated by employing HIV-1 variants with mutant FPs as shown previously and with recombinant HIV-1 using the env genes of 20 HIV-1 isolates from Korean patients. In an infectivity assay, all FP mutants showed lower infectivity than the wild-type NL4-3. In particular, the substitutions at position 7 led to much greater reductions in infectivity than the insertions at position 4. Nevertheless, the replication kinetics of most mutants were similar to those of the wild type, except that the FP mutants with an Ile insertion at position 4 and a Phe substitution at position 7 showed reduced replication. Moreover, most point mutants showed lower IC50 values for enfuvirtide than the wild type, whereas the L7M substitution resulted in a slightly increased IC50 value. The infectivity using the HIV-1 env recombinant viruses decreased in 14 cases but increased slightly in six cases compared with the wild type. Most recombinants were more susceptible to enfuvirtide than the wild type, except for three recombinants that showed slight resistance. Our findings may help to explain the potential mechanisms corresponding to the natural polymorphism of gp41 and to predict the efficiency of enfuvirtide in treatment of HIV-1-infected patients in Korea. PMID:26997611

  20. Deep Sequencing of the Trypanosoma cruzi GP63 Surface Proteases Reveals Diversity and Diversifying Selection among Chronic and Congenital Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, Martin S.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Garcia, Lineth; Torrico, Faustino; Tavares, Suelene B. N.; Cheaib, Bachar; Derome, Nicolas; Delepine, Marc; Baulard, Céline; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Sauer, Sascha; Miles, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease results from infection with the diploid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. T. cruzi is highly genetically diverse, and multiclonal infections in individual hosts are common, but little studied. In this study, we explore T. cruzi infection multiclonality in the context of age, sex and clinical profile among a cohort of chronic patients, as well as paired congenital cases from Cochabamba, Bolivia and Goias, Brazil using amplicon deep sequencing technology. Methodology/ Principal Findings A 450bp fragment of the trypomastigote TcGP63I surface protease gene was amplified and sequenced across 70 chronic and 22 congenital cases on the Illumina MiSeq platform. In addition, a second, mitochondrial target—ND5—was sequenced across the same cohort of cases. Several million reads were generated, and sequencing read depths were normalized within patient cohorts (Goias chronic, n = 43, Goias congenital n = 2, Bolivia chronic, n = 27; Bolivia congenital, n = 20), Among chronic cases, analyses of variance indicated no clear correlation between intra-host sequence diversity and age, sex or symptoms, while principal coordinate analyses showed no clustering by symptoms between patients. Between congenital pairs, we found evidence for the transmission of multiple sequence types from mother to infant, as well as widespread instances of novel genotypes in infants. Finally, non-synonymous to synonymous (dn:ds) nucleotide substitution ratios among sequences of TcGP63Ia and TcGP63Ib subfamilies within each cohort provided powerful evidence of strong diversifying selection at this locus. Conclusions/Significance Our results shed light on the diversity of parasite DTUs within each patient, as well as the extent to which parasite strains pass between mother and foetus in congenital cases. Although we were unable to find any evidence that parasite diversity accumulates with age in our study cohorts, putative diversifying selection within members of the TcGP63I

  1. The Universal Patient Centeredness Questionnaire: reliability and validity of a one-page questionnaire following surveys in three patient populations

    PubMed Central

    Bjertnaes, Oyvind; Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Holmboe, Olaf; Danielsen, Kirsten; Garratt, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background This study developed and tested the reliability and validity of the Universal Patient Centeredness Questionnaire (UPC-Q). Methods The UPC-Q developed in this study has three parts: 1) the aspects that patients consider the most important when receiving a relevant health care service, rating the health care services on these aspects and their prioritization, 2) the overall experiences of patients using the relevant health care service, and 3) suggestions for improvements. The UPC-Q was tested in four different patient-experience surveys in 2015, including psychiatric inpatients (n=109), general practitioner (GP) patients (n=1,059), and inpatients from two hospital samples (n=973, n=599). The UPC-Q was tested for item completeness and ceiling effects, while the UPC-Q scale consisting of the first part of the UPC-Q was tested for internal consistency reliability and construct validity. Results The percentage of patients rating at least one aspect was 70.6% for psychiatric inpatients, 77.6% for hospital inpatients, and 90.6% for GP patients, while 88.9% of the psychiatric inpatients, 93.1% of the hospital inpatients, and 95.3% of the GP patients were able to prioritize the aspects. The internal consistency reliability of the UPC-Q scale was acceptable in all samples (Cronbach’s alpha >0.7), and construct validity was supported by 20 of 21 significant associations between the UPC-Q and related variables. The UPC-Q total score was skewed toward positive evaluations, but the ceiling effect was smaller for an unbalanced response scale than for a balanced scale. Conclusion The UPC-Q includes ratings of what is most important for individual patients, while at the same time providing data for improving the quality of health care and making it possible to monitor trends within and across patient populations. This study included psychiatric inpatients, hospital inpatients, and GP patients, and found that the UPC-Q performed well in terms of acceptance, internal

  2. Measurements of IL-6, soluble IL-6 receptor and soluble gp130 in sera of B-cell lymphoma patients. Does viscum album treatment affect these parameters?

    PubMed

    Kovacs, E; Kuehn, J J

    2002-05-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) can be involved in several diseases including lymphoid malignancies. This cytokine binds to soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) circulating in blood, leading to signal transduction via gp130. Soluble IL-6R shows agonistic activity for IL-6, and the soluble form of gp130 (sgp130) an antagonistic effect against the complex IL-6/sIL-6R. Viscum album extract (Iscador) as an immunomodulator is used in the treatment of malignant disorders. In this study we investigated the effect of this treatment on the serum levels of IL-6, sIL-6R and sgp130 in B-cell lymphoma patients (n = 27), in comparison to healthy controls (n = 28). Twenty-one of 27 patients had been treated previously with chemo/radiotherapy. The patients were divided into two groups; those with short-term (investigated before and during treatment) or those with long-term Viscum album (VA) therapy (investigated during therapy). The serum levels of the three parameters were determined by ELISA. In patients having short-term treatment IL-6 values were similar to those of controls. During long-term therapy the values were significantly lower (P<0.05). The values of sIL-6R were elevated only in long-term treated patients (P<0.05), the values of sgp130 in both short-term (P<0.05) and in long-term treated patients (P=0.001). There is a significant correlation (P<0.05) between levels of sIL-6R and sgp130 in both therapy groups at 24 hours after injection. This indicates that the potent effect of sIL-6R on the biological activity of IL-6 could be inhibited by sgp130 as antagonist. Clinical data show that half of the patients (6/12) with long-term treatment had a continuous complete remission, whereas only 2/15 patients with short-term treatment had a complete remission. PMID:12046687

  3. CLIENT/PATIENT SAMPLE SURVEY (CPSS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Client/Patient Sample Surveys (conducted in 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, and 1997) has been the collection of general purpose statistics on the sociodemographic, clinical, and service use characteristics of clients served in the inpatient, residential, outpatient, a...

  4. Variations in GP–patient communication by ethnicity, age, and gender: evidence from a national primary care patient survey

    PubMed Central

    Burt, Jenni; Lloyd, Cathy; Campbell, John; Roland, Martin; Abel, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background Doctor–patient communication is a key driver of overall satisfaction with primary care. Patients from minority ethnic backgrounds consistently report more negative experiences of doctor–patient communication. However, it is currently unknown whether these ethnic differences are concentrated in one gender or in particular age groups. Aim To determine how reported GP–patient communication varies between patients from different ethnic groups, stratified by age and gender. Design and setting Analysis of data from the English GP Patient Survey from 2012–2013 and 2013–2014, including 1 599 801 responders. Method A composite score was created for doctor–patient communication from five survey items concerned with interpersonal aspects of care. Mixed-effect linear regression models were used to estimate age- and gender-specific differences between white British patients and patients of the same age and gender from each other ethnic group. Results There was strong evidence (P<0.001 for age by gender by ethnicity three-way interaction term) that the effect of ethnicity on reported GP–patient communication varied by both age and gender. The difference in scores between white British and other responders on doctor–patient communication items was largest for older, female Pakistani and Bangladeshi responders, and for younger responders who described their ethnicity as ‘Any other white’. Conclusion The identification of groups with particularly marked differences in experience of GP–patient communication — older, female, Asian patients and younger ‘Any other white’ patients — underlines the need for a renewed focus on quality of care for these groups. PMID:26541182

  5. Patients with microvascular obstruction after primary percutaneous coronary intervention show a gp91phox (NOX2) mediated persistent oxidative stress after reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Celestini, Andrea; Calvieri, Camilla; Cosentino, Nicola; Falcioni, Elena; Carnevale, Roberto; Nocella, Cristina; Fracassi, Francesco; Roberto, Marco; Antonazzo, Roberta P; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Crea, Filippo; Violi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background: Persistent oxidative stress may play a key role in microvascular obstruction (MVO). We aimed at assessing the role of platelet gp91phox (NOX2), the catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase in MVO. Methods: We enrolled 40 patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention within 12 h from symptoms onset, either with angiographic MVO (n=20) or good angiographic myocardial reperfusion (MR) (n=20). Angiographic MVO was defined as a final thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow ≤2 or TIMI flow of 3 with myocardial blush grade <2. NOX2 and isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2α) levels, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) or by an enzyme immunoassays, respectively, were measured on admission, at 24 h and pre-discharge. Results: NOX2 levels increased from baseline to pre-discharge in patients with angiographic MVO (20.25 (15–24.75) pg/ml vs 25.50 (17–29.25) pg/ml, p=0.02), but not in MR patients (p=0.45), with a significant interaction between baseline and pre-discharge levels among the two groups (p=0.04). The levels of 8-iso-PGF2α showed a trend to increase from baseline to pre-discharge in angiographic MVO patients (295 (183.50–389.25) pmol/l vs 322 (206–370) pmol/l, p=0.06), but not in patients with MR (p=0.56), with a trend for interaction between baseline and pre-discharge levels among the two groups (p=0.09). Conclusion: Patients with MVO, but not those with myocardial reperfusion, have a sustained increase of NOX2 and 8-iso-PGF2α. Therapies targeting NOX2 or high dosage antioxidants should be tested for MVO prevention and treatment. PMID:24338297

  6. Use of home remedies: a cross-sectional survey of patients in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reliable information regarding patient knowledge of home remedies and the types of health problems patients use them for is scarce. Nevertheless, anecdotal evidence indicates that home remedies are used by patients for managing minor health problems and that this can be sufficient for symptom management while the body recovers from minor health problems. The aim of the presented study was to explore patient use of home remedies in Germany. Methods A questionnaire was developed and pretested in a pilot study phase. The revised questionnaire was comprised of questions about general knowledge and experienced efficiency of home remedies, the use of home remedies for common health problems and socio-demographic data. Patients were recruited via randomly selected addresses of general practitioners (GPs) in three regions of Germany (Heidelberg, Erfurt and Hanover and surrounding areas). The questionnaire was handed out in the waiting area of GP practices. The data was analyzed descriptively. Results 480 of 592 patients from 37 GP practices were included, according to a response rate of 81%. Based on the survey results, home remedies were widely known and used by about 80% of our respondents (on average 22 different home remedies were used per person). The most frequently used home remedies were steam-inhalation, hot lemon drink, honey, chamomile tea and chicken soup. 80% of respondents tried home remedies before pharmaceutical options. Information about home remedies was most commonly gained from family members, rather than from written guides, media or GPs. Conclusions These results provide an initial overview on the use of home remedies from the patient’s perspective in a German context. Bearing in mind the high use of home remedies that was reported by patients in the study, it is highly likely that GPs in Germany may need to advise patients on their use of home remedies during consultations. To this end, given the scarcity of reliable information on home

  7. A Patient Survey Assessing the Awareness and Acceptability of the Emergency Care Summary and Its Consent Model in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Chris; McCartney, Gerry

    2010-01-01

    Background The Emergency Care Summary (ECS) was introduced in 2006 to allow aspects of the general practitioner (GP; family doctor, equivalent to primary care physician) medical record to be viewed in hospitals and out-of-hours centers in Scotland. Records were automatically uploaded unless patients actively opted out. This study investigated patient awareness and acceptance of this process. Methods This was a questionnaire survey of patients in a GP surgery (office) in Paisley, Scotland. Results Survey results indicated that 42 percent of patients were aware of the ECS, and 16 percent said that they recognized the leaflet posted to households. Of those who recognized the leaflet, 92 percent said they were happy for their record to be part of the system, while the others did not realize their record was to be included. Having read the leaflet, 97 percent said that they were happy for their record to be included in the ECS. Conclusions This study shows that most patients were not aware of the Emergency Care Summary or did not remember seeing the leaflet posted to households. Having read the leaflet, the vast majority of patients were happy for their records to be included in the system. The low awareness of the ECS calls into question the validity of an implied consent model using an information leaflet distributed by post. PMID:20697469

  8. Integrated musculoskeletal service design by GP consortia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal conditions are common in primary care and are associated with significant co-morbidity and impairment of quality of life. Traditional care pathways combined community-based physiotherapy with GP referral to hospital for a consultant opinion. Locally, this model led to only 30% of hospital consultant orthopaedic referrals being listed for surgery, with the majority being referred for physiotherapy. The NHS musculoskeletal framework proposed the use of interface services to provide expertise in diagnosis, triage and management of musculoskeletal problems not requiring surgery. The White Paper Equity and Excellence: Liberating the NHS has replaced PCT commissioning with GP consortia, who will lead future service development. Setting Primary and community care, integrated with secondary care, in the NHS in England. Question How can GP consortia lead the development of integrated musculoskeletal services? Review: The Ealing experience We explore here how Ealing implemented a ‘See and Treat’ interface clinic model to improve surgical conversion rates, reduce unnecessary hospital referrals and provide community treatment more efficiently than a triage model. A high-profile GP education programme enabled GPs to triage in their practices and manage patients without referral. Conclusion In Ealing, we demonstrated that most patients with musculoskeletal conditions can be managed in primary care and community settings. The integrated musculoskeletal service provides clear and fast routes to secondary care. This is both clinically effective and cost-effective, reserving hospital referral for patients most likely to need surgery. GP consortia, in conjunction with strong clinical leadership, inbuilt organisational and professional learning, and a GP champion, are well placed to deliver service redesign by co-ordinating primary care development, local commissioning of community services and the acute commissioning vehicles responsible for secondary

  9. Eliciting symptoms interpreted as normal by patients with early-stage lung cancer: could GP elicitation of normalised symptoms reduce delay in diagnosis? Cross-sectional interview study

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Lucy; Pope, Catherine; Corner, Jessica; Leydon, Geraldine; Banerjee, Anindo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate why symptoms indicative of early-stage lung cancer (LC) were not presented to general practitioners (GPs) and how early symptoms might be better elicited within primary care. Design, setting and participants A qualitative cross-sectional interview study about symptoms and help-seeking in 20 patients from three south England counties, awaiting resection of LC (suspected or histologically confirmed). Analysis drew on principles of discourse analysis and constant comparison to identify processes involved in interpretation and communication about symptoms, and explain non-presentation. Results Most participants experienced health changes possibly indicative of LC which had not been presented during GP consultations. Symptoms that were episodic, or potentially caused by ageing or lifestyle, were frequently not presented to GPs. In interviews, open questions about health changes/symptoms in general did not elicit these symptoms; they only emerged in response to closed questions detailing specific changes in health. Questions using disease-related labels, for example, pain or breathlessness, were less likely to elicit symptoms than questions that used non-disease terminology, such as aches, discomfort or ‘getting out of breath’. Most participants described themselves as feeling well and were reluctant to associate potentially explained, non-specific or episodic symptoms with LC, even after diagnosis. Conclusions Patients with early LC are unlikely to present symptoms possibly indicative of LC that they associate with normal processes, when attending primary care before diagnosis. Faced with patients at high LC risk, GPs will need to actively elicit potential LC symptoms not presented by the patient. Closed questions using non-disease terminology might better elicit normalised symptoms. PMID:23166137

  10. Bylaws for GP Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Individual sections of AGU are governed by collections of bylaws adopted by each membership. The GP Section, at the present time, has no bylaws. Such a document would include articles defining the name, objectives, and membership of the section. Also present would be a description of officers (president, president-elect, and secretary), their duties, nomination and election procedures, and information on committees, meetings, and publications. The GP Section now functions by following some standard, although unwritten, procedures. The usual bylaws used by AGU sections would not change any of the functions or procedures used by our section but would put in writing the structure that we follow. It is possible, in the membership clause, to allow members to be affiliated with more than one section and to no longer claim only a “primary” section. The GP Executive Committee intends to discuss the possibility of adopting our own bylaws at the spring business meeting. We would appreciate any input from GP membership on this topic prior to May. Please direct your comments to Laurie Brown or Subir Banerjee (addresses above).

  11. Therapeutic benefits of cannabis: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Webb, Charles W; Webb, Sandra M

    2014-04-01

    Clinical research regarding the therapeutic benefits of cannabis ("marijuana") has been almost non-existent in the United States since cannabis was given Schedule I status in the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. In order to discover the benefits and adverse effects perceived by medical cannabis patients, especially with regards to chronic pain, we hand-delivered surveys to one hundred consecutive patients who were returning for yearly re-certification for medical cannabis use in Hawai'i. The response rate was 94%. Mean and median ages were 49.3 and 51 years respectively. Ninety-seven per cent of respondents used cannabis primarily for chronic pain. Average pain improvement on a 0-10 pain scale was 5.0 (from 7.8 to 2.8), which translates to a 64% relative decrease in average pain. Half of all respondents also noted relief from stress/anxiety, and nearly half (45%) reported relief from insomnia. Most patients (71%) reported no adverse effects, while 6% reported a cough or throat irritation and 5% feared arrest even though medical cannabis is legal in Hawai'i. No serious adverse effects were reported. These results suggest that Cannabis is an extremely safe and effective medication for many chronic pain patients. Cannabis appears to alleviate pain, insomnia, and may be helpful in relieving anxiety. Cannabis has shown extreme promise in the treatment of numerous medical problems and deserves to be released from the current Schedule I federal prohibition against research and prescription. PMID:24765558

  12. Development and validation of the GP frequency of interprofessional collaboration instrument (FICI-GP) in primary care.

    PubMed

    Van, Connie; Costa, Daniel; Mitchell, Bernadette; Abbott, Penny; Krass, Ines

    2012-07-01

    Existing validated measures of pharmacist-physician collaboration focus on measuring attitudes toward collaboration and do not measure frequency of interactions that comprise actual collaborative behavior. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to measure the frequency of collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and pharmacists from the GP's perspective. An 11-item Frequency of Interprofessional Collaboration Instrument for GPs (FICI-GP) was developed and administered to 1118 GPs in eight divisions of general practice in New South Wales, Australia. Two hundred and fifty-eight (23%) GP surveys were completed and returned. Principal component analysis suggested removal of one item for a final one-factor solution. The refined 10-item FICI-GP had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.87. After collapsing the original five-point response scale to a three-point response scale, the refined FICI-GP demonstrated fit to the Rasch model. Criterion validity of the FICI-GP was supported by the correlation of FICI-GP scores with scores on a previously validated physician-pharmacist collaboration instrument as well as by predicted differences in FICI-GP scores between subgroups of respondents stratified on age, co-location with pharmacists and interactions during residency. The refined 10-item FICI-GP was shown to have good internal consistency, criterion validity and fit to the Rasch model. PMID:22563657

  13. What Predicts Patients’ Willingness to Undergo Online Treatment and Pay for Online Treatment? Results from a Web-Based Survey to Investigate the Changing Patient-Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Bidmon, Sonja; Terlutter, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Background Substantial research has focused on patients’ health information–seeking behavior on the Internet, but little is known about the variables that may predict patients’ willingness to undergo online treatment and willingness to pay additionally for online treatment. Objective This study analyzed sociodemographic variables, psychosocial variables, and variables of Internet usage to predict willingness to undergo online treatment and willingness to pay additionally for online treatment offered by the general practitioner (GP). Methods An online survey of 1006 randomly selected German patients was conducted. The sample was drawn from an e-panel maintained by GfK HealthCare. Missing values were imputed; 958 usable questionnaires were analyzed. Variables with multi-item measurement were factor analyzed. Willingness to undergo online treatment and willingness to pay additionally for online treatment offered by the GP were predicted using 2 multiple regression models. Results Exploratory factor analyses revealed that the disposition of patients’ personality to engage in information-searching behavior on the Internet was unidimensional. Exploratory factor analysis with the variables measuring the motives for Internet usage led to 2 separate factors: perceived usefulness (PU) of the Internet for health-related information searching and social motives for information searching on the Internet. Sociodemographic variables did not serve as significant predictors for willingness to undergo online treatment offered by the GP, whereas PU (B=.092, P=.08), willingness to communicate with the GP more often in the future (B=.495, P<.001), health-related information–seeking personality (B=.369, P<.001), actual use of online communication with the GP (B=.198, P<.001), and social motive (B=.178, P=.002) were significant predictors. Age, gender, satisfaction with the GP, social motive, and trust in the GP had no significant impact on the willingness to pay additionally

  14. Shortening a Patient Experiences Survey for Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Judy H.; Henry, Erika; Oberlander, Tyler; Shi, Peichang; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems—Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS PCMH) Survey assesses patient experiences reflecting domains of care related to general patient experience (access to care, communication with providers, office staff interaction, provider rating) and PCMH-specific aspects of patient care (comprehensiveness of care, self-management support, shared decision making). The current work compares psychometric properties of the current survey and a proposed shortened version of the survey (from 52 to 26 adult survey items, from 66 to 31 child survey items). The revisions were based on initial psychometric analysis and stakeholder input regarding survey length concerns. A total of 268 practices voluntarily submitted adult surveys and 58 submitted child survey data to the National Committee for Quality Assurance in 2013. Mean unadjusted scores, practice-level item and composite reliability, and item-to-scale correlations were calculated. Results show that the shorter adult survey has lower reliability, but still it still meets general definitions of a sound survey for the adult version, and resulted in few changes to mean scores. The impact was more problematic for the pediatric version. Further testing is needed to investigate approaches to improving survey response and the relevance of survey items in informing quality improvement. PMID:27417589

  15. A GP's duty to follow up test results.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Medical negligence claims alleging 'failure to diagnose' are a common cause of claims against general practitioners. In these claims there is often an underlying weakness in the GP's test result and patient tracking systems. This article discusses the duty of care of a GP to follow up patients and their test results. Guidance is provided on how to establish an effective test result tracking system in order to minimise the possibility of a claim arising from 'failure to diagnose'. PMID:12647659

  16. Musculoskeletal (MSK) and Sport and Exercise Medicine (SEM) in General Practice (GP): A Novel GP-based MSK and SEM Clinic for Managing Musculoskeletal symptoms in a GP

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints are common within primary care (1) (2) (3) but some General Practitioners (GPs)/family physicians do not feel comfortable managing these symptoms (3), preferring to refer onto hospital specialists or Integrated Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services (ICATs). Long waiting times for hospital outpatient reviews are a major cause of patient inconvenience and complaints (4). We therefore aimed to establish a GP-ran MSK and sport and exercise medicine (SEM) clinic based within a Belfast GP surgery that would contribute to a sustainable improvement in managing these common conditions within primary care as well as reducing waiting times for patients with these conditions to see a specialist. This shift from hospital-based to community-based management is in-keeping with recent policy changes within the UK health-system, including Transforming Your Care within Northern Ireland (NI) (5). The GP-ran MSK and SEM clinic was held monthly within a Belfast GP practice, staffed by one GP with a specialist interest in MSK and SEM conditions and its performance was reviewed over a three month period. Parameters audited included cases seen, orthopaedic and x-ray referral rates and secondary care referrals comparing the GP practice's performance to the same time period in the previous year as well as patient satisfaction questionnaires. PMID:26733320

  17. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone triage of patients requesting same day consultations in general practice: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial comparing nurse-led and GP-led management systems (ESTEEM)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent years have seen an increase in primary care workload, especially following the introduction of a new General Medical Services contract in 2004. Telephone triage and telephone consultation with patients seeking health care represent initiatives aimed at improving access to care. Some evidence suggests that such approaches may be feasible but conclusions regarding GP workload, cost, and patients’ experience of care, safety, and health status are equivocal. The ESTEEM trial aims to assess the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led computer-supported telephone triage and GP-led telephone triage, compared to usual care, for patients requesting same-day consultations in general practice. Methods/design ESTEEM is a pragmatic, multi-centre cluster randomised clinical trial with patients randomised at practice level to usual care, computer decision-supported nurse triage, or GP-led triage. Following triage of 350–550 patients per practice we anticipate estimating and comparing total primary care workload (volume and time), the economic cost to the NHS, and patient experience of care, safety, and health status in the 4-week period following the index same-day consultation request across the three trial conditions. We will recruit all patients seeking a non-emergency same-day appointment in primary care. Patients aged 12.0–15.9 years and temporary residents will be excluded from the study. The primary outcome is the number of healthcare contacts taking place in the 4-week period following (and including) the index same-day consultation request. A range of secondary outcomes will be examined including patient flow, primary care NHS resource use, patients’ experience of care, safety, and health status. The estimated sample size required is 3,751 patients (11,253 total) in each of the three trial conditions, to detect a mean difference of 0.36 consultations per patient in the four week follow-up period between either intervention group and usual

  18. Emergency supply of prescription-only medicines to patients by community pharmacists: a mixed methods evaluation incorporating patient, pharmacist and GP perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morecroft, Charles W; Mackridge, Adam J; Stokes, Elizabeth C; Gray, Nicola J; Wilson, Sarah E; Ashcroft, Darren M; Mensah, Noah; Pickup, Graham B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate and inform emergency supply of prescription-only medicines by community pharmacists (CPs), including how the service could form an integral component of established healthcare provision to maximise adherence. Design Mixed methods. 4 phases: prospective audit of emergency supply requests for prescribed medicines (October–November 2012 and April 2013); interviews with CPs (February–April 2013); follow-up interviews with patients (April–May 2013); interactive feedback sessions with general practice teams (October–November 2013). Setting 22 community pharmacies and 6 general practices in Northwest England. Participants 27 CPs with experience of dealing with requests for emergency supplies; 25 patients who received an emergency supply of a prescribed medicine; 58 staff at 6 general practices. Results Clinical audit in 22 pharmacies over two 4-week periods reported that 526 medicines were requested by 450 patients. Requests peaked over a bank holiday and around weekends. A significant number of supplies were made during practice opening hours. Most requests were for older patients and for medicines used in long-term conditions. Difficulty in renewing repeat medication (forgetting to order, or prescription delays) was the major reason for requests. The majority of medicines were ‘loaned’ in advance of a National Health Service (NHS) prescription. Interviews with CPs and patients indicated that continuous supply had a positive impact on medicines adherence, removing the need to access urgent care. General practice staff were surprised and concerned by the extent of emergency supply episodes. Conclusions CPs regularly provide emergency supplies to patients who run out of their repeat medication, including during practice opening hours. This may aid adherence. There is currently no feedback loop, however, to general practice. Patient care and interprofessional communication may be better served by the introduction of a formally structured

  19. A study of role expansion: a new GP role in cardiology care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Health Service is reconfiguring health care services in order to meet the increasing challenge of providing care for people with long-term conditions and to reduce the demand on specialised outpatient hospital services by enhancing primary care. A review of cardiology referrals to specialised care and the literature on referral management inspired the development of a new GP role in Cardiology. This new extended role was developed to enable GPs to diagnose and manage patients with mild to moderate heart failure or atrial fibrillation and to use a range of diagnostics effectively in primary care. This entailed GPs participating in a four-session short course with on-going clinical supervision. The new role was piloted in a small number of GP practices in one county in England for four months. This study explores the impact of piloting the Extended Cardiology role on the GP’s role, patients’ experience, service delivery and quality. Methods A mixed methods approach was employed including semi-structured interviews with GPs, a patient experience survey, a quality review of case notes, and analysis on activity and referral data. Results The participating GPs perceived the extended GP role as a professional development opportunity that had the potential to reduce healthcare utilisation and costs, through a reduction in referrals, whilst meeting the patient’s wishes for the provision of care closer to home. Patient experience of the new GP service was positive. The standard of clinical practice was judged acceptable. There was a fall in referrals during the study period. Conclusion This new role in cardiology was broadly welcomed as a model of care by the participating GPs and by patients, because of the potential to improve the quality of care for patients in primary care and reduce costs. As this was a pilot study further development and continuing evaluation of the model is recommended. PMID:24885826

  20. Who seeks primary care for sleep, anxiety and depressive disorders from physicians prescribing homeopathic and other complementary medicine? Results from the EPI3 population survey

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Engel, Pierre; Massol, Jacques; Guillemot, Didier; Avouac, Bernard; Duru, Gerard; Lert, France; Magnier, Anne-Marie; Rossignol, Michel; Rouillon, Frederic; Abenhaim, Lucien; Begaud, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe and compare patients seeking treatment for sleep, anxiety and depressive disorders (SADD) from physicians in general practice (GPs) with three different practice preferences: strictly conventional medicine (GP-CM), mixed complementary and conventional medicine (GP-Mx) and certified homeopathic physicians (GP-Ho). Design and setting The EPI3 survey was a nationwide, observational study of a representative sample of GPs and their patients, conducted in France between March 2007 and July 2008. Participants 1572 patients diagnosed with SADD. Primary and secondary outcomes The patients’ attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine; psychotropic drug utilisation. Results Compared to patients attending GP-CM, GP-Ho patients had healthier lifestyles while GP-Mx patients showed similar profiles. Psychotropic drugs were more likely to be prescribed by GP-CM (64%) than GP-Mx (55.4%) and GP-Ho (31.2%). The three groups of patients shared similar SADD severity. Conclusion Our results showed that patients with SADD, while differing principally in their sociodemographic profiles and conventional psychotropic prescriptions, were actually rather similar regarding the severity of SADD in terms of comorbidities and quality of life. This information may help to better plan resource allocation and management of these common health problems in primary care. PMID:23180389

  1. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  2. Which factors are associated with higher rates of chronic kidney disease recording in primary care? A cross-sectional survey of GP practices

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nicola; Bankart, John; Brunskill, Nigel; Baker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) at stage 3–5 is estimated at 8.5% in the UK, but the recorded rate of CKD from Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) registers in 2007–2008 was 2.9%. This study aimed to identify practice or patient characteristics associated with recorded rates of CKD. Demographic and QOF data for 230 general practices were combined into a database for cross-sectional analysis. Regression analyses investigated factors associated with CKD recording; deprivation, location in Leicester city or Northamptonshire, and low recording of hypertension and stroke were associated with low CKD recording. PMID:21375906

  3. Which factors are associated with higher rates of chronic kidney disease recording in primary care? A cross-sectional survey of GP practices.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nicola; Bankart, John; Brunskill, Nigel; Baker, Richard

    2011-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) at stage 3-5 is estimated at 8.5% in the UK, but the recorded rate of CKD from Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) registers in 2007-2008 was 2.9%. This study aimed to identify practice or patient characteristics associated with recorded rates of CKD. Demographic and QOF data for 230 general practices were combined into a database for cross-sectional analysis. Regression analyses investigated factors associated with CKD recording; deprivation, location in Leicester city or Northamptonshire, and low recording of hypertension and stroke were associated with low CKD recording. PMID:21375906

  4. The LUCK study: Laxative Usage in patients with GP-diagnosed Constipation in the UK, within the general population and in pregnancy. An epidemiological study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD)

    PubMed Central

    Shafe, Anna C. E.; Lee, Sally; Dalrymple, Jamie S. O.; Whorwell, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the high prevalence of constipation and its related public health implications, there is relatively little research available on the condition from large epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of general practitioner (GP)-diagnosed constipation and the prescribing trends for laxatives in the UK, within the general population and during pregnancy. Methods: A cohort study for the period from 2005 to 2009 was performed using the UK primary care database (General Practice Research Database), which contains information on over 3 million individuals. Results: The prevalence of GP-diagnosed constipation ranged from 12 per 1000 persons in 2005 (0.012 per person year) to 12.8 per 1000 in 2009 (0.013 per person year). The prevalence was almost twice as high in women as in men, and was higher in older patients. In 2005 the most commonly prescribed laxatives were lactulose (37%), senna (26%), macrogol (19%), ispaghula (6%), docusate sodium (5%), bisacodyl (4%) and glycerol suppositories (2%). By 2009, this pattern had changed: macrogol (31%), lactulose (29%), senna (22%), ispaghula (5%), docusate sodium (6%), bisacodyl (3%) and glycerol suppositories (3%). In pregnancy, lactulose accounted for 81% of laxative use in 2005, falling to 64% by 2009. In contrast, macrogol use in pregnancy rose from 13% in 2005 to 32% in 2009. Conclusions: GP-diagnosed constipation is common, accounting for a large number of consultations. Laxative prescribing trends have changed over the 5-year study period, prescriptions for macrogol becoming increasingly common and prescriptions for lactulose and senna less common. Macrogol also appears to have been replacing lactulose for treating constipation in pregnant women. PMID:22043228

  5. Patient Suicide: A Survey of Therapists' Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Mueller, Sandra; Petitjean, Sylvie; Euler, Sebastian; Thon, Natasha; Wiesbeck, Gerhard; Wolfersdorf, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    A substantial proportion of therapists will at some point in their professional life experience the loss of a patient to suicide. Our aims were to assess how therapists react to patient's suicide over time and which factors contribute to the reaction. One third of the therapists, mostly women, suffer from severe distress. The impact is not…

  6. Dental orthopantomography: survey of patient dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolotta, A.; Calenda, E.; Calicchia, A.; Indovina, P.L.

