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Sample records for gradient descent learning

  1. Gradient descent learning algorithm overview: a general dynamical systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Baldi, P

    1995-01-01

    Gives a unified treatment of gradient descent learning algorithms for neural networks using a general framework of dynamical systems. This general approach organizes and simplifies all the known algorithms and results which have been originally derived for different problems (fixed point/trajectory learning), for different models (discrete/continuous), for different architectures (forward/recurrent), and using different techniques (backpropagation, variational calculus, adjoint methods, etc.). The general approach can also be applied to derive new algorithms. The author then briefly examines some of the complexity issues and limitations intrinsic to gradient descent learning. Throughout the paper, the author focuses on the problem of trajectory learning. PMID:18263297

  2. Ant colony optimization and stochastic gradient descent.

    PubMed

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Dorigo, Marco

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we study the relationship between the two techniques known as ant colony optimization (ACO) and stochastic gradient descent. More precisely, we show that some empirical ACO algorithms approximate stochastic gradient descent in the space of pheromones, and we propose an implementation of stochastic gradient descent that belongs to the family of ACO algorithms. We then use this insight to explore the mutual contributions of the two techniques. PMID:12171633

  3. Error analysis of stochastic gradient descent ranking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Tang, Yi; Li, Luoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Xuelong; Tang, Yuanyan

    2013-06-01

    Ranking is always an important task in machine learning and information retrieval, e.g., collaborative filtering, recommender systems, drug discovery, etc. A kernel-based stochastic gradient descent algorithm with the least squares loss is proposed for ranking in this paper. The implementation of this algorithm is simple, and an expression of the solution is derived via a sampling operator and an integral operator. An explicit convergence rate for leaning a ranking function is given in terms of the suitable choices of the step size and the regularization parameter. The analysis technique used here is capacity independent and is novel in error analysis of ranking learning. Experimental results on real-world data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in ranking tasks, which verifies the theoretical analysis in ranking error. PMID:24083315

  4. A Gradient Descent Approximation for Graph Cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Alparslan; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    Graph cuts have become very popular in many areas of computer vision including segmentation, energy minimization, and 3D reconstruction. Their ability to find optimal results efficiently and the convenience of usage are some of the factors of this popularity. However, there are a few issues with graph cuts, such as inherent sequential nature of popular algorithms and the memory bloat in large scale problems. In this paper, we introduce a novel method for the approximation of the graph cut optimization by posing the problem as a gradient descent formulation. The advantages of our method is the ability to work efficiently on large problems and the possibility of convenient implementation on parallel architectures such as inexpensive Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). We have implemented the proposed method on the Nvidia 8800GTS GPU. The classical segmentation experiments on static images and video data showed the effectiveness of our method.

  5. Dynamics of the adaptive natural gradient descent method for soft committee machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Masato; Park, Hyeyoung; Okada, Masato

    2004-05-01

    Adaptive natural gradient descent (ANGD) method realizes natural gradient descent (NGD) without needing to know the input distribution of learning data and reduces the calculation cost from a cubic order to a square order. However, no performance analysis of ANGD has been done. We have developed a statistical-mechanical theory of the simplified version of ANGD dynamics for soft committee machines in on-line learning; this method provides deterministic learning dynamics expressed through a few order parameters, even though ANGD intrinsically holds a large approximated Fisher information matrix. Numerical results obtained using this theory were consistent with those of a simulation, with respect not only to the learning curve but also to the learning failure. Utilizing this method, we numerically evaluated ANGD efficiency and found that ANGD generally performs as well as NGD. We also revealed the key condition affecting the learning plateau in ANGD.

  6. Efficient Sensor Placement Optimization Using Gradient Descent and Probabilistic Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh, Vahab; Lévesque, Julien-Charles; Gagné, Christian; Parizeau, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We are proposing an adaptation of the gradient descent method to optimize the position and orientation of sensors for the sensor placement problem. The novelty of the proposed method lies in the combination of gradient descent optimization with a realistic model, which considers both the topography of the environment and a set of sensors with directional probabilistic sensing. The performance of this approach is compared with two other black box optimization methods over area coverage and processing time. Results show that our proposed method produces competitive results on smaller maps and superior results on larger maps, while requiring much less computation than the other optimization methods to which it has been compared. PMID:25196164

  7. Studying the Effect of Adaptive Momentum in Improving the Accuracy of Gradient Descent Back Propagation Algorithm on Classification Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Muhammad Zubair; Nawi, Nazri Mohd.

    Despite being widely used in the practical problems around the world, Gradient Descent Back-propagation algorithm comes with problems like slow convergence and convergence to local minima. Previous researchers have suggested certain modifications to improve the convergence in gradient Descent Back-propagation algorithm such as careful selection of input weights and biases, learning rate, momentum, network topology, activation function and value for 'gain' in the activation function. This research proposed an algorithm for improving the working performance of back-propagation algorithm which is 'Gradient Descent with Adaptive Momentum (GDAM)' by keeping the gain value fixed during all network trials. The performance of GDAM is compared with 'Gradient Descent with fixed Momentum (GDM)' and 'Gradient Descent Method with Adaptive Gain (GDM-AG)'. The learning rate is fixed to 0.4 and maximum epochs are set to 3000 while sigmoid activation function is used for the experimentation. The results show that GDAM is a better approach than previous methods with an accuracy ratio of 1.0 for classification problems like Wine Quality, Mushroom and Thyroid disease.

  8. Efficient Love wave modeling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-02-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a percent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behavior with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  9. Efficient Love wave modelling via Sobolev gradient steepest descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Matt; Ferguson, John; McMechan, George

    2016-05-01

    A new method for finding solutions to ordinary differential equation boundary value problems is introduced, in which Sobolev gradient steepest descent is used to determine eigenfunctions and eigenvalues simultaneously in an iterative scheme. The technique is then applied to the 1-D Love wave problem. The algorithm has several advantages when computing dispersion curves. It avoids the problem of mode skipping, and can handle arbitrary Earth structure profiles in depth. For a given frequency range, computation times scale approximately as the square root of the number of frequencies, and the computation of dispersion curves can be implemented in a fully parallel manner over the modes involved. The steepest descent solutions are within a fraction of a per cent of the analytic solutions for the first 25 modes for a two-layer model. Since all corresponding eigenfunctions are computed along with the dispersion curves, the impact on group and phase velocity of the displacement behaviour with depth is thoroughly examined. The dispersion curves are used to compute synthetic Love wave seismograms that include many higher order modes. An example includes addition of attenuation to a model with a low-velocity zone, with values as low as Q = 20. Finally, a confirming comparison is made with a layer matrix method on the upper 700 km of a whole Earth model.

  10. Memristor-based multilayer neural networks with online gradient descent training.

    PubMed

    Soudry, Daniel; Di Castro, Dotan; Gal, Asaf; Kolodny, Avinoam; Kvatinsky, Shahar

    2015-10-01

    Learning in multilayer neural networks (MNNs) relies on continuous updating of large matrices of synaptic weights by local rules. Such locality can be exploited for massive parallelism when implementing MNNs in hardware. However, these update rules require a multiply and accumulate operation for each synaptic weight, which is challenging to implement compactly using CMOS. In this paper, a method for performing these update operations simultaneously (incremental outer products) using memristor-based arrays is proposed. The method is based on the fact that, approximately, given a voltage pulse, the conductivity of a memristor will increment proportionally to the pulse duration multiplied by the pulse magnitude if the increment is sufficiently small. The proposed method uses a synaptic circuit composed of a small number of components per synapse: one memristor and two CMOS transistors. This circuit is expected to consume between 2% and 8% of the area and static power of previous CMOS-only hardware alternatives. Such a circuit can compactly implement hardware MNNs trainable by scalable algorithms based on online gradient descent (e.g., backpropagation). The utility and robustness of the proposed memristor-based circuit are demonstrated on standard supervised learning tasks. PMID:25594981

  11. Natural gradient learning algorithms for RBF networks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junsheng; Wei, Haikun; Zhang, Chi; Li, Weiling; Guo, Weili; Zhang, Kanjian

    2015-02-01

    Radial basis function (RBF) networks are one of the most widely used models for function approximation and classification. There are many strange behaviors in the learning process of RBF networks, such as slow learning speed and the existence of the plateaus. The natural gradient learning method can overcome these disadvantages effectively. It can accelerate the dynamics of learning and avoid plateaus. In this letter, we assume that the probability density function (pdf) of the input and the activation function are gaussian. First, we introduce natural gradient learning to the RBF networks and give the explicit forms of the Fisher information matrix and its inverse. Second, since it is difficult to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse when the numbers of the hidden units and the dimensions of the input are large, we introduce the adaptive method to the natural gradient learning algorithms. Finally, we give an explicit form of the adaptive natural gradient learning algorithm and compare it to the conventional gradient descent method. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive natural gradient method, which can avoid the plateaus effectively, has a good performance when RBF networks are used for nonlinear functions approximation. PMID:25380332

  12. Comparison of minimum-action and steepest-descent paths in gradient systems.

    PubMed

    Díaz Leines, Grisell; Rogal, Jutta

    2016-02-01

    On high-dimensional and complex potential energy surfaces, the identification of the most likely mechanism for the transition between local minima is a challenging task. Usually the steepest-descent path is used interchangeably with the minimum-energy path and is associated with the most likely path. Here we compare the meaning of the steepest-descent path in complex energy landscapes to the path integral formulation of a trajectory that minimizes the action functional for Brownian dynamics. In particular, for energy landscapes with bifurcation points and multiple minima and saddle points, there can be several steepest-descent paths associated with specific saddles that connect two predetermined states but largely differ from the path of maximum likelihood. The minimum-action path, however, additionally takes into account the scalar work along the trajectory. Minimizing the scalar work can be less ambiguous in the identification of the most likely path in different gradient systems. It can also be used to distinguish between multiple steepest-descent paths that connect reactant and product states. We illustrate that in systems with complex energy landscapes a careful assessment of the steepest-descent path is thus advisable. Here the evaluation of the action can provide valuable information on the analysis and description of the most likely path. PMID:26986352

  13. A new type of descent conjugate gradient method with exact line search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajar, Nurul; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd.; Jusoh, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, conjugate gradient (CG) methods are impressive for solving nonlinear unconstrained optimization problems. In this paper, a new CG method is proposed and analyzed. This new CG method satisfies descent condition and its global convergence is established using exact line search. Numerical results show that this new CG method substantially outperforms the previous CG methods. This new CG method is considered robust, efficient and provided faster and stable convergence.

  14. Fast Automatic Step Size Estimation for Gradient Descent Optimization of Image Registration.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuchuan; van Lew, Baldur; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Staring, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Fast automatic image registration is an important prerequisite for image-guided clinical procedures. However, due to the large number of voxels in an image and the complexity of registration algorithms, this process is often very slow. Stochastic gradient descent is a powerful method to iteratively solve the registration problem, but relies for convergence on a proper selection of the optimization step size. This selection is difficult to perform manually, since it depends on the input data, similarity measure and transformation model. The Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent (ASGD) method is an automatic approach, but it comes at a high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a new computationally efficient method (fast ASGD) to automatically determine the step size for gradient descent methods, by considering the observed distribution of the voxel displacements between iterations. A relation between the step size and the expectation and variance of the observed distribution is derived. While ASGD has quadratic complexity with respect to the transformation parameters, fast ASGD only has linear complexity. Extensive validation has been performed on different datasets with different modalities, inter/intra subjects, different similarity measures and transformation models. For all experiments, we obtained similar accuracy as ASGD. Moreover, the estimation time of fast ASGD is reduced to a very small value, from 40 s to less than 1 s when the number of parameters is 105, almost 40 times faster. Depending on the registration settings, the total registration time is reduced by a factor of 2.5-7 × for the experiments in this paper. PMID:26353367

  15. Nonlinear Performance Seeking Control using Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control and the Method of Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1997-01-01

    Performance Seeking Control (PSC) attempts to find and control the process at the operating condition that will generate maximum performance. In this paper a nonlinear multivariable PSC methodology will be developed, utilizing the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control (FMRLC) and the method of Steepest Descent or Gradient (SDG). This PSC control methodology employs the SDG method to find the operating condition that will generate maximum performance. This operating condition is in turn passed to the FMRLC controller as a set point for the control of the process. The conventional SDG algorithm is modified in this paper in order for convergence to occur monotonically. For the FMRLC control, the conventional fuzzy model reference learning control methodology is utilized, with guidelines generated here for effective tuning of the FMRLC controller.

  16. Data assimilation using a gradient descent method for estimation of intraoperative brain deformation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2009-10-01

    Biomechanical models that simulate brain deformation are gaining attention as alternatives for brain shift compensation. One approach, known as the "forced-displacement method", constrains the model to exactly match the measured data through boundary condition (BC) assignment. Although it improves model estimates and is computationally attractive, the method generates fictitious forces and may be ill-advised due to measurement uncertainty. Previously, we have shown that by assimilating intraoperatively acquired brain displacements in an inversion scheme, the Representer algorithm (REP) is able to maintain stress-free BCs and improve model estimates by 33% over those without data guidance in a controlled environment. However, REP is computationally efficient only when a few data points are used for model guidance because its costs scale linearly in the number of data points assimilated, thereby limiting its utility (and accuracy) in clinical settings. In this paper, we present a steepest gradient descent algorithm (SGD) whose computational complexity scales nearly invariantly with the number of measurements assimilated by iteratively adjusting the forcing conditions to minimize the difference between measured and model-estimated displacements (model-data misfit). Solutions of full linear systems of equations are achieved with a parallelized direct solver on a shared-memory, eight-processor Linux cluster. We summarize the error contributions from the entire process of model-updated image registration compensation and we show that SGD is able to attain model estimates comparable to or better than those obtained with REP, capturing about 74-82% of tumor displacement, but with a computational effort that is significantly less (a factor of 4-fold or more reduction relative to REP) and nearly invariant to the amount of sparse data involved when the number of points assimilated is large. Based on five patient cases, an average computational cost of approximately 2 min for

  17. FPGA-based phase control of acousto-optic modulator Fourier synthesis system through gradient descent phase-locking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Kenneth J; Jones, Andrew M; Gopinath, Juliet T

    2015-06-20

    We present a new application of the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to fast active phase control in a Fourier synthesis system. Pulses (4.9 ns) with an 80 MHz repetition rate are generated by feedback from a single phase-sensitive metric. Phase control is applied via fast current modulation of a tapered amplifier using an SPGD algorithm realized on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The waveforms are maintained by constant active feedback from the FPGA. We also discuss the extension of this technique to many more semiconductor laser emitters in a diode laser array. PMID:26193004

  18. Gradient descent algorithm applied to wavefront retrieval from through-focus images by an extreme ultraviolet microscope with partially coherent source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazoe, Kenji; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-12-01

    The wavefront retrieval by gradient descent algorithm that is typically applied to coherent or incoherent imaging is extended to retrieve a wavefront from a series of through-focus images by partially coherent illumination. For accurate retrieval, we modeled partial coherence as well as object transmittance into the gradient descent algorithm. However, this modeling increases the computation time due to the complexity of partially coherent imaging simulation that is repeatedly used in the optimization loop. To accelerate the computation, we incorporate not only the Fourier transform but also an eigenfunction decomposition of the image. As a demonstration, the extended algorithm is appliedmore » to retrieve a field-dependent wavefront of a microscope operated at extreme ultraviolet wavelength (13.4 nm). The retrieved wavefront qualitatively matches the expected characteristics of the lens design.« less

  19. Gradient descent algorithm applied to wavefront retrieval from through-focus images by an extreme ultraviolet microscope with partially coherent source

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazoe, Kenji; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-12-01

    The wavefront retrieval by gradient descent algorithm that is typically applied to coherent or incoherent imaging is extended to retrieve a wavefront from a series of through-focus images by partially coherent illumination. For accurate retrieval, we modeled partial coherence as well as object transmittance into the gradient descent algorithm. However, this modeling increases the computation time due to the complexity of partially coherent imaging simulation that is repeatedly used in the optimization loop. To accelerate the computation, we incorporate not only the Fourier transform but also an eigenfunction decomposition of the image. As a demonstration, the extended algorithm is applied to retrieve a field-dependent wavefront of a microscope operated at extreme ultraviolet wavelength (13.4 nm). The retrieved wavefront qualitatively matches the expected characteristics of the lens design.

  20. Programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae and ashing analysis: A decrement solution for nuclide and heavy metal disposal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Luo, Lang; Xiang, Sha; Zhang, Gege

    2016-08-15

    One of the waste disposal principles is decrement. The programmed gradient descent biosorption of strontium ions by Saccaromyces cerevisiae regarding bioremoval and ashing process for decrement were studied in present research. The results indicated that S. cerevisiae cells showed valid biosorption for strontium ions with greater than 90% bioremoval efficiency for high concentration strontium ions under batch culture conditions. The S. cerevisiae cells bioaccumulated approximately 10% of strontium ions in the cytoplasm besides adsorbing 90% strontium ions on cell wall. The programmed gradient descent biosorption presented good performance with a nearly 100% bioremoval ratio for low concentration strontium ions after 3 cycles. The ashing process resulted in a huge volume and weight reduction ratio as well as enrichment for strontium in the ash. XRD results showed that SrSO4 existed in ash. Simulated experiments proved that sulfate could adjust the precipitation of strontium ions. Finally, we proposed a technological flow process that combined the programmed gradient descent biosorption and ashing, which could yield great decrement and allow the supernatant to meet discharge standard. This technological flow process may be beneficial for nuclides and heavy metal disposal treatment in many fields. PMID:27136735

  1. Gradient Learning Algorithms for Ontology Computing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Zhu, Linli

    2014-01-01

    The gradient learning model has been raising great attention in view of its promising perspectives for applications in statistics, data dimensionality reducing, and other specific fields. In this paper, we raise a new gradient learning model for ontology similarity measuring and ontology mapping in multidividing setting. The sample error in this setting is given by virtue of the hypothesis space and the trick of ontology dividing operator. Finally, two experiments presented on plant and humanoid robotics field verify the efficiency of the new computation model for ontology similarity measure and ontology mapping applications in multidividing setting. PMID:25530752

  2. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  3. Segmentation of neuronal structures using SARSA (λ)-based boundary amendment with reinforced gradient-descent curve shape fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  4. Segmentation of Neuronal Structures Using SARSA (λ)-Based Boundary Amendment with Reinforced Gradient-Descent Curve Shape Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  5. Regularized Multitask Learning for Multidimensional Log-Density Gradient Estimation.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Ikko; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Log-density gradient estimation is a fundamental statistical problem and possesses various practical applications such as clustering and measuring nongaussianity. A naive two-step approach of first estimating the density and then taking its log gradient is unreliable because an accurate density estimate does not necessarily lead to an accurate log-density gradient estimate. To cope with this problem, a method to directly estimate the log-density gradient without density estimation has been explored and demonstrated to work much better than the two-step method. The objective of this letter is to improve the performance of this direct method in multidimensional cases. Our idea is to regard the problem of log-density gradient estimation in each dimension as a task and apply regularized multitask learning to the direct log-density gradient estimator. We experimentally demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed multitask method in log-density gradient estimation and mode-seeking clustering. PMID:27171983

  6. E-Learning, Engineering, and Learners of African Descent: A Needs Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eugene, Wanda; Clark, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth and short history of e-Learning technologies and the desire to see these technologies integrated into the learning process have caused a lack of specific guidance and firm foundation of principles on which to base instructional choices. Lessons cultivated in the Learning Sciences about the cultural influences of learning provide a…

  7. Gradient language dominance affects talker learning.

    PubMed

    Bregman, Micah R; Creel, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Traditional conceptions of spoken language assume that speech recognition and talker identification are computed separately. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies imply some separation between the two faculties, but recent perceptual studies suggest better talker recognition in familiar languages than unfamiliar languages. A familiar-language benefit in talker recognition potentially implies strong ties between the two domains. However, little is known about the nature of this language familiarity effect. The current study investigated the relationship between speech and talker processing by assessing bilingual and monolingual listeners' ability to learn voices as a function of language familiarity and age of acquisition. Two effects emerged. First, bilinguals learned to recognize talkers in their first language (Korean) more rapidly than they learned to recognize talkers in their second language (English), while English-speaking participants showed the opposite pattern (learning English talkers faster than Korean talkers). Second, bilinguals' learning rate for talkers in their second language (English) correlated with age of English acquisition. Taken together, these results suggest that language background materially affects talker encoding, implying a tight relationship between speech and talker representations. PMID:24211437

  8. Adaptive method of realizing natural gradient learning for multilayer perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Amari, S; Park, H; Fukumizu, K

    2000-06-01

    The natural gradient learning method is known to have ideal performances for on-line training of multilayer perceptrons. It avoids plateaus, which give rise to slow convergence of the backpropagation method. It is Fisher efficient, whereas the conventional method is not. However, for implementing the method, it is necessary to calculate the Fisher information matrix and its inverse, which is practically very difficult. This article proposes an adaptive method of directly obtaining the inverse of the Fisher information matrix. It generalizes the adaptive Gauss-Newton algorithms and provides a solid theoretical justification of them. Simulations show that the proposed adaptive method works very well for realizing natural gradient learning. PMID:10935719

  9. Reinforcement learning of motor skills with policy gradients.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jan; Schaal, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    Autonomous learning is one of the hallmarks of human and animal behavior, and understanding the principles of learning will be crucial in order to achieve true autonomy in advanced machines like humanoid robots. In this paper, we examine learning of complex motor skills with human-like limbs. While supervised learning can offer useful tools for bootstrapping behavior, e.g., by learning from demonstration, it is only reinforcement learning that offers a general approach to the final trial-and-error improvement that is needed by each individual acquiring a skill. Neither neurobiological nor machine learning studies have, so far, offered compelling results on how reinforcement learning can be scaled to the high-dimensional continuous state and action spaces of humans or humanoids. Here, we combine two recent research developments on learning motor control in order to achieve this scaling. First, we interpret the idea of modular motor control by means of motor primitives as a suitable way to generate parameterized control policies for reinforcement learning. Second, we combine motor primitives with the theory of stochastic policy gradient learning, which currently seems to be the only feasible framework for reinforcement learning for humanoids. We evaluate different policy gradient methods with a focus on their applicability to parameterized motor primitives. We compare these algorithms in the context of motor primitive learning, and show that our most modern algorithm, the Episodic Natural Actor-Critic outperforms previous algorithms by at least an order of magnitude. We demonstrate the efficiency of this reinforcement learning method in the application of learning to hit a baseball with an anthropomorphic robot arm. PMID:18482830

  10. Diverse expected gradient active learning for relative attributes.

    PubMed

    You, Xinge; Wang, Ruxin; Tao, Dacheng

    2014-07-01

    The use of relative attributes for semantic understanding of images and videos is a promising way to improve communication between humans and machines. However, it is extremely labor- and time-consuming to define multiple attributes for each instance in large amount of data. One option is to incorporate active learning, so that the informative samples can be actively discovered and then labeled. However, most existing active-learning methods select samples one at a time (serial mode), and may therefore lose efficiency when learning multiple attributes. In this paper, we propose a batch-mode active-learning method, called diverse expected gradient active learning. This method integrates an informativeness analysis and a diversity analysis to form a diverse batch of queries. Specifically, the informativeness analysis employs the expected pairwise gradient length as a measure of informativeness, while the diversity analysis forces a constraint on the proposed diverse gradient angle. Since simultaneous optimization of these two parts is intractable, we utilize a two-step procedure to obtain the diverse batch of queries. A heuristic method is also introduced to suppress imbalanced multiclass distributions. Empirical evaluations of three different databases demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:24983113

  11. Optimization in Quaternion Dynamic Systems: Gradient, Hessian, and Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongpo; Xia, Yili; Mandic, Danilo P

    2016-02-01

    The optimization of real scalar functions of quaternion variables, such as the mean square error or array output power, underpins many practical applications. Solutions typically require the calculation of the gradient and Hessian. However, real functions of quaternion variables are essentially nonanalytic, which are prohibitive to the development of quaternion-valued learning systems. To address this issue, we propose new definitions of quaternion gradient and Hessian, based on the novel generalized Hamilton-real (GHR) calculus, thus making a possible efficient derivation of general optimization algorithms directly in the quaternion field, rather than using the isomorphism with the real domain, as is current practice. In addition, unlike the existing quaternion gradients, the GHR calculus allows for the product and chain rule, and for a one-to-one correspondence of the novel quaternion gradient and Hessian with their real counterparts. Properties of the quaternion gradient and Hessian relevant to numerical applications are also introduced, opening a new avenue of research in quaternion optimization and greatly simplified the derivations of learning algorithms. The proposed GHR calculus is shown to yield the same generic algorithm forms as the corresponding real- and complex-valued algorithms. Advantages of the proposed framework are illuminated over illustrative simulations in quaternion signal processing and neural networks. PMID:26087504

  12. A morphological perceptron with gradient-based learning for Brazilian stock market forecasting.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ricardo de A

    2012-04-01

    Several linear and non-linear techniques have been proposed to solve the stock market forecasting problem. However, a limitation arises from all these techniques and is known as the random walk dilemma (RWD). In this scenario, forecasts generated by arbitrary models have a characteristic one step ahead delay with respect to the time series values, so that, there is a time phase distortion in stock market phenomena reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a suitable model inspired by concepts in mathematical morphology (MM) and lattice theory (LT). This model is generically called the increasing morphological perceptron (IMP). Also, we present a gradient steepest descent method to design the proposed IMP based on ideas from the back-propagation (BP) algorithm and using a systematic approach to overcome the problem of non-differentiability of morphological operations. Into the learning process we have included a procedure to overcome the RWD, which is an automatic correction step that is geared toward eliminating time phase distortions that occur in stock market phenomena. Furthermore, an experimental analysis is conducted with the IMP using four complex non-linear problems of time series forecasting from the Brazilian stock market. Additionally, two natural phenomena time series are used to assess forecasting performance of the proposed IMP with other non financial time series. At the end, the obtained results are discussed and compared to results found using models recently proposed in the literature. PMID:22391234

  13. Accelerated Mini-batch Randomized Block Coordinate Descent Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tuo; Yu, Mo; Wang, Yiming; Arora, Raman; Liu, Han

    2014-01-01

    We consider regularized empirical risk minimization problems. In particular, we minimize the sum of a smooth empirical risk function and a nonsmooth regularization function. When the regularization function is block separable, we can solve the minimization problems in a randomized block coordinate descent (RBCD) manner. Existing RBCD methods usually decrease the objective value by exploiting the partial gradient of a randomly selected block of coordinates in each iteration. Thus they need all data to be accessible so that the partial gradient of the block gradient can be exactly obtained. However, such a “batch” setting may be computationally expensive in practice. In this paper, we propose a mini-batch randomized block coordinate descent (MRBCD) method, which estimates the partial gradient of the selected block based on a mini-batch of randomly sampled data in each iteration. We further accelerate the MRBCD method by exploiting the semi-stochastic optimization scheme, which effectively reduces the variance of the partial gradient estimators. Theoretically, we show that for strongly convex functions, the MRBCD method attains lower overall iteration complexity than existing RBCD methods. As an application, we further trim the MRBCD method to solve the regularized sparse learning problems. Our numerical experiments shows that the MRBCD method naturally exploits the sparsity structure and achieves better computational performance than existing methods. PMID:25620860

  14. A fast and scalable recurrent neural network based on stochastic meta descent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Elhanany, Itamar

    2008-09-01

    This brief presents an efficient and scalable online learning algorithm for recurrent neural networks (RNNs). The approach is based on the real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) algorithm, whereby the sensitivity set of each neuron is reduced to weights associated with either its input or output links. This yields a reduced storage and computational complexity of O(N(2)). Stochastic meta descent (SMD), an adaptive step size scheme for stochastic gradient-descent problems, is employed as means of incorporating curvature information in order to substantially accelerate the learning process. We also introduce a clustered version of our algorithm to further improve its scalability attributes. Despite the dramatic reduction in resource requirements, it is shown through simulation results that the approach outperforms regular RTRL by almost an order of magnitude. Moreover, the scheme lends itself to parallel hardware realization by virtue of the localized property that is inherent to the learning framework. PMID:18779096

  15. Ascent/Descent Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Charles; Andrew, Robert; Roe, Scott; Frye, Ronald; Harvey, Michael; Vu, Tuan; Balachandran, Krishnaiyer; Bly, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Software Suite has been used to support a variety of NASA Shuttle Program mission planning and analysis activities, such as range safety, on the Integrated Planning System (IPS) platform. The Ascent/Descent Software Suite, containing Ascent Flight Design (ASC)/Descent Flight Design (DESC) Configuration items (Cis), lifecycle documents, and data files used for shuttle ascent and entry modeling analysis and mission design, resides on IPS/Linux workstations. A list of tools in Navigation (NAV)/Prop Software Suite represents tool versions established during or after the IPS Equipment Rehost-3 project.

  16. Generalization Gradients in Human Predictive Learning: Effects of Discrimination Training and within-Subjects Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervliet, Bram; Iberico, Carlos; Vervoort, Ellen; Baeyens, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Generalization gradients have been investigated widely in animal conditioning experiments, but much less so in human predictive learning tasks. Here, we apply the experimental design of a recent study on conditioned fear generalization in humans (Lissek et al., 2008) to a predictive learning task, and examine the effects of a number of relevant…

  17. Multivariate Gradient Analysis for Evaluating and Visualizing a Learning System Platform for Computer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the application of canonical gradient analysis to evaluate and visualize student performance and acceptance of a learning system platform. The subject of evaluation is a first year BSc module for computer programming. This uses "Ceebot," an animated and immersive game-like development environment. Multivariate…

  18. Adaptive Performance Seeking Control Using Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control and Positive Gradient Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1997-01-01

    Performance Seeking Control attempts to find the operating condition that will generate optimal performance and control the plant at that operating condition. In this paper a nonlinear multivariable Adaptive Performance Seeking Control (APSC) methodology will be developed and it will be demonstrated on a nonlinear system. The APSC is comprised of the Positive Gradient Control (PGC) and the Fuzzy Model Reference Learning Control (FMRLC). The PGC computes the positive gradients of the desired performance function with respect to the control inputs in order to drive the plant set points to the operating point that will produce optimal performance. The PGC approach will be derived in this paper. The feedback control of the plant is performed by the FMRLC. For the FMRLC, the conventional fuzzy model reference learning control methodology is utilized, with guidelines generated here for the effective tuning of the FMRLC controller.

  19. Terminal Descent Sensor Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Curtis W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulcata software simulates the operation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) radar terminal descent sensor (TDS). The program models TDS radar antennas, RF hardware, and digital processing, as well as the physics of scattering from a coherent ground surface. This application is specific to this sensor and is flexible enough to handle end-to-end design validation. Sulcata is a high-fidelity simulation and is used for performance evaluation, anomaly resolution, and design validation. Within the trajectory frame, almost all internal vectors are represented in whatever coordinate system is used to represent platform position. The trajectory frame must be planet-fixed. The platform body frame is specified relative to arbitrary reference points relative to the platform (spacecraft or test vehicle). Its rotation is a function of time from the trajectory coordinate system specified via dynamics input (file for open loop, callback for closed loop). Orientation of the frame relative to the body is arbitrary, but constant over time. The TDS frame must have a constant rotation and translation from the platform body frame specified at run time. The DEM frame has an arbitrary, but time-constant, rotation and translation with respect to the simulation frame specified at run time. It has the same orientation as sigma0 frame, but is possibly translated. Surface sigma0 has the same arbitrary rotation and translation as DEM frame.

  20. Regression Analysis of Top of Descent Location for Idle-thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel; Bronsvoort, Jesper; McDonald, Greg

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, multiple regression analysis is used to model the top of descent (TOD) location of user-preferred descent trajectories computed by the flight management system (FMS) on over 1000 commercial flights into Melbourne, Australia. The independent variables cruise altitude, final altitude, cruise Mach, descent speed, wind, and engine type were also recorded or computed post-operations. Both first-order and second-order models are considered, where cross-validation, hypothesis testing, and additional analysis are used to compare models. This identifies the models that should give the smallest errors if used to predict TOD location for new data in the future. A model that is linear in TOD altitude, final altitude, descent speed, and wind gives an estimated standard deviation of 3.9 nmi for TOD location given the trajec- tory parameters, which means about 80% of predictions would have error less than 5 nmi in absolute value. This accuracy is better than demonstrated by other ground automation predictions using kinetic models. Furthermore, this approach would enable online learning of the model. Additional data or further knowl- edge of algorithms is necessary to conclude definitively that no second-order terms are appropriate. Possible applications of the linear model are described, including enabling arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the FMS even in congested airspace. In particular, a model for TOD location that is linear in the independent variables would enable decision support tool human-machine interfaces for which a kinetic approach would be computationally too slow.

  1. Refined Generalization Bounds of Gradient Learning over Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shao-Gao

    2015-06-01

    Gradient learning (GL), initially proposed by Mukherjee and Zhou (2006) has been proved to be a powerful tool for conducting variable selection and dimensional reduction simultaneously. This approach presents a nonparametric version of a gradient estimator with positive definite kernels without estimating the true function itself, so that the proposed version has wide applicability and allows for complex effects between predictors. In terms of theory, however, existing generalization bounds for GL depend on capacity-independent techniques, and the capacity of kernel classes cannot be characterized completely. Thus, this letter considers GL estimators that minimize the empirical convex risk. We prove generalization bounds for such estimators with rates that are faster than previous results. Moreover, we provide a novel upper bound for Rademacher chaos complexity of order two, which also plays an important role in general pairwise-type estimations, including ranking and score problems. PMID:25826021

  2. Gradient Learning in Spiking Neural Networks by Dynamic Perturbation of Conductances

    SciTech Connect

    Fiete, Ila R.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2006-07-28

    We present a method of estimating the gradient of an objective function with respect to the synaptic weights of a spiking neural network. The method works by measuring the fluctuations in the objective function in response to dynamic perturbation of the membrane conductances of the neurons. It is compatible with recurrent networks of conductance-based model neurons with dynamic synapses. The method can be interpreted as a biologically plausible synaptic learning rule, if the dynamic perturbations are generated by a special class of 'empiric' synapses driven by random spike trains from an external source.

  3. Simulation Test Of Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes piloted-simulation test of Descent Advisor (DA), subsystem of larger automation system being developed to assist human air-traffic controllers and pilots. Focuses on results of piloted simulation, in which airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes. Crews able to achieve arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 seconds at metering fix. Analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of algorithm to increase accuracies of its predicted trajectories. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for DA concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  4. EXOMARS Descent Module GNC Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portigliotti, S.; Capuano, M.; Montagna, M.; Martella, P.; Venditto, P.

    2007-08-01

    The ExoMars mission is the first ESA led robotic mission of the Aurora Programme and combines technology development with investigations of major scientific interest. Italy is by far the major contributor to the mission through the strong support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). ExoMars will search for traces of past and present life, characterize the Mars geochemistry and water distribution, improve the knowledge of the Mars environment and geophysics, and identify possible surface hazards to future human exploration missions. ExoMars will also validate the technology for safe Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) of a large size Descent Module (DM) carrying a Rover with medium range surface mobility and the access to subsurface. The ExoMars project is presently undergoing its Phase B1 with Thales Alenia Space-Italia as Industrial Prime Contractor. Additionally, as Descent Module responsible, a dedicated simulation tool is under development in Thales Alenia Space-Italia, Turin site, for the end-to-end design and validation / verification of the DM Entry Descent and Landing.

  5. Planning fuel-conservative descents in an airline environmental using a small programmable calculator: Algorithm development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Vicroy, D. D.; Simmon, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, airborne, flight-management descent algorithm was developed and programmed into a small programmable calculator. The algorithm may be operated in either a time mode or speed mode. The time mode was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The speed model was designed for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path for both modes was calculated for a constant with considerations given for the descent Mach/airspeed schedule, gross weight, wind, wind gradient, and nonstandard temperature effects. Flight tests, using the algorithm on the programmable calculator, showed that the open-loop guidance could be useful to airline flight crews for planning and executing fuel-conservative descents.

  6. Planning fuel-conservative descents in an airline environmental using a small programmable calculator: algorithm development and flight test results

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, C.E.; Vicroy, D.D.; Simmon, D.A.

    1985-05-01

    A simple, airborne, flight-management descent algorithm was developed and programmed into a small programmable calculator. The algorithm may be operated in either a time mode or speed mode. The time mode was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The speed model was designed for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path for both modes was calculated for a constant with considerations given for the descent Mach/airspeed schedule, gross weight, wind, wind gradient, and nonstandard temperature effects. Flight tests, using the algorithm on the programmable calculator, showed that the open-loop guidance could be useful to airline flight crews for planning and executing fuel-conservative descents.

  7. Consert during the Philae Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, Alain; Berquin, Yann; Blazquez, Alejandro; Antoine Foulon, Marc; Hahnel, Ronny; Hegler, Sebastian; Jurado, Eric; Kofman, Wlodek; Plettemeier, Dirk; Rogez, Yves; Statz, Christoph; Zine, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    The CONSERT experiment on board Rosetta and Philae is to perform the tomography of the 67P/CG comet nucleus measuring radio waves transmission from the Rosetta S/C to the Philae Lander and using the 67P nucleus rotation to cover different geometries. CONSERT will operate during the Philae descent. This geometry strongly differs from the "nominal" bistatic tomography where the orbiter is on the opposite side of the nucleus by regard to the lander. During the descent, CONSERT will measure direct wave propagating from orbiter to lander and waves reflected / scattered by the 67P surface and subsurface. This signal will provide information of the greatest interest for both scientific investigations of 67P and technical operations of Philae. The landing site position is known a priori with a large ellipse of dispersion due to uncertainties on the Rosetta velocity and Rosetta/Philae separation strength. This dispersion is increased by the difference between nominal and emergency separation strength. An accurate estimation of the landing position as soon as possible after landing is of the greatest interest to optimize Philae operation during FSS. So propagation delay of the direct and reflected waves measured by CONSERT will help to reconstruct the descent geometry in order to more precisely estimate the landing position. The reflected signal is determined by the surface properties: its dielectric permittivity, its roughness and layering. The signal power inversion will allow to map surface properties especially in the vicinity of the landing site. This paper details the measurement configuration. It presents the data retrieval based on Monte-Carlo simulation using Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and expected performances for both science and operations.

  8. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1706

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1706 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridle is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  9. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1433

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1433 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridal is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  10. Spirit's Descent to Mars-1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the descent image motion estimation system camera located on the bottom of the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's lander, shows a view of Gusev Crater as the lander descends to Mars. The picture is taken at an altitude of 1983 meters. Numerous small impact craters can be seen on the surface of the planet. These images help the onboard software to minimize the lander's horizontal velocity before its bridal is cut, and it falls freely to the surface of Mars.

  11. A new steepest descent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Zubai'ah Zainal; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd; Mohd, Ismail

    2014-06-01

    The classical steepest descent (SD) method is known as one of the earliest and the best method to minimize a function. Even though the convergence rate is quite slow, but its simplicity has made it one of the easiest methods to be used and applied especially in the form of computer codes. In this paper, a new modification of SD method is proposed using a new search direction (dk) in the form of two parameters. Numerical results shows that this new SD has far superior convergence rate and more efficient than the classical SD method.

  12. Random versus Deterministic Descent in RNA Energy Landscape Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Day, Luke; Abdelhadi Ep Souki, Ouala; Albrecht, Andreas A.; Steinhöfel, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Identifying sets of metastable conformations is a major research topic in RNA energy landscape analysis, and recently several methods have been proposed for finding local minima in landscapes spawned by RNA secondary structures. An important and time-critical component of such methods is steepest, or gradient, descent in attraction basins of local minima. We analyse the speed-up achievable by randomised descent in attraction basins in the context of large sample sets where the size has an order of magnitude in the region of ~106. While the gain for each individual sample might be marginal, the overall run-time improvement can be significant. Moreover, for the two nongradient methods we analysed for partial energy landscapes induced by ten different RNA sequences, we obtained that the number of observed local minima is on average larger by 7.3% and 3.5%, respectively. The run-time improvement is approximately 16.6% and 6.8% on average over the ten partial energy landscapes. For the large sample size we selected for descent procedures, the coverage of local minima is very high up to energy values of the region where the samples were randomly selected from the partial energy landscapes; that is, the difference to the total set of local minima is mainly due to the upper area of the energy landscapes. PMID:27110241

  13. Correlation as Probability of Common Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Well, Arnold D.

    1996-01-01

    One interpretation of the Pearson product-moment correlation ("r"), correlation as the probability of originating from common descent, important to the genetic measurement of inbreeding, is examined. The conditions under which "r" can be interpreted as the probability of "identity by descent" are specified, and the possibility of generalizing this…

  14. Space Shuttle Orbiter descent navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montez, M. N.; Madden, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    The entry operational sequence (OPS 3) begins approximately 2 hours prior to the deorbit maneuver and continues through atmospheric entry, terminal area energy management (TAEM), approach and landing, and rollout. During this flight phase, the navigation state vector is estimated by the Space Shuttle Orbiter onboard navigation system. This estimate is computed using a six-element sequential Kalman filter, which blends inertial measurement unit (IMU) delta-velocity data with external navaid data. The external navaids available to the filter are tactical air navigation (TACAN), barometric altimeter, and microwave scan beam landing system (MSBLS). Attention is given to the functional design of the Orbiter navigation system, the descent navigation sensors and measurement processing, predicted Kalman gains, correlation coefficients, and current flights navigation performance.

  15. Alternating minimization and Boltzmann machine learning.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W

    1992-01-01

    Training a Boltzmann machine with hidden units is appropriately treated in information geometry using the information divergence and the technique of alternating minimization. The resulting algorithm is shown to be closely related to gradient descent Boltzmann machine learning rules, and the close relationship of both to the EM algorithm is described. An iterative proportional fitting procedure for training machines without hidden units is described and incorporated into the alternating minimization algorithm. PMID:18276461

  16. Predictability of Top of Descent Location for Operational Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its uncertainty models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents at a specified descent speed, and the recorded data included the specified descent speed profile, aircraft weight, and the winds entered into the FMS as well as the radar data. The FMS computed the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and the controllers and pilots then endeavored to allow the FMS to fly the descent to the meter fix with minimal human intervention. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location were extracted from the radar data. Using approximately 70 descents each in Boeing 757 and Airbus 319/320 aircraft, multiple regression estimated TOD location as a linear function of the available predictive factors. The cruise and meter fix altitudes, descent speed, and wind clearly improve goodness of fit. The aircraft weight improves fit for the Airbus descents but not for the B757. Except for a few statistical outliers, the residuals have absolute value less than 5 nmi. Thus, these predictive factors adequately explain the TOD location, which indicates the data do not include excessive noise.

  17. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  18. Descent advisor preliminary field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional- and flight-management-system-equipped jet transports, to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 sec late with a standard deviation of 13.1 sec. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  19. Feature Clustering for Accelerating Parallel Coordinate Descent

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Tewari, Ambuj; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Haglin, David J.

    2012-12-06

    We demonstrate an approach for accelerating calculation of the regularization path for L1 sparse logistic regression problems. We show the benefit of feature clustering as a preconditioning step for parallel block-greedy coordinate descent algorithms.

  20. Apollo experience report: Descent propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammock, W. R., Jr.; Currie, E. C.; Fisher, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    The propulsion system for the descent stage of the lunar module was designed to provide thrust to transfer the fully loaded lunar module with two crewmen from the lunar parking orbit to the lunar surface. A history of the development of this system is presented. Development was accomplished primarily by ground testing of individual components and by testing the integrated system. Unique features of the descent propulsion system were the deep throttling capability and the use of a lightweight cryogenic helium pressurization system.

  1. Artist's rendering of Descent to Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Descent to Lunar Surface: The Commander and Lunar Module Pilot transfer to the IM, separate it from the Command and Service Module, and fire the IM descent engine to land on the Moon. After checking out the spacecraft and eating and resting, the Commander climbs down the ladder and places his left foot on the Moon while his right foot is inside the Lunar Module landing pad.

  2. Descent relations in cubic superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, I. Y.; Gorbachev, R.; Medvedev, P. B.; Rychkov, D. V.

    2008-01-01

    The descent relations between string field theory (SFT) vertices are characteristic relations of the operator formulation of SFT and they provide self-consistency of this theory. The descent relations langleV2|V1rangle and langleV3|V1rangle in the NS fermionic string field theory in the κ and discrete bases are established. Different regularizations and schemes of calculations are considered and relations between them are discussed.

  3. Supervised descent method with low rank and sparsity constraints for robust face alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yubao; Hu, Bin; Deng, Jiankang; Li, Xing

    2015-03-01

    Supervised Descent Method (SDM) learns the descent directions of nonlinear least square objective in a supervised manner, which has been efficiently used for face alignment. However, SDM still may fail in the cases of partial occlusions and serious pose variations. To deal with this issue, we present a new method for robust face alignment by utilizing the low rank prior of human face and enforcing sparse structure of the descent directions. Our approach consists of low rank face frontalization and sparse descent steps. Firstly, in terms of the low rank prior of face image, we recover such a low-rank face from its deformed image and the associated deformation despite significant distortion and corruption. Alignment of the recovered frontal face image is more simple and effective. Then, we propose a sparsity regularized supervised descent model by enforcing the sparse structure of the descent directions under the l1constraint, which makes the model more effective in computation and robust to partial occlusion. Extensive results on several benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed method is robust to facial occlusions and pose variations

  4. Gradient-based manipulation of nonparametric entropy estimates.

    PubMed

    Schraudolph, Nicol N

    2004-07-01

    This paper derives a family of differential learning rules that optimize the Shannon entropy at the output of an adaptive system via kernel density estimation. In contrast to parametric formulations of entropy, this nonparametric approach assumes no particular functional form of the output density. We address problems associated with quantized data and finite sample size, and implement efficient maximum likelihood techniques for optimizing the regularizer. We also develop a normalized entropy estimate that is invariant with respect to affine transformations, facilitating optimization of the shape, rather than the scale, of the output density. Kernel density estimates are smooth and differentiable; this makes the derived entropy estimates amenable to manipulation by gradient descent. The resulting weight updates are surprisingly simple and efficient learning rules that operate on pairs of input samples. They can be tuned for data-limited or memory-limited situations, or modified to give a fully online implementation. PMID:15461076

  5. Reference energy-altitude descent guidance: Simulator evaluation. [aircraft descent and fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbot, K. H.; Knox, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Descent guidance was developed to provide a pilot with information to ake a fuel-conservative descent and cross a designated geographical waypoint at a preselected altitude and airspeed. The guidance was designed to reduce fuel usage during the descent and reduce the mental work load associated with planning a fuel-conservative descent. A piloted simulation was conducted to evaluate the operational use of this guidance concept. The results of the simulation tests show that the use of the guidance reduced fuel consumption and mental work load during the descent. Use of the guidance also decreased the airspeed error, but had no effect on the altitude error when the designated waypoint was crossed. Physical work load increased with the use of the guidance, but remained well within acceptable levels. The pilots found the guidance easy to use as presented and reported that it would be useful in an operational environment.

  6. Descent of the larynx in chimpanzee infants.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Mikami, Akichika; Suzuki, Juri; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2003-06-10

    The human larynx descends during infancy and the early juvenile periods, and this greatly contributes to the morphological foundations of speech development. This developmental phenomenon is believed to be unique to humans. This concept has formed a basis for paleoanthropological studies on the origin and evolution of human speech. We used magnetic resonance imaging to study the development of three living chimpanzees and found that their larynges also descend during infancy, as in human infants. This descent was completed primarily through the rapid descent of the laryngeal skeleton relative to the hyoid, but it was not accompanied by the descent of the hyoid itself. The descent is possibly associated with developmental changes of the swallowing mechanism. Moreover, it contributes physically to an increased independence between the processes of phonation and articulation for vocalization. Thus, the descent of the larynx and the morphological foundations for speech production must have evolved in part during hominoid evolution, and not in a single shift during hominid evolution. PMID:12775758

  7. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; Babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2014-04-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH) and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ~ 32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, have been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3-hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaigns conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half an hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record the observations also when the balloon is descending as this information is useful for scientific purposes.

  8. Assessment of GPS radiosonde descent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Ratnam, M.; Pravallika, N.; babu, S. Ravindra; Basha, G.; Pramitha, M.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.

    2013-12-01

    Radiosondes are widely used to obtain basic meteorological parameters such as pressure (P), temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and horizontal winds during the balloon ascent up to the altitude of balloon burst, usually ∼32-35 km. Data from the radiosondes released from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, has been collected during the ascent and during the descent as well without attaching any parachute or its equivalent since the year 2008. In the present study an attempt has been made to characterize the radiosonde descent data with the main objective of exploring its usefulness and reliability for scientific purposes. We compared the data obtained during ascent and descent phases of the same sounding. The mean differences in T, RH and horizontal winds between ascent and descent data are found to be small and are sometimes even within the uncertainty of the measurements and/or expected diurnal variation itself. The very good consistency observed between the ascent and the descent data shows that one more profile of the meteorological parameters can be constructed within 3 h of time of balloon launch practically at no additional cost. Further checks are done by utilizing the 3 hourly radiosonde observations collected during the Tropical Tropopause Dynamics campaign conducted at Gadanki. In the process of checking the consistency between the radiosonde ascent and descent data, several new findings are arrived at and are reported in this study. In general, it has taken more than half-an-hour for the balloon to reach the ground from the burst altitude. It is also observed that the fall velocity is close to 10 m s-1 near the surface. Finally, it is suggested to record also the observations when the balloon is descending as this information is also useful for scientific purposes.

