Sample records for gram-positive antibacterial activity

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Glutathione-Coated Silver Nanoparticles against Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria

    E-print Network

    Antibacterial Activity of Glutathione-Coated Silver Nanoparticles against Gram Positive and Gram ABSTRACT: In the present paper, we study the mechanism of antibacterial activity of glutathione (GSH on GSH Ag NPs grafted on glass allowed us to elucidate more precisely the antibacterial mechanism

  2. REPORT ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF OREGANO (ORIGANUM VULGARE LINN.) AGAINST GRAM POSITIVE BACTERIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SABAHAT SAEED; PERWEEN TARIQ

    The present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of infusion, decoction and essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare) against 111 Gram-positive bacterial isolates belonging to 23 different species related to 3 genera. Infusion and essential oil exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. aureus, Micrococcus roseus, M. kristinae, M. nishinomiyaensis, M. lylae, M. luteus, M. sedentarius, M. varians, Bacillus megaterium,

  3. Antibacterial activity of Withania somnifera against Gram-positive isolates from pus samples

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Punum; Rawat, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    Background: Withania somnifera is an important medicinal plant that has been used in Ayurvedic and indigenous medicine since ancient times. In the view of its varied therapeutic potential, it has also been the subject of considerable modern scientific attention. Attention has been drawn to antibacterial activity of the plant and its metabolites due to the challenge on growing antibacterial resistant pathogens. Aim: To examine the antimicrobial potential of leaf extract of W. somnifera against Gram-positive cocci. Materials and Methods: In this study, leaf extract of W. somnifera was used to examine their antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive cocci (n = 20) from pus samples of patients admitted in Government Medical College, Haldwani. Agar well diffusion method was used by taking methanolic leaf extract of W. somnifera. Results: It was observed that the methanolic leaf extract of W. somnifera was very effective in inhibiting the test pathogens including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp., with an average zone of inhibition of 20.6 mm and 19.4 mm at 2 mg/ml (100 ?l) concentration, respectively. Conclusion: These results indicate that the antimicrobial property of W. somnifera leaf supports the traditional use of the plant in therapeutic use against microbial infections. PMID:25972723

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of Heteroaryl Isothiazolones against Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.; Cheng, Jijun; Podos, Steven D.; Thoma, Christy L.; Thanassi, Jane A.; Buechter, Douglas D.; Mushtaq, Gohar; Vigliotti, Gerald A.; Bradbury, Barton J.; Deshpande, Milind

    2007-01-01

    The activities of several tricyclic heteroaryl isothiazolones (HITZs) against an assortment of gram-positive and gram-negative clinical isolates were assessed. These compounds target bacterial DNA replication and were found to possess broad-spectrum activities especially against gram-positive strains, including antibiotic-resistant staphylococci and streptococci. These included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-nonsusceptible staphylococci, and quinolone-resistant strains. The HITZs were more active than the comparator antimicrobials in most cases. For gram-negative bacteria, the tested compounds were less active against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae but showed exceptional potencies against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Neisseria spp. Good activity against several anaerobes, as well as Legionella pneumophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae, was also observed. Excellent bactericidal activity against staphylococci was observed in time-kill assays, with an approximately 3-log drop in the numbers of CFU/ml occurring after 4 h of exposure to compound. Postantibiotic effects (PAEs) of 2.0 and 1.7 h for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and MRSA strains, respectively, were observed, and these were similar to those seen with moxifloxacin at 10× MIC. In vivo efficacy was demonstrated in murine infections by using sepsis and thigh infection models. The 50% protective doses were ?1 mg/kg of body weight against S. aureus in the sepsis model, while decreases in the numbers of CFU per thigh equal to or greater than those detected in animals treated with a standard dose of vancomycin were seen in the animals with thigh infections. Pharmacokinetic analyses of treated mice indicated exposures similar to those to ciprofloxacin at equivalent dose levels. These promising initial data suggest further study on the use of the HITZs as antibacterial agents. PMID:17242152

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF LEUKIN: AN ANTIBACTERIAL FACTOR FROM LEUCOCYTES ACTIVE AGAINST GRAM-POSITIVE PATHOGENS

    PubMed Central

    Skarnes, Robert C.; Watson, Dennis W.

    1956-01-01

    A method has been described for the preparation of a potent antibacterial factor from rabbit polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Upon characterization, the factor was found to possess many properties in common with basic proteins. The amino acid analysis revealed that it contained a relatively large amount of arginine (17 per cent) and small amounts of the other two basic amino acids. It has therefore been identified as a protamine or protamine derivative. The leucocyte factor was very active against all Gram-positive pathogens tested but exhibited little or no action against Gram-negative species. A possible explanation of this phenomenon has been discussed. The factor was very heat-stable at acid and neutral pH and its staphylococcidal activity was blocked by glutamyl polypeptide, hyaluronic acid, and desoxyribonudeic acid. Because of the apparent similarity of the product studied here to other poorly defined leucocyte factors which had been termed leukins in the early literature, it is suggested that the name leukin be retained for it. The possible significance of this leukin in natural immunity has been discussed. PMID:13376807

  6. Trends and exceptions of physical properties on antibacterial activity for Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; May-Dracka, Tricia L; Gagnon, Moriah M; Tommasi, Ruben

    2014-12-11

    To better understand the difficulties surrounding the identification of novel antibacterial compounds from corporate screening collections, physical properties of ?3200 antibacterial project compounds with whole cell activity against Gram-negative or Gram-positive pathogens were profiled and compared to actives found from high throughput (HTS) screens conducted on both biochemical and phenotypic bacterial targets. The output from 23 antibacterial HTS screens illustrated that when compared to the properties of the antibacterial project compounds, the HTS actives were significantly more hydrophobic than antibacterial project compounds (typically 2-4 log units higher), and furthermore, for 14/23 HTS screens, the average clogD was higher than the screening collection average (screening collection clogD = 2.45). It was found that the consequences of this were the following: (a) lead identification programs often further gained hydrophobic character with increased biochemical potency, making the separation even larger between the physicochemical properties of known antibacterial agents and the HTS active starting point, (b) the probability of plasma protein binding and cytotoxicity are often increased, and (c) cell-based activity in Gram-negative bacteria was severely limited or, if present, demonstrated significant efflux. Our analysis illustrated that compounds least susceptible to efflux were those which were highly polar and small in MW or very large and typically zwitterionic. Hydrophobicity was often the dominant driver for HTS actives but, more often than not, precluded whole cell antibacterial activity. However, simply designing polar compounds was not sufficient for antibacterial activity and pointed to a lack of understanding of complex and specific bacterial penetration mechanisms. PMID:25402200

  7. Cerium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles abolish the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin against gram positive and gram negative biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    Masadeh, Majed M; Karasneh, Ghadah A; Al-Akhras, Mohammad A; Albiss, Borhan A; Aljarah, Khaled M; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Alzoubi, Karem H

    2015-05-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles have been suggested as good candidates for the development of antibacterial agents. Cerium oxide (CeO2) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been utilized in a number of biomedical applications. Here, the antibacterial activity of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles were evaluated on a panel of gram positive and gram negative bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm cultures. Additionally, the effect of combining CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles with the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin on tested bacteria was investigated. Thus, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles that are required to inhibit bacterial planktonic growth and bacterial biofilm, were evaluated, and were compared to the MICs of the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin alone or in the presence of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Results of this study show that both CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles fail to inhibit bacterial growth and biofilm biomass for all the bacterial strains tested. Moreover, adding CeO2 or Fe2O3 nanoparticles to the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin almost abolished its antibacterial activity. Results of this study suggest that CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles are not good candidates as antibacterial agents, and they could interfere with the activity of important antibiotics. PMID:24643389

  8. Indole trimers with antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms produced using combinatorial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    McClay, Kevin; Mehboob, Shahila; Yu, Jerry; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L; Jeong, Hyunyoung; Johnson, Michael E; Steffan, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The I100V isoform of toluene-4-monooxygenase was used to catalyze the oxidative polymerization of anthranil and various indoles under mildly acidic conditions, favoring the production of trimers. Compounds produced in sufficient yield were purified and tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of B. anthracis, E. faecalis, L. monocytogenes, S. aureus, and in some cases, F. tularensis. 15 of the compounds displayed promising antibacterial activity (MIC < 5 µg/ml) against one or more of the strains tested, with the best MIC values being <0.8 µg/ml. All of these compounds had good selectivity, showing minimal cytotoxicity towards HepG2 cells. The structure was solved for six of the compounds that could be crystallized, revealing that minimally two classes of indole based trimers were produced. One compound class produced was a group of substituted derivatives of the natural product 2,2-bis(3-indolyl) indoxyl. The other group of compounds identified was classified as tryptanthrin-like compounds, all having multi-ring pendant groups attached at position 11 of tryptanthrin. One compound of particular interest, SAB-J85, had a structure that suggests that any compound, with a ring structure that can be activated by an oxygenase, might serve as a substrate for combinatorial biocatalysis. PMID:26112315