    1983-03-01

    Absorbed dose to specific regions of the head and neck during dental orthopantomography with various commercial units was assessed using a Rando ''standard man'' phantom and TLD-100 LiF dosimeters. Relevance to patient protection is discussed.

  7. A patient satisfaction survey for haemophilia treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Hacker, M R; Primeaux, J; Manco-Johnson, M J

    2006-03-01

    The importance of patient satisfaction has continued to grow such that patient satisfaction is now viewed as a vital component of health-care delivery. This is evidenced by the expanding body of research in the area and the use of measures of patient satisfaction as indicators of health-care quality. The value of patient satisfaction is particularly apparent in the setting of chronic disease where medical care utilization is high, compliance with therapy is critical and the patient-provider relationship is often long-term. Although several validated tools exist to quantify general measures of patient satisfaction, there is a recognized need for disease-specific instruments. Not only are there issues that are unique to haemophilia, but many patients receive care via a specialized comprehensive clinic model. The authors were unaware of an instrument that could adequately address patient satisfaction issues specific to haemophilia; thus, they undertook to develop one. The patient satisfaction survey presented here contains fixed-choice, Likert-scale and open-ended questions adapted from previously validated questionnaires. Assessment of face validity and internal consistency indicate that the survey is measuring one underlying construct - patient satisfaction. Information acquired through this survey will provide a quantitative assessment of patient satisfaction within a clinic population of persons with bleeding disorders and could be used to guide decisions regarding provision of health-care services. PMID:16476091

  8. Shed GP of Ebola Virus Triggers Immune Activation and Increased Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Pérez, Beatriz; Volchkova, Valentina A.; Dolnik, Olga; Lawrence, Philip; Volchkov, Viktor E.

    2014-01-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection a significant amount of surface glycoprotein GP is shed from infected cells in a soluble form due to cleavage by cellular metalloprotease TACE. Shed GP and non-structural secreted glycoprotein sGP, both expressed from the same GP gene, have been detected in the blood of human patients and experimentally infected animals. In this study we demonstrate that shed GP could play a particular role during EBOV infection. In effect it binds and activates non-infected dendritic cells and macrophages inducing the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL1β, IL6, IL8, IL12p40, and IL1-RA, IL10). Activation of these cells by shed GP correlates with the increase in surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86. Contrary to shed GP, secreted sGP activates neither DC nor macrophages while it could bind DCs. In this study, we show that shed GP activity is likely mediated through cellular toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and is dependent on GP glycosylation. Treatment of cells with anti-TLR4 antibody completely abolishes shed GP-induced activation of cells. We also demonstrate that shed GP activity is negated upon addition of mannose-binding sera lectin MBL, a molecule known to interact with sugar arrays present on the surface of different microorganisms. Furthermore, we highlight the ability of shed GP to affect endothelial cell function both directly and indirectly, demonstrating the interplay between shed GP, systemic cytokine release and increased vascular permeability. In conclusion, shed GP released from virus-infected cells could activate non-infected DCs and macrophages causing the massive release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and effect vascular permeability. These activities could be at the heart of the excessive and dysregulated inflammatory host reactions to infection and thus contribute to high virus pathogenicity. PMID:25412102

  9. Are physical symptoms among survivors of a disaster presented to the general practitioner? A comparison between self-reports and GP data

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bellis; Yzermans, C Joris; van der Velden, Peter G; Stellato, Rebecca K; Lebret, Erik; Grievink, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Background Most studies examining medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) have been performed in primary or secondary care and have examined symptoms for which patients sought medical attention. Disasters are often described as precipitating factors for MUS. However, health consequences of disasters are typically measured by means of questionnaires, and it is not known whether these self-reported physical symptoms are presented to the GP. It is also not known if the self-reported symptoms are related to a medical disorder or if they remain medically unexplained. In the present study, three research questions were addressed. Firstly, were self-reported symptoms among survivors presented to the GP? Secondly, were the symptoms presented to the GP associated with a high level of functional impairment and distress? Thirdly, what was the GP's clinical judgment of the presented symptoms, i.e. were the symptoms related to a medical diagnosis or could they be labeled MUS? Methods Survivors of a man-made disaster (N = 887) completed a questionnaire 3 weeks (T1) and 18 months (T2) post-disaster. This longitudinal health survey was combined with an ongoing surveillance program of health problems registered by GPs. Results The majority of self-reported symptoms was not presented to the GP and survivors were most likely to present persistent symptoms to the GP. For example, survivors with stomachache at both T1 and T2 were more likely to report stomachache to their GP (28%) than survivors with stomachache at only T1 (6%) or only T2 (13%). Presentation of individual symptoms to the GP was not consistently associated with functional impairment and distress. 56 – 91% of symptoms were labeled as MUS after clinical examination. Conclusion These results indicate that the majority of self-reported symptoms among survivors of a disaster are not presented to the GP and that the decision to consult with a GP for an individual symptom is not dependent on the level of impairment and distress

  10. Why do patients keep coming back? Results of a readmitted patient survey.

    PubMed

    Felix, Holly C; Seaberg, Beverly; Bursac, Zoran; Thostenson, Jeff; Stewart, M Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Hospital readmissions can negatively impact cost and patient outcomes. Predictors of 30-day readmissions have been primarily identified using medical claims data. Reported here are results of a patient survey developed as part of regular hospital quality assurance activities. Two-thirds of patients reported good discharge experiences but were still readmitted. One-third of patients discharged had a post-discharge doctor appointment scheduled; half were readmitted before that scheduled appointment. Results suggest post-discharge experiences could be improved, especially the timing of follow up doctor appointments. Identified weaknesses in the survey process highlight need for engagement of survey methodologists in efforts to understand patient experiences. PMID:25588093

  11. Regulation of the expression of chaperone gp96 in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Lutz; Fischbeck, Anne; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle; Wojtal, Kacper A; Lang, Silvia; Fried, Michael; Vavricka, Stephan R; Hausmann, Martin; Rogler, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The chaperone function of the ER-residing heat shock protein gp96 plays an important role in protein physiology and has additionally important immunological functions due to its peptide-binding capacity. Low amounts of gp96 stimulate immunity; high quantities induce tolerance by mechanisms not fully understood. A lack of gp96 protein in intestinal macrophages (IMACs) from Crohn`s disease (CD) patients correlates with loss of tolerance against the host gut flora, leading to chronic inflammation. Since gp96 shows dose-dependent direction of immunological reactions, we studied primary IMACs and developed cell models to understand the regulation of gp96 expression. Induction of gp96-expression was higher in in vitro differentiated dendritic cells (i.v.DCs) than in in vitro differentiated macrophages (i.v.MACs), whereas monocytes (MOs) expressed only low gp96 levels. The highest levels of expression were found in IMACs. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramyl dipeptide (MDP), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and Interleukin (IL)-4 induced gp96-expression, while IL12, IL-17, IL-23 and interferon (IFN)-γ were not effective indicating that Th1 and Th17 cells are probably not involved in the induction of gp96. Furthermore, gp96 was able to induce its own expression. The ER-stress inducer tunicamycin increased gp96-expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and CD patients showed significantly elevated gp96 mRNA levels in intestinal biopsies which correlated positively with the degree of inflammation of the tissue. Since gp96 is highly expressed on the one hand upon stress induction as during inflammation and on the other hand possibly mediating tolerance, these results will help to understand the whether gp96 plays a role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). PMID:24146856

  12. Patients' perspectives on medical information: results of an informal survey.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kavitha

    2007-01-01

    The autonomy of patients in making medical decisions is increasingly recognised globally, but is not fully adhered to in India. Information is the first step for a patient to be able to make a decision on his or her health care. The objective of this survey was to ascertain patients' perspectives on the amount of information given to them by health professionals. The results of interviews with 222 patients show that perspectives vary, often according to the diagnosis. The amount of information given and the manner in which it is given are often not acceptable to the patient. PMID:18630214

  13. Construction of a GP integration model.

    PubMed

    Batterham, R; Southern, D; Appleby, N; Elsworth, G; Fabris, S; Dunt, D; Young, D

    2002-04-01

    There are frequent calls to improve integration of health services, within and between primary and secondary care sectors. In Australia, general medical practitioners (GPs) are central to these endeavours. This paper aims to better conceptualise GP integration and to develop a model and index based on this. A conceptualisation of integration is proposed based on integration fundamentally as an activity or process not structure. Integration process is the frequency and quality of episodes of information exchange involving the GP and another practitioner or patient and aimed at fulfilling the objectives of the health care system with regard to patient care. These are both direct responses to structural forces and emergent GP capacities and dispositions. The content of this typology was studied using Concept Mapping in 11 groups of GPs, consumers and other practitioners. Clusters of related statements within thematic domains were used as the basis for a provisional model. This was tested using confirmatory factor analysis in a data set derived from a national probability sample of 501 GPs. Some re-specification of the model was necessary, with three integration process factors needing to be subdivided. One factor congeneric model assumptions were used to identify the constituent items for these factors. The result was a model in which 50 items measured nine integration process factors and 20 items measured five enabling factors. Two distinct but correlated higher order factors, relating to individual patient care and public (or community) health--in contrast to a single higher order factor for integration--were identified. The re-specified model was tested with a new sample of 151 GPs and exhibited strong psychometric properties. Reliability and validity were acceptable to this stage of the indices' development. Further testing of the index is necessary to demonstrate factor invariance of the indices in other contexts as well as their utility in cross

  14. Diet and acne: an exploratory survey study of patient beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Giao; Markus, Ramsey; Katta, Rajani

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the past, medical literature reflected that diet was not a proven cause of acne. However, studies in recent years have substantiated a link between certain dietary factors and acne. It is unclear whether patients are aware of recent research findings. Objectives: Acne patients were surveyed to explore beliefs regarding the link between diet and acne, to determine whether these beliefs translated into behavior change and to identify health information sources. Patients/Methods: Upon Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, surveys were administered to 50 acne patients at an academic dermatology clinic in 2014, with 49 completed in full and included in this analysis. Results: Ninety-two percent of respondents believed that diet could affect acne. Seventy-one percent attempted to change their diet to improve acne. Seventy-one percent believed acne to be caused by fried or greasy foods, although chocolate (53%), dairy (47%), and soda drinks (35%) were highly implicated. Patients obtained information from Google searches (49%), dermatologists (43%), family members and TV (41% each), and medical websites (31%). Conclusions: In this exploratory study, patients reported utilizing a diversity of information sources, a majority from the Internet. In those surveyed, there was a persistence of long-held belief that fried/greasy foods and chocolate may serve as acne triggers, and less belief in trigger foods supported by recent research, including refined carbohydrates and sugar. Given the multiplicity of beliefs and utilized sources among acne patients in our survey, there is a need to establish up-to-date and reliable methods to educate patients on diet and acne. PMID:27222768

  15. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys. PMID:24368718

  16. Palliative Care for Patients with Dementia: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Torke, Alexia M.; Holtz, Laura R.; Hui, Siu; Castelluccio, Peter; Connor, Stephen; Eaton, Matthew A.; Sachs, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine the extent to which hospice and nonhospice palliative care (PC) programs provide services to patients with dementia and to describe barriers and facilitators to providing nonhospice PC. DESIGN Telephone and Web-based surveys. SETTING U.S. hospice and PC programs from the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s program list. PARTICIPANTS Executive directors of 240 hospice programs, 173 programs providing hospice and nonhospice PC, and 13 programs providing nonhospice PC. MEASUREMENTS A telephone survey of hospice and PC providers followed by an online survey of programs providing nonhospice PC. RESULTS Ninety-four percent of hospices and 72% of PC programs had served at least one patient with a primary diagnosis of dementia within the past year. Based on 80 responses to the online survey, the most highly rated barriers to providing PC were lack of awareness of PC by families and referring providers, need for respite services, and reimbursement policies. Highly rated needs were family information, assistance with caregiver burden, and behavioral symptoms. Strategies critical for success were an interdisciplinary team, collaboration with community organizations, and alternatives to aggressive end-of-life care. CONCLUSION Almost all hospices and a majority of nonhospice PC programs serve patients with dementia. Education and policy efforts should focus on education for families and providers, support for caregivers, and reforming reimbursement structures to provide coverage for interdisciplinary PC earlier in the disease, when patients have high needs but are not hospice eligible. PMID:21054292

  17. Survey of Threats and Assaults by Patients on Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvir, Yael; Moniwa, Emiko; Crisp-Han, Holly; Levy, Dana; Coverdale, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine the prevalence of threats and assaults by patients on psychiatry residents, their consequences, and the perceived adequacy of supports and institutional responses. Method: Authors conducted an anonymous survey of 519 psychiatry residents in 13 psychiatry programs across the United States. The survey…

  18. Current state of hereditary angioedema management: A patient survey

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Paula; Christiansen, Sandra C.; Li, Henry; Lumry, William; Davis-Lorton, Mark; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Frank, Michael; Castaldo, Anthony; Long, Janet F.; Zuraw, Bruce L.; Riedl, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a chronic disease with a high burden of disease that is poorly understood and often misdiagnosed. Availability of treatments, including C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) replacement, ecallantide, and icatibant, marks a significant advance for HAE patients. We aimed to better understand the current state of HAE care, from a patient perspective, after the introduction of several novel therapies. One session of the United States Hereditary Angioedema Association 2013 patient summit was devoted to data collection for this study. Patients attending the summit were self-selected, and HAE diagnosis was self-reported. Survey questions assessed patient characteristics, burden of disease, and treatment. Participant responses were captured using an audience response system. We surveyed 149 (80%) type I and II HAE (HAE-C1INH) and 37 (20%) HAE with normal C1INH (HAE-nlC1INH) patients. HAE-C1INH (72%) and HAE-nlCINH patients (76%) equally reported that HAE had a significant impact on quality of life (QOL). A third of HAE-C1INH patients were diagnosed within one year of their first HAE attack, but another third reported a delay of more than 10 years. Most HAE-C1INH (88%) and HAE-nlC1INH (76%) patients had on-demand treatment available. HAE-C1INH patients frequently had an individual treatment plan (76%) compared with 50% of HAE-nlC1INH patients. Most HAE-C1INH patients went to the emergency department (ED) or were hospitalized less than once every six months (80%). Our findings show that HAE management is improving with good access to on-demand and prophylactic treatment options. However, HAE patients still have a significant burden of disease and continued research and educational efforts are needed. PMID:25976438

  19. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... patient satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any...

  20. A survey on postanesthetic patient satisfaction in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Adel Ali; Alomar, Yasser Mohammed; Mohammed, Ghali Abdulrahman; Al-Fozan, Mazen Saud; Al-Harbi, Mohammed Saleh; Alrobai, Khalid Abduraziz; Zahoor, Haroon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction after anesthesia is an important outcome of hospital care. The aim is to evaluate the postoperative patient satisfaction during the patient stay at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: Three hundred and fifty-three patients who underwent surgery under general/regional anesthesia were surveyed. They were interviewed face to face on the first postoperative day. We recorded pain and pain controls in addition to some common complication of anesthesia like nausea and vomiting (postoperative nausea and vomiting) as a parameter to assess the rate of patient's satisfaction. Results: The overall level of satisfaction was high (95.2%); 17 (4.8%) patients were dissatisfied with their anesthetic care. There was a strong relation between patient dissatisfaction and: (i) Patients with poor postoperative pain control 13 (12.4%), (ii) patients with moderate nausea 8 (11.1%) and (iii) patients with static and dynamic severe pain 6 (21.4). Several factors were associated with dissatisfaction can be prevented, or better treated. Conclusion: We concluded that the patient satisfaction was high. Postoperative visit should be routinely performed in order to assess the quality and severity of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting and the other side-effects postoperatively. PMID:26240551

  1. Period change in GP And

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Rolland, A.; Lopez de Coca, P.

    1993-05-01

    GP And is a high amplitude d Scuti type star with V~10.m75, DV~0.m55, P=0.d0787 and spectral type A3 (Lopez de Coca et al. 1990, A & A 83, 51). To study the stability of its fundamental pulsation we have carried out simultaneous uvby photometry of this star in the years 1987 and 1992 at Sierra Nevada and Caltar Alto observatories, both in Spain. Ten new times of light maxima were obtained. In total, forty-one time s of light maxima (from 1973 to 1992, collected from Splittgerber 1976, Mitt. Veraend. Sterne 7, 137; Eggen 1978, IBVS 1517; Gieseking et al. 1979, A & AS 36, 457; Burchi et al. 1992, Mem. Soc. Astron. Ital. 63, 87 and us) were used to determinate the ephemeris of the light curve of GP And by means of the classical O-C method.

  2. Deciding if lifestyle is a problem: GP risk assessments or patient evaluations? A conversation analytic study of preventive consultations in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Nielsen, Søren Beck; Reventlow, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to analyse the interaction between patients and GPs in preventive consultations with an emphasis on how patients answer GPs’ questions about lifestyle, and the conditions these answers impose on the process of establishing agreement about lifestyle as a problem or not. Design. Six general practitioners (GPs) video-recorded 15 annual preventive consultations. From these, 32 excerpts of discussions about lifestyle were analysed using conversation analysis (CA). Results. GPs used an interview format to assess risk in patients’ lifestyles. In some cases patients adhered to this format and answered the GPs’ questions, but in many cases patients gave what we have termed “anticipatory answers”. These answers indicate that the patients anticipate a response from their GPs that would highlight problems with their lifestyle. Typically, in an anticipatory answer, patients bypass the interview format to give their own evaluation of their lifestyle and GPs accept this evaluation. In cases of “no-problem” answers from patients, GPs usually encouraged patients by adding support for current habits. Conclusion. Patients anticipated that GPs might assess their lifestyles as problematic and they incorporated this possibility into their responses. They thereby controlled the definition of their lifestyle as a problem or not. GPs generally did not use the information provided in these answers as a resource for further discussion, but rather relied on standard interview procedures. Staying within the patients’ frame of reference and using the patients’ anticipatory answers might provide GPs with a better point of departure for discussion regarding lifestyle. PMID:26467342

  3. Survey of patients' view on functional split of consultant psychiatrists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The functional split model of consultant psychiatrist care for inpatients has been one of the major service redesign that has occurred in the NHS in the last decade. It is unclear if this new split model offers any advantages over the previous sectorised model of working. More recent evidence has suggested that patients, carers and professionals have varied views regarding the benefits of this model. This survey of patient’s views on models of consultant working is the first in Scotland and we have attempted to include a large sample size. The results suggest that after providing sufficient information on both models, the majority of patients from various Scottish health boards have opted for the traditional sectorised model of working. Method During a four week period consecutive patients across 4 health boards attending the General Adult consultant outpatient clinics and those who were admitted to their inpatient ward were offered a structured questionnaire regarding their views on the functional split versus traditional sectorised model. Space was provided for additional comments. The study used descriptive statistical measures for analysis of its results. Ethical approval was confirmed as not being required for this survey of local services. Results We had a response rate of 67%. A significant majority (76%) of service users across the four different health boards indicated a preference for the same consultant to manage their care irrespective of whether they were an inpatient or in the community (Chi-squared = 65, df = 1, p < 0.0001). In their unstructured comments patients often mentioned the value of the therapeutic relationship and trust in a single consultant psychiatrist. Conclusions Our survey suggests that most patients prefer the traditional model where they see a single consultant throughout their journey of care. The views of patients should be sought as much as possible and should be taken into account when considering the best way to

  4. Questionnaire survey on lifestyle of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Haruka; Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Taniai, Makiko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Lack of exercise and excessive food intake are known to be the important causes of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To elucidate the relationship between lifestyle and NASH, we surveyed exercise and dietary habits, comparing them among 171 biopsy-proven NASH patients, 29 nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) patients and 49 normal subjects. Dietary habits including the duration of dinner time, amount of rice at dinner, and weekly frequencies of meat, fries, Chinese noodles, sweets, and instant food consumption were significantly different in male NASH patients compared to normal male subjects. In women, differences were seen in the amount of rice at dinner, frequency of eating out, and proclivity for sweets. In male NASH patients, the frequency of physical exercise was significantly lower. The lifestyle tendencies of NASH were almost similar to those of NAFL. In the comparison between obese NASH and non-obese NASH, no clear lifestyle differences were found. In conclusion, the most striking result of this survey was that the lifestyle of males contributed significantly to the development of NASH. These results point to treatment of NASH in males. In female NASH patients, lifestyle differences were minimal, and the effects of other factors such as genetic background will need to be investigated. PMID:25411525

  5. Questionnaire survey on lifestyle of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Noto, Haruka; Tokushige, Katsutoshi; Hashimoto, Etsuko; Taniai, Makiko; Shiratori, Keiko

    2014-11-01

    Lack of exercise and excessive food intake are known to be the important causes of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To elucidate the relationship between lifestyle and NASH, we surveyed exercise and dietary habits, comparing them among 171 biopsy-proven NASH patients, 29 nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) patients and 49 normal subjects. Dietary habits including the duration of dinner time, amount of rice at dinner, and weekly frequencies of meat, fries, Chinese noodles, sweets, and instant food consumption were significantly different in male NASH patients compared to normal male subjects. In women, differences were seen in the amount of rice at dinner, frequency of eating out, and proclivity for sweets. In male NASH patients, the frequency of physical exercise was significantly lower. The lifestyle tendencies of NASH were almost similar to those of NAFL. In the comparison between obese NASH and non-obese NASH, no clear lifestyle differences were found. In conclusion, the most striking result of this survey was that the lifestyle of males contributed significantly to the development of NASH. These results point to treatment of NASH in males. In female NASH patients, lifestyle differences were minimal, and the effects of other factors such as genetic background will need to be investigated. PMID:25411525

  6. The prisoner as patient - a health services satisfaction survey

    PubMed Central

    Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Rustad, Åse-Bente; Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence for higher morbidity among prison inmates than in the general population. Despite this, patient satisfaction with the prison health services is scarcely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate patient satisfaction with prison health services in Norway and to analyze possible patient and service effects. Methods The survey took part in 29 prisons in the southern and central part of Norway, representing 62% of the total prison capacity in Norway. A total of 1,150 prison inmates with prison health services experiences completed a satisfaction questionnaire (90% response rate). The patients' satisfaction was measured on a 12-item index. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze both patient and service characteristics as predictors of satisfaction. Results The study revealed high levels of dissatisfaction with prison health services. There were substantial differences between services, with between-service-variance accounting for 9% of the total variance. Satisfaction was significantly associated with a senior staff member's evaluation of the health services possessing adequate resources and the quality of drug abuse treatment. At the patient level, satisfaction was significantly associated with older age, frequent consultations and better self-perceived health. Conclusion Prison inmates' satisfaction with the health services provided are low compared with patient satisfaction measured in other health areas. The substantial differences observed between services - even when adjusting for several known factors associated with patient satisfaction - indicate a potential for quality improvement. PMID:19785736

  7. Minority ethnicity patient satisfaction and experience: results of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Richard J; Ferguson, Jamie; Møller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to explore the differential patient satisfaction reported by patients with cancer who are from ethnic minority backgrounds, examining patient-reported experience of interacting with medical and nursing staff. Setting As a secondary analysis, we collated data collected over two consecutive annual rounds of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from September 2012 to November 2013. Participants There were 138 878 responses from 155 hospital trusts across the National Health Service in England, representing a response rate of 63.9% based on the total identified cohort of patients receiving cancer care over those 2 years. Outcomes We used the results of the annual survey, which sought to assess overall patient satisfaction along with patient experience of interacting with clinical nurse specialists, hospital doctors and ward nurses. Results Ethnic minority patients reported lower satisfaction and less positive experiences of care overall. While some of this difference appeared related to demographic and socioeconomic variation, ethnic minority patients remained less positive than those in the White British group, after statistical adjustment. Ethnic minority patients also reported lower confidence in, and less understanding of, healthcare professionals, including clinical nurse specialists, doctors and ward nurses. Conclusions Given the diversity of the British population, as well as the clustering of ethnic minority patients in certain urban areas, a better understanding of the expectations and additional needs of ethnic minority patients is required to improve their experience of and satisfaction with cancer care. PMID:27354083

  8. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  9. Post-sampling mortality and non-response patterns in the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey: Implications for epidemiological studies based on surveys of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Gary A.; Saunders, Catherine L.; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveys of the experience of cancer patients are increasingly being introduced in different countries and used in cancer epidemiology research. Sampling processes, post-sampling mortality and survey non-response can influence the representativeness of cancer patient surveys. Methods We examined predictors of post-sampling mortality and non-response among patients initially included in the sampling frame of the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey. We also compared the respondents’ diagnostic case-mix to other relevant populations of cancer patients, including incident and prevalent cases. Results Of 109,477 initially sampled cancer patients, 6273 (5.7%) died between sampling and survey mail-out. Older age and diagnosis of brain, lung and pancreatic cancer were associated with higher risk of post-sampling mortality. The overall response rate was 67% (67,713 respondents), being >70% for the most affluent patients and those diagnosed with colon or breast cancer and <50% for Asian or Black patients, those under 35 and those diagnosed with brain cancer. The diagnostic case-mix of respondents varied substantially from incident or prevalent cancer cases. Conclusions Respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey represent a population of recently treated cancer survivors. Although patient survey data can provide unique insights for improving cancer care quality, features of survey populations need to be acknowledged when analysing and interpreting findings from studies using such data. PMID:26797675

  10. A Survey of Caregivers' Knowledge About Caring for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Woo; Kim, Sang Beom; Lee, Jong Hwa; Lee, Sook Joung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate how much formal caregivers know about caring for stroke patients, and whether they adequately provide it. Methods Formal caregivers, who worked for stroke patients at 8 hospitals (including 4 university hospitals, 2 rehabilitation hospitals, and 2 convalescent hospitals) participated in this study. The survey was based on a self-report questionnaire, with 6 categories containing a total of 48 questions about the specific care of stroke patients: the demographic characteristics of the caregivers, bed positioning, the provision of meals, position changes and transfers, the range of motion exercises, and caregiver training. Results A total of 217 caregivers were surveyed, and they were distributed as follows: 41% came from the university hospitals, 35% came from the rehabilitation hospitals, and 24% came from the convalescent hospitals. The percentages of correct answers were distributed as follows: 64.3% for bed positioning, 74.3% for providing meals, and 62.4% for position change and transfer. The total and subscale scores of the caregivers working at convalescent hospitals were significantly lower than those of the caregivers working at the other types of hospitals (p<0.05). Only 7.8% of the total participants received training on a regular basis. The caregivers obtained most of the information from caregiver associations (58.1%), and the majority of the caregivers (65.4%) were willing to receive training. Conclusion About one third (33.8%) of caregivers did not have adequate knowledge of how to properly care for stroke patients; in fact, a significant number of caregivers demonstrated inappropriate and insufficient knowledge in several areas. It is assumed that the provision of regular training, by rehabilitation experts, will improve the professionalism and knowledge of the caregivers, and positively affect patient outcomes. PMID:26605179

  11. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%). The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data suggest that cultural