  9. Diabatic Descent In The Stratospheric Polar Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, J.; Schoeberl, M.

    Polar regions experience diabatic cooling during the fall and winter months, resulting in a downward mass flux. An accurate measure of this fall and winter diabatic descent, as well as an understanding of the transport of air into and out of the winter polar vor- tices, is required for estimates of polar ozone depletion. We have calculated diabatic cooling rates using a radiative transfer code and U.K. Met Office (UKMO) tempera- tures for the years 1992-2000. These cooling rates, together with UKMO horizontal winds, have been used to compute three-dimensional forward and backward diabatic trajectories for the seven month fall to spring period in both the NH and the SH. The forward calculations estimate the maximum amount of descent that can occur. How- ever, they are not necessarily a good indicator of the origin of the springtime vortex air because more equatorward air from lower altitudes can be entrained within the vortex during its formation. The back trajectories, starting in the springtime lower middle stratosphere, show a complex final distribution of parcels. One population originates in the fall in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and experiences considerable de- scent, while the remaining parcels originate at lower altitudes in the midlatitudes and are mixed into the polar regions during vortex formation. The amount of descent ex- perienced by the first population shows little variability from year to year, while the computed descent and mixing of the remaining parcels show considerable interannual variability due to the varying polar meteorology. Because of this complex parcel dis- tribution it is not meaningful to speak of a net amount of descent experienced over the entire winter period. We have also compared diabatic trajectories with kinematic tra- jectories, in which the vertical motion is given by the UKMO analysed omega fields. These show that the kinematic trajectory descent is much less than the diabatic tra- jectory descent and exhibits

  10. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  11. Learning with regularizers in multilayer neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, David; Rattray, Magnus

    1998-02-01

    We study the effect of regularization in an on-line gradient-descent learning scenario for a general two-layer student network with an arbitrary number of hidden units. Training examples are randomly drawn input vectors labeled by a two-layer teacher network with an arbitrary number of hidden units that may be corrupted by Gaussian output noise. We examine the effect of weight decay regularization on the dynamical evolution of the order parameters and generalization error in various phases of the learning process, in both noiseless and noisy scenarios.

  12. Descent Assisted Split Habitat Lunar Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Descent Assisted Split Habitat (DASH) lunar lander concept utilizes a disposable braking stage for descent and a minimally sized pressurized volume for crew transport to and from the lunar surface. The lander can also be configured to perform autonomous cargo missions. Although a braking-stage approach represents a significantly different operational concept compared with a traditional two-stage lander, the DASH lander offers many important benefits. These benefits include improved crew egress/ingress and large-cargo unloading; excellent surface visibility during landing; elimination of the need for deep-throttling descent engines; potentially reduced plume-surface interactions and lower vertical touchdown velocity; and reduced lander gross mass through efficient mass staging and volume segmentation. This paper documents the conceptual study on various aspects of the design, including development of sortie and outpost lander configurations and a mission concept of operations; the initial descent trajectory design; the initial spacecraft sizing estimates and subsystem design; and the identification of technology needs

  13. The hormonal control of testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Levy, J B; Husmann, D A

    1995-01-01

    Descent of the testes is a complex event mediated by hormonal and mechanical factors. At present we hypothesize that testicular descent occurs as the result of the secretion of descendin from a normal testicle. Descendin secretion results in selective growth of the gubernacular cells. Gubernacular outgrowth results in masculinization of the inguinal canal. At the beginning of testicular descent, the patent processus migrates into the inguinal canal, transmitting intraabdominal pressure to the gubernaculum. The gubernaculum in turn applies traction to the testicle to introduce the testicle into the inguinal canal. Descent of the testes into and through the inguinal canal is an interplay between intraabdominal pressure transmitted by a patent processus vaginalis and androgen-induced gubernacular regression. Specifically, we hypothesize that androgens under control of an intact fetal hypothalamic-pituitary axis alter the viscoelastic properties of the gubernaculum. Reductions in the turgidity of the gubernaculum allow intraabdominal pressure to push the testicle into the scrotum. Functional abnormalities in any of the above factors will result in cryptorchidism. PMID:8867594

  14. Ka-Band Radar Terminal Descent Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollard, Brian; Berkun, Andrew; Tope, Michael; Andricos, Constantine; Okonek, Joseph; Lou, Yunling

    2007-01-01

    The terminal descent sensor (TDS) is a radar altimeter/velocimeter that improves the accuracy of velocity sensing by more than an order of magnitude when compared to existing sensors. The TDS is designed for the safe planetary landing of payloads, and may be used in helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft requiring high-accuracy velocity sensing

  15. Research study: STS-1 Orbiter Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of STS-1 orbiter descent data from AVE-SESAME contact programs to the REEDA system and the reduction of raw radiosonde data is summarized. A first difference program, contact data program, plot data program, and 30 second data program were developed. Six radiosonde soundings were taken. An example of the outputs of each of the programs is presented.

  16. Coping with Discrimination among Mexican Descent Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Romero, Andrea J.

    2008-01-01

    The current research is designed to explore the relationship among discrimination stress, coping strategies, and self-esteem among Mexican descent youth (N = 73, age 11-15 years). Results suggest that primary control engagement and disengagement coping strategies are positively associated with discrimination stress. Furthermore, self-esteem is…

  17. Method of descent for integrable lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoyavlensky, Oleg

    2009-05-01

    A method of descent for constructing integrable Hamiltonian systems is introduced. The derived periodic and nonperiodic lattices possess Lax representations with spectral parameter and have plenty of first integrals. Examples of Liouville-integrable four-dimensional Hamiltonian Lotka-Volterra systems are presented.

  18. America's Descent into Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes America's descent into madness under the regime of neoliberalism that has emerged in the United States since the late 1970s. In part, this is due to the emergence of a public pedagogy produced by the corporate-owned media that now saturates Americans with a market-driven value system that undermines those formative…

  19. Optimum Strategies for Selecting Descent Flight-Path Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G. (Inventor); Green, Steven M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An information processing system and method for adaptively selecting an aircraft descent flight path for an aircraft, are provided. The system receives flight adaptation parameters, including aircraft flight descent time period, aircraft flight descent airspace region, and aircraft flight descent flyability constraints. The system queries a plurality of flight data sources and retrieves flight information including any of winds and temperatures aloft data, airspace/navigation constraints, airspace traffic demand, and airspace arrival delay model. The system calculates a set of candidate descent profiles, each defined by at least one of a flight path angle and a descent rate, and each including an aggregated total fuel consumption value for the aircraft following a calculated trajectory, and a flyability constraints metric for the calculated trajectory. The system selects a best candidate descent profile having the least fuel consumption value while the fly ability constraints metric remains within aircraft flight descent flyability constraints.

  20. A Descent Rate Control Approach to Developing an Autonomous Descent Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Travis D.

    Circular parachutes have been used for aerial payload/personnel deliveries for over 100 years. In the past two decades, significant work has been done to improve the landing accuracies of cargo deliveries for humanitarian and military applications. This dissertation discusses the approach developed in which a circular parachute is used in conjunction with an electro-mechanical reefing system to manipulate the landing location. Rather than attempt to steer the autonomous descent vehicle directly, control of the landing location is accomplished by modifying the amount of time spent in a particular wind layer. Descent rate control is performed by reversibly reefing the parachute canopy. The first stage of the research investigated the use of a single actuation during descent (with periodic updates), in conjunction with a curvilinear target. Simulation results using real-world wind data are presented, illustrating the utility of the methodology developed. Additionally, hardware development and flight-testing of the single actuation autonomous descent vehicle are presented. The next phase of the research focuses on expanding the single actuation descent rate control methodology to incorporate a multi-actuation path-planning system. By modifying the parachute size throughout the descent, the controllability of the system greatly increases. The trajectory planning methodology developed provides a robust approach to accurately manipulate the landing location of the vehicle. The primary benefits of this system are the inherent robustness to release location errors and the ability to overcome vehicle uncertainties (mass, parachute size, etc.). A separate application of the path-planning methodology is also presented. An in-flight path-prediction system was developed for use in high-altitude ballooning by utilizing the path-planning methodology developed for descent vehicles. The developed onboard system improves landing location predictions in-flight using collected flight

  1. How Entorhinal Grid Cells May Learn Multiple Spatial Scales from a Dorsoventral Gradient of Cell Response Rates in a Self-organizing Map

    PubMed Central

    Grossberg, Stephen; Pilly, Praveen K.

    2012-01-01

    Place cells in the hippocampus of higher mammals are critical for spatial navigation. Recent modeling clarifies how this may be achieved by how grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) input to place cells. Grid cells exhibit hexagonal grid firing patterns across space in multiple spatial scales along the MEC dorsoventral axis. Signals from grid cells of multiple scales combine adaptively to activate place cells that represent much larger spaces than grid cells. But how do grid cells learn to fire at multiple positions that form a hexagonal grid, and with spatial scales that increase along the dorsoventral axis? In vitro recordings of medial entorhinal layer II stellate cells have revealed subthreshold membrane potential oscillations (MPOs) whose temporal periods, and time constants of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), both increase along this axis. Slower (faster) subthreshold MPOs and slower (faster) EPSPs correlate with larger (smaller) grid spacings and field widths. A self-organizing map neural model explains how the anatomical gradient of grid spatial scales can be learned by cells that respond more slowly along the gradient to their inputs from stripe cells of multiple scales, which perform linear velocity path integration. The model cells also exhibit MPO frequencies that covary with their response rates. The gradient in intrinsic rhythmicity is thus not compelling evidence for oscillatory interference as a mechanism of grid cell firing. A response rate gradient combined with input stripe cells that have normalized receptive fields can reproduce all known spatial and temporal properties of grid cells along the MEC dorsoventral axis. This spatial gradient mechanism is homologous to a gradient mechanism for temporal learning in the lateral entorhinal cortex and its hippocampal projections. Spatial and temporal representations may hereby arise from homologous mechanisms, thereby embodying a mechanistic “neural relativity” that may clarify

  2. Rhinoplasty in the patient of African descent.

    PubMed

    Harris, Monte O

    2010-02-01

    We are in the midst of truly changing times, as patients of African descent actively embrace facial cosmetic surgery. Gaining surgical consistency in patients of African descent has proven to be elusive and unpredictable for many rhinoplasty surgeons. Surgical success relies on the surgeon's ability precisely to identify anatomic variables and reconcile these anatomic realities with the patient's expectations for aesthetic improvement and ethnic identity. An appreciation for underlying heritage provides a link culturally to connect with prospective patients and serves as a tool for establishing realistic aesthetic goals. This article highlights the significance of exploring ancestry in the rhinoplasty consultation; identifies key anatomic variables in the nasal tip, dorsum, and alar base; and reviews surgical logic that has facilitated the achievement of consistent, balanced aesthetic outcomes. PMID:20206100

  3. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  4. Mars Exploration Entry, Descent and Landing Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert D.; Manning, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The United States has successfully landed five robotic systems on the surface of Mars. These systems all had landed mass below 0.6 metric tons (t), had landed footprints on the order of hundreds of km and landed at sites below -1.4 km MOLA elevation due the need to perform entry, descent and landing operations in an environment with sufficient atmospheric density. At present, robotic exploration systems engineers are struggling with the challenges of increasing landed mass capability to 0.8 t while improving landed accuracy to tens of km and landing at a site as high as +2 km MOLA elevation for the Mars Science Laboratory project. Meanwhile, current plans for human exploration of Mars call for the landing of 40-80 t surface elements at scientifically interesting locations within close proximity (tens of m) of pre-positioned robotic assets. This paper summarizes past successful entry, descent and landing systems and approaches being developed by the robotic Mars exploration program to increased landed performance (mass, accuracy and surface elevation). In addition, the entry, descent and landing sequence for a human exploration system will be reviewed, highlighting the technology and systems advances required.

  5. Simulating Descent and Landing of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Jain, Abhinandan; Martin, Bryan; Lim, Christopher; Henriquez, David; McMahon, Elihu; Sohl, Garrett; Banerjee, Pranab; Steele, Robert; Bentley, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent, and Surface landing (DSENDS) software performs high-fidelity simulation of the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of a spacecraft into the atmosphere and onto the surface of a planet or a smaller body. DSENDS is an extension of the DShell and DARTS programs, which afford capabilities for mathematical modeling of the dynamics of a spacecraft as a whole and of its instruments, actuators, and other subsystems. DSENDS enables the modeling (including real-time simulation) of flight-train elements and all spacecraft responses during various phases of EDL. DSENDS provides high-fidelity models of the aerodynamics of entry bodies and parachutes plus supporting models of atmospheres. Terrain and real-time responses of terrain-imaging radar and lidar instruments can also be modeled. The program includes modules for simulation of guidance, navigation, hypersonic steering, and powered descent. Automated state-machine-driven model switching is used to represent spacecraft separations and reconfigurations. Models for computing landing contact and impact forces are expected to be added. DSENDS can be used as a stand-alone program or incorporated into a larger program that simulates operations in real time.

  6. The q-G method : A q-version of the Steepest Descent method for global optimization.

    PubMed

    Soterroni, Aline C; Galski, Roberto L; Scarabello, Marluce C; Ramos, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the q-Gradient (q-G) method, a q-version of the Steepest Descent method, is presented. The main idea behind the q-G method is the use of the negative of the q-gradient vector of the objective function as the search direction. The q-gradient vector, or simply the q-gradient, is a generalization of the classical gradient vector based on the concept of Jackson's derivative from the q-calculus. Its use provides the algorithm an effective mechanism for escaping from local minima. The q-G method reduces to the Steepest Descent method when the parameter q tends to 1. The algorithm has three free parameters and it is implemented so that the search process gradually shifts from global exploration in the beginning to local exploitation in the end. We evaluated the q-G method on 34 test functions, and compared its performance with 34 optimization algorithms, including derivative-free algorithms and the Steepest Descent method. Our results show that the q-G method is competitive and has a great potential for solving multimodal optimization problems. PMID:26543781

  7. System for Estimating Horizontal Velocity During Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew; Cheng, Yang; Wilson, Reg; Goguen, Jay; Martin, Alejandro San; Leger, Chris; Matthies, Larry

    2007-01-01

    The descent image motion estimation system (DIMES) is a system of hardware and software, designed for original use in estimating the horizontal velocity of a spacecraft descending toward a landing on Mars. The estimated horizontal velocity is used in generating rocket-firing commands to reduce the horizontal velocity as part of an overall control scheme to minimize the landing impact. DIMES can also be used for estimating the horizontal velocity of a remotely controlled or autonomous aircraft for purposes of navigation and control.

  8. APOLLO 11: Lunar Module Separates for descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Separation of the Lunar module for descent to the Lunar surface From the film documentary 'APOLLO 11:'The eagle Has Landed'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 11: First manned lunar landing and return to Earth with Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin. Landed in the Sea of Tranquilityon July 20, 1969; deployed TV camera and EASEP experiments, performed lunar surface EVA, returned lunar soil samples. Mission Duration 195 hrs 18 min 35sec

  9. Stair ascent and descent at different inclinations.

    PubMed

    Riener, Robert; Rabuffetti, Marco; Frigo, Carlo

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanics and motor co-ordination in humans during stair climbing at different inclinations. Ten normal subjects ascended and descended a five-step staircase at three different inclinations (24 degrees, 30 degrees, 42 degrees ). Three steps were instrumented with force sensors and provided 6 dof ground reactions. Kinematics was analysed by a camera-based optoelectronic system. An inverse dynamics approach was applied to compute joint moments and powers. The different kinematic and kinetic patterns of stair ascent and descent were analysed and compared to level walking patterns. Temporal gait cycle parameters and ground reactions were not significantly affected by staircase inclination. Joint angles and moments showed a relatively low but significant dependency on the inclination. A large influence was observed in joint powers. This can be related to the varying amount of potential energy that has to be produced (during ascent) or absorbed (during descent) by the muscles. The kinematics and kinetics of staircase walking differ considerably from level walking. Interestingly, no definite signs could be found indicating that there is an adaptation or shift in the motor patterns when moving from level to stair walking. This can be clearly seen in the foot placement: compared to level walking, the forefoot strikes the ground first--independent from climbing direction and inclination. This and further findings suggest that there is a certain inclination angle or angular range where subjects do switch between a level walking and a stair walking gait pattern. PMID:11809579

  10. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  11. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  12. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  13. Learning dynamics of a single polar variable complex-valued neuron.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Tohru

    2015-05-01

    This letter investigates the characteristics of the complex-valued neuron model with parameters represented by polar coordinates (called polar variable complex-valued neuron). The parameters of the polar variable complex-valued neuron are unidentifiable. The plateau phenomenon can occur during learning of the polar variable complex-valued neuron. Furthermore, computer simulations suggest that a single polar variable complex-valued neuron has the following characteristics in the case of using the steepest gradient-descent method with square error: (1) unidentifiable parameters (singular points) degrade the learning speed and (2) a plateau can occur during learning. When the weight is attracted to the singular point, the learning tends to become stuck. However, computer simulations also show that the steepest gradient-descent method with amplitude-phase error and the complex-valued natural gradient method could reduce the effects of the singular points. The learning dynamics near singular points depends on the error functions and the training algorithms used. PMID:25774543

  14. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a) The following must be...

  15. Hair Breakage in Patients of African Descent: Role of Dermoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Martinez Velasco, María Abril; Tosti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy represents a useful technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of hair and scalp disorders. To date, little has been published regarding dermoscopy findings of hair disorders in patients of African descent. This article illustrates how dermoscopy allows fast diagnosis of hair breakage due to intrinsic factors and chemical damage in African descent patients. PMID:27170942

  16. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tomasso P.; Chen, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently places the Curiosity rove on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview to the MSL entry, descent and landing system design and preliminary flight performance results.

  17. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a) The following must be...

  18. 14 CFR 31.19 - Performance: Uncontrolled descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Performance: Uncontrolled descent. 31.19 Section 31.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.19 Performance: Uncontrolled descent. (a) The following must be...

  19. Distributed Control by Lagrangian Steepest Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Bieniawski, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Often adaptive, distributed control can be viewed as an iterated game between independent players. The coupling between the players mixed strategies, arising as the system evolves from one instant to the next, is determined by the system designer. Information theory tells us that the most likely joint strategy of the players, given a value of the expectation of the overall control objective function, is the minimizer of a function o the joint strategy. So the goal of the system designer is to speed evolution of the joint strategy to that Lagrangian mhimbhgpoint,lowerthe expectated value of the control objective function, and repeat Here we elaborate the theory of algorithms that do this using local descent procedures, and that thereby achieve efficient, adaptive, distributed control.

  20. Bridle Device in Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view of a portion of the descent stage of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory shows two of the stage's three spherical fuel tanks flanking the bridle device assembly. The photograph was taken in early October 2008 from the center of the descent stage looking outward. The top of the descent stage is toward the top of the image.

    The bridle device assembly is about two-thirds of a meter, or 2 feet, from top to bottom, and has two main parts. The cylinder on the top is the descent brake. The conical-shaped mechanism below that is the bridle assembly, including a spool of nylon and Vectran cords that will be attached to the rover.

    When pyrotechnic bolts fire to sever the rigid connection between the rover and the descent stage, gravity will pull the tethered rover away from the descent stage. The bridle or tether, attached to three points on the rover, will unspool from the bridle assembly, beginning from the larger-diameter portion. The rotation rate of the assembly, hence the descent rate of the rover, will be governed by the descent brake. Inside the housing of that brake are gear boxes and banks of mechanical resistors engineered to prevent the bridle from spooling out too quickly or too slowly. The length of the bridle will allow the rover to be lowered about 7.5 meters (25 feet) while still tethered to the descent stage.

    The Starsys division of SpaceDev Inc., Poway, Calif., provided the descent brake. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., built the bridle assembly. Vectran is a product of Kuraray Co. Ltd., Tokyo. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  1. Human and machine learning in non-Markovian decision making.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Aaron Michael; Friedrich, Johannes; Tartaglia, Elisa M; Marchesotti, Silvia; Senn, Walter; Herzog, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Humans can learn under a wide variety of feedback conditions. Reinforcement learning (RL), where a series of rewarded decisions must be made, is a particularly important type of learning. Computational and behavioral studies of RL have focused mainly on Markovian decision processes, where the next state depends on only the current state and action. Little is known about non-Markovian decision making, where the next state depends on more than the current state and action. Learning is non-Markovian, for example, when there is no unique mapping between actions and feedback. We have produced a model based on spiking neurons that can handle these non-Markovian conditions by performing policy gradient descent [1]. Here, we examine the model's performance and compare it with human learning and a Bayes optimal reference, which provides an upper-bound on performance. We find that in all cases, our population of spiking neurons model well-describes human performance. PMID:25898139

  2. Human and Machine Learning in Non-Markovian Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Aaron Michael; Friedrich, Johannes; Tartaglia, Elisa M.; Marchesotti, Silvia; Senn, Walter; Herzog, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Humans can learn under a wide variety of feedback conditions. Reinforcement learning (RL), where a series of rewarded decisions must be made, is a particularly important type of learning. Computational and behavioral studies of RL have focused mainly on Markovian decision processes, where the next state depends on only the current state and action. Little is known about non-Markovian decision making, where the next state depends on more than the current state and action. Learning is non-Markovian, for example, when there is no unique mapping between actions and feedback. We have produced a model based on spiking neurons that can handle these non-Markovian conditions by performing policy gradient descent [1]. Here, we examine the model’s performance and compare it with human learning and a Bayes optimal reference, which provides an upper-bound on performance. We find that in all cases, our population of spiking neurons model well-describes human performance. PMID:25898139

  3. ExoMars Entry, Descent, and Landing Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatekin, Özgür; Forget, Francois; Withers, Paul; Colombatti, Giacomo; Aboudan, Alessio; Lewis, Stephen; Ferri, Francesca; Van Hove, Bart; Gerbal, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Schiaparelli, the Entry Demonstrator Module (EDM) of the ESA ExoMars Program will to land on Mars on 19th October 2016. The ExoMars Atmospheric Mars Entry and Landing Investigations and Analysis (AMELIA) team seeks to exploit the Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) engineering measurements of Schiaparelli for scientific investigations of Mars' atmosphere and surface. ExoMars offers a rare opportunity to perform an in situ investigation of the martian environment over a wide altitude range. There has been only 7 successfully landing on the surface of Mars, from the Viking probes in the 1970's to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) in 2012. ExoMars EDM is equipped with an instrumented heat shield like MSL. These novel flight sensors complement conventional accelerometer and gyroscope instrumentation, and provide additional information to reconstruct atmospheric conditions with. This abstract outlines general atmospheric reconstruction methodology using complementary set of sensors and in particular the use of surface pressure and radio data. In addition, we discuss the lessons learned from previous EDL and the plans for ExoMars AMELIA data analysis.

  4. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutton, R. E.; Moore, H. J.; Scott, R. F.; Shorthill, R. W.; Spitzer, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift materials, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock.

  5. Surface erosion caused on Mars from Viking descent engine plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, R.E.; Moore, H.J.; Scott, R.F.; Shorthill, R.W.; Spitzer, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    During the Martian landings the descent engine plumes on Viking Lander 1 (VL-1) and Viking Lander 2 (VL-2) eroded the Martian surface materials. This had been anticipated and investigated both analytically and experimentally during the design phase of the Viking spacecraft. This paper presents data on erosion obtained during the tests of the Viking descent engine and the evidence for erosion by the descent engines of VL-1 and VL-2 on Mars. From these and other results, it is concluded that there are four distinct surface materials on Mars: (1) drift material, (2) crusty to cloddy material, (3) blocky material, and (4) rock. ?? 1980 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  6. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelscher, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing simulation was created over the past two years to serve as the primary Crew Exploration Vehicle guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis tool at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) simulation is a six degree-of-freedom tool with a unique design architecture which has a high level of flexibility. This paper describes the decision history and motivations that guided the creation of this simulation tool. The capabilities of the models within ANTARES are presented in detail. Special attention is given to features of the highly flexible GN&C architecture and the details of the implemented GN&C algorithms. ANTARES provides a foundation simulation for the Orion Project that has already been successfully used for requirements analysis, system definition analysis, and preliminary GN&C design analysis. ANTARES will find useful application in engineering analysis, mission operations, crew training, avionics-in-the-loop testing, etc. This paper focuses on the entry simulation aspect of ANTARES, which is part of a bigger simulation package supporting the entire mission profile of the Orion vehicle. The unique aspects of entry GN&C design are covered, including how the simulation is being used for Monte Carlo dispersion analysis and for support of linear stability analysis. Sample simulation output from ANTARES is presented in an appendix.

  7. Auroral precipitation and descent of thermospheric NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Sven; Espy, Patrick; Hibbins, Robert; Paxton, Larry; Funke, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Energetic particle precipitation in Auroras (E <20 keV) produces nitric oxide (NO) in the upper meso- and lower thermosphere region (UMLT). The subsequent descent of the NO produced in the UMLT to the lower meso- and upper stratosphere is referred to as the energetic particle precipitation indirect effect (EPP IE). The downwelling of NO produced in Auroras alters the chemistry of the mesosphere and upper stratosphere (e.g. by the NOx cycle) and possibly has important effects also on its dynamics. By observations of auroral precipitation from SSUSI(DMSP) and measurements of NO from MIPAS(ENVISAT) and SMR(ODIN) we investigate the quantitative relation of the electron fluxes and characteristic energies of auroral precipitation to the NO produced in the lower thermosphere and the subsequent downwelling of NO. Using additional ground-based (e.g. Meteor Radar, Microwave Radiometer) and satellite observations (SOFIE) we attempt to quantify the EPP IE and its impact on atmospheric chemistry and dynamics.

  8. Mars Exploration Rover Entry, Descent, and Landing: A Thermal Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Sunada, Eric T.; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.; Phillip, Charles J.

    2005-01-01

    Perhaps the most challenging mission phase for the Mars Exploration Rovers was the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). During this phase, the entry vehicle attached to its cruise stage was transformed into a stowed tetrahedral Lander that was surrounded by inflated airbags through a series of complex events. There was only one opportunity to successfully execute an automated command sequence without any possible ground intervention. The success of EDL was reliant upon the system thermal design: 1) to thermally condition EDL hardware from cruise storage temperatures to operating temperature ranges; 2) to maintain the Rover electronics within operating temperature ranges without the benefit of the cruise single phase cooling loop, which had been evacuated in preparation for EDL; and 3) to maintain the cruise stage propulsion components for the critical turn to entry attitude. Since the EDL architecture was inherited from Mars Pathfinder (MPF), the initial EDL thermal design would be inherited from MPF. However, hardware and implementation differences from MPF ultimately changed the MPF inheritance approach for the EDL thermal design. With the lack of full inheritance, the verification and validation of the EDL thermal design took on increased significance. This paper will summarize the verification and validation approach for the EDL thermal design along with applicable system level thermal testing results as well as appropriate thermal analyses. In addition, the lessons learned during the system-level testing will be discussed. Finally, the in-flight EDL experiences of both MER-A and -B missions (Spirit and Opportunity, respectively) will be presented, demonstrated how lessons learned from Spirit were applied to Opportunity.

  9. Manipulating the Gradient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  10. Design and Development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Guernsey, Carl S.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory mission successfully landed the largest interplanetary rover ever built, Curiosity, on the surface of Mars. The Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase of this mission was by far the most complex landing ever attempted on a planetary body. The Descent Stage Propulsion System played an integral and critical role during Curiosity's EDL. The Descent Stage Propulsion System was a one of a kind hydrazine propulsion system designed specifically for the EDL phase of the MSL mission. It was designed, built, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the design and development of the MSL Descent Stage Propulsion System. Driving requirements, system design, component selection, operational sequence of the system at Mars, new developments, and key challenges will be discussed.

  11. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  12. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  13. Ascent/descent ancillary data production user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brans, H. R.; Seacord, A. W., II; Ulmer, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Product, also called the A/D BET because it contains a Best Estimate of the Trajectory (BET), is a collection of trajectory, attitude, and atmospheric related parameters computed for the ascent and descent phases of each Shuttle Mission. These computations are executed shortly after the event in a post-flight environment. A collection of several routines including some stand-alone routines constitute what is called the Ascent/Descent Ancillary Data Production Program. A User's Guide for that program is given. It is intended to provide the reader with all the information necessary to generate an Ascent or a Descent Ancillary Data Product. It includes descriptions of the input data and output data for each routine, and contains explicit instructions on how to run each routine. A description of the final output product is given.

  14. Air-Traffic Controllers Evaluate The Descent Advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of Descent Advisor algorithm: software automation aid intended to assist air-traffic controllers in spacing traffic and meeting specified times or arrival. Based partly on mathematical models of weather conditions and performances of aircraft, it generates suggested clearances, including top-of-descent points and speed-profile data to attain objectives. Study focused on operational characteristics with specific attention to how it can be used for prediction, spacing, and metering.

  15. Design principles of descent vehicles with an inflatable braking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexashkin, S. N.; Pichkhadze, K. M.; Finchenko, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    A new type of descent vehicle (DVs) is described: a descent vehicle with an inflatable braking device (IBD DV). IBD development issues, as well as materials needed for the design, manufacturing, and testing of an IBD and its thermal protection, are discussed. A list is given of Russian integrated test facilities intended for testing IBD DVs. Progress is described in the development of IBD DVs in Russia and abroad.

  16. Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Descent from the Summit of 'Husband Hill' (QTVR)

    In late November 2005 while descending 'Husband Hill,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took the most detailed panorama so far of the 'Inner Basin,' the rover's next target destination. Spirit acquired the 405 individual images that make up this 360-degree view of the surrounding terrain using five different filters on the panoramic camera. The rover took the images on Martian days, or sols, 672 to 677 (Nov. 23 to 28, 2005 -- the Thanksgiving holiday weekend).

    This image is an approximately true-color rendering using camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. Seams between individual frames have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

    'Home Plate,' a bright, semi-circular feature scientists hope to investigate, is harder to discern in this image than in earlier views taken from higher up the hill. Spirit acquired this more oblique view, known as the 'Seminole panorama,' from about halfway down the south flank of Husband Hill, 50 meters (164 feet) or so below the summit. Near the center of the panorama, on the horizon, are 'McCool Hill' and 'Ramon Hill,' named, like Husband Hill, in honor of the fallen astronauts of the space shuttle Columbia. Husband Hill is visible behind the rover, on the right and left sides of the panorama. An arc of rover tracks made while avoiding obstacles and getting into position to examine rock outcrops can be traced over a long distance by zooming in to explore the panorama in greater detail.

    Spirit is now significantly farther downhill toward the center of this panorama, en route to Home Plate and other enigmatic soils and outcrop rocks in the quest to uncover the history of Gusev Crater and the 'Columbia Hills.'

  17. A descent of the aurora over Lapland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiter, Daniel; Partamies, Noora

    2014-05-01

    A very large statistical study (≃ 4 × 105 measurements) into the peak emission height of the aurora has shown that the aurora over Lapland descended significantly between 1996 and 2007. The study was performed using images from a network of ground-based all-sky cameras which form part of the MIRACLE (Magnetometers-Ionospheric Radar-All-sky Cameras Large Experiment) network, and are located at various observation stations across northern Finland and Sweden. The height of the aurora was first measured about a century ago. Since then, it has generally been assumed that the peak emission height of any particular auroral emission is constant for similar geomagnetic conditions. The present work was motivated by the need to improve estimates of the height of the aurora used to calculate other ionospheric and auroral properties, such as optical flow velocities and auroral arc widths. In recent years MIRACLE has produced approximately 105 images of the aurora per station per year. In order to analyse such a large number of images, a novel fast and automatic method was developed for finding the peak emission height of an auroral structure from a pair of all-sky camera images with overlapping fields of view. This method has been applied to all auroral images recorded by the MIRACLE intensified CCD cameras in operation between 1996 and 2007. Such a large data set allows the study of variations in the height of the aurora with time (yearly, monthly, hourly) and with solar and geomagnetic indices such as F10.7 and Kp. Results from the statistical study show that the peak emission height of green (557.7 nm, O1S - O1D transition) aurora over Lapland descended by about 10 km between 1996 and 2007. This descent occurred independently of the solar cycle, and is thought to be due to a cooling and contraction of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  18. Importance of Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Join Fernando Abilleira, a NASA trajectory analyst for the Mars Exploration Office, and learn all the new technologies developed with the new Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity to enter and land saf...

  19. Design of automation tools for management of descent traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Nedell, William

    1988-01-01

    The design of an automated air traffic control system based on a hierarchy of advisory tools for controllers is described. Compatibility of the tools with the human controller, a key objective of the design, is achieved by a judicious selection of tasks to be automated and careful attention to the design of the controller system interface. The design comprises three interconnected subsystems referred to as the Traffic Management Advisor, the Descent Advisor, and the Final Approach Spacing Tool. Each of these subsystems provides a collection of tools for specific controller positions and tasks. This paper focuses primarily on the Descent Advisor which provides automation tools for managing descent traffic. The algorithms, automation modes, and graphical interfaces incorporated in the design are described. Information generated by the Descent Advisor tools is integrated into a plan view traffic display consisting of a high-resolution color monitor. Estimated arrival times of aircraft are presented graphically on a time line, which is also used interactively in combination with a mouse input device to select and schedule arrival times. Other graphical markers indicate the location of the fuel-optimum top-of-descent point and the predicted separation distances of aircraft at a designated time-control point. Computer generated advisories provide speed and descent clearances which the controller can issue to aircraft to help them arrive at the feeder gate at the scheduled times or with specified separation distances. Two types of horizontal guidance modes, selectable by the controller, provide markers for managing the horizontal flightpaths of aircraft under various conditions. The entire system consisting of descent advisor algorithm, a library of aircraft performance models, national airspace system data bases, and interactive display software has been implemented on a workstation made by Sun Microsystems, Inc. It is planned to use this configuration in operational

  20. Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) on the Mars Polar Lander

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Caplinger, M.A.; Carr, M.H.; Squyres, S.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Mars Descent Imager, or MARDI, experiment on the Mars Polar Lander (MPL) consists of a camera characterized by small physical size and mass (???6 ?? 6 ?? 12 cm, including baffle; <500 gm), low power requirements (<2.5 W, including power supply losses), and high science performance (1000 x 1000 pixel, low noise). The intent of the investigation is to acquire nested images over a range of resolutions, from 8 m/pixel to better than 1 cm/pixel, during the roughly 2 min it takes the MPL to descend from 8 km to the surface under parachute and rocket-powered deceleration. Observational goals will include studies of (1) surface morphology (e.g., nature and distribution of landforms indicating past and present environmental processes); (2) local and regional geography (e.g., context for other lander instruments: precise location, detailed local relief); and (3) relationships to features seen in orbiter data. To accomplish these goals, MARDI will collect three types of images. Four small images (256 x 256 pixels) will be acquired on 0.5 s centers beginning 0.3 s before MPL's heatshield is jettisoned. Sixteen full-frame images (1024 X 1024, circularly edited) will be acquired on 5.3 s centers thereafter. Just after backshell jettison but prior to the start of powered descent, a "best final nonpowered descent image" will be acquired. Five seconds after the start of powered descent, the camera will begin acquiring images on 4 s centers. Storage for as many as ten 800 x 800 pixel images is available during terminal descent. A number of spacecraft factors are likely to impact the quality of MARDI images, including substantial motion blur resulting from large rates of attitude variation during parachute descent and substantial rocket-engine-induced vibration during powered descent. In addition, the mounting location of the camera places the exhaust plume of the hydrazine engines prominently in the field of view. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Active Semi-Supervised Learning Method with Hybrid Deep Belief Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shusen; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm called active hybrid deep belief networks (AHD), to address the semi-supervised sentiment classification problem with deep learning. First, we construct the previous several hidden layers using restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM), which can reduce the dimension and abstract the information of the reviews quickly. Second, we construct the following hidden layers using convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (CRBM), which can abstract the information of reviews effectively. Third, the constructed deep architecture is fine-tuned by gradient-descent based supervised learning with an exponential loss function. Finally, active learning method is combined based on the proposed deep architecture. We did several experiments on five sentiment classification datasets, and show that AHD is competitive with previous semi-supervised learning algorithm. Experiments are also conducted to verify the effectiveness of our proposed method with different number of labeled reviews and unlabeled reviews respectively. PMID:25208128

  2. Active semi-supervised learning method with hybrid deep belief networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shusen; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel semi-supervised learning algorithm called active hybrid deep belief networks (AHD), to address the semi-supervised sentiment classification problem with deep learning. First, we construct the previous several hidden layers using restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM), which can reduce the dimension and abstract the information of the reviews quickly. Second, we construct the following hidden layers using convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (CRBM), which can abstract the information of reviews effectively. Third, the constructed deep architecture is fine-tuned by gradient-descent based supervised learning with an exponential loss function. Finally, active learning method is combined based on the proposed deep architecture. We did several experiments on five sentiment classification datasets, and show that AHD is competitive with previous semi-supervised learning algorithm. Experiments are also conducted to verify the effectiveness of our proposed method with different number of labeled reviews and unlabeled reviews respectively. PMID:25208128

  3. Fault-tolerant nonlinear adaptive flight control using sliding mode online learning.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Schnetter, Philipp; Placzek, Robin; Vörsmann, Peter

    2012-08-01

    An expanded nonlinear model inversion flight control strategy using sliding mode online learning for neural networks is presented. The proposed control strategy is implemented for a small unmanned aircraft system (UAS). This class of aircraft is very susceptible towards nonlinearities like atmospheric turbulence, model uncertainties and of course system failures. Therefore, these systems mark a sensible testbed to evaluate fault-tolerant, adaptive flight control strategies. Within this work the concept of feedback linearization is combined with feed forward neural networks to compensate for inversion errors and other nonlinear effects. Backpropagation-based adaption laws of the network weights are used for online training. Within these adaption laws the standard gradient descent backpropagation algorithm is augmented with the concept of sliding mode control (SMC). Implemented as a learning algorithm, this nonlinear control strategy treats the neural network as a controlled system and allows a stable, dynamic calculation of the learning rates. While considering the system's stability, this robust online learning method therefore offers a higher speed of convergence, especially in the presence of external disturbances. The SMC-based flight controller is tested and compared with the standard gradient descent backpropagation algorithm in the presence of system failures. PMID:22386784

  4. Crew Procedures for Continuous Descent Arrivals Using Conventional Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Williams, David H.; Lewis, Elliot T,

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents results from a simulation study which investigated the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures for conducting a descent through a busy terminal area, using conventional transport-category automation. This research was part of the Low Noise Flight Procedures (LNFP) element within the Quiet Aircraft Technology (QAT) Project, that addressed development of flight guidance, and supporting pilot and Air Traffic Control (ATC) procedures for low noise operations. The procedures and chart were designed to be easy to understand, and to make it easy for the crew to make changes via the Flight Management Computer Control-Display Unit (FMC-CDU) to accommodate changes from ATC. The test runs were intended to represent situations typical of what exists in many of today's terminal areas, including interruptions to the descent in the form of clearances issued by ATC.

  5. MSL Entry, Descent and Landing Performance and Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, Mary Kae; Dwyer-Cianciola, Alicia; Dyakonov, Artem; Edquist, Karl; Powell, Dick; Striepe, Scott; Way, David; Graves, Claude; Carman, Gil; Sostaric, Ron

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the MARS Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) performance and environments is shown. The topics include: 1) High Altitude and Precision Landing; 2) Guided, Lifting, Ballistic Trade; 3) Supersonic Chute Deploy Altitude; 4) Guided, Lifting, Ballistic Landing Footprint Video; 5) Transition Indicator at Peak Heating Point on Trajectory; 6) Aeroheating at Peak Heating Point on Trajectory Nominal, No Uncertainty Included; 7) Comparison to Previous Missions; 8) Pork Chop Plots - EDL Performance for Mission Design; 9) Max Heat Rate Est (CBE+Uncert) W/cm2; 10) Nominal Super Chute Deploy Alt Above MOLA (km); 11) Monte Carlo; 12) MSL Option M2 Entry, Descent and Landing; 13) Entry Performance; 14) Entry Aeroheating and Entry g's; 15) Terminal Descent; and 16) How An Ideal Chute Deployment Altitude Varies with Time of Year and Latitude (JSC Chart).

  6. Democratic reinforcement: learning via self-organization

    SciTech Connect

    Stassinopoulos, D.; Bak, P.

    1995-12-31

    The problem of learning in the absence of external intelligence is discussed in the context of a simple model. The model consists of a set of randomly connected, or layered integrate-and fire neurons. Inputs to and outputs from the environment are connected randomly to subsets of neurons. The connections between firing neurons are strengthened or weakened according to whether the action is successful or not. The model departs from the traditional gradient-descent based approaches to learning by operating at a highly susceptible ``critical`` state, with low activity and sparse connections between firing neurons. Quantitative studies on the performance of our model in a simple association task show that by tuning our system close to this critical state we can obtain dramatic gains in performance.

  7. Mars Smart Lander Simulations for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striepe, S. A.; Way, D. W.; Balaram, J.

    2002-01-01

    Two primary simulations have been developed and are being updated for the Mars Smart Lander Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL). The high fidelity engineering end-to-end EDL simulation that is based on NASA Langley's Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) and the end-to-end real-time, hardware-in-the-loop simulation testbed, which is based on NASA JPL's (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS). This paper presents the status of these Mars Smart Lander EDL end-to-end simulations at this time. Various models, capabilities, as well as validation and verification for these simulations are discussed.

  8. Flight Data Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Repository

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Elmain M.; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Winterhalter, NASA Engineering and Safety Center Chief Engineer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsor a 3-year effort to collect entry, descent, and landing material and to establish a NASA-wide archive to serve the material. The principle focus of this task was to identify entry, descent, and landing repository material that was at risk of being permanently lost due to damage, decay, and undocumented storage. To provide NASA-wide access to this material, a web-based digital archive was created. This document contains the outcome of the effort.

  9. Space shuttle descent design: From development to operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.; Hite, R. E., III

    1985-01-01

    The descent guidance system, the descent trajectories design, and generating of the associated flight products are discussed. The programs which allow the successful transitions from development to STS operations, resulting in reduced manpower requirements and compressed schedules for flight design cycles are addressed. The topics include: (1) continually upgraded tools for the job, i.e., consolidating tools via electronic data transfers, tailoring general purpose software for needs, easy access to tools through an interactive approach, and appropriate flexibility to allow design changes and provide growth capability; (2) stabilizing the flight profile designs (I-loads) in an uncertain environment; and (3) standardizing external interfaces within performance and subsystems constraints of the Orbiter.

  10. Rosetta Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and Philae's Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-09-01

    In November 2014 the Rosetta mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its Philae lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more challenging. Philae fell almost radially towards 67P, as shown in an animation produced by the European Space Agency (ESA) prior to the event. Below, we investigate whether it is possible to model the spacecraft's descent time and impact speed using concepts taught in an introductory physics course.

  11. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 1 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Komar, David R.; Munk, Michelle M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wilhite, Alan W.; Kinney, David J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Howard, Austin R.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Studak, Joseph W.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.; Casoliva, Jordi; Ivanov, Mark C.; Clark, Ian; Sengupta, Anita

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the motivation, approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission

  12. ATMOS/ATLAS-3 Observations of Long-Lived Tracers and Descent in the Antarctic Vortex in November 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. C.; Manney, G. L.; Gunson, M. R.; Abbas, M. M.; Chang, A. Y.; Goldman, A.; Irion, F. W.; Michelsen, H. A.; Newchurch, M. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Salawitch, R. J.; Stiller, G. P.; Zander, R.

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the long-lived tracers N2O, CH4 and HF obtained by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument in early November 1994 are used to estimate average descent rates during winter in the Antarctic polar vortex of 0.5 to 1.5 km/month in the lower stratosphere, and 2.5 to 3.5 km/month in the middle and upper stratosphere. Descent rates inferred from ATMOS tracer observations agree well with theoretical estimates obtained using radiative heating calculations. Air of mesospheric origin (N2O less than 5 ppbV) was observed at altitudes above about 25 km within the vortex. Strong horizontal gradients of tracer mixing ratios, the presence of mesospheric air in the vortex in early spring, and the variation with altitude of inferred descent rates indicate that the Antarctic vortex is highly isolated from midlatitudes throughout the winter from approximately 20 km to the stratopause. The 1994 Antarctic vortex remained well isolated between 20 and 30 km through at least mid-November.

  13. Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, James F.; Bodie, James H.; Brown, Joseph D.; Chen, Allen; Chen, Curtis W.; Essmiller, John C.; Fisher, Charles D.; Goldberg, Hannah R.; Lee, Steven W.; Shaffer, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will deliver a 900 kg rover to the surface of Mars in August 2012. MSL will utilize a new pulse-Doppler landing radar, the Terminal Descent Sensor (TDS). The TDS employs six narrow-beam antennas to provide unprecedented slant range and velocity performance at Mars to enable soft touchdown of the MSL rover using a unique sky crane Entry, De-scent, and Landing (EDL) technique. Prior to use on MSL, the TDS was put through a rigorous verification and validation (V&V) process. A key element of this V&V was operating the TDS over a series of field tests, using flight-like profiles expected during the descent and landing of MSL over Mars-like terrain on Earth. Limits of TDS performance were characterized with additional testing meant to stress operational modes outside of the expected EDL flight profiles. The flight envelope over which the TDS must operate on Mars encompasses such a large range of altitudes and velocities that a variety of venues were neces-sary to cover the test space. These venues included an F/A-18 high performance aircraft, a Eurocopter AS350 AStar helicopter and 100-meter tall Echo Towers at the China Lake Naval Air Warfare Center. Testing was carried out over a five year period from July 2006 to June 2011. TDS performance was shown, in gen-eral, to be excellent over all venues. This paper describes the planning, design, and implementation of the field test campaign plus results and lessons learned.

  14. A Portfolio of Outstanding Americans of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelevier, Benjamin, Jr.

    A cross section of Mexican American achievement is presented in a portfolio of 37 portraits of outstanding Americans of Mexican descent. Drawn in black and white on heavy paper stock by Mr. David L. Rodriguez, the sketches are suitable for display purposes. With the likenesses are biographical sketches in both English and Spanish which were…

  15. LANDER program manual: A lunar ascent and descent simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    LANDER is a computer program used to predict the trajectory and flight performance of a spacecraft ascending or descending between a low lunar orbit of 15 to 500 nautical miles (nm) and the lunar surface. It is a three degree-of-freedom simulation which is used to analyze the translational motion of the vehicle during descent. Attitude dynamics and rotational motion are not considered. The program can be used to simulate either an ascent from the Moon or a descent to the Moon. For an ascent, the spacecraft is initialized at the lunar surface and accelerates vertically away from the ground at full thrust. When the local velocity becomes 30 ft/s, the vehicle turns downrange with a pitch-over maneuver and proceeds to fly a gravity turn until Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). The spacecraft then coasts until it reaches the requested holding orbit where it performs an orbital insertion burn. During a descent simulation, the lander begins in the holding orbit and performs a deorbit burn. It then coasts to pericynthion, where it reignites its engines and begins a gravity turn descent. When the local horizontal velocity becomes zero, the lander pitches up to a vertical orientation and begins to hover in search of a landing site. The lander hovers for a period of time specified by the user, and then lands.

  16. "Rosetta" Mission's "7 Hours of Terror" and "Philae's" Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Philip

    2015-01-01

    In November 2014 the "Rosetta" mission to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko made the headlines when its "Philae" lander completed a successful unpowered descent onto the surface of the comet nucleus after "7 hours of terror" for the mission scientists. 67P's irregular shape and rotation made this task even more…

  17. Stress within a Bicultural Context for Adolescents of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Andrea J.; Roberts, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Folkman and Lazarus's theory of stress and coping was used to develop a measure assessing the perceived stress within a bicultural context. Middle school students of Mexican descent (N=881) reported their perceived stress from intergenerational acculturation gaps, within-group discrimination, out-group discrimination, and monolingual stress.…

  18. A Comparison of Inexact Newton and Coordinate Descent Meshoptimization Technqiues

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L F; Knupp, P; Munson, T; Shontz, S

    2004-07-08

    We compare inexact Newton and coordinate descent methods for optimizing the quality of a mesh by repositioning the vertices, where quality is measured by the harmonic mean of the mean-ratio metric. The effects of problem size, element size heterogeneity, and various vertex displacement schemes on the performance of these algorithms are assessed for a series of tetrahedral meshes.

  19. Abuse against Women with Disabilities of Mexican Descent: Cultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, Noreen M.; Reed, Bruce J.; Sanchez, Rubi

    2008-01-01

    Although considerable attention has been focused on violence against women with disabilities, environmental and cultural factors that contribute to this violence have received limited attention. This paper examines violence against women of Mexican descent with disabilities. Recommendations are offered to researchers, educators, and service…

  20. 14 CFR 23.69 - Enroute climb/descent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Enroute climb/descent. 23.69 Section 23.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.69...

  1. The Challenge of Mars EDL (Entry, Descent, and Landing)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the some of the challenges of Martian atmospheric entry, descent and landing (EDL) on the surface of Mars. It reviews some of the technological difficulties, and some solutions that are being developed for future unmanned missions with larger payloads than previous landers, and ultimately human spacecraft landing.

  2. Simulation Results for Airborne Precision Spacing along Continuous Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Abbott, Terence S.; Capron, William R.; Baxley, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a fast-time simulation experiment and a high-fidelity simulator validation with merging streams of aircraft flying Continuous Descent Arrivals through generic airspace to a runway at Dallas-Ft Worth. Aircraft made small speed adjustments based on an airborne-based spacing algorithm, so as to arrive at the threshold exactly at the assigned time interval behind their Traffic-To-Follow. The 40 aircraft were initialized at different altitudes and speeds on one of four different routes, and then merged at different points and altitudes while flying Continuous Descent Arrivals. This merging and spacing using flight deck equipment and procedures to augment or implement Air Traffic Management directives is called Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing, an important subset of a larger Airborne Precision Spacing functionality. This research indicates that Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing initiated while at cruise altitude and well prior to the Terminal Radar Approach Control entry can significantly contribute to the delivery of aircraft at a specified interval to the runway threshold with a high degree of accuracy and at a reduced pilot workload. Furthermore, previously documented work has shown that using a Continuous Descent Arrival instead of a traditional step-down descent can save fuel, reduce noise, and reduce emissions. Research into Flight Deck-based Merging and Spacing is a cooperative effort between government and industry partners.