  9. Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  10. Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10-xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2, xAg?=?0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a?=?b?=?9.435 Ĺ, c?=?6.876 Ĺ for xAg?=?0.05, a?=?b?=?9.443 Ĺ, c?=?6.875 Ĺ for xAg?=?0.2, and a?=?b?=?9.445 Ĺ, c?=?6.877 Ĺ for xAg?=?0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a?=?b?=?9.418 Ĺ, c?=?6.884 Ĺ (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples (xAg?=?0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of xAg in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth (P. stuartii). PMID:22721352

  11. Significance of postgrowth processing of ZnO nanostructures on antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Shahid; Rehman, Malik A; Ismail, Hammad; Mirza, Bushra; Bhatti, Arshad S

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we highlighted the effect of surface modifications of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanostructures (NSs) grown by the vapor–solid mechanism on their antibacterial activity. Two sets of ZnO NSs were modified separately – one set was modified by annealing in an Ar environment, and the second set was modified in O2 plasma. Annealing in Ar below 800°C resulted in a compressed lattice, which was due to removal of Zn interstitials and increased O vacancies. Annealing above 1,000°C caused the formation of a new prominent phase, Zn2SiO4. Plasma oxidation of the ZnO NSs caused an expansion in the lattice due to the removal of O vacancies and incorporation of excess O. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed for the quantification of defects associated with Zn and O in the as-grown and processed ZnO NS. Two distinct bands were observed, one in the ultraviolet (UV) region, due to interband transitions, and other in the visible region, due to defects associated with Zn and O. PL confirmed the surface modification of ZnO NS, as substantial decrease in intensities of visible band was observed. Antibacterial activity of the modified ZnO NSs demonstrated that the surface modifications by Ar annealing limited the antibacterial characteristics of ZnO NS against Staphylococcus aureus. However, ZnO NSs annealed at 1,000°C or higher showed a remarkable antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. O2 plasma–treated NS showed appreciable antibacterial activity against both E. coli and S. aureus. The minimum inhibition concentration was determined to be 0.5 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL for Ar-annealed and plasma-oxidized ZnO NS, respectively. It was thus proved that the O content at the surface of the ZnO NS was crucial to tune the antibacterial activity against both selected gram-negative (E. coli) and gram-positive (S. aureus) bacterial species.

  12. Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity of Capped Silver Nanoparticles in Combination with Antibiotics, on Model Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Rastogi, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The nanoparticles used in this study were prepared from AgNO3 using NaBH4 in the presence of capping agents such as citrate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. The formed nanoparticles were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM, and XRD. The generation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed from the appearance of yellow colour and an absorption maximum between 399 and 404?nm. The produced nanoparticles were found to be spherical in shape and polydisperse. For citrate, SDS, and PVP capped nanoparticles, the average particle sizes were 38.3 ± 13.5, 19.3 ± 6.0, and 16.0 ± 4.8?nm, respectively. The crystallinity of the nanoparticles in FCC structure is confirmed from the SAED and XRD patterns. Also, the combined antibacterial activity of these differently capped nanoparticles with selected antibiotics (streptomycin, ampicillin, and tetracycline) was evaluated on model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, employing disc diffusion assay. The activity of the tested antibiotics was enhanced in combination with all the stabilized nanoparticles, against both the Gram classes of bacteria. The combined effects of silver nanoparticles and antibiotics were more prominent with PVP capped nanoparticles as compared to citrate and SDS capped ones. The results of this study demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles in combination with antibiotics. PMID:23970844

  13. Discovery of a New Class of Non-?-lactam Inhibitors of Penicillin-Binding Proteins with Gram-Positive Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by hard-to-treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a serious global public-health concern, as MRSA has become broadly resistant to many classes of antibiotics. We disclose herein the discovery of a new class of non-?-lactam antibiotics, the oxadiazoles, which inhibit penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) of MRSA. The oxadiazoles show bactericidal activity against vancomycin- and linezolid-resistant MRSA and other Gram-positive bacterial strains, in vivo efficacy in a mouse model of infection, and have 100% oral bioavailability. PMID:24517363

  14. Non-Aqueous Glycerol Monolaurate Gel Exhibits Antibacterial and Anti-Biofilm Activity against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Elizabeth A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin and surgical infections due to Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are causes of patient morbidity and increased healthcare costs. These organisms grow planktonically and as biofilms, and many strains exhibit antibiotic resistance. This study examines the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML), as solubilized in a non-aqueous vehicle (5% GML Gel), as a novel, broadly-active topical antimicrobial. The FDA has designated GML as generally recognized as safe for human use, and the compound is commonly used in the cosmetic and food industries. Methods In vitro, bacterial strains in broths and biofilms were exposed to GML Gel, and effects on bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs) were assessed. In vivo,subcutaneous incisions were made in New Zealand white rabbits; the incisions were closed with four sutures. Bacterial strains were painted onto the incision sites, and then GML Gel or placebo was liberally applied to cover the sites completely. Rabbits were allowed to awaken and were examined for CFUs as a function of exposure time. Results In vitro, GML Gel was bactericidal for all broth culture and biofilm organisms in <1 hour and <4 hour, respectively; no CFUs were detected after the entire 24 h test period. In vivo, GML Gel inhibited bacterial growth in the surgical incision sites, compared to no growth inhibition in controls. GML Gel significantly reduced inflammation, as viewed by lack of redness in and below the incision sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that 5% GML Gel is useful as a potent topical antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent for prevention of infections. PMID:25799455

  15. Development of a five-hour radiometric serum antibacterial assay for gram-positive cocci

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, D.G.; Guidon, P.T. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    A preliminary report on a 5-hr radiometric serum antibacterial assay (ABA) for Gram-positive cocci is presented. The method agreed within +- one twofold dilution with static ABA endpoints in 24/26 (92%) of the assays and with cidal ABA end-points in 23/26 (88%) of the assays performed.

  16. CEM-101 Activity against Gram-Positive Organisms?

    PubMed Central

    Woosley, Leah N.; Castanheira, Mariana; Jones, Ronald N.

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activity of CEM-101, a new fluoroketolide, was determined against Gram-positive organisms with various macrolide susceptibility profiles. Experiments for determination of the MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), timed killing, single-step and multistep mutation rates, the erythromycin induction of resistance, postantibiotic effect (PAE), and drug interactions were performed for CEM-101; and the results were compared to those obtained with telithromycin, macrolides, and lincosamides. The MBCs of CEM-101 remained lower overall than those of telithromycin, and CEM-101 displayed a 2-fold greater potency than the ketolide. Timed-killing curve testing showed that CEM-101 had greater bactericidal activity than telithromycin (a ?3-log10-CFU/ml decrease in the initial inoculum at 24 h) against the staphylococcal isolates tested. The propensity of CEM-101 to cause resistance was low, as determined from the rates of resistance determined in single-step mutational studies (<10?8 or 10?9). In multipassaging studies, mutants of two strains (both of which were USA300 isolates) resistant to CEM-101 emerged. That number was comparable to the number resistant to clindamycin but less than the number resistant to telithromycin. Erythromycin induced CEM-101 resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, similar to telithromycin; however, in seven of eight beta-hemolytic streptococci, CEM-101 resistance induction was not observed. CEM-101 showed a significant concentration- and exposure-dependent PAE against the strains tested, with the values ranging from 2.3 to 6.1 h for Gram-positive organisms (these times were longer than those for telithromycin). No antagonism was found in synergy analyses, with enhanced inhibition being most noted for combinations with CEM-101 and ceftriaxone, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Overall, this new antimicrobial agent (CEM-101) showed good antimicrobial characteristics compared with those of the agents in its class and exhibited measured parameter values similar or superior to those of utilized comparators, indicating that CEM-101 warrants further clinical evaluation. PMID:20176910

  17. Mutactimycin E, a new anthracycline antibiotic with gram-positive activity.

    PubMed

    Hopp, D Craig; Rabenstein, John; Rhea, Joshua; Smith, Chris; Romari, Khadidja; Clarke, Midori; Francis, Linda; Irigoyen, Macarena; Milanowski, Dennis; Luche, Michele; Carr, Grant J; Mocek, Ulla

    2008-11-01

    Resistance to currently available antibiotics has become a widely recognized crisis in the medical community. To address this, many companies and researchers are refocusing their attention towards natural products, which have an excellent track record of producing effective antibacterial drugs. The AMRI natural product library was screened for activity against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA). The active samples were counter screened for cytotoxicity against the human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cell line to determine an in vitro therapeutic index (in vitro TI). Those samples with a high in vitro TI were selected for fractionation and dereplication. This led to the discovery of a new anthracycline structure. This metabolite, named mutactimycin E (1), exhibited moderate activity against several gram positive organisms. Here we report the isolation, structure elucidation and biological activities of this new compound. PMID:19168982

  18. In Vitro Activities of Linezolid against Important Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogens Including Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Noskin, Gary A.; Siddiqui, Farida; Stosor, Valentina; Hacek, Donna; Peterson, Lance R.