  12. Predicting Patients' Expectations of Hospital Chaplains: A Multisite Survey

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Marek, Dean V.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Johnson, Mary E.; Buryska, James F.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; O'Bryan, Floyd G.; Hansen, Patrick D.; Howick, Priscilla H.; Durland, Heidi L.; Lackore, Kandace A.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Mueller, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify patient expectations regarding chaplain visitation, characteristics of patients who want to be visited by a chaplain, and what patients deem important when a chaplain visits. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Three weeks after discharge, 4500 eligible medical and surgical patients from hospitals in Minnesota, Arizona, and Florida were surveyed by mail to collect demographic information and expectations regarding chaplain visitation. The survey was conducted during the following time periods: Minnesota participants, April 6 until April 25, 2006; Arizona participants, October 16, 2008, until January 13, 2009; Florida participants, October 16, 2008, until January 20, 2009. Categorical variables were summarized with frequencies or percentages. Associations between responses and site were examined using χ2 tests. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of wanting chaplain visitation on the basis of patient demographics and perceived importance of reasons for chaplain visitation. RESULTS: About one-third of those surveyed responded from each site. Most were male, married, aged 56 years or older, and Protestant or Catholic. Of the respondents, nearly 70% reported wanting chaplain visitation, 43% were visited, and 81% indicated that visitation was important. The strongest predictor of wanting chaplain visitation was denomination vs no indicated religious affiliation (Catholic: odds ratio [OR], 8.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.49-14.64; P<.001; evangelical Protestant: OR, 4.95; 95% CI, 2.74-8.91; P<.001; mainline Protestant: OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 2.58-7.29; P<.001). Being female was a weak predictor (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.05-2.09; P=.03), as was site. Among the reasons given by respondents for wanting chaplain visitation, the most important were that chaplains served as reminders of God's care and presence (OR, 4.37; 95% CI, 2.58-7.40; P<.001) and that they provided prayer or scripture reading (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.53-4.20; P<.001

  13. A novel tetrameric gp350 1-470 as a potential Epstein-Barr virus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xinle; Cao, Zhouhong; Sen, Goutam; Chattopadhyay, Gouri; Fuller, Deborah H; Fuller, James T; Snapper, Dustin M; Snow, Andrew L; Mond, James J; Snapper, Clifford M

    2013-06-26

    Infectious mononucleosis and B-cell transformation in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is dependent upon binding of the EBV envelope glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on B-cells. Gp350-specific antibody comprises most of the EBV neutralizing activity in the serum of infected patients, making this protein a promising target antigen for a prophylactic EBV vaccine. We describe a novel, tetrameric gp350-based vaccine that exhibits markedly enhanced immunogenicity relative to its monomeric counterpart. Plasmid DNA was constructed for synthesis, within transfected CHO cells, of a tetrameric, truncated (a.a. 1-470) gp350 protein (gp350(1-470)). Tetrameric gp350(1-470) induced ≈ 20-fold higher serum titers of gp350(1-470)-specific IgG and >19-fold enhancements in neutralizing titers at the highest dose, and was >25-fold more immunogenic on a per-weight basis than monomeric gp350(1-470). Further, epidermal immunization with plasmid DNA encoding gp350(1-470) tetramer induced 8-fold higher serum titers of gp350(1-470)-specific IgG relative to monomer. Tetrameric gp350(1-470) binding to human CD21 was >24-fold more efficient on a per-weight basis than monomer, but neither tetramer nor monomer mediated polyclonal human B-cell activation. Finally, the introduction of strong, universal tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell epitopes into the tetrameric gp350(1-470) had no effect on the gp350(1-470)-specific IgG response in naïve mice, and resulted in suppressed gp350(1-470)-specific IgG responses in TT-primed mice. Collectively, these data suggest that tetrameric gp350(1-470) is a potentially promising candidate for testing as a prophylactic EBV vaccine, and that protein multimerization, using the approach described herein, is likely to be clinically relevant for enhancing the immunogenicity of other proteins of vaccine interest. PMID:23665339

  14. A novel tetrameric gp3501-470 as a potential Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xinle; Cao, Zhouhong; Sen, Goutam; Chattopadhyay, Gouri; Fuller, Deborah H.; Fuller, James T.; Snapper, Dustin M.; Snow, Andrew; Mond, James J.; Snapper, Clifford M.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis and B-cell transformation in response to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is dependent upon binding of the EBV envelope glycoprotein gp350 to CD21 on B-cells. Gp350-specific antibody comprises most of the EBV neutralizing activity in the serum of infected patients, making this protein a promising target antigen for a prophylactic EBV vaccine. We describe a novel, tetrameric gp350-based vaccine that exhibits markedly enhanced immunogenicity relative to its monomeric counterpart. Plasmid DNA was constructed for synthesis, within transfected CHO cells, of a tetrameric, truncated (a.a. 1-470) gp350 protein (gp3501-470). Tetrameric gp3501-470 induced ~20-fold higher serum titers of gp3501-470-specific IgG and >19-fold enhancements in neutralizing titers at the highest dose, and was >25-fold more immunogenic on a per-weight basis than monomeric gp3501-470. Further, epidermal immunization with plasmid DNA encoding gp3501-470 tetramer induced 8-fold higher serum titers of gp3501-470-specific IgG relative to monomer. Tetrameric gp3501-470 binding to human CD21 was >24-fold more efficient on a per-weight basis than monomer, but neither tetramer nor monomer mediated polyclonal human B-cell activation. Finally, the introduction of strong, universal tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell epitopes into the tetrameric gp3501-470 had no effect on the gp3501-470-specific IgG response in naïve mice, and resulted in suppressed gp3501-470-specific IgG responses in TT-primed mice. Collectively, these data suggest that tetrameric gp3501-470 is a potentially promising candidate for testing as a prophylactic EBV vaccine, and that protein multimerization, using the approach described herein, is likely to be clinically relevant for enhancing the immunogenicity of other proteins of vaccine interest. PMID:23665339

  15. Perceptions of Video-Based Appointments from the Patient's Home: A Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Sarah M.; O'Neil, Daniel A.; Wood, Douglas L.; Spurrier, Barbara R.; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We examined patient interest in a telehealth model in which the patient supplies the hardware and Internet connectivity to meet with a healthcare provider from his or her home via video call (video appointment). We hoped to understand prospectively the desirability, feasibility, and viability from the patient perspective. Materials and Methods: A phone survey was conducted of a random sample of patients who had been seen in the outpatient setting at a single institution. The sample was stratified by proximity to the local institution with oversampling for patients living outside a 120-mile radius. Results: Out of 500 total patients, 301 patients responded, and 263 met the inclusion criteria. Of those 263 respondents, 38% indicated “very likely” to accept an invitation to see their provider via video, 28.1% “somewhat likely,” and 33.8% “not at all likely.” Of respondents, 75% have broadband, although only 36% reported having a Web camera. The primary factors affecting willingness to participate in a video appointment include comfort in setting up a video call, age, and distance participants would have traveled for an in-clinic appointment. Conclusions: Patient survey data indicate that most patients are likely to be accepting of telehealth care to the home using video call and that most have the required technology. Nevertheless, there are still significant hurdles to effectively implement this adaptation of telehealth care as part of mainstream practice. PMID:25166260

  16. Hearing the patient's voice? Factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Davies, E; Cleary, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a framework for understanding factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement. Design: Qualitative interviews with senior health professionals and managers and a review of the literature. Setting: A quality improvement collaborative in Minnesota, USA involving teams from eight medical groups, focusing on how to use patient survey data to improve patient centred care. Participants: Eight team leaders (medical, clinical improvement or service quality directors) and six team members (clinical improvement coordinators and managers). Results: Respondents reported three types of barriers before the collaborative: organisational, professional and data related. Organisational barriers included lack of supporting values for patient centred care, competing priorities, and lack of an effective quality improvement infrastructure. Professional barriers included clinicians and staff not being used to focusing on patient interaction as a quality issue, individuals not necessarily having been selected, trained or supported to provide patient centred care, and scepticism, defensiveness or resistance to change following feedback. Data related barriers included lack of expertise with survey data, lack of timely and specific results, uncertainty over the effective interventions or time frames for improvement, and consequent risk of perceived low cost effectiveness of data collection. Factors that appeared to have promoted data use included board led strategies to change culture and create quality improvement forums, leadership from senior physicians and managers, and the persistence of quality improvement staff over several years in demonstrating change in other areas. Conclusion: Using patient survey data may require a more concerted effort than for other clinical data. Organisations may need to develop cultures that support patient centred care, quality improvement capacity, and to align professional receptiveness and leadership with

  17. Sleep telemedicine: a survey study of patient preferences.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jessica M; Schwamm, Lee H; Bianchi, Matt T

    2012-01-01

    Telemedicine is an increasingly recognized option for cost-effective management of chronic conditions. We surveyed Sleep Clinic patients about their experiences and preferences regarding different forms of telemedicine. Adult Sleep Clinic patients seen between 2009 and 2011 received a brief survey either by postal mail (n = 156) or, for those with an available email address, electronically (n = 282). The overall response rate was 28.1% (n = 123 responses), with email response rates being higher than postal mail responses. The most commonly reported barriers to in-person physician visits were parking cost (44%), time away from work/school (34%), and cost of gas (26%). Whereas 89% of respondents indicated using telephone and 55% of respondents indicated using email to communicate with providers, none reported experience with video telemedicine. Despite this lack of experience, over 60% reported feeling comfortable or willing to try it. Of those who were uncomfortable about video telemedicine, the two main reasons were that in-person visits feel more natural (48%) and that the doctor might need to perform an examination (24%). More than half of respondents reported willingness to pay a copay for a video visit. Video telemedicine represents a feasible option for chronic sleep disorders management. PMID:22844614

  18. CD4 peptide-protein conjugates, but not recombinant human CD4, bind to recombinant gp120 from the human immunodeficiency virus in the presence of serum from AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetie, V; Slaughter, C; Wheeler, H T; Uhr, J W; Vitetta, E S

    1991-01-01

    Sera from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+; Walter Reed stage 6) individuals inhibit the interaction between recombinant human CD4 and recombinant gp120 from HIV (rCD4 and rgp120, respectively), thereby interfering with the ability of soluble rCD4 to block infection with HIV or rCD4-toxin conjugates to kill HIV-infected cells. In this report we demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of such sera is caused primarily by anti-gp120 antibodies that do not recognize the CD4 interaction site on gp120. To circumvent the problem of inhibition, we have generated a construct containing a peptide of CD4 (residues 41-84) conjugated to ovalbumin (three to five peptides per molecule). This multivalent conjugate binds to rgp120 and binding is not inhibited by antibodies in HIV+ sera. PMID:2062847

  19. Isolation and identification of renal cell carcinoma-derived peptides associated with GP96.

    PubMed

    Li, H-Z; Li, C-W; Li, C-Y; Zhang, B-F; Li, L-T; Li, J-M; Zheng, J-N; Chang, J-W

    2013-08-01

    We determined the possible associated determinants and analyzed whether gp96-_associated antigenic peptides can be found in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The gp96-peptide complexes were chromatographically purified from resected tumor tissue of RCC patients. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis confirmed gp96 using the gp96 monoclonal antibody, and its concentration was measured using BCA. Approximately 20 to 50 μg gp96-peptide complexes was obtained from 1 g RCC tissue. The mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the eluted peptides included the initial profiling using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS. Quadrupole time-of-flight MS combined with the Mascot search engine was used to identify the peptides and find proteins from primary sequence databases. MS analysis results demonstrated that the mass range of peptide associated with gp96 was from 1046.48 to 3501.56 Da. Further research confirmed the sequences of two gp96-associated peptides, namely, LVPLEGWGGNVM and PPVYYVPYVVL. However, the original protein of the two peptides could not be found. The results demonstrated that the gp96-associated peptides are small molecular peptides, and the two peptides are deduced to be RCC-associated peptides. The identified peptides were confirmed to be associated with gp96 using the protocols described above. However, the specificity and relevance of the association to the immunogenicity of gp96 remains to be examined. Further analysis must be accomplished before the findings can be applied in peptide vaccine. PMID:23448575

  20. Occupational therapy intervention with patients with breast cancer: a survey.

    PubMed

    Vockins, H

    2004-03-01

    Occupational therapists (OTs) working with patients with breast cancer provide a variety of therapeutic interventions. A survey was undertaken to record the different assessments and treatments employed by OTs in a specialist cancer centre with the type and length of interventions recorded on a log sheet by each therapist over a period of a month. A significant amount of time was spent facilitating educational programmes, teaching relaxation techniques and exploring strategies for managing breathlessness and fatigue. However, documentation and report writing consumed the largest proportion of the therapists' time. Less time was spent on assessment of activities of daily living and home assessments, often perceived to be the traditional domain of OTs. PMID:14961775

  1. Real-Time Patient Survey Data During Routine Clinical Activities for Rapid-Cycle Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveying patients is increasingly important for evaluating and improving health care delivery, but practical survey strategies during routine care activities have not been available. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting routine patient surveys in a primary care clinic using commercially available technology (Web-based survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, cloud-based management of survey data) to expedite and enhance several steps in data collection and management for rapid quality improvement cycles. Methods We used a Web-based data management tool (survey creation, deployment on tablet computers, real-time data accumulation and display of survey results) to conduct four patient surveys during routine clinic sessions over a one-month period. Each survey consisted of three questions and focused on a specific patient care domain (dental care, waiting room experience, care access/continuity, Internet connectivity). Results Of the 727 available patients during clinic survey days, 316 patients (43.4%) attempted the survey, and 293 (40.3%) completed the survey. For the four 3-question surveys, the average time per survey was overall 40.4 seconds, with a range of 5.4 to 20.3 seconds for individual questions. Yes/No questions took less time than multiple choice questions (average 9.6 seconds versus 14.0). Average response time showed no clear pattern by order of questions or by proctor strategy, but monotonically increased with number of words in the question (<20 words, 21-30 words, >30 words)—8.0, 11.8, 16.8, seconds, respectively. Conclusions This technology-enabled data management system helped capture patient opinions, accelerate turnaround of survey data, with minimal impact on a busy primary care clinic. This new model of patient survey data management is feasible and sustainable in a busy office setting, supports and engages clinicians in the quality improvement process, and harmonizes with the vision of a learning health

  2. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  3. Missed Opportunity: National Survey of Primary Care Physicians and Patients on Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    A national representative survey of primary care physicians (N=648) was conducted to determine how they deal with patients who have substance abuse problems. The survey revealed how physicians identify substance abuse in their patients, what efforts they make to help these patients, and what barriers they find to effective diagnosis and treatment.…

  4. Multinational survey of chiropractic patients: reasons for seeking care

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Charles; Globe, Gary; Terre, Lisa; Mirtz, Timothy A.; Greene, Leon; Globe, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Introduction This study explores the extent to which consumers seek wellness care when choosing chiropractors whose practice methods are known to include periodic evaluative and interventional methods to maintain wellness and prevent illness. Methods Using an international convenience sample of Sacro-Occipital Technique (SOT) practitioners, 1316 consecutive patients attending 27 different chiropractic clinics in the USA, Europe and Australia completed a one-page survey on intake to assess reason for seeking care. A forced choice response was obtained characterizing the patient’s reason for seeking chiropractic care. Results More than 40% of chiropractic patient visits were initiated for the purposes of health enhancement and/or disease prevention. Conclusion Although prudence dictates great caution when generalizing from this study, if confirmed by subsequent research among other similar cohorts, the present results may lend support to continued arguments of consumer demand for a more comprehensive paradigm of chiropractic care, beyond routine musculoskeletal complaints, that conceptualizes the systemic, nonspecific effects of the chiropractic encounter in much broader terms. PMID:18769601

  5. Australian GP registrars' use of e-resources.

    PubMed

    Denny, Bianca; Chester, Andrea; Butler, Mexie; Brown, James

    2015-03-01

    Traditional face-to-face learning opportunities for Australian GP registrars are complemented by the use of e-resources. The current study aimed to investigate GP trainees' use of e-resources and their preferences for sourcing clinical information to inform the prospective direction and design of e-resources for the GP education and training sector. One-hundred and nineteen registrars completed a custom online survey measuring the type and frequency of use of e-resources, and preferences for their design and content. Results indicated that for the majority of registrars e-resources were the first preference for obtaining clinical information (77.3%). The most frequently used e-resources included non-medical search engines, medical journals and prescribing software. Factors relevant to registrars' selection and use of e-resources included the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the information. It is concluded that the use of e-resources provides a valuable supplement to registrars' learning and teaching. However, issues of quality and consistency raise some concerns regarding the use of e-resources for obtaining clinical information. PMID:25898296

  6. Lessons learned from an Internet GP information system.

    PubMed

    Briggs, J S; Bradley, M P

    1998-01-01

    We describe the prototype of an application that in actual use would allow GPs to find out more information about consultants at hospitals. This would aid the GP in making the decision about which consultant a patient should be referred to. The requirements of the application from the GP's perspective are described, together with some of the issues that have to be resolved before hospitals can provide the necessary information in a standard format. The application is implemented as a client--server system using standard Internet technologies such as Java and HTML. This architecture has a number of advantages but also revealed some issues concerning security and the format of data, among other things. The project showed that there is a desire for such a system and that that desire can be fulfilled at a relatively low cost. PMID:9785327

  7. Accessing primary care: a simulated patient study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Carter, Mary; Davey, Antoinette; Roberts, Martin J; Elliott, Marc N; Roland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulated patient, or so-called ‘mystery-shopper’, studies are a controversial, but potentially useful, approach to take when conducting health services research. Aim To investigate the construct validity of survey questions relating to access to primary care included in the English GP Patient Survey. Design and setting Observational study in 41 general practices in rural, urban, and inner-city settings in the UK. Method Between May 2010 and March 2011, researchers telephoned practices at monthly intervals, simulating patients requesting routine, but prompt, appointments. Seven measures of access and appointment availability, measured from the mystery-shopper contacts, were related to seven measures of practice performance from the GP Patient Survey. Results Practices with lower access scores in the GP Patient Survey had poorer access and appointment availability for five out of seven items measured directly, when compared with practices that had higher scores. Scores on items from the national survey that related to appointment availability were significantly associated with direct measures of appointment availability. Patient-satisfaction levels and the likelihood that patients would recommend their practice were related to the availability of appointments. Patients’ reports of ease of telephone access in the national survey were unrelated to three out of four measures of practice call handling, but were related to the time taken to resolve an appointment request, suggesting responders’ possible confusion in answering this question. Conclusion Items relating to the accessibility of care in a the English GP patient survey have construct validity. Patients’ satisfaction with their practice is not related to practice call handling, but is related to appointment availability. PMID:23561783

  8. The impact of a GP clinical audit on the provision of smoking cessation advice

    PubMed Central

    McKay-Brown, Lisa; Bishop, Nicole; Balmford, James; Borland, Ron; Kirby, Catherine; Piterman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether participation in a clinical audit and education session would improve GP management of patients who smoke. Methods GPs who participated in an associated smoking cessation research program were invited to complete a three-stage clinical audit. This process included a retrospective self-audit of smoking cessation management practices over the 6 months prior to commencing the study, attending a 2.5 hour education session about GP management of smoking cessation, and completion of a second retrospective self-audit 6 months later. Twenty-eight GPs completed the full audit and education process, providing information about their smoking cessation management with 1114 patients. The main outcome measure was changes in GP management of smoking cessation with patients across the audit period, as measured by the clinical audit tool. Results The majority of GPs (57%) indicated that as a result of the audit process they had altered their approach to the management of patients who smoke. Quantitative analyses confirmed significant increases in various forms of evidence-based smoking cessation management practices to assist patients to quit, or maintain quitting across the audit period. However comparative analyses of patient data challenged these findings, suggesting that the clinical audit process had less impact on GP practice than suggested in GP's self-reported audit data. Conclusion This study provides some support for the combined use of self-auditing, feedback and education to improve GP management of smoking cessation. However further research is warranted to examine GP- and patient-based reports of outcomes from clinical audit and other educational interventions. PMID:18973708

  9. Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Selected by Screening of an Immune Human Phage Library against an Envelope Glycoprotein (gp140) Isolated from a Patient (R2) with Broadly HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Vidita; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Sidorov, Igor A.; Louise, John M.; Harris, Ilia; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Bouma, Peter; Cham, Fatim; Choudhary, Anil; Rybak, Susanna M.; Fouts, Timothy; Montefiori, David C.; Broder, Christopher C.; Quinnan, Gerald V.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Elicitation of broadly cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (bcnAbs) in HIV infections is rare. To test the hypothesis that such antibodies could be elicited by HIV envelope glycoproteins (Envs) with unusual immunogenic properties and to identify novel bcnAbs, we used a soluble Env ectodomain (gp140) from a donor (R2) with high level of bcnAbs as an antigen for panning of an immune phage-displayed antibody library. The panning with the R2 Env resulted in significantly higher number of cross-reactive antibody clones than by using Envs from two other isolates (89.6 and IIIB). Two of the identified human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs), m22 and m24, had sequences, neutralizing and binding activities similar or identical to those of the gp120-specific bcnAbs m18 and m14. The use of the R2 Env but not other Envs for panning resulted in the identification of a novel gp41-specific hmAb, m46. For several of the tested HIV-1 primary isolates its potency on molar basis was comparable to that of T20. It inhibited entry of primary isolates from different clades with an increased activity for cell lines with low CCR5 surface concentrations. The m46 neutralizing activity against a panel of clade C isolates was significantly higher in an assay based on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (4 out of 5 isolates were neutralized with an IC50 in the range from 1.5 to 25 μg/ml) than in an assay based on a cell line with relatively high concentration of cell-surface associated CCR5. In contrast to 2F5 and Z13, this antibody did not bind to denatured gp140 and gp41-derived peptides indicating a conformational nature of its epitope. It bound to a 5-helix bundle but not to N-heptad repeat coiled coils and a 6-helix bundle construct indicating contribution of both gp41 heptad repeats to its epitope and to a possible mechanism of neutralization. These results indicate that the R2 Env may contain unique exposed conserved epitopes that could contribute to its ability to elicit broadly cross

  10. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  11. Quality of life in rectal cancer patients after radical surgery: a survey of Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the impact of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in disease-free survivors after radical surgery for rectal cancer in a Chinese mainland population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional survey from August 2002 to February 2011 by use of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires of 438 patients who underwent curative surgery for rectal cancer. Patients who were followed up for a minimum of 6 months, had no relevant major comorbidities and whose disease had not recurred were asked to complete both questionnaires. The impact of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on HRQoL were compared by univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results In total, 285 patients responded to the survey (response rate, 65.1%). Psychological-related HRQoL variables such as emotional function (P = 0.021) and future perspectives (P = 0.044) were poorer for younger patients than for older patients; and physiological-related HRQoL was reflected by physical function (P = 0.039), which was poorer for older patients than for younger patients. In terms of physiologic function and symptoms concerning HRQoL, such as pain (P = 0.002) and insomnia (P = 0.018), females had lower values than males. Low education and unemployment were associated with a worse HRQoL. HRQoL was worse for patients with stomas compared to those without, especially in psychosocial areas such as role function (P = 0.025), social function (P <0.001) and body image (P = 0.004). Financial HRQoL was worse for younger patients and patients with stoma. Conclusions HRQoL aspects and degrees to which they were impaired after curative surgery for rectal cancer were different when compared by many sociodemographic and clinical factors in Chinese mainland patients. PMID:24886668

  12. Effects of heat shock protein gp96 on human dendritic cell maturation and CTL expansion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Zan, Yanlu; Shan, Ming; Liu, Changmei; Shi, Ming; Li, Wei; Zhang, Zhixin; Liu, Na; Wang, Fusheng; Zhong, Weidong; Liao, Fulian; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2006-06-01

    We reported previously that heat shock protein gp96 and its N-terminal fragment were able to stimulate CTL expansion specific for a HBV peptide (SYVNTNMGL) in BALB/c mice. Here we characterized the adjuvant effects of gp96 on human HLA-A2 restricted T cells. Full-length gp96 isolated from healthy human liver and recombinant fragments both from prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells were analyzed for their ability to stimulate maturation of human dendritic cells. It was found that in vitro these proteins were capable of maturating human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC) isolated from healthy donors as well as from HBV-positive, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, gp96 and the recombinant fragments were found to augment CTL response specific for the HBcAg(18-27) FLPSDFFPSV peptide of hepatitis B virus. PMID:16630554

  13. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0515).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey... Collection. Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  14. HIV-1 gp120 and Drugs of Abuse: Interactions in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Peter S.; Shah, Ankit; Weemhoff, James; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, D.P.; Kumar, Anil

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is a global public health problem with more than 34 million people living with HIV infection. Although great strides have been made in treating this epidemic with therapeutic agents, the increase in patient life span has been coincident with an increase in the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HAND is thought to result from the neurotoxic effects of viral proteins that are shed from HIV-infected microglial cells. One of the primary neurotoxins responsible for this effect is the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. Exposure of neurons to gp120 has been demonstrated to cause apoptosis in neurons, as well as numerous indirect effects such as an increase in inflammatory cytokines, an increase in oxidative stress, and an increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier. In many patients, the use of drugs of abuse (DOA) exacerbates the neurotoxic effects of gp120. Cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine are three DOAs that are commonly used by those infected with HIV-1. All three of these DOAs have been demonstrated to increase oxidative stress in the CNS as well as to increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Numerous model systems have demonstrated that these DOAs have the capability of exacerbating the neurotoxic effects of gp120. This review will summarize the neurotoxic effects of gp120, the deleterious effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine on the CNS, and the combined effects of gp120 in the context of these drugs. PMID:22591361

  15. HIV-1 gp120 and drugs of abuse: interactions in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Peter S; Shah, Ankit; Weemhoff, James; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, D P; Kumar, Anil

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1 infection is a global public health problem with more than 34 million people living with HIV infection. Although great strides have been made in treating this epidemic with therapeutic agents, the increase in patient life span has been coincident with an increase in the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HAND is thought to result from the neurotoxic effects of viral proteins that are shed from HIV-infected microglial cells. One of the primary neurotoxins responsible for this effect is the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. Exposure of neurons to gp120 has been demonstrated to cause apoptosis in neurons, as well as numerous indirect effects such as an increase in inflammatory cytokines, an increase in oxidative stress, and an increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier. In many patients, the use of drugs of abuse (DOA) exacerbates the neurotoxic effects of gp120. Cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine are three DOAs that are commonly used by those infected with HIV-1. All three of these DOAs have been demonstrated to increase oxidative stress in the CNS as well as to increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier. Numerous model systems have demonstrated that these DOAs have the capability of exacerbating the neurotoxic effects of gp120. This review will summarize the neurotoxic effects of gp120, the deleterious effects of cocaine, methamphetamine and morphine on the CNS, and the combined effects of gp120 in the context of these drugs. PMID:22591361

  16. A Wnt5a signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 gp120-induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Su-Bo; Ji, Guangchen; Li, Bei; Andersson, Tommy; Neugebauer, Volker; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Pathological pain is one of the most common neurological complications in HIV-1/AIDS patients. However, the pathogenic process is unclear. Our recent studies show that Wnt5a is up-regulated in the spinal cord dorsal horn of the HIV patients who develop pain and that HIV-1 gp120, a potential causal factor of the HIV-associated pain, rapidly up-regulates Wnt5a in the mouse SDH. Using a mouse model, we show here that a specific Wnt5a antagonist, Box-5, attenuated gp120-induced mechanical allodynia. Conversely, a Wnt5a agonist, Foxy5, facilitated the allodynia. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates gp120-induced allodynia, we tested the role of the JNK/TNF-α pathway. We observed that the JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 blocked either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. Similarly, the TNF-α-specific antagonist Enbrel also reversed either gp120- or Foxy5-induced allodynia. These data suggest that JNK and TNF-α mediate the biological effects of Wnt5a in regulating gp120-induced allodynia. To investigate the cellular mechanism, we performed extracellular single-unit recording from SDH neurons in anesthetized mice. Both Box5 and SP600125 negated gp120-induced potentiation of SDH neuron spiking evoked by mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw. Furthermore, while Foxy5 potentiated spike frequency of SDH neurons, either SP600125 or Enbrel blocked the potentiation. The data indicate that Wnt5a potentiates the activity of SDH neurons via the JNK-TNF-α pathway. Collectively, our findings suggest that Wnt5a regulates the pathogenesis of gp120-induced pain, likely by sensitizing pain-processing SDH neurons via JNK/TNF-α signaling. PMID:25840108

  17. Ten Years of Patient Surveys in Accredited Breast Centers in North Rhine-Westphalia

    PubMed Central

    Ansmann, L.; Kowalski, C.; Pfaff, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient surveys are an established tool for quality control in healthcare organizations. This report looks at the design and development of the annual patient surveys carried out among breast cancer patients treated in the Breast Centers of North Rhine-Westphalia and discusses selected findings from 10 consecutive years. Material and Methods: Since 2006 the Institute for Medical Sociology, Health Services Research and Rehabilitation Science (IMVR) of the University of Cologne has carried out an annual survey of breast cancer patients using the Cologne Patient Questionnaire for Breast Cancer. The patients included in the survey have been diagnosed with primary breast cancer and undergo surgery between February and July in one of the Breast Centers in North Rhine-Westphalia accredited by the medical association of Westphalia-Lippe. The questionnaire and the type of feedback given to the Breast Centers were comprehensively revised in 2014. Selected results collected over the survey period were analyzed descriptively. Results: The survey period of 10 years provides information on the actual medical care delivered in the Breast Centers based on the data obtained in this period from around 40 000 patients. Some areas showed positive developments over time. Conclusion: The approach used to survey patients, the Cologne Patient Questionnaire for Breast Cancer 2.0 and the benchmark-focused feedback provide an impetus for organizational learning in Breast Centers. The concept could also be used in other healthcare organizations to stimulate learning and improve healthcare services. PMID:26855439

  18. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs), design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA) were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82), but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing patient safety culture

  19. Development and Evaluation of the CAHPS® Survey for In-center Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weidmer, Beverly A.; Cleary, Paul D.; Keller, San; Evensen, Christian; Hurtado, Margarita P.; Kosiak, Beth; Gallagher, Patricia M.; Levine, Roger; Hays, Ron D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) assesses patient experiences of care as part of the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System and Quality Incentive Program. This article describes the development and evaluation of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems In-Center Hemodialysis survey (CAHPS® ICH survey). Study Design We conducted formative research to generate survey questions and conducted statistical analyses of survey responses to evaluate the survey’s measurement properties. Setting and Participants Formative research included 5 focus groups (2 with hemodialysis patients, 2 with caregivers, 1 with nephrologists) and 56 cognitive interviews with dialysis patients. We collected field test responses to the survey from 1454 dialysis patients receiving care at 32 facilities. Measurements & Outcomes We assessed the CAHPS ICH Survey. Results Response rate was 46%. Analyses support 3 multi-item scales: Nephrologists’ Communication and Caring (7 items, Cronbach’s alpha = 0.89); Quality of Dialysis Center Care and Operations (22 items, alpha = 0.93); and, Providing Information to Patients (11 items, alpha = 0.75). The communication scale was the most strongly correlated with the global rating of the ‘kidney doctor’ (r = 0.78). The Dialysis Center Care and Operations scale was most strongly correlated with the global ratings of staff (r = 0.75) and of the center (r = 0.69). Providing Information to Patients was most strongly correlated with the global rating of the staff (r=0.41). Limitations Males and younger patients were over-represented in the field test compared to the general U.S. population of dialysis patients. A relatively small number of patients completed the survey in Spanish. Conclusions This study provides support for the reliability and validity of the CAHPS ICH survey for assessing ESRD patient experiences of care at dialysis facilities. The survey can be used to compare care