  3. Women of African Descent: Persistence in Completing Doctorates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddrisu, Vannetta Bailey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the educational persistence of women of African descent (WOAD) in pursuit of a doctorate degree at universities in the southeastern United States. WOAD are women of African ancestry born outside the African continent. These women are heirs to an inner dogged determination and spirit to survive despite all odds (Pulliam, 2003,…

  4. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group and the Reconstruction of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton*, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of NASA, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997 and arrived at Saturn in 2004. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. It was recognized early in the Huygens program that to correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for ground truth calibration of the Cassini orbiter remote sensing observations, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location would be necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG) was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team. With membership comprising representatives from all the probe engineering and instrument teams as well as representatives of industry and the Cassini and Huygens Project Scientists, the DTWG presented an organizational framework within which instrument data was shared, the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction implemented, and the trajectory reconstruction efficiently disseminated. The primary goal of the Descent Trajectory Working Group was to develop retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry interface altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe, and to provide a reconstruction of the Huygens probe trajectory from entry to the surface of Titan that is maximally consistent with all available engineering and science

  5. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability

  6. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Martin, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface. Our development and assessments show clearly that this kind of inflatable technology originally developed for the Martian atmosphere, is feasible for use by Earth entry and descent applications. The preliminary results are highly promising indicating that the current Mars probe design could be used as it is for the Earth. According tp our analyses, the higher atmospheric pressure at an altitude of 12 km and less requires an additional pressurizing device for the in atable system increasing the entry mass by approximately 2 kg. These analyses involved the calculation of 120 different atmospheric entry and descent trajectories. The analysis of the existing technologies and current trends have indicated that the kind of inflatable technology pursued by RITD has high potential to enhance the European space technology expertise. This kind of technology is clearly feasible for utilization by Earth entry and descent applications.

  7. Learning and optimization with cascaded VLSI neural network building-block chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, T.; Eberhardt, S. P.; Tran, M.; Daud, T.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    To demonstrate the versatility of the building-block approach, two neural network applications were implemented on cascaded analog VLSI chips. Weights were implemented using 7-b multiplying digital-to-analog converter (MDAC) synapse circuits, with 31 x 32 and 32 x 32 synapses per chip. A novel learning algorithm compatible with analog VLSI was applied to the two-input parity problem. The algorithm combines dynamically evolving architecture with limited gradient-descent backpropagation for efficient and versatile supervised learning. To implement the learning algorithm in hardware, synapse circuits were paralleled for additional quantization levels. The hardware-in-the-loop learning system allocated 2-5 hidden neurons for parity problems. Also, a 7 x 7 assignment problem was mapped onto a cascaded 64-neuron fully connected feedback network. In 100 randomly selected problems, the network found optimal or good solutions in most cases, with settling times in the range of 7-100 microseconds.

  8. Irradiance gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.J. Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne ); Heckbert, P.S. . School of Computer Science Technische Hogeschool Delft . Dept. of Technical Mathematics and Informatics)

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  9. Analysis of various descent trajectories for a hypersonic-cruise, cold-wall research airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    The probable descent operating conditions for a hypersonic air-breathing research airplane were examined. Descents selected were cruise angle of attack, high dynamic pressure, high lift coefficient, turns, and descents with drag brakes. The descents were parametrically exercised and compared from the standpoint of cold-wall (367 K) aircraft heat load. The descent parameters compared were total heat load, peak heating rate, time to landing, time to end of heat pulse, and range. Trends in total heat load as a function of cruise Mach number, cruise dynamic pressure, angle-of-attack limitation, pull-up g-load, heading angle, and drag-brake size are presented.

  10. A Symmetric Time-Varying Cluster Rate of Descent Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    A model of the time-varying rate of descent of the Orion vehicle was developed based on the observed correlation between canopy projected area and drag coefficient. This initial version of the model assumes cluster symmetry and only varies the vertical component of velocity. The cluster fly-out angle is modeled as a series of sine waves based on flight test data. The projected area of each canopy is synchronized with the primary fly-out angle mode. The sudden loss of projected area during canopy collisions is modeled at minimum fly-out angles, leading to brief increases in rate of descent. The cluster geometry is converted to drag coefficient using empirically derived constants. A more complete model is under development, which computes the aerodynamic response of each canopy to its local incidence angle.

  11. Helicopter optimal descent and landing after power loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    An optimal control solution is obtained for the descent and landing of a helicopter after the loss of power in level flight. The model considers the helicopter vertical velocity, horizontal velocity, and rotor speed; and it includes representations of ground effect, rotor inflow time lag, pilot reaction time, rotor stall, and the induced velocity curve in the vortex ring state. The control (rotor thrust magnitude and direction) required to minimize the vertical and horizontal velocity at contact with the ground is obtained using nonlinear optimal control theory. It is found that the optimal descent after power loss in hover is a purely vertical flight path. Good correlation, even quantitatively, is found between the calculations and (non-optimal) flight test results.

  12. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, H.; Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric re-entry and descent system concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques that were originally developed for Mars. The ultimate goal of this EU-funded RITD-project (Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development) was to assess the benefits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develop a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and even Lunar applications envisaged include the use of the EDLS approach in returning payloads of 4-8 kg down to the surface.

  13. Optimum climb and descent trajectories for airline missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, H.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of optimum fixed-range trajectories whose structure is constrained to climb, steady cruise, and descent segments are derived by application of optimal control theory. The performance function consists of the sum of fuel and time costs, referred to as direct operating cost (DOC). The state variable is range to go and the independent variable is energy. In this formulation a cruise segment always occurs at the optimum cruise energy for sufficiently large range. At short ranges (400 n. mi. and less), a cruise segment may also occur below the optimum cruise energy. The existence of such a cruise segment depends primarily on the fuel flow vs thrust characteristics and on thrust constraints. If thrust is a free control variable along with airspeed, it is shown that such cruise segments will not generally occur. If thrust is constrained to some maximum value in climb and to some minimum in descent, such cruise segments generally will occur.

  14. Apollo LM guidance computer software for the final lunar descent.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyles, D.

    1973-01-01

    In all manned lunar landings to date, the lunar module Commander has taken partial manual control of the spacecraft during the final stage of the descent, below roughly 500 ft altitude. This report describes programs developed at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, MIT, for use in the LM's guidance computer during the final descent. At this time computational demands on the on-board computer are at a maximum, and particularly close interaction with the crew is necessary. The emphasis is on the design of the computer software rather than on justification of the particular guidance algorithms employed. After the computer and the mission have been introduced, the current configuration of the final landing programs and an advanced version developed experimentally by the author are described.

  15. Flight Management System Execution of Idle-Thrust Descents in Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel L.

    2011-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the trajectory predictor and its error models, commercial flights executed idle-thrust descents, and the recorded data includes the target speed profile and FMS intent trajectories. The FMS computes the intended descent path assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and any intervention by the controllers that alters the FMS execution of the descent is recorded so that such flights are discarded from the analysis. The horizontal flight path, cruise and meter fix altitudes, and actual TOD location are extracted from the radar data. Using more than 60 descents in Boeing 777 aircraft, the actual speeds are compared to the intended descent speed profile. In addition, three aspects of the accuracy of the FMS intent trajectory are analyzed: the meter fix crossing time, the TOD location, and the altitude at the meter fix. The actual TOD location is within 5 nmi of the intent location for over 95% of the descents. Roughly 90% of the time, the airspeed is within 0.01 of the target Mach number and within 10 KCAS of the target descent CAS, but the meter fix crossing time is only within 50 sec of the time computed by the FMS. Overall, the aircraft seem to be executing the descents as intended by the designers of the onboard automation.

  16. A new steepest descent method with global convergence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Zubai'ah Zainal; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd.

    2016-06-01

    One of the earliest and the best method to minimize a function is the classical steepest descent (SD) method. In this paper, a new modification of SD method is suggested using a new search direction, d k. The numerical results are presented based on number of iterations and CPU time. It shows that the new d k are efficient when compared to the classical SD.

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of Stair Descent in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Tatsuya; Katsuhira, Junji

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were to investigate the lower extremity joint kinematics and kinetics of patients with the knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) during stair descent and clarify the biomechanical factors related to their difficulty in stair descent. [Subjects and Methods] Eight healthy elderly persons and four knee OA patients participated in this study. A 3-D motion analysis system and force plates were employed to measure lower extremity joint angles, ranges of motion, joint moments, joint powers, and ratios of contribution for the joint powers while descending stairs. [Results] Knee joint flexion angle, extension moment, and negative power during the early stance phase in the knee OA group were smaller than those in the healthy subjects group. However, no significant changes in these parameters in the ankle joint were observed between the two subject groups. [Conclusion] Knee OA patients could not use the knee joint to absorb impact during the early stance phase of stair descent. Hence, they might compensate for the roles played by the intact knee joint by mainly using ipsilateral ankle kinematics and kinetics. PMID:24926119

  18. Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance of the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Prince, Jill L.; Wueen, Eric M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    On May 25, 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander successfully landed on the northern arctic plains of Mars. An overview of a preliminary reconstruction analysis performed on each entry, descent, and landing phase to assess the performance of Phoenix as it descended is presented and a comparison to pre-entry predictions is provided. The landing occurred 21 km further downrange than the predicted landing location. Analysis of the flight data revealed that the primary cause of Phoenix s downrange landing was a higher trim total angle of attack during the hypersonic phase of the entry, which resulted in Phoenix flying a slightly lifting trajectory. The cause of this higher trim attitude is not known at this time. Parachute deployment was 6.4 s later than prediction. This later deployment time was within the variations expected and is consistent with a lifting trajectory. The parachute deployment and inflation process occurred as expected with no anomalies identified. The subsequent parachute descent and powered terminal landing also behaved as expected. A preliminary reconstruction of the landing day atmospheric density profile was found to be lower than the best apriori prediction, ranging from a few percent less to a maximum of 8%. A comparison of the flight reconstructed trajectory parameters shows that the actual Phoenix entry, descent, and landing was close to pre-entry predictions. This reconstruction investigation is currently ongoing and the results to date are in the process of being refined.

  19. Airborne Management of Traffic Conflicts in Descent With Arrival Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Barhydt, Richard; Krishnamurthy, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    NASA is studying far-term air traffic management concepts that may increase operational efficiency through a redistribution of decisionmaking authority among airborne and ground-based elements of the air transportation system. One component of this research, En Route Free Maneuvering, allows trained pilots of equipped autonomous aircraft to assume responsibility for traffic separation. Ground-based air traffic controllers would continue to separate traffic unequipped for autonomous operations and would issue flow management constraints to all aircraft. To evaluate En Route Free Maneuvering operations, a human-in-the-loop experiment was jointly conducted by the NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers. In this experiment, test subject pilots used desktop flight simulators to resolve conflicts in cruise and descent, and to adhere to air traffic flow constraints issued by test subject controllers. Simulators at NASA Langley were equipped with a prototype Autonomous Operations Planner (AOP) flight deck toolset to assist pilots with conflict management and constraint compliance tasks. Results from the experiment are presented, focusing specifically on operations during the initial descent into the terminal area. Airborne conflict resolution performance in descent, conformance to traffic flow management constraints, and the effects of conflicting traffic on constraint conformance are all presented. Subjective data from subject pilots are also presented, showing perceived levels of workload, safety, and acceptability of autonomous arrival operations. Finally, potential AOP functionality enhancements are discussed along with suggestions to improve arrival procedures.

  20. Free-falls and parachute descents in the standard atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A P

    1947-01-01

    A detailed table of the standard equilibrium velocity and standard equilibrium time is presented for bodies falling in the standard atmosphere. This table gives the velocity at various altitudes and the time of fall from sea level to -4000 feet and from 80,000 feet to sea level. In addition to this standard table, there are given short tables and charts of an open-parachute descent and free-falls; the terminal velocity at sea level, and the variation of the weight-to-drag ratio (2w/cds)1/2 for various weight jumpers from 90 to 30 feet in open-parachute descent; and estimations of drag coefficients of silk and nylon parachutes. The table of standard equilibrium velocities and standard equilibrium times may be used directly for open-parachute descents, given the weight of the jumper, the diameter of the parachute, and the drag coefficient. For free-falls starting from horizontal flight, approximately 14 seconds must be added to the equilibrium time given in the table to obtain the total time to sea level. (author)

  1. Factors Associated with Sleep Disturbance in Women of Mexican Descent

    PubMed Central

    Heilemann, MarySue V.; Choudhury, Shonali M.; Kury, Felix Salvador; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The aims were to identify the most useful parameters of acculturation in relation to self reported sleep disturbance and describe risk factors for sleep disturbance in women of Mexican descent. Background Little is known about acculturation as a factor for poor sleep in the context of other personal factors such as income or sense of resilience or mastery for Latinas in the United States. Methods These personal factors were incorporated into a modification of the Conceptual Framework of Impaired Sleep to guide our secondary analysis of self-reported sleep disturbance. Cross sectional data from a convenience sample of 312 women of Mexican descent of childbearing age (21-40 years) located in an urban California community were collected and previously analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms and post traumatic stress disorder. The General Sleep Disturbance Scale (in English and Spanish) was used to assess sleep disturbance. Results Early socialization to the United States during childhood was the most useful acculturation parameter for understanding self reported sleep disturbance in this sample. In a multivariate regression analysis, three factors (higher acculturation, lower income, and higher depressive symptoms) were significant in accounting for 40% of the variance in sleep disturbance. Conclusion When low income Latinas of Mexican descent report sleep problems, clinicians should probe for environmental sleep factors associated with low income, such as noise, over-crowding, and exposure to trauma and violence, and refer the woman to psychotherapy and counselling rather than merely prescribe a sleep medication. PMID:22221152

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease in children of middle eastern descent.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Christina Mai Ying; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (SCHR). The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn's disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course. PMID:24987422

  3. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Forbes, John C.; Thornton, Randall J.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform multiple burns including the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine technology testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  4. Lunar Surface Access Module Descent Engine Turbopump Technology: Detailed Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alarez, Erika; Thornton, Randall J.; Forbes, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The need for a high specific impulse LOX/LH2 pump-fed lunar lander engine has been established by NASA for the new lunar exploration architecture. Studies indicate that a 4-engine cluster in the thrust range of 9,000-lbf each is a candidate configuration for the main propulsion of the manned lunar lander vehicle. The lander descent engine will be required to perform minor mid-course corrections, a Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn, a de-orbit burn, and the powered descent onto the lunar surface. In order to achieve the wide range of thrust required, the engines must be capable of throttling approximately 10:1. Working under internal research and development funding, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been conducting the development of a 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 lunar lander descent engine testbed. This paper highlights the detailed design and analysis efforts to develop the lander engine Fuel Turbopump (FTP) whose operating speeds range from 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm. The capability of the FTP to operate across this wide range of speeds imposes several structural and dynamic challenges, and the small size of the FTP creates scaling and manufacturing challenges that are also addressed in this paper.

  5. Titan Explorer Entry, Descent and Landing Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody L.; Lindberg, Robert E.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    2006-01-01

    The Titan Explorer mission concept includes an orbiter, entry probe and inflatable airship designed to take remote and in-situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere. A modified entry, descent and landing trajectory at Titan that incorporates mid-air airship inflation (under a parachute) and separation is developed and examined for Titan Explorer. The feasibility of mid-air inflation and deployment of an airship under a parachute is determined by implementing and validating an airship buoyancy and inflation model in the trajectory simulation program, Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). A nominal POST2 trajectory simulation case study is generated which examines different descent scenarios by varying airship inflation duration, orientation, and separation. The buoyancy model incorporation into POST2 is new to the software and may be used in future trajectory simulations. Each case from the nominal POST2 trajectory case study simulates a successful separation between the parachute and airship systems with sufficient velocity change as to alter their paths to avoid collision throughout their descent. The airship and heatshield also separate acceptably with a minimum distance of separation from the parachute system of 1.5 km. This analysis shows the feasibility of airship inflation on a parachute for different orientations, airship separation at various inflation times, and preparation for level-flight at Titan.

  6. Data-Analysis System for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Timothy; Chang, Christine; Sartorius, Edgar; Finley, Susan; White, Leslie; Estabrook, Polly; Fort, David

    2005-01-01

    A report describes the Entry Descent Landing Data Analysis (EDA), which is a system of signal-processing software and computer hardware for acquiring status data conveyed by multiple-frequency-shift-keying tone signals transmitted by a spacecraft during descent to the surface of a remote planet. The design of the EDA meets the challenge of processing weak, fluctuating signals that are Doppler-shifted by amounts that are only partly predictable. The software supports both real-time and post processing. The software performs fast-Fourier-transform integration, parallel frequency tracking with prediction, and mapping of detected tones to specific events. The use of backtrack and refinement parallel-processing threads helps to minimize data gaps. The design affords flexibility to enable division of a descent track into segments, within each of which the EDA is configured optimally for processing in the face of signal conditions and uncertainties. A dynamic-lock-state feature enables the detection of signals using minimum required computing power less when signals are steadily detected, more when signals fluctuate. At present, the hardware comprises eight dual-processor personal-computer modules and a server. The hardware is modular, making it possible to increase computing power by adding computers.

  7. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children of Middle Eastern Descent

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Christina Mai Ying; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (SCHR). The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn's disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course. PMID:24987422

  8. A mesh gradient technique for numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A class of successive-improvement optimization methods in which directions of descent are defined in the state space along each trial trajectory are considered. The given problem is first decomposed into two discrete levels by imposing mesh points. Level 1 consists of running optimal subarcs between each successive pair of mesh points. For normal systems, these optimal two-point boundary value problems can be solved by following a routine prescription if the mesh spacing is sufficiently close. A spacing criterion is given. Under appropriate conditions, the criterion value depends only on the coordinates of the mesh points, and its gradient with respect to those coordinates may be defined by interpreting the adjoint variables as partial derivatives of the criterion value function. In level 2, the gradient data is used to generate improvement steps or search directions in the state space which satisfy the boundary values and constraints of the given problem.

  9. Relationship of beliefs, epistemology, and alternate conceptions to college student understanding of evolution and common descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joyce Catherine

    Quantitative and qualitative methodologies were combined to explore the relationships between an understanding of evolution and 4 epistemology factors: (a) control of learning, (b) speed of learning , (c) stability of knowledge, and (d) belief in evolution/creationism. A 17-item instrument was developed that reliably measured a belief in creationism and subtle differences between this belief and an acceptance of evolution. The subjects were 45 students enrolled in a biology course at a 2-year community college. Evolution was taught in a traditional format, and common descent was taught in an inquiry-based laboratory session consisting of: (a) a comparison of hemoglobin DNA sequences of the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla; and (b) a comparison of 8 primate skull casts, including the modern human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and five prehistoric fossils. Prior to instruction the students completed an epistemology questionnaire and a knowledge test about evolution. Five weeks after instruction, the students completed a posttest. A t-test revealed no differences between the pretest and the posttest. However, the group of students that scored higher on the posttest than on the pretest was found to have a stronger belief in the uncertainty of knowledge. Pearson r was computed to check for relationships between the 4 epistemological factors and the understanding of evolution. There was a significant relationship between a belief in creationism and a lessor understanding of evolution as measured on both the pretest and the posttest (ps < .05). The relationship between gender and test scores was also examined with men demonstrating statistically significantly higher scores on the common descent component than women did. Narrative data included interviews and branching/grouping activities. Four alternate conceptions about common descent were identified. Even after instruction, 16 out of 39 students thought humans evolved from the chimpanzee. Additionally, students grouped the 8

  10. A model for learning to segment temporal sequences, utilizing a mixture of RNN experts together with adaptive variance.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Jun; Tani, Jun

    2008-12-01

    This paper proposes a novel learning method for a mixture of recurrent neural network (RNN) experts model, which can acquire the ability to generate desired sequences by dynamically switching between experts. Our method is based on maximum likelihood estimation, using a gradient descent algorithm. This approach is similar to that used in conventional methods; however, we modify the likelihood function by adding a mechanism to alter the variance for each expert. The proposed method is demonstrated to successfully learn Markov chain switching among a set of 9 Lissajous curves, for which the conventional method fails. The learning performance, analyzed in terms of the generalization capability, of the proposed method is also shown to be superior to that of the conventional method. With the addition of a gating network, the proposed method is successfully applied to the learning of sensory-motor flows for a small humanoid robot as a realistic problem of time series prediction and generation. PMID:18938059

  11. Polynomial harmonic GMDH learning networks for time series modeling.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Nikolay Y; Iba, Hitoshi

    2003-12-01

    This paper presents a constructive approach to neural network modeling of polynomial harmonic functions. This is an approach to growing higher-order networks like these build by the multilayer GMDH algorithm using activation polynomials. Two contributions for enhancement of the neural network learning are offered: (1) extending the expressive power of the network representation with another compositional scheme for combining polynomial terms and harmonics obtained analytically from the data; (2) space improving the higher-order network performance with a backpropagation algorithm for further gradient descent learning of the weights, initialized by least squares fitting during the growing phase. Empirical results show that the polynomial harmonic version phGMDH outperforms the previous GMDH, a Neurofuzzy GMDH and traditional MLP neural networks on time series modeling tasks. Applying next backpropagation training helps to achieve superior polynomial network performances. PMID:14622880

  12. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, Alejandro M.; Burkhart, Paul D.; mendeck, Gavin F.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of

  13. Mars Science Laboratory: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2007-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. To do so, MSL will fly a guided lifting entry at a lift-to-drag ratio in excess of that ever flown at Mars, deploy the largest parachute ever at Mars, and perform a novel Sky Crane maneuver. Through improved altitude capability, increased latitude coverage, and more accurate payload delivery, MSL is allowing the science community to consider the exploration of previously inaccessible regions of the planet. The MSL EDL system is a new EDL architecture based on Viking heritage technologies and designed to meet the challenges of landing increasing massive payloads on Mars. In accordance with level-1 requirements, the MSL EDL system is being designed to land an 850 kg rover to altitudes as high as 1 km above the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter defined areoid within 10 km of the desired landing site. Accordingly, MSL will enter the largest entry mass, fly the largest 70 degree sphere-cone aeroshell, generate the largest hypersonic lift-to-drag ratio, and deploy the largest Disk-Gap-Band supersonic parachute of any previous mission to Mars. Major EDL events include a hypersonic guided entry, supersonic parachute deploy and inflation, subsonic heatshield jettison, terminal descent sensor acquisition, powered descent initiation, sky crane terminal descent, rover touchdown detection, and descent stage flyaway. Key performance metrics, derived from level-1 requirements and tracked by the EDL design team to indicate performance capability and timeline margins, include altitude and range at parachute deploy, time on radar, and propellant use. The MSL EDL system, which will continue to develop over the next three years, will enable a notable extension in the advancement of Mars surface science by delivering more science capability than ever before to the surface of

  14. Parameter-exploring policy gradients.

    PubMed

    Sehnke, Frank; Osendorfer, Christian; Rückstiess, Thomas; Graves, Alex; Peters, Jan; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    We present a model-free reinforcement learning method for partially observable Markov decision problems. Our method estimates a likelihood gradient by sampling directly in parameter space, which leads to lower variance gradient estimates than obtained by regular policy gradient methods. We show that for several complex control tasks, including robust standing with a humanoid robot, this method outperforms well-known algorithms from the fields of standard policy gradients, finite difference methods and population based heuristics. We also show that the improvement is largest when the parameter samples are drawn symmetrically. Lastly we analyse the importance of the individual components of our method by incrementally incorporating them into the other algorithms, and measuring the gain in performance after each step. PMID:20061118

  15. Modeling of magma descent and volcano deformation during a vulcanian eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, T.; Nishimura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic edifice generally deflates due to the discharge of magma in the conduit or reservoir when an eruption occurs. Contrary, recent geodetic observations for vulcanian eruptions of Showa crater at Sakurajima, Japan, show uplift toward the crater at the beginning of eruptions (Iguchi, 2013). In this study, we explain such apparently unexpected deformations by considering magma descent processes in a shallow conduit associated with vulcanian eruptions. A vulcanian eruption is simplified to be triggered by a removal of cap-rock that pressurizes magma in the conduit. Magma in the upper part of conduit is fragmented by large pressure differences built up in the conduit to rapidly effuse volcanic ash. The fragmentation surface propagates downward as volcanic ash ejects. Such magma descent during eruption is formulated by Koyaguchi and Mitani (2005). We propose a moving pressure source model for calculating volcano deformation, following their model. The normal stress acting on the conduit wall is reduced after the passage of the fragmentation surface, which acts as a deflation source. Upward drag force works on the conduit wall bellow the fragmentation surface where a high pressure gradient is formed in the magma. These processes are described by seven model parameters: conduit length L, conduit radius, initial overpressure at the top of the conduit, initial position of the magma head, magma porosity, magma viscosity and descent rate of the fragmentation surface, U. We calculate tilt and strain at the foot of volcano with a conical topography with a height of 1km and inclination angle of 11 degrees by using 3-D boundary element method. We assume appropriate parameters for vulcanian eruptions at andesitic volcanoes such as Sakurajima volcano, and set a cylindrical conduit at the summit. Numerical calculations of volcano deformations at 1-4 km distances from the conduit show following characteristics. Uplift toward the crater appears just after an eruption, because

  16. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  17. Entry, Descent, and Landing for Human Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Michelle M.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of a human mission to Mars is landing safely on the Martian surface. Mars has such low atmospheric density that decelerating large masses (tens of metric tons) requires methods that have not yet been demonstrated, and are not yet planned in future Mars missions. To identify the most promising options for Mars entry, descent, and landing, and to plan development of the needed technologies, NASA's Human Architecture Team (HAT) has refined candidate methods for emplacing needed elements of the human Mars exploration architecture (such as ascent vehicles and habitats) on the Mars surface. This paper explains the detailed, optimized simulations that have been developed to define the mass needed at Mars arrival to accomplish the entry, descent, and landing functions. Based on previous work, technology options for hypersonic deceleration include rigid, mid-L/D (lift-to-drag ratio) aeroshells, and inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs). The hypersonic IADs, or HIADs, are about 20% less massive than the rigid vehicles, but both have their technology development challenges. For the supersonic regime, supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) is an attractive option, since a propulsive stage must be carried for terminal descent and can be ignited at higher speeds. The use of SRP eliminates the need for an additional deceleration system, but SRP is at a low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) in that the interacting plumes are not well-characterized, and their effect on vehicle stability has not been studied, to date. These architecture-level assessments have been used to define the key performance parameters and a technology development strategy for achieving the challenging mission of landing large payloads on Mars.

  18. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Davis, Thomas J.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1987-01-01

    A ground-based, four-dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA Ames Research Center. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. This paper investigates the ability of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the results of the simulation studies are presented.

  19. A piloted simulator evaluation of a ground-based 4-D descent advisor algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based, four dimensional (4D) descent-advisor algorithm is under development at NASA-Ames. The algorithm combines detailed aerodynamic, propulsive, and atmospheric models with an efficient numerical integration scheme to generate 4D descent advisories. The ability is investigated of the 4D descent advisor algorithm to provide adequate control of arrival time for aircraft not equipped with on-board 4D guidance systems. A piloted simulation was conducted to determine the precision with which the descent advisor could predict the 4D trajectories of typical straight-in descents flown by airline pilots under different wind conditions. The effects of errors in the estimation of wind and initial aircraft weight were also studied. A description of the descent advisor as well as the result of the simulation studies are presented.

  20. STS-1 operational flight profile. Volume 5: Descent, cycle 3. Appendix C: Monte Carlo dispersion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of three nonlinear the Monte Carlo dispersion analyses for the Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) Orbiter Descent Operational Flight Profile, Cycle 3 are presented. Fifty randomly selected simulation for the end of mission (EOM) descent, the abort once around (AOA) descent targeted line are steep target line, and the AOA descent targeted to the shallow target line are analyzed. These analyses compare the flight environment with system and operational constraints on the flight environment and in some cases use simplified system models as an aid in assessing the STS-1 descent flight profile. In addition, descent flight envelops are provided as a data base for use by system specialists to determine the flight readiness for STS-1. The results of these dispersion analyses supersede results of the dispersion analysis previously documented.

  1. OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Abramson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of orbital flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. It was intended that this document serve as the sole requirements control instrument between MPB/MPAD and the A/D ancillary data users. The requirements are primarily functional in nature, but some detail level requirements are also included.

  2. Revalidation of the Huygens Descent Control Sub-System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens probe, part of the Cassini mission to Saturn, is designed to investigate the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. The passage of the probe through the atmosphere is controlled by the Descent Control Sub-System (DCSS), which consists of three parachutes and associated mechanisms. The Cassini / Huygens mission was launched in October 1997 and was designed during the early 1990's. During the time since the design and launch, analysis capabilities have improved significantly, knowledge of the Titan environment has improved and the baseline mission has been modified. Consequently, a study was performed to revalidate the DCSS design against the current predictions.

  3. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in patients of African descent].

    PubMed

    Maia, Morgana Lima e; Trevisam, Paula Grasiele Carvalho; Minicucci, Marcos; Mazeto, Glaucia M F S; Azevedo, Paula S

    2014-10-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) is an endocrine emergency marked by recurrent attacks of muscle weakness associated with hypokalemia and thyrotoxicosis. Asiatic male patients are most often affected. On the other hand, African descents rarely present this disease. The case described shows an afrodescendant patient with hypokalemia and tetraparesis, whose diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was considered during this crisis. The THPP, although rare, is potentially lethal. Therefore, in cases of flaccid paresis crisis this diagnosis should always be considered, especially if associated with hypokalemia. In this situation, if no previous diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, this should also be regarded. PMID:25372590

  4. Shuttle program: OFT ascent/descent ancillary data requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. C., Jr.; Knoedler, J.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements are presented for the ascent/descent (A/D) navigation and attitude-dependent ancillary data products to be generated for the space shuttle orbiter in support of the orbital flight test (OFT) flight test requirements, MPAD guidance and navigation performance assessment, and the mission evaluation team. The A/D ancillary data support for OFT mission evaluation activities is confined to providing postflight position, velocity, attitude, and associated navigation and attitude derived parameters for the Orbiter over particular flight phases and time intervals.

  5. Conceptual design of "Exomars-2018" Descent Module developed by federal enterprise "Lavochkin Association"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khartov, V. V.; Martynov, M. B.; Lukiyanchikov, A. V.; Alexashkin, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Goals and tasks for "ExoMars-2018" mission and share of responsibilities between European partners and p]Russia are presented. The main design requirements for a Descent Module (DM) that define its design concept as well as design specific features are given. The structure of the descent module, thermal control, means for securing systems interaction onboard the spacecraft "ExoMars-2018", and radio communication with the descent module are examined.

  6. An evaluation of descent strategies for TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Groce, J. L.; Coote, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on system throughput and fleet fuel usage of arrival aircraft utilizing three 4D RNAV descent strategies (cost optimal, clean-idle Mach/CAS and constant descent angle Mach/CAS), both individually and in combination, in an advanced air traffic control metering environment. Results are presented for all mixtures of arrival traffic consisting of three Boeing commercial jet types and for all combinations of the three descent strategies for a typical en route metering airport arrival distribution.

  7. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation 2 (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Bose, Deepak; White, Todd R.; Wright, Henry S.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Kuhl, Christopher A.; Trombetta, Dominic; Santos, Jose A.; Oishi, Tomomi; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Mahzari, Milad; Pennington, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation 2 (MEDLI2) sensor suite will measure aerodynamic, aerothermodynamic, and TPS performance during the atmospheric entry, descent, and landing phases of the Mars 2020 mission. The key objectives are to reduce design margin and prediction uncertainties for the aerothermal environments and aerodynamic database. For MEDLI2, the sensors are installed on both the heatshield and backshell, and include 7 pressure transducers, 17 thermal plugs, and 3 heat flux sensors (including a radiometer). These sensors will expand the set of measurements collected by the highly successful MEDLI suite, collecting supersonic pressure measurements on the forebody, a pressure measurement on the aftbody, direct heat flux measurements on the aftbody, a radiative heating measurement on the aftbody, and multiple near-surface thermal measurements on the thermal protection system (TPS) materials on both the forebody and aftbody. To meet the science objectives, supersonic pressure transducers and heat flux sensors are currently being developed and their qualification and calibration plans are presented. Finally, the reconstruction targets for data accuracy are presented, along with the planned methodologies for achieving the targets.

  8. High mammographic density in women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Percent mammographic density (PMD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer and is known to be approximately 60% heritable. Here we report a finding of an association between genetic ancestry and adjusted PMD. Methods We selected self-identified Caucasian women in the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute Cohort whose screening mammograms placed them in the top or bottom quintiles of age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Our final dataset included 474 women with the highest adjusted PMD and 469 with the lowest genotyped on the Illumina 1 M platform. Principal component analysis (PCA) and identity-by-descent analyses allowed us to infer the women's genetic ancestry and correlate it with adjusted PMD. Results Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, as defined by the first principal component of PCA and identity-by-descent analyses, represented approximately 15% of the sample. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, defined by the first principal component of PCA, was associated with higher adjusted PMD (P = 0.004). Using multivariate regression to adjust for epidemiologic factors associated with PMD, including age at parity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, did not attenuate the association. Conclusions Women of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, based on genetic analysis, are more likely to have high age-adjusted and body mass index-adjusted PMD. Ashkenazi Jews may have a unique set of genetic variants or environmental risk factors that increase mammographic density. PMID:23668689

  9. Controller evaluations of the descent advisor automation aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard; Volckers, Uwe; Erzberger, Heinz

    1989-01-01

    An automation aid to assist air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting arrival times at a fix has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The automation aid, referred to as the descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent point and speed profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is interfaced with a mouse-based, menu-driven controller display that allows the air traffic controller to interactively use its accurate predictive capability to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. This paper focuses on operational issues concerning the utilization of the DA, specifically, how the DA can be used for prediction, intrail spacing, and metering. In order to evaluate the DA, a real time simulation was conducted using both current and retired controller subjects. Controllers operated in teams of two, as they do in the present environment; issues of training and team interaction will be discussed. Evaluations by controllers indicated considerable enthusiasm for the DA aid, and provided specific recommendations for using the tool effectively.

  10. Mars Exploration Rover Terminal Descent Mission Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Queen, Eric M.

    2004-01-01

    Because of NASA's added reliance on simulation for successful interplanetary missions, the MER mission has developed a detailed EDL trajectory modeling and simulation. This paper summarizes how the MER EDL sequence of events are modeled, verification of the methods used, and the inputs. This simulation is built upon a multibody parachute trajectory simulation tool that has been developed in POST I1 that accurately simulates the trajectory of multiple vehicles in flight with interacting forces. In this model the parachute and the suspended bodies are treated as 6 Degree-of-Freedom (6 DOF) bodies. The terminal descent phase of the mission consists of several Entry, Descent, Landing (EDL) events, such as parachute deployment, heatshield separation, deployment of the lander from the backshell, deployment of the airbags, RAD firings, TIRS firings, etc. For an accurate, reliable simulation these events need to be modeled seamlessly and robustly so that the simulations will remain numerically stable during Monte-Carlo simulations. This paper also summarizes how the events have been modeled, the numerical issues, and modeling challenges.

  11. Vascular considerations in glaucoma patients of African and European descent.

    PubMed

    Huck, Andrew; Harris, Alon; Siesky, Brent; Kim, Nathaniel; Muchnik, Michael; Kanakamedala, Priyanka; Amireskandari, Annahita; Abrams-Tobe, Leslie

    2014-08-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in individuals of African descent (AD). While open-angle glaucoma (OAG) disproportionately affects individuals of AD compared with persons of European descent (ED), the physiological mechanisms behind this disparity are largely unknown. The more rapid progression and greater severity of the disease in persons of AD further raise the concern for identifying these underlying differences in disease pathophysiology between AD and ED glaucoma patients. Ocular structural differences between AD and ED patients, including larger optic disc area, cup:disc ratio and thinner corneas, have been found. AD individuals are also disproportionately affected by systemic vascular diseases, including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke and diabetes mellitus. Abnormal ocular blood flow has been implicated as a risk factor for glaucoma, and pilot research is beginning to identify localized ocular vascular differences between AD and ED OAG patients. Given the known systemic vascular deficits and the relationship between glaucoma and ocular blood flow, exploring these concepts in terms of glaucoma risk factors may have a significant impact in elucidating the mechanisms behind the disease disparity in the AD population. PMID:24460758

  12. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars is Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km x 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  13. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Simulation Using DSENDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, P. Daniel; Casoliva, Jordi; Balaram, Bob

    2013-01-01

    The most recent planetary science mission to Mars was Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) with the Curiosity rover, launched November 26, 2011 and landed at Gale Crater on August 6, 2012. This spacecraft was the first use at Mars of a complete closed-loop Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) system, including guided entry with a lifting body that greatly reduces dispersions during the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phase to achieve a 25 km X 20 km landing error relative to the selected Gale Crater landing target. In order to confirm meeting the above landing criteria, high-fidelity simulation of the EDL phase is required. The tool used for 6DOF EDL trajectory verification analysis is Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent and Surface landing (DSENDS), which is a high-fidelity simulation tool from JPLs Dynamics and Real-Time Simulation Laboratory for the development, test and operations of aero-flight vehicles. DSENDS inherent capability is augmented for MSL with project-specific models of atmosphere, aerodynamics, sensors and thrusters along with GN&C flight software to enable high-fidelity trajectory simulation. This paper will present the model integration and independent verification experience of the JPL EDL trajectory analysis team.

  14. On gradient field theories: gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the fundamentals of gradient field theories are presented and reviewed. In particular, the theories of gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity are investigated and compared. For gradient magnetostatics, non-singular expressions for the magnetic vector gauge potential, the Biot-Savart law, the Lorentz force and the mutual interaction energy of two electric current loops are derived and discussed. For gradient elasticity, non-singular forms of all dislocation key formulas (Burgers equation, Mura equation, Peach-Koehler stress equation, Peach-Koehler force equation, and mutual interaction energy of two dislocation loops) are presented. In addition, similarities between an electric current loop and a dislocation loop are pointed out. The obtained fields for both gradient theories are non-singular due to a straightforward and self-consistent regularization.

  15. Shape Tracking with Occlusions via Coarse-to-Fine Region-Based Sobolev Descent.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanchao; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2015-05-01

    We present a method to track the shape of an object from video. The method uses a joint shape and appearance model of the object, which is propagated to match shape and radiance in subsequent frames, determining object shape. Self-occlusions and dis-occlusions of the object from camera and object motion pose difficulties to joint shape and appearance models in tracking. They are unable to adapt to new shape and appearance information, leading to inaccurate shape detection. In this work, we model self-occlusions and dis-occlusions in a joint shape and appearance tracking framework. Self-occlusions and the warp to propagate the model are coupled, thus we formulate a joint optimization problem. We derive a coarse-to-fine optimization method, advantageous in tracking, that initially perturbs the model by coarse perturbations before transitioning to finer-scale perturbations seamlessly. This coarse-to-fine behavior is automatically induced by gradient descent on a novel infinite-dimensional Riemannian manifold that we introduce. The manifold consists of planar parameterized regions, and the metric that we introduce is a novel Sobolev metric. Experiments on video exhibiting occlusions/dis-occlusions, complex radiance and background show that occlusion/dis-occlusion modeling leads to superior shape accuracy. PMID:26353328

  16. The Role of la Familia for Women of Mexican Descent Who Are Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo, Sandra Gray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe the role of "la familia" for women of Mexican descent as it relates to their development as leaders and their leadership in academia. Purposeful sampling was utilized to reach the goal of 18 participants who were female academic leaders of Mexican descent teaching full time in…

  17. The Yearly Variation in Fall-Winter Arctic Winter Vortex Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Newman, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    Using the change in HALOE methane profiles from early September to late March, we have estimated the minimum amount of diabatic descent within the polar which takes place during Arctic winter. The year to year variations are a result in the year to year variations in stratospheric wave activity which (1) modify the temperature of the vortex and thus the cooling rate; (2) reduce the apparent descent by mixing high amounts of methane into the vortex. The peak descent amounts from HALOE methane vary from l0km -14km near the arrival altitude of 25 km. Using a diabatic trajectory calculation, we compare forward and backward trajectories over the course of the winter using UKMO assimilated stratospheric data. The forward calculation agrees fairly well with the observed descent. The backward calculation appears to be unable to produce the observed amount of descent, but this is only an apparent effect due to the density decrease in parcels with altitude. Finally we show the results for unmixed descent experiments - where the parcels are fixed in latitude and longitude and allowed to descend based on the local cooling rate. Unmixed descent is found to always exceed mixed descent, because when normal parcel motion is included, the path average cooling is always less than the cooling at a fixed polar point.

  18. The ExoMars Entry & Descent system: an enabler for European planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebleu, D.; Monier, J.; Marchand, B.; Squillaci, J.-R.; Lubrano, G.; Capus, P.; Laurenti, P.; Poncy, J.; Couzin, P.

    2013-09-01

    After HUYGENS and thanks to the ExoMars Entry and Descent System, Europe will confirm the capacity to land on planetary bodies. This presentation reports the development status of ExoMars EDM Entry & Descent system. All development tests are performed, and the subsystems flight models manufacturing are in progress.

  19. Miniature coherent velocimeter and altimeter (MCVA) for terminal descent control on lunar and planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dan; Cardell, Greg; Szwaykowski, Piotr; Shaffat, Syed T.; Meras, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    While the overall architecture of an Entry Descent and Landing (EDL) system may vary depending on specific mission requirementsw, measurements of the rate vector with respect to the surface is a primary requirement for the Terminal Descent Control (TDC) phase of any controlled lander.

  20. Ethnic Identity and Acculturative Stress as Mediators of Depression in Students of Asian Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantrip, Crystal; Mazzetti, Francesco; Grasso, Joseph; Gill, Sara; Miller, Janna; Haner, Morgynn; Rude, Stephanie; Awad, Germine

    2015-01-01

    This study underscored the importance of addressing the well-being of college students of Asian descent, because these students had higher rates of depression and lower positive feelings about their ethnic group compared with students of European descent, as measured by the Affirmation subscale of the Ethnic Identity Scale. Affirmation mediated…

  1. Apollo 16 LM-11 descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    The performance of the LM-11 Descent Propulsion System during the Apollo 16 Mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted 1 sigma uncertainty of 0.2 seconds. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 50 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9839 lbf; specific impulse, 306.9 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1.592. These values are +0.34, +0.03 and +0.0 percent different, respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits. Several flight measurement discrepancies that existed during the flight are discussed.

  2. Mars Exploration Rover: Launch, Cruise, Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, James K.; Manning, Robert M.; Adler, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Project was an ambitious effort to land two highly capable rovers on Mars and concurrently explore the Martian surface for three months each. Launched in June and July of 2003, cruise operations were conducted through January 4, 2004 with the first landing, followed by the second landing on January 25. The prime mission for the second rover ended on April 27, 2004. This paper will provide an overview of the launch, cruise, and landing phases of the mission, including the engineering and science objectives and challenges involved in the selection and targeting of the landing sites, as well as the excitement and challenges of atmospheric entry, descent and landing execution.

  3. Mars Exploration Rover Mission: Entry, Descent, and Landing System Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Lee, Wayne; Steltzner, Adam; SanMartin, Alejanhdro

    2004-01-01

    System validation for a Mars entry, descent, and landing system is not simply a demonstration that the electrical system functions in the associated environments. The function of this system is its interaction with the atmospheric and surface environment. Thus, in addition to traditional test-bed, hardware-in-the-loop, testing, a validation program that confirms the environmental interaction is required. Unfortunately, it is not possible to conduct a meaningful end-to-end test of a Mars landing system on Earth. The validation plan must be constructed from an interconnected combination of simulation, analysis and test. For the Mars Exploration Rover mission, this combination of activities and the logic of how they combined to the system's validation was explicitly stated, reviewed, and tracked as part of the development plan.

  4. Time-controlled descent guidance in uncertain winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menga, G.; Erzberger, H.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed for constructing a statistical model of the altitude-dependent mean wind profile from the historical record of wind measurements at particular locations. The model is constructed by fitting a Markov process, with altitude as the stage variable, to the historical wind data. The wind model, together with the aircraft dynamics and the error characteristics of the navigation system, are incorporated in the design of a state estimator, which gives the minimum variance estimate of the aircraft state and the wind vector. The state and wind estimates are used as inputs to a linear feedback law for guiding the aircraft along the nominal trajectory. An example design of a time-constrained (4D RNAV) descent guidance system is presented, showing tracking accuracy, control activity, and probability of arrival time with and without the wind estimator.

  5. Overview of the Phoenix Entry, Descent and Landing System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grover, Myron R., III; Cichy, Benjamin D.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Phoenix Mars Lander began its journey to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida in August 2007, but its journey to the launch pad began many years earlier in 1997 as NASA s Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. In the intervening years, the entry, descent and landing (EDL) system architecture went through a series of changes, resulting in the system flown to the surface of Mars on May 25th, 2008. Some changes, such as entry velocity and landing site elevation, were the result of differences in mission design. Other changes, including the removal of hypersonic guidance, the reformulation of the parachute deployment algorithm, and the addition of the backshell avoidance maneuver, were driven by constant efforts to augment system robustness. An overview of the Phoenix EDL system architecture is presented along with rationales driving these architectural changes.

  6. Mars Exploration Rovers Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Knocke, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover mission successfully landed two rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity" on Mars on January 4th and 25th of 2004, respectively. The trajectory analysis performed to define the entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario is described. The entry requirements and constraints are presented, as well as uncertainties used in a Monte Carlo dispersion analysis to statistically assess the robustness of the entry design to off-nominal conditions. In the analysis, six-degree-of-freedom and three-degree-of-freedom trajectory results are compared to assess the entry characteristics of the capsule. Comparison of the preentry results to preliminary post-landing reconstruction data shows that all EDL parameters were within the requirements. In addition, the final landing position for both "Spirit" and "Opportunity" were within 15 km of the predicted landing location.

  7. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Martynov, Maxim; Schmidt, Walter; Harri, Ari-Matti; Vsevolod Koryanov, D.; Kazakovtcev, Victor; Haukka, Harri; Arruego, Ignacio; Finchenko, Valery; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrei; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    Abstract A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) or Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth’s atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth’s atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. “Mini-1” category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: - qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, - Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, - m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, - V (m/s): re-entry velocity and - theta(deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet (“Mini-1” category) -type

  8. RITD - Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, Jyri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Koryanov, Vsevolod; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Haukka, Harri; Finchenko, Valery; Martynov, Maxim; Ostresko, Boris; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Viktor; Martin, Susanna; Siili, Tero

    2014-05-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses to the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry. 1. EDLS for Earth The dynamical stability of the craft is analysed, concentrating on the most critical part of the atmospheric re-entry, the transonic phase. In Martian atmosphere the MetNet vehicle stability during the transonic phase is understood. However, in the more dense Earth's atmosphere, the transonic phase is shorter and turbulence more violent. Therefore, the EDLS has to be sufficiently dynamically stable to overcome the forces tending to deflect the craft from its nominal trajectory and attitude. The preliminary design of the inflatable EDLS for Earth will be commenced once the scaling of the re-entry system and the dynamical stability analysis have been performed. The RITD-project concentrates on mission and applications achievable with the current MetNet-type (i.e. 'Mini-1' category) of lander, and on requirements posed by other type Earth re-entry concepts. 2. Entry Angle Determination for Mini-1 - lander For successful Earth landing, the suitable re-entry angle and velocity with specific descent vehicle (DV) mass and heat flux parameters need to be determined. These key parameters in determining the Earth re-entry for DV are: qmax (kW/m2): maximal specific heat flux, Q (MJ/m2): specific integral heat flux to DV front shield, m (kg): descent vehicle (DV) mass, V (m/s): re-entry velocity and Θ (deg.): flight-path angle at Earth re-entry For Earth re-entry, the calculation results in the optimal value of entry velocity for MetNet ('Mini-1' category) -type lander, with mass of 22kg, being

  9. The stabilization interval system of a tethered descent underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayvoronskiy, S. A.; Ezangina, T.; Khozhaev, I.; Efimov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    To damp the vertical oscillations of a descent submersible caused by dusting the control system utilizing a shock-absorbing hoist located on the submersible was developed. A robust proportional-plus-integral action controller was included in the control loop to ensure acceptable dynamic properties of the system by interval variations of the module mass, the rope length, the equivalent value of stiffness of a spring linkage and the equivalent value of damping factor of the spring linkage. A parametric synthesis of the controller was carried out on the basis of the robust expansion of the coefficient method of the quality rating estimation. The system operability was confirmed by the results of the digital simulation parameters

  10. On Belonging: The American Adolescent of Arab Descent.

    PubMed

    Khouri, Lama Z

    2016-08-01

    Although American families of Arab origin come from 22 countries and from varied backgrounds and cultures, reports suggest that they suffer equally from acculturation stress, stereotyping, discrimination, and the reverberations of the aftermath of September 11 as well as global affairs. However, because children and adolescents from these families, particularly those who are newly arrived immigrants, tend to do well in school, they are rarely targeted by research or policy. This article uses the narratives of 5 middle school age male students from Arab descent who were in a support group that met for 3 years (2004-2007), beginning shortly after President George W. Bush's declaration of the war on the "axis of evil." I used vignettes from this group to illustrate the stressors this population faces. The final section suggests an option for supporting this population. PMID:27472891

  11. Adapting Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System for Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Guerrero, H.; Schmidt, W.; Haukka, H.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ostresko, B.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Arruego, I.; Martin, S.; Siili, T.

    2013-09-01

    In 2001 - 2011 an inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Martian atmosphere was developed by FMI and the MetNet team. This MetNet Mars Lander EDLS is used in both the initial deceleration during atmospheric entry and in the final deceleration before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator to Martian surface. The EDLS design is ingenious and its applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied in the on-going project. In particular, the behavior of the system in the critical transonic aerodynamic (from hypersonic to subsonic) regime will be investigated. This project targets to analyze and test the transonic behavior of this compact and light weight payload entry system to Earth's atmosphere [1]. Scaling and adaptation for terrestrial atmospheric conditions, instead of a completely new design, is a favorable approach for providing a new re-entry vehicle for terrestrial space applications.