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of resistance in gram-positive bacteria has necessitated a search for new antimicrobial agents. Linezolid is an oxazolidinone, a new class of antibacterial agents with enhanced activity against pathogens. We compared the activity of linezolid to those of other antimicrobial agents against 3,945 clinical isolates. Linezolid demonstrated potent activity against all isolates tested. For all vancomycin-susceptible enterococci, staphylococci, and streptococci, the activity of linezolid was comparable to that of vancomycin. Against oxacillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, linezolid was the most active agent tested. In summary, linezolid appears to be a promising new antimicrobial agent for the treatment of gram-positive infections. PMID:10428937

  19. Antimicrobial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, Mohammad; Khan, Mohammad S; Habib, Sami S; Memic, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanomaterials have unique properties compared to their bulk counterparts. For this reason, nanotechnology has attracted a great deal of attention from the scientific community. Metal oxide nanomaterials like ZnO and CuO have been used industrially for several purposes, including cosmetics, paints, plastics, and textiles. A common feature that these nanoparticles exhibit is their antimicrobial behavior against pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we demonstrate the antimicrobial activity of ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3 nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods and results Nanosized particles of three metal oxides (ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3) were synthesized by a sol–gel combustion route and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the single-phase formation of all three nanomaterials. The particle sizes were observed to be 18, 22, and 28 nm for ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3, respectively. We used these nanomaterials to evaluate their antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) bacteria. Conclusion Among the three metal oxide nanomaterials, ZnO showed greatest antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria used in this study. It was observed that ZnO nanoparticles have excellent bactericidal potential, while Fe2O3 nanoparticles exhibited the least bactericidal activity. The order of antibacterial activity was demonstrated to be the following: ZnO > CuO > Fe2O3. PMID:23233805

  20. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Daniels, Dwayne; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50? ? L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3?mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0?mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  1. Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50??L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3?mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0?mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Tigecycline (GAR936), Daptomycin, and Comparative Antimicrobial Agents against Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus and Other Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Petersen; Patricia A. Bradford; William J. Weiss; Timothy M. Murphy; P. E. Sum; Steven J. Projan

    2002-01-01

    Tigecycline (GAR-936) and daptomycin are potent antibacterial compounds in advanced stages of clinical trials. These novel agents target multiply resistant pathogenic bacteria. Daptomycin is principally active against gram-positive bacteria, while tigecycline has broad-spectrum activity. When tested by the standard protocols of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards in Mueller-Hinton broth II, tigecycline was more active than daptomycin (MICs at

  3. Comparative in vitro activity of levofloxacin and ofloxacin against Gram-positive bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George M. Eliopoulos; Christine B. Wennersten; Robert C. Moellering

    1996-01-01

    The in vitro activity of levofloxacin against 506 Gram-positive bacteria was compared with those of D(?)-ofloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin. Levofloxacin was generally twice as active as ofloxacin against these organisms (range, 0–3 twofold dilutions). Sparfloxacin appeared to have the greatest activity overall, but for several groups of organisms minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC90s) of this com pound were within one

  4. Drosophila Toll is activated by Gram-positive bacteria through a circulating peptidoglycan recognition protein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatiana Michel; Jean-Marc Reichhart; Jules A. Hoffmann; Julien Royet

    2001-01-01

    Microbial infection activates two distinct intracellular signalling cascades in the immune-responsive fat body of Drosophila. Gram-positive bacteria and fungi predominantly induce the Toll signalling pathway, whereas Gram-negative bacteria activate the Imd pathway. Loss-of-function mutants in either pathway reduce the resistance to corresponding infections. Genetic screens have identified a range of genes involved in these intracellular signalling cascades, but how they

  5. Novel tetrahydropyran-based bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors with potent anti-gram positive activity and improved safety profile.

    PubMed

    Surivet, Jean-Philippe; Zumbrunn, Cornelia; Rueedi, Georg; Bur, Daniel; Bruyčre, Thierry; Locher, Hans; Ritz, Daniel; Seiler, Peter; Kohl, Christopher; Ertel, Eric A; Hess, Patrick; Gauvin, Jean-Christophe; Mirre, Azely; Kaegi, Verena; Dos Santos, Marina; Kraemer, Stéphanie; Gaertner, Mika; Delers, Jonathan; Enderlin-Paput, Michel; Weiss, Maria; Sube, Romain; Hadana, Hakim; Keck, Wolfgang; Hubschwerlen, Christian

    2015-01-22

    Novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens are urgently needed. In a previous report, we have shown that tetrahydropyran-based inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) display potent antibacterial activity and exhibit no target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. During the course of our optimization program, lead compound 5 was deprioritized due to adverse findings in cardiovascular safety studies. In the effort of mitigating these findings and optimizing further the pharmacological profile of this class of compounds, we have identified a subseries of tetrahydropyran-based molecules that are potent DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors and display excellent antibacterial activity against Gram positive pathogens, including clinically relevant resistant isolates. One representative of this class, compound 32d, elicited only weak inhibition of hERG K(+) channels and hNaV1.5 Na(+) channels, and no effects were observed on cardiovascular parameters in anesthetized guinea pigs. In vivo efficacy in animal infection models has been demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. PMID:25494934

  6. Activity of a New Oral Streptogramin, XRP2868, against Gram-Positive Cocci Harboring Various Mechanisms of Resistance to Streptogramins

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Michel; Leclercq, Roland

    2006-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of XRP2868, a new oral streptogramin composed of a combination of RPR132552 (streptogramin A) and RPR202868 (streptogramin B), was evaluated against a collection of clinical gram-positive isolates with characterized phenotypes and genotypes of streptogramin resistance. The effects of genes for resistance to streptogramin A or B on the activity of XRP2868 and its components were also tested by cloning these genes individually or in various combinations in gram-positive recipient strains susceptible to quinupristin-dalfopristin. The species tested included Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and other species of streptococci. XRP2868 was generally fourfold more potent than quinupristin-dalfopristin against S. aureus, E. faecium, and streptococci and had activity against E. faecalis (MICs = 0.25 to 1 ?g/ml). XRP2868 appeared to be affected by the same mechanisms of resistance as those to quinupristin-dalfopristin. Nevertheless, the strong activity of factor A of the oral streptogramin enabled the combination to be very potent against streptogramin-susceptible staphylococci, streptococci, and E. faecium (MICs = 0.03 to 0.25 ?g/ml) and to retain low MICs against the strains harboring a mechanism of resistance to factor A or factor B of the streptogramin. However, the combination of mechanisms of resistance to factors A and B caused an increase in the MICs of XRP2868, which reached 1 to 4 ?g/ml. As with the other streptogramins, there was a reduction in the bactericidal effect of XRPR2868 when the staphylococcal strains acquired a constitutively expressed erm gene. PMID:16377692

  7. Activation and manipulation of host responses by a Gram-positive bacterium.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Vasudevan; Sessa, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The interaction between tomato plants and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) represents a model pathosystem to study the interplay between the virulence determinants of a Gram-positive bacterium and the attempt of a crop plant to counteract pathogen invasion. To investigate plant responses activated during this compatible interaction, we recently analyzed gene expression profiles of tomato stems infected with Cmm. This analysis revealed activation of basal defense responses that are typically observed upon plant perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In addition, Cmm infection upregulated the expression of host genes related to ethylene synthesis and response. Further analysis of tomato plants impaired in ethylene perception and production demonstrated an important role for ethylene in the development of disease symptoms. Here we discuss possible molecular strategies used by the plant to recognize Cmm infection and possible mechanisms employed by the pathogen to interfere with the activation of plant defense responses and promote disease. PMID:19704516

  8. Antimicrobial activity of fusidic acid and disk diffusion susceptibility testing criteria for gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, E; Barriault, D

    1995-01-01

    The in vitro activity of fusidic acid was assessed and was compared with those of cloxacillin, cefamandole, vancomycin, teicoplanin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, pefloxacin, and fleroxacin against 500 gram-positive cocci: 151 Staphylococcus aureus, 197 coagulase-negative staphylococci, and 152 Enterococcus faecalis strains. All clinical isolates were concomitantly tested by disk diffusion and agar dilution procedures as outlined by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The results with fusidic acid were further analyzed by regression line and error rate-bounded methods. With control American Type Culture Collection organisms, the values were within the limits of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards or published limits. The incidence of resistance to fusidic acid was 0.7% for S. aureus, 2.5% for coagulase-negative staphylococci, and 99.3% for E. faecalis. The correlation coefficient between the results of disk diffusion and agar dilution tests with fusidic acid was 0.90. Current interpretive criteria for susceptibility to fusidic acid (i.e., MIC of < 2 micrograms/ml and inhibitory zone of 20 mm) gave 1% false susceptibility (all strains being E. faecalis). This error rate is practically eliminated if a zone diameter of 21 mm is considered the breakpoint for susceptibility. PMID:7665633