  20. Development of the human immune response against the major surface protein (gp190) of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, H M; Früh, K; von Brunn, A; Esposito, F; Lombardi, S; Crisanti, A; Bujard, H

    1989-01-01

    The 190-kilodalton glycoprotein (gp190) of Plasmodium falciparum, the precursor of the major surface proteins of merozoites, is considered a promising candidate for a blood stage malaria vaccine. DNA sequences specific for the gp190 of the two isolates K1 and MAD20 were subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The panel of fusion proteins obtained represents about 80% of the polymorphic sequences observed so far within various isolates of P. falciparum. Sera from individuals living in a malaria-endemic area of West Africa were tested in immunoblots against the gp190 fusion proteins, and antibody reactivity was mapped to defined regions of the gp190. Depending on the age of the individual and on the presence of parasites in the blood, distinct regions of gp190 were differentially recognized by the respective antibodies. Similarly, the analysis of sera from German patients with acute malaria revealed a distinct pattern. When grouped according to age and to parasitemia, the reactivity of the sera of people living in malaria-endemic areas may indicate a correlation between certain gp190 regions and protective immune response. Images PMID:2680981

  1. Paracoccidioides lutzii Plp43 Is an Active Glucanase with Partial Antigenic Identity with P. brasiliensis gp43

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Natanael P.; Vallejo, Milene C.; Conceição, Palloma M.; Camargo, Zoilo P.; Hahn, Rosane; Puccia, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). P. brasiliensis main diagnostic antigen is glycoprotein gp43, and its peptide sequence is 81% identical with a P. lutzii ortholog here called Plp43. P. lutzii (“Pb01-like”) apparently predominates in Midwestern/Northern Brazil, where high percentages of false-negative reactions using P. brasiliensis antigens have recently been reported. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant Plp43 to study its antigenic identity with gp43. Methodology We expressed rPlp43 as a secreted major component in Pichia pastoris and studied its reactivity in immunoblot with PCM patients' sera from Southwestern and Midwestern Brazil. Principal Findings We showed that rPlp43 is not glycosylated and bears glucanase activity. The protein did not react with anti-gp43 monoclonal antibodies in immunoblot, suggesting absence of the corresponding gp43 epitopes. Nevertheless, common epitope(s) might exist, considering that gp43-positive PCM sera recognized rPlp43 in immunoblot, while gp43-negative sera (33 out of 51) from patients resident in Midwestern Brazil were also rPlp43-negative. Two genotyped P. lutzii were from patients with gp43-negative sera, suggesting that non-reactive sera are from patients infected with this species. Conclusion Our data suggest that gp43 and Plp43 bear one or only a few common epitopes and that gp43 cannot be used in diagnosis of PCM patients infected with P. lutzii probably because Plp43 is poorly expressed during infection. PMID:25166744

  2. Memory B Cell Antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 Cloned from Individuals Infected with Clade A and B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mouquet, Hugo; Klein, Florian; Scheid, Johannes F.; Warncke, Malte; Pietzsch, John; Oliveira, Thiago Y. K.; Velinzon, Klara; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency. PMID:21931643

  3. Worrying about wasting GP time as a barrier to help-seeking: a community-based, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Cromme, Susanne K; Whitaker, Katriina L; Winstanley, Kelly; Renzi, Cristina; Smith, Claire Friedemann; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background Worrying about wasting GP time is frequently cited as a barrier to help-seeking for cancer symptoms. Aim To explore the circumstances under which individuals feel that they are wasting GP time. Design and setting Community-based, qualitative interview studies that took place in London, the South East and the North West of England. Method Interviewees (n = 62) were recruited from a sample (n = 2042) of adults aged ≥50 years, who completed a ‘health survey’ that included a list of cancer ‘alarm’ symptoms. Individuals who reported symptoms at baseline that were still present at the 3-month follow-up (n = 271), and who had also consented to be contacted (n = 215), constituted the pool of people invited for interview. Analyses focused on accounts of worrying about wasting GP time. Results Participants were worried about wasting GP time when time constraints were visible, while dismissive interactions with their GP induced a worry of unnecessary help-seeking. Many felt that symptoms that were not persistent, worsening, or life-threatening did not warrant GP attention. Additionally, patients considered it time-wasting when they perceived attention from nurses or pharmacists to be sufficient, or when appointment structures (for example, ‘one issue per visit’) were not adhered to. Close relationships with GPs eased worries about time-wasting, while some patients saw GPs as fulfilling a service financed by taxpayers. Conclusion Worrying about wasting GP time is a complex barrier to help-seeking. GP time and resource scarcity, symptom gravity, appointment etiquette, and previous GP interactions contribute to increasing worries. Friendly GP relationships, economic reasoning, and a focus on the GP’s responsibilities as a medical professional reduce this worry. PMID:27215569

  4. A patient-initiated voluntary online survey of adverse medical events: the perspective of 696 injured patients and families

    PubMed Central

    Southwick, Frederick S; Cranley, Nicole M; Hallisy, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventable medical errors continue to be a major cause of death in the USA and throughout the world. Many patients have written about their experiences on websites and in published books. Methods As patients and family members who have experienced medical harm, we have created a nationwide voluntary survey in order to more broadly and systematically capture the perspective of patients and patient families experiencing adverse medical events and have used quantitative and qualitative analysis to summarise the responses of 696 patients and their families. Results Harm was most commonly associated with diagnostic and therapeutic errors, followed by surgical or procedural complications, hospital-associated infections and medication errors, and our quantitative results match those of previous provider-initiated patient surveys. Qualitative analysis of 450 narratives revealed a lack of perceived provider and system accountability, deficient and disrespectful communication and a failure of providers to listen as major themes. The consequences of adverse events included death, post-traumatic stress, financial hardship and permanent disability. These conditions and consequences led to a loss of patients’ trust in both the health system and providers. Patients and family members offered suggestions for preventing future adverse events and emphasised the importance of shared decision-making. Conclusions This large voluntary survey of medical harm highlights the potential efficacy of patient-initiated surveys for providing meaningful feedback and for guiding improvements in patient care. PMID:26092166

  5. Knowledge expectations of surgical orthopaedic patients: a European survey.

    PubMed

    Valkeapää, Kirsi; Klemetti, Seija; Cabrera, Esther; Cano, Sara; Charalambous, Andreas; Copanitsanou, Panagiota; Ingadottir, Brynja; Istomina, Natalja; Johansson Stark, Åsa; Katajisto, Jouko; Lemonidou, Chryssoula; Papastavrou, Evridiki; Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Sourtzi, Panayota; Unosson, Mitra; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2014-12-01

    Ageing population entails a growing international problem of osteoarthritis. Best practices for education of these patients are lacking. This study focused on empowering education in Northern (Finland, Iceland, Lithuania and Sweden) and Southern Europe (Cyprus, Greece and Spain). The aim was to analyse associations between expected knowledge and background factors. The data were collected from European arthroplasty patients with the Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients- scale, (KE(hp) - scale), including bio-physiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions. Patients had essential bio-physiological and functional knowledge expectations. Women expected more than men, employed less than retired, unemployed or who worked at home. Generally, patients in Northern countries expected more than in Southern countries. However, highest expectations were found in Sweden and Greece, lowest in Spain and Cyprus. There are differences in knowledge expectations based on patients' backgrounds. Development of common standards in European patient education needs further research. PMID:24118436

  6. What Do Patients Want? Survey of Patient Desires for Education in an Urban University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Thomas; Veazey, Kathryn; Leccese, Paul; Druck, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study examines the emergency department (ED) waiting room (WR) population’s knowledge about the ED process and hospital function and explores the types of educational materials that might appeal to patients and their companions in an ED waiting room. Our goal was to identify potential high-impact opportunities for patient education. Methods A 32-question survey about demographics, usage of primary care physicians (PCP), understanding of the ED and triage process, desire to know about delays, health education and understanding of teaching hospitals was offered to all qualified individuals. Results Five hundred and forty-four surveys were returned. Fifty-five percent reported having a PCP, of which 53% (29% of all WR patients) called a PCP prior to coming to the ED. It was found that 51.2% can define triage; 51% as an acuity assessment and 17% as a vital signs check. Sixty-nine percent knew why patients were seen according to triage priority. Seventy-two percent wanted to know about delays, yet only 25% wanted to know others’ wait times. People wanted updates every 41 minutes and only three percent wanted a physician to do this. Forty-one percent wanted information on how the ED functions, 60% via handouts and 43% via video. Information on updates and common medical emergencies is significantly more important than material on common illnesses, finding a PCP, or ED function (p<0.05). Median estimated time for medical workup ranged from 35 minutes for radiographs, to one hour for lab results, computed tomography, specialist consult, and admission. Sixty-nine percent knew the definition of a teaching hospital and of those, 87% knew they were at a teaching hospital. Subgroup analysis between racial groups showed significantly reduced knowledge of the definitions of triage and teaching hospitals and significantly increased desire for information on ED function in minority groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The major findings in this study were that many

  7. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sophia K.; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N.; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Methods Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Results Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p < .001). Patient group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non–patient group respondents (all p < .05). Industry and academic respondents more often cited internal bureaucratic processes and reluctance to share information as engagement barriers than did patient group respondents (all p < .01). Patient groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non–patient group respondents (all p< .01). Conclusions Despite reported similarities among approaches to engagement by the three stakeholder groups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with

  8. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  9. Gp15 and gp16 cooperate in translocating bacteriophage T7 DNA into the infected cell

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chung-Yu; Kemp, Priscilla; Molineux, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of up to four amino acids from the C terminus of the 1318 residue bacteriophage T7 gp16 allows plaque formation at normal efficiencies. Loss of five residues results in non-infective virions, and loss of twelve prevents assembly of stable particles. However, replacing the C-terminal seven with nineteen non-native residues allows assembly of non-infective virions. The latter adsorb and eject internal core proteins into the cell envelope but no phage DNA enters the cytoplasm. Extragenic suppressors of the defective gene 16 lie in gene 15; the mutant gp15 proteins not only re-establish infectivity, they fully restore the kinetics of genome internalization to those exhibited by wild-type phage. After ejection from the infecting particle, gp15 and gp16 thus function together in ratcheting the leading end of the T7 genome into the cytoplasm of the infected cell. PMID:20036409

  10. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Rehani, M

    2015-07-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resourced countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group. PMID:25836695

  11. NATIONAL SURVEY OF PRESCRIPTION DRUG INFORMATION PROVIDED TO PATIENTS (NSPDIPP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National telephone surveys were conducted in 1992, 1994, 1996, and 1998 to determine how much prescription medicine information consumers receive and through which sources. Approximately 1,000 U.S. consumers who received a new prescription for themselves or a family member at a r...

  12. An Evidence-Based Antimicrobial Stewardship Smartphone App for Hospital Outpatients: Survey-based Needs Assessment Among Patients

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Monsey; Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Gharbi, Myriam; Charani, Esmita; Moore, Luke SP; Gilchrist, Mark; Husson, Fran; Costelloe, Ceire; Holmes, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Background Current advances in modern technology have enabled the development and utilization of electronic medical software apps for both mobile and desktop computing devices. A range of apps on a large variety of clinical conditions for patients and the public are available, but very few target antimicrobials or infections. Objective We sought to explore the use of different antimicrobial information resources with a focus on electronic platforms, including apps for portable devices, by outpatients at two large, geographically distinct National Health Service (NHS) teaching hospital trusts in England. We wanted to determine whether there is demand for an evidence-based app for patients, to garner their perceptions around infections/antimicrobial prescribing, and to describe patients’ experiences of their interactions with health care professionals in relation to this topic. Methods A cross-sectional survey design was used to investigate aspects of antimicrobial prescribing and electronic devices experienced by patients at four hospitals in London and a teaching hospital in the East of England. Results A total of 99 surveys were completed and analyzed. A total of 82% (80/98) of respondents had recently been prescribed antimicrobials; 87% (85/98) of respondents were prescribed an antimicrobial by a hospital doctor or through their general practitioner (GP) in primary care. Respondents wanted information on the etiology (42/65, 65%) and prevention and/or management (32/65, 49%) of their infections, with the infections reported being upper and lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, oral, and skin and soft tissue infections. All patients (92/92, 100%) desired specific information on the antimicrobial prescribed. Approximately half (52/95, 55%) stated it was “fine” for doctors to use a mobile phone/tablet computer during the consultation while 13% (12/95) did not support the idea of doctors accessing health care information in this way. Although only 30% (27

  13. Usability of patient experience surveys in Australian primary health care: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Karen; Parkinson, Anne; Banfield, Michelle; Sargent, Ginny M; Desborough, Jane; Hehir, Kanupriya Kalia

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring patient experience is essential for stimulating innovation in health care and improving quality and accountability. Internationally, standardised approaches are used to collect patient experience information, but in Australian primary health care (PHC), little is known about which patient experience surveys are used and which aspects of experience they measure. This prevents routine inclusion of patient experience data in quality improvement or system performance measurement. A scoping review was undertaken to identify relevant surveys. Data on survey availability, psychometric properties, target population, method and frequency of administration were extracted. Survey items were mapped against six dimensions of patient experience described internationally. Ninety-five surveys were identified; 34 were developed for use in Australia. Surveys vary in content, size, aspects of experience measured and methods of administration. The quality of data collected and the extent to which it is used in quality improvement is unclear. Collection of patient experience data in Australian PHC is not well developed or standardised and there are few publicly available instruments. There is a need to clearly identify the purposes for which data are to be used and to develop an integrated approach that articulates these collections with other quality and performance data. Some options are discussed. PMID:27469275

  14. GP trainers and trainees - trait and gender differences in personality: implications for GP training.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Megan; MacLeod, Sheona; Kedziora, Marta; Main, Paul

    2016-05-01

    This study looked at differences between established GP trainers and current GP trainees in relation to personality traits. Personality differences are particularly important for training in the UK context where the attributes of successful GPs may be evolving as the context changes, and where there is a unique one-to-one relationship between trainer and trainee. GP trainers and trainees attending educational events were invited to participate in this study by completing the NEO-PI-R, a personality measure. Correlation and multiple regression analysis demonstrated differences between these groups; some in line with expected differences relating to age and gender. Others, such as lower reported levels of emotional resilience, may be particular to this trainee population. Overall the gender differences are significant given the trend towards the feminisation of the medical profession. Generational differences may also explain some behaviour and attitudinal differences which can aid trainers' understanding of training issues. The findings have important implications for training, particularly in relation to the development of emotional resilience for GP trainees, and for recruitment. Further research correlating educational outcomes and perceived satisfaction with a GP career and GP training would indicate if trainer/trainee personality differences have a direct bearing on educational outcomes and future practice. PMID:27059247

  15. Effectiveness of a biopsychosocial e-learning intervention on the clinical judgements of medical students and GP trainees regarding future risk of disability in patients with chronic lower back pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Christopher P; MacNeela, Pádraig; Reynolds, Bronagh; Hamm, Robert M; Main, Christopher J; O'Connor, Laura L; Conneely, Sinéad; Taheny, Darragh; Slattery, Brian W; O'Neill, Ciaran; NicGabhainn, Saoirse; Murphy, Andrew W; Kropmans, Thomas; McGuire, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic lower back pain (CLBP) is a major healthcare problem with wide ranging effects. It is a priority for appropriate management of CLBP to get individuals back to work as early as possible. Interventions that identify biopsychosocial barriers to recovery have been observed to lead to successfully reduced pain-related work absences and increased return to work for individuals with CLBP. Modern conceptualisations of pain adopt a biopsychosocial approach, such as the flags approach. Biopsychosocial perspectives have been applied to judgements about future adjustment, recovery from pain and risk of long-term disability; and provide a helpful model for understanding the importance of contextual interactions between psychosocial and biological variables in the experience of pain. Medical students and general practitioner (GP) trainees are important groups to target with education about biopsychosocial conceptualisations of pain and related clinical implications. Aim The current study will compare the effects of an e-learning intervention that focuses on a biopsychosocial model of pain, on the clinical judgements of medical students and trainees. Methods and analysis Medical student and GP trainee participants will be randomised to 1 of 2 study conditions: (1) a 20 min e-learning intervention focused on the fundamentals of the flags approach to clinical judgement-making regarding risk of future pain-related disability; compared with a (2) wait-list control group on judgement accuracy and weighting (ie, primary outcomes); flags approach knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards pain, judgement speed and empathy (ie, secondary outcomes). Participants will be assessed at preintervention and postintervention. Ethics and dissemination The study will be performed in agreement with the Declaration of Helsinki and is approved by the National University of Ireland Galway Research Ethics Committee. The results of the trial will be published according to the

  16. Patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics: a review and comparison.

    PubMed

    Ebn Ahmady, Arezoo; Pakkhesal, Mina; Zafarmand, A Hamid; Lando, Harry Alan

    2015-04-01

    Health care is becoming more patient-centered and, as a result, patients' experiences of care and assessment of satisfaction are taken more seriously. Patient satisfaction influences treatment cooperation, and better cooperation leads to healthier patients in the long term. This generalization clearly applies in the dental school clinic setting. Furthermore, dental school clinics' administrators and clinicians should know about the dimensions of their patient satisfaction in order to provide the highest quality of care. The aim of this study was to review studies published between 1980 and March 2014 to identify the dimensions used to measure patients' satisfaction when they receive services in dental school clinics. The PubMed database was used to access published studies using patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics, and the dimensions used in these surveys were then categorized. Through several stages of searching in PubMed, the authors selected 41 articles from a total of 730; after further critical appraisal, nine articles were retained. Five dimensions included in patient surveys were identified: quality, interaction, access, environment, and cost. Determining the dimensions used in patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics can assist academic dental institutions in providing the highest quality of care. PMID:25838009

  17. Effectiveness of GP access to magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background GPs commonly see patients with knee problems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee is an accurate diagnostic test for meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee, but there is uncertainty about the appropriate use of MRI and when it should enter the diagnostic pathway for patients with these problems. Aim To assess the effectiveness of GP referral to early MRI and a provisional orthopaedic appointment, compared with referral to an orthopaedic specialist without prior MRI for patients with continuing knee problems. Design of study Pragmatic multicentre randomised trial with two parallel groups. Setting A total of 553 patients consulting their GP about a continuing knee problem were recruited from 163 general practices at 11 sites across the UK. Method Patients were randomised to MRI within 12 weeks of GP referral including a provisional orthopaedic appointment, or orthopaedic appointment without prior MRI within a maximum of 9 months from GP referral. The primary outcome measures were the Short Form 36-item (SF-36) physical functioning scale and the Knee Quality of Life 26-item Questionnaire (KQoL-26) at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Patients randomised to MRI improved mean SF-36 physical functioning scores by 2.81 (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.26 to 5.89) more than those referred to orthopaedics (P = 0.072). Patients randomised to MRI improved mean KQoL-26 physical functioning scores by 3.65 (95% CI = 1.03 to 6.28) more than controls (P = 0.007). There were no other significant differences. Conclusion GP access to MRI yielded small, but statistically significant, benefits in patients' knee-related quality of life but non-significant improvements in physical functioning. PMID:19000393

  18. GP attitudes and self-reported behaviour in primary care consultations for low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Nadine; Ong, Bie Nio

    2009-01-01

    Background. The implementation of guideline recommendations in primary care has become widespread. The treatment of low back pain (LBP) has followed suite. Research shows that the use of LBP guidelines is influenced by the believability of the underlying evidence, the GPs consultation style and uncertainties surrounding diagnosis and treatment. Objective. To qualitatively examine the attitudes and self-reported behaviour of GPs in relation to guideline adherence for patients with LBP. Method. A mixed-method design combining a national UK-based survey of GPs and physiotherapists with an embedded qualitative study. This report focuses only on the GP interviews. We explored GPs’ experience of managing LBP patients and the rationale for treatment offered to a patient described in a written vignette. All interviews were digitally recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. Results. GPs encountered difficulties adhering to guideline recommendations for LBP patients. They experienced particular tensions between recommendations to stay active versus the expectation of being prescribed rest. GPs expressed that chronic LBP often poses an intractable problem requiring specialist advice. The perception that guideline recommendations are ‘imposed’ may create resistance, and the evidence base is not always considered believable. Conclusions. GPs acknowledge guideline recommendations but divergence occurs in implementation. This is due to GPs focussing on the whole person—not just one condition—and the importance of maintaining the doctor–patient relationship, which relies on effective negotiation of mutual perceptions and expectations. Further exploration on how consultation processes can be constructed to effectively combine evidence with patient-centred care is needed. PMID:19546118

  19. 77 FR 50546 - Agency Information Collection: (PACT Patient Experiences Survey); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection: (PACT Patient Experiences Survey); Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans... proposal for the collection of information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C... patient experiences from this data collection are intended to help form future national VA policy....

  20. Tertiary survey of the trauma patient in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Grossman, M D; Born, C

    2000-06-01

    The issues surrounding the arrival of trauma patients to the ICU have been defined. By necessity, many of these topics are dealt with elsewhere in greater detail. The basic framework within which this phase of care could be optimized has been provided. Pitfalls related to patients' mode of arrival to the ICU affect subsequent management and should direct specific clinical activity. The tertiary survey is a complete summation and cataloguing of a patient's injuries. The need for ongoing resuscitation determines how much attention can be paid to the tertiary survey. Clinical suspicion based on mechanism and pattern of injury and thorough, repeated, complete physical examination are the essential elements of the tertiary survey. The survey is affected by factors that alter patients' mental status because examination is most reliable in patients who can localize pain. Medications, intoxication, and head injuries are common factors that interfere with the reliability of the tertiary survey for variable periods. Radiographic assessment is used to identify injuries suspected on the basis of mechanism of injury, injury pattern, and findings on physical examination. Some studies may be done portably; others require transport within the hospital. The intensivist must prioritize these ongoing diagnostic studies based on patient stability and the need for ongoing resuscitation. PMID:10897262

  1. Hyperion 5113/GP Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Bion J.

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated an infrasound sensor, the 5113/GP manufactured by Hyperion. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by the University of Mississippi. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, and seismic sensitivity. These sensors are being evaluated prior to deployment by the U.S. Air Force.

  2. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  3. HIV-1 protein gp120 rapidly impairs memory in chicks by interrupting the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, S P; Edwards, T M; Ng, K T; Robinson, S R

    2007-01-01

    Learning and memory impairments are frequently observed in patients suffering from AIDS Dementia Complex (ADC). These effects have been linked to the presence of gp120, an HIV viral coat glycoprotein. The present study investigated the possibility that gp120 prevents the uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes, leading to an interruption of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a subsequent impairment of memory. Ten microliters of 10nM gp120 was bilaterally injected into the region of the intermediate medial mesopallium of day-old chicks at various times before, or after, training using a single-trial passive avoidance task. Gp120 was found to significantly impair memory retention when injected 10-40 min after training. Memory impairments were evident within 5 min of gp120 administration and remained evident 24h later. Further, the amnestic effect of gp120 could be overcome with glutamine or with precursors of glutamate synthesis, but only weakly by glutamate. These results support the conclusion that the amnestic effect of gp120 is due to an impaired uptake of glutamate by astrocytes and a subsequent interruption of glutamine supply to neurones. The data indicate that the glutamate-glutamine cycle may be a useful therapeutic target in the treatment of ADC. PMID:16714124

  4. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administered to anesthesiologists, trainees, and nurses during February 2011 and the responses were collected anonymously during March 2011. Results A total of 28 anesthesiologists, 27 trainees, and 47 nurses responded to this survey. Most participants involved in this survey were satisfied with AIMS (96.3%, 82.2%, and 89.3% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively) and preferred AIMS over handwritten anesthesia records in 96.3%, 71.4%, and 97.9% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively. However, there were also criticisms of AIMS related to user-discomfort during short, simple or emergency surgeries, doubtful legal status, and inconvenient placement of the system. Conclusions Overall, most of the anesthetic practitioners in this hospital quickly accepted and prefer AIMS over the handwritten anesthetic records in the OR. PMID:22558502

  5. Ubiquitous Computing for Remote Cardiac Patient Monitoring: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Kambhatla, Kashyap; Hu, Fei; Lifson, Mark; Xiao, Yang

    2008-01-01

    New wireless technologies, such as wireless LAN and sensor networks, for telecardiology purposes give new possibilities for monitoring vital parameters with wearable biomedical sensors, and give patients the freedom to be mobile and still be under continuous monitoring and thereby better quality of patient care. This paper will detail the architecture and quality-of-service (QoS) characteristics in integrated wireless telecardiology platforms. It will also discuss the current promising hardware/software platforms for wireless cardiac monitoring. The design methodology and challenges are provided for realistic implementation. PMID:18604301

  6. GP Workbench Manual: Technical Manual, User's Guide, and Software Guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oden, Charles P.; Moulton, Craig W.

    2006-01-01

    GP Workbench is an open-source general-purpose geophysical data processing software package written primarily for ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. It also includes support for several USGS prototype electromagnetic instruments such as the VETEM and ALLTEM. The two main programs in the package are GP Workbench and GP Wave Utilities. GP Workbench has routines for filtering, gridding, and migrating GPR data; as well as an inversion routine for characterizing UXO (unexploded ordinance) using ALLTEM data. GP Workbench provides two-dimensional (section view) and three-dimensional (plan view or time slice view) processing for GPR data. GP Workbench can produce high-quality graphics for reports when Surfer 8 or higher (Golden Software) is installed. GP Wave Utilities provides a wide range of processing algorithms for single waveforms, such as filtering, correlation, deconvolution, and calculating GPR waveforms. GP Wave Utilities is used primarily for calibrating radar systems and processing individual traces. Both programs also contain research features related to the calibration of GPR systems and calculating subsurface waveforms. The software is written to run on the Windows operating systems. GP Workbench can import GPR data file formats used by major commercial instrument manufacturers including Sensors and Software, GSSI, and Mala. The GP Workbench native file format is SU (Seismic Unix), and subsequently, files generated by GP Workbench can be read by Seismic Unix as well as many other data processing packages.