  12. Y chromosome lineages in men of west African descent.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jada Benn; Doura, Menahem B; Keita, Shomarka O Y; Kittles, Rick A

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ∼1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called "Grain Coast" of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30-40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  13. Y Chromosome Lineages in Men of West African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Shomarka O. Y.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ∼1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called “Grain Coast” of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30–40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  14. Supervised Learning in Adaptive DNA Strand Displacement Networks.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Matthew R; Stefanovic, Darko

    2016-08-19

    The development of engineered biochemical circuits that exhibit adaptive behavior is a key goal of synthetic biology and molecular computing. Such circuits could be used for long-term monitoring and control of biochemical systems, for instance, to prevent disease or to enable the development of artificial life. In this article, we present a framework for developing adaptive molecular circuits using buffered DNA strand displacement networks, which extend existing DNA strand displacement circuit architectures to enable straightforward storage and modification of behavioral parameters. As a proof of concept, we use this framework to design and simulate a DNA circuit for supervised learning of a class of linear functions by stochastic gradient descent. This work highlights the potential of buffered DNA strand displacement as a powerful circuit architecture for implementing adaptive molecular systems. PMID:27111037

  15. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent And Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI): Hardware Performance and Data Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Alan; Bose, Deepak; Karlgaard, Chris; Munk, Michelle; Kuhl, Chris; Schoenenberger, Mark; Antill, Chuck; Verhappen, Ron; Kutty, Prasad; White, Todd

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI) hardware was a first-of-its-kind sensor system that gathered temperature and pressure readings on the MSL heatshield during Mars entry on August 6, 2012. MEDLI began as challenging instrumentation problem, and has been a model of collaboration across multiple NASA organizations. After the culmination of almost 6 years of effort, the sensors performed extremely well, collecting data from before atmospheric interface through parachute deploy. This paper will summarize the history of the MEDLI project and hardware development, including key lessons learned that can apply to future instrumentation efforts. MEDLI returned an unprecedented amount of high-quality engineering data from a Mars entry vehicle. We will present the performance of the 3 sensor types: pressure, temperature, and isotherm tracking, as well as the performance of the custom-built sensor support electronics. A key component throughout the MEDLI project has been the ground testing and analysis effort required to understand the returned flight data. Although data analysis is ongoing through 2013, this paper will reveal some of the early findings on the aerothermodynamic environment that MSL encountered at Mars, the response of the heatshield material to that heating environment, and the aerodynamic performance of the entry vehicle. The MEDLI data results promise to challenge our engineering assumptions and revolutionize the way we account for margins in entry vehicle design.

  16. Parachute Models Used in the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Way, David W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Davis, Jody L.; Powell, Richard W.; Kipp, Devin M.; Adams, Douglas S.; Witkowski, Al; Kandis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    An end-to-end simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing (EDL) sequence was created at the NASA Langley Research Center using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2). This simulation is capable of providing numerous MSL system and flight software responses, including Monte Carlo-derived statistics of these responses. The MSL POST2 simulation includes models of EDL system elements, including those related to the parachute system. Among these there are models for the parachute geometry, mass properties, deployment, inflation, opening force, area oscillations, aerodynamic coefficients, apparent mass, interaction with the main landing engines, and off-loading. These models were kept as simple as possible, considering the overall objectives of the simulation. The main purpose of this paper is to describe these parachute system models to the extent necessary to understand how they work and some of their limitations. A list of lessons learned during the development of the models and simulation is provided. Future improvements to the parachute system models are proposed.

  17. Learning and tuning fuzzy logic controllers through reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for learning and tuning a fuzzy logic controller based on reinforcements from a dynamic system. In particular, our generalized approximate reasoning-based intelligent control (GARIC) architecture (1) learns and tunes a fuzzy logic controller even when only weak reinforcement, such as a binary failure signal, is available; (2) introduces a new conjunction operator in computing the rule strengths of fuzzy control rules; (3) introduces a new localized mean of maximum (LMOM) method in combining the conclusions of several firing control rules; and (4) learns to produce real-valued control actions. Learning is achieved by integrating fuzzy inference into a feedforward neural network, which can then adaptively improve performance by using gradient descent methods. We extend the AHC algorithm of Barto et al. (1983) to include the prior control knowledge of human operators. The GARIC architecture is applied to a cart-pole balancing system and demonstrates significant improvements in terms of the speed of learning and robustness to changes in the dynamic system's parameters over previous schemes for cart-pole balancing.

  18. Learning and tuning fuzzy logic controllers through reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap

    1992-01-01

    A new method for learning and tuning a fuzzy logic controller based on reinforcements from a dynamic system is presented. In particular, our Generalized Approximate Reasoning-based Intelligent Control (GARIC) architecture: (1) learns and tunes a fuzzy logic controller even when only weak reinforcements, such as a binary failure signal, is available; (2) introduces a new conjunction operator in computing the rule strengths of fuzzy control rules; (3) introduces a new localized mean of maximum (LMOM) method in combining the conclusions of several firing control rules; and (4) learns to produce real-valued control actions. Learning is achieved by integrating fuzzy inference into a feedforward network, which can then adaptively improve performance by using gradient descent methods. We extend the AHC algorithm of Barto, Sutton, and Anderson to include the prior control knowledge of human operators. The GARIC architecture is applied to a cart-pole balancing system and has demonstrated significant improvements in terms of the speed of learning and robustness to changes in the dynamic system's parameters over previous schemes for cart-pole balancing.

  19. Structure identification in fuzzy inference using reinforcement learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap

    1993-01-01

    In our previous work on the GARIC architecture, we have shown that the system can start with surface structure of the knowledge base (i.e., the linguistic expression of the rules) and learn the deep structure (i.e., the fuzzy membership functions of the labels used in the rules) by using reinforcement learning. Assuming the surface structure, GARIC refines the fuzzy membership functions used in the consequents of the rules using a gradient descent procedure. This hybrid fuzzy logic and reinforcement learning approach can learn to balance a cart-pole system and to backup a truck to its docking location after a few trials. In this paper, we discuss how to do structure identification using reinforcement learning in fuzzy inference systems. This involves identifying both surface as well as deep structure of the knowledge base. The term set of fuzzy linguistic labels used in describing the values of each control variable must be derived. In this process, splitting a label refers to creating new labels which are more granular than the original label and merging two labels creates a more general label. Splitting and merging of labels directly transform the structure of the action selection network used in GARIC by increasing or decreasing the number of hidden layer nodes.

  20. A Collective Pursuit of Learning the Possibility to Be: The CAMP Experience Assisting Situationally Marginalized Mexican American Students to a Successful Student Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Reynaldo, III

    2007-01-01

    Many students of Mexican descent must learn how to be successful students. This study describes 5 students of Mexican descent from situationally marginalized lives who were a part of a support and retention scholarship program (College Assistance Migrant Program--CAMP). These case studies document how they perceived their learning and how they…

  1. Descent strategy comparisons for TNAV-equipped aircraft under airplane-preferred operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    Three 4-D descent strategies were evaluated which were employed by TNAV-equipped aircraft in an advanced metering air traffic control environment. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to assess performance using three criteria when traffic enters the simulation under preferred cruise operating conditions (altitude and speed): throughput, fuel usage, and conflict probability. In comparison to an evaluation previously performed under NASA contract, the current analysis indicates that the optimal descent strategy is preferred over the clean-idle and constant descent angle (CFPA) strategies when all three criteria are considered.

  2. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  3. Fast temporal neural learning using teacher forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Bahren, Jacob (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A neural network is trained to output a time dependent target vector defined over a predetermined time interval in response to a time dependent input vector defined over the same time interval by applying corresponding elements of the error vector, or difference between the target vector and the actual neuron output vector, to the inputs of corresponding output neurons of the network as corrective feedback. This feedback decreases the error and quickens the learning process, so that a much smaller number of training cycles are required to complete the learning process. A conventional gradient descent algorithm is employed to update the neural network parameters at the end of the predetermined time interval. The foregoing process is repeated in repetitive cycles until the actual output vector corresponds to the target vector. In the preferred embodiment, as the overall error of the neural network output decreasing during successive training cycles, the portion of the error fed back to the output neurons is decreased accordingly, allowing the network to learn with greater freedom from teacher forcing as the network parameters converge to their optimum values. The invention may also be used to train a neural network with stationary training and target vectors.

  4. Fast temporal neural learning using teacher forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor); Bahren, Jacob (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A neural network is trained to output a time dependent target vector defined over a predetermined time interval in response to a time dependent input vector defined over the same time interval by applying corresponding elements of the error vector, or difference between the target vector and the actual neuron output vector, to the inputs of corresponding output neurons of the network as corrective feedback. This feedback decreases the error and quickens the learning process, so that a much smaller number of training cycles are required to complete the learning process. A conventional gradient descent algorithm is employed to update the neural network parameters at the end of the predetermined time interval. The foregoing process is repeated in repetitive cycles until the actual output vector corresponds to the target vector. In the preferred embodiment, as the overall error of the neural network output decreasing during successive training cycles, the portion of the error fed back to the output neurons is decreased accordingly, allowing the network to learn with greater freedom from teacher forcing as the network parameters converge to their optimum values. The invention may also be used to train a neural network with stationary training and target vectors.

  5. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.; Knox, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  6. Description of the computations and pilot procedures for planning fuel-conservative descents with a small programmable calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Vicroy, D.D.; Knox, C.E.

    1983-05-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm and the vertical performance modeling required for the DC-10 airplane is described.

  7. Three learning phases for radial-basis-function networks.

    PubMed

    Schwenker, F; Kestler, H A; Palm, G

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, learning algorithms for radial basis function (RBF) networks are discussed. Whereas multilayer perceptrons (MLP) are typically trained with backpropagation algorithms, starting the training procedure with a random initialization of the MLP's parameters, an RBF network may be trained in many different ways. We categorize these RBF training methods into one-, two-, and three-phase learning schemes. Two-phase RBF learning is a very common learning scheme. The two layers of an RBF network are learnt separately; first the RBF layer is trained, including the adaptation of centers and scaling parameters, and then the weights of the output layer are adapted. RBF centers may be trained by clustering, vector quantization and classification tree algorithms, and the output layer by supervised learning (through gradient descent or pseudo inverse solution). Results from numerical experiments of RBF classifiers trained by two-phase learning are presented in three completely different pattern recognition applications: (a) the classification of 3D visual objects; (b) the recognition hand-written digits (2D objects); and (c) the categorization of high-resolution electrocardiograms given as a time series (ID objects) and as a set of features extracted from these time series. In these applications, it can be observed that the performance of RBF classifiers trained with two-phase learning can be improved through a third backpropagation-like training phase of the RBF network, adapting the whole set of parameters (RBF centers, scaling parameters, and output layer weights) simultaneously. This, we call three-phase learning in RBF networks. A practical advantage of two- and three-phase learning in RBF networks is the possibility to use unlabeled training data for the first training phase. Support vector (SV) learning in RBF networks is a different learning approach. SV learning can be considered, in this context of learning, as a special type of one-phase learning, where

  8. Preliminary Study of a Model Rotor in Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAlister, K. W.; Tung, C.; Sharpe, D. L.; Huang, S.; Hendley, E. M.

    2000-01-01

    Within a program designed to develop experimental techniques for measuring the trajectory and structure of vortices trailing from the tips of rotor blades, the present preliminary study focuses on a method for quantifying the trajectory of the trailing vortex during descent flight conditions. This study also presents rotor loads and blade surface pressures for a range of tip-path plane angles and Mach numbers. Blade pressures near the leading edge and along the outer radius are compared with data obtained on the same model rotor, but in open jet facilities. A triangulation procedure based on two directable laser-light sheets, each containing an embedded reference, proved effective in defining the spatial coordinates of the trailing vortex. When interrogating a cross section of the flow that contains several trailing vortices, the greatest clarity was found to result when the flow is uniformly seeded. Surface pressure responses during blade-vortex interactions appeared equally sensitive near the leading edge and along the outer portion of the blade, but diminished rapidly as the distance along the blade chord increased. The pressure response was virtually independent of whether the tip-path plane angle was obtained through shaft tilt or cyclic pitch. Although the shape and frequency of the pressure perturbations on the advancing blade during blade-vortex interaction are similar to those obtained in open-jet facilities, the angle of the tip-path plane may need to be lower than the range covered in this study.

  9. STS-40 descent BET products: Development and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Wood, James S.; Findlay, John T.

    1991-01-01

    Descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) Data were generated for the final Orbiter Experiments Flight, STS-40. This report discusses the actual development of these post-flight products: the inertial BET, the Extended BET, and the Aerodynamic BET. Summary results are also included. The inertial BET was determined based on processing Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRSS) coherent Doppler data in conjunction with observations from eleven C-band stations, to include data from the Kwajalein Atoll and the usual California coastal radars, as well as data from five cinetheodolite cameras in the vicinity of the runways at EAFB. The anchor epoch utilized for the trajectory reconstruction was 53,904 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an altitude at epoch of approximately 708 kft. Atmospheric data to enable development of an Extended BET for this mission were upsurped from the JSC operational post-flight BET. These data were evaluated based on Space Shuttle-derived considerations as well as model comparisons. The Aerodynamic BET includes configuration information, final mass properties, and both flight-determined and predicted aerodynamic performance estimates. The predicted data were based on the final pre-operational databook, updated to include flight determined incrementals based on an earlier ensemble of flights. Aerodynamic performance comparisons are presented and correlated versus statistical results based on twenty-two previous missions.

  10. Evolution and ecology of directed aerial descent in arboreal ants.

    PubMed

    Yanoviak, Stephen P; Munk, Yonatan; Dudley, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Directed aerial descent (DAD) is used by a variety of arboreal animals to escape predators, to remain in the canopy, and to access resources. Here, we build upon the discovery of DAD in ants of tropical canopies by summarizing its known phylogenetic distribution among ant genera, and within both the subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae and the genus Cephalotes. DAD has multiple evolutionary origins in ants, occurring independently in numerous genera in the subfamilies Myrmicinae, Formicinae, and Pseudomyrmecinae. Ablation experiments and video recordings of ants in a vertical wind tunnel showed that DAD in Cephalotes atratus is achieved via postural changes, specifically orientation of the legs and gaster. The occurrence of DAD in Formicinae indicates that the presence of a postpetiole is not essential for the behavior. Evidence to date indicates that gliding behavior is accomplished by visual targeting mediated by the compound eyes, and is restricted to diurnally active ants that nest in trees. Occlusion of ocelli in Pseudomyrmex gracilis workers had no effect on their success or performance in gliding. Experimental assessment of the fate of ants that fall to the understory showed that ants landing in water are 15 times more likely to suffer lethal attacks than are ants landing in leaf litter. Variation in both the aerodynamic mechanisms and selective advantages of DAD merits further study given the broad taxonomic diversity of arboreal ants that engage in this intriguing form of flight. PMID:21562023

  11. Orion Entry, Descent, and Landing Performance and Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broome, Joel M.; Johnson, Wyatt

    2007-01-01

    The Orion Vehicle is the next spacecraft to take humans into space and will include missions to ISS as well as missions to the Moon. As part of that challenge, the vehicle will have to accommodate multiple mission design concepts, since return from Low Earth Orbit and return from the Moon can be quite different. Commonality between the different missions as it relates to vehicle systems, guidance capability, and operations concepts is the goal. Several unique mission design concepts include the specification of multiple land-based landing sites for a vehicle with closed-loop direct and skip entry guidance, followed by a parachute descent and landing attenuation system. This includes the ability of the vehicle to accurately target and land at a designated landing site, including site location aspects, landing site size, and landing opportunities assessments. Analyses associated with these mission design and flight performance challenges and constraints will be discussed as well as potential operational concepts to provide feasibility and/or mission commonality.

  12. Physics-based Entry, Descent and Landing Risk Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Ken; Huynh, Loc C.; Manning, Ted

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based risk model was developed to assess the risk associated with thermal protection system failures during the entry, descent and landing phase of a manned spacecraft mission. In the model, entry trajectories were computed using a three-degree-of-freedom trajectory tool, the aerothermodynamic heating environment was computed using an engineering-level computational tool and the thermal response of the TPS material was modeled using a one-dimensional thermal response tool. The model was capable of modeling the effect of micrometeoroid and orbital debris impact damage on the TPS thermal response. A Monte Carlo analysis was used to determine the effects of uncertainties in the vehicle state at Entry Interface, aerothermodynamic heating and material properties on the performance of the TPS design. The failure criterion was set as a temperature limit at the bondline between the TPS and the underlying structure. Both direct computation and response surface approaches were used to compute the risk. The model was applied to a generic manned space capsule design. The effect of material property uncertainty and MMOD damage on risk of failure were analyzed. A comparison of the direct computation and response surface approach was undertaken.

  13. Development of a Mars Airplane Entry, Descent, and Flight Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, James E.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    2001-01-01

    An entry, descent, and flight (EDF) trajectory profile for a Mars airplane mission is defined as consisting of the following elements: ballistic entry of an aeroshell; supersonic deployment of a decelerator parachute; subsonic release of a heat shield; release, unfolding, and orientation of an airplane to flight attitude; and execution of a pull up maneuver to achieve trimmed, horizontal flight. Using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) a trajectory optimization problem was formulated. Model data representative of a specific Mars airplane configuration, current models of the Mars surface topography and atmosphere, and current estimates of the interplanetary trajectory, were incorporated into the analysis. The goal is to develop an EDF trajectory to maximize the surface-relative altitude of the airplane at the end of a pull up maneuver, while subject to the mission design constraints. The trajectory performance was evaluated for three potential mission sites and was found to be site-sensitive. The trajectory performance, examined for sensitivity to a number of design and constraint variables, was found to be most sensitive to airplane mass, aerodynamic performance characteristics, and the pull up Mach constraint. Based on the results of this sensitivity study, an airplane-drag optimized trajectory was developed that showed a significant performance improvement.

  14. Estimating Controller Intervention Probabilities for Optimized Profile Descent Arrivals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; Erzberger, Heinz; Huynh, Phu V.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of arrival traffic at Dallas/Fort-Worth and Denver airports were conducted to evaluate incorporating scheduling and separation constraints into advisories that define continuous descent approaches. The goal was to reduce the number of controller interventions required to ensure flights maintain minimum separation distances of 5 nmi horizontally and 1000 ft vertically. It was shown that simply incorporating arrival meter fix crossing-time constraints into the advisory generation could eliminate over half of the all predicted separation violations and more than 80% of the predicted violations between two arrival flights. Predicted separation violations between arrivals and non-arrivals were 32% of all predicted separation violations at Denver and 41% at Dallas/Fort-Worth. A probabilistic analysis of meter fix crossing-time errors is included which shows that some controller interventions will still be required even when the predicted crossing-times of the advisories are set to add a 1 or 2 nmi buffer above the minimum in-trail separation of 5 nmi. The 2 nmi buffer was shown to increase average flight delays by up to 30 sec when compared to the 1 nmi buffer, but it only resulted in a maximum decrease in average arrival throughput of one flight per hour.

  15. Engineering description of the ascent/descent bet product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seacord, A. W., II

    1986-01-01

    The Ascent/Descent output product is produced in the OPIP routine from three files which constitute its input. One of these, OPIP.IN, contains mission specific parameters. Meteorological data, such as atmospheric wind velocities, temperatures, and density, are obtained from the second file, the Corrected Meteorological Data File (METDATA). The third file is the TRJATTDATA file which contains the time-tagged state vectors that combine trajectory information from the Best Estimate of Trajectory (BET) filter, LBRET5, and Best Estimate of Attitude (BEA) derived from IMU telemetry. Each term in the two output data files (BETDATA and the Navigation Block, or NAVBLK) are defined. The description of the BETDATA file includes an outline of the algorithm used to calculate each term. To facilitate describing the algorithms, a nomenclature is defined. The description of the nomenclature includes a definition of the coordinate systems used. The NAVBLK file contains navigation input parameters. Each term in NAVBLK is defined and its source is listed. The production of NAVBLK requires only two computational algorithms. These two algorithms, which compute the terms DELTA and RSUBO, are described. Finally, the distribution of data in the NAVBLK records is listed.

  16. Minimum Landing Error Powered-Descent Guidance for Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Acikmese, Behcet

    2011-01-01

    An algorithm improves the accuracy with which a lander can be delivered to the surface of Mars. The main idea behind this innovation is the use of a lossless convexification, which converts an otherwise non-convex constraint related to thruster throttling to a convex constraint, enabling convex optimization to be used. The convexification leads directly to an algorithm that guarantees finding the global optimum of the original nonconvex optimization problem with a deterministic upper bound on the number of iterations required for convergence. In this innovation, previous work in powered-descent guidance using convex optimization is extended to handle the case where the lander must get as close as possible to the target given the available fuel, but is not required to arrive exactly at the target. The new algorithm calculates the minimum-fuel trajectory to the target, if one exists, and calculates the trajectory that minimizes the distance to the target if no solution to the target exists. This approach poses the problem as two Second-Order Cone Programs, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic bounds on the number of iterations required.

  17. Race, language, and mental evolution in Darwin's descent of man.

    PubMed

    Alter, Stephen G

    2007-01-01

    Charles Darwin was notoriously ambiguous in his remarks about the relationship between human evolution and biological race. He stressed the original unity of the races, yet he also helped to popularize the notion of a racial hierarchy filling the gaps between the highest anthropoids and civilized Europeans. A focus on Darwin's explanation of how humans initially evolved, however, shows that he mainly stressed not hierarchy but a version of humanity's original mental unity. In his book The Descent of Man, Darwin emphasized a substantial degree of mental development (including the incipient use of language) in the early, monogenetic phase of human evolution. This development, he argued, necessarily came before primeval man's numerical increase, geographic dispersion, and racial diversification, because only thus could one explain how that group was able to spread at the expense of rival ape-like populations. This scenario stood opposed to a new evolutionary polygenism formulated in the wake of Darwin's Origin of Species by his ostensible supporters Alfred Russel Wallace and Ernst Haeckel. Darwin judged this outlook inadequate to the task of explaining humanity's emergence. PMID:17623873

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; Burkhart, P. Dan; Chen, Allen; Comeaux, Keith A.; Guernsey, Carl S.; Kipp, Devin M.; Lorenzoni, Leila V.; Mendeck, Gavin F.; Powell, Richard W.; Rivellini, Tommaso P.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Sell, Steven W.; Prakash, Ravi; Way, David W.

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than prior missions to Mars, MSL will offer access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. The MSL EDL sequence is a result of a more stringent requirement set than any of its predecessors. Notable among these requirements is landing a 900 kg rover in a landing ellipse much smaller than that of any previous Mars lander. In meeting these requirements, MSL is extending the limits of the EDL technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Thus, there are many design challenges that must be solved for the mission to be successful. Several pieces of the EDL design are technological firsts, such as guided entry and precision landing on another planet, as well as the entire Sky Crane maneuver. This paper discusses the MSL EDL architecture and discusses some of the challenges faced in delivering an unprecedented rover payload to the surface of Mars.

  19. Rapidly Registering Identity-by-Descent Across Ancestral Recombination Graphs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Carmi, Shai; Pe'er, Itsik

    2016-06-01

    The genomes of remotely related individuals occasionally contain long segments that are identical by descent (IBD). Sharing of IBD segments has many applications in population and medical genetics, and it is thus desirable to study their properties in simulations. However, no current method provides a direct, efficient means to extract IBD segments from simulated genealogies. Here, we introduce computationally efficient approaches to extract ground-truth IBD segments from a sequence of genealogies, or equivalently, an ancestral recombination graph. Specifically, we use a two-step scheme, where we first identify putative shared segments by comparing the common ancestors of all pairs of individuals at some distance apart. This reduces the search space considerably, and we then proceed by determining the true IBD status of the candidate segments. Under some assumptions and when allowing a limited resolution of segment lengths, our run-time complexity is reduced from O(n(3) log n) for the naïve algorithm to O(n log n), where n is the number of individuals in the sample. PMID:27104872

  20. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  1. Fabrication Assembly and Test of the Mars Science Laboratory Descent Stage Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Morgan; Baker, Ray; Casillas, Art; Strommen, Dellon; Tanimoto, Rebekah

    2013-01-01

    The Descent Stage Propulsion System (DSPS) is the most challenging and complex propulsion system ever built at JPL. Performance requirements, such as the entry Reaction Control System (RCS) requirements, and the terminal descent requirements (3300 N maximum thrust and approximately 835,000 N-s total impulse in less than a minute), required a large amount of propellant and a large number of components for a spacecraft that had to fit in a 4.5 meter aeroshell. The size and shape of the aeroshell, along with the envelope of the stowed rover, limited the configuration options for the Descent Stage structure. The configuration and mass constraints of the Descent Stage structure, along with performance requirements, drove the configuration of the DSPS. This paper will examine some of the challenges encountered and solutions developed during the fabrication, assembly, and test of the DSPS.

  2. Antarctic Polar Descent and Planetary Wave Activity Observed in ISAMS CO from April to July 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, D. R.; Stanford, J. L.; Nakamura, N.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Taylor, F. W.; Remedios, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    Antarctic polar descent and planetary wave activity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are observed in ISAMS CO data from April to July 1992. CO-derived mean April-to-May upper stratosphere descent rates of 15 K/day (0.25 km/day) at 60 S and 20 K/day (0.33 km/day) at 80 S are compared with descent rates from diabatic trajectory analyses. At 60 S there is excellent agreement, while at 80 S the trajectory-derived descent is significantly larger in early April. Zonal wavenumber 1 enhancement of CO is observed on 9 and 28 May, coincident with enhanced wave 1 in UKMO geopotential height. The 9 May event extends from 40 to 70 km and shows westward phase tilt with height, while the 28 May event extends from 40 to 50 km and shows virtually no phase tilt with height.

  3. A conflict analysis of 4D descent strategies in a metered, multiple-arrival route environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Harris, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    A conflict analysis was performed on multiple arrival traffic at a typical metered airport. The Flow Management Evaluation Model (FMEM) was used to simulate arrival operations using Denver Stapleton's arrival route structure. Sensitivities of conflict performance to three different 4-D descent strategies (clear-idle Mach/Constant AirSpeed (CAS), constant descent angle Mach/CAS and energy optimal) were examined for three traffic mixes represented by those found at Denver Stapleton, John F. Kennedy and typical en route metering (ERM) airports. The Monte Carlo technique was used to generate simulation entry point times. Analysis results indicate that the clean-idle descent strategy offers the best compromise in overall performance. Performance measures primarily include susceptibility to conflict and conflict severity. Fuel usage performance is extrapolated from previous descent strategy studies.

  4. Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Technology Investments Within NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, M. M.

    2014-06-01

    NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate has several investments in entry, descent and landing technologies, across its nine programs. This presentation will give a top-level view of the various investments.

  5. Atmospheric Properties Reconstruction from the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Withers, P.

    2014-07-01

    Data acquired during the entry, descent and landing of the Mars Science Laboratory were used to reconstruct the atmospheric profiles for density, pressure and temperature with excellent vertical resolution and extent.

  6. User's manual for a fuel-conservative descent planning algorithm implemented on a small programmable calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified flight management descent algorithm was developed and programmed on a small programmable calculator. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. An explanation and examples of how the algorithm is used, as well as a detailed flow chart and listing of the algorithm are contained.

  7. THE AFRICAN DESCENT AND GLAUCOMA EVALUATION STUDY (ADAGES): PREDICTORS OF VISUAL FIELD DAMAGE IN GLAUCOMA SUSPECTS

    PubMed Central

    Khachatryan, Naira; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Sharpsten, Lucie; Bowd, Christopher; Sample, Pamela A.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Girkin, Christopher A.; Weinreb, Robert N.; Miki, Atsuya; Hammel, Na’ama; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate racial differences in the development of visual field (VF) damage in glaucoma suspects. Design Prospective, observational cohort study. Methods Six hundred thirty six eyes from 357 glaucoma suspects with normal VF at baseline were included from the multicenter African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study (ADAGES). Racial differences in the development of VF damage were examined using multivariable Cox Proportional Hazard models. Results Thirty one (25.4%) of 122 African descent participants and 47 (20.0%) of 235 European descent participants developed VF damage (p=0.078). In multivariable analysis, worse baseline VF mean deviation, higher mean arterial pressure during follow up, and a race *mean intraocular pressure (IOP) interaction term were significantly associated with the development of VF damage suggesting that racial differences in the risk of VF damage varied by IOP. At higher mean IOP levels, race was predictive of the development of VF damage even after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. At mean IOPs during follow-up of 22, 24 and 26 mmHg, multivariable hazard ratios (95%CI) for the development of VF damage in African descent compared to European descent subjects were 2.03 (1.15–3.57), 2.71 (1.39–5.29), and 3.61 (1.61–8.08), respectively. However, at lower mean IOP levels (below 22 mmHg) during follow-up, African descent was not predictive of the development of VF damage. Conclusion In this cohort of glaucoma suspects with similar access to treatment, multivariate analysis revealed that at higher mean IOP during follow-up, individuals of African descent were more likely to develop VF damage than individuals of European descent. PMID:25597839

  8. A simple method for estimating minimum autorotative descent rate of single rotor helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Schroers, L. G.

    1978-01-01

    Flight test results of minimum autorotative descent rate are compared with calculations based on the minimum power required for steady level flight. Empirical correction factors are derived that account for differences in energy dissipation between these two flight conditions. A method is also presented for estimating the minimum power coefficient for level flight for any helicopter for use in the empirical estimation procedure of autorotative descent rate.

  9. Analysis of Flight Management System Predictions of Idle-Thrust Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stell, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    To enable arriving aircraft to fly optimized descents computed by the flight management system (FMS) in congested airspace, ground automation must accurately predict descent trajectories. To support development of the predictor and its uncertainty models, descents from cruise to the meter fix were executed using vertical navigation in a B737-700 simulator and a B777-200 simulator, both with commercial FMSs. For both aircraft types, the FMS computed the intended descent path for a specified speed profile assuming idle thrust after top of descent (TOD), and then it controlled the avionics without human intervention. The test matrix varied aircraft weight, descent speed, and wind conditions. The first analysis in this paper determined the effect of the test matrix parameters on the FMS computation of TOD location, and it compared the results to those for the current ground predictor in the Efficient Descent Advisor (EDA). The second analysis was similar but considered the time to fly a specified distance to the meter fix. The effects of the test matrix variables together with the accuracy requirements for the predictor will determine the allowable error for the predictor inputs. For the B737, the EDA prediction of meter fix crossing time agreed well with the FMS; but its prediction of TOD location probably was not sufficiently accurate to enable idle-thrust descents in congested airspace, even though the FMS and EDA gave similar shapes for TOD location as a function of the test matrix variables. For the B777, the FMS and EDA gave different shapes for the TOD location function, and the EDA prediction of the TOD location is not accurate enough to fully enable the concept. Furthermore, the differences between the FMS and EDA predictions of meter fix crossing time for the B777 indicated that at least one of them was not sufficiently accurate.

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing System Development Challenges and Preliminary Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam D.; San Martin, A. Miguel; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory project recently landed the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars. With the success of the landing system, the performance envelope of entry, descent, and landing capabilities has been extended over the previous state of the art. This paper will present an overview of the MSL entry, descent, and landing system, a discussion of a subset of its development challenges, and include a discussion of preliminary results of the flight reconstruction effort.

  11. Principal whitened gradient for information geometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhirong; Laaksonen, Jorma

    2008-01-01

    We propose two strategies to improve the optimization in information geometry. First, a local Euclidean embedding is identified by whitening the tangent space, which leads to an additive parameter update sequence that approximates the geodesic flow to the optimal density model. Second, removal of the minor components of gradients enhances the estimation of the Fisher information matrix and reduces the computational cost. We also prove that dimensionality reduction is necessary for learning multidimensional linear transformations. The optimization based on the principal whitened gradients demonstrates faster and more robust convergence in simulations on unsupervised learning with synthetic data and on discriminant analysis of breast cancer data. PMID:18255260

  12. The Huygens Probe Descent Trajectory Working Group: Organizational framework, goals, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Witasse, Olivier; Pérez-Ayúcar, Miguel; Matson, Dennis L.

    2007-11-01

    Cassini/Huygens, a flagship mission to explore the rings, atmosphere, magnetic field, and moons that make up the Saturn system, is a joint endeavor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the European Space Agency, and Agenzia Spaziale Italiana. Comprising two spacecraft - a Saturn orbiter built by NASA and a Titan entry/descent probe built by the European Space Agency - Cassini/Huygens was launched in October 1997. The Huygens probe parachuted to the surface of Titan in January 2005. During the descent, six science instruments provided in situ measurements of Titan's atmosphere, clouds, and winds, and photographed Titan's surface. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments, and to provide a reference set of data for ground-truth calibration of orbiter remote sensing measurements, an accurate reconstruction of the probe entry and descent trajectory and surface landing location is necessary. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group was chartered in 1996 as a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team to develop and implement an organizational framework and retrieval methodologies for the probe descent trajectory reconstruction from the entry altitude of 1270 km to the surface using navigation data, and engineering and science data acquired by the instruments on the Huygens Probe. This paper presents an overview of the Descent Trajectory Working Group, including the history, rationale, goals and objectives, organizational framework, rules and procedures, and implementation.

  13. Atmospheric Environments for Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, Carl G.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Scientific measurements of atmospheric properties have been made by a wide variety of planetary flyby missions, orbiters, and landers. Although landers can make in-situ observations of near-surface atmospheric conditions (and can collect atmospheric data during their entry phase), the vast majority of data on planetary atmospheres has been collected by remote sensing techniques from flyby and orbiter spacecraft (and to some extent by Earth-based remote sensing). Many of these remote sensing observations (made over a variety of spectral ranges), consist of vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature as a function of atmospheric pressure level. While these measurements are of great interest to atmospheric scientists and modelers of planetary atmospheres, the primary interest for engineers designing entry descent and landing (EDL) systems is information about atmospheric density as a function of geometric altitude. Fortunately, as described in in this paper, it is possible to use a combination of the gas-law relation and the hydrostatic balance relation to convert temperature-versus-pressure, scientific observations into density-versus-altitude data for use in engineering applications. The following section provides a brief introduction to atmospheric thermodynamics, as well as constituents, and winds for EDL. It also gives methodology for using atmospheric information to do "back-of-the-envelope" calculations of various EDL aeroheating parameters, including peak deceleration rate ("g-load"), peak convective heat rate. and total heat load on EDL spacecraft thermal protection systems. Brief information is also provided about atmospheric variations and perturbations for EDL guidance and control issues, and atmospheric issues for EDL parachute systems. Subsequent sections give details of the atmospheric environments for five destinations for possible EDL missions: Venus. Earth. Mars, Saturn, and Titan. Specific atmospheric information is provided for these destinations

  14. Optimal sliding guidance algorithm for Mars powered descent phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibben, Daniel R.; Furfaro, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Landing on large planetary bodies (e.g. Mars) with pinpoint accuracy presents a set of new challenges that must be addressed. One such challenge is the development of new guidance algorithms that exhibit a higher degree of robustness and flexibility. In this paper, the Zero-Effort-Miss/Zero-Effort-Velocity (ZEM/ZEV) optimal sliding guidance (OSG) scheme is applied to the Mars powered descent phase. This guidance algorithm has been specifically designed to combine techniques from both optimal and sliding control theories to generate an acceleration command based purely on the current estimated spacecraft state and desired final target state. Consequently, OSG yields closed-loop trajectories that do not need a reference trajectory. The guidance algorithm has its roots in the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance and its mathematical equations are naturally derived by defining a non-linear sliding surface as a function of the terms Zero-Effort-Miss and Zero-Effort-Velocity. With the addition of the sliding mode and using Lyapunov theory for non-autonomous systems, one can formally prove that the developed OSG law is globally finite-time stable to unknown but bounded perturbations. Here, the focus is on comparing the generalized ZEM/ZEV feedback guidance with the OSG law to explicitly demonstrate the benefits of the sliding mode augmentation. Results show that the sliding guidance provides a more robust solution in off-nominal scenarios while providing similar fuel consumption when compared to the non-sliding guidance command. Further, a Monte Carlo analysis is performed to examine the performance of the OSG law under perturbed conditions.

  15. Mars 2020 Entry, Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Wright, Henry; White, Todd; Schoenenberger, Mark; Santos, Jose; Karlgaard, Chris; Kuhl, Chris; Oishi, TOmo; Trombetta, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    This paper will introduce Mars Entry Descent and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI2) on NASA's Mars2020 mission. Mars2020 is a flagship NASA mission with science and technology objectives to help answer questions about possibility of life on Mars as well as to demonstrate technologies for future human expedition. Mars2020 is scheduled for launch in 2020. MEDLI2 is a suite of instruments embedded in the heatshield and backshell thermal protection systems of Mars2020 entry vehicle. The objectives of MEDLI2 are to gather critical aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics and TPS performance data during EDL phase of the mission. MEDLI2 builds up the success of MEDLI flight instrumentation on Mars Science Laboratory mission in 2012. MEDLI instrumentation suite measured surface pressure and TPS temperature on the heatshield during MSL entry into Mars. MEDLI data has since been used for unprecedented reconstruction of aerodynamic drag, vehicle attitude, in-situ atmospheric density, aerothermal heating, transition to turbulence, in-depth TPS performance and TPS ablation. [1,2] In addition to validating predictive models, MEDLI data has highlighted extra margin available in the MSL forebody TPS, which can potentially be used to reduce vehicle parasitic mass. MEDLI2 expands the scope of instrumentation by focusing on quantities of interest not addressed in MEDLI suite. The type the sensors are expanded and their layout on the TPS modified to meet these new objectives. The paper will provide key motivation and governing requirements that drive the choice and the implementation of the new sensor suite. The implementation considerations of sensor selection, qualification, and demonstration of minimal risk to the host mission will be described. The additional challenges associated with mechanical accommodation, electrical impact, data storage and retrieval for MEDLI2 system, which extends sensors to backshell will also be described.

  16. Cascade Error Projection: A Learning Algorithm for Hardware Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A.; Daud, Taher

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we workout a detailed mathematical analysis for a new learning algorithm termed Cascade Error Projection (CEP) and a general learning frame work. This frame work can be used to obtain the cascade correlation learning algorithm by choosing a particular set of parameters. Furthermore, CEP learning algorithm is operated only on one layer, whereas the other set of weights can be calculated deterministically. In association with the dynamical stepsize change concept to convert the weight update from infinite space into a finite space, the relation between the current stepsize and the previous energy level is also given and the estimation procedure for optimal stepsize is used for validation of our proposed technique. The weight values of zero are used for starting the learning for every layer, and a single hidden unit is applied instead of using a pool of candidate hidden units similar to cascade correlation scheme. Therefore, simplicity in hardware implementation is also obtained. Furthermore, this analysis allows us to select from other methods (such as the conjugate gradient descent or the Newton's second order) one of which will be a good candidate for the learning technique. The choice of learning technique depends on the constraints of the problem (e.g., speed, performance, and hardware implementation); one technique may be more suitable than others. Moreover, for a discrete weight space, the theoretical analysis presents the capability of learning with limited weight quantization. Finally, 5- to 8-bit parity and chaotic time series prediction problems are investigated; the simulation results demonstrate that 4-bit or more weight quantization is sufficient for learning neural network using CEP. In addition, it is demonstrated that this technique is able to compensate for less bit weight resolution by incorporating additional hidden units. However, generation result may suffer somewhat with lower bit weight quantization.

  17. The Beagle 2 entry descent and landing system (EDLS) software - development and re-use of software for the Red Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, Martin

    2002-07-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to the Beagle 2 Mars probe and the associated mission, followed by a description of Logica's software responsibility on this programme. The approach taken during software development and implementation of the missioncritical entry, descent and landing system software is then described. This has focussed on maximising re-use of expertise from similar programmes such as Huygens and Rosetta. At the same time effort was devoted to ensure that re-use was enabled within the programme as well as opening up the possibility for re-use on subsequent missions. Finally, the lessons learned are highlighted and a number of conclusions are drawn.

  18. Two New PRP Conjugate Gradient Algorithms for Minimization Optimization Models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Gonglin; Duan, Xiabin; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Cui, Zengru; Sheng, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Two new PRP conjugate Algorithms are proposed in this paper based on two modified PRP conjugate gradient methods: the first algorithm is proposed for solving unconstrained optimization problems, and the second algorithm is proposed for solving nonlinear equations. The first method contains two aspects of information: function value and gradient value. The two methods both possess some good properties, as follows: 1)βk ≥ 0 2) the search direction has the trust region property without the use of any line search method 3) the search direction has sufficient descent property without the use of any line search method. Under some suitable conditions, we establish the global convergence of the two algorithms. We conduct numerical experiments to evaluate our algorithms. The numerical results indicate that the first algorithm is effective and competitive for solving unconstrained optimization problems and that the second algorithm is effective for solving large-scale nonlinear equations. PMID:26502409

  19. Status Needs Positive Change. Report of the Subcommittee on the Immigrant Community of African Descent. Volume 4, Immigrants of African Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Governor's Advisory Committee for Black Affairs, Albany.

    This document comprises an analysis of the needs of immigrants of African descent to New York State in the following areas: (1) economic planning; (2) culture and the arts; (3) immigration reform and amnesty; and (4) health care. Immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa comprise rapidly growing segments of the State's population. These immigrants…

  20. NASA Now: Forces and Motion: Curiosity -- Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Anita Sengupta, a senior systems engineer, describes the nail-biting seven minutes of terror as Curiosity entered the Martian atmosphere barreling toward a landing on the Martian surface. Learn...

  1. Ship wake-detection procedure using conjugate gradient trained artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.; Lehman, S.K.; Dowla, F.U.; Lu, S.Y.; Johansson, E.M.; Goodman, D.M. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports that a method has been developed to reduce large two-dimensional images to significantly smaller feature lists. These feature lists overcome the problem of storing and manipulating large amounts of data. A new artificial neural network using conjugate gradient training methods, operating on sets of feature lists, was successfully trained to determine the presence or absence of wakes in synthetic aperture radar images. A comparison has been made between the different conjugate gradient and steepest-descent training methods and has demonstrated the superiority of the former over the latter.

  2. A modified form of conjugate gradient method for unconstrained optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Nur Hamizah Abdul; Rivaie, Mohd.; Mamat, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Conjugate gradient (CG) methods have been recognized as an interesting technique to solve optimization problems, due to the numerical efficiency, simplicity and low memory requirements. In this paper, we propose a new CG method based on the study of Rivaie et al. [7] (Comparative study of conjugate gradient coefficient for unconstrained Optimization, Aus. J. Bas. Appl. Sci. 5(2011) 947-951). Then, we show that our method satisfies sufficient descent condition and converges globally with exact line search. Numerical results show that our proposed method is efficient for given standard test problems, compare to other existing CG methods.

  3. Shake rattle and roll: the bony labyrinth and aerial descent in squamates.

    PubMed

    Boistel, Renaud; Herrel, Anthony; Lebrun, Renaud; Daghfous, Gheylen; Tafforeau, Paul; Losos, Jonathan B; Vanhooydonck, Bieke

    2011-12-01

    Controlled aerial descent has evolved many times independently in vertebrates. Squamates (lizards and snakes) are unusual in that respect due to the large number of independent origins of the evolution of this behavior. Although some squamates such as flying geckos of the genus Ptychozoon and the flying dragons of the genus Draco show obvious adaptations including skin flaps or enlarged ribs allowing them to increase their surface area and slow down their descent, many others appear unspecialized. Yet, specializations can be expected at the level of the sensory and neural systems allowing animals to maintain stability during controlled aerial descent. The vestibular system is a likely candidate given that it is an acceleration detector and is well-suited to detect changes in pitch, roll and yaw. Here we use conventional and synchrotron μCT scans to quantify the morphology of the vestibular system in squamates able to perform controlled aerial descent compared to species characterized by a terrestrial or climbing life style. Our results show the presence of a strong phylogenetic signal in the data with the vestibular system in species from the same family being morphologically similar. However, both our shape analysis and an analysis of the dimensions of the vestibular system showed clear differences among animals with different life-styles. Species able to perform a controlled aerial descent differed in the position and shape of the inner ear, especially of the posterior ampulla. Given the limited stability of squamates against roll and the fact that the posterior ampulla is tuned to changes in roll this suggests an adaptive evolution of the vestibular system in squamates using controlled aerial descent. Future studies testing for similar differences in other groups of vertebrates known to use controlled aerial descent are needed to test the generality of this observation. PMID:21700578

  4. Aerodynamics of Reentry Vehicle Clipper at Descent Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Yu. P.; Reshetin, A. G.; Dyadkin, A. A.; Petrov, N. K.; Simakova, T. V.; Tokarev, V. A.

    2005-02-01

    From Gagarin spacecraft to reusable orbiter Buran, RSC Energia has traveled a long way in the search for the most optimal and, which is no less important, the most reliable spacecraft for manned space flight. During the forty years of space exploration, in cooperation with a broad base of subcontractors, a number of problems have been solved which assure a safe long stay in space. Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft were replaced with Soyuz supporting a crew of three. During missions to a space station, it provides crew rescue capability in case of a space station emergency at all times (the spacecraft life is 200 days).The latest modification of Soyuz spacecraft -Soyuz TMA -in contrast to its predecessors, allows to become a space flight participant to a person of virtually any anthropometric parameters with a mass of 50 to 95 kg capable of withstanding up to 6 g load during descent. At present, Soyuz TMA spacecraft are the state-of-the-art, reliable and only means of the ISS crew delivery, in-flight support and return. Introduced on the basis of many years of experience in operation of manned spacecraft were not only the principles of deep redundancy of on-board systems and equipment, but, to assure the main task of the spacecraft -the crew return to Earth -the principles of functional redundancy. That is, vital operations can be performed by different systems based on different physical principles. The emergency escape system that was developed is the only one in the world that provides crew rescue in case of LV failure at any phase in its flight. Several generations of space stations that have been developed have broadened, virtually beyond all limits, capabilities of man in space. The docking system developed at RSC Energia allowed not only to dock spacecraft in space, but also to construct in orbit various complex space systems. These include large space stations, and may include in the future the in-orbit construction of systems for the exploration of the Moon and

  5. Tracer-Based Determination of Vortex Descent in the 1999-2000 Arctic Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Jost, Hans-Juerg; Loewenstein, Max; Podolske, James R.; Hurst, Dale F.; Elkins, James W.; Schauffler, Sue M.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Herman, Robert L.; Webster, Christopher R.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed analysis of available in situ and remotely sensed N2O and CH4 data measured in the 1999-2000 winter Arctic vortex has been performed in order to quantify the temporal evolution of vortex descent. Differences in potential temperature (theta) among balloon and aircraft vertical profiles (an average of 19-23 K on a given N2O or CH4 isopleth) indicated significant vortex inhomogeneity in late fall as compared with late winter profiles. A composite fall vortex profile was constructed for November 26, 1999, whose error bars encompassed the observed variability. High-latitude, extravortex profiles measured in different years and seasons revealed substantial variability in N2O and CH4 on theta surfaces, but all were clearly distinguishable from the first vortex profiles measured in late fall 1999. From these extravortex-vortex differences, we inferred descent prior to November 26: 397+/-15 K (1sigma) at 30 ppbv N2O and 640 ppbv CH4, and 28+/-13 K above 200 ppbv N2O and 1280 ppbv CH4. Changes in theta were determined on five N2O and CH4 isopleths from November 26 through March 12, and descent rates were calculated on each N2O isopleth for several time intervals. The maximum descent rates were seen between November 26 and January 27: 0.82+/-0.20 K/day averaged over 50-250 ppbv N2O. By late winter (February 26-March 12), the average rate had decreased to 0.10+/-0.25 K/day. Descent rates also decreased with increasing N2O; the winter average (November 26-March 5) descent rate varied from 0.75+/-0.10 K/day at 50 ppbv to 0.40+/-0.11 K/day at 250 ppbv. Comparison of these results with observations and models of descent in prior years showed very good overall agreement. Two models of the 1999-2000 vortex descent, SLIMCAT and REPROBUS, despite theta offsets with respect to observed profiles of up to 20 K on most tracer isopleths, produced descent rates that agreed very favorably with the inferred rates from observation.

  6. Learning Precise Spike Train-to-Spike Train Transformations in Multilayer Feedforward Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arunava

    2016-05-01

    We derive a synaptic weight update rule for learning temporally precise spike train-to-spike train transformations in multilayer feedforward networks of spiking neurons. The framework, aimed at seamlessly generalizing error backpropagation to the deterministic spiking neuron setting, is based strictly on spike timing and avoids invoking concepts pertaining to spike rates or probabilistic models of spiking. The derivation is founded on two innovations. First, an error functional is proposed that compares the spike train emitted by the output neuron of the network to the desired spike train by way of their putative impact on a virtual postsynaptic neuron. This formulation sidesteps the need for spike alignment and leads to closed-form solutions for all quantities of interest. Second, virtual assignment of weights to spikes rather than synapses enables a perturbation analysis of individual spike times and synaptic weights of the output, as well as all intermediate neurons in the network, which yields the gradients of the error functional with respect to the said entities. Learning proceeds via a gradient descent mechanism that leverages these quantities. Simulation experiments demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed learning framework. The experiments also highlight asymmetries between synapses on excitatory and inhibitory neurons. PMID:26942750

  7. Analysis of foot clearance in firefighters during ascent and descent of stairs.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Richard M; Horn, Gavin P; Rosengren, Karl S; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Slips, trips, and falls are a leading cause of injury to firefighters with many injuries occurring while traversing stairs, possibly exaggerated by acute fatigue from firefighting activities and/or asymmetric load carriage. This study examined the effects that fatigue, induced by simulated firefighting activities, and hose load carriage have on foot clearance while traversing stairs. Landing and passing foot clearances for each stair during ascent and descent of a short staircase were investigated. Clearances decreased significantly (p < 0.05) post-exercise for nine of 12 ascent parameters and increased for two of eight descent parameters. Load carriage resulted in significantly decreased (p < 0.05) clearance over three ascent parameters, and one increase during descent. Decreased clearances during ascent caused by fatigue or load carriage may result in an increased trip risk. Increased clearances during descent may suggest use of a compensation strategy to ensure stair clearance or an increased risk of over-stepping during descent. PMID:26360190

  8. Conversations about Science across Activities in Mexican-Descent Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah R.; Esterly, Jennifer; Callanan, Maureen A.; Wright, Ramser; Navarro, Rocio

    2007-01-01

    Parent-child "everyday" conversations have been suggested as a source of children's early science learning. If such conversations are important, then it would be pertinent to know whether children from different family backgrounds have different experiences talking about science in informal settings. We focus on the relation between parents'…

  9. TRW - Lunar Descent Engine. Chapter 6, Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elverum, Gerard W.

    2009-01-01

    it came to Apollo 13, we went back into the record, and said, "Hey, we have pushed this system around up there on Apollo 5, and we have also restarted this tandem configuration." The requirements on Apollo 13 were to put it back into play. The spacecraft was out of free return to the earth at the time of the accident. It would not have come back. NASA said, "Okay, we ll use the descent engine to put the spacecraft in a free trajectory; it will go around the moon and be on free trajectory back to Earth." Then, as it came around the far side of the moon, the guys found out that they had an oxygen problem. As you remember, things were getting pretty bad in there. They said, "We ve got to get it back as fast as we can. Is it okay if we re-fire the engine? Now, we re in a free trajectory, so we want to put as much delta-v (or change in velocity) in as we can. Can we re-fire right now?" We said, "Yes, the data says it has been this period of time." We could re-fire the engine, run the rest of the duty cycle up as far as we needed while preserving enough fluids to make the final correction as the spacecraft got near Earth, and restart the engine. It was pretty fortuitous that we could give them those answers.