  9. Tedizolid: a novel oxazolidinone with potent activity against multidrug-resistant gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Love, Riley; Adam, Heather; Golden, Alyssa; Zelenitsky, Sheryl; Schweizer, Frank; Gorityala, Bala; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Rubinstein, Ethan; Walkty, Andrew; Gin, Alfred S; Gilmour, Matthew; Hoban, Daryl J; Lynch, Joseph P; Karlowsky, James A

    2015-02-01

    Tedizolid phosphate is a novel oxazolidinone prodrug (converted to the active form tedizolid by phosphatases in vivo) that has been developed and recently approved (June 2014) by the United States FDA for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) caused by susceptible Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Tedizolid is an oxazolidinone, but differs from other oxazolidinones by possessing a modified side chain at the C-5 position of the oxazolidinone nucleus which confers activity against certain linezolid-resistant pathogens and has an optimized C- and D-ring system that improves potency through additional binding site interactions. The mechanism of action of tedizolid is similar to other oxazolidinones and occurs through inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis by binding to 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the 50S subunit of the ribosome. As with other oxazolidinones, the spontaneous frequency of resistance development to tedizolid is low. Tedizolid is four- to eightfold more potent in vivo than linezolid against all species of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci, including drug-resistant phenotypes such as MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and linezolid-resistant phenotypes. Importantly, tedizolid demonstrates activity against linezolid-resistant bacterial strains harboring the horizontally transmissible cfr gene, in the absence of certain ribosomal mutations conferring reduced oxazolidinone susceptibility. With its half-life of approximately 12 h, tedizolid is dosed once daily. It demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics, has a high oral bioavailability of approximately 90 %, and is primarily excreted by the liver as an inactive, non-circulating sulphate conjugate. Tedizolid does not require dosage adjustment in patients with any degree of renal dysfunction or hepatic dysfunction. Studies in animals have demonstrated that the pharmacodynamic parameter most closely associated with the efficacy of tedizolid is fAUC(0-24h)/MIC. In non-neutropenic animals, a dose-response enhancement was observed with tedizolid and lower exposures were required compared to neutropenic cohorts. Two Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated non-inferiority of a once-daily tedizolid 200 mg dose for 6-10 days versus twice-daily 600 mg linezolid for the treatment of ABSSSIs. Both trials used the primary endpoint of early clinical response at 48-72 h; however, one trial compared oral formulations while the other initiated therapy with the parenteral formulation and allowed oral sequential therapy following initial clinical response. Throughout its development, tedizolid has demonstrated that it is well tolerated and animal studies have shown a lower propensity for neuropathies with long-term use than its predecessor linezolid. Data from the two completed Phase III clinical trials demonstrated that the studied tedizolid regimen (200 mg once daily for 6 days) had significantly less impact on hematologic parameters as well as significantly less gastrointestinal treatment-emergent adverse effects (TEAEs) than its comparator linezolid. As with linezolid, tedizolid is a weak, reversible MAO inhibitor; however, a murine head twitch model validated to assess serotonergic activity reported no increase in the number of head twitches with tedizolid even at doses that exceeded the C max in humans by up to 25-fold. Tyramine and pseudoephedrine challenge studies in humans have also reported no meaningful MAO-related interactions with tedizolid. With its enhanced in vitro activity against a broad-spectrum of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria, convenient once-daily dosing, a short 6-day course of therapy, availability of both oral and intravenous routes of administration, and an adverse effect profile that appears to be more favorable than linezolid, tedizolid is an attractive agent for use in both the hospital and community settings. Tedizolid is currently undergoing additional Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia

  10. The in vitro activity of daptomycin against 514 Gram-positive aerobic clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    King, A; Phillips, I

    2001-08-01

    The in vitro activity of daptomycin was assessed in comparison with that of vancomycin and penicillin against a wide range of Gram-positive aerobic clinical isolates. MICs were determined by an agar dilution method on Mueller-Hinton agar (NCCLS/EUCAST) and on Isotonic agar adjusted to contain 50 mg/L free calcium (BSAC). Both media were enriched with 5% horse blood for fastidious organisms. Daptomycin MICs for all 172 staphylococci, including methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, were 0.03-0.5 mg/L. For 99 of the 100 enterococci (Enterococcus faecalis, n = 50; Enterococcus faecium, n = 50), including 37 vancomycin-resistant isolates, they were 0.25-2 mg/L. For all 108 beta-haemolytic streptococci, including Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae, daptomycin MICs were 0.016- 0.25 mg/L; for 101 alpha-haemolytic streptococci, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and 'viridans' streptococci, they were 0.016-2 mg/L. For miscellaneous vancomycin-resistant isolates including Lactobacillus spp., Lactococcus spp., Leuconostoc spp., Pediococcus spp. and isolates of Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus gallinarum, daptomycin MICs were 0.03-2 mg/L; MICs for the seven isolates of Listeria monocytogenes were 0.25-4 mg/L. There was little difference between the results on Mueller-Hinton agar and on supplemented Isotonic agar The discrepant results occasionally obtained tended to be one dilution higher on supplemented Isotonic agar. Daptomycin was active (MICs < or = 2 mg/L) against all the isolates tested with the exception of one isolate each of E. faecium and L. monocytogenes (MICs = 4 mg/L). Our results indicate that daptomycin MICs are independent of methicillin and vancomycin MICs. PMID:11481291

  11. Antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants of Papua New Guinea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A J Leach; David N Leach; G J Leach

    1988-01-01

    Soxhlet acetone extracts obtained from Cycas circinalis, Morinda citrifolia, Bridelia penangiana, Tridax procumbens, Hibiscus tiliaceus and Hypericum papuanum all show antibacterial activity. The activity of the last 3 species was restricted to the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.

  12. In Vitro Activity of Ozenoxacin against Quinolone-Susceptible and Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    López, Y.; Tato, M.; Espinal, P.; Garcia-Alonso, F.; Gargallo-Viola, D.; Cantón, R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210–1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections. PMID:24080666

  13. Novel imidazoline antimicrobial scaffold that inhibits DNA replication with activity against mycobacteria and drug resistant Gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kendra K; Fay, Allison; Yan, Han-Guang; Kunwar, Pratima; Socci, Nicholas D; Pottabathini, Narender; Juventhala, Ramakrishna R; Djaballah, Hakim; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-11-21

    Bacterial antimicrobial resistance is an escalating public health threat, yet the current antimicrobial pipeline remains alarmingly depleted, making the development of new antimicrobials an urgent need. Here, we identify a novel, potent, imidazoline antimicrobial compound, SKI-356313, with bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Gram-positive cocci, including vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). SKI-356313 is active in murine models of Streptococcus pneumoniae and MRSA infection and is potently bactericidal for both replicating and nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. Using a combination of genetics, whole genome sequencing, and a novel target ID approach using real time imaging of core macromolecular biosynthesis, we show that SKI-356313 inhibits DNA replication and displaces the replisome from the bacterial nucleoid. These results identify a new antimicrobial scaffold with a novel mechanism of action and potential therapeutic utility against nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and antibiotic resistant Gram-positive cocci. PMID:25222597

  14. Zulu medicinal plants with antibacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan E. Kelmanson; Anna K. Jäger; Johannes van Staden

    2000-01-01

    Aqueous, methanolic and ethyl acetate extracts of 14 plants used in traditional Zulu medicine for treatment of ailments of an infectious nature were screened for antibacterial activity. Most of the activity detected was against Gram-positive bacteria. Tuber bark extracts of Dioscorea sylvatica had activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and extracts of Dioscorea dregeana, Cheilanthes viridis and Vernonia colorata were active

  15. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 ?g/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  16. Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6?m and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay minerals appeared in some places attached to cell walls. Experiments showed that exchanging AMZ clay with KCl caused loss of antibacterial property. Among the exchangeable -and potentially toxic- ions we measured Al+3, Cu+2, Zn+2, Ba+2 and Co+2. Besides being toxic at high concentrations, these species affect the electrophoretic interactions between clay and bacteria surfaces. Additionally, the cation exchange neutralizes the clay surface charge thus modifying further the behavior of particles in suspension. Therefore, we evaluated the clay and bacteria zeta potential (?) as an index for possible electrostatic forces and modeled the total interactions using DLVO theory. We suspended the particles in water equilibrated with clay (leachate). Results show that at pH 4, the ? of clays is -14 mV while it is -3mV for bacteria. The divalent ions and trivalent Aluminum, present in the AMZ leachate, compress the thickness of the double layer (hydration shell) thus decreasing electrostatic repulsion and allowing particles to come closer. The proximity of particles increases the probability of attractive forces to bind clays and cells. In summary, results indicate that a process other than simple chemical transfer from clay to bacteria is operating. The electrostatic attraction and physical proximity may enhance the toxic action of metals and interfere with the membrane properties or processes.