  7. Patient satisfaction surveys as a market research tool for general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, K; Salter, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recent policy developments, embracing the notions of consumer choice, quality of care, and increased general practitioner control over practice budgets have resulted in a new competitive environment in primary care. General practitioners must now be more aware of how their patients feel about the services they receive, and patient satisfaction surveys can be an effective tool for general practices. AIM. A survey was undertaken to investigate the use of a patient satisfaction survey and whether aspects of patient satisfaction varied according to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, social class, housing tenure and length of time in education. METHOD. A sample of 2173 adults living in Medway District Health Authority were surveyed by postal questionnaire in September 1991 in order to elicit their views on general practice services. RESULTS. Levels of satisfaction varied with age, with younger people being consistently less satisfied with general practice services than older people. Women, those in social classes 1-3N, home owners and those who left school aged 17 years or older were more critical of primary care services than men, those in social classes 3M-5, tenants and those who left school before the age of 17 years. CONCLUSION. Surveys and analyses of this kind, if conducted for a single practice, can form the basis of a marketing strategy aimed at optimizing list size, list composition, and service quality. Satisfaction surveys can be readily incorporated into medical audit and financial management. PMID:8204335

  8. A Delphi Method Analysis to Create an Emergency Medicine Educational Patient Satisfaction Survey

    PubMed Central

    London, Kory S.; Singal, Bonita; Fowler, Jennifer; Prepejchal, Rebecca; Simmons, Stefanie; Finefrock, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Feedback on patient satisfaction (PS) as a means to monitor and improve performance in patient communication is lacking in residency training. A physician’s promotion, compensation and job satisfaction may be impacted by his individual PS scores, once he is in practice. Many communication and satisfaction surveys exist but none focus on the emergency department setting for educational purposes. The goal of this project was to create an emergency medicine-based educational PS survey with strong evidence for content validity. Methods We used the Delphi Method (DM) to obtain expert opinion via an iterative process of surveying. Questions were mined from four PS surveys as well as from group suggestion. The DM analysis determined the structure, content and appropriate use of the tool. The group used four-point Likert-type scales and Lynn’s criteria for content validity to determine relevant questions from the stated goals. Results Twelve recruited experts participated in a series of seven surveys to achieve consensus. A 10-question, single-page survey with an additional page of qualitative questions and demographic questions was selected. Thirty one questions were judged to be relevant from an original 48-question list. Of these, the final 10 questions were chosen. Response rates for individual survey items was 99.5%. Conclusion The DM produced a consensus survey with content validity evidence. Future work will be needed to obtain evidence for response process, internal structure and construct validity. PMID:26759663

  9. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E.; Schief, William R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-04-15

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate - and structurally plastic - layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated {beta}-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A 'layered' gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a {beta}-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  10. Immunologic NO synthase: elevation in severe AIDS dementia and induction by HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Adamson, D C; Wildemann, B; Sasaki, M; Glass, J D; McArthur, J C; Christov, V I; Dawson, T M; Dawson, V L

    1996-12-13

    Indirect mechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of the dementia associated with human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Proinflammatory molecules such as tumor necrosis factor alpha and eicosanoids are elevated in the central nervous system of patients with HIV-1-related dementia. Nitric oxide (NO) is a potential mediator of neuronal injury, because cytokines may activate the immunologic (type II) isoform of NO synthase (iNOS). The levels of iNOS in severe HIV-1-associated dementia coincided with increased expression of the HIV-1 coat protein gp41. Furthermore, gp41 induced iNOS in primary cultures of mixed rat neuronal and glial cells and killed neurons through a NO-dependent mechanism. Thus, gp41-induced NO formation may contribute to the severe cognitive dysfunction associated with HIV-1 infection. PMID:8943206

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis and sexuality: A patient survey in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on patients’ sexuality and identify disease and other factors such as fatigue that most influence sexual relationships. Methods A specific pretested questionnaire was sent to all members of a French patient association (ANDAR). Questions related to demographics, disease status, quality of life (utility, EQ-5D), pain, psychological status (mood), fatigue and emotional and sexual relationships. To isolate the impact of RA, an attempt was made to include a matched sample from the general population. Results The analysis included 1271 patients, but only 70 controls agreed to participate and comparisons should therefore be considered with caution. The two groups were similar in terms of age, gender distribution, living conditions and diseases other than RA. However, patients scored worse for global health, mood, fatigue, had a lower utility (0.55 versus 0.65). Controls were more active sexually (69% versus 63%), in particular women (71% versus 60%). Age, gender, living alone, physical function and mood were significant predictors for being sexually active for patients; for controls, age and overall quality of life (utility) were significant predictors. Conclusions While it is known that RA has a negative impact on patients’ sexuality, there have been few attempts to quantify the problem. Our study highlights the negative impact of RA on patients’ sexuality, and triggers the question how to include this aspect into care. PMID:22963081

  12. Autonomy vs paternalism in the emergency department: the potential deleterious impact of patient satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Beth D; Schatman, Michael E

    2013-07-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys, such as Press Ganey, are flawed metrics for the emergency department setting and also in broader pain medicine. National experts discuss the pitfalls of applying such measures in pain care, and the potential unintended negative consequences to patients and providers alike. Evaluators, administrators, and payers are challenged to understand the limitations of Press Ganey and patient satisfactions in pain treatment, and the field is challenged to develop meaningful and valid metrics for best practices and competencies. PMID:23758676

  13. Research in general practice: a survey of incentives and disincentives for research participation.

    PubMed

    Brodaty, Henry; Gibson, Louisa Hr; Waine, Melissa L; Shell, Allan M; Lilian, Ruth; Pond, Constance Dimity

    2013-09-01

    Background Recruitment rates of general practitioners (GPs) to do research vary widely. This may be related to the ability of a study to incorporate incentives for GPs and minimise barriers to participation. Method A convenience sample of 30 GPs, ten each from the Sydney intervention and control groups Ageing in General Practice 'Detection and Management of Dementia' project (GP project) and 10 GPs who had refused participation, were recruited to determine incentives and barriers to participating in research. GPs completed the 11-item 'Meeting the challenges of research in general practice: general practitioner questionnaire' (GP survey) between months 15 and 24 of the GP project, and received brief qualitative interviews from a research GP to clarify responses where possible. Results The most important incentives the 30 GPs gave for participating in the project were a desire to update knowledge (endorsed by 70%), to help patients (70%), and altruism (60%). Lack of time (43%) was the main barrier. GPs also commented on excessive paperwork and an inadequate explanation of research. Conclusions While a desire to update knowledge and help patients as well as altruism were incentives, time burden was the primary barrier and was likely related to extensive paperwork. Future recruitment may be improved by minimising time burden, making studies simpler with online data entry, offering remuneration and using a GP recruiter. PMID:24427184

  14. Do Therapists Google Their Patients? A Survey Among Psychotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Herzberg, Philipp Y

    2016-01-01

    Background The increasing use of the Internet and its array of social networks brings new ways for psychotherapists to find out information about their patients, often referred to as patient-targeted googling (PTG). However, this topic has been subject to little empirical research; there has been hardly any attention given to it in Germany and the rest of Europe and it has not been included in ethical guidelines for psychotherapy despite the complex ethical issues it raises. Objective This study explored German psychotherapists’ behavior and experiences related to PTG, investigated how these vary with sociodemographic factors and therapeutic background, and explored the circumstances in which psychotherapists considered PTG to be appropriate or not. Methods A total of 207 psychotherapists responded to a newly developed questionnaire that assessed their experience of and views on PTG. The study sample was a nonrepresentative convenience sample recruited online via several German-speaking professional therapy platforms. Results Most therapists (84.5%, 174/207) stated that they had not actively considered the topic of PTG. However, 39.6% (82/207) said that they had already looked for patient information online (eg, when they suspected a patient may have been lying) and 39.3% (81/207) knew colleagues or supervisors who had done so. Only 2.4% (5/207) of therapists had come across PTG during their education and training. Conclusions It is essential to provide PTG as a part of therapists’ education and training. Furthermore, the complex problems concerning PTG should be introduced into codes of ethics to provide explicit guidance for psychotherapists in practice. This report provides initial suggestions to open up debate on this topic. PMID:26733210

  15. ‘I need her to be a doctor’: patients’ experiences of presenting health information from the internet in GP consultations

    PubMed Central

    Bowes, Parvathy; Stevenson, Fiona; Ahluwalia, Sanjiv; Murray, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients are increasingly using the internet for health-related information and may bring this to a GP consultation. There is scant information about why patients do this and what they expect from their GP. Aim The aim was to explore patients’ motivation in presenting information, their perception of the GP’s response and what they wanted from their doctor. Design and setting Qualitative study based in North London involving patients with experience of bringing health information from the internet to their GP. Method Semi-structured face-to-face and telephone interviews using a critical incident technique, recorded, transcribed verbatim, and subjected to thematic analysis by a multidisciplinary team of researchers. Results Twenty-six interviews were completed. Participants reported using the internet to become better informed about their health and hence make best use of the limited time available with the GP and to enable the GP to take their problem more seriously. Patients expected their GP to acknowledge the information; discuss, explain, or contextualise it; and offer a professional opinion. Patients tended to prioritise the GP opinion over the internet information. However, if the GP appeared disinterested, dismissive or patronising patients reported damage to the doctor–patient relationship, occasionally to the extent of seeking a second opinion or changing their doctor. Conclusion This is the first in-depth qualitative study to explore why patients present internet information to their GP within the consultation and what they want when they do this. This information should help GPs respond appropriately in such circumstances. PMID:23211176

  16. Arterial surgery for arm ischemia. A survey of 136 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Holleman, J H; Hardy, J D; Williamson, J W; Raju, S; Neely, W A

    1980-01-01

    A series of 136 patients with upper extremity ischemia requiring operative correction is presented. Causes of the ischemia included trauma, atherosclerosis, embolism, iatrogenic causes, radiation injury, and cervical rib syndrome. Operations included primary repair, various bypass grafts and embolectomy. Illustrative case reports are used to emphasize important points. The subclavian, axillary and brachial arteries have been considered separately. In general, ischemia of the arm caused by a discrete lesion is amenable to surgical correction with an excellent change of success. Images Fig. 1. Figs. 5a and b. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7387235

  17. 75 FR 62635 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... needed to determine patients' satisfaction with services provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey.... Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB...

  18. Clinical management of arrhythmias in elderly patients: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Hocini, Mélèze; Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess clinical practice in management of cardiac arrhythmias in elderly patients (age ≥75 years) in the European countries. The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network members. Responses were received from 50 centres in 20 countries. The results of the survey have shown that management of cardiac arrhythmias is generally in accordance with the guidelines and consensus recommendations on management of cardiac arrhythmias, although there are some areas of variation, especially on age limit and exclusion of elderly patients for anticoagulation, ablation, and device therapy. PMID:25634939

  19. Can clinicians benefit from patient satisfaction surveys? Evaluating the NSF for Older People, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    lliffe, Steve; Wilcock, Jane; Manthorpe, Jill; Moriarty, Jo; Cornes, Michelle; Clough, Roger; Bright, Les

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background A transformation of healthcare is underway, from a sellers' market to a consumers' market, where the satisfaction of the patient's needs is part of the definition of quality. Patient satisfaction surveys are widely used to judge service quality, but clinicians are sceptical about them because they are too often poorly designed measures that do not lead to improvements in the quality of care. Aim To explore the use of patient satisfaction survey data in identifying problems with the provision of inpatient care for older people. Methods A case study using secondary analysis of postal survey data about older people's experiences of health and social care services, obtained during the evaluation of the National Service Framework for Older People in 2005–2006. The survey asked about experiences of inpatient care and of discharge from hospital, and sought perceptions of the avoidability of the admission. Settings and participants A total of 4170 people aged 50 years and over returned a postal questionnaire in six local authority areas of England. Responses from 584 who had experienced a recent overnight stay in hospital are reported and discussed. Findings The response rate was 35%, ranging from 26% to 44% in the six areas surveyed. The great majority of those who had recent direct experience of inpatient care reported that they had been engaged in decision-making, that staff promoted their independence and maintained their dignity. There were widespread examples, however, of the opposite experiences. Discharge from hospital was problematic for about one-third of survey respondents with this experience, and there were different accounts of poorly managed discharges from all areas. Conclusions Case studies using local survey data can be used as formative assessments of services. The response rate to the survey and the likelihood of responder bias mean that patient satisfaction survey data of this sort cannot be used to judge or compare services in a

  20. Feasibility of real-time satisfaction surveys through automated analysis of patients' unstructured comments and sentiments.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Torii, Manabu; Clementz, Laura; Aron, David C

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how sentiment analysis (an artificial intelligence procedure that classifies opinions expressed within the text) can be used to design real-time satisfaction surveys. To improve participation, real-time surveys must be radically short. The shortest possible survey is a comment card. Patients' comments can be found online at sites organized for rating clinical care, within e-mails, in hospital complaint registries, or through simplified satisfaction surveys such as "Minute Survey." Sentiment analysis uses patterns among words to classify a comment into a complaint, or praise. It further classifies complaints into specific reasons for dissatisfaction, similar to broad categories found in longer surveys such as Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. In this manner, sentiment analysis allows one to re-create responses to longer satisfaction surveys from a list of comments. To demonstrate, this article provides an analysis of sentiments expressed in 995 online comments made at the RateMDs.com Web site. We focused on pediatrician and obstetrician/gynecologist physicians in District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. We were able to classify patients' reasons for dissatisfaction and the analysis provided information on how practices can improve their care. This article reports the accuracy of classifications of comments. Accuracy will improve as the number of comments received increases. In addition, we ranked physicians using the concept of time-to-next complaint. A time-between control chart was used to assess whether time-to-next complaint exceeded historical patterns and therefore suggested a departure from norms. These findings suggest that (1) patients' comments are easily available, (2) sentiment analysis can classify these comments into complaints/praise, and (3) time-to-next complaint can turn these classifications into numerical benchmarks that can trace impact of improvements over time. The procedures described in the

  1. Mobilization of patients in neurological Intensive Care Units of India: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Anup; Chakravarthy, Kalyana; Rao, Bhamini K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The rehabilitation needs of the patients in neurological Intensive Care Units (ICUs) vary from that of a medical ICU patient. Early mobilization is known to improve the various neurological outcomes in patients admitted to neurological ICUs, although little is known about the practice pattern among physiotherapists. The mobilization practice pattern may vary significantly than that of developed countries due to the reasons of differences in training of professionals, availability of equipment, and financial assistance by health insurance. Aim of the Study: To study the current mobilization practices by the physiotherapists in neurological ICUs of India. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a content validated questionnaire about the mobilization practices. Online questionnaire was distributed to physiotherapists working in neurological ICUs of India. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Out of 185 e-mails sent, 82 physiotherapists completed the survey (survey response rate = 44%). Eighty participants (97.6%) mentioned that the patients received some form of mobilization during the day. The majority of the physiotherapists (58.5%), “always” provided bed mobility exercises to their patients when it was found appropriate for the patients. Many physiotherapists (41.5%) used tilt table “sometimes” to introduce orthostatism for their patients. Conclusion: Mobilization in various forms is being practiced in the neurological ICUs of India. However, fewer mobilization sessions are conducted on weekends and night hours in Indian Neurological ICUs. PMID:27390457

  2. Patient satisfaction in the outpatients' chemotherapy unit of Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey: a staff survey

    PubMed Central

    Turhal, Nazim S; Efe, Basak; Gumus, Mahmut; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Karamanoglu, Ayla; Sengoz, Meric

    2002-01-01

    Background We conducted a survey to find out how patients feel about the care they receive in the outpatient chemotherapy unit of Marmara University Hospital. Methods The American College of Physicians Patient Satisfaction survey translated into Turkish was used. A meeting was held with all involved staff, before conducting the survey, to review the purpose and determine the process. The study was conducted with 100 random patients. Results Consistent with cancer frequency, most patients had either lung, colorectal or breast cancer. Their insurance was government sponsored in close to 90%. The educational levels were above Turkish median but consistent with the area the hospital is serving. They were coming to the unit on average 8.5 months. The responses were not influenced by the surveyed diagnosis, age, sex or educational status (p > 0,05). Particularly health care team's attention, trust and courtesy came forward as strong points. The weaknesses noted as difficulties in booking an outpatient doctor visit appointment because the phone line was busy or the secretary was not courteous, the excessive amount of time and effort it required to get laboratory and radiology results. Conclusion The health care system is basically a service based industry and customer satisfaction is at utmost importance just as in other service-oriented sectors. We hope this study will shed light in that area and Turkish health care providers will pay closer attention to how their patients feel about the services that they are getting. PMID:12443536

  3. A survey of resilience, burnout, and tolerance of uncertainty in Australian general practice registrars

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Burnout and intolerance of uncertainty have been linked to low job satisfaction and lower quality patient care. While resilience is related to these concepts, no study has examined these three concepts in a cohort of doctors. The objective of this study was to measure resilience, burnout, compassion satisfaction, personal meaning in patient care and intolerance of uncertainty in Australian general practice (GP) registrars. Methods We conducted a paper-based cross-sectional survey of GP registrars in Australia from June to July 2010, recruited from a newsletter item or registrar education events. Survey measures included the Resilience Scale-14, a single-item scale for burnout, Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale, Personal Meaning in Patient Care scale, Intolerance of Uncertainty-12 scale, and Physician Response to Uncertainty scale. Results 128 GP registrars responded (response rate 90%). Fourteen percent of registrars were found to be at risk of burnout using the single-item scale for burnout, but none met the criteria for burnout using the ProQOL scale. Secondary traumatic stress, general intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety due to clinical uncertainty and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to patients were associated with being at higher risk of burnout, but sex, age, practice location, training duration, years since graduation, and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to physicians were not. Only ten percent of registrars had high resilience scores. Resilience was positively associated with compassion satisfaction and personal meaning in patient care. Resilience was negatively associated with burnout, secondary traumatic stress, inhibitory anxiety, general intolerance to uncertainty, concern about bad outcomes and reluctance to disclose uncertainty to patients. Conclusions GP registrars in this survey showed a lower level of burnout than in other recent surveys of the broader junior doctor population in both Australia and overseas. Resilience

  4. Decreased glial and synaptic glutamate uptake in the striatum of HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Roberto I; Roman, Cristina; Capo-Velez, Coral M; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms leading to the neurocognitive deficits in humans with immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are not well resolved. A number of cell culture models have demonstrated that the HIV-envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) decreases the reuptake of glutamate, which is necessary for learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. However, the impact of brain HIV-1 gp120 on glutamate uptake systems in vivo remains unknown. Notably, alterations in brain glutamate uptake systems are implicated in a number of neurodegenerative and neurocognitive disorders. We characterized the kinetic properties of system XAG (sodium-dependent) and systems xc- (sodium-independent) [3H]-L-glutamate uptake in the striatum and hippocampus of HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mice, an established model of HIV neuropathology. We determined the kinetic constant Vmax (maximal velocity) and Km (affinity) of both systems XAG and xc- using subcellular preparations derived from neurons and glial cells. We show significant (30-35 %) reductions in the Vmax of systems XAG and xc- in both neuronal and glial preparations derived from the striatum, but not from the hippocampus of gp120 mice relative to wild-type (WT) controls. Moreover, immunoblot analysis showed that the protein expression of glutamate transporter subtype-1 (GLT-1), the predominant brain glutamate transporter, was significantly reduced in the striatum but not in the hippocampus of gp120 mice. These extensive and region-specific deficits of glutamate uptake likely contribute to the development and/or severity of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Understanding the role of striatal glutamate uptake systems in HIV-1 gp120 may advance the development of new therapeutic strategies to prevent neuronal damage and improve cognitive function in HIV patients. PMID:26567011

  5. Complementary and alternative medicine use in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: an Italian multicentric survey.

    PubMed

    D'Arena, Giovanni; Laurenti, Luca; Coscia, Marta; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Pozzato, Gabriele; Vigliotti, Maria Luigia; Nunziata, Giuseppe; Fragasso, Alberto; Villa, Maria Rosaria; Grossi, Alberto; Selleri, Carmine; Deaglio, Silvia; La Sala, Antonio; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; Aliberti, Luig; De Martino, Laura; Giudice, Aldo; Musto, Pellegrino; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2014-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common in patients with cancer and its use is steadily increasing over time. We performed a multicenter survey in which the use of CAM in 442 Italian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the commonest form of leukemia in Western countries, was assessed. Data were collected by means of a face-to-face standardized questionnaire with several items. Mean age was 69 years; 258 patients (58%) were male and 184 (42%) female. Seventy-three patients (16.5%) were found to be CAM users. The most common CAM therapies were green tea, aloe formulations and high dose vitamins. Predictors of CAM use were female gender, younger age, higher education level, internet availability and newspaper reading. The reasons for CAM popularity among these patients are complex. Given the number of patients combining therapy with CAM and its possible drug interactions, doctor interest as well as patient education about CAM should be improved. PMID:23829282

  6. Survey of special patient care programs at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Debra M; Stoeckel, Daniel C; Rieken, Susan E

    2007-09-01

    This article describes the results of a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools regarding the delivery of dental care to special needs patients. The purposes of the fifteen-item survey were to identify the percentage of dental schools that operate special patient care (SPC) clinics, gain information as to how care is being provided in those clinics, and identify how this patient population is managed in institutions without designated SPC clinics. Forty percent of the respondent institutions had designated SPC clinics. Institutions without SPC clinics tend to mainstream these patients into their predoctoral clinics or refer them to residency programs such as GPR or pediatric programs within their university. PMID:17761621

  7. On-orbit GP-B Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhlfelder, B.; Green, G.; Keiser, G. M.; Smith, M.

    Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is a space-based experiment designed to measure two non-Newtonian precessions of precision gyroscopes in orbit about the Earth. The on-orbit mission is divided into three phases: initialization, science, and post-science calibration. The initialization phase configures the space vehicle for science and spans the first two months of the 18 month on-orbit dewar lifetime. Initialization consists of adjusting the vehicle's 640 km orbit to within 0.003 degrees of a nearly polar orbit, use of an on-board tracking telescope to point the vehicle to a distant fixed reference star, and spinning each of the science gyroscopes to approximately 100 Hz. After initialization, science data are collected for each gyroscope. A London Moment based gyroscope readout system provides a measurement of the precession of the gyroscope spin axis orientation. Following the collection of the science data, the Newtonian drift rates of the gyroscopes are intentionally enhanced. This calibration provides a bound of the amount of Newtonian gyroscope precession present in the science phase, gyroscope data. All vehicle commanding and data collection will be performed using the GP-B ground station. The team is now readying for the planned April 2004 launch.

  8. Patient Preferences for Receiving Education on Venous Thromboembolism Prevention – A Survey of Stakeholder Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hasan M.; Farrow, Norma E.; Shaffer, Dauryne L.; Hobson, Deborah B.; Kulik, Susan V.; Zaruba, Paul D.; Shermock, Kenneth M.; Kraus, Peggy S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Streiff, Michael B.; Haut, Elliott R.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients and is largely preventable. Strategies to decrease the burden of VTE have focused on improving clinicians’ prescribing of prophylaxis with relatively less emphasis on patient education. Objective To develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. Design, Setting and Participants The objective of this study was to develop a patient-centered approach to education of patients and their families on VTE: including importance, risk factors, and benefit/harm of VTE prophylaxis in hospital settings. We implemented a three-phase, web-based survey (SurveyMonkey) between March 2014 and September 2014 and analyzed survey data using descriptive statistics. Four hundred twenty one members of several national stakeholder organizations and a single local patient and family advisory board were invited to participate via email. We assessed participants’ preferences for VTE education topics and methods of delivery. Participants wanted to learn about VTE symptoms, risk factors, prevention, and complications in a context that emphasized harm. Although participants were willing to learn using a variety of methods, most preferred to receive education in the context of a doctor-patient encounter. The next most common preferences were for video and paper educational materials. Conclusions Patients want to learn about the harm associated with VTE through a variety of methods. Efforts to improve VTE prophylaxis and decrease preventable harm from VTE should target the entire continuum of care and a variety of stakeholders including patients and their families. PMID:27031330

  9. An Exploratory Study of GP Perceptions of the Impact of a Primary Care Counselling Service on Their Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Tim; Amoateng, Geoffrey; Wrycraft, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of research into GP perceptions of the impact of on-site counselling on general practice. The research is part of a larger evaluation of a local enhanced primary care mental service. The initial survey and in-depth interviews with GPs reported here focused on the pre-existing counselling service. The results suggest…

  10. GP130 activation induces myeloma and collaborates with MYC

    PubMed Central

    Dechow, Tobias; Steidle, Sabine; Götze, Katharina S.; Rudelius, Martina; Behnke, Kerstin; Pechloff, Konstanze; Kratzat, Susanne; Bullinger, Lars; Fend, Falko; Soberon, Valeria; Mitova, Nadya; Li, Zhoulei; Thaler, Markus; Bauer, Jan; Pietschmann, Elke; Albers, Corinna; Grundler, Rebekka; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Peschel, Christian; Duyster, Justus; Rose-John, Stefan; Bassermann, Florian; Keller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell neoplasm that results from clonal expansion of an Ig-secreting terminally differentiated B cell. Advanced MM is characterized by tissue damage that involves bone, kidney, and other organs and is typically associated with recurrent genetic abnormalities. IL-6 signaling via the IL-6 signal transducer GP130 has been implicated as an important driver of MM pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of constitutively active GP130 (L-GP130) in a murine retroviral transduction-transplantation model induces rapid MM development of high penetrance. L-GP130–expressing mice recapitulated all of the characteristics of human disease, including monoclonal gammopathy, BM infiltration with lytic bone lesions, and protein deposition in the kidney. Moreover, the disease was easily transplantable and allowed different therapeutic options to be evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Using this model, we determined that GP130 signaling collaborated with MYC to induce MM and was responsible and sufficient for directing the plasma cell phenotype. Accordingly, we identified Myc aberrations in the L-GP130 MM model. Evaluation of human MM samples revealed recurrent activation of STAT3, a downstream target of GP130 signaling. Together, our results indicate that deregulated GP130 activity contributes to MM pathogenesis and that pathways downstream of GP130 activity have potential as therapeutic targets in MM. PMID:25384216

  11. Cancer Patient Perception of the Living Will: Report of a Pilot Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Ronald L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Conducted pilot survey of 64 patients with late stage malignancy who had signed living wills. Found that 70.3 percent were grateful for opportunity to sign living will and maintain autonomy over their terminal care, 20.3 percent were either apparently indifferent or unwilling to discuss issue, and 9.4 percent appeared disturbed by their signing of…

  12. Web survey and embedded intervention on emergency department personnel perceptions of role in patient experience.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Leo; Sweeney, Lynn A; Cousins, Anna C; Bertsch, Karina S; Gardiner, Fenwick G; Tomaselli, Nicole M; Boss, Robert M; Gibbs, Frantz J; Jay, Gregory D

    2012-04-01

    Investigators examined emergency department (ED) personnel's perceived job responsibilities and insights into determinants of patient experience. Surveys queried subjects on their perceptions of select clinical care-related actions (CCAs) to assess discipline-specific and service-specific CCA ownership and valuation. Investigators surveyed 153 of 634 ED personnel. A total of 3047 responses to 3802 queries indicated that a specified CCA was 'always' (58.2%) or 'sometimes' (21.9%) the subject's responsibility. A total of 3645 of 3797 responses indicated the CCA specified was 'always' (84.2%) or 'sometimes' (11.8%) important to the patient experience. Twelve percent of subjects reported not being responsible for monitoring or correcting medical errors. After exposure to survey queries, subjects indicated changing or re-considering how they communicate with patients (28.1%), deliver clinical care (20.2%), and arrange disposition/follow-up (20.3%). ED personnel's perceptions of CCA ownership and importance to patient experience were assessed. Subjects reported detectable levels of anticipated job-related behavioral changes traceable to survey-embedded intervention. PMID:21659883

  13. A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

    2010-09-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

  14. Profile of e-patients: analysis of their cancer information-seeking from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghye; Kwon, Nahyun

    2010-10-01

    Researchers have yet to fully understand how competent e-patients are in selecting and using health information sources, or, more importantly, who e-patients are. This study attempted to uncover how cancer e-patients differ from other cancer information seekers in terms of their sociodemographic background, social networks, information competence, and selection of cancer information sources. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, and a series of chi-square tests showed that factors that distinguished cancer e-patients from other cancer information seekers were age, gender, education, employment status, health insurance, and membership in online support groups. They were not different in the other factors measured by the survey. Our logistic regression analysis revealed that the e-patients were older and talked about their health issues with friends or family more frequently compared with online health information seekers without cancer. While preferring information from their doctors over the Internet, e-patients used the Internet as their primary source. In contrast to previous literature, we found little evidence that e-patients were savvy health information consumers who could make informed decisions on their own health. The findings of this study addressed a need for a better design and delivery of health information literacy programs for cancer e-patients. PMID:21104502

  15. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care

    PubMed Central

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then assess actual practice (adherence) by HHD patients. We also assessed training and adherence where GAPs do not exist. We received a 43% response rate from patients and 76% response from nurses representing 19 randomly selected HHD training centers. We found that nurses were not uniformly instructing HHD patients according to GAP, patients were not performing access cannulation according to GAP, nor were they adherent to their training procedures. Identification of signs and symptoms of infection was commonly trained appropriately, but we observed a reluctance to report some signs and symptoms of infection by patients. Of particular concern, when aggregating all steps surveyed, not a single nurse or patient reported training or performing all steps in accordance with GAP. We also identified practices for which there are no GAPs that require further study and may or may not impact outcomes such as infection. Further research is needed to develop strategies to implement and expand GAP, measure outcomes, and ultimately develop BDP for HHD to improve infectious complications. PMID:25154423

  16. Survey of risk factors for osteoporosis and osteoprotective behaviors among patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Marianna; Wagner, Mary L; Wu, Brenda Y

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of risk factors for osteoporosis in persons with epilepsy, patients' awareness of their risk, and their engagement in osteoprotective behaviors were assessed in this study. Two hundred and sixty patients with epilepsy (F=51.5%, average age=42) completed a survey tool. Of 106 patients with a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) result, 52% had low bone mineral density, and 11% had osteoporosis. The results suggest that the majority of patients with epilepsy do not engage in bone-protective behaviors. Those who have undergone a DXA scan may be more likely to take calcium and vitamin D supplementation compared with those who did not undergo a DXA scan, but they do not engage in other osteoprotective behaviors. Many patients did not accurately report their DXA results, indicating that better patient education is warranted. PMID:25812937

  17. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the effects of piperine on P-gp function and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yi; Chin Tan, Theresa May; Lim, Lee-Yong

    2008-08-01

    Piperine, a major component of black pepper, is used as spice and nutrient enhancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and prolonged piperine exposure on cellular P-gp expression and function in vitro and in vivo. Piperine at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, determined by MTT assay to be non-cytotoxic, was observed to inhibit P-gp mediated efflux transport of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin across L-MDR1 and Caco-2 cell monolayers. The acute inhibitory effect was dependent on piperine concentration, with abolishment of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin polarized transport attained at 50 {mu}M of piperine. In contrast, prolonged (48 and 72 h) co-incubation of Caco-2 cell monolayers with piperine (50 and 100 {mu}M) increased P-gp activity through an up-regulation of cellular P-gp protein and MDR1 mRNA levels. The up-regulated protein was functionally active, as demonstrated by a higher degree of [{sup 3}H]-digoxin efflux across the cell monolayers, but the induction was readily reversed by the removal of the spice from the culture medium. Peroral administration of piperine at the dose of 112 {mu}g/kg body weight/day to male Wistar rats for 14 consecutive days also led to increased intestinal P-gp levels. However, there was a concomitant reduction in the rodent liver P-gp although the kidney P-gp level was unaffected. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when piperine is to be co-administered with drugs that are P-gp substrates, particularly for patients whose diet relies heavily on pepper.

  18. Validation of a survey tool to assess the patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students

    PubMed Central

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; Carter, Stephen R; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patient safety education is a key strategy to minimise harm, and is increasingly being introduced into junior pharmacy curricula. However, currently there is no valid and reliable survey tool to measure the patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students. This study aimed to validate a modified survey tool, originally developed by Madigosky et al, to evaluate patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students. Design A 23-item cross-sectional patient safety survey tool was utilised to evaluate first and second year pharmacy students’ attitudes during May 2013 with both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses performed to understand the psychometric properties of the survey tool and to establish construct validity. Setting Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia Participants 245 first year and 201 second year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy Programme at The University of Sydney, Australia in May 2013. Results After exploratory factor analysis on first year student responses (55.76% variance explained) and confirmatory factor analysis on second year responses, a 5-factor model consisting of 14 items was obtained with satisfactory model fit (χ2 (66)=112.83, p<0.001, RMSEA=0.06, CFI=0.91) and nesting between year groups (Δχ2(7)=3.079, p=0.878). The five factors measured students’ attitudes towards: (1) being quality improvement focused, (2) internalising errors regardless of harm, (3) value of contextual learning, (4) acceptability of questioning more senior healthcare professionals’ behaviour and (5) attitude towards open disclosure. Conclusions This study has established the reliability and validity of a modified survey tool to evaluate patient safety attitudes of pharmacy students, with the potential for use in course development and evaluation. PMID:26359285

  19. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  20. The results of a national survey regarding nutritional care of obese burn patients.