  10. Preliminary assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and landing simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David W.

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and the novel Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the Entry, Descent, and Landing system.

  11. Descent and Landing Triggers for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Exploration Flight Test-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, Brian D.; Semrau, Jeffrey D.; Duke, Charity J.

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) will perform a flight test known as Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) currently scheduled for 2014. One of the primary functions of this test is to exercise all of the important Guidance, Navigation, Control (GN&C), and Propulsion systems, along with the flight software for future flights. The Descent and Landing segment of the flight is governed by the requirements levied on the GN&C system by the Landing and Recovery System (LRS). The LRS is a complex system of parachutes and flight control modes that ensure that the Orion MPCV safely lands at its designated target in the Pacific Ocean. The Descent and Landing segment begins with the jettisoning of the Forward Bay Cover and concludes with sensing touchdown. This paper discusses the requirements, design, testing, analysis and performance of the current EFT-1 Descent and Landing Triggers flight software.

  12. Advances in POST2 End-to-End Descent and Landing Simulation for the ALHAT Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jody L.; Striepe, Scott A.; Maddock, Robert W.; Hines, Glenn D.; Paschall, Stephen, II; Cohanim, Babak E.; Fill, Thomas; Johnson, Michael C.; Bishop, Robert H.; DeMars, Kyle J.; Sostaric, Ronald r.; Johnson, Andrew E.

    2008-01-01

    Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used as a basis for an end-to-end descent and landing trajectory simulation that is essential in determining design and integration capability and system performance of the lunar descent and landing system and environment models for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. The POST2 simulation provides a six degree-of-freedom capability necessary to test, design and operate a descent and landing system for successful lunar landing. This paper presents advances in the development and model-implementation of the POST2 simulation, as well as preliminary system performance analysis, used for the testing and evaluation of ALHAT project system models.

  13. Gradient Driven Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannell, David

    2005-01-01

    We have worked with our collaborators at the University of Milan (Professor Marzio Giglio and his group-supported by ASI) to define the science required to measure gradient driven fluctuations in the microgravity environment. Such a study would provide an accurate test of the extent to which the theory of fluctuating hydrodynamics can be used to predict the properties of fluids maintained in a stressed, non-equilibrium state. As mentioned above, the results should also provide direct visual insight into the behavior of a variety of fluid systems containing gradients or interfaces, when placed in the microgravity environment. With support from the current grant, we have identified three key systems for detailed investigation. These three systems are: 1) A single-component fluid to be studied in the presence of a temperature gradient; 2) A mixture of two organic liquids to be studied both in the presence of a temperature gradient, which induces a steady-state concentration gradient, and with the temperature gradient removed, but while the concentration gradient is dying by means of diffusion; 3) Various pairs of liquids undergoing free diffusion, including a proteidbuffer solution and pairs of mixtures having different concentrations, to allow us to vary the differences in fluid properties in a controlled manner.

  14. A novel multivariate performance optimization method based on sparse coding and hyper-predictor learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiachen; Ding, Zhiyong; Guo, Fei; Wang, Huogen; Hughes, Nick

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of optimization of multivariate performance measures, and propose a novel algorithm for it. Different from traditional machine learning methods which optimize simple loss functions to learn prediction function, the problem studied in this paper is how to learn effective hyper-predictor for a tuple of data points, so that a complex loss function corresponding to a multivariate performance measure can be minimized. We propose to present the tuple of data points to a tuple of sparse codes via a dictionary, and then apply a linear function to compare a sparse code against a given candidate class label. To learn the dictionary, sparse codes, and parameter of the linear function, we propose a joint optimization problem. In this problem, the both the reconstruction error and sparsity of sparse code, and the upper bound of the complex loss function are minimized. Moreover, the upper bound of the loss function is approximated by the sparse codes and the linear function parameter. To optimize this problem, we develop an iterative algorithm based on descent gradient methods to learn the sparse codes and hyper-predictor parameter alternately. Experiment results on some benchmark data sets show the advantage of the proposed methods over other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:26291045

  15. Supervised learning of hidden Markov models for sequence discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Mamitsuka, Hiroshi

    1997-12-01

    We present two supervised learning algorithms for hidden Markov models (HMMs) for sequence discrimination. When we model a class of sequences with an HMM, conventional learning algorithms for HMMs have trained the HMM with training examples belonging to the class, i.e. positive examples alone, while both of our methods allow us to use negative examples as well as positive examples. One of our algorithms minimizes a kind of distance between a target likelihood of a given training sequence and an actual likelihood of the sequence, which is obtained by a given HMM, using an additive type of parameter updating based on a gradient-descent learning. The other algorithm maximizes a criterion which represents a kind of ratio of the likelihood of a positive example to the likelihood of the total example, using a multiplicative type of parameter updating which is more efficient in actual computation time than the additive type one. We compare our two methods with two conventional methods on a type of cross-validation of actual motif classification experiments. Experimental results show that in terms of the average number of classification errors, our two methods out-perform the two conventional algorithms. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Compensation of significant parametric uncertainties using sliding mode online learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnetter, Philipp; Kruger, Thomas

    An augmented nonlinear inverse dynamics (NID) flight control strategy using sliding mode online learning for a small unmanned aircraft system (UAS) is presented. Because parameter identification for this class of aircraft often is not valid throughout the complete flight envelope, aerodynamic parameters used for model based control strategies may show significant deviations. For the concept of feedback linearization this leads to inversion errors that in combination with the distinctive susceptibility of small UAS towards atmospheric turbulence pose a demanding control task for these systems. In this work an adaptive flight control strategy using feedforward neural networks for counteracting such nonlinear effects is augmented with the concept of sliding mode control (SMC). SMC-learning is derived from variable structure theory. It considers a neural network and its training as a control problem. It is shown that by the dynamic calculation of the learning rates, stability can be guaranteed and thus increase the robustness against external disturbances and system failures. With the resulting higher speed of convergence a wide range of simultaneously occurring disturbances can be compensated. The SMC-based flight controller is tested and compared to the standard gradient descent (GD) backpropagation algorithm under the influence of significant model uncertainties and system failures.

  17. Minimum-Cost Aircraft Descent Trajectories with a Constrained Altitude Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G.; Sadovsky, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical formula for solving the speed profile that accrues minimum cost during an aircraft descent with a constrained altitude profile is derived. The optimal speed profile first reaches a certain speed, called the minimum-cost speed, as quickly as possible using an appropriate extreme value of thrust. The speed profile then stays on the minimum-cost speed as long as possible, before switching to an extreme value of thrust for the rest of the descent. The formula is applied to an actual arrival route and its sensitivity to winds and airlines' business objectives is analyzed.

  18. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  19. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Kinney, David J.; Howard, Austin R.; Chen, George T.; Ivanov, Mark C.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Westhelle, Carlos H.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. This paper summarizes the approach and top-level results from Year 1 of the Study, which focused on landing 10-50 mt on Mars, but also included a trade study of the best advanced parachute design for increasing the landed payloads within the EDL architecture of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission.

  20. Initial Field Evaluation of Pilot Procedures for Flying CTAS Descent Clearances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Everett; Goka, Tsuyoshi; Cashion, Patricia; Feary, Michael; Graham, Holly; Smith, Nancy; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) is a new support system that is designed to assist air traffic controllers in the management of arrival traffic. CTAS will provide controllers with more information about current air traffic, enabling them to provide clearances for efficient, conflict-free descents that help achieve an orderly stream of aircraft at the final approach fix. CTAS is a computer-based system that functions as a "ground-based FMS" that can predict flight trajectories and arrival times for all incoming aircraft. CTAS uses an aircraft's cruise airspeed; current air traffic, winds and temperature; performance characteristics of the aircraft type; and individual airline preferences to create a flight profile from cruise altitude to the final approach fix. Controllers can use this flight profile to provide a descent clearance that will allow an aircraft to fly an efficient descent and merge more smoothly with other arriving aircraft. A field test of the CTAS Descent Advisor software was conducted at the Denver Center for aircraft arriving at the Stapleton International Airport from September 12-29. CTAS Descent clearances were given to a NASA flight test aircraft and to 77 airline flights that arrived during low traffic periods. For the airline portion of the field test, cockpit procedures and pilot briefing packages for both FMS equipped and unequipped aircraft were developed in cooperation with an airline. The procedures developed for the FMS equipped aircraft were to fly a VNAV descent at a controller specified speed to cross a metering fix at a specified altitude and speed. For nonFMS aircraft, the clearance also specified a CTAS calculated top-of-descent point. Some CTAS related flight deck issues included how much time was available to the pilots' for compliance, the amount of information that needed to be interpreted in the clearance and possible repercussions of misunderstandings. Data collected during the study ranged from subjective data

  1. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  2. Effects of aircraft and flight parameters on energy-efficient profile descents in time-based metered traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of several parameters on the time required to fly a nominal profile descent of a B-737 from an entry fix to a metering fix 75 n.mi. away was studied. The ground distance for the constant speed segment was adjusted in each case so that the aircraft would always arrive at the metering fix position at the completion of the five segments of the profile descent. The influence of eight parameters on the same nominal profile descent is outlined, but the method used for the off nominal cases was changed. The time calculated for the constant speed segment in the nominal case is used for all off nominal cases. This method allows the aircraft to arrive at the metering fix before or after the profile descent is complete. It is shown that descent Mach number and wind speed have a large effect on the time error, whereas weight was a much smaller effect.

  3. Sexual Health Discussions between African-American Mothers and Mothers of Latino Descent and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Ashley; Ellis, Monica U.; Castellanos, Ted; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y.; Sneed, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined approaches used by African-American mothers and mothers of Latino descent for informal sex-related discussions with their children to inform sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV intervention development efforts. We recruited mothers (of children aged 12-15) from youth service agencies and a university in southern California.…

  4. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations. PMID:26834342

  5. Forward stair descent with hybrid neuroprosthesis after paralysis: Single case study demonstrating feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Bulea, Thomas C.; Kobetic, Rudi; Audu, Musa L.; Schnellenberger, John R.; Pinault, Gilles; Triolo, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to negotiate stairs is important for community access and independent mobility but requires more effort and strength than level walking. For this reason, previous attempts to utilize functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) to restore stair navigation after spinal cord injury (SCI) have had limited success and are not readily generalizable. Stair descent is particularly challenging because it requires energy absorption via eccentric muscle contractions, a task not easily accomplished with FNS. This article presents the design and initial testing of a hybrid neuroprosthesis with a variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM-HNP) for stair descent. Using a 16-channel percutaneous FNS system, a muscle activation pattern was synthesized to descend stairs with the VIKM-HNP in a step-by-step fashion. A finite state control system was implemented to deactivate knee extensor stimulation and utilize the VIKM-HNP to absorb energy and regulate descent speed. Feasibility testing was performed on one individual with complete thoracic-level SCI. Stair descent was achieved with maximum upper-limb forces of less than 45% body weight compared with previously reported value of 70% with FNS only. The experiments also provided insight into design requirements for future hybrid systems for stair navigation, the implications of which are discussed. PMID:25437932

  6. Education by Any Means Necessary: Peoples of African Descent and Community-Based Pedagogical Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Ty-Ron Michael; Peck, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study examines how and why peoples of African descent access and utilize community-based pedagogical spaces that exist outside schools. Employing a theoretical framework that fuses historical methodology and border-crossing theory, the researchers review existing scholarship and primary documents to present an historical examination of how…

  7. Use of steepest descent and various approximations for efficient computation of minimum noise aircraft landing trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, G.; Witt, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to landing trajectory optimization research were discussed: (1) programming and modifying the steepest descent optimization procedure, (2) successfully iterating toward the optimum for a four-mile trajectory, (3) beginning optimization runs for a twenty-mile trajectory, and (4) adapt wind tunnel data for computer usage. Other related areas were discussed in detail in the two previous annual reports.

  8. Predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Polese, Janaine Cunha; Scianni, Aline Alvim; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci Fuscaldi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine which clinical measures of walking performance and lower limb muscle strength would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent in community-dwelling individuals with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Regression analysis of cross-sectional data from 55 individuals between one and five years post-stroke was used to investigate the measures of walking (speed and distance covered during the 6-minute walk test [6MWT]), and strength of the paretic knee extensor and ankle plantar flexor muscles would predict energy cost during stair ascent and descent. [Results] Three predictors (habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles) were kept in the model. Habitual walking speed alone explained 47% of the variance in energy cost during stair ascent and descent. When the strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles was included in the model, the explained variance increased to 53%. By adding the distance covered during the 6MWT, the variance increased to 58%. [Conclusion] Habitual walking speed, distance covered during the 6MWT, and strength of the paretic knee extensor muscles were significant predictors of energy cost during stair ascent and descent in individuals with mild walking limitations. PMID:26834342

  9. Smart-Divert Powered Descent Guidance to Avoid the Backshell Landing Dispersion Ellipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M.; Acikmese, Behcet

    2013-01-01

    A smart-divert capability has been added into the Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) software originally developed for Mars pinpoint and precision landing. The smart-divert algorithm accounts for the landing dispersions of the entry backshell, which separates from the lander vehicle at the end of the parachute descent phase and prior to powered descent. The smart-divert PDG algorithm utilizes the onboard fuel and vehicle thrust vectoring to mitigate landing error in an intelligent way: ensuring that the lander touches down with minimum- fuel usage at the minimum distance from the desired landing location that also avoids impact by the descending backshell. The smart-divert PDG software implements a computationally efficient, convex formulation of the powered-descent guidance problem to provide pinpoint or precision-landing guidance solutions that are fuel-optimal and satisfy physical thrust bound and pointing constraints, as well as position and speed constraints. The initial smart-divert implementation enforced a lateral-divert corridor parallel to the ground velocity vector; this was based on guidance requirements for MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) landings. This initial method was overly conservative since the divert corridor was infinite in the down-range direction despite the backshell landing inside a calculable dispersion ellipse. Basing the divert constraint instead on a local tangent to the backshell dispersion ellipse in the direction of the desired landing site provides a far less conservative constraint. The resulting enhanced smart-divert PDG algorithm avoids impact with the descending backshell and has reduced conservatism.

  10. Access to Health Care Among Latinos of Mexican Descent in "Colonias" in Two Texas Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Larry; Arizmendi, Lydia; Cornelius, Llewellyn J.

    2004-01-01

    Critical to resolving the problem of health disparities among Latinos is examining the needs within ethnic subpopulations. This paper focused on the unique challenges encountered by one ethnic subpopulation -- Latinos of Mexican descent living in colonias. Findings reaffirm the importance of looking within ethnic subpopulations to understand the…

  11. High-Resolution Detection of Identity by Descent in Unrelated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Sharon R.; Browning, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of recent identity by descent (IBD) in population samples is important for population-based linkage mapping and for highly accurate genotype imputation and haplotype-phase inference. We present a method for detection of recent IBD in population samples. Our method accounts for linkage disequilibrium between SNPs to enable full use of high-density SNP data. We find that our method can detect segments of a length of 2 cM with moderate power and negligible false discovery rate in Illumina 550K data in Northwestern Europeans. We compare our method with GERMLINE and PLINK, and we show that our method has a level of resolution that is significantly better than these existing methods, thus extending the usefulness of recent IBD in analysis of high-density SNP data. We survey four genomic regions in a sample of UK individuals of European descent and find that on average, at a given location, our method detects IBD in 2.7 per 10,000 pairs of individuals in Illumina 550K data. We also present methodology and results for detection of homozygosity by descent (HBD) and survey the whole genome in a sample of 1373 UK individuals of European descent. We detect HBD in 4.7 individuals per 10,000 on average at a given location. Our methodology is implemented in the freely available BEAGLE software package. PMID:20303063

  12. Feeling Frugal: Socioeconomic Status, Acculturation, and Cultural Health Beliefs among Women of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrayo, Evelinn A.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae

    2003-01-01

    Investigates influences of acculturation, socioeconomic status (SES), and cultural health beliefs on Mexican-descent women's preventive health behaviors. In 5 focus group interviews sampling across levels of acculturation and SES, women expressing more traditional Mexican health beliefs about breast cancer screening were of lower SES and were less…

  13. Rotary-Wing Decelerators for Probe Descent Through the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Aiken, Edwin; Pisanich, Greg

    2005-01-01

    An innovative concept is proposed for atmospheric entry probe deceleration, wherein one or more deployed rotors (in autorotation or wind-turbine flow states) on the aft end of the probe effect controlled descent. This concept is particularly oriented toward probes intended to land safely on the surface of Venus. Initial work on design trade studies is discussed.

  14. Hybrid Entry Ship: A Conceptual Entry-Descent and Surveillance Platform for Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mr.; Saroha, Mr.; Priyadarshi, Mr.; Limaye, Mr.

    2015-04-01

    A hybrid entry ship concept which will enter from low Venus orbit. It will undergo series of changes in its configuration to meet an optimal entry-descent and surveillance sequence. It houses payloads upto 300 kg. Available power to payload is 250W.

  15. A Critical Analysis of Western Perspectives on Families of Arab Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitin, Ben K.; Allen, Katherine R.; Bekheet, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Western research on families of Arab descent has increased in the current decade, compared to the previous 30 years. In this review of 256 empirical articles, through a critical postcolonial lens, domestic violence and family planning were the two most established areas of study. Generally, samples have come from a small group of countries such as…

  16. A Terminal Descent Sensor Trade Study Overview for the Orion Landing and Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Catherine; Prakash, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    This trade study was conducted as a part of the Orion Landing System Advanced Development Project to determine possible Terminal Descent Sensor (TDS) architectures that could be used for a rocket assisted landing system. Several technologies were considered for the Orion TDS including radar, lidar, GPS applications, mechanical sensors, and gamma ray altimetry.

  17. Molecular and genetic regulation of testis descent and external genitalia development.

    PubMed

    Klonisch, Thomas; Fowler, Paul A; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2004-06-01

    Testicular descent as a prerequisite for the production of mature spermatozoa and normal external genitalia morphogenesis, and therefore facilitating copulation and internal fertilization, are essential developmental steps in reproduction of vertebrate species. Cryptorchidism, the failure of testis descent, and feminization of external genitalia in the male, usually in the form of hypospadias, in which the opening of the urethra occurs along the ventral aspect of the penis, are the most frequent pediatric complications. Thus, elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of testis descent and the formation of external genitalia merits a special focus. Natural and transgenic rodent models have demonstrated both morphogenic processes to be under the control of a plethora of genetic factors with complex time-, space-, and dose-restricted expression pattern. The review elucidates the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of testis descent and the formation of external genitalia and, wherever possible, assesses the differences between these rodent animal models and other mammalian species, including human. PMID:15136137

  18. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  19. Relativistic klystrons for high-gradient accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Westenskow, G.A.; Aalberts, D.P.; Boyd, J.K.; Deis, G.A.; Houck, T.L.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Ryne, R.D.; Yu, S.S. ); Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Koontz, R.F.; Lavine, T.L.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W. ); Haimson, J.; Mecklen

    1990-09-05

    Experimental work is being performed by collaborators at LLNL, SLAC, and LBL to investigate relativistic klystrons as a possible rf power source for future high-gradient accelerators. We have learned how to overcome or previously reported problem of high power rf pulse shortening and have achieved peak rf power levels of 330 MW using an 11.4-GHz high-gain tube with multiple output structures. In these experiments the rf pulse is of the same duration as the beam current pulse. In addition, experiments have been performed on two short sections of a high-gradient accelerator using the rf power from a relativistic klystron. An average accelerating gradient of 84 MV/m has been achieved with 80-MW of rf power.

  20. DeepTrack: Learning Discriminative Feature Representations Online for Robust Visual Tracking.

    PubMed

    Hanxi Li; Yi Li; Porikli, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Deep neural networks, albeit their great success on feature learning in various computer vision tasks, are usually considered as impractical for online visual tracking, because they require very long training time and a large number of training samples. In this paper, we present an efficient and very robust tracking algorithm using a single convolutional neural network (CNN) for learning effective feature representations of the target object in a purely online manner. Our contributions are multifold. First, we introduce a novel truncated structural loss function that maintains as many training samples as possible and reduces the risk of tracking error accumulation. Second, we enhance the ordinary stochastic gradient descent approach in CNN training with a robust sample selection mechanism. The sampling mechanism randomly generates positive and negative samples from different temporal distributions, which are generated by taking the temporal relations and label noise into account. Finally, a lazy yet effective updating scheme is designed for CNN training. Equipped with this novel updating algorithm, the CNN model is robust to some long-existing difficulties in visual tracking, such as occlusion or incorrect detections, without loss of the effective adaption for significant appearance changes. In the experiment, our CNN tracker outperforms all compared state-of-the-art methods on two recently proposed benchmarks, which in total involve over 60 video sequences. The remarkable performance improvement over the existing trackers illustrates the superiority of the feature representations, which are learned purely online via the proposed deep learning framework. PMID:26841390

  1. Time-oriented hierarchical method for computation of principal components using subspace learning algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Marko; Ogawa, Hidemitsu

    2004-10-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Principal Subspace Analysis (PSA) are classic techniques in statistical data analysis, feature extraction and data compression. Given a set of multivariate measurements, PCA and PSA provide a smaller set of "basis vectors" with less redundancy, and a subspace spanned by them, respectively. Artificial neurons and neural networks have been shown to perform PSA and PCA when gradient ascent (descent) learning rules are used, which is related to the constrained maximization (minimization) of statistical objective functions. Due to their low complexity, such algorithms and their implementation in neural networks are potentially useful in cases of tracking slow changes of correlations in the input data or in updating eigenvectors with new samples. In this paper we propose PCA learning algorithm that is fully homogeneous with respect to neurons. The algorithm is obtained by modification of one of the most famous PSA learning algorithms--Subspace Learning Algorithm (SLA). Modification of the algorithm is based on Time-Oriented Hierarchical Method (TOHM). The method uses two distinct time scales. On a faster time scale PSA algorithm is responsible for the "behavior" of all output neurons. On a slower scale, output neurons will compete for fulfillment of their "own interests". On this scale, basis vectors in the principal subspace are rotated toward the principal eigenvectors. At the end of the paper it will be briefly analyzed how (or why) time-oriented hierarchical method can be used for transformation of any of the existing neural network PSA method, into PCA method. PMID:15593379

  2. Gradient enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zijl, Peter C.; Hurd, Ralph E.

    2011-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the personal recollections of the authors regarding their contributions to the introduction of shielded gradient technology into NMR spectroscopy during the late 1980s and early 1990s. It provides some background into early probe design and details some of the early technical progress with the use of shielded magnetic field gradients for coherence selection in high resolution NMR and describes the developments at General Electric, the National Institutes of Health, Georgetown University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine that ultimately led to this technology becoming commonplace in modern NMR spectroscopy. Most of this early technical work was published in the Journal of Magnetic Resonance.

  3. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed.

  4. HIGH GRADIENT INDUCTION ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Blackfield, D; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-06-21

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is stimulated by the desire for compact flash x-ray radiography sources. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be described. Progress in applying this technology to several applications will be reviewed.

  5. Gradient tabu search.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Svetlana; Engels, Bernd

    2007-01-30

    This paper presents a modification of the tabu search called gradient tabu search (GTS). It uses analytical gradients for a fast minimization to the next local minimum and analytical diagonal elements of the Hessian to escape local minima. For an efficient blocking of already visited areas tabu regions and tabu directions are introduced into the tabu list (TL). Trials with various well-known test functions indicate that the GTS is a very promising approach to determine local and global minima of differentiable functions. Possible application areas could be optimization routines for force field parameters or conformational searches for large molecules. PMID:17186482

  6. Bioactive Molecule Prediction Using Extreme Gradient Boosting.

    PubMed

    Babajide Mustapha, Ismail; Saeed, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Following the explosive growth in chemical and biological data, the shift from traditional methods of drug discovery to computer-aided means has made data mining and machine learning methods integral parts of today's drug discovery process. In this paper, extreme gradient boosting (Xgboost), which is an ensemble of Classification and Regression Tree (CART) and a variant of the Gradient Boosting Machine, was investigated for the prediction of biological activity based on quantitative description of the compound's molecular structure. Seven datasets, well known in the literature were used in this paper and experimental results show that Xgboost can outperform machine learning algorithms like Random Forest (RF), Support Vector Machines (LSVM), Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFN) and Naïve Bayes (NB) for the prediction of biological activities. In addition to its ability to detect minority activity classes in highly imbalanced datasets, it showed remarkable performance on both high and low diversity datasets. PMID:27483216

  7. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  8. Recursive least-squares learning algorithms for neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S. ); Hwang, Jenq-Neng . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a pair of recursive least squares (RLS) algorithms for online training of multilayer perceptrons, which are a class of feedforward artificial neural networks. These algorithms incorporate second order information about the training error surface in order to achieve faster learning rates than are possible using first order gradient descent algorithms such as the generalized delta rule. A least squares formulation is derived from a linearization of the training error function. Individual training pattern errors are linearized about the network parameters that were in effect when the pattern was presented. This permits the recursive solution of the least squares approximation, either via conventional RLS recursions or by recursive QR decomposition-based techniques. The computational complexity of the update is in the order of (N{sup 2}), where N is the number of network parameters. This is due to the estimation of the N {times} N inverse Hessian matrix. Less computationally intensive approximations of the RLS algorithms can be easily derived by using only block diagonal elements of this matrix, thereby partitioning the learning into independent sets. A simulation example is presented in which a neural network is trained to approximate a two dimensional Gaussian bump. In this example, RLS training required an order of magnitude fewer iterations on average (527) than did training with the generalized delta rule (6331). 14 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  10. One pass learning for generalized classifier neural network.

    PubMed

    Ozyildirim, Buse Melis; Avci, Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    Generalized classifier neural network introduced as a kind of radial basis function neural network, uses gradient descent based optimized smoothing parameter value to provide efficient classification. However, optimization consumes quite a long time and may cause a drawback. In this work, one pass learning for generalized classifier neural network is proposed to overcome this disadvantage. Proposed method utilizes standard deviation of each class to calculate corresponding smoothing parameter. Since different datasets may have different standard deviations and data distributions, proposed method tries to handle these differences by defining two functions for smoothing parameter calculation. Thresholding is applied to determine which function will be used. One of these functions is defined for datasets having different range of values. It provides balanced smoothing parameters for these datasets through logarithmic function and changing the operation range to lower boundary. On the other hand, the other function calculates smoothing parameter value for classes having standard deviation smaller than the threshold value. Proposed method is tested on 14 datasets and performance of one pass learning generalized classifier neural network is compared with that of probabilistic neural network, radial basis function neural network, extreme learning machines, and standard and logarithmic learning generalized classifier neural network in MATLAB environment. One pass learning generalized classifier neural network provides more than a thousand times faster classification than standard and logarithmic generalized classifier neural network. Due to its classification accuracy and speed, one pass generalized classifier neural network can be considered as an efficient alternative to probabilistic neural network. Test results show that proposed method overcomes computational drawback of generalized classifier neural network and may increase the classification performance. PMID

  11. Impact of mismodeled idle engine performance on calculation and tracking of optimal 4-D descent trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced flight management systems are being developed which are capable of calculating optimal 3-D and 4-D flight trajectories for arbitrary fuel and time costs. These systems require mathematical models of airplane performance in order to compute the optimal profiles. Mismodeled idle engine characteristics can result in descent trajectories requiring excessive throttle and/or speedbrake activity in order to achieve the desired end conditions. This paper evaluates the cost and fuel penalties, trajectory variations, and flight control requirements associated with typical idle engine modeling errors for a twin-jet transport airplane. Variations in idle power setting, thrust, fuel flow, and surge bleed operation were evaluated for a cruise/descent flight segment. The results of this analysis provide insight into the penalties associated with uncertainties in idle engine performance and suggest methods of modeling which minimize these penalties.

  12. Multibody Modeling and Simulation for the Mars Phoenix Lander Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Eric M.; Prince, Jill L.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2008-01-01

    A multi-body flight simulation for the Phoenix Mars Lander has been developed that includes high fidelity six degree-of-freedom rigid-body models for the parachute and lander system. The simulation provides attitude and rate history predictions of all bodies throughout the flight, as well as loads on each of the connecting lines. In so doing, a realistic behavior of the descending parachute/lander system dynamics can be simulated that allows assessment of the Phoenix descent performance and identification of potential sensitivities for landing. This simulation provides a complete end-to-end capability of modeling the entire entry, descent, and landing sequence for the mission. Time histories of the parachute and lander aerodynamic angles are presented. The response of the lander system to various wind models and wind shears is shown to be acceptable. Monte Carlo simulation results are also presented.

  13. A Bayesian Framework for Landing Site Selection During Autonomous Spacecraft Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serrano, Navid

    2006-01-01

    The success of a landed space exploration mission depends largely on the final landing site. Factors influencing site selection include safety, fuel-consumption, and scientific return. This paper addresses the problem of selecting the best available landing site based on these factors in real-time during autonomous spacecraft descent onto a planetary surface. The problem is modeled probabilistically using Bayesian Networks (BNs). BNs provide a means of representing the causal relationships between variables that impact the quality of a landing site. The final landing site is determined via probabilistic reasoning based on terrain safety derived from on-board sensors, available fuel based on spacecraft descent dynamics, and regions of interest defined by mission scientists.

  14. Capture Conditions for Merging Trajectory Segments to Model Realistic Aircraft Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Slattery, Rhonda A.

    1996-01-01

    A typical commercial aircraft trajectory consists of a series of flight segments. An aircraft switches from one segment to another when certain specified variables reach their desired values. Trajectory synthesis for air traffic control automation must be consistent with practical pilot procedures. We examine capture conditions for merging trajectory segments to model commercial aircraft descent in trajectory synthesis. These conditions translate into bounds on measurements of atmospheric wind, pressure, and temperature. They also define ranges of thrust and drag feasible for a descent trajectory. Capture conditions are derived for the Center-TRACON Automation System developed at NASA Ames Research Center for automated air traffic control. Various uses of capture conditions are discussed. A Boeing 727-200 aircraft is used to provide numerical examples of capture conditions.

  15. The descent of ant: field-measured performance of gliding ants.

    PubMed

    Munk, Yonatan; Yanoviak, Stephen P; Koehl, M A R; Dudley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Gliding ants avoid predatory attacks and potentially mortal consequences of dislodgement from rainforest canopy substrates by directing their aerial descent towards nearby tree trunks. The ecologically relevant measure of performance for gliding ants is the ratio of net horizontal to vertical distance traveled over the course of a gliding trajectory, or glide index. To study variation in glide index, we measured three-dimensional trajectories of Cephalotes atratus ants gliding in natural rainforest habitats. We determined that righting phase duration, glide angle, and path directness all significantly influence variation in glide index. Unsuccessful landing attempts result in the ant bouncing off its target and being forced to make a second landing attempt. Our results indicate that ants are not passive gliders and that they exert active control over the aerodynamic forces they experience during their descent, despite their apparent lack of specialized control surfaces. PMID:25788722

  16. Assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Davis, J. L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was only the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and a novel and untested Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multi-body computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the vehicle.

  17. Preliminary Assessment of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5, 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, successfully landed inside Gale Crater. This landing was only the seventh successful landing and fourth rover to be delivered to Mars. Weighing nearly one metric ton, Curiosity is the largest and most complex rover ever sent to investigate another planet. Safely landing such a large payload required an innovative Entry, Descent, and Landing system, which included the first guided entry at Mars, the largest supersonic parachute ever flown at Mars, and a novel and untested Sky Crane landing system. A complete, end-to-end, six degree-of-freedom, multibody computer simulation of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing sequence was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. In-flight data gathered during the successful landing is compared to pre-flight statistical distributions, predicted by the simulation. These comparisons provide insight into both the accuracy of the simulation and the overall performance of the vehicle.

  18. Performance evaluation of a lower limb exoskeleton for stair ascent and descent with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Farris, Ryan J; Quintero, Hugo A; Goldfarb, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a powered lower limb exoskeleton to aid paraplegic individuals in stair ascent and descent. A brief description of the exoskeleton hardware is provided along with an explanation of the control methodology implemented to allow stair ascent and descent. Tests were performed with a paraplegic individual (T10 complete injury level) and data is presented from multiple trials, including the hip and knee joint torque and power required to perform this functionality. Joint torque and power requirements are summarized, including peak hip and knee joint torque requirements of 0.75 Nm/kg and 0.87 Nm/kg, respectively, and peak hip and knee joint power requirements of approximately 0.65 W/kg and 0.85 W/kg, respectively. PMID:23366287

  19. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Study: Phase 2 Report on Exploration Feed-Forward Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer Ciancolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Engelund, Walter C.; Komar, D. R.; Queen, Eric M.; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Way, David W.; Zang, Thomas A.; Murch, Jeff G.; Krizan, Shawn A.; Olds, Aaron D.; Powell, Richard W.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Daivd J.; McGuire, M. Kathleen; Arnold, James O.; Covington, M. Alan; Sostaric, Ronald R.; Zumwalt, Carlie H.; Llama, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. Year 1 of the study focused on technologies required for Exploration-class missions to land payloads of 10 to 50 t. Inflatable decelerators, rigid aeroshell and supersonic retro-propulsion emerged as the top candidate technologies. In Year 2 of the study, low TRL technologies identified in Year 1, inflatables aeroshells and supersonic retropropulsion, were combined to create a demonstration precursor robotic mission. This part of the EDL-SA Year 2 effort, called Exploration Feed Forward (EFF), took much of the systems analysis simulation and component model development from Year 1 to the next level of detail.

  20. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Feed Forward Internal Peer Review Slide Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia M. (Editor)

    2011-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and human-scale missions. Year 1 of the study focused on technologies required for Exploration-class missions to land payloads of 10 to 50 mt. Inflatable decelerators, rigid aeroshell and supersonic retro-propulsion emerged as the top candidate technologies. In Year 2 of the study, low TRL technologies identified in Year 1, inflatables aeroshells and supersonic retropropulsion, were combined to create a demonstration precursor robotic mission. This part of the EDL-SA Year 2 effort, called Exploration Feed Forward (EFF), took much of the systems analysis simulation and component model development from Year 1 to the next level of detail.

  1. Performance Evaluation of a Lower Limb Exoskeleton for Stair Ascent and Descent with Paraplegia*

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ryan J.; Quintero, Hugo A.; Goldfarb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a powered lower limb exoskeleton to aid paraplegic individuals in stair ascent and descent. A brief description of the exoskeleton hardware is provided along with an explanation of the control methodology implemented to allow stair ascent and descent. Tests were performed with a paraplegic individual (T10 complete injury level) and data is presented from multiple trials, including the hip and knee joint torque and power required to perform this functionality. Joint torque and power requirements are summarized, including peak hip and knee joint torque requirements of 0.75 Nm/kg and 0.87 Nm/kg, respectively, and peak hip and knee joint power requirements of approximately 0.65 W/kg and 0.85 W/kg, respectively. PMID:23366287

  2. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for lunar module descent and ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The premission planning, the real-time situation, and the postflight analysis for the Apollo 11 lunar descent and ascent are described. A comparison between premission planning and actual results is included. A navigation correction capability, developed from Apollo 11 postflight analysis was used successfully on Apollo 12 to provide the first pinpoint landing. An experience summary, which illustrates typical problems encountered by the mission planners, is also included.

  3. Flying Schedule-Matching Descents to Explore Flight Crews' Perceptions of Their Load and Task Feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Lynne Hazel; Sharma, Shivanjli; Lozito, Sharon; Kaneshige, John; Hayashi, Miwa; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Multiple studies have investigated the development and use of ground-based (controller) tools to manage and schedule traffic in future terminal airspace. No studies have investigated the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. To begin to redress the balance, an exploratory study investigated the procedures and actions of ten Boeing-747-400 crews as they flew eight continuous descent approaches in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, with the descents being controlled using speed alone. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: speed changes, route constraints, clearance phraseology, and winds. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there was at least a 50 second difference in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The primary focus of this paper is the potential impact of ground scheduling tools on the flight crews performance and procedures. Crews reported "moderate to low" workload, on average; however, short periods of intense and high workload were observed. The non-flying pilot often reported a higher level of workload than the flying-pilot, which may be due to their increased interaction with the Flight Management Computer, when using the aircraft automation to assist with managing the descent clearances. It is concluded that ground-side tools and automation may have a larger impact on the current-day flight-deck than was assumed and that studies investigating this impact should continue in parallel with controller support tool development.

  4. Biological effects of fuel and exhaust components from spacecraft descent engines employing hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehwalt, M. E.; Woeller, F. H.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of the products of the Viking terminal descent engine fuel upon possible extraterrestrial life at the Martian landing site is examined. The effects of the engine exhaust, the hydrazine fuel, and the breakdown products of the latter on terrestrial microorganisms have been studied. The results indicate that the gaseous exhaust products would probably not be hazardous to microorganisms, but that liquid hydrazine would be lethal.

  5. A High-Heritage Blunt-Body Entry, Descent, and Landing Concept for Human Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Humphrey; Manning, Robert; Sklyanskiy, Evgeniy; Braun, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human-scale landers require the delivery of much heavier payloads to the surface of Mars than is possible with entry, descent, and landing (EDL) approaches used to date. A conceptual design was developed for a 10 m diameter crewed Mars lander with an entry mass of approx.75 t that could deliver approx.28 t of useful landed mass (ULM) to a zero Mars areoid, or lower, elevation. The EDL design centers upon use of a high ballistic coefficient blunt-body entry vehicle and throttled supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP). The design concept includes a 26 t Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) that could support a crew of 2 for approx.24 days, a crew of 3 for approx.16 days, or a crew of 4 for approx.12 days. The MAV concept is for a fully-fueled single-stage vehicle that utilizes a single pump-fed 250 kN engine using Mono-Methyl Hydrazine (MMH) and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen (MON-25) propellants that would deliver the crew to a low Mars orbit (LMO) at the end of the surface mission. The MAV concept could potentially provide abort-to-orbit capability during much of the EDL profile in response to fault conditions and could accommodate return to orbit for cases where the MAV had no access to other Mars surface infrastructure. The design concept for the descent stage utilizes six 250 kN MMH/MON-25 engines that would have very high commonality with the MAV engine. Analysis indicates that the MAV would require approx.20 t of propellant (including residuals) and the descent stage would require approx.21 t of propellant. The addition of a 12 m diameter supersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator (SIAD), based on a proven flight design, was studied as an optional method to improve the ULM fraction, reducing the required descent propellant by approx.4 t.

  6. STS-35 Pilot Gardner with descent checklist on OV-102's forward flight deck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Pilot Guy S. Gardner, wearing his launch and entry suit (LES), reviews descent checklist while at the pilots station on the forward flight deck of Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. Crewmembers are conducting procedures related to the final stages of the mission and the landing sequence. Silhouetted in forward windows W4 and W5 are the head up display (HUD), flight mirror assembly, and a drinking water bag with straw.

  7. Scaling Up Coordinate Descent Algorithms for Large ℓ1 Regularization Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Scherrer, Chad; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Tewari, Ambuj; Haglin, David J.

    2012-07-03

    We present a generic framework for parallel coordinate descent (CD) algorithms that has as special cases the original sequential algorithms of Cyclic CD and Stochastic CD, as well as the recent parallel Shotgun algorithm of Bradley et al. We introduce two novel parallel algorithms that are also special cases---Thread-Greedy CD and Coloring-Based CD---and give performance measurements for an OpenMP implementation of these.

  8. Entry, Descent, and Landing Aerothermodynamics: NASA Langley Experimental Capabilities and Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Berger, Karen T.; Berry, Scott A.; Bruckmann, Gregory J.; Buck, Gregory M.; DiFulvio, Michael; Horvath, Thomas J.; Liechty, Derek S.; Merski, N. Ronald; Murphy, Kelly J.; Rufer, Shann J.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2014-01-01

    A review is presented of recent research, development, testing and evaluation activities related to entry, descent and landing that have been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. An overview of the test facilities, model development and fabrication capabilities, and instrumentation and measurement techniques employed in this work is provided. Contributions to hypersonic/supersonic flight and planetary exploration programs are detailed, as are fundamental research and development activities.

  9. Strong refraction near the Venus surface - Effects observed by descent probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croft, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The telemetry signals from Pioneer Venus probes indicated the strong downward refraction of radio waves. As the probes descended, the strength of the direct signal decreased because of absorption and refractive defocusing. During the last 30 km of descent there was a second measured component in addition to the direct signal. Strong atmospheric reaction is important in strengthening echoes that are scattered toward the earth. Such surface-reflected signals are good indicators of horizontal winds.

  10. Bigravity from gradient expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Yasuho; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2016-05-01

    We discuss how the ghost-free bigravity coupled with a single scalar field can be derived from a braneworld setup. We consider DGP two-brane model without radion stabilization. The bulk configuration is solved for given boundary metrics, and it is substituted back into the action to obtain the effective four-dimensional action. In order to obtain the ghost-free bigravity, we consider the gradient expansion in which the brane separation is supposed to be sufficiently small so that two boundary metrics are almost identical. The obtained effective theory is shown to be ghost free as expected, however, the interaction between two gravitons takes the Fierz-Pauli form at the leading order of the gradient expansion, even though we do not use the approximation of linear perturbation. We also find that the radion remains as a scalar field in the four-dimensional effective theory, but its coupling to the metrics is non-trivial.

  11. A spectral KRMI conjugate gradient method under the strong-Wolfe line search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadijah, Wan; Rivaie, Mohd.; Mamat, Mustafa; Jusoh, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a modification of spectral conjugate gradient (CG) method is proposed which combines the advantages of the spectral CG method and the RMIL method namely as spectral Khadijah-Rivaie-Mustafa-Ibrahim (SKRMI) to solve unconstrained optimization problems. Based on inexact line searches, the objective function generates a sufficient descent direction and the global convergence property for the proposed method has been proved. Moreover, the method reduces to the standard RMIL method if exact line search is applied. Numerical results are also presented to examine the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. A modification of classical conjugate gradient method using strong Wolfe line search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoid, Syazni; Rivaie, Mohd.; Mamat, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Recently many researches try to develop and improve the Conjugate Gradient (CG) methods because of its convergence properties and low computation costing. In this paper, another CG coefficient (βk) will be proposed which is categorized as modification in such a way to improve the performance of the classical CG methods. This paper is focused on generating βk with several desirable properties: (1) generate descent search direction at each iterations; and (2) converge globally by using strong Wolfe line search. Numerical comparisons of three CG methods show the robustness and the efficiency of the new method in solving all given problems.

  13. The Cassini/Huygens Doppler Wind Experiment: Results from the Titan Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, M. K.; Dutta-Roy, R.; Allison, M.; Asmar, S. W.; Atkinson, D. H.; Edenhofer, P.; Plettemeier, D.; Tyler, G. L.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of the Doppler Wind Experiment (DWE), one of the six scientific investigations comprising the payload of the ESA Huygens Probe, is a determination of the wind velocity in Titan's atmosphere. Measurements of the Doppler shift of the S-band (2040 MHz) carrier signal to the Cassini Orbiter and to Earth were recorded during the Probe descent in order to deduce wind-induced motion of the Probe to an accuracy better than 1 m s-1. An experiment with the same scientific goal was performed with the Galileo Probe at Jupiter. Analogous to the Galileo experience, it was anticipated that the frequency of the Huygens radio signal could be measured on Earth to obtain an additional component of the horizontal winds. Specific secondary science objectives of DWE include measurements of: (a) Doppler fluctuations to determine the turbulence spectrum and possible wave activity in the Titan atmosphere; (b) Doppler and signal level modulation to monitor Probe descent dynamics (e.g., spinrate/spinphase, parachute swing); (c) Probe coordinates and orientation during descent and after impact on Titan.

  14. Simulation Results of the Huygens Probe Entry and Descent Trajectory Reconstruction Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazeminejad, B.; Atkinson, D. H.; Perez-Ayucar, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cassini/Huygens is a joint NASA/ESA mission to explore the Saturnian system. The ESA Huygens probe is scheduled to be released from the Cassini spacecraft on December 25, 2004, enter the atmosphere of Titan in January, 2005, and descend to Titan s surface using a sequence of different parachutes. To correctly interpret and correlate results from the probe science experiments and to provide a reference set of data for "ground-truthing" Orbiter remote sensing measurements, it is essential that the probe entry and descent trajectory reconstruction be performed as early as possible in the postflight data analysis phase. The Huygens Descent Trajectory Working Group (DTWG), a subgroup of the Huygens Science Working Team (HSWT), is responsible for developing a methodology and performing the entry and descent trajectory reconstruction. This paper provides an outline of the trajectory reconstruction methodology, preliminary probe trajectory retrieval test results using a simulated synthetic Huygens dataset developed by the Huygens Project Scientist Team at ESA/ESTEC, and a discussion of strategies for recovery from possible instrument failure.

  15. MR Imaging in Diagnosis of Pelvic Floor Descent: Supine versus Sitting Position

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Adolfo; Monaco, Luigi; Serra, Nicola; Feragalli, Beatrice; Iacomino, Aniello; Brunese, Luca; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Functional disorders of the pelvic floor represent have a significant impact on the quality of life. The advent of open-configuration systems allowed for the evaluation of defecation with MR imaging in sitting position. The purpose of the present study is to compare the results of static and dynamic pelvic MR performed in supine position versus sitting position, using a new MR prototype machine, in the diagnosis of pelvic floor descent. Materials and Methods. Thirty-one patients with pelvic floor disorders were enrolled, and underwent MR Defecography in supine position with 1.5 T closed magnet (MAGNETOM Symphony, Siemens, Germany) and in sitting position with a 0.25-Tesla open magnet system (G-Scan ESAOTE, Italy). Results. In rest and squeezing phases, positions of bladder, vagina, and ARJ were significantly different when the patient was imaged in supine versus sitting position. In the defecation phase, a significant difference for the bladder and vagina position was detected between the two exams whereas a significant difference for the ARJ was not found. A statistically significant difference exists when the pelvic floor descent is evaluated in sitting versus supine position. Conclusion. Our results show that MR Defecography in sitting position may represent a useful tool to correctly diagnose and grade the pelvic organ descent. PMID:26880893

  16. Additive Genetic Variation in Schizophrenia Risk Is Shared by Populations of African and European Descent

    PubMed Central

    de Candia, Teresa R.; Lee, S. Hong; Yang, Jian; Browning, Brian L.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Hewitt, John K.; Goddard, Michael E.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Visscher, Peter M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Keller, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the extent to which the proportion of schizophrenia’s additive genetic variation tagged by SNPs is shared by populations of European and African descent, we analyzed the largest combined African descent (AD [n = 2,142]) and European descent (ED [n = 4,990]) schizophrenia case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) data set available, the Molecular Genetics of Schizophrenia (MGS) data set. We show how a method that uses genomic similarities at measured SNPs to estimate the additive genetic correlation (SNP correlation [SNP-rg]) between traits can be extended to estimate SNP-rg for the same trait between ethnicities. We estimated SNP-rg for schizophrenia between the MGS ED and MGS AD samples to be 0.66 (SE = 0.23), which is significantly different from 0 (p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003), but not 1 (p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.26). We re-estimated SNP-rg between an independent ED data set (n = 6,665) and the MGS AD sample to be 0.61 (SE = 0.21, p(SNP-rg = 0) = 0.0003, p(SNP-rg = 1) = 0.16). These results suggest that many schizophrenia risk alleles are shared across ethnic groups and predate African-European divergence. PMID:23954163

  17. The relief formed by the descent phenomenon in the north-east part of Kosova.

    PubMed

    Bulliqi, Shpejtim; Isufi, Florim; Ramadani, Ibrahim; Gashi, Gani

    2012-04-01

    In the diverse relief of north-east part of Kosova a relatively wide range occupies the relief modelled by the descent phenomenon, which is conditioned by morph-structural and climatic factors quite suitable for their development. The morphogenesis activity of descent phenomenon is conditioned by the types of rocks, tectonic process of this region and climatic conditions. These factors condition horizontal and vertical relief fragmentation, slope, especially in Gollaku mountains and in SE part of Kopaonik mountain. Along the tectonic descents, the steepness is detaching and the detaching lines consisting of magmatic rocks show overthrows, demolitions and stony torrents, but the Teri gene composition formations are modelled by sliding and muddy torrents, depending upon the presence of clayey and alevrolite belts on these Teri gene ones. The impact of factors and conditions on the relief of this part, the phenomena like demolitions, overthrows, sliding, muddy torrents, stony torrents, etc, operate here, which play an important morphological role in the modelling of relief. PMID:23424844

  18. Involvement of Fibroblast Growth Factors and Their Receptors in Epididymo-Testicular Descent and Maldescent.

    PubMed

    Hadziselimovic, Faruk

    2016-02-01

    Maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit can occur as an isolated event or as a component of various syndromes. When part of a syndrome, crypto-epididymis is usually accompanied by other genital and/or extragenital features. Epididymis development is primarily regulated by androgens, and successful epididymo-testicular unit development and descent requires an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The developing gonadotropin-releasing hormone system is essential for epididymo-testicular descent and is highly sensitive to reduced fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Our understanding of the impact of FGFR1 in the process of epididymo-testicular descent has recently improved. At later stages of embryonic development, the undifferentiated epididymal mesenchyme is a specific domain for FGFR1 expression. The majority of individuals with syndromic crypto-epididymis, as well as individuals with isolated maldescent of the epididymo-testicular unit, exhibit some disturbance of FGF, FGFR1 and/or genes involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation. However, the mechanisms underlying FGF dysregulation may differ between various syndromes. PMID:27022326

  19. Flight-Deck Strategies and Outcomes When Flying Schedule-Matching Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneshige, John T.; Sharma, Shivanjli; Martin Lynne; Lozito, Sandra; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies at NASA Ames Research Center have investigated the development and use of ground-based (air traffic controller) tools to manage and schedule air traffic in future terminal airspace. An exploratory study was undertaken to investigate the impacts that such tools (and concepts) could have on the flight-deck. Ten Boeing 747-400 crews flew eight optimized profile descents in the Los Angeles terminal airspace, while receiving scripted current day and futuristic speed clearances, to ascertain their ability to fly schedulematching descents without prior training. Although the study was exploratory in nature, four variables were manipulated: route constraints, winds, speed changes, and clearance phraseology. Despite flying the same scenarios with the same events and timing, there were significant differences in the time it took crews to fly the approaches. This variation is the product of a number of factors but highlights potential difficulties for scheduling tools that would have to accommodate this amount of natural variation in descent times. The focus of this paper is the examination of the crews' aircraft management strategies and outcomes. This includes potentially problematic human-automation interaction issues that may negatively impact arrival times, speed and altitude constraint compliance, and energy management efficiency.