  17. Screening of Yemeni medicinal plants for antibacterial and cytotoxic activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. A. Awadh Ali; W.-D Jülich; C Kusnick; U Lindequist

    2001-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts of 20 selected plant species used by Yemeni traditional healers to treat infectious diseases were screened for their antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, as well as for cytotoxic activity. Fourteen of the ethanolic extracts showed variable degrees of antibacterial activity. The active ethanolic extracts were partitioned between ethyl acetate and water for a first separation.

  18. Two recombinant peptides, SpStrongylocins 1 and 2, from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, show antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Smith, L Courtney; Karp, Matti T; Stensvĺg, Klara

    2010-03-01

    The cysteine-rich strongylocins were the first antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) discovered from the sea urchin species, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. Homologous putative proteins (called SpStrongylocin) were found in the sister species, S. purpuratus. To demonstrate that they exhibit the same antibacterial activity as strongylocins, cDNAs encoding the 'mature' peptides (SpStrongylocins 1 and 2) were cloned into a direct expression system fusing a protease cleavage site and two purification tags to the recombinant peptide. Both recombinant fusion peptides were expressed in a soluble form in an Escherichia coli strain tolerant to toxic proteins. Enterokinase was used to remove the fusion tags and purified recombinant SpStrongylocins 1 and 2 showed antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The results of membrane integrity assays against cytoplasmic membranes of E. coli suggest that both recombinant SpStrongylocins 1 and 2 conduct their antibacterial activity by intracellular killing mechanisms because no increase in membrane permeability was detected. PMID:19852980

  19. Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

  20. In Vitro Activity of Tedizolid Against Gram-Positive Bacteria in Patients With Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia: A Korean Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-09-01

    We compared the activities of tedizolid to those of linezolid and other commonly used antimicrobial agents against gram-positive cocci recovered from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in Korean hospitals. Gram-positive isolates were collected from 356 patients with SSSIs and 144 patients with HAP at eight hospitals in Korea from 2011 to 2014. SSSIs included impetigo, cellulitis, erysipelas, furuncles, abscesses, and infected burns. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by using the CLSI agar dilution method. All of the gram-positive isolates were inhibited by ?1 ?g/mL tedizolid. The minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]?? of tedizolid was 0.5 ?g/mL for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was 4-fold lower than that of linezolid. Tedizolid may become a useful option for the treatment of SSSIs and HAP caused by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26206690

  1. In-vitro activity of RP 59500, a new semisynthetic streptogramin antibiotic, against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brumfitt, W; Hamilton-Miller, J M; Shah, S

    1992-07-01

    A study of the in-vitro activity of RP 59500, a semisynthetic derivative of pristinamycin, against a range of Gram-positive bacteria including erythromycin-resistant strains was undertaken. MICs were determined by plate dilution in IsoSensitest agar and MBCs by velvet pad replication. RP 59500 was found to have in-vitro activity almost identical to that of its parent compound, pristinamycin. Sixty methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 60 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) were found to be sensitive to RP 59500, with MICs of 0.13-1 mg/L. All the MSSA and most MRSA showed an MBC less than 2 mg/L. Erythromycin-resistant S. aureus (62) were as sensitive to RP 59500 as were erythromycin-sensitive strains (58). RP 59500 was more active against MRSA than fusidate, vancomycin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem or erythromycin. Forty strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci (11 were erythromycin-resistant) showed MICs of 0.25-1 mg/L, and RP 59500 was more active than methicillin, erythromycin, imipenem, cefotaxime or vancomycin. Sixty strains of streptococci (20 pneumococci and 40 of groups A, B, C, or G) and 20 enterococci were inhibited by 0.13-1 mg/L and 0.25-4 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive bacilli (five each of diphtheroids, lactobacilli, Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus spp., and 19 Clostridium spp.) were also sensitive, with MICs of between 0.06 and 4 mg/L. All 279 strains tested were judged to be sensitive to RP 59500, which was bactericidal and showed a small inoculum effect. The activity against MRSA, and against erythromycin-resistant strains of all species was particularly interesting. PMID:1399948

  2. Glycerol Monolaurate Antibacterial Activity in Broth and Biofilm Cultures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick M. Schlievert; Marnie L. Peterson

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundGlycerol monolaurate (GML) is an antimicrobial agent that has potent activity against gram-positive bacteria. This study examines GML antibacterial activity in comparison to lauric acid, in broth cultures compared to biofilm cultures, and against a wide range of gram-positive, gram-negative, and non-gram staining bacteria.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsGML is ?200 times more effective than lauric acid in bactericidal activity, defined as a ?3

  3. Lactose permease of Escherichia coli catalyzes active beta-galactoside transport in a gram-positive bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Brabetz, W; Liebl, W; Schleifer, K H

    1993-01-01

    The following several lines of evidence demonstrate that lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli is assembled into the cytoplasmic membrane of gram-positive Corynebacterium glutamicum, expressing the lacY gene, as a functional carrier protein. (i) LacY was detected immunologically in the cytoplasmic membrane fraction of the heterologous host. (ii) Recombinant C. glutamicum cells bearing the lacY gene displayed an increased influx of o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, which was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide. (iii) Washed cells were capable of accumulating methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside about 60-fold. (iv) The uptake of methyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside was energy dependent and could be inhibited by the addition of 10 microM carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone. LacY of E. coli was active in the recombinant C. glutamicum cells despite the different membrane lipid compositions of these organisms. PMID:8226697

  4. Discovery of Novel Cell Wall-Active Compounds Using PywaC, a Sensitive Reporter of Cell Wall Stress, in the Model Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, T. L.; Perri, A. L.; French, S.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in recent years has radically reduced the clinical efficacy of many antibacterial treatments and now poses a significant threat to public health. One of the earliest studied well-validated targets for antimicrobial discovery is the bacterial cell wall. The essential nature of this pathway, its conservation among bacterial pathogens, and its absence in human biology have made cell wall synthesis an attractive pathway for new antibiotic drug discovery. Herein, we describe a highly sensitive screening methodology for identifying chemical agents that perturb cell wall synthesis, using the model of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We report on a cell-based pilot screen of 26,000 small molecules to look for cell wall-active chemicals in real time using an autonomous luminescence gene cluster driven by the promoter of ywaC, which encodes a guanosine tetra(penta)phosphate synthetase that is expressed under cell wall stress. The promoter-reporter system was generally much more sensitive than growth inhibition testing and responded almost exclusively to cell wall-active antibiotics. Follow-up testing of the compounds from the pilot screen with secondary assays to verify the mechanism of action led to the discovery of 9 novel cell wall-active compounds. PMID:24687489

  5. Pyrrolidine bis-cyclic guanidines with antimicrobial activity against drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    (MRSA). The eight compound mixtures exhibiting bactericidal activity (10 lg/mL) against MRSA were used to direct the synthesis of 36 individual compounds that were then screened for activity against MRSA individual compounds were bactericidal for MRSA at 62.5 lg/mL, with a subset of these compounds showing

  6. An antimicrobial modified silicone peritoneal catheter with activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Bayston; Leanne E. Fisher; Klaus Weber

    2009-01-01

    Peritonitis, exit site and tunnel infections are serious complications of peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), which may lead to catheter loss, despite measures taken to reduce the infection rate. Catheters coated with antimicrobials have shown only short-term activity. We have developed a process for conferring broad-spectrum, long-duration antimicrobial activity on CAPD catheters while reducing the risk of resistance. Catheters were processed using

  7. Antimicrobial activity of cationic gemini surfactant containing an oxycarbonyl group in the lipophilic portion against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Taiga; Imai, Yoshitane; Kawaguchi, Kakuhiro; Miyano, Naoko; Ikeda, Isao

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the antimicrobial activities of a cationic Gemini surfactant, trans-1,4-bis[2-(alkanoyloxy)ethyldimethylammonio]-2-butene dichloride [II-m-2(t-butene)] and its derivatives against Gram-positive and Gram-negative microorganisms. The II-m-2(t-butene) compound was previously shown to have good surface activity and biodegradability. A dodecanoyloxy derivative (m = 12) of II-m-2(t-butene) showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive Streptococcus aureus [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 7.8 ?g/mL] and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (MIC: 31.2 ?g/mL). PMID:24420061

  8. In vitro activity of RP59500, an injectable streptogramin antibiotic, against vancomycin-resistant gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Collins, L A; Malanoski, G J; Eliopoulos, G M; Wennersten, C B; Ferraro, M J; Moellering, R C

    1993-03-01

    The in vitro activity of RP59500, a streptogramin antibiotic, against 146 clinical isolates of vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria was examined. Five strains of the species Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus gallinarum, for which the MIC of vancomycin was 8 micrograms/ml, were also studied. Twenty-eight vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were included for comparison. The drug was highly active against Leuconostoc spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Pediococcus spp. (MICs, < or = 2 micrograms/ml). RP59500 was more active against vancomycin-susceptible strains of E. faecium than E. faecalis (MICs for 90% of the strains [MIC90s], 1.0 versus 32 micrograms/ml). Vancomycin-resistant strains of E. faecalis were as resistant to RP59500 as vancomycin-susceptible strains (MIC90, 32 micrograms/ml), but some vancomycin-resistant E. faecium strains were relatively more resistant to the new agent (MIC90, 16; MIC range, 0.5 to 32 micrograms/ml) than were vancomycin-susceptible organisms of this species. PMID:8460927