    PubMed

    Coen, Jennifer R; Carpenter, Annette M; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Matt, Sarah E; Shaw, Jesse D; Flanagan, Katherine E; Pavlovich, Anna R; Jeng, James C; Jordan, Marion H

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the nutritional needs of obese burn patients. Given the impact of obesity on the morbidity and mortality of these patients, a uniform understanding of perceptions and practices is needed. To elucidate current practices of clinicians working with the obese burn population, the authors constructed a multidisciplinary survey designed to collect this information from practitioners in United States burn centers. An electronic approach was implemented to allow for ease of distribution and completion. A portable document format (pdf) letter was e-mailed to the members of the American Burn Association and then mailed separately to additional registered dietitians identified as working in burn centers. This letter contained a link to a 29-question survey on the SurveyMonkey.com server. Questions took the form of multiple choice and free text entry. Responses were received from physicians, mid-level practitioners, registered dietitians, and nurses. Seventy-five percent of respondents defined obesity as body mass index >30. The Harris-Benedict equation was identified as the most frequently used equation to calculate the caloric needs of burn patients (32%). Fifty-eight percent indicated that they alter their calculations for the obese patient by using adjusted body weight. Calculations for estimated protein needs varied among centers. The majority did not use hypocaloric formulas for obese patients (79%). Enteral nutrition was initiated within the first 24 hours for both obese and nonobese patients at most centers. Sixty-three percent suspend enteral nutrition during operative procedures for all patients. Oral feeding of obese patients was the most preferred route, with total parenteral nutrition being the least preferred. Longer length of stay, poor wound healing, poor graft take, and prolonged intubation were outcomes perceived to occur more in the obese burn population. In the absence of supporting research, clinicians are making adjustments to the

  1. Musculoskeletal pain after stopping tyrosine kinase inhibitor in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Seiichiro; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Saito, Yuu; Suguro, Tamiko; Asano, Michiyo; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Sakuta, Juri; Akahane, Daigo; Tanaka, Yuko; Furuya, Nahoko; Ando, Keiko; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Okabe, Seiichi; Gotoh, Moritaka; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey to assess the state of patients with CML after discontinuation of TKI therapy. Nine of 27 patients developed musculoskeletal pain after TKI discontinuation. One had discontinued nilotinib and eight had discontinued imatinib therapy. Median time to symptom development after discontinuation was 2 weeks. Four experienced grade 3 symptoms as per the CTCAE ver. 4.0. One had pain persisting over a period of 21 months. There was a significant difference between patients with and without symptoms as regards female gender and the probability of persistent MMR. Awareness of this withdrawal syndrome after TKI discontinuation is imperative. PMID:27498732

  2. Nature as the Most Important Coping Strategy Among Cancer Patients: A Swedish Survey.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Nader

    2015-08-01

    The authors have conducted a quantitative survey to examine the extent to which the results obtained in a qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden (Ahmadi, Culture, religion and spirituality in coping: The example of cancer patients in Sweden, Uppsala, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006) are applicable to a wider population of cancer patients in this country. In addition to questions relating to the former qualitative study, this survey also references the RCOPE questionnaire (designed by Kenneth I Pargament) in the design of the new quantitative study. In this study, questionnaires were distributed among persons diagnosed with cancer; 2,355 people responded. The results show that nature has been the most important coping method among cancer patients in Sweden. The highest mean value (2.9) is the factor 'nature has been an important resource to you so that you could deal with your illnesses'. Two out of three respondents (68 %) affirm that this method helped them feel significantly better during or after illness. The second highest average (2.8) is the factor 'listening to 'natural music' (birdsong and the wind)'. Two out of three respondents (66 %) answered that this coping method significantly helped them feel better during illness. The third highest average (2.7) is the factor 'to walk or engage in any activity outdoors gives you a spiritual sense'. This survey concerning the role of nature as the most important coping method for cancer patients confirms the result obtained from the previous qualitative studies. PMID:24363200

  3. Management of patients with ventricular tachycardia in Europe: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Todd, Derick M; Proclemer, Alessandro; Sciaraffia, Elena; Estner, Heidi L; Broadhurst, Paul; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) survey was to assess clinical practice in the management of ventricular tachycardia (VT). The data are based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the members of the EHRA Research Network. Responses were received from 31 centres in 16 countries. The results of the survey show that the management of VT is in general in accordance with guidelines. Antiarrhythmic drugs are still frequently used for VT treatment. In patients at high risk of sudden cardiac death, an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator is routinely recommended, while the treatment options vary for patients with moderate or low risk. A discreet attitude is adopted for catheter ablation in high-risk patients as demonstrated by a relatively low rate of catheter ablation. PMID:26273104

  4. A Survey and Analysis of Techniques Used in Attracting the Black Middle-Class Patient

    PubMed Central

    Barnwell, Sydney; LaMendola, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    This study presents a survey which is based upon the black physician's perception of the expectations of the black middle-class patient. This perception is that the middle-class expectations are low; hence, satisfaction is low, and the result is that prospective patients tend to utilize the services of white physicians. The survey was designed to sample opinions of physicians attending the 1983 annual meeting of the National Medical Association in Chicago, and it determined the most useful techniques in attracting black middle-class patients. These investigators believe that there is an immediate need of a market-concept approach utilizing the results of this study to help the black doctor market his services more effectively. Such a market concept approach is presented. PMID:3999152

  5. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  6. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit. 35.604 Section 35.604 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a...

  7. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E... their satisfaction with the quality of services/care provided by home care program staff. An agency...

  8. 77 FR 69550 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  9. 78 FR 6851 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  10. What Do Stroke Patients Look for in Game-Based Rehabilitation: A Survey Study.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ya-Xuan; Huang, Pei-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of physical disability, and early, intensive, and repetitive rehabilitation exercises are crucial to the recovery of stroke survivors. Unfortunately, research shows that only one third of stroke patients actually perform recommended exercises at home, because of the repetitive and mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation exercises. Thus, to motivate stroke survivors to engage in monotonous rehabilitation is a significant issue in the therapy process. Game-based rehabilitation systems have the potential to encourage patients continuing rehabilitation exercises at home. However, these systems are still rarely adopted at patients' places. Discovering and eliminating the obstacles in promoting game-based rehabilitation at home is therefore essential. For this purpose, we conducted a study to collect and analyze the opinions and expectations of stroke patients and clinical therapists. The study is composed of 2 parts: Rehab-preference survey - interviews to both patients and therapists to understand the current practices, challenges, and expectations on game-based rehabilitation systems; and Rehab-compatibility survey - a gaming experiment with therapists to elaborate what commercial games are compatible with rehabilitation. The study is conducted with 30 outpatients with stroke and 19 occupational therapists from 2 rehabilitation centers in Taiwan. Our surveys show that game-based rehabilitation systems can turn the rehabilitation exercises more appealing and provide personalized motivation for various stroke patients. Patients prefer to perform rehabilitation exercises with more diverse and fun games, and need cost-effective rehabilitation systems, which are often built on commodity hardware. Our study also sheds light on incorporating the existing design-for-fun games into rehabilitation system. We envision the results are helpful in developing a platform which enables rehab-compatible (i.e., existing, appropriately

  11. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23344560

  12. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment. PMID:19042527

  13. Immunodiagnosis of Paracoccidioidomycosis due to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Using a Latex Test: Detection of Specific Antibody Anti-gp43 and Specific Antigen gp43

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Priscila Oliveira; Rodrigues, Anderson Messias; Fernandes, Geisa Ferreira; da Silva, Silvia Helena Marques; Burger, Eva; de Camargo, Zoilo Pires

    2015-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a life-threatening systemic disease and is a neglected public health problem in many endemic regions of Latin America. Though several diagnostic methods are available, almost all of them present with some limitations. Method/Principle Findings A latex immunoassay using sensitized latex particles (SLPs) with gp43 antigen, the immunodominant antigen of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, or the monoclonal antibody mAb17c (anti-gp43) was evaluated for antibody or antigen detection in sera, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from patients with PCM due to P. brasiliensis. The gp43-SLPs performed optimally to detect specific antibodies with high levels of sensitivity (98.46%, 95% CI 91.7–100.0), specificity (93.94%, 95% CI 87.3–97.7), and positive (91.4%) and negative (98.9%) predictive values. In addition, we propose the use of mAb17c-SLPs to detect circulating gp43, which would be particularly important in patients with immune deficiencies who fail to produce normal levels of immunoglobulins, achieving good levels of sensitivity (96.92%, 95% CI 89.3–99.6), specificity (88.89%, 95% CI 81.0–94.3), and positive (85.1%) and negative (97.8%) predictive values. Very good agreement between latex tests and double immune diffusion was observed for gp43-SLPs (k = 0.924) and mAb17c-SLPs (k = 0.850), which reinforces the usefulness of our tests for the rapid diagnosis of PCM in less than 10 minutes. Minor cross-reactivity occurred with sera from patients with other fungal infections. We successfully detected antigens and antibodies from CSF and BAL samples. In addition, the latex test was useful for monitoring PCM patients receiving therapy. Conclusions/Significance The high diagnostic accuracy, low cost, reduced assay time, and simplicity of this new latex test offer the potential to be commercialized and makes it an attractive diagnostic assay for use not only in clinics and medical mycology laboratories, but

  14. Behavioral economics survey of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Naoya; Okajima, Fumitaka; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Goto, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background Adherence to treatment and the metabolic control of diabetes are challenging in many patients with diabetes. The theory of neuroeconomics can provide important clues for understanding unreasonable human behavior concerning decisions between outcomes occurring at different time points. Objective We investigated patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes to determine whether patients who are at a risk of developing complications are less risk averse. We also examined whether patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different behavioral traits in decision making under risk. Methods We conducted a behavioral economics survey of 219 outpatients, 66 with type 1 diabetes and 153 with type 2 diabetes. All patients had been referred by general practitioners or other departments in the hospital. At the time of the survey, levels of hemoglobin A1c were not significantly different between patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Results Patients with type 2 diabetes showed a lower response rate to the survey compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (71.9% vs 87.9%, P<0.01). Logistic regression analysis indicated that diabetic retinopathy was negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries, myopic time preference, willingness to pay for preventive medicine, and levels of satisfaction with life. Diabetic nephropathy was also negatively associated with risk averse in pricing of hypothetical lotteries. Detailed analysis revealed that a lower proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes (22.7%) were categorized as risk averse compared with patients with type 1 diabetes (43.1%, P<0.05) in hypothetical lottery risk estimation. Conclusion This is the first report that investigated patients with diabetes in a clinical setting using a method based on behavioral economics. The results suggest that the attitude of patients toward risk plays an important role in the progress of the complications of diabetes. Different educational and

  15. 76 FR 4890 - Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of Application January 20, 2011. Take notice that on January 11, 2011, Northwest Pipeline GP (Northwest), 295 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, Utah... Project consists of: Abandonment in place of approximately 15 miles of 16-inch diameter pipeline...

  16. 77 FR 73635 - Northwest Storage GP, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Storage GP, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on November 21, 2012, Northwest Storage GP, LLC. (Northwest) filed with the Federal Energy...

  17. 78 FR 42513 - Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Pipeline GP; Notice of Application Take notice that on June 25, 2013, Northwest Pipeline GP (Northwest), 295 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, Utah 84108, filed in Docket No. CP13-507-000 an abbreviated...

  18. Patients' journeys to a narcolepsy diagnosis: a physician survey and retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P; Acebo, Christine; Kim, Ann

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong disorder with potentially debilitating symptoms. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis often requires multiple tests and physician visits. This report describes results from an online, quantitative, company-sponsored survey in which physicians provided information from the charts of their patients with narcolepsy. Neurologists, pulmonologists, psychiatrists, and other specialists who were board certified in sleep medicine; had 2 to 30 years of clinical experience; and treated ≥ 5 narcolepsy patients per month were invited to complete ≤ 6 surveys using charts of patients who were treated for narcolepsy in the last 6 months. Data from 252 patients were collected from 77 physicians. Patients were predominantly male (55%), white (67%), and had a median age of 38 years (range: 12-83 years). Referral to the respondent physician was common, mainly from primary care physicians. The most common initial symptoms were excessive daytime sleepiness (91%), trouble staying awake during the day (44%), and trouble concentrating/functioning during the day (43%). Overall, initial symptoms were of at least moderate severity in 85% of patients. Most patients completed overnight polysomnography (83%), a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (76%), and/or the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (62%). The median time from patient-reported symptom onset to diagnosis was 22 months (range: 0-126 months); at least half saw ≥ 2 providers before being diagnosed; and 60% of patients had previously been misdiagnosed with other disorders, including depression (31%), insomnia (18%), and/or obstructive sleep apnea (13%). In this study, the journey to a narcolepsy diagnosis required evaluation by multiple physicians and took nearly 2 years in 50% of patients, and > 5 years in 18%. These data highlight the need for increased awareness of the signs and symptoms of narcolepsy. PMID:24918805

  19. Patient empowerment within a coronary care unit: insights for health professionals drawn from a patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Lewin, David; Piper, Stewart

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate coronary care patients' perceptions of their care and interventions related to empowerment and strengthening patient choice. The study, conducted in one acute National Health Service (NHS) Trust in Cambridgeshire, England, and completed in 2002, employed a prospective survey design. The research used a self-completion, pilot, postal questionnaire, including closed, open and scaled questions as the main method of data collection. From a total of 200 eligible patients, an unselected, consecutive sample of 142 in-patients consented to participate, of whom 103 returned the questionnaire--a response rate of 73%. In contrast to much published literature, this study demonstrated that empowerment issues involving the rights of coronary care patients to be primary decision makers, managers of their illnesses and ultimate arbiters of their treatment and care were of minimal concern to all but a few. Almost 90% of patients were content to entrust their care exclusively to health professionals based on their confidence in the clinical expertise of the medical and nursing staff. Findings suggested that, while respondents were well-satisfied with their care, the ethos of patient empowerment was of peripheral concern and readily abdicated in the face of acute illness. PMID:17071087

  20. Assessing patients' experience of integrated care: a survey of patient views in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    PubMed Central

    Mastellos, Nikolaos; Gunn, Laura; Harris, Matthew; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip; Pappas, Yannis

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the importance of continuity of care and patient engagement, few studies have captured patients' views on integrated care. This study assesses patient experience in the Integrated Care Pilot in North West London with the aim to help clinicians and policymakers understand patients' acceptability of integrated care and design future initiatives. Methods A survey was developed, validated and distributed to 2029 randomly selected practice patients identified as having a care plan. Results A total of 405 questionnaires were included for analysis. Respondents identified a number of benefits associated with the pilot, including increased patient involvement in decision-making, improved patient–provider relationship, better organisation and access to care, and enhanced inter-professional communication. However, only 22.4% were aware of having a care plan, and of these only 37.9% had a copy of the care plan. Knowledge of care plans was significantly associated with a more positive experience. Conclusions This study reinforces the view that integrated care can improve quality of care and patient experience. However, care planning was a complex and technically challenging process that occurred more slowly than planned with wide variation in quality and time of recruitment to the pilot, making it difficult to assess the sustainability of benefits. PMID:24987321

  1. Does Choose & Book fail to deliver the expected choice to patients? A survey of patients' experience of outpatient appointment booking

    PubMed Central

    Green, Judith; McDowall, Zoe; Potts, Henry WW

    2008-01-01

    Background Choose and Book is a central part of the UK Government patient choice agenda that seeks to provide patients with a choice over the time, date and place of their first outpatient appointment. This is done through the use of a computerised booking system. After a 2004 pilot study, Choose and Book was formally launched in January 2006. This is the first study of patient experience of Choose and Book since then. Methods A questionnaire survey of reported experience of choice over the time, data and place of appointment, carried out in a National Health Service hospital in London. 104 patients at their first outpatient appointment completed the questionnaire, consisting of a consecutive series of patients referred through Choose and Book and a sample referred through the conventional booking system. Results Among the Choose and Book patients, 66% (31/47; 95% CI 52 to 78%) reported not being given a choice of appointment date, 66% (31/47; 95% CI 52 to 78%) reported not being given a choice of appointment time, 86% (37/43; 95% CI 74 to 94%) reported being given a choice of fewer than four hospitals in total and 32% (15/47; 95% CI 20 to 46%) reported not being given any choice of hospital. Conclusion In this study, patients did not experience the degree of choice that Choose and Book was designed to deliver. PMID:18673533

  2. Survey of patient exposure from general radiography and mammography in Japan in 2014.

    PubMed

    Asada, Y; Suzuki, S; Minami, K; Shirakawa, S; Kobayashi, M

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing patient exposure to radiation, we conducted a questionnaire survey regarding radiographic conditions in 2014. Here we report estimates of dose exposure in general radiography and mammography through an investigation and comparison of present patient exposure conditions. Questionnaires were sent to 3000 facilities nationwide in Japan. Surveys asked questions on a total of 16 items related to general radiography, including the chest, abdomen, and breast. Output data from x-ray tubes measured in the Chubu area of Japan were used as the mean in these estimates. The index of patient exposure was adopted as the entrance skin dose (ESD) for general radiography and as the mean glandular dose (MGD) for mammography. The response rate for this survey was 21.9%. Our results showed that doses received through the use of flat-panel detector (FPD) devices were lower than those received through computed radiography devices, except for the ankle joint (e.g. in chest examination, the dose from FPD and CR was 0.24 mGy, 0.31 mGy on the average, respectively). These results suggest that more widespread use of FPD devices could lead to decreases in the ESD and MGD, thereby reducing patient exposure. PMID:26975874

  3. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study. PMID:23715209

  4. General practitioners' knowledge of their patients' psychosocial problems: multipractice questionnaire survey.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbrandsen, P.; Hjortdahl, P.; Fugelli, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate general practitioners' knowledge of a range of psychosocial problems among their patients and to explore whether doctors' recognition of psychosocial problems depends on previous general knowledge about the patient or the type of problem or on certain characteristics of the doctor or the patient. DESIGN: Multipractice survey of consecutive adult patients consulting general practitioners. Doctors and patients answered written questions. SETTING: Buskerud county, Norway. SUBJECTS: 1401 adults attending 89 general practitioners during one regular working day in March 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Doctors' knowledge of nine predefined psychosocial problems in patients; these problems were assessed by the patients as affecting their health on the day of consultation; odds ratios for the doctor's recognition of each problem, adjusted for characteristics of patients, doctors, and practices; and the doctor's assessment of previous general knowledge about the patient. RESULTS: Doctors' knowledge of the problems ranged from 53% (108/203) of "stressful working conditions" to 19% (12/63) of a history of "violence or threats." Good previous knowledge of the patient increased the odds for the doctor's recognition of "sorrow," "violence or threats," "substance misuse in close friend or relative," and "difficult conflict with close friend or relative." Age and sex of doctor and patient, patient's educational level and living situation, and location of practice influenced the doctor's awareness. CONCLUSIONS: Variation in the patients' communication abilities, the need for confidence in the doctor-patient relationship before revealing intimate problems, and a tendency for the doctors to be entrapped by their expectations may explain these findings. PMID:9112847

  5. Consumers’ Patient Portal Preferences and Health Literacy: A Survey Using Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Caswell, Kaitlyn; Peterson, Ellen; Aberle, Denise R; Bui, Alex AT; Arnold, Corey W

    2016-01-01

    Background eHealth apps have the potential to meet the information needs of patient populations and improve health literacy rates. However, little work has been done to document perceived usability of portals and health literacy of specific topics. Objective Our aim was to establish a baseline of lung cancer health literacy and perceived portal usability. Methods A survey based on previously validated instruments was used to assess a baseline of patient portal usability and health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. The survey was distributed via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to 500 participants. Results Our results show differences in preferences and literacy by demographic cohorts, with a trend of chronically ill patients having a more positive reception of patient portals and a higher health literacy rate of lung cancer knowledge (P<.05). Conclusions This article provides a baseline of usability needs and health literacy that suggests that chronically ill patients have a greater preference for patient portals and higher level of health literacy within the domain of lung cancer. PMID:27278634

  6. A cross-sectional study describing factors associated with utilisation of GP services by a cohort of people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background People who inject drugs (PWID) use healthcare services, including primary care, at a disproportionately high rate. We investigated key correlates of general practitioner (GP) related service utilisation within a cohort of PWID. Methods Using baseline data from a cohort of 645 community-recruited PWID based in Melbourne, Victoria, we conducted a secondary analysis of associations between past month use of GP services unrelated to opioid substitution therapy (OST) and socio-demographic and drug use characteristics and self-reported health using multivariate logistic regression. Results Just under one-third (29%) of PWID had accessed GP services in the month prior to being surveyed. Participants who reported living with children (adjusted odds ratio, AOR 1.97, 95% CI 1.04 - 3.73) or having had contact with a social worker in the past month (AOR 1.92, 95% CI 1.24 - 2.98) were more likely to have seen a GP in the past month. Participants who were injecting daily or more frequently (AOR 0.50, 95% CI 0.30 - 0.83) or had a weekly income of less than $400 (AOR 0.59, 95% CI 0.38 - 0.91) were less likely to report having seen a GP in the past month. Conclusions Our sample frequently attended GP services for health needs unrelated to OST. Findings highlight both the characteristics of PWID accessing GP services and also those potentially missing out on primary care and preventive services. PMID:25030526

  7. Knowledge and Apprehension of Dental Patients about MERS-A Questionnaire Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Rodrigues, Jean Clare; Azouni, Khalid; Darwish, Shorouk; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Alkaabba, Abdul Aziz Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease caused by beta corona virus. From April 11th to 9th June 2014, World Health Organization (WHO) reported a total of 402 laboratory confirmed cases of MERS from KSA, out of which 132 cases were reported from Riyadh alone. Aim The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and apprehension of patients about MERS visiting Al Farabi College of Dentistry, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire based survey was conducted which consisted of 10 self-prepared questions. A total of 404 patients participated in this study. Results Three hundred and forty patients had heard about MERS. Nearly a quarter of the patients (25.74%) were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. A little more than half of the patients (50.99%) knew that camel was a source of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome-Corona virus. Most of the patients (80.72%) were aware of the infection control measures to be followed by dentist and 138 patients claimed they took some precaution when present inside the dental college. Conclusion Majority of the patients had heard about MERS and was aware of the infection control measures. However, some patients were apprehensive about undergoing dental treatment because of MERS. Further steps need to be taken to educate the patient’s about transmission of MERS and infection control measures in a dental hospital. PMID:27437361

  8. Stress perceptions in community clinic: a pilot survey of patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Goodrick, G Ken; Kneuper, Suzanne; Steinbauer, Jeffrey R

    2005-04-01

    This pilot survey of 103 patients and 17 physicians in an urban family medicine clinic gathered information pertinent to the design of a feasible stress intervention for patients bothered by stress, but who did not have a psychiatric diagnosis. Among patients, 45% reported being excessively bothered by stress in the preceding month, with the chief stressors being job (70% reporting), financial worries (58%) and family concerns (50%). Patients reported a variety of problems perceived to be related to stress, such as headaches, insomnia, eating control, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Although about 80% reported using positive coping methods (e.g., talking, exercising, and relaxing), 42% reported using alcohol, and 10% used non-prescribed drugs to cope with stress. Only 37% of patients had sought help for stress from their physician. The wide variety of responses from the physicians reflected a lack of standardized approaches, inadequate training, and a reluctance to engage patients about their stress problems. About 42% of the physicians reported routinely asking patients about stress, and 77% felt that dealing with patient stress was a significant burden on their practice of medicine. Overall, the findings indicate that opportunities are being missed for helping patients to deal with stress constructively, and that a standardized stress self-management program might be one solution. PMID:15810562

  9. A qualitative study of GP, NP and patient views about the use of rapid streptococcal antigen detection tests (RADTs) in primary care: ‘swamped with sore throats?’

    PubMed Central

    Leydon, Gerry M; McDermott, Lisa; Moore, Mike; Williamson, Ian; Hobbs, F D Richard; Lambton, Tessa; Cooper, Rebecca; Henderson, Hugo; Little, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore patient and healthcare professionals’ (HCP) views of clinical scores and rapid streptococcal antigen detection tests (RADTs) for acute sore throat. Design Qualitative semistructured interview study. Setting UK primary care. Participants General practitioners (GPs), nurse practitioners (NPs) and patients from general practices across Hampshire, Oxfordshire and the West Midlands who were participating in the Primary Care Streptococcal Management (PRISM) study. Method Semistructured, face-to-face and phone interviews were conducted with GPs, NPs and patients from general practices across Hampshire, Oxfordshire and the West Midlands. Results 51 participants took part in the study. Of these, 42 were HCPs (29 GPs and 13 NPs) and 9 were patients. HCPs could see a positive role for RADTs in terms of reassurance, as an educational tool for patients, and for aiding inexperienced practitioners, but also had major concerns about RADT use in clinical practice. Particular concerns included the validity of the tests (the role of other bacteria, and carrier states), the tension and possible disconnect with clinical assessment and intuition, the issues of time and resource use and the potential for medicalisation of self-limiting illness. In contrast, however, experience of using RADTs over time seemed to make some participants more positive about using the tests. Moreover, patients were much more positive about the place of RADTs in providing reassurance and in limiting their antibiotic use. Conclusions It is unlikely that RADTs will have a (comfortable) place in clinical practice in the near future until health professionals’ concerns are met, and they have direct experience of using them. The routine use of clinical scoring systems for acute upper respiratory illness also face important barriers related to clinicians’ perceptions of their utility in the face of clinician experience and intuition. PMID:23558734

  10. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandy, Palanisamy; Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Wei, Tan Tyng; Loon, Tan Wee; Yee, Lim Chong

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use. Objective To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia. Methods A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted. Results The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of “staff training and skills” were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup. Conclusion The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety. PMID:27524887

  11. The cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 enhances neurogenesis in GFAP/Gp120 transgenic mice displaying deficits in neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Hava Karsenty; Jiang, Shuxian; Fu, Yigong; Rockenstein, Edward; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Zvonok, Alexander; Masliah, Eliezer; Avraham, Shalom

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: HIV-1 glycoprotein Gp120 induces apoptosis in rodent and human neurons in vitro and in vivo. HIV-1/Gp120 is involved in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and inhibits proliferation of adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)/Gp120 transgenic (Tg) mice. As cannabinoids exert neuroprotective effects in several model systems, we examined the protective effects of the CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 on Gp120-mediated insults on neurogenesis. Experimental Approach: We assessed the effects of AM1241 on survival and apoptosis in cultures of human and murine NPCs with immunohistochemical and TUNEL techniques. Neurogenesis in the hippocampus of GFAP/Gp120 transgenic mice in vivo was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Key Results: AM1241 inhibited in vitro Gp120-mediated neurotoxicity and apoptosis of primary human and murine NPCs and increased their survival. AM1241 also promoted differentiation of NPCs to neuronal cells. While GFAP/Gp120 Tg mice exhibited impaired neurogenesis, as indicated by reduction in BrdU+ cells and doublecortin+ (DCX+) cells, and a decrease in cells with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), administration of AM1241 to GFAP/Gp120 Tg mice resulted in enhanced in vivo neurogenesis in the hippocampus as indicated by increase in neuroblasts, neuronal cells, BrdU+ cells and PCNA+ cells. Astrogliosis and gliogenesis were decreased in GFAP/Gp120 Tg mice treated with AM1241, compared with those treated with vehicle. Conclusions and Implications: The CB2 receptor agonist rescued impaired neurogenesis caused by HIV-1/Gp120 insult. Thus, CB2 receptor agonists may act as neuroprotective agents, restoring impaired neurogenesis in patients with HAD. PMID:24148086

  12. Pathogenic significance of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity found in the envelope glycoprotein gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto

    2006-03-01

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The precursor activity of serum Gc protein was lost or reduced in HIV-infected patients. These patient sera contained alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase), which deglycosylates serum Gc protein. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF and thus loses MAF precursor activity, leading to immunosuppression. Nagalase in the blood stream of HIV-infected patients was complexed with patient immunoglobulin G, suggesting that this enzyme is immunogenic, seemingly a viral gene product. In fact, Nagalase was inducible by treatment of cultures of HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a provirus-inducing agent. This enzyme was immunoprecipitable with polyclonal anti-HIV but not with anticellular constitutive enzyme or with antitumor Nagalase. The kinetic parameters (km value of 1.27 mM and pH optimum of 6.1), of the patient serum Nagalase were distinct from those of constitutive enzyme (km value of 4.83 mM and pH optimum of 4.3). This glycosidase should reside on an envelope protein capable of interacting with cellular membranous O-glycans. Although cloned gp160 exhibited no Nagalase activity, treatment of gp160 with trypsin expressed Nagalase activity, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage of gp160 to generate gp120 and gp41 is required for Nagalase activity. Cloned gp120 exhibited Nagalase activity while cloned gp41 showed no Nagalase activity. Since proteolytic cleavage of protein gp160 is required for expression of both fusion capacity and Nagalase activity, Nagalase seems to be an enzymatic basis for fusion in the infectious process. Therefore, Nagalase appears to play dual roles in viral infectivity and immunosuppression. PMID:16545013

  13. Moving towards an electronic patient record: a survey to assess the needs of community family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, H. R.; Tudiver, F.; Holbrook, A. M.; Geiger, G.; Keshavjee, K. K.; Troyan, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the needs of community family physicians regarding electronic patient records (EPRs). DESIGN: A comprehensive survey was sent to 101 community family physicians in Hamilton, Ontario, who had expressed an interest in EPRs. RESULTS: 46 physicians responded (46%). 87% felt that an EPR would result in their providing better patient care. A wide variety of items were deemed to be important to be included on the EPR "front page". Desired functionality emphasized labs, medications, consultation, hospital follow-up and health maintenance. Family physicians tended to prefer templates to other data entry methods such as typing and dictating. Respondents were more willing to view information from the hospital than to let the hospital view information from their own offices. CONCLUSION: This survey provided useful information on the perceived EPR needs of community-based family physicians. It will be repeated post-computerization. PMID:9929216

  14. Students' perceptions of their preparation for AIDS patient care: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Hurley, P M; McGriff, E P

    1996-06-01

    A survey of undergraduate students (n = 1,390) was conducted to determine their self-perceptions of their educational preparation to care of persons with HIV disease. HIV/AIDS content was included in the curricula of 97% of the respondents, with hours of instruction ranging from 0 to 18 with a mean of five. School policies regarding HIV clinical experiences varied from requiring all students to care for at least one AIDS patient to considering student preferences. Students (n = 944) perceived that faculty were willing to assign and supervise students in the care of HIV/AIDS patients. The majority of students (73%) believed that their preparation to care for AIDS patients was excellent or good. A genuine feeling of compassion was apparent in the responses of most students, and it was evident that faculty had taught students to care for HIV/AIDS patients without prejudice, and with respect for human life. PMID:11361619

  15. N-acetylcysteine prevents HIV gp 120-related damage of human cultured astrocytes: correlation with glutamine synthase dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Visalli, Valeria; Muscoli, Carolina; Sacco, Iolanda; Sculco, Francesca; Palma, Ernesto; Costa, Nicola; Colica, Carmela; Rotiroti, Domenicantonio; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    the effects of gp120 on astroglial cells were counteracted by NAC thus suggesting a novel and potentially useful approach in the treatment of glutammatergic disorders found in HAD patients. PMID:18062818

  16. [Proposal for a survey for assisting the family and caregivers of patients with spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Mancussi e Faro, A C

    1999-12-01

    This study proposes a basis survey for assistance to the family and caregivers because we believe there is necessity of family participation on the treatment, trying to understand and share the disease or deficiency situation. We objectified to sketch the relationship degree and the people's gender that accompanied the spinal cord injured hurt medular patient in nursing consultations and to discuss the necessity of basis survey to the assistance family and to the caregiver. 101 nursing consultations were accomplished, in clinic health, to the spinal cord injured patient and his/her relative and 36 patients were totalized, from this number 26 (72.22%) were male and 10 (27.78%), were female. It was verified that the men with medular lesion, in the greater number (27-80.7 O/o), were accompanied with his relatives specially mother and wife, while the women with medular lesion, in the greater number too (7-70%) were accompanied with her relatives of diversified proximity. In reference to the basis survey that comprehend the care at house and the caregiver necessity, we can affirm its relevance, trying to context the family support identified attending the caregivers. PMID:11337805