  20. International Space Station (ISS) Soyuz Vehicle Descent Module Evaluation of Thermal Protection System (TPS) Penetration Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Lear, Dana M.; Prior, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The descent module (DM) of the ISS Soyuz vehicle is covered by thermal protection system (TPS) materials that provide protection from heating conditions experienced during reentry. Damage and penetration of these materials by micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) impacts could result in loss of vehicle during return phases of the mission. The descent module heat shield has relatively thick TPS and is protected by the instrument-service module. The TPS materials on the conical sides of the descent module (referred to as backshell in this test plan) are exposed to more MMOD impacts and are relatively thin compared to the heat shield. This test program provides hypervelocity impact (HVI) data on materials similar in composition and density to the Soyuz TPS on the backshell of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz TPS penetration risk assessments. The impact testing was coordinated by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Hypervelocity Impact Technology (HVIT) Group [1] in Houston, Texas. The HVI testing was conducted at the NASA-JSC White Sands Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility (WSTF) at Las Cruces, New Mexico. Figure

  1. Kinetic comparison of older men and women during walk-to-stair descent transition.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2014-09-01

    Stair walking is one of the most challenging tasks for older adults, with women reporting higher incidence of falls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gender differences in kinetics during stair descent transition. Twenty-eight participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 and 69.0 years of mean age, respectively) performed stair descent from level walking in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom-made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were combined using inverse dynamics to generate kinetic data for gender comparison. The top and the first step on the staircase were chosen for analysis. Women showed a higher trail leg peak hip abductor moment (-1.0 Nm/kg), lower trail leg peak knee extensor moment and eccentric power (0.74 Nm/kg and 3.15 W/kg), and lower peak concentric power at trail leg ankle joint (1.29 W/kg) as compared to men (p<0.05; -0.82 Nm/kg, 0.89 Nm/kg, 3.83 W/kg, and 1.78 W/kg, respectively). The lead leg knee eccentric power was also lower in women (p<0.05). This decreased ability to exert knee control during stair descent transition may predispose women to a higher risk of fall. PMID:25082325

  2. Controlled weather balloon ascents and descents for atmospheric research and climate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, A.; Philipona, R.; Romanens, G.; Hurst, D. F.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    In situ upper-air measurements are often made with instruments attached to weather balloons launched at the surface and lifted into the stratosphere. Present day balloon-borne sensors allow near-continuous measurements from the Earth's surface to about 35 km (3-5 hPa), where the balloons burst and their instrument payloads descend with parachutes. It has been demonstrated that ascending weather balloons can perturb the air measured by very sensitive humidity and temperature sensors trailing behind them, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The use of controlled balloon descent for such measurements has therefore been investigated and is described here. We distinguish between the one balloon technique that uses a simple automatic valve system to release helium from the balloon at a pre-set ambient pressure, and the double balloon technique that uses a carrier balloon to lift the payload and a parachute balloon to control the descent of instruments after the carrier balloon is released at pre-set altitude. The automatic valve technique has been used for several decades for water vapor soundings with frost point hygrometers, whereas the double balloon technique has recently been re-established and deployed to measure radiation and temperature profiles through the atmosphere. Double balloon soundings also strongly reduce pendulum motion of the payload, stabilizing radiation instruments during ascent. We present the flight characteristics of these two ballooning techniques and compare the quality of temperature and humidity measurements made during ascent and descent.

  3. Controlled weather balloon ascents and descents for atmospheric research and climate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Hurst, Dale F.; Hall, Emrys G.; Jordan, Allen F.

    2016-03-01

    In situ upper-air measurements are often made with instruments attached to weather balloons launched at the surface and lifted into the stratosphere. Present-day balloon-borne sensors allow near-continuous measurements from the Earth's surface to about 35 km (3-5 hPa), where the balloons burst and their instrument payloads descend with parachutes. It has been demonstrated that ascending weather balloons can perturb the air measured by very sensitive humidity and temperature sensors trailing behind them, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The use of controlled balloon descent for such measurements has therefore been investigated and is described here. We distinguish between the single balloon technique that uses a simple automatic valve system to release helium from the balloon at a preset ambient pressure, and the double balloon technique that uses a carrier balloon to lift the payload and a parachute balloon to control the descent of instruments after the carrier balloon is released at preset altitude. The automatic valve technique has been used for several decades for water vapor soundings with frost point hygrometers, whereas the double balloon technique has recently been re-established and deployed to measure radiation and temperature profiles through the atmosphere. Double balloon soundings also strongly reduce pendulum motion of the payload, stabilizing radiation instruments during ascent. We present the flight characteristics of these two ballooning techniques and compare the quality of temperature and humidity measurements made during ascent and descent.

  4. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Mission proposals that land on asteroids are becoming popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site. The problem under investigation is how to design a fuel-optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed on-board the spacecraft, without interaction from ground control. An optimal trajectory designed immediately prior to the descent burn has many advantages. These advantages include the ability to use the actual vehicle starting state as the initial condition in the trajectory design and the ease of updating the landing target site if the original landing site is no longer viable. For long trajectories, the trajectory can be updated periodically by a redesign of the optimal trajectory based on current vehicle conditions to improve the guidance performance. One of the key drivers for being completely autonomous is the infrequent and delayed communication between ground control and the vehicle. Challenges that arise from designing an asteroid powered descent trajectory include complicated nonlinear gravity fields, small rotating bodies and low thrust vehicles.

  5. Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Trajectory and Atmosphere Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Kutty, Prasad; Schoenenberer, Mark; Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2013-01-01

    On August 5th 2012, The Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle successfully entered Mars atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover on its surface. A Kalman filter approach has been implemented to reconstruct the entry, descent, and landing trajectory based on all available data. The data sources considered in the Kalman filtering approach include the inertial measurement unit accelerations and angular rates, the terrain descent sensor, the measured landing site, orbit determination solutions for the initial conditions, and a new set of instrumentation for planetary entry reconstruction consisting of forebody pressure sensors, known as the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System. These pressure measurements are unique for planetary entry, descent, and landing reconstruction as they enable a reconstruction of the freestream atmospheric conditions without any prior assumptions being made on the vehicle aerodynamics. Moreover, the processing of these pressure measurements in the Kalman filter approach enables the identification of atmospheric winds, which has not been accomplished in past planetary entry reconstructions. This separation of atmosphere and aerodynamics allows for aerodynamic model reconciliation and uncertainty quantification, which directly impacts future missions. This paper describes the mathematical formulation of the Kalman filtering approach, a summary of data sources and preprocessing activities, and results of the reconstruction.

  6. The uncertain significance of low vitamin D levels in African descent populations: a review of the bone and cardiometabolic literature.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michelle Y; Thoreson, Caroline K; Ramsey, Natalie L M; Ricks, Madia; Sumner, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D levels in people of African descent are often described as inadequate or deficient. Whether low vitamin D levels in people of African descent lead to compromised bone or cardiometabolic health is unknown. Clarity on this issue is essential because if clinically significant vitamin D deficiency is present, vitamin D supplementation is necessary. However, if vitamin D is metabolically sufficient, vitamin D supplementation could be wasteful of scarce resources and even harmful. In this review vitamin D physiology is described with a focus on issues specific to populations of African descent such as the influence of melanin on endogenous vitamin D production and lactose intolerance on the willingness of people to ingest vitamin D fortified foods. Then data on the relationship of vitamin D to bone and cardiometabolic health in people of African descent are evaluated. PMID:24267433

  7. The Uncertain Significance of Low Vitamin D levels in African Descent Populations: A Review of the Bone and Cardiometabolic Literature

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Michelle Y; Thoreson, Caroline K; Ramsey, Natalie L M; Ricks, Madia; Sumner, Anne E

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D levels in people of African descent are often described as inadequate or deficient. Whether low vitamin D levels in people of African descent lead to compromised bone or cardiometabolic health is unknown. Clarity on this issue is essential because if clinically significant vitamin D deficiency is present, vitamin D supplementation is necessary. However, if vitamin D is metabolically sufficient, vitamin D supplementation could be wasteful of scarce resources and even harmful. In this review vitamin D physiology is described with a focus on issues specific to populations of African descent such as the influence of melanin on endogenous vitamin D production and lactose intolerance on the willingness of people to ingest vitamin D fortified foods. Then data on the relationship of vitamin D to bone and cardiometabolic health in people of African descent are evaluated. PMID:24267433

  8. DeepTrack: Learning Discriminative Feature Representations Online for Robust Visual Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hanxi; Li, Yi; Porikli, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Deep neural networks, albeit their great success on feature learning in various computer vision tasks, are usually considered as impractical for online visual tracking because they require very long training time and a large number of training samples. In this work, we present an efficient and very robust tracking algorithm using a single Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for learning effective feature representations of the target object, in a purely online manner. Our contributions are multifold: First, we introduce a novel truncated structural loss function that maintains as many training samples as possible and reduces the risk of tracking error accumulation. Second, we enhance the ordinary Stochastic Gradient Descent approach in CNN training with a robust sample selection mechanism. The sampling mechanism randomly generates positive and negative samples from different temporal distributions, which are generated by taking the temporal relations and label noise into account. Finally, a lazy yet effective updating scheme is designed for CNN training. Equipped with this novel updating algorithm, the CNN model is robust to some long-existing difficulties in visual tracking such as occlusion or incorrect detections, without loss of the effective adaption for significant appearance changes. In the experiment, our CNN tracker outperforms all compared state-of-the-art methods on two recently proposed benchmarks which in total involve over 60 video sequences. The remarkable performance improvement over the existing trackers illustrates the superiority of the feature representations which are learned

  9. Spatio-temporal learning with the online finite and infinite echo-state Gaussian processes.

    PubMed

    Soh, Harold; Demiris, Yiannis

    2015-03-01

    Successful biological systems adapt to change. In this paper, we are principally concerned with adaptive systems that operate in environments where data arrives sequentially and is multivariate in nature, for example, sensory streams in robotic systems. We contribute two reservoir inspired methods: 1) the online echostate Gaussian process (OESGP) and 2) its infinite variant, the online infinite echostate Gaussian process (OIESGP) Both algorithms are iterative fixed-budget methods that learn from noisy time series. In particular, the OESGP combines the echo-state network with Bayesian online learning for Gaussian processes. Extending this to infinite reservoirs yields the OIESGP, which uses a novel recursive kernel with automatic relevance determination that enables spatial and temporal feature weighting. When fused with stochastic natural gradient descent, the kernel hyperparameters are iteratively adapted to better model the target system. Furthermore, insights into the underlying system can be gleamed from inspection of the resulting hyperparameters. Experiments on noisy benchmark problems (one-step prediction and system identification) demonstrate that our methods yield high accuracies relative to state-of-the-art methods, and standard kernels with sliding windows, particularly on problems with irrelevant dimensions. In addition, we describe two case studies in robotic learning-by-demonstration involving the Nao humanoid robot and the Assistive Robot Transport for Youngsters (ARTY) smart wheelchair. PMID:25720008

  10. A Convex Formulation for Learning a Shared Predictive Structure from Multiple Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhui; Tang, Lei; Liu, Jun; Ye, Jieping

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of learning from multiple related tasks for improved generalization performance by extracting their shared structures. The alternating structure optimization (ASO) algorithm, which couples all tasks using a shared feature representation, has been successfully applied in various multitask learning problems. However, ASO is nonconvex and the alternating algorithm only finds a local solution. We first present an improved ASO formulation (iASO) for multitask learning based on a new regularizer. We then convert iASO, a nonconvex formulation, into a relaxed convex one (rASO). Interestingly, our theoretical analysis reveals that rASO finds a globally optimal solution to its nonconvex counterpart iASO under certain conditions. rASO can be equivalently reformulated as a semidefinite program (SDP), which is, however, not scalable to large datasets. We propose to employ the block coordinate descent (BCD) method and the accelerated projected gradient (APG) algorithm separately to find the globally optimal solution to rASO; we also develop efficient algorithms for solving the key subproblems involved in BCD and APG. The experiments on the Yahoo webpages datasets and the Drosophila gene expression pattern images datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms and confirm our theoretical analysis. PMID:23520249

  11. Continuous gravity gradient logging

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.

    1986-07-29

    A method is described for conducting a gravimetry survey of an earth formation, comprising the steps of: (a) continuously traversing the earth formation with a gravity logging tool having a column of fluid within the tool, (b) measuring a first pressure difference along a first interval within the column of fluid, (c) measuring a second pressure difference along a second interval within the column of fluid, (d) differencing the first and second pressure differences to determine the gravity gradient along the earth formation between the first and second intervals.

  12. A comparison study of North Adriatic Dense Water descent using observations in March, 2006 and March, 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Jeffrey W.; Carniel, Sandro; Bergamasco, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Giovanni; Hobbs, Richard; Matić, Frano; Rixen, Michel; Russo, Aniello; Schroeder, Katrin; Wood, Warren

    2010-05-01

    North Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW) forms on the Adriatic shallow shelf, travels southeastward along the Italian slope in a dense vein near the 100 m isobath, and then descends with mixing after it crosses the Palagruža Sill. As it can be much denser than the surrounding water masses, this descent could take the form of cascading especially at the topographic interruption of the Bari Canyon system. Two recent observational programs gathered data on this process in winters with strikingly different NAdDW conditions. The DART06A international collaborative cruise in March 2006 occurred during a period of strong NAdDW production and export to the southeast, as evidenced by bottom potential densities exceeding 29.7 kg/m3 along the sill observed by the 12 time-series moorings that spanned it. Further south, both upstream and offshore of the Bari Canyon system, observed temperature/salinity relationships from CTDs show mixing connections between waters deeper than 600 m (densities of 29.3 kg/m3 and 29.4 kg/m3) on the Italian slope and spatially unconnected waters at 100 m depth on the nearby coastal shelf (densities > 29.4 kg/m3). The AdriaSeismic09 international cruise in March 2009 was organized to examine the spatial pathways and evolution of NAdDW near the sill and canyons, but encountered a period of weak or absent NAdDW production and export. CTDs show that in March 2009 the northern source vein at 100 m depth was present but lower in density (maximum at 29.2 kg/m3) and was therefore not able to sink in bulk below the slightly denser surrounding waters. However, a thin layer of this water was found descending down the slope near the sill in a bottom-boundary layer through use of the new technique of seismic oceanography. This technique can image vertical thermal gradients with horizontal and vertical resolutions as fine as 7 meters all the way to the bottom. The temperature-salinity measurements from the two winters show that the bulk of 2009 water was lighter by a

  13. Acquired undescended testes and fertility potential: is orchiopexy at diagnosis better than awaiting spontaneous descent?

    PubMed

    van der Plas, E M; van Brakel, J; Meij-de Vries, A; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; Hazebroek, F W J; Hack, W W M; Dohle, G R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate testicular function in men with previous acquired undescended testis (UDT) in whom orchiopexy was performed at diagnosis compared with a similar group of men in whom spontaneous descent was awaited until puberty. Secondly, we examined the influence of age at orchiopexy on fertility parameters in adult life. A total of 169 men of the 'orchiopexy at diagnosis' group and 207 men of the 'wait and see' protocol group were invited for participation. All participants underwent an andrological evaluation, including medical history, physical examination, scrotal ultrasound, determination of reproductive hormones, and semen analysis. Results were compared for men in whom orchiopexy was performed at diagnoses with men in whom spontaneous descent was awaited until puberty followed by orchiopexy in case of non-descent. In the 'orchiopexy at diagnosis' group, 63 men of whom 14 with bilateral UDT, and in the 'wait and see' protocol group, 65 men of whom 15 with bilateral UDT were included. For unilateral UDT Inhibin B was found to be significantly lower and median progressive motility was higher in men with orchiopexy at diagnosis. For bilateral UDT, semen concentration and progressive motility showed a trend toward a favorable outcome for orchiopexy at diagnosis. Age at orchiopexy being under or above 10 years of age had no significant influence on the fertility potential. The outcome of physical examination, scrotal ultrasound, endocrine function, and semen analysis indicates a compromised fertility potential in men with previous acquired UDT. None of the protocols proved to be superior. For bilateral UDT, a trend toward favorable outcome of orchiopexy at diagnosis was seen. Furthermore, age at orchiopexy did not have an influence on fertility parameters. Therefore, in our opinion a 'conservative policy' is warranted for unilateral UDT, especially because over 50% of acquired UDT descend spontaneously. PMID:26084887

  14. Entry, Descent, and Landing Communications for the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abilleira, Fernando; Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), established as the most advanced rover to land on the surface of Mars to date, launched on November 26th, 2011 and arrived to the Martian Gale Crater during the night of August 5th, 2012 (PDT). MSL will investigate whether the landing region was ever suitable to support carbon-based life, and examine rocks, soil, and the atmosphere with a sophisticated suite of tools. This paper addresses the flight system requirement by which the vehicle transmitted indications of the following events using both X-band tones and UHF telemetry to allow identification of probable root causes should a mission anomaly have occurred: Heat-Rejection System (HRS) venting, completion of the cruise stage separation, turn to entry attitude, atmospheric deceleration, bank angle reversal commanded, parachute deployment, heatshield separation, radar ground acquisition, powered descent initiation, rover separation from the descent stage, and rover release. During Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL), the flight system transmitted a UHF telemetry stream adequate to determine the state of the spacecraft (including the presence of faults) at 8 kbps initiating from cruise stage separation through at least one minute after positive indication of rover release on the surface of Mars. The flight system also transmitted X-band semaphore tones from Entry to Landing plus one minute although since MSL was occulted, as predicted, by Mars as seen from the Earth, Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communications were interrupted at approximately is approx. 5 min after Entry ( approximately 130 prior to Landing). The primary data return paths were through the Deep Space Network (DSN) for DTE and the existing Mars network of orbiting assets for UHF, which included the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Express (MEX) elements. These orbiters recorded the telemetry data stream and returned it back to Earth via the DSN. The paper also discusses the total power

  15. Trunk and Lower Extremity Kinematics During Stair Descent in Women With or Without Patellofemoral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schwane, Brandi G.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Goto, Shiho; Blackburn, J. Troy; Aguilar, Alain J.; Padua, Darin A.

    2015-01-01

    Context There is limited evidence indicating the contribution of trunk kinematics to patellofemoral pain (PFP). A better understanding of the interaction between trunk and lower extremity kinematics in this population may provide new avenues for interventions to treat PFP. Objective To compare trunk and lower extremity kinematics between participants with PFP and healthy controls during a stair-descent task. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twenty women with PFP (age = 22.2 ± 3.1 years, height = 164.5 ± 9.2 cm, mass = 63.5 ± 13.6 kg) and 20 healthy women (age = 21.0 ± 2.6 years, height = 164.5 ± 7.1 cm, mass = 63.8 ± 12.7 kg). Intervention(s) Kinematics were recorded as participants performed stair descent at a controlled velocity. Main Outcome Measure(s) Three-dimensional joint displacement of the trunk, hip, and knee during the stance phase of stair descent for the affected leg was measured using a 7-camera infrared optical motion-capture system. Pretest and posttest pain were assessed using a visual analogue scale. Kinematic differences between groups were determined using independent-samples t tests. A 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance (group = PFP, control; time = pretest, posttest) was used to compare knee pain. Results We observed greater knee internal-rotation displacement for the PFP group (12.8° ± 7.2°) as compared with the control group (8.9° ± 4.4°). No other between-groups differences were observed for the trunk, hip, or other knee variables. Conclusions We observed no difference in trunk kinematics between groups but did note differences in knee internal-rotation displacement. These findings contribute to the current knowledge of altered movement in those with PFP and provide direction for exercise interventions. PMID:25898109

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  17. Dietary Associations of Household Food Insecurity Among Children of Mexican Descent: Results of a Binational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Lisa G; Harley, Kim; Fernald, Lia CH; Guendelman, Sylvia; Mejia, Fabiola; Neufeld, Lynnette M

    2015-01-01

    Background/objective Children of Mexican descent frequently experience household food insecurity both in the United States (US) and Mexico, however, little is known about the associations of food insecurity with dietary intake. This study aimed to understand the level of perceived food insecurity and its association with dietary intake among children of Mexican descent residing in the US and Mexico. Design This cross-sectional study utilized data from a 2006 binational study of five-year-old children of Mexican descent living in migrant communities in California (CA) and Mexico (MX). Methods In CA, children were 301 participants from the CHAMACOS study, a longitudinal birth cohort in a Mexican immigrant community. MX children (n=301) were participants in the Proyecto Mariposa study, which was designed to capture a sample of women and their children living in Mexico who closely resembled the CA sample, yet who never migrated to the US. Household food insecurity was measured using the US Department of Agriculture Food Security Scale and dietary intake was assessed with food frequency questionnaires. Analysis of variance was used to examine unadjusted and adjusted differences in total energy, nutrient intake, and consumption of food groups by household food security status. Results Approximately 39% of the CA mothers and 75% of the MX mothers reported low or very low food security in the last 12 months (p<0.01). Children in the US, experiencing food insecurity consumed more fat, saturated fat, sweets and fried snacks than children not experiencing food insecurity. In contrast, in Mexico food insecurity was associated with lower intake of total carbohydrates, dairy and vitamin B6. Conclusions Programs and policies addressing food insecurity in the US and Mexico may need to take steps to address dietary intake among children in households experiencing food insecurity, possibly through education and programs to increase resources to obtain healthy foods. PMID:19942017

  18. Altair Descent and Ascent Reference Trajectory Design and Initial Dispersion Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kos, Larry D.; Polsgrove, Tara T.; Sostaric, Ronald r.; Braden, Ellen M.; Sullivan, Jacob J.; Lee, Thanh T.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair Lunar Lander is the linchpin in the Constellation Program (CxP) for human return to the Moon. Altair is delivered to low Earth orbit (LEO) by the Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle, and after subsequent docking with Orion in LEO, the Altair/Orion stack is delivered through translunar injection (TLI). The Altair/Orion stack separating from the Earth departure stage (EDS) shortly after TLI and continues the flight to the Moon as a single stack. Altair performs the lunar orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver, targeting a 100-km circular orbit. This orbit will be a polar orbit for missions landing near the lunar South Pole. After spending nearly 24 hours in low lunar orbit (LLO), the lander undocks from Orion and performs a series of small maneuvers to set up for descending to the lunar surface. This descent begins with a small deorbit insertion (DOI) maneuver, putting the lander on an orbit that has a perilune of 15.24 km (50,000 ft), the altitude where the actual powered descent initiation (PDI) commences. At liftoff from Earth, Altair has a mass of 45 metric tons (mt). However after LOI (without Orion attached), the lander mass is slightly less than 33 mt at PDI. The lander currently has a single descent module main engine, with TBD lb(sub f) thrust (TBD N), providing a thrust-to-weight ratio of approximately TBD Earth g's at PDI. LDAC-3 (Lander design and analysis cycle #3) is the most recently closed design sizing and mass properties iteration. Upgrades for loss of crew (LDAC-2) and loss of mission (LDAC-3) have been incorporated into the lander baseline design (and its Master Equipment List). Also, recently, Altair has been working requirements analyses (LRAC-1). All nominal data here are from the LDAC-3 analysis cycle. All dispersions results here are from LRAC-1 analyses.

  19. Influence of seasonal cycles in Martian atmosphere on entry, descent and landing sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčeta, Dušan; Šegan, Stevo; Rašuo, Boško

    2014-05-01

    The phenomena like high eccentricity of Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion, separately or together can significantly alter not only the level of some Martian atmospheric parameters but also the characteristics of its diurnal and seasonal cycle. Considering that entry, descent and landing (EDL) sequence is mainly driven by the density profile of the atmosphere and aerodynamic characteristic of the entry vehicle. We have performed the analysis of the influence of the seasonal cycles of the atmospheric parameters on EDL profiles by using Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM). Since the height of the deployment of the parachute and the time passed from the deployment to propulsion firing (descent time) are of crucial importance for safe landing and the achievable landing site elevation we paid special attention to the influence of the areocentric longitude of the Sun (Ls) on these variables. We have found that these variables have periodic variability with respect to Ls and can be very well approximated with a sine wave function whose mean value depends only on the landing site elevation while the amplitudes and phases depend only on the landing site latitude. The amplitudes exhibit behavior which is symmetric with respect to the latitude but the symmetry is shifted from the equator to the northern mid-tropics. We have also noticed that the strong temperature inversions which are usual for middle and higher northern latitudes while Mars is around its orbital perihelion significantly alter the descent time without influencing the height of the parachute deployment. At last, we applied our model to determine the dependence of the accessible landing region on Ls and found that this region reaches maximum when Mars is around the orbital perihelion and can vary 50° in latitude throughout the Martian year.

  20. Non Linear Conjugate Gradient

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-11-17

    Software that simulates and inverts electromagnetic field data for subsurface electrical properties (electrical conductivity) of geological media. The software treats data produced by a time harmonic source field excitation arising from the following antenna geometery: loops and grounded bipoles, as well as point electric and magnetic dioples. The inversion process is carried out using a non-linear conjugate gradient optimization scheme, which minimizes the misfit between field data and model data using a least squares criteria.more » The software is an upgrade from the code NLCGCS_MP ver 1.0. The upgrade includes the following components: Incorporation of new 1 D field sourcing routines to more accurately simulate the 3D electromagnetic field for arbitrary geologic& media, treatment for generalized finite length transmitting antenna geometry (antennas with vertical and horizontal component directions). In addition, the software has been upgraded to treat transverse anisotropy in electrical conductivity.« less

  1. Tectorial Membrane Stiffness Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Emadi, Gulam; Getnick, Geoffrey; Quesnel, Alicia; Dallos, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear processes sound with high sensitivity and fine resolution over a wide frequency range. The underlying mechanism for this remarkable ability is the “cochlear amplifier”, which operates by modifying cochlear micromechanics. However, it is largely unknown how the cochlea implements this modification. Although gradual improvements in experimental techniques have yielded ever-better descriptions of gross basilar membrane vibration, the internal workings of the organ of Corti and of the tectorial membrane have resisted exploration. Although measurements of cochlear function in mice with a gene mutation for α-tectorin indicate the tectorial membrane's key role in the mechanoelectrical transformation by the inner ear, direct experimental data on the tectorial membrane's physical properties are limited, and only a few direct measurements on tectorial micromechanics are available. Using the hemicochlea, we are able to show that a tectorial membrane stiffness gradient exists along the cochlea, similar to that of the basilar membrane. In artificial perilymph (but with low calcium), the transversal and radial driving point stiffnesses change at a rate of –4.0 dB/mm and −4.9 dB/mm, respectively, along the length of the cochlear spiral. In artificial endolymph, the stiffness gradient for the transversal component was –3.4 dB/mm. Combined with the changes in tectorial membrane dimensions from base to apex, the radial stiffness changes would be able to provide a second frequency-place map in the cochlea. Young's modulus, which was obtained from measurements performed in the transversal direction, decreased by −2.6 dB/mm from base to apex. PMID:17496047

  2. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    SciTech Connect

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G.

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  3. Maraia Capsule Flight Testing and Results for Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald R.; Strahan, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    The Maraia concept is a modest size (150 lb., 30" diameter) capsule that has been proposed as an ISS based, mostly autonomous earth return capability to function either as an Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) technology test platform or as a small on-demand sample return vehicle. A flight test program has been completed including high altitude balloon testing of the proposed capsule shape, with the purpose of investigating aerodynamics and stability during the latter portion of the entry flight regime, along with demonstrating a potential recovery system. This paper includes description, objectives, and results from the test program.

  4. Fuel-Efficient Descent and Landing Guidance Logic for a Safe Lunar Touchdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.

    2011-01-01

    The landing of a crewed lunar lander on the surface of the Moon will be the climax of any Moon mission. At touchdown, the landing mechanism must absorb the load imparted on the lander due to the vertical component of the lander's touchdown velocity. Also, a large horizontal velocity must be avoided because it could cause the lander to tip over, risking the life of the crew. To be conservative, the worst-case lander's touchdown velocity is always assumed in designing the landing mechanism, making it very heavy. Fuel-optimal guidance algorithms for soft planetary landing have been studied extensively. In most of these studies, the lander is constrained to touchdown with zero velocity. With bounds imposed on the magnitude of the engine thrust, the optimal control solutions typically have a "bang-bang" thrust profile: the thrust magnitude "bangs" instantaneously between its maximum and minimum magnitudes. But the descent engine might not be able to throttle between its extremes instantaneously. There is also a concern about the acceptability of "bang-bang" control to the crew. In our study, the optimal control of a lander is formulated with a cost function that penalizes both the touchdown velocity and the fuel cost of the descent engine. In this formulation, there is not a requirement to achieve a zero touchdown velocity. Only a touchdown velocity that is consistent with the capability of the landing gear design is required. Also, since the nominal throttle level for the terminal descent sub-phase is well below the peak engine thrust, no bound on the engine thrust is used in our formulated problem. Instead of bangbang type solution, the optimal thrust generated is a continuous function of time. With this formulation, we can easily derive analytical expressions for the optimal thrust vector, touchdown velocity components, and other system variables. These expressions provide insights into the "physics" of the optimal landing and terminal descent maneuver. These

  5. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Navigation Strategy for Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing Telecommunication Relay Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jessica L.; Menon, Premkumar R.; Demcak, Stuart W.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an orbiting asset that performs remote sensing observations in order to characterize the surface, subsurface and atmosphere of Mars. To support upcoming NASA Mars Exploration Program Office objectives, MRO will be used as a relay communication link for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission during the MSL Entry, Descent and Landing sequence. To do so, MRO Navigation must synchronize the MRO Primary Science Orbit (PSO) with a set of target conditions requested by the MSL Navigation Team; this may be accomplished via propulsive maneuvers. This paper describes the MRO Navigation strategy for and operational performance of MSL EDL relay telecommunication support.

  6. The effect of navigation state selection on fuel dispersions for powered lunar descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jessica Thornley

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to study the performance of the closed-loop guidance, navigation, and control system of a lunar lander in powered descent. The simulation includes six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics, an extended Kalman filter, guidance based upon modified Apollo methods, an attitude control system, and several different types of sensors. Sensors included in the sensor suite include accelerometers, gyroscopes, a star camera, an altimeter, a velocimeter, and a radio navigation system. The simulation is used to examine the effects of sensor errors and the number of navigation states on total fuel use.

  7. Functional Equivalence Acceptance Testing of FUN3D for Entry Descent and Landing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Glass, Christopher E.; Padilla, Jose F.; Hammond, Dana P.; White, Jeffery A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional equivalence of the unstructured grid code FUN3D to the the structured grid code LAURA (Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm) is documented for applications of interest to the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) community. Examples from an existing suite of regression tests are used to demonstrate the functional equivalence, encompassing various thermochemical models and vehicle configurations. Algorithm modifications required for the node-based unstructured grid code (FUN3D) to reproduce functionality of the cell-centered structured code (LAURA) are also documented. Challenges associated with computation on tetrahedral grids versus computation on structured-grid derived hexahedral systems are discussed.

  8. Apollo 14 mission report. Supplement 5: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of the LM-8 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 14 mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted l sigma uncertainty. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 43 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9802, lbf; specific impulse, 304.1 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1603. These values are + or - 0.8, -0.06, and + or - 0.3 percent different respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits.

  9. PIGS: improved estimates of identity-by-descent probabilities by probabilistic IBD graph sampling.

    PubMed

    Park, Danny S; Baran, Yael; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Burchard, Esteban G; Zaitlen, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Identifying segments in the genome of different individuals that are identical-by-descent (IBD) is a fundamental element of genetics. IBD data is used for numerous applications including demographic inference, heritability estimation, and mapping disease loci. Simultaneous detection of IBD over multiple haplotypes has proven to be computationally difficult. To overcome this, many state of the art methods estimate the probability of IBD between each pair of haplotypes separately. While computationally efficient, these methods fail to leverage the clique structure of IBD resulting in less powerful IBD identification, especially for small IBD segments. PMID:25860540

  10. The Mars Exploration Rovers Entry Descent and Landing and the Use of Aerodynamic Decelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steltzner, Adam; Desai, Prasun; Lee, Wayne; Bruno, Robin

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) project, the next United States mission to the surface of Mars, uses aerodynamic decelerators in during its entry, descent and landing (EDL) phase. These two identical missions (MER-A and MER-B), which deliver NASA s largest mobile science suite to date to the surface of Mars, employ hypersonic entry with an ablative energy dissipating aeroshell, a supersonic/subsonic disk-gap-band parachute and an airbag landing system within EDL. This paper gives an overview of the MER EDL system and speaks to some of the challenges faced by the various aerodynamic decelerators.

  11. Perceived reasons for depression among low income women of Mexican descent.

    PubMed

    Heilemann, MarySue V; Coffey-Love, Melody; Frutos, Lisa

    2004-10-01

    From a larger cross-sectional study of 315 women of Mexican descent, this secondary analysis focused on short answers to open-ended questions related to reasons given by 107 women at risk for depression (>16 on CES-D) for feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or depression within the last month. Data were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Six categories of reasons were derived from data including: (1) partner issues, (2) family issues, (3) feelings of being alone, (4) inability to provide for material needs, (5) bodily symptoms and experiences, and (6) vague nonspecific reasons. Results are useful for designing future treatment programs. PMID:15529284

  12. Adventures in Parallel Processing: Entry, Descent and Landing Simulation for the Genesis and Stardust Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Daniel T.; Desai, Prasun N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the Entry, Descent and Landing simulation tradeoffs and techniques that were used to provide the Monte Carlo data required to approve entry during a critical period just before entry of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule. The same techniques will be used again when Stardust returns on January 15, 2006. Only one hour was available for the simulation which propagated 2000 dispersed entry states to the ground. Creative simulation tradeoffs combined with parallel processing were needed to provide the landing footprint statistics that were an essential part of the Go/NoGo decision that authorized release of the Sample Return Capsule a few hours before entry.

  13. Design requirements and development of an airborne descent path definition algorithm for time navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.; Thompson, J. L.; Groce, J. L.; Schwab, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements for a 4D path definition algorithm are described. These requirements were developed for the NASA ATOPS as an extension of the Local Flow Management/Profile Descent algorithm. They specify the processing flow, functional and data architectures, and system input requirements, and recommended the addition of a broad path revision (reinitialization) function capability. The document also summarizes algorithm design enhancements and the implementation status of the algorithm on an in-house PDP-11/70 computer. Finally, the requirements for the pilot-computer interfaces, the lateral path processor, and guidance and steering function are described.

  14. Using survival analysis to determine association between maternal pelvis height and antenatal fetal head descent in Ugandan mothers

    PubMed Central

    Munabi, Ian Guyton; Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fetal head descent is used to demonstrate the maternal pelvis capacity to accommodate the fetal head. This is especially important in low resource settings that have high rates of childbirth related maternal deaths and morbidity. This study looked at maternal height and an additional measure, maternal pelvis height, from automotive engineering. The objective of the study was to determine the associations between maternal: height and pelvis height with the rate of fetal head descent in expectant Ugandan mothers. Methods This was a cross sectional study on 1265 singleton mothers attending antenatal clinics at five hospitals in various parts of Uganda. In addition to the routine antenatal examination, each mother had their pelvis height recorded following informed consent. Survival analysis was done using STATA 12. Results It was found that 27% of mothers had fetal head descent with an incident rate of 0.028 per week after the 25th week of pregnancy. Significant associations were observed between the rate of fetal head descent with: maternal height (Adj Haz ratio 0.93 P < 0.01) and maternal pelvis height (Adj Haz ratio 1.15 P < 0.01). Conclusion The significant associations observed between maternal: height and pelvis height with rate of fetal head descent, demonstrate a need for further study of maternal pelvis height as an additional decision support tool for screening mothers in low resource settings. PMID:26918071

  15. [People of African descent in the region of the Americas and health equity].

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristina

    2002-01-01

    The Region of the Americas and the Caribbean has a complex demographic profile from an ethnic and racial perspective. One of the largest groups is composed of persons of African descent, who in some countries, such as Brazil and the Dominican Republic, comprise 46 and 84% of the total population, respectively. Recent analyses of the statistics available in some countries of the Region show wide gaps in terms of living conditions and health in these communities, as well as gaps in access to health services. PAHO, through its Public Policy and Health Program, under the Division of Health and Human Development, supports sectorial efforts and those of civil organizations that aim to improve health conditions in this segment of the population, while taking into account their sociodemographic and cultural characteristics. This article briefly summarizes health conditions and access to health services in selected countries, as well as some aspects of the recent changes to the legislation in those countries. Finally, collaborative activities on the part of United Nations agencies and international financial institutions for the benefit of people of African descent and other ethnic minorities are described. PMID:12162849

  16. Experimental evaluation of active and passive means of alleviating rotor impulsive noise in descent flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janakiram, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    A controlled wind tunnel test program was conducted on a model 2.14 m (7 ft) diameter teetering rotor to determine the effectiveness of blade tips such as the Ogee tip and the TAMI (Tip Air Mass Injection) tip in reducing the impulsive noise due to blade-vortex interaction in descent flight. In addition, a full rectangular tip which has the same span as the Ogee tip and an effective rectangular tip which has the same lifting area as the Ogee tip were also considered. The tests were conducted at two advance ratios (0.125 and 0.14) with various descent rates ranging from steady level flight to about 6 m/sec (20 ft/sec). A comparison of the performance of different rotors showed that for the same tip Mach number and thrust, the Ogee tip rotor absorbed more power than the full rectangular tip rotor, while the TAMI tip rotor absorbed more power than the effective tip rotor.

  17. Mars Phoenix Entry, Descent, and Landing Simulation Design and Modelling Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Desai, Prasun N.; Queen, Eric M.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Mars Phoenix Lander was launched in August of 2007 on a ten month cruise to reach the northern plains of Mars in May 2008. Its mission continues NASA s pursuit to find evidence of water on Mars. Phoenix carries upon it a slew of science instruments to study soil and ice samples from the northern region of the planet, an area previously undiscovered by robotic landers. In order for these science instruments to be useful, it was necessary for Phoenix to perform a safe entry, descent, and landing (EDL) onto the surface of Mars. The EDL design was defined through simulation and analysis of the various phases of the descent. An overview of the simulation and various models developed to characterize the EDL performance is provided. Monte Carlo statistical analysis was performed to assess the performance and robustness of the Phoenix EDL system and are presented in this paper. Using these simulation and modelling tools throughout the design and into the operations phase, the Mars Phoenix EDL was a success on May 25, 2008.

  18. Caste-, work-, and descent-based discrimination as a determinant of health in social epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajan R

    2014-01-01

    Social epidemiology explores health in the context of broad social determinants of health, where the boundary lines between health and politics appear increasingly blurred. Social determinants of health such as caste, discrimination, and social exclusion are inherently political in nature, hence it becomes imperative to look at health through a broader perspective of political philosophy, ideology, and caste that imposes enormous obstacles to a person's full attainment of civil, political, economic, social, and cultural rights. Caste is descent based and hereditary in nature. It is a characteristic determined by one's birth into a particular caste, irrespective of the faith practiced by the individual. Caste denotes a system of rigid social stratification into ranked groups defined by descent and occupation. Under various caste systems throughout the world, caste divisions also dominate in housing, marriage, and general social interaction divisions that are reinforced through the practice and threat of social ostracism, economic boycotts, and even physical violence-all of which undermine health equality. PMID:24871772

  19. Enhancements on the Convex Programming Based Powered Descent Guidance Algorithm for Mars Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars; Scharf, Daniel P.; Wolf, Aron

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present enhancements on the powered descent guidance algorithm developed for Mars pinpoint landing. The guidance algorithm solves the powered descent minimum fuel trajectory optimization problem via a direct numerical method. Our main contribution is to formulate the trajectory optimization problem, which has nonconvex control constraints, as a finite dimensional convex optimization problem, specifically as a finite dimensional second order cone programming (SOCP) problem. SOCP is a subclass of convex programming, and there are efficient SOCP solvers with deterministic convergence properties. Hence, the resulting guidance algorithm can potentially be implemented onboard a spacecraft for real-time applications. Particularly, this paper discusses the algorithmic improvements obtained by: (i) Using an efficient approach to choose the optimal time-of-flight; (ii) Using a computationally inexpensive way to detect the feasibility/ infeasibility of the problem due to the thrust-to-weight constraint; (iii) Incorporating the rotation rate of the planet into the problem formulation; (iv) Developing additional constraints on the position and velocity to guarantee no-subsurface flight between the time samples of the temporal discretization; (v) Developing a fuel-limited targeting algorithm; (vi) Initial result on developing an onboard table lookup method to obtain almost fuel optimal solutions in real-time.

  20. Flight Mechanics of the Entry, Descent and Landing of the ExoMars Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HayaRamos, Rodrigo; Boneti, Davide

    2007-01-01

    ExoMars is ESA's current mission to planet Mars. A high mobility rover and a fixed station will be deployed on the surface of Mars. This paper regards the flight mechanics of the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) phases used for the mission analysis and design of the Baseline and back-up scenarios of the mission. The EDL concept is based on a ballistic entry, followed by a descent under parachutes and inflatable devices (airbags) for landing. The mission analysis and design is driven by the flexibility in terms of landing site, arrival dates and the very stringent requirement in terms of landing accuracy. The challenging requirements currently imposed to the mission need innovative analysis and design techniques to support system design trade-offs to cope with the variability in entry conditions. The concept of the Global Entry Corridor has been conceived, designed, implemented and successfully validated as a key tool to provide a global picture of the mission capabilities in terms of landing site reachability.

  1. Trajectory Guidance for Mars Robotic Precursors: Aerocapture, Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sostaric, Ronald R.; Zumwalt, Carlie; Garcia-Llama, Eduardo; Powell, Richard; Shidner, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Future crewed missions to Mars require improvements in landed mass capability beyond that which is possible using state-of-the-art Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems. Current systems are capable of an estimated maximum landed mass of 1-1.5 metric tons (MT), while human Mars studies require 20-40 MT. A set of technologies were investigated by the EDL Systems Analysis (SA) project to assess the performance of candidate EDL architectures. A single architecture was selected for the design of a robotic precursor mission, entitled Exploration Feed Forward (EFF), whose objective is to demonstrate these technologies. In particular, inflatable aerodynamic decelerators (IADs) and supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP) have been shown to have the greatest mass benefit and extensibility to future exploration missions. In order to evaluate these technologies and develop the mission, candidate guidance algorithms have been coded into the simulation for the purposes of studying system performance. These guidance algorithms include aerocapture, entry, and powered descent. The performance of the algorithms for each of these phases in the presence of dispersions has been assessed using a Monte Carlo technique.

  2. The FarNet Journey: Perceptions of Maori Students Engaged in Secondary Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Carolyn; Barbour, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    This case study investigated the perceptions of Maori students in the Virtual Learning Network of what constituted effective strategies for engaging them in online learning. In the FarNet cluster, about 63 students from the four secondary and five area schools access the VLN, and approximately 80 percent of those students are of Maori descent.…

  3. Gradients in analyzability.

    PubMed

    Grotstein, J S

    A discussion of "Some Communicative Properties of the Bipersonal Field" by Robert Langs, M.D. In response to Dr. Langs' delineation of the bipersonal field concept and his clinical elaboration of a triad of disorders which are graded into classifications of descending analyzability: Types A,B, and C fields. I confirm his thesis and endeavor to demonstrate some underlying foundations of his categorical assumptions, namely the conceptions of projective identification, of the intactness of the background object of primary identification, the conception of a dual-track theory of infantile development in order to delineate the parallel between the separated self and the continuation of primary identification, and the postulation of manic and schizoid types of narcissistic character disorders (Types B and C respectively). All of these conceptions are vicissitudes of the varying ways in which patients confront the depressive position of separation-individuation with rapprochement and, thereby, conform to a gradient in which symbolization interpretations can be utilized in analytic treatment. PMID:738806

  4. POST2 End-To-End Descent and Landing Simulation for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Jody l.; Striepe, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    The Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) is used as a basis for an end-to-end descent and landing trajectory simulation that is essential in determining the design and performance capability of lunar descent and landing system models and lunar environment models for the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project. This POST2-based ALHAT simulation provides descent and landing simulation capability by integrating lunar environment and lander system models (including terrain, sensor, guidance, navigation, and control models), along with the data necessary to design and operate a landing system for robotic, human, and cargo lunar-landing success. This paper presents the current and planned development and model validation of the POST2-based end-to-end trajectory simulation used for the testing, performance and evaluation of ALHAT project system and models.

  5. Preliminary assessment of variable geometry stair ascent and descent with a powered lower limb orthosis for individuals with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ekelem, Andrew; Murray, Spencer; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a controller for a lower-limb exoskeleton that enables variable-geometry stair ascent and descent for persons with lower limb paralysis. The controller was evaluated on a subject with T10 complete spinal cord injury (SCI) on two staircases, one with a riser height and tread depth of 18.4 × 27.9 cm (7.25 × 11 in) and the other 17.8 × 29.8 cm (7 × 11.75 in). The controller enabled ascent and descent of both staircases without explicit tuning for each, and with an average step rate of 12.9 step/min during ascent and 14.6 step/min during descent. PMID:26737336

  6. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Agyemang, Charles; Addo, Juliet; Bhopal, Raj; de Graft Aikins, Ama; Stronks, Karien

    2009-01-01

    Background Most European countries are ethnically and culturally diverse. Globally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. The major risk factors for CVD have been well established. This picture holds true for all regions of the world and in different ethnic groups. However, the prevalence of CVD and related risk factors vary among ethnic groups. Methods This article provides a review of current understanding of the epidemiology of vascular disease, principally coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and related risk factors among populations of Sub-Sahara African descent (henceforth, African descent) in comparison with the European populations in Europe. Results Compared with European populations, populations of African descent have an increased risk of stroke, whereas CHD is less common. They also have higher rates of hypertension and diabetes than European populations. Obesity is highly prevalent, but smoking rate is lower among African descent women. Older people of African descent have more favourable lipid profile and dietary habits than their European counterparts. Alcohol consumption is less common among populations of African descent. The rate of physical activity differs between European countries. Dutch African-Suriname men and women are less physically active than the White-Dutch whereas British African women are more physically active than women in the general population. Literature on psychosocial stress shows inconsistent results. Conclusion Hypertension and diabetes are highly prevalent among African populations, which may explain their high rate of stroke in Europe. The relatively low rate of CHD may be explained by the low rates of other risk factors including a more favourable lipid profile and the low prevalence of smoking. The risk factors are changing, and on the whole, getting worse especially among African women. Cohort studies and clinical trials are therefore needed among these groups to determine the relative

  7. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  8. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  9. Empirical equation estimates geothermal gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. )

    1995-01-02

    An empirical equation can estimate geothermal (natural) temperature profiles in new exploration areas. These gradients are useful for cement slurry and mud design and for improving electrical and temperature log interpretation. Downhole circulating temperature logs and surface outlet temperatures are used for predicting the geothermal gradients.

  10. Mesosphere-to-stratosphere descent of odd nitrogen in February-March 2009 after sudden stratospheric warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, S.-M.; Verronen, P. T.; Thölix, L.; Kyrölä, E.; Backman, L.; Karpechko, A. Yu.; Seppälä, A.