  9. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  10. Antibacterial activity of traditional Australian medicinal plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enzo A Palombo; Susan J Semple

    2001-01-01

    Fifty-six ethanolic extracts of various parts of 39 plants used in traditional Australian Aboriginal medicine were investigated for their antibacterial activities against four Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium) bacterial species. In a plate-hole diffusion assay, 12 extracts inhibited the growth of one or

  11. Antibacterial activity of South African plants used for medicinal purposes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tonia Rabe; Johannes van Staden

    1997-01-01

    Crude extracts from 21 South African medicinal plants, traditionally used for ailments of an infectious or septic nature, were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity using the agar diffusion and dilution methods. Almost all the activity exhibited was against Gram-positive bacteria, with 12 of the 21 plant species tested showing some activity against Bacillus subtilis. Only the Warburgia salutaris methanol

  12. Antibacterial activity of gemini quaternary ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Ob??k, Ewa; Piecuch, Agata; Guz-Regner, Katarzyna; Dworniczek, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    A series of gemini quaternary ammonium salts (chlorides and bromides), with various hydrocarbon chain and spacer lengths, were tested. These compounds exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and were not mutagenic. The strongest antibacterial effect was observed for TMPG-10 Cl (against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853) and TMPG-12 Br (against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and Escherichia coli ATCC 11229 and clinical ESBL(+) isolate 434) surfactants. These compounds inhibited the adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35984 to a polystyrene surface and eradicated biofilm formed by P. aeruginosa PAO1. The activity of studied compounds was dependent on hydrocarbon chain length. PMID:24236547

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Microsphaera multipartita gen. nov., sp. nov., a Polysaccharide-Accumulating Gram-Positive Bacterium from Activated Sludge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YUKIHIKO YOSHIM; AURA HIRAISHI; KAZUNORI NAKAMUFU

    A new gram-positive bacterium was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing syn- thetic wastewater. This organism, designated strain Y-104T (T = type strain), was a coccus-shaped, aerobic chemoorganotroph that had a strictly respiratory type of metabolism with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. This strain accumulates large amounts of polysaccharide in its cells. Strain Y-104T has the following chemotaxonomic

  14. Role for intracellular platelet-activating factor in the circulatory failure in a model of gram-positive shock.

    PubMed Central

    De Kimpe, S. J.; Thiemermann, C.; Vane, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. This study investigates the effects of two structurally different antagonists of platelet-activating factor (PAF), BN52021 and WEB2086, on the circulatory and renal failure elicited by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus (an organism without endotoxin) in anaesthetized rats. 2. Administration of LTA (10 mg kg-1, i.v.) caused hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline (1 microgram kg-1, i.v.) WEB2086 (5 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) inhibited the delayed fall in mean arterial blood pressure (at 300 min: 99 +/- 6 mmHg vs. 75 +/- 6 mmHg, P < 0.01) and prevented the decrease in pressor response to noradrenaline (at 300 min: 36 +/- 5 mmHg min vs. 17 +/- 5 mmHg min, P < 0.01). Surprisingly, BN52021 (20 mg kg-1, i.v., 20 min before and 150 min after LTA) neither prevented the hypotension (74 +/- 6 mmHg) nor the vascular hyporeactivity (21 +/- 5 mmHg min). However, BN52021 inhibited the hypotension to injections of PAF as well as the circulatory failure elicited by lipopolysaccharides (10 mg kg-1, i.v.). 3. LTA caused an increase in plasma concentration of creatinine from 39 +/- 5 microM (sham-operated) to 70 +/- 8 microM and urea from 4.7 +/- 0.1 to 13.1 +/- 1.6 mM. The renal failure elicited by LTA was significantly inhibited by WEB2086 (creatinine: 45 +/- 4 microM and urea: 5.7 +/- 0.7 mM), but not by BN52021. 4. The induction of nitric oxide synthase activity in lungs by LTA was attenuated by WEB2086 from 98 +/- 17 to 40 +/- 15 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein (P < 0.01), but not by BN52021 (148 +/- 21 pmol L-citrulline 30 min-1 mg-1 protein). Similarly, WEB2086, but not BN52021, inhibited the increase in plasma nitrite concentration associated with the delayed circulatory failure caused by LTA. The release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) after injection of LTA was not attenuated by WEB2086. 5. The induction of nitrite release by cultured macrophages activated with LTA (10 micrograms ml-1 for 24 h) was inhibited by 74 +/- 4% by WEB2086 (3 x 10(-4) M), but not by BN52021, indicating that only WEB2086 acts on intracellular PAF receptors. 6. Thus, the intracellular release of PAF contributes to the circulatory and renal failure and induction of nitric oxide synthase elicited by LTA in anaesthetized rats. The difference between the two structurally different PAF antagonists in our septic shock models using either LTA or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), shows the importance of models for Gram-positive sepsis in the elucidation of the pathophysiology of septic shock and for the evaluation of potential drugs. PMID:8719795

  15. Lysis of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by antibacterial porous polymeric monolith formed in microfluidic biochips for sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Aly, Mohamed Aly Saad; Gauthier, Mario; Yeow, John

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial cell lysis is demonstrated using polymeric microfluidic biochips operating via a hybrid mechanical shearing/contact killing mechanism. These biochips are fabricated from a cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (X-PMMA) substrate by well-controlled, high-throughput laser micromachining. The unreacted double bonds at the surface of X-PMMA provide covalent bonding for the formation of a porous polymeric monolith (PPM), thus contributing to the mechanical stability of the biochip and eliminating the need for surface treatment. The lysis efficiency of these biochips was tested for gram-positive (Enterococcus saccharolyticus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and confirmed by off-chip PCR without further purification. The influence of the flow rate when pumping the bacterial suspension through the PPM, and of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance on the cell lysis efficiency was investigated at a cell concentration of 10(5) CFU/mL. It was shown that the contribution of contact killing to cell lysis was more important than that of mechanical shearing in the PPM. The biochip showed better lysis efficiency than the off-chip chemical, mechanical, and thermal lysis techniques used in this work. The biochip also acts as a filter that isolates cell debris and allows PCR-amplifiable DNA to pass through. The system performs more efficient lysis for gram-negative than for gram-positive bacteria. The biochip does not require chemical/enzymatic reagents, power consumption, or complicated design and fabrication processes, which makes it an attractive on-chip lysis device that can be used in sample preparation for genetics and point-of-care diagnostics. The biochips were reused for 20 lysis cycles without any evidence of physical damage to the PPM, significant performance degradation, or DNA carryover when they were back-flushed between cycles. The biochips efficiently lysed both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in about 35 min per lysis and PPM regeneration cycle. PMID:25059724

  16. Tumor necrosis factor alpha mediates lethal activity of killed gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in D-galactosamine-treated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Freudenberg, M A; Galanos, C

    1991-01-01

    Treatment with D-galactosamine increases sensitivity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responder mice to the lethal effects of LPS, while nonresponder mice remain resistant (M.A. Freudenberg, D. Keppler, and C. Galanos, Infect. Immun. 51:891-895, 1986). In the present study it is shown that, in contrast to LPS, killed gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella abortus equi and S. typhimurium) were highly toxic for D-galactosamine-treated LPS-responder (C57BL/10 ScSN and C3H/HeN) and -nonresponder (C57BL/10 ScCR and C3H/HeJ) mice, although to a higher extent in the former strains. Also, killed gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acnes, and Mycobacterium phlei) exhibited toxicity for D-galactosamine-treated mice, LPS-responder and -nonresponder mice being equally susceptible. Evidently, bacterial components other than LPS may exhibit lethal effects in sensitized animals. In all cases, the lethality of LPS and of bacteria was inhibited by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) serum. While LPS induced TNF-alpha in vitro only in macrophages from LPS-responder mice, gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria induced TNF-alpha also in macrophages from LPS-nonresponder mice. The data show that TNF-alpha is a common endogenous mediator of the lethal activity of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. PMID:2037372

  17. Silver triflate catalyzed synthesis of 3-aminoalkylated indoles and evaluation of their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vagicherla Kameshwara; Rao, Madharam Sudershan; Jain, Navin; Panwar, Jitendra; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    An efficient, one-pot synthesis was developed for 3-aminoalkylated indoles by three-component coupling reaction of aldehydes, N-methylanilines, and indoles using AgOTf as a catalyst. A series of twenty 3-aminoalkylated indoles was evaluated for their antibacterial activities against both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria. Compounds 4b and 4r showed good antibacterial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative strains. However, inversing the property of substituent (from 4r to 4q) resulted in the significant fall in the magnitude of antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. PMID:22373086