  17. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society shoe survey of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Pinzur, M S; Shields, N N; Goelitz, B; Slovenkai, M; Kaye, R; Ross, S D; Suri, M

    1999-11-01

    A one-page written survey was completed by 402 randomly selected patients with diabetes in five cities during a scheduled visit to their endocrinologist. Patients averaged 61.5 years of age and had been diagnosed with diabetes for 27.3 years. This study suggests that approximately 25% of adults with diabetes are at risk for developing foot ulcers, the precursor to deep infection leading to lower limb amputation. The goal at the inception of this project was to obtain benchmark data on the current level of prophylactic foot care being provided to adult patients with diabetes. The results of this survey suggest that most individuals with diabetes and their physicians are aware of potential diabetic foot morbidity, yet very few take advantage of prophylactic protective footware. Even fewer are presently taking advantage of benefits established through the Medicare Therapeutic Foot Bill. This survey highlights a substantial opportunity for improvement in the long-term care of individuals with diabetes. PMID:10582845

  18. A cross-sectional survey of patient needs in hospital evacuation.

    PubMed

    Rimstad, Rune; Holtan, Anders

    2015-01-01

    To aid development of contingency plans, a cross-sectional survey of inpatient needs in the event of a total hospital evacuation within a few hours was undertaken. The hospital is a part of a tertiary care facility with a mixed surgical and medical population and a relatively large load of emergency medicine. A doctor or nurse on each ward registered patients' physical mobility, special needs complicating transportation (intensive care, labor, isolation, etc), and the lowest acceptable level of care after evacuation. Of the 760 included patients, 57.8 percent could walk, 20.0 percent needed wheelchair, and 22.2 percent needed transport on stretcher. Special needs were registered for 18.2 percent of patients. Only 49.7 percent of patients needed to be evacuated to another hospital to continue care on an acceptable level, while 37.6 percent could be discharged to their own home, and 12.6 percent could be evacuated to a nursing home. Patients in psychiatric wards and high dependency units had distinctly different needs than patients in ordinary somatic wards. The differences between patients in surgical and nonsurgical wards were minor. Patient discharge seems to be a considerable capacity buffer in a hospital crisis situation. PMID:26312655

  19. A cross-sectional survey of patient needs in hospital evacuation.

    PubMed

    Rimstad, Rune; Holtan, Anders

    2015-01-01

    To aid development of contingency plans, a cross-sectional survey of inpatient needs in the event of a total hospital evacuation within a few hours was undertaken. The hospital is a part of a tertiary care facility with a mixed surgical and medical population and a relatively large load of emergency medicine. A doctor or nurse on each ward registered patients' physical mobility, special needs complicating transportation (intensive care, labor, isolation, etc), and the lowest acceptable level of care after evacuation. Of the 760 included patients, 57.8 percent could walk, 20.0 percent needed wheelchair, and 22.2 percent needed transport on stretcher. Special needs were registered for 18.2 percent of patients. Only 49.7 percent of patients needed to be evacuated to another hospital to continue care on an acceptable level, while 37.6 percent could be discharged to their own home, and 12.6 percent could be evacuated to a nursing home. Patients in psychiatric wards and high dependency units had distinctly different needs than patients in ordinary somatic wards. The differences between patients in surgical and nonsurgical wards were minor. Patient discharge seems to be a considerable capacity buffer in a hospital crisis situation. PMID:27149311

  20. How psoriasis patients perceive, obtain, and use biologic agents: Survey from an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Isip, Leah; Bhutani, Tina; Dennis, Madison; Heller, Misha M; Lee, Eric S; Nie, Hong; Liao, Wilson

    2013-02-01

    The availability of new biologic agents for the treatment of psoriasis provides hope for improved quality of life outcomes. However, the way patients come to use biologics, the potential barriers they encounter, and their attitudes towards using these medications are still not well studied. Here, we conducted a survey of 106 psoriasis patients at an academic medical center to discern patient attitudes towards biologics. We found that most patients learn of biologics through their physician and perform follow-up research using the Internet. Most patients did not find it difficult to make the decision to start a biologic. Difficulty in obtaining biologics was associated with age less than 55 (p = 0.01), lower income level (p = 0.007), and lack of insurance (p = 0.04). Patients were found to have high satisfaction and compliance rates on biologics. Of patients who missed a dose of their biologic, this was mainly due to logistical reasons such as not having the medication or forgetting to take it, rather than being depressed or overwhelmed. Patients with lower income levels had increased cut backs in personal expenses due to co-payments (p = 0.001). Among respondents, the mean annual out-of-pocket expense for a biologic was $557.12 per year, with a range of $0-7000. PMID:22007699

  1. Bivalirudin is superior to heparins alone with bailout GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction transported emergently for primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a pre-specified analysis from the EUROMAX trial

    PubMed Central

    Zeymer, Uwe; van 't Hof, Arnoud; Adgey, Jennifer; Nibbe, Lutz; Clemmensen, Peter; Cavallini, Claudio; ten Berg, Jurrien; Coste, Pierre; Huber, Kurt; Deliargyris, Efthymios N.; Day, Jonathan; Bernstein, Debra; Goldstein, Patrick; Hamm, Christian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Aims In the HORIZONS trial, in-hospital treatment with bivalirudin reduced bleeding and mortality in primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with heparin and routine glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (GPI). It is unknown whether this advantage of bivalirudin is observed in comparison with heparins only with GPI used as bailout. Methods and results In the EUROMAX study, 2198 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were randomized during transport for primary PCI to bivalirudin or to heparins with optional GPI. Primary and principal outcome was the composites of death or non-CABG-related major bleeding at 30 days. This pre-specified analysis compared patients receiving bivalirudin (n = 1089) with those receiving heparins with routine upstream GPI (n = 649) and those receiving heparins only with GPI use restricted to bailout (n = 460). The primary outcome death and major bleeding occurred in 5.1% with bivalirudin, 7.6% with heparin plus routine GPI (HR 0.67 and 95% CI 0.46–0.97, P = 0.034), and 9.8% with heparins plus bailout GPI (HR 0.52 and 95% CI 0.35–0.75, P = 0.006). Following adjustment by logistic regression, bivalirudin was still associated with significantly lower rates of the primary outcome (odds ratio 0.53, 95% CI 0.33–0.87) and major bleeding (odds ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.24–0.82) compared with heparins alone with bailout GPI. Rates of stent thrombosis were higher with bivalirudin (1.6 vs. 0.6 vs. 0.4%, P = 0.09 and 0.09). Conclusion Bivalirudin, started during transport for primary PCI, reduces major bleeding compared with both patients treated with heparin only plus bailout GPI and patients treated with heparin and routine GPI, but increased stent thrombosis. PMID:24849104

  2. Attitude of patients with HIV infection towards organ transplant between HIV patients. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Taha, Huda; Newby, Katie; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the HIV patients' attitudes towards the practice of organ transplant between HIV patients using a cross-sectional survey design. In total, 206 patients participated with a mean age of 42 (±8.8) years. The majority (70%) were black African and women (54%), and 83% described themselves as heterosexual. Most participants (n = 171, 83%) were on treatment, and 159 (93%) had viral load less than 40 copies/ml. Mean duration of illness and mean duration of treatment were 77 (±42.7) and 68 (±41) months, respectively. Of all participants, 128 (62%) reported that they would consider donating either any organ or a specific organ/s to an HIV patient, 33 (16%) would not consider it and 45 (22%) were unsure about donating their organs. Furthermore, 113 (55%) participants would consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient, 37 (18%) would not consider it, and 56 (27%) were unsure. Ninety-eight participants (42%) reported that they would consider both donating and receiving an organ. Multinomial logistic regression analysis found that significantly more Black African than Caucasian participants were unsure about organ donation (p = 0.011, OR = 3.887). Participants with longer duration of infection were significantly less likely to consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient (p = 0.036, OR = 1.297). Overall, the study findings indicated that the majority of participants were in favour of organ transplant between HIV patients. Use of HIV-infected donors could potentially reduce current organ waiting list among HIV patients. PMID:25614524

  3. A pilot Croatian survey of risk factor (CRO-SURF) management in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Pećin, Ivan; Milicić, Davor; Jurin, Hrvoje; Reiner, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    A pilot survey was performed to determine the presence of known risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Croatian patients with diagnosed coronary heart disease (CHD) using a new questionnaire. The idea was to test this new and very simple questionnaire but also to compare the data collected in this pilot survey with the results of the last Croatian national survey (TASPIC-CRO V) and so to obtain the information whether secondary prevention has improved between 2003 and 2010. 122 patients with established CHD (88 men, 34 women, mean age 66.3 years) treated in Zagreb University Hospital Center were included. Data collection was based on filling the SURF questionnaire right after the clinical exam or later using review of medical records. Patients were hospitalized because of CABG (1%), PCI (8%), ACS (35%) or chronic stable angina (56%). The history of arterial hypertension had 95%patients (however, on admission mean systolic pressure was 130.1 mmHg, diastolic 76.8 mmHg), 90% had dyslipidaemia (total cholesterol <4.5 mmol/L had 43%; <4.0 mmol/L 33%; LDL-cholesterol <2.5 mmol/L 49%; <2.0 mmol/L 32%; HDL>1.2 mmol/L (women) or >1.0 mmol/L (men) had 67%), 25% had diabetes which was poorly regulated (mean HbA1c 8.2%), 18% were active smokers. After discharge only 24% performed cardiac rehabilitation. Mean body mass index of the patients was 28.3 kg/m2 (32% were obese, 72% overweight). Compared to TASPIC-CRO V there was lower usage of aspirin than recommended on discharge. This was also true for statin therapy. More patients were taking beta blockers, calcium antagonists and diuretics than 7 years ago. This pilot survey showed that CRO-SURF questionnaire is short, quick, effective and simple to use. It is a good and cost effective tool to collect data on CVD risk factors and their management. The results obtained by using it indicate that there is still a high prevalence of modifiable risk factors in Croatian patients with CHD. PMID:22856217

  4. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  5. Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey: Economic Impact of COPD in 12 Countries

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Jason; Landis, Sarah H.; Maskell, Joe; Oh, Yeon-Mok; van der Molen, Thys; Han, MeiLan K.; Mannino, David M.; Ichinose, Masakazu; Punekar, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Background The Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey estimated the prevalence and burden of COPD across 12 countries. Using data from this survey we evaluated the economic impact of COPD. Methods This cross-sectional, population-based survey questioned 4,343 subjects aged 40 years and older, fulfilling a case definition of COPD based on self-reported physician diagnosis or symptomatology. Direct cost measures were based on exacerbations of COPD (treated and those requiring emergency department visits and/or hospitalisation), contacts with healthcare professionals, and COPD medications. Indirect costs were calculated from work loss values using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment scale. Combined direct and indirect costs estimated the total societal costs per patient. Results The annual direct costs of COPD ranged from $504 (South Korea) to $9,981 (USA), with inpatient hospitalisations (5 countries) and home oxygen therapy (3 countries) being the key drivers of direct costs. The proportion of patients completely prevented from working due to their COPD ranged from 6% (Italy) to 52% (USA and UK) with 8 countries reporting this to be ≥20%. Total societal costs per patient varied widely from $1,721 (Russia) to $30,826 (USA) but a consistent pattern across countries showed greater costs among those with increased burden of COPD (symptoms, health status and more severe disease) and a greater number of comorbidities. Conclusions The economic burden of COPD is considerable across countries, and requires targeted resources to optimise COPD management encompassing the control of symptoms, prevention of exacerbations and effective treatment of comorbidities. Strategies to allow COPD patients to remain in work are important for addressing the substantial wider societal costs. PMID:27092775

  6. Murine responses to recombinant MVA versus ALVAC vaccines against tumor-associated antigens, gp100 and 5T4.

    PubMed

    Hanwell, David G; McNeil, Bryan; Visan, Lucian; Rodrigues, Lauren; Dunn, Pamela; Shewen, Patricia E; Macallum, Grace E; Turner, Patricia V; Vogel, Thorsten U

    2013-05-01

    Virally vectored cancer vaccines comprise a new form of immunotherapy that aim to generate anti-tumor immune responses with potential for tumor clearance and enhanced patient survival. Here, we compared 2 replication-deficient poxviruses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and ALVAC(2) in their ability to induce antigen expression and immunogenicity of the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) 5T4 and gp100. To facilitate the comparison, recombinant MVA-gp100M and ALVAC(2)-5T4 were constructed to complement existing ALVAC(2)-gp100M and MVA-5T4 vectors. Recombinant TAA expression in chicken embryo fibroblast cells was confirmed by Western blot analysis. 5T4 expression was approximately equal for both viruses, whereas ALVAC-derived gp100 was quickly degraded, at a time point when MVA-derived gp100 was still stable and expressed at high levels. Human leukocyte antigen-A2 transgenic mice were vaccinated with recombinant viruses and the CD8 T-cell responses elicited against each TAA were monitored by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot. No 5T4 peptide responses were detected using splenocytes from mice vaccinated with either vector, whereas vaccination with MVA elicited a significantly higher gp100-specific response than ALVAC(2) at 10 PFU (P<0.001). In CD-1 mice, each vector elicited similar 5T4 antibody responses, whereas MVA was more potent and induced gp100 antibody responses at a lower immunization dose than ALVAC (P<0.001). In this study, immunogenicity varied depending on the viral vector used and reflected vector-associated differences in in vitro TAA expression and stability. These findings suggest that novel vector-transgene combinations must be assessed individually when designing vaccines, and that stability of vector-encoded proteins produced in vitro may be useful as a predictor for in vitro immunogenicity. PMID:23603858

  7. Psychometric Properties of the AHRQ Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture: A Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aboneh, Ephrem A.; Look, Kevin; Stone, Jamie; Lester, Corey; Chui, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) developed a hospital patient safety culture survey in 2004, and has adapted this survey to other healthcare settings, such as nursing homes and medical offices, and most recently community pharmacies. However, it is unknown if safety culture dimensions developed in hospital settings can be transferred to community pharmacies. The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Community Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Method The survey was administered to 543 community pharmacists in [state], United States. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the fit of our data with the proposed AHRQ model. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the underlying factor structure. Internal consistency reliabilities were calculated. Results A total of 433 usable surveys were returned (response rate of 80%). Results from the confirmatory factor analysis showed inadequate model fit for the original 36 item, 11-factor structure. Exploratory factor analysis showed that a modified 27 item, 4-factor structure better reflected the underlying safety culture dimensions in community pharmacies. The communication openness factor, with 3 items, dropped in its entirety while 6 items dropped from multiple factors. The remaining 27 items redistributed to form the 4-factor structure: safety related communication, staff training and work environment, organizational response to safety events, and staffing, work pressure and pace. Cronbach's α of 0.95 suggested good internal consistency. Conclusion Dimensions related to safety culture in a community pharmacy environment may differ from those in other healthcare settings such as in hospitals. Our findings suggest that validation studies need to be conducted before applying safety dimensions from other healthcare settings into community pharmacies. PMID:26208535

  8. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Alexandre Franco; de Paula, Renata Monteiro; de Castro Piau, Cinthia Gonçalves Barbosa; Costa, Priscila Paganini; Bezerra, Ana Cristina Barreto

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages). A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3%) working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%); about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05). Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3%) or only toothbrushes (28.2%) with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3%) to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01). Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05). However, most professionals (56.4%) reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs. PMID:27275074

  9. Paediatric hereditary angioedema: a survey of UK service provision and patient experience

    PubMed Central

    Read, N; Lim, E; Tarzi, M D; Hildick-Smith, P; Burns, S; Fidler, K J

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare disease characterized by episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. For affected children in the United Kingdom, there are relatively few data regarding disease prevalence, service organization and the humanistic burden of the disease. To improve knowledge in these areas, we surveyed major providers of care for children with HAE. A questionnaire was sent to major paediatric centres to determine patient numbers, symptoms, diagnostic difficulties, management and available services. In addition, all patients at a single centre were given a questionnaire to determine the experiences of children and their families. Sixteen of 28 centres responded, caring for a total of 111 UK children. Seven children had experienced life-threatening crises. One-third of patients were on long-term prophylactic medication, including C1 inhibitor prophylaxis in four children. Eight centres reported patients who were initially misdiagnosed. Broad differences in management were noted, particularly regarding indications for long-term prophylaxis and treatment monitoring. We also noted substantial variation in the organization of services between centres, including the number of consultants contributing to patient care, the availability of specialist nurses, the availability of home therapy training and the provision of patient information. Ten of 12 patient/carer questionnaires were returned, identifying three common themes: the need to access specialist knowledge, the importance of home therapy and concerns around the direct effect of angioedema on their life. To our knowledge, this study represents the first dedicated survey of paediatric HAE services in the United Kingdom and provides useful information to inform the optimization of services. PMID:25113655

  10. GP IIb/IIIa Blockade During Peripheral Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Tepe, Gunnar Wiskirchen, Jakub; Pereira, Philippe; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephen; Duda, Stephan H.

    2008-01-15

    The activation of the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor is the final and common pathway in platelet aggregation. By blocking this receptor, platelet aggregation can be inhibited independently of the stimulus prompted the targeting of this receptor. Several years ago, three drugs have been approved for coronary artery indications. Since that time, there is increasing evidence that GP IIb/IIIa receptor blockade might have also an important role in peripheral arterial intervention. This article summarizes the action and differences of GP Ilb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and its possible indication in peripheral arteries.

  11. Understanding and Predicting Social Media Use Among Community Health Center Patients: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of social media by health care organizations is growing and provides Web-based tools to connect patients, caregivers, and providers. Objective The aim was to determine the use and factors predicting the use of social media for health care–related purposes among medically underserved primary care patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 444 patients of a federally qualified community health center. Results Community health center patients preferred that their providers use email, cell phones for texting, and Facebook and cell phone apps for sharing health information. Significantly more Hispanic than white patients believed their providers should use Facebook (P=.001), YouTube (P=.01), and Twitter (P=.04) for sharing health information. Use and intentions to use social media for health-related purposes were significantly higher for those patients with higher subjective norm scores. Conclusions Understanding use and factors predicting use can increase adoption and utilization of social media for health care–related purposes among underserved patients in community health centers. PMID:25427823

  12. Towards Patient-Oriented Diabetes Care: Results from Two KORA Surveys in Southern Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Renée; Meisinger, Christa; Holle, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to examine the relationship of diabetes care processes and patient outcomes with an expanded set of indicators regarding patient-oriented care delivery, such as treatment satisfaction, the quality of patient-physician relationship, and a wider range of patient outcomes such as self-management, health behaviour, disease-related burden, and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Methods. The study population consisted of 486 participants with type 2 diabetes in two population-based follow-up surveys, conducted in 2003 to 2005 and 2006 to 2008 in Southern Germany. Data were self-reported and questionnaire-based, including the SF-12 for HRQL. Multiple regression models were used to identify associations between care processes and outcomes with adjustment for confounders. Results. Frequent medical examinations increased the likelihood of self-monitoring activities, such as foot care. A positive patient experienced relationship with their physician is associated with higher adherence to medical recommendations, such as medication intake, and the score of the SF-12 mental component. Participants with diabetes-related complications reported higher levels of medical examinations and multiprofessional care. Conclusions. Indicators of patient-oriented care should become an indispensable part of diabetes clinical practice guidelines with the aim of striving for more effective support of patients. PMID:25859544

  13. Internet use by patients with bipolar disorder: Results from an international multisite survey.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Yw; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Del Zompo, Maria; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Lund, Anne Hvenegaard; Misiak, Blazej; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'Donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Piotrowski, Patryk; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-08-30

    There is considerable international interest in online education of patients with bipolar disorder, yet little understanding of how patients use the Internet and other sources to seek information. 1171 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in 17 countries completed a paper-based, anonymous survey. 81% of the patients used the Internet, a percentage similar to the general public. Older age, less education, and challenges in country telecommunications infrastructure and demographics decreased the odds of using the Internet. About 78% of the Internet users looked online for information on bipolar disorder or 63% of the total sample. More years of education in relation to the country mean, and feeling very confident about managing life decreased the odds of seeking information on bipolar disorder online, while having attended support groups increased the odds. Patients who looked online for information on bipolar disorder consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 2.3 other information sources such as books, physician handouts, and others with bipolar disorder. Patients not using the Internet consulted medical professionals plus a mean of 1.6 other information sources. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who use the Internet is about the same as the general public. Other information sources remain important. PMID:27391371

  14. Survey of Canadian chiropractors’ involvement in the treatment of patients under the age of 18

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Marja J; Papadopoulos, Costa

    1999-01-01

    Background: There is limited information about the degree of Canadian chiropractors’ involvement in treating patients under the age of 18. Study Objective: To determine how frequently and for what reasons chiropractors treat patients under the age of 18. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 1,200 Canadian chiropractors. In addition to completing a questionnaire, chiropractors were asked to keep a diary for one month indicating how many children under the age of 18 they had seen and for what reason. Results: Fifty-nine percent completed the questionnaire and 48% the diaries. Almost all chiropractors were involved in treating patients under the age of 18. The older the patients, the more likely chiropractors were to treat them. The diary data show consistently lower involvement in treating patients under age 18 than the questionnaires. Differences were smaller, the older the patient. Questionnaire and diary data show that chiropractors see these patients mostly for musculoskeletal conditions. However, chiropractors overestimated the frequency of treating children with colic, menstrual complaints and immune system conditions on the questionnaire. Major geographic differences were found. Eighty-six percent of chiropractors expressed interest in more training in this field. Conclusion: These data provide important baseline data for further studies and suggest the importance of further training.

  15. [Some problems for dosage form based on questionnaire surveying compliance in patients taking tamsulosin hydrochloride].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Ikuko; Yamasaki, Keishi; Tsuruda, Atsuko; Tsuzaki, Shoichiro; Ishimatsu, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Seo, Hakaru

    2008-02-01

    After the dosage form of tamsulosin hydrochloride was changed from a capsule to on orally disintegrating tablet (ODT, Harnal D), we often received patient complaints and noted an increase in noncompliance with medication regimens. The change in dosage form appeared to cause poor compliance by patients who had become accustomed to the light pink/white capsule over many years. Therefore, we carried out a questionnaire survey of patients taking the ODT form to determine the effects of changing the dosage form and the usefulness of the ODT. Most (92%) of respondents took the ODT with water. In addition, 16% missed taking the medicine after the change in dosage form. ODT is a dosage form that is easy to take for patient with dysphagia, or those on restricted water intake. However, it appears that elderly men and patients with visual disorders cannot distinguish the ODT from other medicines and this affects patient compliance. In conclusion, all pharmaceutical companies should consider the design of medications in terms of coloration, indications, or shape in anticipation of the aging society in future, so that patients can distinguish them. Furthermore, sufficient pharmaceutical care is needed to improve both compliance and safety management for the elderly. PMID:18239377

  16. A survey of nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Hemmat, Faezeh; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, Foroozan; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Zayeri, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is considered as the most important quality for healthcare. One of the main factors that play an important role in the promotion of healthcare institutes is patient safety. This study describes the nurses’ awareness of patient safety culture in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, 83 nurses working in neonatal intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were selected using purposive sampling. Data collection tools consisted of the demographic characteristics questionnaire and the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Data were analyzed by using SPSS software. Results: The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was “expectations and actions of the supervisor/manager in promoting safety culture.” The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was “frequency of error reporting.” 21.70% of the NICU nurses reported one or two incidents in their work units in the previous 12 months. Conclusions: In order to create and promote patient safety, appropriate management of resources and a correct understanding of patient safety culture are required. In this way, awareness of dimensions which are not acceptable provides the basic information necessary for improving patient safety. PMID:26257806

  17. Survey of abuse and violence by patients and relatives towards intensive care staff.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J; Appelboam, R; McQuillan, P J

    2003-09-01

    A postal survey of senior nurses in intensive care units in England and Wales was conducted. The aim was to ascertain the frequency of abusive and violent behaviour by patients and relatives towards intensive care staff, discover the perceived causes, effects and documentation of such behaviour and define the current and proposed security arrangements for intensive care units. Response rate was 94%. During the study period, verbal abuse of nurses by patients and by relatives occurred in 87% and 74% of intensive care units, respectively. The relevant figures for doctors were 65% and 59%, respectively. Nurses experienced physical abuse by patients and by relatives in at least 77% and 17% of intensive care units, respectively (doctors 38% and 8%). Illness was the main perceived cause of offences by patients whereas 'distress' (45%), alcohol (24%), sociopathic behaviour (27%) were the main putative causes amongst relatives. Whilst 43% of intensive care units have no security system at the door, staff awareness, training and communication skills may be the principle tools in reducing the frequency and consequences of violent and abusive behaviour. This survey probably underestimates the problem. PMID:12911365

  18. A survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus affecting patients in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S; Kerr, G E; Mackintosh, C A; Marples, R R

    1990-07-01

    For a six-month period between October 1987 and March 1988, 660 isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from 570 patients were sent to the Staphylococcus Reference Laboratory at Colindale to supplement the National reporting survey of MRSA in England and Wales. The isolates were characterized by phage typing, antibiotic susceptibility and by selected biochemical tests. Patient details were also surveyed. Fourteen strains affected more than one hospital and were called multi-hospital epidemic strains. One strain, EMRSA-1, accounted for more than 40% of isolates and of patients. Other epidemic strains were defined. Ten additional strains were restricted to single hospitals. Only 25 primary isolates were non-typable but 67 sporadic typable strains occurred. The patients affected were approximately equally either infected or colonized. The sexes were represented equally. Orthopaedic and geriatric wards were over-represented. Epidemic strains were clumping factor positive while some sporadic strains were weak producers. Urea alkalinization and protein A production could supplement phage typing and antibiotic resistance in strain recognition. PMID:1974905

  19. Access to and utilisation of GP services among Burmese migrants in London: a cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An estimated 10,000 Burmese migrants are currently living in London. No studies have been conducted on their access to health services. Furthermore, most studies on migrants in the United Kingdom (UK) have been conducted at the point of service provision, carrying the risk of selection bias. Our cross-sectional study explored access to and utilisation of General Practice (GP) services by Burmese migrants residing in London. Methods We used a mixed-method approach: a quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires was complemented by qualitative in-depth interviews for developing the questionnaire and triangulating the findings of the survey. Overall, 137 questionnaires were received (a response rate of 57%) and 11 in-depth interviews conducted. The main outcome variables of the study included GP registration, barriers towards registration, GP consultations, barriers towards consultations, and knowledge on entitlements to health care. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, association tests, and a multivariate analysis using logistic regression. The qualitative information was analysed using content analysis. Results The respondents were young, of roughly equal gender (51.5% female), well educated, and had a fair level of knowledge on health services in the UK. Although the GP registration rate was relatively high (80%, 109 out of 136), GP service utilisation during the last episode of illness, at 56.8% (54 out of 95), was low. The statistical analysis showed that age being younger than 35 years, lacking prior overseas experience, having an unstable immigration status, having a shorter duration of stay, and resorting to self-medication were the main barriers hindering Burmese migrants from accessing primary health care services. These findings were corroborated by the in-depth interviews. Conclusions Our study found that having formal access to primary health care was not sufficient to ensure GP registration and health

  20. Cbl-b inhibits P-gp transporter function by preventing its translocation into caveolae in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Teng, Yuee; Li, Zhi; Xu, Ling; Liu, Jing; Ma, Yanju; Fan, Yibo; Li, Ce; Liu, Shizhou; Wang, Zhenning; Hu, Xuejun; Zhang, Jingdong; Liu, Yunpeng

    2015-01-01

    The transport function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) requires its efficient localization to caveolae, a subset of lipid rafts, and disruption of caveolae suppresses P-gp transport function. However, the regulatory molecules involved in the translocation of P-gp into caveolae remain unknown. In the present study, we showed that c-Src dependent Caveolin-1 phosphorylation promoted the translocation of P-gp into caveolae, resulting in multidrug resistance in adriamycin resistant gastric cancer SGC7901/Adr and breast cancer MCF-7/Adr cells. In a negative feedback loop, the translocation of Cbl-b from the nucleus to the cytoplasm prevented the localization of P-gp to caveolae resulting in the reversal of MDR through the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Src. Clinical data showed a significant positive relationship between Cbl-b expression and survival in P-gp positive breast cancer patients who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Our findings identified a new regulatory mechanism of P-gp transport function in multiple drug-resistant gastric and breast cancers. PMID:25788263

  1. Investigating coping strategies and social support among Canadian melanoma patients: A survey approach.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, Melanie; Cyr, Annette; Gregorio, Nancy; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Complex support needs are involved in coping with a diagnosis of melanoma. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived social support levels and utilization of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies by Canadian melanoma patients. The impact of social support level on coping strategy utilization was also examined. Social support and coping strategies were assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) and the 28-item Brief COPE, respectively. Perceived levels of emotional/informational support were significantly lower than affectionate support and positive social interaction. Acceptance, active coping, and use of emotional support were the most frequently utilized coping strategies. Patients with higher perceived levels of social support had significantly higher adaptive coping scores than patients with lower levels of social support. Health care professionals have an important role in promoting awareness of and access to emotional and informational support resources in order to improve perceived social support levels. PMID:26642495

  2. The patient as a radioactive source: an intercomparison of survey meters for measurements in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Uhrhan, K; Drzezga, A; Sudbrock, F

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the radiation exposure in nuclear medicine is evaluated by measuring dose rates in the proximity of patients and those in close contact to sources like capsules and syringes. A huge number of different survey meters (SMs) are offered commercially. This topic has recently gained interest since dosemeters and active personal dosemeters (APD) for the new dose quantities (ambient and directional dose equivalent) have become available. One main concern is the practical use of SMs and APD in daily clinical routines. Therefore, the radiation field of four common radiopharmaceuticals containing (18)F, (90)Y, (99m)Tc and (131)I in radioactive sources or after application to the patient was determined. Measurements were carried out with different SMs and for several distances. Dose rates decline significantly with the distance to the patient, and with some restrictions, APD can be used as SMs. PMID:25071244

  3. Nutritional survey of patients in a general surgical ward: is there an effective predictor of malnutrition?

    PubMed Central

    Neithercut, W D; Smith, A D; McAllister, J; La Ferla, G

    1987-01-01

    A survey of patients in a general surgical ward was undertaken to establish biochemical and anthropometric standards which could be used to detect malnourished patients in hospital. Results of biochemical and anthropometric tests of nutritional status were compared with assessment by a clinician and the quick nutritional index of Seltzer. Triceps skinfold thickness and serum albumin concentrations indicated that 29% and 35% of patients, respectively, were undernourished compared with 16% by clinical assessment and 17% by the quick nutritional index. Significant correlations (p less than 0.001) between serum albumin and transferrin concentrations and arm muscle area were found for men but not for women. Poor nutritional specificity and sensitivity of some anthropometric and biochemical tests may account for the difference in the level of undernutrition found by these tests and clinical assessment. This shows the importance of the choice of test in influencing the level of undernutrition detected. PMID:3624502

  4. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care. PMID:23701200

  5. Designing cobalt chromium removable partial dentures for patients with shortened dental arches: a pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Nassani, M Z; Devlin, H; Tarakji, B; McCord, J F

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this survey was to investigate the quality of prescription for the fabrication of cobalt chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs) that are used to extend the shortened dental arches (SDAs). A survey of four commercial dental laboratories located in northern England was conducted. The target of this survey was cobalt chromium RPDs that were requested to restore SDAs comprising the anterior teeth and 2-4 premolars. Dentists' prescriptions were scrutinised, and a special data collection form was completed accordingly. A total of 94 dentists' prescriptions and associated SDA casts were examined. Almost all the requested cobalt chromium RPDs were clasp-retained RPDs (97%). Scrutinising the 91 prescriptions for clasp-retained cobalt chromium RPDs showed that dentists' prescriptions did not have any instructions about the design of the partial denture in a considerable proportion of the cases (32%). Teeth to be clasped were identified clearly in 45% of the prescriptions. A majority of the dentists (64%) failed to provide any instructions about the design of the rests to be placed on the most posterior premolar abutment teeth. A considerable proportion of the dentists delegated the task of selecting the type of the major connector to the dental technician (41%). Only 21 (23%) of the examined casts had clearly defined rest seat preparation. The outcome of this pilot survey shows inadequate quality of prescription in designing RPDs for patients with SDAs. This finding has an ethical and clinical bearing and does not fit with current legal guidelines relevant to designing RPDs. PMID:21175736

  6. Health behaviors and their correlates among participants in the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey

    PubMed Central

    Müllerová, Hana; Landis, Sarah H; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Davis, Kourtney J; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M; Maskell, Joe; Menezes, Ana M; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Tabberer, Maggie; Han, MeiLan K

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims We used data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey to test the hypothesis that patients with COPD who report less engagement with their disease management are also more likely to report greater impact of the disease. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 4,343 subjects aged ≥40 years from 12 countries, fulfilling a case definition of COPD based on self-reported physician diagnosis or symptomatology. The impact of COPD was measured with COPD Assessment Test, modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale, and hospital admissions and emergency department visits for COPD in the prior year. The 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13) instrument and the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were used to measure patient disease engagement and medication adherence, respectively. Results Twenty-eight percent of subjects reported being either disengaged or struggling with their disease (low engagement: PAM-13 levels 1 and 2), and 35% reported poor adherence (MMAS-8 <6). In univariate analyses, lower PAM-13 and MMAS-8 scores were significantly associated with poorer COPD-specific health status, greater breathlessness and lower BMI (PAM-13 only), less satisfaction with their doctor’s management of COPD, and more emergency department visits. In multivariate regression models, poor satisfaction with their doctor’s management of COPD was significantly associated with both low PAM-13 and MMAS-8 scores; low PAM-13 scores were additionally independently associated with higher COPD Assessment Test and modified Medical Research Council scores and low BMI (underweight). Conclusion Poor patient engagement and medication adherence are frequent and associated with worse COPD-specific health status, higher health care utilization, and lower satisfaction with health care providers. More research will be needed to better understand what factors can be modified to improve medication adherence and

  7. Binding of Full-Length HIV-1 gp120 to CD4 Induces Structural Reorientation around the gp120 Core

    SciTech Connect

    Ashish,F.; Garg, R.; Anguita, J.; Krueger, J.