    2011-05-01

    We use the 3-D FinROSE chemistry transport model (CTM) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) observations to study connections between atmospheric dynamics and middle atmospheric NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) distribution. Two cases are considered in the northern polar regions: (1) descent of mesospheric NOx in February-March 2009 after a major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) and, for comparison, (2) early 2007 when no NOx descent occurred. The model uses the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational data for winds and temperature, and we force NOx at the model upper altitude boundary (80 km) with ACE-FTS observations. We then compare the model results with ACE-FTS observations at lower altitudes. For the periods studied, geomagnetic indices are low, which indicates absence of local NOx production by particle precipitation. This gives us a good opportunity to study effects of atmospheric transport on polar NOx. The model results show no NOx descent in 2007, in agreement with ACE-FTS. In contrast, a large amount of NOx descends in February-March 2009 from the upper to lower mesosphere at latitudes larger than 60° N, i.e. inside the polar vortex. Both observations and model results suggest NOx increases of 150-200 ppb (i.e. by factor of 50) at 65 km due to the descent. However, the model underestimates the amount of NOx around 55 km by 40-60 ppb. According to the model results, chemical loss of NOx is insignificant during the descent period, i.e. polar NOx is mainly controlled by dynamics. The descent is terminated and the polar NOx amounts return to pre-descent levels in mid-March, when the polar vortex breaks. The break-up prevents the descending NOx from reaching the upper stratosphere, where it could participate in catalytic ozone destruction. Both ACE-FTS observations and FinROSE show a decrease of ozone of 20-30 % at 30-50 km from mid-February to mid-March. In the model, these ozone changes are not

  11. Prevalence of Hb S (HHB: c.20A > T) in a Honduran population of African descent.

    PubMed

    Erazo, Brian M; Ramírez, Gilberto A; Cerrato, Linda E; Pinto, Luis J; Castro, Edder J; Yanez, Néstor J; Montoya, Brayan; Fontecha, Gustavo A

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common hemoglobinopathy worldwide, particularly in Africa and among people of African descent. Serious clinical consequences characterize the homozygous condition. To determine the prevalence of Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and anemia in a community of people of African descent from Honduras, 202 individuals were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The high prevalence found indicates that it is necessary to implement a program to prevent the consequences of this disease in vulnerable populations of Honduras. PMID:25707678

  12. Estimation of Pairwise Identity by Descent From Dense Genetic Marker Data in a Population Sample of Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    I present a new approach for calculating probabilities of identity by descent for pairs of haplotypes. The approach is based on a joint hidden Markov model for haplotype frequencies and identity by descent (IBD). This model allows for linkage disequilibrium, and the method can be applied to very dense marker data. The method has high power for detecting IBD tracts of genetic length of 1 cM, with the use of sufficiently dense markers. This enables detection of pairwise IBD between haplotypes from individuals whose most recent common ancestor lived up to 50 generations ago. PMID:18430938

  13. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  14. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  15. Transitioning from Free-Flight to TRACON Airspace: The Ground Perspective of User-Preferred Descents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy; Palmer, Everett; Null, Cynthia (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Free-flight is considered to play a major role in the future air traffic environment. Studies are underway addressing different concepts for free-flight and self separation in enroute airspace. One common opinion throughout the different concepts is that the airspace surrounding major airports, the Terminal Radar Approach CONtrol (TRACON) will not be a free flight area. This means that aircraft in this area are completely controlled by air traffic controllers, who may be supported by decision support system like the Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS). How the transition from the free-flight area (enroute airspace) to the terminal area will take place is currently unclear, This paper describes a study at NASA Ames Research Center addressing the perspective of air traffic controllers handling user-preferred (FMS-optimized) descent trajectories during this transition phase. Two major issues in enabling user preferred descents from the controllers' point of view are predictability and controllability. In an environment in which the air traffic services are highly responsive to user preferences controllers need to know, where and when aircraft will change their trajectory and they need to have appropriate means and procedures at hand to control the aircraft according to the overall traffic situation. Predictability shall be enhanced by: 1) Indicating airspace corridors for descending aircraft; 2) Modify the controller interface; 3) Using a ground based conflict probe; 4) Making use of downlinked intent information from the aircraft FMS; and 5) Requiring to fly pilots on user preferred trajectories coupled to the FMS in the lateral and vertical axis. Additional controllability shall be achieved by supporting the controllers with CTAS center tools: 1) Traffic Management Advisor (TMA); 2) Conflict Probing and Trial Planning (CP/TP); and 3) Enroute Descent Advisor (E/DA). The paper describes the general concept and the modifications to current systems required to enable

  16. Genetic drift. Descent, lineage, and pedigree of the Trojans in Homer's Iliad.

    PubMed

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, Euterpe

    2007-12-15

    Homer's Iliad, is an epic poem that describes the last 70 days of the Trojan War, which was waged against the city of Troy by the Achaeans. Here, the descent, lineage, and the pedigree of the Trojans are presented. In the Illiad, they are said to have originated from Zeus. Beginning with him, the Trojan pedigree comprised 17 men in 8 generations with Dardanus, founder of Dardania in the second generation; Tros, King of the Trojans in the fourth generation; and the two heroes Hector and Aeneas in the eighth generation. In the seventh generation, Priam, as King of the Trojans, had a huge family, including 50 sons: 19 children with his wife Hecabe, other sons with many different wives, and some daughters as well. Hector, the first born, became leader of the Trojans. Hector's brother, Paris, in abducting Helen of Sparta, the wife of King Menelaus, caused the Trojan War to break out. PMID:17985360

  17. Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations Analysis for the Mars Phoenix Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Jill L.; Desai, Prasun N.; Queen, Eric M.; Grover, Myron R.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix lander was launched August 4, 2007 and remained in cruise for ten months before landing in the northern plains of Mars in May 2008. The one-month Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) operations phase prior to entry consisted of daily analyses, meetings, and decisions necessary to determine if trajectory correction maneuvers and environmental parameter updates to the spacecraft were required. An overview of the Phoenix EDL trajectory simulation and analysis that was performed during the EDL approach and operations phase is described in detail. The evolution of the Monte Carlo statistics and footprint ellipse during the final approach phase is also provided. The EDL operations effort accurately delivered the Phoenix lander to the desired landing region on May 25, 2008.

  18. Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrumentation (MEDLI): Complete Flight Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Bose, Deepak; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Kuhl, Christopher A.; Santos, Jose A.; Wright, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle (EV) successfully entered the Mars atmosphere and landed the Curiosity rover safely on the surface of the planet in Gale crater on August 6, 2012. MSL carried the MSL Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Instrumentation (MEDLI). MEDLI delivered the first in-depth understanding of the Mars entry environments and the response of the entry vehicle to those environments. MEDLI was comprised of three major subsystems: the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS), the MEDLI Integrated Sensor Plugs (MISP), and the Sensor Support Electronics (SSE). Ultimately, the entire MEDLI sensor suite consisting of both MEADS and MISP provided measurements that were used for trajectory reconstruction and engineering validation of aerodynamic, atmospheric, and thermal protection system (TPS) models in addition to Earth-based systems testing procedures. This report contains in-depth hardware descriptions, performance evaluation, and data information of the three MEDLI subsystems.

  19. Construction and validation of the Measurement of Acculturation Strategies for People of African Descent (MASPAD).

    PubMed

    Obasi, Ezemenari M; Leong, Frederick T L

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the development of the Measurement of Acculturation Strategies for People of African Descent (MASPAD), a bidimensional instrument designed to assess acculturation strategies (i.e., Traditionalist, Integrationist, Assimilationist, and Marginalist). Two studies were conducted to describe the development of the MASPAD and to assess its psychometric properties. Data were collected from 367 African American participants in Atlanta, GA; Columbus, OH; Los Angeles; and New York City, NY. The MASPAD consistently produced scores with adequate reliability and independent raters provided initial evidence for face and content validity. Pearson correlation coefficients supported the purported orthogonality of the MASPAD subscales. The MASPAD was found to be a significant predictor of cultural worldview and values. The bidimensional model of acculturation theorized to exist in the MASPAD was supported with a confirmatory factor analysis on data collected from 831 participants. Future directions for this body of research are discussed. PMID:21058816

  20. A Survey of Supersonic Retropropulsion Technology for Mars Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korzun, Ashley M.; Cruz, Juan R.; Braun, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a literature survey on supersonic retropropulsion technology as it applies to Mars entry, descent, and landing (EDL). The relevance of this technology to the feasibility of Mars EDL is shown to increase with ballistic coefficient to the point that it is likely required for human Mars exploration. The use of retropropulsion to decelerate an entry vehicle from hypersonic or supersonic conditions to a subsonic velocity is the primary focus of this review. Discussed are systems-level studies, general flowfield characteristics, static aerodynamics, vehicle and flowfield stability considerations, and aerothermodynamics. The experimental and computational approaches used to develop retropropulsion technology are also reviewed. Finally, the applicability and limitations of the existing literature and current state-of-the-art computational tools to future missions are discussed in the context of human and robotic Mars exploration.

  1. Participation and Research of Astronomers and Astrophysicists of Black African Descent (1900–2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Urama, Johnson

    The second half of the Twentieth Century witnessed the emergence of the first modern Astronomers and Astrophysicists of Black African descent. In this paper we enumerate these researchers and briefly describe their activities. We also describe the broader social and political contexts which have impacted their participation and research. We focus primarily on researchers in the United States of America (28) and in Nigeria (19) who have together produced over 90% of the astronomical researchers known to the authors. We briefly mention researchers from other countries including South Africa (3) and in Eurasia (2). We conclude by describing the pioneering researchers and disseminators of the Black African Diaspora's contribution of to the modern astronomical sciences.

  2. Participation and Research of Astronomers and Astrophysicists of Black African Descent (1900 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Urama, Johnson

    The second half of the Twentieth Century witnessed the emergence of the first modern Astronomers and Astrophysicists of Black African descent. In this paper we enumerate these researchers and briefly describe their activities. We also describe the broader social and political contexts which have impacted their participation and research. We focus primarily on researchers in the United States of America (28) and in Nigeria (19) who have together produced over 90% of the astronomical researchers known to the authors. We briefly mention researchers from other countries including South Africa (3) and in Eurasia (2). We conclude by describing the pioneering researchers and disseminators of the Black African Diaspora's contribution of to the modern astronomical sciences.

  3. Computation of identity-by-descent proportions shared by two siblings

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Sun Wei )

    1994-06-01

    The author provides a novel approach to computing the mean and variance of the proportion of genetic material shared identical by descent (IBD) by sibling paris in a specified chromosomal region, conditional on observed marker data. He first shows that each chromosome in an offspring can be represented by a two-state Markov chain, with the time parameter being map distance along the chromosome. On this basis, it is shown that IBD proportion can be written as a stochastic integral and that the computation of its mean and variance can be reduced to evaluation of an integral of some elementary functions. In addition, it is shown how Goldgar's model can be extended to include dominance effects. Several examples are provided to illustrate the calculation. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Accurate Non-parametric Estimation of Recent Effective Population Size from Segments of Identity by Descent

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Sharon R.; Browning, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Existing methods for estimating historical effective population size from genetic data have been unable to accurately estimate effective population size during the most recent past. We present a non-parametric method for accurately estimating recent effective population size by using inferred long segments of identity by descent (IBD). We found that inferred segments of IBD contain information about effective population size from around 4 generations to around 50 generations ago for SNP array data and to over 200 generations ago for sequence data. In human populations that we examined, the estimates of effective size were approximately one-third of the census size. We estimate the effective population size of European-ancestry individuals in the UK four generations ago to be eight million and the effective population size of Finland four generations ago to be 0.7 million. Our method is implemented in the open-source IBDNe software package. PMID:26299365

  5. The Unparalleled Systems Engineering of MSL's Backup Entry, Descent, and Landing System: Second Chance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roumeliotis, Chris; Grinblat, Jonathan; Reeves, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Second Chance (SECC) was a bare bones version of Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) Entry Descent & Landing (EDL) flight software that ran on Curiosity's backup computer, which could have taken over swiftly in the event of a reset of Curiosity's prime computer, in order to land her safely on Mars. Without SECC, a reset of Curiosity's prime computer would have lead to catastrophic mission failure. Even though a reset of the prime computer never occurred, SECC had the important responsibility as EDL's guardian angel, and this responsibility would not have seen such success without unparalleled systems engineering. This paper will focus on the systems engineering behind SECC: Covering a brief overview of SECC's design, the intense schedule to use SECC as a backup system, the verification and validation of the system's "Do No Harm" mandate, the system's overall functional performance, and finally, its use on the fateful day of August 5th, 2012.

  6. Three cases of Troyer syndrome in two families of Filipino descent.

    PubMed

    Butler, Shauna; Helbig, Katherine L; Alcaraz, Wendy; Seaver, Laurie H; Hsieh, David T; Rohena, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Troyer syndrome is a complex hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) due to a mutation in SPG20 first reported in the Old Amish population. A genetic mutation in SPG20 is responsible for a loss of function of the protein spartin in this disease. Since its initial report, this syndrome has also been reported in Turkish and Omani families. Here we report the case of three patients of Filipino descent with Troyer syndrome. Whole exome sequencing (WES) identified a homozygous mutation c.364_365delAT which predicts p.Met122Valfs*2 in SPG20. This is the same mutation identified in affected patients from the Omani and Turkish families, and is the first report of this syndrome in the Filipino population. Although Troyer syndrome has characteristic phenotypic manifestations it is likely underdiagnosed due to its rarity and we expect that WES will lead to identifying this disease in other individuals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112432

  7. Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis. Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to establish the Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis assessment, which involved development of an enhanced simulation architecture using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) simulation tool. The assessment was requested to enhance the capability of the Agency to provide rapid evaluation of EDL characteristics in systems analysis studies, preliminary design, mission development and execution, and time-critical assessments. Many of the new simulation framework capabilities were developed to support the Agency EDL Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) team, that is conducting studies of the technologies and architectures that are required to enable higher mass robotic and human mission to Mars. The appendices to the original report are contained in this document.

  8. Electronic Nature of Step-edge Barriers Against Adatom Descent on Transition-metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Yina; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    The activation barriers against adatom migration on terraces and across steps play an essential role in determining the growth morphology of surfaces, interfaces, and thin lms. By studying a series of adatoms on representative transition metal surfaces through extensive rst-principles calculations, we establish a clear correlation between the preferred mechanism and activation energy for adatom descent at a step and the relative degree of electronic shell lling between the adatom and the substrate. We also nd an approximate linear relation between the adatom hopping barriers at step edges and the adatom-surface bonding strength. These results may serve as simple guiding rules for predicting the precise atomic nature of surface morphologies in heteroepitaxial growth such as nanowires.

  9. Factors affecting breastfeeding among women of Mexican origin or descent in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, S C; Engle, P L; Arnold, L; Haynes, K

    1987-04-01

    Data on breastfeeding intentions and behavior were collected in prenatal and postpartum interviews as part of a study on first birth among 518 women of Mexican origin or descent in two Los Angeles hospitals. The prenatal intentions of 82 per cent of the women to breastfeed were maintained postpartum in one hospital but dropped sharply in the other. A greater number of hours a day with the baby in the hospital and earlier initiation of breastfeeding were associated with the hospital where prenatal breastfeeding intentions were more likely to be carried out. The intention to work postpartum was associated both with the decision not to breastfeed at all and with shorter intended duration of breastfeeding. PMID:3826466

  10. Quantification of Plume-Soil Interaction and Excavation Due to the Sky Crane Descent Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vizcaino, Jeffrey; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of the particulate erosion that occurs as a result of a rocket exhaust plume impinging on soil during extraterrestrial landings is critical for future robotic and human lander mission design. The aerodynamic environment that results from the reflected plumes results in dust lifting, site alteration and saltation, all of which create a potentially erosive and contaminant heavy environment for the lander vehicle and any surrounding structures. The Mars Science Lab (MSL), weighing nearly one metric ton, required higher levels of thrust from its retro propulsive systems and an entirely new descent system to minimize these effects. In this work we seek to quantify plume soil interaction and its resultant soil erosion caused by the MSL's Sky Crane descent stage engines by performing three dimensional digital terrain and elevation mapping of the Curiosity rover's landing site. Analysis of plume soil interaction altitude and time was performed by detailed examination of the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) still frames and reconstructed inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensor data. Results show initial plume soil interaction from the Sky Crane's eight engines began at ground elevations greater than 60 meters and more than 25 seconds before the rovers' touchdown event. During this time, viscous shear erosion (VSE) was dominant typically resulting in dusting of the surface with flow propagating nearly parallel to the surface. As the vehicle descended and decreased to four powered engines plume-plume and plume soil interaction increased the overall erosion rate at the surface. Visibility was greatly reduced at a height of roughly 20 meters above the surface and fell to zero ground visibility shortly after. The deployment phase of the Sky Crane descent stage hovering at nearly six meters above the surface showed the greatest amount of erosion with several large particles of soil being kicked up, recirculated, and impacting the bottom of the rover chassis. Image

  11. A Multidisciplinary Tool for Systems Analysis of Planetary Entry, Descent, and Landing (SAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2009-01-01

    SAPE is a Python-based multidisciplinary analysis tool for systems analysis of planetary entry, descent, and landing (EDL) for Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Titan. The purpose of SAPE is to provide a variable-fidelity capability for conceptual and preliminary analysis within the same framework. SAPE includes the following analysis modules: geometry, trajectory, aerodynamics, aerothermal, thermal protection system, and structural sizing. SAPE uses the Python language-a platform-independent open-source software for integration and for the user interface. The development has relied heavily on the object-oriented programming capabilities that are available in Python. Modules are provided to interface with commercial and government off-the-shelf software components (e.g., thermal protection systems and finite-element analysis). SAPE runs on Microsoft Windows and Apple Mac OS X and has been partially tested on Linux.

  12. Iterative CT reconstruction using coordinate descent with ordered subsets of data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noo, F.; Hahn, K.; Schöndube, H.; Stierstorfer, K.

    2016-04-01

    Image reconstruction based on iterative minimization of a penalized weighted least-square criteria has become an important topic of research in X-ray computed tomography. This topic is motivated by increasing evidence that such a formalism may enable a significant reduction in dose imparted to the patient while maintaining or improving image quality. One important issue associated with this iterative image reconstruction concept is slow convergence and the associated computational effort. For this reason, there is interest in finding methods that produce approximate versions of the targeted image with a small number of iterations and an acceptable level of discrepancy. We introduce here a novel method to produce such approximations: ordered subsets in combination with iterative coordinate descent. Preliminary results demonstrate that this method can produce, within 10 iterations and using only a constant image as initial condition, satisfactory reconstructions that retain the noise properties of the targeted image.

  13. Development of advanced entry, descent, and landing technologies for future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Cheng-Chih (Chester)

    2006-01-01

    Future Mars missions may need the capability to land much closer to a desired target and/or advanced methods of detecting, avoiding, or tolerating landing hazards. Therefore, technologies that enable 'pinpoint landing' (within tens of meters to 1 km of a target site) will be crucial to meet future mission requirements. As part of NASA Research Announcement, NRA 03-OSS-01, NASA solicited proposals for technology development needs of missions to be launched to Mars during or after the 2009 launch opportunity. Six technology areas were identified as of high priority including advanced entry, descent, and landing (EDL) technologies. In May 2004, 11 proposals with PIs from universities, industries, and NASA centers, were awarded in the area of advanced EDL by NASA for further study and development. This paper presents an overview of these developing technologies.

  14. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Rasky, Daniel; Hintze, Paul; Sibille, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss a new mass-efficient and innovative way of protecting high-mass spacecraft during planetary Entry, Descent & Landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system (TPS) for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from regolith materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Two regolith processing and manufacturing methods will be discussed: 1) Compression and sintering of the regolith to yield low density materials; 2) Formulations of a High-temperature silicone RTV (Room Temperature Vulcanizing) compound are used to bind regolith particles together. The overall positive results of torch flame impingement tests and plasma arc jet testing on the resulting samples will also be discussed.

  15. Partner violence, depression, and practice implications with families of Chinese descent.

    PubMed

    Yick, Alice G; Shibusawa, Tazuko; Agbayani-Siewert, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Because the Chinese tend to display psychological problems such as depression in somatic This article examines cultural aspects, experiences, and the mental health consequences of partner violence among families of Chinese descent. A total of 262 Chinese men and women participated in a telephone survey about partner violence and psychological well-being. Symptoms, two indicators of mental health were employed in the research study. Findings indicated a high level of verbal aggression both perpetrated and sustained by participants. Rates of physical abuse were lower; however, these figures dispel the model minority myth associated with Asian Americans. In addition, findings showed a positive correlation between depression and partner violence. Those who experienced verbal and physical aggression by a spouse/intimate partner in the last 12 months were more likely to experience depression. Those who perpetrated physical aggression were more likely to experience somatic symptoms. Practice and research implications are highlighted. PMID:14692179

  16. Cassini/Huygens Probe Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) at Titan Independent Technical Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Lockwood, Mary Kae; Cruz, Juan R.; Striepe, Scott A.; Sutton, Kenneth; Fisher, Jody; Takashima, Naruhisa T.; Justus, Jere; Keller, Vernon W.; Bose, Deepak; Prabhu, Dinesh; Chen, Y. K.; Olejniczak, Joe; Cruz, Juan R; Duvall, Aleta

    2009-01-01

    Starting in January 2004, the NESC has received several communications from knowledgeable technical experts at NASA expressing shared concerns (mainly at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Ames Research Center (ARC)) about Huygens mission success. It was suggested that NASA become more technically involved directly in the analysis of Huygens' entry, descent and landing (EDL) focusing on the parachute deployment trigger performance and the resultant effects on the operation of the parachute system, and the determination of the radiative heating environment at Titan by ESA and the corresponding thermal protection system (TPS) response. A NESC Team was formed and tasked to provide an independent assessment of these concerns. The results of that assessment are documented in this report.

  17. Overview of the NASA Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis Exploration Feed-Forward Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Zang, Thomas A.; Sostaric, Ronald R.; McGuire, M. Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Technology required to land large payloads (20 to 50 mt) on Mars remains elusive. In an effort to identify the most viable investment path, NASA and others have been studying various concepts. One such study, the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDLSA) Study [1] identified three potential options: the rigid aeroshell, the inflatable aeroshell and supersonic retropropulsion (SRP). In an effort to drive out additional levels of design detail, a smaller demonstrator, or exploration feed-forward (EFF), robotic mission was devised that utilized two of the three (inflatable aeroshell and SRP) high potential technologies in a configuration to demonstrate landing a two to four metric ton payload on Mars. This paper presents and overview of the maximum landed mass, inflatable aeroshell controllability and sensor suite capability assessments of the selected technologies and recommends specific technology areas for additional work.

  18. Supersonic Retropropulsion Technology Development in NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edquist, Karl T.; Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Kelb, Bil; Korzun, Ashley; Dyakonov, Artem A.; Zarchi, Kerry A.; Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Post, Ethan A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) space technology roadmap calls for new technologies to achieve human exploration of Mars in the coming decades [1]. One of those technologies, termed Supersonic Retropropulsion (SRP), involves initiation of propulsive deceleration at supersonic Mach numbers. The potential benefits afforded by SRP to improve payload mass and landing precision make the technology attractive for future EDL missions. NASA's EDL project spent two years advancing the technological maturity of SRP for Mars exploration [2-15]. This paper summarizes the technical accomplishments from the project and highlights challenges and recommendations for future SRP technology development programs. These challenges include: developing sufficiently large SRP engines for use on human-scale entry systems; testing and computationally modelling complex and unsteady SRP fluid dynamics; understanding the effects of SRP on entry vehicle stability and controllability; and demonstrating sub-scale SRP entry systems in Earth's atmosphere.

  19. Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations Analysis for the Genesis Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Lyons, Dan T.

    2005-01-01

    On September 8, 2004, the Genesis spacecraft returned to Earth after spending 29 months about the sun-Earth libration point collecting solar wind particles. Four hours prior to Earth arrival, the entry capsule containing the samples was released for entry and subsequent landing at the Utah Test and Training Range. This paper provides an overview of the entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis that was performed during the Mission Operations Phase leading up to final approach to Earth. The operations effort accurately delivered the entry capsule to the desired landing site. The final landing location was 8.3 km from the target, and was well within the allowable landing area. Preliminary reconstruction analyses indicate that the actual entry trajectory was very close to the pre-entry prediction.

  20. The nonlinear steepest descent approach to the singular asymptotics of the second Painlevé transcendent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothner, Thomas; Its, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    We consider the real-valued solutions of the second Painlevé equation on the real line. The two-parameter family of the solutions having singular asymptotics as x→+∞ or/and x→-∞ is studied with the help of the Deift-Zhou nonlinear steepest descent method. Explicit evaluation in terms of trigonometric functions of the (singular) leading orders of the asymptotics is carried out and the corresponding connection formulae obtained. A novel methodological feature is the appearance of the “soliton” type Riemann-Hilbert problem in the course of the implementation of the Deift-Zhou scheme for the Riemann-Hilbert problem corresponding to the second Painlevé equation within the Riemann-Hilbert isomonodromy approach. The result of the paper reproduces previously known formulae derived by Kapaev via the original isomonodromy technique.

  1. Descent of tremor source locations before the 2014 phreatic eruption of Ontake volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Masashi; Matsubayashi, Hirotoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    On 27 September 2014, Ontake volcano, in central Japan, suddenly erupted without precursory activity. We estimated and tracked the source locations of volcanic tremor associated with the eruption at high temporal resolution, using a method based on the spatial distribution of tremor amplitudes. Although the tremor source locations were not well constrained in depth, their epicenters were well located beneath the erupted crater and the summit. Tremor sources were seen to descend approximately 2 km over a period of several minutes prior to the beginning of the eruption. Detailed analysis of the time series of tremor amplitudes suggests that this descent is a robust feature. Our finding may be an important constraint for modeling the 2014 eruption of Ontake volcano as well as for monitoring activities on this and other volcanoes.

  2. Mars atmospheric winds indicated by motion of the Viking landers during parachute descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiff, A.

    1993-04-01

    The parachute descent trajectories of the two Viking landers are used to determine winds in the Martian atmosphere at altitudes from 1.5 to 3.5 km. Viking 1 descended within a vigorously convective boundary layer, while Viking 2 at 1.5 km was above the boundary layer. Turbulent velocities in the Viking 1 boundary layer were approximately 3 m/sec, and mean upflow velocity was approximately 1 m/sec. The Viking 2 atmosphere was relatively quiescent, with orderly wind directional variation possibly suggesting the presence of waves. Comparison of the measured winds with a recent global circulation model showed little or no correspondence, probably an indication that the winds were locally controlled. The high sensitivity of winds at altitudes up to several kilometers to terrain slopes as small as a few meters per kilometer would suggest that slope winds may be widely found in the lowest few kilometers of the Martian atmosphere.

  3. Why the Viking descent probes found only one ionospheric layer at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayyasi, Majd; Mendillo, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Radio wave transmissions from satellites revealed that Mars had two relatively distinct layers of ionization: a maximum electron density near 130 km, and a secondary layer near 110 km. When the Viking descent probes—with their in situ observing capabilities—passed through the ionosphere, the peak electron density was found, with no indication of a secondary layer below. Here we use an ionospheric model to show that profiles of electron density versus height have shapes that favor the detection of two layers at local times near dawn and dusk (where many thousands of radio occultation observations have been made), but that the two layers essentially merge into one during midday hours (when Viking measurements were made). The profile shapes are attributed to ionizing geometry of solar photons and to chemical processes that affect the profile shapes in a way that favors secondary peak formation near sunrise and sunset.

  4. Regolith-Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Hintze, Paul E.; Sibille, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss a new mass-efficient and innovative way of protecting high-mass spacecraft during planetary Entry, Descent & Landing (EDL). Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system (TPS) for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from regolith materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Three regolith processing and manufacturing methods will be discussed: 1) oxygen & metal extraction ISRU processes produce glassy melts enriched in alumina and titania, processed to obtain variable density, high melting point and heat-resistance; 2) compression and sintering of the regolith yield low density materials; 3) in-situ derived high-temperature polymers are created to bind regolith particles together, with a lower energy budget.

  5. Approach and Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Allen; Greco, Martin; Martin-Mur, Tomas; Portock, Brian; Steltzner, Adam

    2013-01-01

    On August 5th, 2012, at 10:31 PM PDT, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity landed safely within Gale Crater. Her successful landing de-pended not only upon the flawless execution of the numerous critical activities during the seven minute entry, descent, and landing (EDL), but also upon the operational preparations and decisions made by the flight team during approach, the final weeks, days, and hours prior to landing. During this period, decisions made by the flight team balanced operational risk to the spacecraft in flight with any resulting risks incurred during EDL as a result of those decisions. This pa-per summarizes the operations plans made in preparation for Approach and EDL and the as flown decisions and actions executed that balanced the operational and EDL risks and prepared the vehicle for a successful landing.

  6. On the Use of a Range Trigger for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2012, during the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle, a 21.5 m Viking-heritage, Disk-Gap-Band, supersonic parachute will be deployed at approximately Mach 2. The baseline algorithm for commanding this parachute deployment is a navigated planet-relative velocity trigger. This paper compares the performance of an alternative range-to-go trigger (sometimes referred to as Smart Chute ), which can significantly reduce the landing footprint size. Numerical Monte Carlo results, predicted by the POST2 MSL POST End-to-End EDL simulation, are corroborated and explained by applying propagation of uncertainty methods to develop an analytic estimate for the standard deviation of Mach number. A negative correlation is shown to exist between the standard deviations of wind velocity and the planet-relative velocity at parachute deploy, which mitigates the Mach number rise in the case of the range trigger.

  7. Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to establish the Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis assessment, which involved development of an enhanced simulation architecture using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) simulation tool. The assessment was requested to enhance the capability of the Agency to provide rapid evaluation of EDL characteristics in systems analysis studies, preliminary design, mission development and execution, and time-critical assessments. Many of the new simulation framework capabilities were developed to support the Agency EDL Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) team, that is conducting studies of the technologies and architectures that are required to enable higher mass robotic and human mission to Mars. The findings of the assessment are contained in this report.

  8. Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis, Phase 2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Daniel G.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to establish the Simulation Framework for Rapid Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) Analysis assessment, which involved development of an enhanced simulation architecture using the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II simulation tool. The assessment was requested to enhance the capability of the Agency to provide rapid evaluation of EDL characteristics in systems analysis studies, preliminary design, mission development and execution, and time-critical assessments. Many of the new simulation framework capabilities were developed to support the Agency EDL-Systems Analysis (SA) team that is conducting studies of the technologies and architectures that are required to enable human and higher mass robotic missions to Mars. The findings, observations, and recommendations from the NESC are provided in this report.

  9. Parametric Mass Modeling for Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Komar, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the parametric mass models used for the Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems Analysis study conducted by NASA in FY2009-2010. The study examined eight unique exploration class architectures that included elements such as a rigid mid-L/D aeroshell, a lifting hypersonic inflatable decelerator, a drag supersonic inflatable decelerator, a lifting supersonic inflatable decelerator implemented with a skirt, and subsonic/supersonic retro-propulsion. Parametric models used in this study relate the component mass to vehicle dimensions and mission key environmental parameters such as maximum deceleration and total heat load. The use of a parametric mass model allows the simultaneous optimization of trajectory and mass sizing parameters.

  10. The Mast Cameras and Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) for the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.; Bell, J. F.; Cameron, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Lemmon, M. T.; Parker, T. J.; Sullivan, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    Based on operational experience gained during the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission, we proposed and were selected to conduct two related imaging experiments: (1) an investigation of the geology and short-term atmospheric vertical wind profile local to the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing site using descent imaging, and (2) a broadly-based scientific investigation of the MSL locale employing visible and very near infra-red imaging techniques from a pair of mast-mounted, high resolution cameras. Both instruments share a common electronics design, a design also employed for the MSL Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) [1]. The primary differences between the cameras are in the nature and number of mechanisms and specific optics tailored to each camera s requirements.

  11. Molecular analysis of patients of Sardinian descent with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    Rosatelli, M C; Meloni, A; Faa, V; Saba, L; Crisponi, G; Clemente, M G; Meloni, G; Piga, M T; Cao, A

    1997-01-01

    This study reports the molecular characterisation of the bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyl-transferase gene (UGT1) in a group of patients of Sardinian descent with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I and their relatives. Sequence analysis of both UGT1A exon 1 and common exons 2-5 was performed in all patients, leading to the detection of AF170 and a novel mutation (470insT), both residing in UGT1A exon 1. All but two heterozygotes for the AF170 mutation showed normal serum bilirubin levels. These two subjects were also heterozygous for the sequence variation A(TA)7TAA in the promoter region of the UGT1A gene. Images PMID:9039987

  12. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density. PMID:25978093

  13. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  14. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  15. Atmospheric Risk Assessment for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Allen; Vasavada, Ashwin; Cianciolo, Alicia; Barnes, Jeff; Tyler, Dan; Hinson, David; Lewis, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    In 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) systems, by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. As with previous Mars landers, atmospheric conditions during entry, descent, and landing directly impact the performance of MSL's EDL system. While the vehicle's novel guided entry system allows it to "fly out" a range of atmospheric uncertainties, its trajectory through the atmosphere creates a variety of atmospheric sensitivities not present on previous Mars entry systems and landers. Given the mission's stringent landing capability requirements, understanding the atmosphere state and spacecraft sensitivities takes on heightened importance. MSL's guided entry trajectory differs significantly from recent Mars landers and includes events that generate different atmospheric sensitivities than past missions. The existence of these sensitivities and general advancement in the state of Mars atmospheric knowledge has led the MSL team to employ new atmosphere modeling techniques in addition to past practices. A joint EDL engineering and Mars atmosphere science and modeling team has been created to identify the key system sensitivities, gather available atmospheric data sets, develop relevant atmosphere models, and formulate methods to integrate atmosphere information into EDL performance assessments. The team consists of EDL engineers, project science staff, and Mars atmospheric scientists from a variety of institutions. This paper provides an overview of the system performance sensitivities that have driven the atmosphere modeling approach, discusses the atmosphere data sets and models employed by the team as a result of the identified sensitivities, and introduces the tools used to translate atmospheric knowledge into quantitative EDL performance assessments.

  16. Entry, Descent, and Landing with Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing and Shock Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet's moon atmospheres for entry, and descent can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. A three engine retro-propulsion configuration with a 2.5 inch diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn 1x1 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70 degree Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a supersonic retro-propulsion system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retro-propulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. In addition, special topics of electromagnetic interference with retro-propulsion induced shock waves and retro-propulsion for Earth launched booster recovery are also addressed.

  17. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmosphere for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retro-propulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. As part of those efforts, NASA began to conduct experiments to gather the experimental data to make informed decisions on the "best" EDL options. A model of a three engine retro-propulsion configuration with a 2.5 in. diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70 Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a supersonic retro-propulsion system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retro-propulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. The rocket engine flow was simulated with a non-combusting flow of air.

  18. Entry, Descent, and Landing with Propulsive Deceleration: Supersonic Retropropulsion Wind Tunnel Testing and Shock Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet's moon atmospheres for entry, and descent can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions. Future EDL systems may include an inflatable decelerator for the initial atmospheric entry and an additional supersonic retropropulsion (SRP) rocket system for the final soft landing. A three engine retropropulsion configuration with a 2.5 in. diameter sphere-cone aeroshell model was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center's 1- by 1-ft (1×1) Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). The testing was conducted to identify potential blockage issues in the tunnel, and visualize the rocket flow and shock interactions during supersonic and hypersonic entry conditions. Earlier experimental testing of a 70deg Viking-like (sphere-cone) aeroshell was conducted as a baseline for testing of a SRP system. This baseline testing defined the flow field around the aeroshell and from this comparative baseline data, retropropulsion options will be assessed. Images and analyses from the SWT testing with 300- and 500-psia rocket engine chamber pressures are presented here. In addition, special topics of electromagnetic interference with retropropulsion induced shock waves and retropropulsion for Earth launched booster recovery are also addressed.

  19. Atmospheric properties reconstruction from the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein-Rathlou, Christina; Withers, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landed on August 5, 2012 in Gale Crater on Mars (4.5 S, 137.4 E) [1]. The MSL entry vehicle measured accelerations and angular velocity during its descent through the Martian atmosphere using accelerometers and gyroscopes in an inertial measurement unit. We have applied smoothing techniques previously developed for the NASA Phoenix Mars mission [2] to these acceleration data. Smoothed accelerations were used in conjunction with the vehicle’s aerodynamic database to reconstruct atmospheric density, pressure and temperature profiles to above 120 km altitude. The density profile was estimated using axial accelerations in the drag force equation. Corresponding pressure and temperature profiles were calculated using the hydrostatic equilibrium and ideal gas law, respectively. In contrast to previous missions, MSL used a guided entry that resulted in periods of near-horizontal flight at approximately 20 km altitude [3], during which pressure could not be determined from hydrostatic equilibrium. Instead, atmospheric pressures at low altitudes were determined independently by the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) [4]. These were used in conjunction with accelerometer-derived densities to extend the atmospheric temperature profile through the period of near-horizontal flight. Although the results present only a snapshot of the regional atmospheric conditions at the time of entry, descent and landing of MSL, they have excellent vertical resolution and vertical extent, thereby complementing orbital observations. We will present an overview of our atmospheric reconstruction process, the derived atmospheric profiles, and preliminary scientific interpretation of the atmospheric results. References: [1] Vasavada, A.R. et al (2014), JGR-Planets, 119, 6, 1134-1161 [2] Withers, P. (2013) Planet. & Space Sci., 79-80, 52-55, [3] Dutta, S. et al. (2013) 23rd AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Meeting, AAS 13-309, [4] Schoenenberger, M. et al

  20. Icing Frequencies Experienced During Climb and Descent by Fighter-Interceptor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Porter J.

    1958-01-01

    Data and analyses are presented on the relative frequencies of occurrence and severity of icing cloud layers encountered by jet aircraft in the climb and descent phases of flights to high altitudes. Fighter-interceptor aircraft operated by the Air Defense Command (USAF) at bases in the Duluth and Seattle areas collected the data with icing meters installed for a l-year period. The project was part of an extensive program conducted by the NACA to collect Icing cloud data for evaluating the icing problem relevant to routine operations. The average frequency of occurrence of icing was found to be about 5 percent of the number of climbs and descents during 1 year of operations The icing encounters were predominantly in the low and middle cloud layers, decreasing above 15,000 feet to practically none above 25,000 feet. The greatest thickness of ice that would accumulate on any aircraft component (as indicated by the accretion on a small object) was measured with the icing meters. The ice thicknesses on a small sensing probe averaged less than 1/32 inch and did not exceed 1/2 inch. Such accumulations are relatively small when compared with those that can form during horizontal flight in icing clouds. The light accretions resulted from relatively steep angles of flight through generally thin cloud layers. Because of the limited statistical reliability of the results, an analysis was made using previous statistics on icing clouds below an altitude of 20,000 feet to determine the general icing severity probabilities. The calculations were made using adiabatic lifting as a basis to establish the liquid-water content. Probabilities of over-all ice accretions on a small object as a function of airspeed and rate of climb were computed from the derived water contents. These results were then combined with the probability of occurrence of icing in order to give the icing severity that can be expected for routine aircraft operations.

  1. The Effects of the Diurnal Atmospheric Variability on Entry, Descent and Landing on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marceta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Landing on Mars is extremely challenging task due to the fact that the Martian atmosphere is the most hostile environment in the Solar system to perform the entry, descent and landing (EDL) process, because it is thick enough to create substantial heating of the entry vehicle but not thick enough to reduce its velocity to the one necessary for safe landing. Beside this, the atmosphere is very dynamic mainly due to high eccentricity of the Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital to the equatorial plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion. Although seasonal variations of atmospheric parameters are significantly larger than the diurnal, it is very important to analyze diurnal cycles as they can significantly change vertical and horizontal atmospheric profiles in very short time intervals. This can present a serious threat to missions which have very precise timings and specific requirements such as the requirement for the daytime landing to enable ground images acquisition during the descent and landing phase. A 3-degrees-of-freedom trajectory integration routine was combined with the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) to identify the dependence of the EDL profiles on the diurnal cycles of atmospheric parameters throughout the Martian year. The obtained results show that the influence of the diurnal cycles is the largest at the equator and decreases relatively symmetrically towards the poles with a slightly stronger influence in the northern hemisphere. Also, there is a significant influence of the orbital position of Mars on the effect of diurnal atmospheric variations which causes that, around the orbital perihelion and winter solstice, there is some kind of inversion of the dependance of optimal entry timing on latitude of the landing site comparing to the rest of the Martian year.

  2. Close proximity spacecraft maneuvers near irregularly shaped small bodies: Hovering, translation, and descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broschart, Stephen B.

    Recently there has been significant interest in sending spacecraft to small-bodies in our solar system, such as asteroids, comets, and small planetary satellites, for the purpose of scientific study. It is believed that the composition of these bodies, unchanged for billions of years, can aid in understanding the formative period of our solar system. However, missions to small-bodies are difficult from a dynamical standpoint, complicated by the irregular shape and gravitational potential of the small-body, strong perturbations from solar radiation pressure and third body gravity, and significant uncertainty in the small-body parameters. This dissertation studies the spacecraft maneuvers required to enable a sampling mission in this unique dynamical environment, including station-keeping (hovering), translation, and descent. The bulk of this work studies hovering maneuvers, where equilibrium is created at an arbitrary position by using thrusters to null the nominal spacecraft acceleration. Contributions include a numerical study of previous results on the stability of hovering, a definition of the zero-velocity surface that exists in the vicinity of hovering spacecraft (for time-invariant dynamics), and a dead-band hovering controller design that ensures the trajectory is bounded within a prescribed region. It is found that bounded hovering near the surface of a small-body can often be achieved using dead-band control on only one direction of motion; altitude measurements alone are often sufficient to implement this control. A constant thrust strategy for translation and descent maneuvers appropriate for autonomous implementation is also presented and shown to accurately complete maneuvers in the vicinity of the initial position. Sensitivity analysis studies the effects of parameter uncertainty on these maneuvers. The theory presented within is supported throughout with numerical analysis (software tools are described within) and test cases using models of real

  3. DASH: a method for identical-by-descent haplotype mapping uncovers association with recent variation.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander; Kenny, Eimear E; Lowe, Jennifer K; Salit, Jaqueline; Saxena, Richa; Kathiresan, Sekar; Altshuler, David M; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Breslow, Jan L; Pe'er, Itsik

    2011-06-10

    Rare variants affecting phenotype pose a unique challenge for human genetics. Although genome-wide association studies have successfully detected many common causal variants, they are underpowered in identifying disease variants that are too rare or population-specific to be imputed from a general reference panel and thus are poorly represented on commercial SNP arrays. We set out to overcome these challenges and detect association between disease and rare alleles using SNP arrays by relying on long stretches of genomic sharing that are identical by descent. We have developed an algorithm, DASH, which builds upon pairwise identical-by-descent shared segments to infer clusters of individuals likely to be sharing a single haplotype. DASH constructs a graph with nodes representing individuals and links on the basis of such segments spanning a locus and uses an iterative minimum cut algorithm to identify densely connected components. We have applied DASH to simulated data and diverse GWAS data sets by constructing haplotype clusters and testing them for association. In simulations we show this approach to be significantly more powerful than single-marker testing in an isolated population that is from Kosrae, Federated States of Micronesia and has abundant IBD, and we provide orthogonal information for rare, recent variants in the outbred Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium (WTCCC) data. In both cohorts, we identified a number of haplotype associations, five such loci in the WTCCC data and ten in the isolated, that were conditionally significant beyond any individual nearby markers. We have replicated one of these loci in an independent European cohort and identified putative structural changes in low-pass whole-genome sequence of the cluster carriers. PMID:21620352

  4. Strategies for Choosing Descent Flight-Path Angles for Small Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong Gilbert; Green, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Three candidate strategies for choosing the descent flight path angle (FPA) for small jets are proposed, analyzed, and compared for fuel efficiency under arrival metering conditions. The strategies vary in operational complexity from a universally fixed FPA, or FPA function that varies with descent speed for improved fuel efficiency, to the minimum-fuel FPA computed for each flight based on winds, route, and speed profile. Methodologies for selecting the parameter for the first two strategies are described. The differences in fuel burn are analyzed over a year s worth of arrival traffic and atmospheric conditions recorded for the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) Airport during 2011. The results show that the universally fixed FPA strategy (same FPA for all flights, all year) burns on average 26 lbs more fuel per flight as compared to the minimum-fuel solution. This FPA is adapted to the arrival gate (direction of entry to the terminal) and various timespans (season, month and day) to improve fuel efficiency. Compared to a typical FPA of approximately 3 degrees the adapted FPAs vary significantly, up to 1.3 from one arrival gate to another or up to 1.4 from one day to another. Adapting the universally fixed FPA strategy to the arrival gate or to each day reduces the extra fuel burn relative to the minimum-fuel solution by 27% and 34%, respectively. The adaptations to gate and time combined shows up to 57% reduction of the extra fuel burn. The second strategy, an FPA function, contributes a 17% reduction in the 26 lbs of extra fuel burn over the universally fixed FPA strategy. Compared to the corresponding adaptations of the universally fixed FPA, adaptations of the FPA function reduce the extra fuel burn anywhere from 15-23% depending on the extent of adaptation. The combined effect of the FPA function strategy with both directional and temporal adaptation recovers 67% of the extra fuel relative to the minimum-fuel solution.

  5. Mathematical modeling approaches in the study of glaucoma disparities among people of African and European descents

    PubMed Central

    Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Arciero, Julia C.; Siesky, Brent A.; Amireskandari, Annahita; Gerber, Austin L.; Huck, Andrew H.; Kim, Nathaniel J.; Cassani, Simone; Carichino, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Open angle glaucoma (OAG) is a severe ocular disease characterized by progressive and irreversible vision loss. While elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a well-established risk factor for OAG, the progression of OAG in many cases, despite IOP treatment, suggests that other risk factors must play significant roles in the development of the disease. For example, various structural properties of the eye, ocular blood flow properties, and systemic conditions have been identified as risk factors for OAG. Ethnicity has also been indicated as a relevant factor that affects the incidence and prevalence of OAG; in fact, OAG is the leading cause of blindness among people of African descent. Numerous clinical studies have been designed to examine the possible correlation and causation between OAG and these factors; however, these studies are met with the challenge of isolating the individual role of multiple interconnected factors. Over the last decade, various mathematical modeling approaches have been implemented in combination with clinical studies in order to provide a mechanical and hemodynamical description of the eye in relation to the entire human body and to assess the contribution of single risk factors to the development of OAG. This review provides a summary of the clinical evidence of ocular structural differences, ocular vascular differences and systemic vascular differences among people of African and European descent, describes the mathematical approaches that have been proposed to study ocular mechanics and hemodynamics while discussing how they could be used to investigate the relevance to OAG of racial disparities, and outlines possible new directions of research. PMID:24501718

  6. Analysis of the Accuracy of Ballistic Descent from a Circular Circumterrestrial Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikharulidze, Yu. G.; Korchagin, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of the transportation of the results of experiments and observations to Earth every so often appears in space research. Its simplest and low-cost solution is the employment of a small ballistic reentry spacecraft. Such a spacecraft has no system of control of the descent trajectory in the atmosphere. This can result in a large spread of landing points, which make it difficult to search for the spacecraft and very often a safe landing. In this work, a choice of a compromise scheme of the flight is considered, which includes the optimum braking maneuver, adequate conditions of the entry into the atmosphere with limited heating and overload, and also the possibility of landing within the limits of a circle with a radius of 12.5 km. The following disturbing factors were taken into account in the analysis of the accuracy of landing: the errors of the braking impulse execution, the variations of the atmosphere density and the wind, the error of the specification of the ballistic coefficient of the reentry spacecraft, and a displacement of its center of mass from the symmetry axis. It is demonstrated that the optimum maneuver assures the maximum absolute value of the reentry angle and the insensitivity of the trajectory of descent with respect to small errors of orientation of the braking engine in the plane of the orbit. It is also demonstrated that the possible error of the landing point due to the error of specification of the ballistic coefficient does not depend (in the linear approximation) upon its value and depends only upon the reentry angle and the accuracy of specification of this coefficient. A guided parachute with an aerodynamic efficiency of about two should be used at the last leg of the reentry trajectory. This will allow one to land in a prescribed range and to produce adequate conditions for the interception of the reentry spacecraft by a helicopter in order to prevent a rough landing.

  7. Differences in Ocular Blood Flow in Glaucoma Between Patients of African and European Descent

    PubMed Central

    Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon; Racette, Lyne; Abassi, Rania; Chandrasekhar, Kaarthik; Tobe, Leslie A.; Behzadi, Jennifer; Eckert, George; Amireskandari, Annahita; Muchnik, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate differences in ocular blood flow in individuals of African descent (AD) and European descent (ED) with open angle glaucoma (OAG). Patients and Methods A retrospective data analysis was performed on OAG patients of AD and ED who were previously examined for ocular blood flow within the Department of Ophthalmology at Indiana University School of Medicine. Data analysis included blood pressure, heart rate, visual fields, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, and color Doppler imaging of retrobulbar vessels. Color Doppler imaging measurements were performed on ophthalmic, central retinal, and nasal and temporal short posterior ciliary arteries, with peak systolic (PSV) and end diastolic velocities (EDV) as well as the Pourcelot vascular resistive index calculated for each vessel. Two-sample t tests of unequal variance were performed with P values <0.05 considered statistically significant. Results OAG patients of AD had statistically significant lower retrobulbar blood flow values than patients of ED including lower ophthalmic artery PSV (P=0.0001), ophthalmic artery EDV (P=0.0008), central retinal artery PSV (P=0.01), temporal short posterior ciliary artery PSV (P=0.0037), and nasal short posterior ciliary artery PSV (P<0.0001). No significant differences were found in terms of intraocular pressure or visual field parameters. Conclusions Significantly lower blood flow values were identified in all retrobulbar blood vessels in AD compared with ED OAG patients. These findings suggest that the contribution of ocular blood flow to the disease process may be different in AD compared with ED OAG patients. PMID:23807346

  8. Planning fuel-conservative descents with or without time constraints using a small programmable calculator: Algorithm development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified flight-management descent algorithm, programmed on a small programmable calculator, was developed and flight tested. It was designed to aid the pilot in planning and executing a fuel-conservative descent to arrive at a metering fix at a time designated by the air traffic control system. The algorithm may also be used for planning fuel-conservative descents when time is not a consideration. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard temperature effects. The flight-management descent algorithm is described. The results of flight tests flown with a T-39A (Sabreliner) airplane are presented.