  18. Antibacterial activity of soluble pyridinium-type polymers.

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, N; Nishiguchi, M

    1988-01-01

    Cross-linked poly(N-benzyl-4-vinylpyridinium halide) (designated insoluble BVP) was previously reported to capture bacterial cells alive by contact with them. The corresponding linear polymer poly(N-benzyl-4-vinylpyridinium salt) (designated soluble BVP) was found to exhibit antibacterial activity. This soluble pyridinium-type polymer showed strong antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas it was less active against gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity of this cationic, polymeric disinfectant was considerably greater than that of the corresponding monomeric compound and was approximately equal to that of conventional disinfectants such as benzalkonium chloride and chlorohexidine. PMID:3202632

  19. In vitro assessment of Ag2O nanoparticles toxicity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Negi, Harshita; Rathinavelu Saravanan, Palaniyandi; Agarwal, Tithi; Ghulam Haider Zaidi, Mohd; Goel, Reeta

    2013-01-01

    In view of antibiotic resistance among pathogens, the present study is to address the toxicity of Ag2O nanoparticles against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria through in vitro assays. The preliminary screening by agar diffusion assay confirms the antibacterial activity of Ag2O nanoparticles against all the test bacteria. Comparative antibacterial activity of Ag2O nanoparticles and respective antibiotics reveals their broad range of activity and lower inhibitory dose against the used bacterial strains. Further, they can inhibit E. coli with an effective dose of 0.036 mg/ml within 1 h of exposure time as determined by luciferin based ATP assay. Moreover, the Ag2O nanoparticles exhibit higher antibacterial efficacy against Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria, as revealed by their MIC & MBC values. Therefore, Ag2O nanoparticles pave the way for a new generation of antibacterial agents against the emerging multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:23518522

  20. Alternating electric fields combined with activated carbon for disinfection of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in fluidized bed electrode system.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Bernard, Séverine; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Yntema, Doekle R; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-10-15

    Strong electric fields for disinfection of wastewaters have been employed already for several decades. An innovative approach combining low strength (7 V/cm) alternating electric fields with a granular activated carbon fluidized bed electrode (FBE) for disinfection was presented recently. For disinfection performance of FBE several pure microbial cultures were tested: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis as representatives from Gram positive bacteria and Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli YMc10 as representatives from Gram negative bacteria. The alternating electric field amplitude and shape were kept constant. Only the effect of alternating electric field frequency on disinfection performance was investigated. From the bacteria tested, the Gram negative strains were more susceptible and the Gram positive microorganisms were more resistant to FBE disinfection. The collected data indicate that the efficiency of disinfection is frequency and strain dependent. During 6 h of disinfection, the decrease above 2 Log units was achieved with P. luteola and E. coli at 10 kHz and at dual frequency shift keying (FSK) modulated signal with frequencies of 10 kHz and 140 kHz. FBE technology appears to offer a new way for selective bacterial disinfection, however further optimizations are needed on treatment duration, and energy input, to improve effectiveness. PMID:24012021

  1. Antibacterial activity of resin rich plant extracts

    PubMed Central

    Shuaib, Mohd; Ali, Abuzer; Ali, Mohd; Panda, Bibhu Prasad; Ahmad, Mohd Imtiyaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The in vitro antibacterial activity of resin rich methanolic extracts (RRMEs) of Commiphora myrrha, Operculina turpethum, and Pinus roxburghii. Materials and Methods: Different concentration were studied by agar-well diffusion method against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis) and Gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae). Results: Among all the bacterial strains tested, E. faecalis was most sensitive and S. typhi was resistant to C. myrrha and P. roxburghii. The extracts of O. turpethum were active against all tested strains in which B. subtilis and S. aureus were the most sensitive. Conclusion: This suggested that the antibacterial activity of RRMEs of O. turpethum was more than C. myrrha and P. roxburghii. This probably explains the potential of these plants against a number of infections caused by bacterial strains tested. PMID:24302834

  2. Antibacterial activities of peptides designed as hybrids of antimicrobial peptides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hyung Keun Kim; Dong Gun Lee; Hee Nam Kim; Bo Hwa Choi; Cheol-Hee Choi; Kyung-Soo Hahm

    2002-01-01

    Hybrid peptides (HP-MA, HP-ME), each of 20 residues and incorporating 2–9 residues of Helicobacter pylori ribosomal protein L1 (HP) and 1–12 residues of magainin 2 and melittin, were designed. The antibiotic activities of these peptides were evaluated using bacterial, tumor and human erythrocyte cells. HP-MA had a stronger antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria than HP (2-20) and

  3. Lactococcus lactis TrxD represents a subgroup of thioredoxins prevalent in Gram-positive bacteria containing WCXDC active site motifs.

    PubMed

    Björnberg, Olof; Efler, Petr; Ebong, Epie Denis; Svensson, Birte; Hägglund, Per

    2014-12-15

    Three protein disulfide reductases of the thioredoxin superfamily from the industrially important Gram-positive Lactococcus lactis (LlTrxA, LlTrxD and LlNrdH) are compared to the "classical" thioredoxin from Escherichia coli (EcTrx1). LlTrxA resembles EcTrx1 with a WCGPC active site motif and other key residues conserved. By contrast, LlTrxD is more distantly related and contains a WCGDC motif. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that LlTrxD represents a subgroup of thioredoxins from Gram-positive bacteria. LlNrdH is a glutaredoxin-like electron donor for ribonucleotide reductase class Ib. Based on protein-protein equilibria LlTrxA (E°'=-259mV) and LlNrdH (E°'=-238mV) show approximately 10mV higher standard state redox potentials than the corresponding E. coli homologues, while E°' of LlTrxD is -243mV, more similar to glutaredoxin than "classical" thioredoxin. EcTrx1 and LlTrxA have high capacity to reduce insulin disulfides and their exposed active site thiol is alkylated at a similar rate at pH 7.0. LlTrxD on the other hand, is alkylated by iodoacetamide at almost 100 fold higher rate and shows no activity towards insulin disulfides. LlTrxA, LlTrxD and LlNrdH are all efficiently reduced by NADPH dependent thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from L. lactis and good cross-reactivity towards E. coli TrxR was observed with LlTrxD as the notable exception. PMID:25255970

  4. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral activity of propolis of different geographic origin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Kujumgiev; I Tsvetkova; Yu Serkedjieva; V Bankova; R Christov; S Popov

    1999-01-01

    Propolis samples from different geographic origins were investigated for their antibacterial (against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli), antifungal (against Candida albicans) and antiviral (against Avian influenza virus) activities. All samples were active against the fungal and Gram-positive bacterial test strains, and most showed antiviral activity. The activities of all samples were similar in spite of the differences in their chemical

  5. Antibacterial activity and chemical constitutions of Ziziphora clinopodioides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzan Ozturk; Sezai Ercisli

    2007-01-01

    The essential oil and methanol extract obtained from aerial parts of Ziziphora clinopodioides Lam. harvested in the Eastern part of Turkey were evaluated for their chemical composition and antibacterial activity against 52 Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The GC–MS analyses allowed 18 compounds to be determined; the main constituents of the essential oils were (+)-pulegone (31.86%), 1,8-cineole (12.21%), limonene (10.48%), menthol

  6. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seenivasan Prabuseenivasan; Manickkam Jayakumar; Savarimuthu Ignacimuthu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. METHODS:: The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris) and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the

  7. Activities of the Semisynthetic Glycopeptide LY191145 against Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THALIA I. NICAS; DEBORAH L. MULLEN; JANE E. FLOKOWITSCH; DAVID A. PRESTON; NANCY J. SNYDER; ROBERT E. STRATFORD; ANDROBIN D. G. COOPER

    1995-01-01

    LY191145 is the prototype of a series of compounds with activities against vancomycin-resistant enterococci derived by modification of the glycopeptide antibiotic LY264826. LY191145 had MICs for vancomycin- and teicoplanin-resistant enterococci of <4 mg\\/ml for 50% of isolates and <16 mg\\/ml for 90% of isolates. Its MICs for vancomycin-resistant, teicoplanin-susceptible enterococci were 1 to 8 mg\\/ml. LY191145 retains the potent activities

  8. Site-specific mutagenesis and functional analysis of active sites of sulfur oxygenase reductase from Gram-positive moderate thermophile Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huijun; Guo, Wenbin; Xu, Changan; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2013-12-14

    Sequence alignments revealed that the conserved motifs of SORSa which formed an independent branch between archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs according to the phylogenetic relationship were similar with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs. In order to investigate the active sites of SORSa, cysteines 31, 101 and 104 (C31, C101, C104), histidines 86 and 90 (H86 and H90) and glutamate 114 (E114) of SORSa were chosen as the target amino acid residues for site-specific mutagenesis. The wild type and six mutant SORs were expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. Enzyme activity determination revealed that the active sites of SORSa were identical with the archaea and Gram-negative bacteria SORs reported. Replacement of any cysteine residues reduced SOR activity by 53-100%, while the mutants of H86A, H90A and E114A lost their enzyme activities largely, only remaining 20%, 19% and 32% activity of the wild type SOR respectively. This study will enrich our awareness for active sites of SOR in a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:23726793

  9. A new multicopper oxidase from Gram-positive bacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis with activity modulating methionine rich tail.