    2006-01-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering data on the unliganded full-length fully glycosylated HIV-1 gp120, the soluble CD4 (domains 1-2) receptor and their complex in solution are presented. Ab initio structure restorations using these data provides the first look at the envelope shape for the unliganded and the complexed gp120 molecule. Fitting known crystal structures of the unliganded SIV and the complexed HIV gp120 core regions within our resultant shape constraints reveals movement of the V3 loop upon binding.

  8. How we do it: analysing GP referral priorities: the unforeseen effect of 'Choose and Book'.

    PubMed

    Pothier, D D; Repanos, C; Awad, Z

    2006-08-01

    The introduction of Choose and Book may have a significant effect on the proportion of urgent referrals seen by ENT surgeons. Much of the responsibility for prioritisation will be transferred to the GP. Patients who are considered urgent by the ENT surgeon will be added to those considered urgent by the GP. Our results show that there was little agreement between GPs and ENT surgeon on what constitutes an urgent referral. The combined effect of joint prioritisation and the removal of the 'soon' category resulted in a 270% increase in 'urgent' referrals in our sample. This potentially unforeseen consequence of the Choose and Book system should be taken into consideration by ENT departments to allow for an expansion of the 'urgent' category. PMID:16911656

  9. Physical Therapy Management for Adult Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Canadian Practice Survey

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cathy M.; Jackson, Jennifer; Lucy, S. Deborah; Prendergast, Monique; Sinclair, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine current Canadian physical therapy practice for adult patients requiring routine care following cardiac surgery. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted of a selected sample (n=18) of Canadian hospitals performing cardiac surgery to determine cardiorespiratory care, mobility, exercises, and education provided to patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Results: An average of 21 cardiac surgeries per week (range: 6–42) were performed, with an average length of stay of 6.4 days (range: 4.0–10.6). Patients were seen preoperatively at 7 of 18 sites and on postoperative day 1 (POD-1) at 16 of 18 sites. On POD-1, 16 sites performed deep breathing and coughing, 7 used incentive spirometers, 13 did upper-extremity exercises, and 12 did lower-extremity exercises. Nine sites provided cardiorespiratory treatment on POD-3. On POD-1, patients were dangled at 17 sites and mobilized out of bed at 13. By POD-3, patients ambulated 50–120 m per session 2–5 times per day. Sternal precautions were variable, but the lifting limit was reported as ranging between 5 lb and 10 lb. Conclusions: Canadian physical therapists reported the provision of cardiorespiratory treatment after POD-1. According to current available evidence, this level of care may be unnecessary for uncomplicated patients following cardiac surgery. In addition, some sites provide cardiorespiratory treatment techniques that are not supported by evidence in the literature. Further research is required. PMID:21629599

  10. Attitudes toward the care of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A survey of community internists.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A A; Watson-Abady, J A; Mandel, F S

    1990-01-01

    Community physicians may play an increasing role in treating patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) because of the shift away from inpatient care. At a community hospital in New York, NY, we surveyed 230 attending physicians in a department of medicine to determine their attitudes toward the care of patients with AIDS. Factor analysis produced three clusters of attitudes termed antipathy, liability, and isolation. These factors, together with physicians' "knowledge" and background, were analyzed as predictors of treating patients with AIDS. While antipathy, isolation, and fear of acquiring AIDS were not predictors, liability scores were inversely correlated with the likelihood of treating the disease (r = -.18). Liability was influenced by patients' attitudes toward AIDS. Primary care physicians had higher liability and isolation scores than subspecialists and were more likely to see support groups, guaranteed funding, and education as incentives to treat patients with AIDS. Further study is needed to target measures that support primary care physicians in their care of patients with this disease. PMID:2297299

  11. Is therapeutic judgement influenced by the patient's socio-economic status? A factorial vignette survey.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Esben Elholm; Morville, Anne-Le; Larsen, Anette Enemark; Hansen, Tina

    2016-07-01

    Background In Denmark patients are entitled to rehabilitation regardless of socio-economic status (SES). During this process therapists have to balance cost effectiveness with providing equal treatment. Aim To investigate whether occupational therapists and physiotherapists were influenced by the patient's SES. Material and method An experimental factorial vignette survey was used. Four different vignettes describing fictitious patient cases with different SES variables were randomly allocated to therapists working in somatic hospitals. Thereafter, the therapists judged specific clinical situations and general attitudes in relation to the patient's SES. Chi-square was used to test the statistical association between the variables. Results No statistically significant associations were found between the specific clinical situations and the patient's SES. A statistical significant association was found between general attitudes and the patient's SES. Subgroup analysis revealed a statistically significant association between the therapist's gender, age, and the therapeutic judgement in relation to SES. Conclusion In the specific clinical situations, Danish therapists seem to maintain their professional ethical principles, although they might face ethical dilemmas during their clinical decision-making. In order to prevent and resolve these dilemmas, they have to be made explicit. However, further research on how SES influences the health care professional's judgement is warranted. PMID:26982521

  12. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients. PMID:20135072

  13. Describing team development within a novel GP-led urgent care centre model: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Igantowicz, Agnieszka; Gnani, Shamini; Greenfield, Geva

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urgent care centres (UCCs) co-located within an emergency department were developed to reduce the numbers of inappropriate emergency department admissions. Since then various UCC models have developed, including a novel general practitioner (GP)-led UCC that incorporates both GPs and emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs). Traditionally these two groups do not work alongside each other within an emergency setting. Although good teamwork is crucial to better patient outcomes, there is little within the literature about the development of a team consisting of different healthcare professionals in a novel healthcare setting. Our aim was therefore to describe staff members' perspectives of team development within the GP-led UCC model. Design Open-ended semistructured interviews, analysed using thematic content analysis. Setting GP-led urgent care centres in two academic teaching hospitals in London. Participants 15 UCC staff members including six GPs, four ENPs, two receptionists and three managers. Results Overall participants were positive about the interprofessional team that had developed and recognised that this process had taken time. Hierarchy within the UCC setting has diminished with time, although some residual hierarchical beliefs do appear to remain. Staff appreciated interdisciplinary collaboration was likely to improve patient care. Eight key facilitating factors for the team were identified: appointment of leaders, perception of fair workload, education on roles/skill sets and development of these, shared professional understanding, interdisciplinary working, ED collaboration, clinical guidelines and social interactions. Conclusions A strong interprofessional team has evolved within the GP-led UCCs over time, breaking down traditional professional divides. Future implementation of UCC models should pro-actively incorporate the eight facilitating factors identified from the outset, to enable effective teams to develop more quickly. PMID:27338875

  14. Assessing Anticoagulation Practice Patterns in Patients on Durable Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices: An International Survey.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Douglas L; Horn, Edward T; Lyster, Haifa; Panos, Anthony L; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J; Lehmkuhl, Hans B; Perez, Alexandra; Shullo, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation in mechanical circulatory support (MCS) patients dictated by local practice, and therefore uniform standards for management are lacking. To characterize the worldwide variance in anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in patients with MCS devices, a 42 item survey was created and distributed electronically in August 2014. The survey assessed the center-perceived thromboembolic risk (minimal, low, moderate, or high) and characterized the antiplatelet and anticoagulant strategies for the Thoratec HeartMate II (HMII) and HeartWare HVAD (HVAD). A total of 83/214 centers (39%) responded: North America (60/152), Europe (18/50), Australia (2/4), and Asia (3/8). Although the most common target international normalized ratio (INR) was 2-3 for both devices, significant variability exists. Anticoagulation intensity tended to be lower with the HMII, with more centers targeting INR values of less than 2.5. Aspirin monotherapy was the most common antiplatelet regimen; however, the HVAD patients were more likely to be on daily aspirin doses over 100 mg. In addition, parenteral bridging was more frequent with the HVAD device. While 43.8% of respondents indicated an increase in the perceived risk of HMII device thrombosis in 2014, intensification of anticoagulation (22%) or antiplatelet (11%) therapy was infrequent. Our findings verify the wide variety of anticoagulation practice patterns between MCS centers. PMID:26309097

  15. Are rehabilitation services for patients in UK eye clinics adequate? A survey of eye care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie-Gallery, H; Conway, M L; Subramanian, A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine whether specific services such as emotional and family support are currently available in the United Kingdom for people with visual impairment. Methods A validated online survey was created and distributed to clinical staff in eye clinics (for example, ophthalmologists and optometrists) and rehabilitation staff (for example, social and rehabilitation workers) in the community, who worked with people with visual impairment. A total of 67 clinical and 42 rehabilitation staff completed the entire survey online. Results Only 67% of the respondents claimed their clinics provide emotional support and 44% of respondent's clinics provided family support. Clinical and rehabilitation staff have differences in opinion over what constitutes an essential service for a visually impaired patient. Rehabilitation staff considered emotional support and referral to social services as essential more often than clinical staff (P<0.05). There is some confusion over the type of personnel who provides each type of service, with some services showing substantial repetition. Conclusion In the clinics sampled, there appears to be an underprovision of emotional support (attentive listening plus constructive suggestions) and family support (emotional support and advice for family members) for visually impaired patients in the United Kingdom. There also seems to be some discrepancy in services that eye care professionals feel are available and previous reports by visually impaired patients of the service they receive. There is a need to develop standardised pathways across the United Kingdom, to solve some of these issues. PMID:22814804

  16. Development and applicability of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient safety culture at healthcare organizations plays an important role in guaranteeing, improving and promoting overall patient safety. Although several conceptual frameworks have been proposed in the past, no standard measurement tool has yet been developed for Japan. Methods In order to examine possibilities to introduce the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) in Japan, the authors of this study translated the HSOPS into Japanese, and evaluated its factor structure, internal consistency, and construct validity. Healthcare workers (n = 6,395) from 13 acute care general hospitals in Japan participated in this survey. Results Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the Japanese HSOPS' 12-factor model was selected as the most pertinent, and showed a sufficiently high standard partial regression coefficient. The internal reliability of the subscale scores was 0.46-0.88. The construct validity of each safety culture sub-dimension was confirmed by polychoric correlation, and by an ordered probit analysis. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that the factor structures of the Japanese and the American HSOPS are almost identical, and that the Japanese HSOPS has acceptable levels of internal reliability and construct validity. This shows that the HSOPS can be introduced in Japan. PMID:21294920

  17. Patient safety education at Japanese medical schools: results of a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient safety education, including error prevention strategies and management of adverse events, has become a topic of worldwide concern. The importance of the patient safety is also recognized in Japan following two serious medical accidents in 1999. Furthermore, educational curriculum guideline revisions in 2008 by relevant the Ministry of Education includes patient safety as part of the core medical curriculum. However, little is known about the patient safety education in Japanese medical schools partly because a comprehensive study has not yet been conducted in this field. Therefore, we have conducted a nationwide survey in order to clarify the current status of patient safety education at medical schools in Japan. Results Response rate was 60.0% (n = 48/80). Ninety-eight-percent of respondents (n = 47/48) reported integration of patient safety education into their curricula. Thirty-nine percent reported devoting less than five hours to the topic. All schools that teach patient safety reported use of lecture based teaching methods while few used alternative methods, such as role-playing or in-hospital training. Topics related to medical error theory and legal ramifications of error are widely taught while practical topics related to error analysis such as root cause analysis are less often covered. Conclusions Based on responses to our survey, most Japanese medical schools have incorporated the topic of patient safety into their curricula. However, the number of hours devoted to the patient safety education is far from the sufficient level with forty percent of medical schools that devote five hours or less to it. In addition, most medical schools employ only the lecture based learning, lacking diversity in teaching methods. Although most medical schools cover basic error theory, error analysis is taught at fewer schools. We still need to make improvements to our medical safety curricula. We believe that this study has the implications for

  18. Patient Safety Competence of Nursing Students in Saudi Arabia: A Self-Reported Survey

    PubMed Central

    Colet, Paolo C.; Cruz, Jonas P.; Cruz, Charlie P.; Al-otaibi, Jazi; Qubeilat, Hikmet; Alquwez, Nahed

    2015-01-01

    Objective With the growing recognition of the significance of patient safety (PS) in educational institutions and health organizations, it is essential to understand the perspective of nursing students on their own PS competence. This study analyzed the self-reported PS competence of nursing students at a government university in Saudi Arabia. Methodology A cross-sectional self-reported survey of 191 respondents, using the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey (H-PEPSS) was conducted. The survey tool reflected 6 key socio-cultural dimensions assessing competence in classroom and clinical setting. Results Female nursing students reported higher PS competence in both the classroom and clinical settings along the dimensions ‘working in teams’ and ‘communicating effectively’ while males reported higher competence in both settings as to the ‘managing safety risks’ and ‘understanding human and environmental factors’ dimensions. The respondents’ academic level and self–reported PS competence have weak negative correlation in the classroom while a strong negative correlation between the 2 variables existed in the clinical setting. Self-reported PS competence for the dimensions ‘working in teams’, ‘recognize and respond to remove immediate risks of harm’, and ‘culture of safety’ is significantly higher in classroom than in the clinical setting. Conclusion Generally, the Saudi nursing students reported varying levels of competence in the six dimensions of patient safety. Significant gap between the perceived PS competence was observed between learning settings. Educational and training interventions are suggested for implementation to bridge this gap. PMID:26715921

  19. A survey of patients and providers at free clinics across the United States.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Alida Maria; Frank, Scott; Blixen, Carol E

    2011-02-01

    This study set out to demonstrate the need for free clinics on a national level, to identify difference among types of free clinics in the US, to identify which services were commonly used, and to determine where else patients would seek care if not at the free clinics. Two separate, distinct surveys were sent out, one to free clinic directors and another to free clinic patients. Chi-squared tests, two tailed t-tests, and percentages were used to describe results and significant differences. 1,114 free clinics were identified in the US. 172 free clinics and 362 patients responded. Most clinics (44%) were independent. A mean of 4,310 annual visits was reported. Most patients used primary care (86%) and pharmacy (80%) services. If the free clinic did not exist, 24% would not seek care, 21% due to cost. Most would seek care at another free clinic (47%), or the emergency room (23%). Most patients were satisfied with their care at the free clinic (97%). Patient satisfaction correlated with use of primary care (P = 0.0143). Most patients (77%) reported greater satisfaction with the care they received at the free clinic than with their prior care. Free clinics provide primary care to a substantial number of uninsured and working poor. They provide an alternative to patients who might otherwise seek primary care in the emergency room. Even with reform of the national health care system, free clinics will provide primary care to millions of uninsured. How they will adapt to provide this care is yet to be seen. PMID:20532596

  20. A survey of outcome of adjustable suture as first operation in patients with strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Razmjoo, Hasan; Attarzadeh, Hosein; Karbasi, Najmeh; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Salam, Hasan; Jamshidi, Aliraza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adjustable suture used for years to improve the outcome of strabismus surgery. We surveyed outcome of our patients with strabismus who underwent adjustable suture. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was performed at Ophthalmology Centre of Feiz Hospital in Isfahan on 95 participants that candidate for adjustable suture strabismus surgery. Patients were divided into three age groups: Under 10 years, 10-19 years, and 20 years and over. Outcome of adjustable suture surgery consequence of residual postoperative deviation was divided into four groups: Excellent, good, acceptable, and unacceptable. Results: Out of 95 patients studied, 51 (53.7%) were males and 44 (46.3%) were females. The mean of deviation angles were 53.8 ± 17.9 PD (Prism dioptres) in alt XT, 44.5 ± 12 PD in alt ET and 52 ± 13.5 PD in const ET, 47.1 ± 13.1PD in cons XT, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups (P = 0.051). Results of surgery were in 38 patients (40%) excellent, in 31 patients (32.6%) good, in 19 patients (20%) acceptable, and in 7 patients (7.4%) unacceptable. Seven (7.4%) patients required reoperation. Conclusions: In the present study, the frequency of re-operation was much lower than other similar studies (7.4% vs. 30-50%). This suggests that the adjustable technique that used in our study can be associated with lower reoperation than other adjustable techniques used in the other similar studies. PMID:25250293

  1. Nutrition Screening and Assessment in Hospitalized Patients: A Survey of Current Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vihas; Romano, Michelle; Corkins, Mark R; DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Earthman, Carrie; Malone, Ainsley; Miller, Sarah; Sabino, Kim; Wooley, Jennifer; Guenter, Peggi

    2014-07-01

    Background: The Joint Commission has mandated universal screening and assessment of hospitalized patients for malnutrition since 1995. Although various validated and nonvalidated tools are available, implementation of this mandate has not been well characterized. We report results of a survey of hospital-based professionals in the United States describing their perspective on the current range of nutrition screening and assessment practices as well as associated gaps in knowledge. Methods and Materials: Data from a 2012-2013 cross-sectional, web-based survey targeting members of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses, and the Society of Hospital Medicine were collected with non-hospital-based members excluded. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Survey data from 1777 unique email addresses are included in this report. A majority of respondents were dietitians, nearly half were A.S.P.E.N. members, and 69.4% reported caring for a mix of adult and pediatric patients. Most respondents answered affirmatively about nutrition screening being performed in alignment with The Joint Commission mandate, but only 50% were familiar with the 2012 Consensus Statement from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics/A.S.P.E.N. on adult malnutrition. In most cases, nurses were primarily responsible for nutrition screening, while dietitians had primary responsibility for assessment. No one specific assessment tool or International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was identified as being used a majority of the time in assessing or coding a patient for malnutrition. Conclusions: The survey findings affirmed compliance with accreditation standards in completing a nutrition screen within 24 hours of admission, and most hospitals appear to have a process to perform a nutrition assessment once a screen is completed. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in both use of tools and

  2. The Research Directions Survey: patient and parent perspectives of eating disorder research.

    PubMed

    Witton, N S; Leichner, P; Sandhu-Sahota, P; Filippelli, D

    2007-01-01

    Seventy-two patients and parents completed the "Research Directions Survey" (RDS), consisting of an open-ended question and four rank-ordered lists. The RDS was designed to examine aspects of eating disorders (ED) that these individuals perceive as priorities for future research. The top three themes emerging from the open-ended question were treatment, family dynamics, and motivation for recovery. In the four ranking questions, respondents indicated low self-esteem, weight-related comments, body image distortions, and individual psychotherapy as most important for future research. This paper discusses the implications of our findings and directions for future research in ED. PMID:17520453

  3. Twitter Social Media is an Effective Tool for Breast Cancer Patient Education and Support: Patient-Reported Outcomes by Survey

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported benefits, many women do not attend breast cancer support groups. Abundant online resources for support exist, but information regarding the effectiveness of participation is lacking. We report the results of a Twitter breast cancer support community participant survey. Objective The aim was to determine the effectiveness of social media as a tool for breast cancer patient education and decreasing anxiety. Methods The Breast Cancer Social Media Twitter support community (#BCSM) began in July 2011. Institutional review board approval with a waiver of informed consent was obtained for a deidentified survey that was posted for 2 weeks on Twitter and on the #BCSM blog and Facebook page. Results There were 206 respondents to the survey. In all, 92.7% (191/206) were female. Respondents reported increased knowledge about breast cancer in the following domains: overall knowledge (80.9%, 153/189), survivorship (85.7%, 162/189), metastatic breast cancer (79.4%, 150/189), cancer types and biology (70.9%, 134/189), clinical trials and research (66.1%, 125/189), treatment options (55.6%, 105/189), breast imaging (56.6%, 107/189), genetic testing and risk assessment (53.9%, 102/189), and radiotherapy (43.4%, 82/189). Participation led 31.2% (59/189) to seek a second opinion or bring additional information to the attention of their treatment team and 71.9% (136/189) reported plans to increase their outreach and advocacy efforts as a result of participation. Levels of reported anxiety before and after participation were analyzed: 29 of 43 (67%) patients who initially reported “high or extreme” anxiety reported “low or no” anxiety after participation (P<.001). Also, no patients initially reporting low or no anxiety before participation reported an increase to high or extreme anxiety after participation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients’ perceived knowledge increases and their anxiety decreases by participation in a

  4. Frequency of and predictors for withholding patient safety concerns among oncology staff: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, D L B; Gehring, K

    2015-05-01

    Speaking up about patient safety is vital to avoid errors reaching the patient and to improve a culture of safety. This study investigated the prevalence of non-speaking up despite concerns for safety and aimed to identify predictors for withholding voice among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in oncology. A self-administered questionnaire assessed safety concerns, speaking up beliefs and behaviours among nurses and doctors from nine oncology departments. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors for withholding safety concerns. A total of 1013 HCPs returned the completed survey (response rate 65%). Safety concerns were common among responders. Fifty-four per cent reported to recognise their colleagues making potentially harmful errors at least sometimes. A majority of responders reported at least some episodes of withholding concerns about patient safety. Thirty-seven per cent said they remained silent at least once when they had information that might have helped prevent an incident. Respondents believed that a high level of interpersonal, communication and coping skills are necessary to speak up about patient safety issues at their workplace. Higher levels of perceived advocacy for patient safety and psychological safety significantly decreased the frequency of withholding voice. Remaining silent about safety concerns is a common phenomenon in oncology. Improved strategies are needed to support staff in effective communication and make cancer care safer. PMID:25287114

  5. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    PubMed

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (P<0.001) more money for further courses. The results show the publicly perceived importance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. PMID:22251347

  6. Follow-up Reality for Breast Cancer Patients – Standardised Survey of Patients and Physicians and Analysis of Treatment Data

    PubMed Central

    Feiten, S.; Dünnebacke, J.; Friesenhahn, V.; Heymanns, J.; Köppler, H.; Meister, R.; Thomalla, J.; van Roye, C.; Wey, D.; Weide, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Currently, about 360 000 breast cancer patients who could, after completion of their primary therapy, take advantage of follow-up options are living in Germany. Up to now very little is known about the extent to which the available options are used and as to how the follow-up reality is experienced and evaluated. Thus, an explorative examination among the patients and their physicians was undertaken. Patients and Methods: All patients who underwent surgery in a certified breast centre between 2007 and 2013 received a standardised questionnaire; at the same time the physicians responsible for the follow-up were invited to answer a standardised questionnaire. Results: 920 patients (response rate: 61 %) with a median age of 65 years (32–95) could be analysed. 99 % of the participants stated that they regularly attended follow-ups. The personal contact with the physician (mean value: 4.4) and the reassurance that the cancer disease had not recurred (mean value: 4.5) were described on a scale of 0 to 5 to be two of the most important factors of the follow-up. Deficits were expressed with regard to psychosocial care (70 %) and the perception and treatment of physical complaints (55 %). In addition, 105 physicians returned completed questionnaires (response rate: 12 %). For asymptomatic patients the physicians performed the following examinations most frequently: anamnesis (92 %), physical examination (87 %) as well as laboratory tests (63 %) and tumour marker determinations (40 %). Conclusion: On the whole it became clear that the vast majority of the patients took advantage of the follow-up options. From the patientʼs perspective the importance of the follow-up lies in contact to the physician and the comforting assurance that the breast cancer has not relapsed. Deficits are seen in the psychosocial care and the perception and treatment of physical impairments. Not recommended examinations were employed by a significant proportion of

  7. Quality and coordination of care for patients with multiple conditions: results from an international survey of patient experience.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Jako S; Voerman, Gerlienke E; Grol, Richard; Faber, Marjan J; Schneider, Eric C

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies using clinical performance measures suggest that quality of care for patients with multiple chronic conditions is not worse than that for others. This article presents patient-reported experiences of health care among 8,973 of chronically ill adults from eight countries, using telephone survey data. We designed a ''morbidity score'' combining the number of conditions and reported health status. Respondents with high morbidity scores reported less favorable experience with coordination of care compared to those with low morbidity scores. They also reported lower ratings of overall quality of care. There were no differences in reported experience with the individual physicians. Comparing type of comorbidity, chronic lung, and mental health problems were associated with lower ratings than hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed in the context of health care reform. Pay-for-performance programs need to account for chronic conditions to avoid penalizing physicians who care for larger shares of such patients. PMID:20801976

  8. Identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against GP73 for use as a potential biomarker in liver cancer screening and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuming; Xi, Yun; Fang, Jianmin; Luo, Shuhong; Wilson, Jarad J; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2016-01-01

    Golgi membrane protein 1, or GP73, is recently being evaluated as a novel cancer biomarker against prostate cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the microenvironment of HCC, GP73 expression levels are significantly elevated. It is this elevation that may prove more specific and sensitive for HCC detection than that of the traditional biomarker, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). This may be especially true if it can be measured and identified earlier in the diagnostic process. We sought to develop a testing platform to measure GP73 levels for the purposes of earlier diagnostic screening of at risk patients. We expressed recombinant GP73 protein to use as an immunogen in order to develop several monoclonal anti-GP73 antibodies. Three clones, 1D7, 2B2, and 5B4, were identified with all three having a higher than 1:5,000,000 titer. These clones were then isotyped and validated to bind the immunogen protein. Different combinations of antibody pairs were then tested in order to create a functional sandwich antibody pair. Using this pair on liver disease patient serum samples, we found that GP73 was significantly elevated when compared to healthy control patient serum (P < 0.0001). Average GP73 levels in HCC patients was 284.0 ng/mL, slightly higher than liver disease patients (265.6 ng/mL), and significantly elevated over normal serum levels is (74.86 ng/mL). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) for GP73 to detect liver cancer was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.00; P < 0.0001), and GP73 levels had a sensitivity of 97%, a specificity of 87% for detecting liver cancer. By contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of liver disease detection was 76% and 97%, respectively. We then tested detection of 74 serum samples (n control = 46, n liver disease = 7, n liver cancer = 21) by our ELISA testing methodology and commercial kit simultaneously. The results found that our kit and the commercial kit had a good linear correlation

  9. User views of a regional secure unit--findings from a patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Ford, K; Sweeney, J; Farrington, A

    1999-05-01

    This paper includes key findings of a patient satisfaction survey, conducted within an English Medium Secure Unit, offering care and treatment for 45 male and female mentally disordered offenders. It aims to identify patients' perceptions of the quality of their care and other aspects of their lives within the secure unit. Following permission from the local Ethics Committee, two interviewers collected data within a two week period, using a semi-structured interview schedule. All but three of the respondents agreed to be interviewed. Talking to nurses was perceived as highly satisfying. However, provision for specific cultural and women's needs, facilities for visitors, opportunities to practise religious beliefs and access to care plans were highlighted as unsatisfactory. The study concludes with recommendations for improvement, some of which have already been considered and implemented. PMID:10734845

  10. Patients with protracted pain: A survey conducted at The London Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Jennifer M; Stollar, Thelma D; Littlejohns, David W; Twycross, Robert G; Vere, Duncan W

    1977-01-01

    Physical pain has always been part of human experience, and throughout history it is recorded that doctors and wise men and women have sought to ease pain. The attitudes of those suffering pain, however, have varied from stoical acceptance to sullen endurance. Today, most people consciously seek to avoid pain or to have their pain eased, although they do not always expect what in fact appears to be possible. This study of 13 patients with protracted pain was carried out at The London Hospital by a professional group to see how patients regarded their own pain and the efforts of doctors and nurses to relieve it. The attitudes of the doctors and nurses were also studied, and the results, despite the limitations of the survey, suggest that: [List: see text] PMID:874980