  9. Evaluating the physical demands when using sled-type stair descent devices to evacuate mobility-limited occupants from high-rise buildings.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Steven A; Mehta, Jay P; Hedman, Glenn E; Park, Sanghyun; Reichelt, Paul A; Conrad, Karen M

    2015-09-01

    The physical demands on evacuators were investigated when using different types of sled-type stair descent devices designed for the emergency evacuation of high rise buildings. Twelve firefighters used six sled-type stair descent devices during simulated evacuations. The devices were evaluated under two staircase width conditions (1.12, and 1.32 m). Dependent measures included electromyographic (EMG) data, heart rates, Borg Scale ratings, and descent velocities. All stair descent speeds were below those reported during pedestrian egress trials. With the exception of the inflatable device, the devices operated by two evacuators had higher descent speeds than those operated by a single evacuator. High friction materials under the sleds facilitated control and reduced the muscle demands on stairs but increased physical demands on the landings. Usability assessments found devices with shorter overall lengths had fewer wall contacts on the landing, and handles integrated in the straps were preferred by the evacuators. PMID:25959322

  10. DISR imaging and the geometry of the descent of the Huygens probe within Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Doose, Lyn R.; See, Chuck; McFarlane, Elisabeth A.; Schröder, Stefan E.; Rizk, Bashar

    2007-11-01

    The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) provided 376 images during the descent to Titan and 224 images after landing. Images of the surface had scales between 150 m/pixel and 0.4 mm/pixel, all of which we assembled into a mosaic. The analysis of the surface and haze features in these images and of other data gave tight constraints on the geometry of the descent, particularly the trajectory, the tip and tilt, and the rotation of the Huygens probe. Huygens moved on average in the direction of 2∘ north of east from 145 to 50 km altitude, turning to 5∘ south of east between 30 and 20 km altitude, before turning back to east. At 6.5 km altitude, it reversed to WNW, before reversing back to SE at 0.7 km altitude. At first, Huygens was tilting slowly by up to 15∘ as expected for a descent through layers of changing wind speeds. As the winds calmed, tilts decreased. Tilts were approximately retrieved throughout the main-parachute phase, but only for 160 specific times afterwards. Average swing rates were 5∘/s at high and low altitudes, but 13∘/s between 110 and 30 km altitude. Maximum swing rates were often above 40∘/s, far above the design limit of 6∘/s, but they caused problems only for a single component of DISR, the Sun Sensor. The excitation of such high swing rates on the stabilizer parachute is not fully understood. Before the parachute exchange, the rotational rate of Huygens smoothly approached the expected equilibrium value of 3 rotations per vertical kilometer, although clockwise instead of counterclockwise. Starting at 40 s after the parachute exchange until landing, Huygens rotated erratically. Long-term averages of the rotational rate varied between 2.0 and 4.5 rotations/km. On time scales shorter than a minute, some 100 strong rotational accelerations or decelerations created azimuthal irregularities of up to 180∘, which caused DISR to take most exposures at random azimuths instead of pre-selected azimuths. Nevertheless, we

  11. "Arubaito," or Short-Term Working Abroad in Japan: A Case Study of Brazilian University Students of Japanese Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    International migration between Japan and Brazil dates back to 1908, when the first group of Japanese migrated to Brazil. However, in the 1980s, a reverse flow occurred, as thousands of Brazilians of Japanese descent traveled to Japan to work in manufacturing and construction factories ("dekasegi" workers). Japanese Brazilians up until the third…

  12. Making Sense of Women of African Descent's Place in the Politics of (Urban) Space through the Vehicle of Popular Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoo-Adare, Epifania

    This paper is a brief account and argument for using Built Environment Education Workshops (BEEWs) as a data collection method. The research is based on women of African descent and the connections among their social practices, the spaces that generate them and are generated by them, and the language they use to mediate and/or negotiate those…

  13. Factors that Enable Women of South Asian and African Descent to Succeed in Leadership Positions in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamassah, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This research study focused on the factors that enable women of South Asian and African descent to succeed as leaders in the college system. The findings were derived from online questionnaires and in-depth interviews of 16 racialized women from two Greater Toronto Area (GTA) colleges. Many factors and recommendations were shared. Some of the…

  14. Family Relations and the Adjustment of Young Children of Mexican Descent: Do Family Cultural Values Moderate These Associations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Wendy C.; Modry-Mandell, Kerri

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the role of family cultural values as moderators of the association between family relations and the adjustment of young children. Fifty-five families of Mexican descent with young children enrolled in Head Start programs in the Southwest participated. Mothers provided information about closeness of the mother-child…

  15. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  16. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  17. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  18. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  19. 14 CFR 121.333 - Supplemental oxygen for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. 121.333 Section 121.333... for emergency descent and for first aid; turbine engine powered airplanes with pressurized cabins. (a... passenger cabin occupants. (3) For first-aid treatment of occupants who for physiological reasons...

  20. 'The full has never been told': building a theory of sexual health for heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Candice N; Delgado-Romero, Edward A; Mosley, Della V; Huynh, Sophia

    2016-08-01

    Research on Black sexual health often fails to represent the heterogeneity of Black ethnic groups. For people of Caribbean descent in the USA, ethnicity is a salient cultural factor that influences definitions and experiences of sexual health. Most research on people of Caribbean descent focuses on the relatively high rate of STIs, but sexual health is defined more broadly than STI prevalence. Psychological and emotional indicators and the voice of participants are important to consider when exploring the sexual health of a minority culture. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively explore how heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent define and understand sexual health for themselves. Eleven men who self-identified as Black, Caribbean and heterosexual participated in three focus groups and were asked to define sexual health, critique behaviours expertly identified as healthy and address what encourages and discourages sexual health in their lives. Findings point to six dimensions of sexual health for heterosexual Black men of Caribbean descent. These include: heterosexually privileged, protective, contextual, interpersonal, cultural and pleasurable dimensions. There were some notable departures from current expert definitions of sexual health. Recommendations for further theory development are provided. PMID:26907581

  1. [G-tolerance of female cosmonauts during descent in space flights of 8 up to 169 days in duration].

    PubMed

    Koloteva, M I; Kotovskaia, A R; Vil'-Vil'iams, I F; Luk'ianiuk, V Iu; Gavrilova, L N

    2001-01-01

    Investigations into g-tolerance of female cosmonauts during descent in space flights of varying duration are topical for the present day, as there are little data on this issue. Tolerance of +Gz-loads during descent was analyzed based on the data about 4 female cosmonauts in 5 space flights. The space flights were conventionally divided into short- (8-16 days) and long-term (169 days). In two space flights (16 and 169-d long), tubeless anti-g suit Centaur was warn during descent. In these space flights, g-tolerance of females was quite satisfactory advocating for the possibility for women to fly to space without any constraints. When the anti-g suit was not used, female physiological systems were stressed heavier than male. The spacesuit smoothed away this difference. Our results evidence a distinct positive effect of wearing the anti-g suit by female cosmonauts during descent as it reduces stress to their physiological systems. PMID:11915747

  2. Anticipatory kinematics and muscle activity preceding transitions from level-ground walking to stair ascent and descent.

    PubMed

    Peng, Joshua; Fey, Nicholas P; Kuiken, Todd A; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-02-29

    The majority of fall-related accidents are during stair ambulation-occurring commonly at the top and bottom stairs of each flight, locations in which individuals are transitioning to stairs. Little is known about how individuals adjust their biomechanics in anticipation of walking-stair transitions. We identified the anticipatory stride mechanics of nine able-bodied individuals as they approached transitions from level ground walking to stair ascent and descent. Unlike prior investigations of stair ambulation, we analyzed two consecutive "anticipation" strides preceding the transitions strides to stairs, and tested a comprehensive set of kinematic and electromyographic (EMG) data from both the leading and trailing legs. Subjects completed ten trials of baseline overground walking and ten trials of walking to stair ascent and descent. Deviations relative to baseline were assessed. Significant changes in mechanics and EMG occurred in the earliest anticipation strides analyzed for both ascent and descent transitions. For stair descent, these changes were consistent with observed reductions in walking speed, which occurred in all anticipation strides tested. For stair ascent, subjects maintained their speed until the swing phase of the latest anticipation stride, and changes were found that would normally be observed for decreasing speed. Given the timing and nature of the observed changes, this study has implications for enhancing intent recognition systems and evaluating fall-prone or disabled individuals, by testing their abilities to sense upcoming transitions and decelerate during locomotion. PMID:26830440

  3. Implicit Theories of Intelligence across Academic Domains: A Study of Meaning Making in Adolescents of Mexican Descent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quihuis, Gisell; Bempechat, Janine; Jimenez, Norma V.; Boulay, Beth A.

    2002-01-01

    Used quantitative and qualitative methodologies to examine the implicit theories of intelligence of low-income adolescents of Mexican descent and the meanings they attached to these theories in four academic domains. Found that even students who were designated as entity theorists (intelligence as a fixed trait) on the basis of questionnaire…

  4. Multiple Marginality and Urban Education: Community and School Socialization among Low-Income Mexican-Descent Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conchas, Gilberto Q.; Vigil, James Diego

    2010-01-01

    This article conceptualizes the crucial social and developmental features impacting Mexican-descent youth and adolescents in low-income communities in southern California. All youth in these neighborhoods must confront and come to grips with the many environmental, socioeconomic, racial, and cultural forces they confront. However, it is the…

  5. Stable iteratively regularized gradient method for nonlinear irregular equations under large noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokurin, Mihail Yu

    2006-02-01

    We consider an iteratively regularized version of the method of gradient descent for solving nonlinear irregular equations F(x) = 0 in a Hilbert space. When studying regularization methods for such equations with noisy operators F, traditional conditions on available approximations {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}} amount to error estimates of the form \\Vert {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x)- F(x) \\Vert \\leq \\delta , for x from a neighbourhood of a solution. Convergence of the methods is usually established on the assumption that the error level δ → 0, i.e. that noisy elements {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) strongly converge to the exact value F(x). In this paper we analyse approximating properties of the regularized gradient method assuming that {\\skew3\\widetilde{F}}(x) may converge to F(x) only weakly. We suggest an a priori stopping rule for the gradient iteration and give error estimates for obtained approximate solutions in terms of levels of strong and weak perturbations of the original operator. The main theorem generalizes recent results of Bakushinsky and Kokurin (2004 Iterative Methods for Approximate Solution of Inverse Problems (Dordrecht: Springer)) on the stopping of regularized gradient method under strong perturbations of F.

  6. Spatial gradient tuning in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Tom; Goldflam, Michael; Jokerst, Nan; Basov, Dimitri; Smith, David

    2011-03-01

    Gradient Index (GRIN) metamaterials have been used to create devices inspired by, but often surpassing the potential of, conventional GRIN optics. The unit-cell nature of metamaterials presents the opportunity to exert much greater control over spatial gradients than is possible in natural materials. This is true not only during the design phase but also offers the potential for real-time reconfiguration of the metamaterial gradient. This ability fits nicely into the picture of transformation-optics, in which spatial gradients can enable an impressive suite of innovative devices. We discuss methods to exert control over metamaterial response, focusing on our recent demonstrations using Vanadium Dioxide. We give special attention to role of memristance and mem-capacitance observed in Vanadium Dioxide, which simplify the demands of stimuli and addressing, as well as intersecting metamaterials with the field of memory-materials.

  7. Generalized gradient and contour program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hellman, Marshall Strong

    1972-01-01

    This program computes estimates of gradients, prepares contour maps, and plots various sets of data provided by the user on the CalComp plotters. The gradients represent the maximum rates of change of a real variable Z=f(X,Y) with respect to the twodimensional rectangle on which the function is defined. The contours are lines of equal Z values. The program also plots special line data sets provided by the user.

  8. Temporal generalization gradients following an interdimensional discrimination protocol.

    PubMed

    Vieira de Castro, Ana Catarina; Vasconcelos, Marco; Machado, Armando

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of interdimensional discrimination training in the temporal generalization gradient. In a matching-to-sample task, pigeons learned to choose key S after a T-s houselight sample and key NS in the absence of the houselight sample. For one group of pigeons, T = 20 s; for another, T = 10 s. Subsequently, houselight duration was varied to obtain temporal generalization gradients. Results showed that (a) proportion S increased as houselight duration ranged from 0 s to T s and then remained high for houselight durations longer than T; (b) the gradients were well described by negative-exponential functions; (c) these non-flat gradients were present from the beginning of testing, and; (d) the average gradients obtained with T = 20 s and T = 10 s overlapped when plotted in relative time. We conclude that temporal control does not require explicit discrimination training along the temporal dimension, and that temporal generalization gradients obtained with an interdimensional protocol show the scalar property of timing. We discuss how these findings challenge current models of timing. PMID:26605786

  9. The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) Experiment on the Huygens Entry Probe of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasko, M. G.; Buchhauser, D.; Bushroe, M.; Dafoe, L. E.; Doose, L. R.; Eibl, A.; Fellows, C.; Farlane, E. M.; Prout, G. M.; Pringle, M. J.; Rizk, B.; See, C.; Smith, P. H.; Tsetsenekos, K.

    2002-07-01

    The payload of the Huygens Probe into the atmosphere of Titan includes the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR). This instrument includes an integrated package of several optical instruments built around a silicon charge coupled device (CCD) detector, a pair of linear InGaAs array detectors, and several individual silicon detectors. Fiber optics are used extensively to feed these detectors with light collected from three frame imagers, an upward and downward-looking visible spectrometer, an upward and downward looking near-infrared spectrometer, upward and downward looking violet phtotometers, a four-channel solar aerole camera, and a sun sensor that determines the azimuth and zenith angle of the sun and measures the flux in the direct solar beam at 940 nm. An onboard optical calibration system uses a small lamp and fiber optics to track the relative sensitivity of the different optical instruments relative to each other during the seven year cruise to Titan. A 20 watt lamp and collimator are used to provide spectrally continuous illumination of the surface during the last 100 m of the descent for measurements of the reflection spectrum of the surface. The instrument contains software and hardware data compressors to permit measurements of upward and downward direct and diffuse solar flux between 350 and 1700 nm in some 330 spectral bands at approximately 2 km vertical resolution from an alititude of 160 km to the surface. The solar aureole camera measures the brightness of a 6° wide strip of the sky from 25 to 75° zenith angle near and opposite the azimuth of the sun in two passbands near 500 and 935 nm using vertical and horizontal polarizers in each spectral channel at a similar vertical resolution. The downward-looking spectrometers provide the reflection spectrum of the surface at a total of some 600 locations between 850 and 1700 nm and at more than 3000 locations between 480 and 960 nm. Some 500 individual images of the surface are expected which can

  10. Estimation of coastal density gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. J.; Palmer, M. R.; Polton, J. A.; O'Neill, C. K.

    2012-04-01

    Density gradients in coastal regions with significant freshwater input are large and variable and are a major control of nearshore circulation. However their measurement is difficult, especially where the gradients are largest close to the coast, with significant uncertainties because of a variety of factors - spatial and time scales are small, tidal currents are strong and water depths shallow. Whilst temperature measurements are relatively straightforward, measurements of salinity (the dominant control of spatial variability) can be less reliable in turbid coastal waters. Liverpool Bay has strong tidal mixing and receives fresh water principally from the Dee, Mersey, Ribble and Conwy estuaries, each with different catchment influences. Horizontal and vertical density gradients are variable both in space and time. The water column stratifies intermittently. A Coastal Observatory has been operational since 2002 with regular (quasi monthly) CTD surveys on a 9 km grid, an situ station, an instrumented ferry travelling between Birkenhead and Dublin and a shore-based HF radar system measuring surface currents and waves. These measurements are complementary, each having different space-time characteristics. For coastal gradients the ferry is particularly useful since measurements are made right from the mouth of Mersey. From measurements at the in situ site alone density gradients can only be estimated from the tidal excursion. A suite of coupled physical, wave and ecological models are run in association with these measurements. The models, here on a 1.8 km grid, enable detailed estimation of nearshore density gradients, provided appropriate river run-off data are available. Examples are presented of the density gradients estimated from the different measurements and models, together with accuracies and uncertainties, showing that systematic time series measurements within a few kilometres of the coast are a high priority. (Here gliders are an exciting prospect for

  11. Runway Texture and Grid Pattern Effects on Rate-of-Descent Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. A.; Dearing, M. G.; Sweet, B. T.; Kaiser, M. K.; Rutkowski, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To date, perceptual errors occur in determining descent rate from a computer-generated image in flight simulation. Pilots tend to touch down twice as hard in simulation than in flight, and more training time is needed in simulation before reaching steady-state performance. Barnes suggested that recognition of range may be the culprit, and he cited that problems such as collimated objects, binocular vision, and poor resolution lead to poor estimation of the velocity vector. Brown's study essentially ruled out that the lack of binocular vision is the problem. Dorfel added specificity to the problem by showing that pilots underestimated range in simulated scenes by 50% when 800 ft from the runway threshold. Palmer and Petitt showed that pilots are able to distinguish between a 1.7 ft/sec and 2.9 ft/sec sink rate when passively observing sink rates in a night scene. Platform motion also plays a role, as previous research has shown that the addition of substantial platform motion improves pilot estimates of vertical velocity and results in simulated touchdown rates more closely resembling flight. This experiment examined how some specific variations in the visual scene properties affect a pilot's perception of sink rate. It extended another experiment that focused on the visual and motion cues necessary for helicopter autorotations. In that experiment, pilots performed steep approaches to a runway. The visual content of the runway and its surroundings varied in two ways: texture and rectangular grid spacing. Four textures, included a no-texture case, were evaluated. Three grid spacings, including a no-grid case, were evaluated. The results showed that pilot better controlled their vertical descent rates when good texture cues were present. No significant differences were found for the grid manipulation. Using those visual scenes a simple psychophysics, experiment was performed. The purpose was to determine if the variations in the visual scenes allowed pilots to better

  12. Reactive Sequencing for Autonomous Navigation Evolving from Phoenix Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Christopher A.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual Machine Language (VML) is an award-winning advanced procedural sequencing language in use on NASA deep-space missions since 1997, and was used for the successful entry, descent, and landing (EDL) of the Phoenix spacecraft onto the surface of Mars. Phoenix EDL utilized a state-oriented operations architecture which executed within the constraints of the existing VML 2.0 flight capability, compatible with the linear "land or die" nature of the mission. The intricacies of Phoenix EDL included the planned discarding of portions of the vehicle, the complex communications management for relay through on-orbit assets, the presence of temporally indeterminate physical events, and the need to rapidly catch up four days of sequencing should a reboot of the spacecraft flight computer occur shortly before atmospheric entry. These formidable operational challenges led to new techniques for packaging and coordinating reusable sequences called blocks using one-way synchronization via VML sequencing global variable events. The coordinated blocks acted as an ensemble to land the spacecraft, while individually managing various elements in as simple a fashion as possible. This paper outlines prototype VML 2.1 flight capabilities that have evolved from the one-way synchronization techniques in order to implement even more ambitious autonomous mission capabilities. Target missions for these new capabilities include autonomous touch-and-go sampling of cometary and asteroidal bodies, lunar landing of robotic missions, and ultimately landing of crewed lunar vehicles. Close proximity guidance, navigation, and control operations, on-orbit rendezvous, and descent and landing events featured in these missions require elaborate abort capability, manifesting highly non-linear scenarios that are so complex as to overtax traditional sequencing, or even the sort of one-way coordinated sequencing used during EDL. Foreseeing advanced command and control needs for small body and lunar landing

  13. Spacecraft Trajectory Generation by Successive Approximation for Powered Descent and Cyclers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casoliva, Jordi

    Methods for spacecraft trajectory generation must be reliable. Complex nonlinear dynamics and constraints impede straightforward approaches. The approach pursued in this dissertation is to use successive approximation, which entails solving a sequence of problems, each one of which can be solved reliably, leading to the solution of the problem of interest. First, contractive sequential convex programming (CSCP) is developed and then applied to the problem of optimal powered descent landing in the presence of complex constraints, aerodynamic force and nonlinear engine performance. Second, numerical continuation is applied to the generation of cycler (periodic) spacecraft trajectories in the Earth-Moon system, the challenge here being the multiple scales of the three-body dynamics. The first-order necessary conditions for minimum-fuel powered descent are derived and interpreted. Both a point-mass model with throttle and thrust angle control and a rigid-body model with throttle and angular velocity control are considered, with a more complete analysis of the rigid-body case than previously available in the literature. The effects of boundary conditions on the thrust direction and finite bounds on the angular velocities are analyzed for the rigid-body case. Minimum-fuel solutions, obtained numerically, illustrate the optimal strategies. The optimal powered descent landing problem considered in the development of CSCP has a convex cost function, nonlinear dynamics, convex state constraints and nonlinear non-convex control constraints. The non-convexity in the control constraints is handled with the lossless convexification technique which consists of a convex relaxation on the control constraints. The novelty of CSCP is the ability to account for nonlinear dynamics and nonlinear control bounds in the optimal control problem and the use of interior-point methods for second-order cone programs which are guaranteed to find the optimal solution. CSCP solves a convergent

  14. Rapid Gradient-Echo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Gradient echo sequences are widely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for numerous applications ranging from angiography to perfusion to functional MRI. Compared with spin-echo techniques, the very short repetition times of gradient-echo methods enable very rapid 2D and 3D imaging, but also lead to complicated “steady states.” Signal and contrast behavior can be described graphically and mathematically, and depends strongly on the type of spoiling: fully balanced (no spoiling), gradient spoiling, or RF-spoiling. These spoiling options trade off between high signal and pure T1 contrast while the flip angle also affects image contrast in all cases, both of which can be demonstrated theoretically and in image examples. As with spin-echo sequences, magnetization preparation can be added to gradient-echo sequences to alter image contrast. Gradient echo sequences are widely used for numerous applications such as 3D perfusion imaging, functional MRI, cardiac imaging and MR angiography. PMID:23097185

  15. Mars Sample Return Using Commercial Capabilities: Propulsive Entry, Descent, and Landing of a Capsule Form Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Andrew A.; Lemke, Lawrence G.; Huynh, Loc C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a critical portion of the work that has been done at NASA, Ames Research Center regarding the use of the commercially developed Dragon capsule as a delivery vehicle for the elements of a high priority Mars Sample Return mission. The objective of the investigation was to determine entry and landed mass capabilities that cover anticipated mission conditions. The "Red Dragon", Mars configuration, uses supersonic retro-propulsion, with no required parachute system, to perform Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) maneuvers. The propulsive system proposed for use is the same system that will perform an abort, if necessary, for a human rated version of the Dragon capsule. Standard trajectory analysis tools are applied to publically available information about Dragon and other legacy capsule forms in order to perform the investigation. Trajectory simulation parameters include entry velocity, flight path angle, lift to drag Ratio (L/D), landing site elevation, atmosphere density, and total entry mass, in addition engineering assumptions for the performance of the propulsion system are stated. Mass estimates for major elements of the overall proposed architecture are coupled to this EDL analysis to close the overall architecture. Three synodic launch opportunities, beginning with the 2022 opportunity, define the arrival conditions. Results state the relations between the analysis parameters as well as sensitivities to those parameters. The EDL performance envelope includes landing altitudes between 0 and -4 km referenced to the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter datum as well as minimum and maximum atmosphere density. Total entry masses between 7 and 10 mt are considered with architecture closure occurring between 9.0 and 10 mt. Propellant mass fractions for each major phase of the EDL - Entry, Terminal Descent, and Hazard Avoidance - have been derived. An assessment of the effect of the entry conditions on the Thermal Protection System (TPS) currently in use for

  16. A learning rule for very simple universal approximators consisting of a single layer of perceptrons.

    PubMed

    Auer, Peter; Burgsteiner, Harald; Maass, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    One may argue that the simplest type of neural networks beyond a single perceptron is an array of several perceptrons in parallel. In spite of their simplicity, such circuits can compute any Boolean function if one views the majority of the binary perceptron outputs as the binary output of the parallel perceptron, and they are universal approximators for arbitrary continuous functions with values in [0,1] if one views the fraction of perceptrons that output 1 as the analog output of the parallel perceptron. Note that in contrast to the familiar model of a "multi-layer perceptron" the parallel perceptron that we consider here has just binary values as outputs of gates on the hidden layer. For a long time one has thought that there exists no competitive learning algorithm for these extremely simple neural networks, which also came to be known as committee machines. It is commonly assumed that one has to replace the hard threshold gates on the hidden layer by sigmoidal gates (or RBF-gates) and that one has to tune the weights on at least two successive layers in order to achieve satisfactory learning results for any class of neural networks that yield universal approximators. We show that this assumption is not true, by exhibiting a simple learning algorithm for parallel perceptrons - the parallel delta rule (p-delta rule). In contrast to backprop for multi-layer perceptrons, the p-delta rule only has to tune a single layer of weights, and it does not require the computation and communication of analog values with high precision. Reduced communication also distinguishes our new learning rule from other learning rules for parallel perceptrons such as MADALINE. Obviously these features make the p-delta rule attractive as a biologically more realistic alternative to backprop in biological neural circuits, but also for implementations in special purpose hardware. We show that the p-delta rule also implements gradient descent-with regard to a suitable error measure

  17. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youcong; Liu, Qiwen; Li, Yao; Shen, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.

  18. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Anaya, R M; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y -; Falabella, S; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Paul, A C; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2006-11-15

    High voltage systems operated in vacuum require insulating materials to maintain spacing between conductors held at different potentials, and may be used to maintain a nonconductive vacuum boundary. Traditional vacuum insulators generally consist of a single material, but insulating structures composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal can also be built. These ''High-Gradient Insulators'' have been experimentally shown to withstand higher voltage gradients than comparable conventional insulators. As a result, they have application to a wide range of high-voltage vacuum systems where compact size is important. This paper describes ongoing research on these structures, as well as the current theoretical understanding driving this work.

  19. Oxidation in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of a temperature gradient and heat flux on point defect diffusion in protective oxide scales were examined. Irreversible thermodynamics were used to expand Fick's first law of diffusion to include a heat flux term--a Soret effect. Oxidation kinetics were developed for the oxidation of cobalt and for nickel doped with chromium. Research in progress is described to verify the effects of a heat flux by oxidizing pure cobalt in a temperature gradient above 800 C, and comparing the kinetics to isothermal oxidation. The tests are being carried out in the new high temperature gaseous corrosion and corrosion/erosion facility at the Albany Research Center.

  20. Templating Surfaces with Gradient Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Genzer,J.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most versatile and widely used methods of forming surfaces with position-dependent wettability is that conceived by Chaudhury and Whitesides more than a decade ago. In this paper we review several projects that utilize this gradient-forming methodology for: controlled of deposition of self-assembled monolayers on surfaces, generating arrays of nanoparticles with number density gradients, probing the mushroom-to-brush transition in surface-anchored polymers, and controlling the speed of moving liquid droplets on surfaces.

  1. Neighborhood Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms among Mexican-descent residents of Texas City, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Alyssa Marie; Peek, M. Kristen; Eschbach, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Substantial research shows that increased Hispanic neighborhood concentration is associated with several beneficial health outcomes including lower adult mortality, better self-rated health, and fewer respiratory problems. Literature on the relationship of Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms is more equivocal. In addition, few studies have directly investigated hypothesized mechanisms of this relationship. This study uses data from a probability sample of 1,238 Mexican-descent adults living in 48 neighborhoods in Texas City, Texas. Multilevel regression models investigate whether Hispanic neighborhood composition is associated with fewer depressive symptoms. This study also investigates whether social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate or moderate the relationship, and whether results differ by primary language used at home. We find that individuals living in high Hispanic composition neighborhoods experience fewer depressive symptoms than individuals in low Hispanic composition neighborhoods. In addition, we find that these beneficial effects only apply to respondents who speak English. Social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. In addition, discrimination and stress moderate the relationship between Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms. Our findings support theories linking higher neighborhood Hispanic composition and better mental health, and suggest that Spanish language use, social support, discrimination and stress may play important roles in the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. PMID:24355471

  2. Neocytolysis on descent from altitude: a newly recognized mechanism for the control of red cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Ruiz, W.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Tapia, R.; Hachey, D. L.; Gonzales, G. F.; Alfrey, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of space-flight anemia have uncovered a physiologic process, neocytolysis, by which young red blood cells are selectively hemolyzed, allowing rapid adaptation when red cell mass is excessive for a new environment. OBJECTIVES: 1) To confirm that neocytolysis occurs in another situation of acute plethora-when high-altitude dwellers with polycythemia descend to sea level; and 2) to clarify the role of erythropoietin suppression. DESIGN: Prospective observational and interventional study. SETTING: Cerro de Pasco (4380 m) and Lima (sea level), Peru. PARTICIPANTS: Nine volunteers with polycythemia. INTERVENTIONS: Volunteers were transported to sea level; three received low-dose erythropoietin. MEASUREMENTS: Changes in red cell mass, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, reticulocyte count, ferritin level, serum erythropoietin, and enrichment of administered(13)C in heme. RESULTS: In six participants, red cell mass decreased by 7% to 10% within a few days of descent; this decrease was mirrored by a rapid increase in serum ferritin level. Reticulocyte production did not decrease, a finding that establishes a hemolytic mechanism.(13)C changes in circulating heme were consistent with hemolysis of young cells. Erythropoietin was suppressed, and administration of exogenous erythropoietin prevented the changes in red cell mass, serum ferritin level, and(13)C-heme. CONCLUSIONS: Neocytolysis and the role of erythropoietin are confirmed in persons with polycythemia who descend from high altitude. This may have implications that extend beyond space and altitude medicine to renal disease and other situations of erythropoietin suppression, hemolysis, and polycythemia.

  3. Direct-to-Earth Communications with Mars Science Laboratory During Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, Melissa; Finley, Susan; Fort, David; Schratz, Brian; Ilott, Peter; Mukai, Ryan; Estabrook, Polly; Oudrhiri, Kamal; Kahan, Daniel; Satorius, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) undergoes extreme heating and acceleration during Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) on Mars. Unknown dynamics lead to large Doppler shifts, making communication challenging. During EDL, a special form of Multiple Frequency Shift Keying (MFSK) communication is used for Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication. The X-band signal is received by the Deep Space Network (DSN) at the Canberra Deep Space Communication complex, then down-converted, digitized, and recorded by open-loop Radio Science Receivers (RSR), and decoded in real-time by the EDL Data Analysis (EDA) System. The EDA uses lock states with configurable Fast Fourier Transforms to acquire and track the signal. RSR configuration and channel allocation is shown. Testing prior to EDL is discussed including software simulations, test bed runs with MSL flight hardware, and the in-flight end-to-end test. EDA configuration parameters and signal dynamics during pre-entry, entry, and parachute deployment are analyzed. RSR and EDA performance during MSL EDL is evaluated, including performance using a single 70-meter DSN antenna and an array of two 34-meter DSN antennas as a back up to the 70-meter antenna.

  4. Efficiently finding the minimum free energy path from steepest descent path.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changjun; Huang, Yanzhao; Ji, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Yi

    2013-04-28

    Minimum Free Energy Path (MFEP) is very important in computational biology and chemistry. The barrier in the path is related to the reaction rate, and the start-to-end difference gives the relative stability between reactant and product. All these information is significant to experiment and practical application. But finding MFEP is not an easy job. Lots of degrees of freedom make the computation very complicated and time consuming. In this paper, we use the Steepest Descent Path (SDP) to accelerate the sampling of MFEP. The SHAKE algorithm and the Lagrangian multipliers are used to control the optimization of both SDP and MFEP. These strategies are simple and effective. For the former, it is more interesting. Because as we known, SHAKE algorithm was designed to handle the constraints in molecular dynamics in the past, has never been used in geometry optimization. Final applications on ALA dipeptide and 10-ALA peptide show that this combined optimization method works well. Use the information in SDP, the initial path could reach the more optimal MFEP. So more accurate free energies could be obtained and the amount of computation time could be saved. PMID:23635126

  5. Genome-wide patterns of identity-by-descent sharing in the French Canadian founder population

    PubMed Central

    Gauvin, Héloïse; Moreau, Claudia; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Laprise, Catherine; Vézina, Hélène; Labuda, Damian; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène

    2014-01-01

    In genetics the ability to accurately describe the familial relationships among a group of individuals can be very useful. Recent statistical tools succeeded in assessing the degree of relatedness up to 6–7 generations with good power using dense genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism data to estimate the extent of identity-by-descent (IBD) sharing. It is therefore important to describe genome-wide patterns of IBD sharing for more remote and complex relatedness between individuals, such as that observed in a founder population like Quebec, Canada. Taking advantage of the extended genealogical records of the French Canadian founder population, we first compared different tools to identify regions of IBD in order to best describe genome-wide IBD sharing and its correlation with genealogical characteristics. Results showed that the extent of IBD sharing identified with FastIBD correlates best with relatedness measured using genealogical data. Total length of IBD sharing explained 85% of the genealogical kinship's variance. In addition, we observed significantly higher sharing in pairs of individuals with at least one inbred ancestor compared with those without any. Furthermore, patterns of IBD sharing and average sharing were different across regional populations, consistent with the settlement history of Quebec. Our results suggest that, as expected, the complex relatedness present in founder populations is reflected in patterns of IBD sharing. Using these patterns, it is thus possible to gain insight on the types of distant relationships in a sample from a founder population like Quebec. PMID:24129432

  6. PRIMUS: Rapid Reconstruction of Pedigrees from Genome-wide Estimates of Identity by Descent

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Jeffrey; Qiao, Dandi; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Below, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and correctly utilizing relatedness among samples is essential for genetic analysis; however, managing sample records and pedigrees can often be error prone and incomplete. Data sets ascertained by random sampling often harbor cryptic relatedness that can be leveraged in genetic analyses for maximizing power. We have developed a method that uses genome-wide estimates of pairwise identity by descent to identify families and quickly reconstruct and score all possible pedigrees that fit the genetic data by using up to third-degree relatives, and we have included it in the software package PRIMUS (Pedigree Reconstruction and Identification of the Maximally Unrelated Set). Here, we validate its performance on simulated, clinical, and HapMap pedigrees. Among these samples, we demonstrate that PRIMUS can verify reported pedigree structures and identify cryptic relationships. Finally, we show that PRIMUS reconstructed pedigrees, all of which were previously unknown, for 203 families from a cohort collected in Starr County, TX (1,890 samples). PMID:25439724

  7. PRIMUS: rapid reconstruction of pedigrees from genome-wide estimates of identity by descent.

    PubMed

    Staples, Jeffrey; Qiao, Dandi; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Nickerson, Deborah A; Below, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    Understanding and correctly utilizing relatedness among samples is essential for genetic analysis; however, managing sample records and pedigrees can often be error prone and incomplete. Data sets ascertained by random sampling often harbor cryptic relatedness that can be leveraged in genetic analyses for maximizing power. We have developed a method that uses genome-wide estimates of pairwise identity by descent to identify families and quickly reconstruct and score all possible pedigrees that fit the genetic data by using up to third-degree relatives, and we have included it in the software package PRIMUS (Pedigree Reconstruction and Identification of the Maximally Unrelated Set). Here, we validate its performance on simulated, clinical, and HapMap pedigrees. Among these samples, we demonstrate that PRIMUS can verify reported pedigree structures and identify cryptic relationships. Finally, we show that PRIMUS reconstructed pedigrees, all of which were previously unknown, for 203 families from a cohort collected in Starr County, TX (1,890 samples). PMID:25439724

  8. Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy and Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis in a Family of South Indian Descent

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Muthiah; Senthil, N.; Sujatha, S.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels in cellular membranes. They may manifest as diseases affecting skeletal muscle contraction, the conduction system of the heart, nervous system function, and vision syndromes. We describe a family of South Indian descent with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which four members also have idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a genetically heterogeneous channelopathy that has been linked to mutations in genes encoding three ion channels CACNIAS, SCN4A, and KCNJ2 predominantly. Although data on specific gene in idiopathic generalized epilepsy is relatively scarce, mutations of voltage gated sodium channel subunit genes (CACNB4) and nonsense mutations in voltage gated calcium channels (CACNA1A) have been linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in two families. We speculate that gene mutations altering the ability of the beta subunit to interact with the alpha subunit of the CaV1.1 channel and mutations in the pore-forming potassium channel subunit may be possible explanations for the combined manifestation of both diseases. Functional analysis of voltage gated calcium channel and other ion channels mutations may provide additional support and insight for the causal role of these mutations. The understanding of mutations in ion-channel genes will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of such inherited channelopathies. PMID:25893123

  9. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy and hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a family of South Indian descent.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Muthiah; Senthil, N; Sujatha, S

    2015-01-01

    Inherited channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels in cellular membranes. They may manifest as diseases affecting skeletal muscle contraction, the conduction system of the heart, nervous system function, and vision syndromes. We describe a family of South Indian descent with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which four members also have idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a genetically heterogeneous channelopathy that has been linked to mutations in genes encoding three ion channels CACNIAS, SCN4A, and KCNJ2 predominantly. Although data on specific gene in idiopathic generalized epilepsy is relatively scarce, mutations of voltage gated sodium channel subunit genes (CACNB4) and nonsense mutations in voltage gated calcium channels (CACNA1A) have been linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in two families. We speculate that gene mutations altering the ability of the beta subunit to interact with the alpha subunit of the CaV1.1 channel and mutations in the pore-forming potassium channel subunit may be possible explanations for the combined manifestation of both diseases. Functional analysis of voltage gated calcium channel and other ion channels mutations may provide additional support and insight for the causal role of these mutations. The understanding of mutations in ion-channel genes will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of such inherited channelopathies. PMID:25893123

  10. Altair Navigation During Trans-Lunar Cruise, Lunar Orbit, Descent and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Todd A.; Heyne, Martin; Riedel, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair lunar lander navigation system is driven by a set of requirements that not only specify a need to land within 100 m of a designated spot on the Moon, but also be capable of a safe return to an orbiting Orion capsule in the event of loss of Earth ground support. These requirements lead to the need for a robust and capable on-board navigation system that works in conjunction with an Earth ground navigation system that uses primarily ground-based radiometric tracking. The resulting system relies heavily on combining a multiplicity of data types including navigation state updates from the ground based navigation system, passive optical imaging from a gimbaled camera, a stable inertial measurement unit, and a capable radar altimeter and velocimeter. The focus of this paper is on navigation performance during the trans-lunar cruise, lunar orbit, and descent/landing mission phases with the goal of characterizing knowledge and delivery errors to key mission events, bound the statistical delta V costs for executing the mission, as well as the determine the landing dispersions due to navigation. This study examines the nominal performance that can be obtained using the current best estimate of the vehicle, sensor, and environment models. Performance of the system under a variety sensor outages and parametric trades is also examined.

  11. Proportion of genome shared identical by descent by relatives: concept, computation, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun-Wei Guo

    1995-06-01

    One widely used measure of genetic similarity for pairs of relatives is gene identity-by-descent (IBD) sharing. Genes that are copies of a single gene in a common ancestor of the individuals who now carry them are said to be IBD. One obvious extension of the IBD concept is IBD gene(s) shared by more than two individuals. In this paper, I further extend the gene IBD concept to the proportion of genomes shared IBD by every member of a group of relatives. Genome may refer either to the entire autosomal genome or to one or more chromosomal segments or regions with known lengths. Consideration of a genome instead of one or two loci has several advantages. I present a model to describe the cross-over process, based on the work of K.P. Donnelly. On the basis of this model, I give a mathematical definition of the proportion of genome shared IBD by relatives, or IBDP for short. Since the distribution of the IBDP is in general very difficult to determine, and since in most applications the mean and variance of the IBDP will suffice, I then provide a method for computing the first two moments of the IBDP. Applications to assessing gene survival, to genetic resemblance between two relatives, and to gene mapping are illustrated with examples. Finally, I discuss the utility of the IBDP in other areas. 34 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Assessment of environments for Mars Science Laboratory entry, descent, and surface operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Chen, Allen; Barnes, Jeffrey R.; Burkhart, P. Daniel; Cantor, Bruce A.; Dwyer-Cianciolo, Alicia M.; Fergason, Robini L.; Hinson, David P.; Justh, Hilary L.; Kass, David M.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Mischna, Michael A.; Murphy, James R.; Rafkin, Scot C.R.; Tyler, Daniel; Withers, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory mission aims to land a car-sized rover on Mars' surface and operate it for at least one Mars year in order to assess whether its field area was ever capable of supporting microbial life. Here we describe the approach used to identify, characterize, and assess environmental risks to the landing and rover surface operations. Novel entry, descent, and landing approaches will be used to accurately deliver the 900-kg rover, including the ability to sense and "fly out" deviations from a best-estimate atmospheric state. A joint engineering and science team developed methods to estimate the range of potential atmospheric states at the time of arrival and to quantitatively assess the spacecraft's performance and risk given its particular sensitivities to atmospheric conditions. Numerical models are used to calculate the atmospheric parameters, with observations used to define model cases, tune model parameters, and validate results. This joint program has resulted in a spacecraft capable of accessing, with minimal risk, the four finalist sites chosen for their scientific merit. The capability to operate the landed rover over the latitude range of candidate landing sites, and for all seasons, was verified against an analysis of surface environmental conditions described here. These results, from orbital and model data sets, also drive engineering simulations of the rover's thermal state that are used to plan surface operations.

  13. Ground-based tracking of the Huygens Probe during the Titan descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Border, J. S.; Lowe, S. T.; Preston, R. A.; Bird, M. K.

    2004-02-01

    The radio signal from the Huygens Probe will be received using radio tracking stations on Earth as it descends through the atmosphere of Titan. The recording will be used to determine the Doppler shift of the signal and hence the velocity of the Probe in the direction of Earth. These velocity measurements will be used to determine the Titan wind speed as a function of altitude, thereby complementing the Huygens signal measurements on the Cassini Orbiter (DWE - Doppler Wind Experiment), which yield a velocity measurement in a different direction. The combined measurements will provide confirmation of the basic wind profile and most probably allow a separation of the wind speed into its meridional and zonal components. The signal strength received at Earth from Huygens will be comparable to that from a similar experiment performed with the Galileo Probe at Jupiter, and will thus probably be too weak to detect in real time because of the modulation by the (then) unknown telemetry. Instead, wide-band recordings of the Probe signal will be made throughout the three-hour descent. After the Probe telemetry is relayed from Cassini to Earth, the recorded signal is processed against a telemetry template, enabling signal integration over several seconds for determining the Probe frequency. Technical aspects and some anticipated results of the Earth-based DWE are presented.

  14. Identity-by-Descent-Based Phasing and Imputation in Founder Populations Using Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Palin, Kimmo; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F; Wilson, James F; Durbin, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of haplotypes, the combination of alleles co-residing on a single copy of a chromosome, enables powerful gene mapping and sequence imputation methods. Since humans are diploid, haplotypes must be derived from genotypes by a phasing process. In this study, we present a new computational model for haplotype phasing based on pairwise sharing of haplotypes inferred to be Identical-By-Descent (IBD). We apply the Bayesian network based model in a new phasing algorithm, called systematic long-range phasing (SLRP), that can capitalize on the close genetic relationships in isolated founder populations, and show with simulated and real genome-wide genotype data that SLRP substantially reduces the rate of phasing errors compared to previous phasing algorithms. Furthermore, the method accurately identifies regions of IBD, enabling linkage-like studies without pedigrees, and can be used to impute most genotypes with very low error rate. Genet. Epidemiol. 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.35:853-860, 2011 PMID:22006673

  15. Clogging of Joule-Thomson Devices in Liquid Hydrogen-Lunar Lander Descent Stage Operating Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurns, J. M.

    2010-04-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for future space exploration missions. The NASA Constellation Program lunar architecture considers LOX/LH2 propulsion for the lunar lander descent stage main engine an enabling technology, ensuring the cryogenic propellants are available at the correct conditions for engine operation. This cryogenic storage system may utilize a Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS) that includes J-T devices to maintain tank fluid pressure and temperature. Previous experimental investigations have indicated that J-T devices may become clogged when flowing LH2 while operating at a temperature range from 20.5 K to 24.4 K. It has been proposed that clogging is due to a trace amount of metastable, supercooled liquid neon in the regular LH2 supply. In time, flow blockage occurs from accretion of solid neon on the orifice. This clogging poses a realistic threat to spacecraft propulsion systems utilizing J-T devices in cryogenic pressure control systems. TVS failure due to J-T clogging would prevent removal of environmental heat from the propellant and potential loss of mission. This report describes J-T clogging tests performed with LH2. Tests were performed in the expected Lunar Lander operating regime, and several methods were evaluated to determine the optimum approach to mitigating the potential risk of J-T clogging.

  16. Clinical and molecular evidence for the role of androgens and WT1 in testis descent.

    PubMed

    Lim, H N; Hughes, I A; Hawkins, J R

    2001-12-20

    Testicular maldescent is a common congenital disorder associated with testicular cancer and infertility. In this study, testis position was assessed in subjects with genital abnormalities due to AR mutations, Denys-Drash and WAGR syndromes or an unknown aetiology. Subjects with completely female genitalia and an AR mutation or an unknown aetiology had a greater proportion of maldescended testes (intra-abdominal and inguinal) than those with less severe abnormalities (P=0.00027 and P<0.000001, respectively). Whereas subjects with severe, moderate or mild abnormalities and an unknown aetiology, had similar testis positions. The Denys-Drash and WAGR syndrome group had a greater proportion of maldescended testes than the AR mutation (P=0.013) and unknown aetiology groups (P=0.00019). Androgen production and AR binding were normal in three subjects with Denys-Drash and WAGR syndromes. These findings indicate that the relationship between testis descent and genital abnormalities is a multi-factorial process with greater complexity than previously proposed. PMID:11738793

  17. Development of Thermal Protection Materials for Future Mars Entry, Descent and Landing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Beck, Robin A. S.; Arnold, James O.; Hwang, Helen; Wright, Michael J.; Szalai, Christine E.; Blosser, Max; Poteet, Carl C.

    2010-01-01

    Entry Systems will play a crucial role as NASA develops the technologies required for Human Mars Exploration. The Exploration Technology Development Program Office established the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Technology Development Project to develop Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for insertion into future Mars Entry Systems. An assessment of current entry system technologies identified significant opportunity to improve the current state of the art in thermal protection materials in order to enable landing of heavy mass (40 mT) payloads. To accomplish this goal, the EDL Project has outlined a framework to define, develop and model the thermal protection system material concepts required to allow for the human exploration of Mars via aerocapture followed by entry. Two primary classes of ablative materials are being developed: rigid and flexible. The rigid ablatives will be applied to the acreage of a 10x30 m rigid mid L/D Aeroshell to endure the dual pulse heating (peak approx.500 W/sq cm). Likewise, flexible ablative materials are being developed for 20-30 m diameter deployable aerodynamic decelerator entry systems that could endure dual pulse heating (peak aprrox.120 W/sq cm). A technology Roadmap is presented that will be used for facilitating the maturation of both the rigid and flexible ablative materials through application of decision metrics (requirements, key performance parameters, TRL definitions, and evaluation criteria) used to assess and advance the various candidate TPS material technologies.

  18. Identification of 15 genetic loci associated with risk of major depression in individuals of European descent.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Craig L; Nagle, Michael W; Tian, Chao; Chen, Xing; Paciga, Sara A; Wendland, Jens R; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A; Perlis, Roy H; Winslow, Ashley R

    2016-09-01

    Despite strong evidence supporting the heritability of major depressive disorder (MDD), previous genome-wide studies were unable to identify risk loci among individuals of European descent. We used self-report data from 75,607 individuals reporting clinical diagnosis of depression and 231,747 individuals reporting no history of depression through 23andMe and carried out meta-analysis of these results with published MDD genome-wide association study results. We identified five independent variants from four regions associated with self-report of clinical diagnosis or treatment for depression. Loci with a P value <1.0 × 10(-5) in the meta-analysis were further analyzed in a replication data set (45,773 cases and 106,354 controls) from 23andMe. A total of 17 independent SNPs from 15 regions reached genome-wide significance after joint analysis over all three data sets. Some of these loci were also implicated in genome-wide association studies of related psychiatric traits. These studies provide evidence for large-scale consumer genomic data as a powerful and efficient complement to data collected from traditional means of ascertainment for neuropsychiatric disease genomics. PMID:27479909

  19. Multidisciplinary Tool for Systems Analysis of Planetary Entry, Descent, and Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2011-01-01

    Systems analysis of a planetary entry (SAPE), descent, and landing (EDL) is a multidisciplinary activity in nature. SAPE improves the performance of the systems analysis team by automating and streamlining the process, and this improvement can reduce the errors that stem from manual data transfer among discipline experts. SAPE is a multidisciplinary tool for systems analysis of planetary EDL for Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Titan. It performs EDL systems analysis for any planet, operates cross-platform (i.e., Windows, Mac, and Linux operating systems), uses existing software components and open-source software to avoid software licensing issues, performs low-fidelity systems analysis in one hour on a computer that is comparable to an average laptop, and keeps discipline experts in the analysis loop. SAPE uses Python, a platform-independent, open-source language, for integration and for the user interface. Development has relied heavily on the object-oriented programming capabilities that are available in Python. Modules are provided to interface with commercial and government off-the-shelf software components (e.g., thermal protection systems and finite-element analysis). SAPE currently includes the following analysis modules: geometry, trajectory, aerodynamics, aerothermal, thermal protection system, and interface for structural sizing.

  20. Descent and Surface Wind Expectations for Titan North Polar Summer Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Newman, C. E.; Tokano, T.; Mitchell, J.; Charnay, B.; Lebonnois, S.; Achterberg, R.

    2012-04-01

    Titan’s north polar lakes and seas have emerged as an attractive target of future exploration for the early 2020s, notably for the Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) Discovery mission, presently undergoing a Phase A study. In support of that effort, a detailed study has been made of the winds that may be expected at relevant locations and seasons, since the wind profile with altitude is the principal determinant (as with Huygens) of the size of the expected landing ellipse, and winds on the surface may lead to drift of floating capsules and may generate surface waves. Here we review Cassini data (zonal winds inferred from thermal infrared measurements, as well as a few near-IR cloud-tracking observations) of what should be similar conditions at the ‘mirror image’ place and season - Titan’s southern hemisphere in 2005-2009. In addition, we assess results from four different global circulation models. These inputs are used to define a simple analytic engineering wind envelope for Monte-Carlo descent simulations. The high latitudes of the large seas Ligeia (~80oN) and Kraken (~70oN) during the late summer season (northern autumn equinox is in 2025) mean that stratospheric winds will be considerably weaker than those encountered by the Huygens probe near the equator. We additionally examine the surface windspeed histories. While the various models have broadly similar speeds (in turn consistent with Huygens data) their time histories are somewhat different in character and direction.