    PubMed

    Classen, Thomas; Pietruszka, Jörg; Schuback, Saskia Marina

    2013-05-01

    Multicopper oxidases are involved in a wide variety of physiological tasks in nature. They are part of the lignin formation/decomposition system in plants and fungi. In bacteria they are part of developmental processes and the heavy metal resistance apparatus. A well characterised example is the copper tolerance protein CueO of Escherichia coli (CueO(EC)). Here, we report the heterologous expression of the apo- and holo-form of CueO(RE), a homologue to CueO(EC) from Rhodococcus erythropolis. Upon incubation with copper(II) ions, low active apo-CueO(RE) was converted into the active holo-CueO(RE) in vivo. The holo-form was physico-chemically characterised using a copper(I) BCA complex and the model substrate 2,6-dimethoxyphenol. The spectroscopic and catalytic properties are different from CueO(EC), revealing a high catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of 115 min(-1)mM(-1) with physiological K(m) of 80 ?M for the cuprous oxidase activity. At the C-terminus of CueO(RE) a methionine rich tail region was identified which can be found in a variety of actinobacteria. Chimeras of the E. coli and R. erythropolis enzymes were constructed to investigate the influence of this tail regarding kinetic parameters. It was shown that the tail did not have the same function as the corresponding methionine rich loop in CueO(EC). However, it modulated the kinetic properties of the enzyme. PMID:23485678

  10. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel levofloxacin derivatives containing a substituted thienylethyl moiety

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Piperazinyl quinolones such as ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin and levofloxacin are an important group of quinolone antimicrobials which are widely used in the treatment of various infectious diseases. In the present study, we synthesized a new series of levofloxacin derivatives and evaluated their antibacterial activities. Methods The N-substituted analogs of levofloxacin 6a–j were prepared by nucleophilic reaction of N-desmethyl levofloxacin 11 with thienylethyl bromide derivatives 8 or 9. All target compounds were tested using conventional agar dilution method in comparison to levofloxacin and N-desmethyl levofloxacin and their MIC values were determined against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Results All compounds showed significant antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria (MIC?=?0.04-6.25 ?g/mL); however, the activity against Gram-negative bacteria was lower (MIC?=?1.56–100 ?g/mL). As is evident from the data, oxime derivatives 6e, 6h and 6i are superior in inhibiting the growth of Gram-positive bacteria (MIC?=?0.04–0.19 ?g/mL), and their activities were found to be 5–25 times better than N-desmethyl levofloxacin 11 and equal or better than levofloxacin 4. Conclusion We have designed and synthesized novel quinolone derivatives bearing functionalized thienylethyl moiety on the piperazine ring of levofloxacin. The results of antibacterial screening against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria revealed that the introduction of functionalized thienylethyl moiety on the piperazine ring of levofloxacin can improve the activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria are responsible for a wide range of infectious diseases, and rising resistance in this group is causing increasing concern. Thus, this study introduces structural features of levofloxacin scaffold for development of new candidates in the field of anti-Gram positive chemotherapy PMID:23351676

  11. Effect of CL 184,005, a platelet-activating factor antagonist in a murine model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced gram-positive sepsis.

    PubMed

    DeJoy, S Q; Jeyaseelan, R; Torley, L W; Pickett, W C; Wissner, A; Wick, M M; Oronsky, A L; Kerwar, S S

    1994-01-01

    Experiments using a murine model of heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus-induced gram-positive bacterial sepsis indicate that the lethal bacterial effects can be prevented if mice are pretreated with CL 184,005, a platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist. CL 184,005 was ineffective when administered after bacterial challenge. Plasma of mice pretreated with CL 184,005 contained significantly less tumor necrosis factor (TNF), suggesting that CL 184,005 interferes with TNF synthesis induced by S. aureus. Spleen-associated TNF protein was also decreased by pretreatment with CL 184,005. Although TNF levels were significantly decreased in mice treated with CL 184,005, interleukin-6 levels in serum were significantly increased. Athymic mice were also susceptible to the lethal effects of S. aureus, suggesting that T cells were not involved. When rats rendered hypotensive with S. aureus were treated with CL 184,005, their blood pressure was normalized. Mice treated with enterotoxin B were not protected if they were pretreated with CL 184,005; however, TNF levels in these mice were significantly lower, suggesting that mediators other than PAF and TNF may contribute to the lethal effects of enterotoxin. PMID:8277176

  12. Amino acid modified xanthone derivatives: novel, highly promising membrane-active antimicrobials for multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jun-Jie; Lin, Shuimu; Aung, Thet Tun; Lim, Fanghui; Zou, Hanxun; Bai, Yang; Li, Jianguo; Lin, Huifen; Pang, Li Mei; Koh, Wee Luan; Salleh, Shuhaida Mohamed; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Zhou, Lei; Qiu, Shengxiang; Pervushin, Konstantin; Verma, Chandra; Tan, Donald T H; Cao, Derong; Liu, Shouping; Beuerman, Roger W

    2015-01-22

    Antibiotic resistance is a critical global health care crisis requiring urgent action to develop more effective antibiotics. Utilizing the hydrophobic scaffold of xanthone, we identified three components that mimicked the action of an antimicrobial cationic peptide to produce membrane-targeting antimicrobials. Compounds 5c and 6, which contain a hydrophobic xanthone core, lipophilic chains, and cationic amino acids, displayed very promising antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and VRE, rapid time-kill, avoidance of antibiotic resistance, and low toxicity. The bacterial membrane selectivity of these molecules was comparable to that of several membrane-targeting antibiotics in clinical trials. 5c and 6 were effective in a mouse model of corneal infection by S. aureus and MRSA. Evidence is presented indicating that 5c and 6 target the negatively charged bacterial membrane via a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. These results suggest that 5c and 6 have significant promise for combating life-threatening infections. PMID:25474410

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity of some plant essential oils

    PubMed Central

    Prabuseenivasan, Seenivasan; Jayakumar, Manickkam; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2006-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of 21 plant essential oils against six bacterial species. Methods: The selected essential oils were screened against four gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris) and two gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus at four different concentrations (1:1, 1:5, 1:10 and 1:20) using disc diffusion method. The MIC of the active essential oils were tested using two fold agar dilution method at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 25.6 mg/ml. Results: Out of 21 essential oils tested, 19 oils showed antibacterial activity against one or more strains. Cinnamon, clove, geranium, lemon, lime, orange and rosemary oils exhibited significant inhibitory effect. Cinnamon oil showed promising inhibitory activity even at low concentration, whereas aniseed, eucalyptus and camphor oils were least active against the tested bacteria. In general, B. subtilis was the most susceptible. On the other hand, K. pneumoniae exhibited low degree of sensitivity. Conclusion: Majority of the oils showed antibacterial activity against the tested strains. However Cinnamon, clove and lime oils were found to be inhibiting both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Cinnamon oil can be a good source of antibacterial agents. PMID:17134518

  14. Development of Tyrocidine A Analogues with Improved Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Michael A.; Citron, Diane M.; Wang, Clay C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of new antibacterial therapeutic agents capable of halting microbial resistance is a chief pursuit in clinical medicine. Classes of antibiotics that target and destroy bacterial membranes are attractive due to the decreased likelihood that bacteria will be able to generate resistance to this mechanism. The amphipathic cyclic decapeptide, Tyrocidine A, is a model for this class of antibiotics. Tyrocidine A is composed of a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic face, allowing for insertion into bacterial membranes, creating porous channels and destroying membrane integrity. We have used a combination of molecular modeling and solid phase synthesis to prepare Tyrocidine A and analogues 1–8. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC’s) of these compounds were determined for a host of gram positive species and E. coli as a representative gram negative bacterium. Analogues 2 and 5 demonstrated moderate 2 to 8-fold increases in antibacterial activity over the parent Tyrocidine A for a variety of pathogenic microbes. (Best MIC’s for E. coli 32 ?g/mL and 2 ?g/mL for most gram positives) Examination of the structure activity relationship between the analogues demonstrated a preference for increased amphipathicity but did not show a clear preference for increasing hydrophilicity versus hydrophobicity in improving antibacterial activity. Of note, movement of positively charged lysine residues or neutral pentafluorophenyl residues to different positions within the cyclopeptide ring system demonstrated improvements in antibacterial activity. PMID:17728134

  15. Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis CBMDC3f with antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive foodborne pathogenic bacteria: UV-MALDI-TOF MS analysis of its bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Torres, M J; Petroselli, G; Daz, M; Erra-Balsells, R; Audisio, M C

    2015-06-01

    In this work a new Bacillus sp. strain, isolated from honey, was characterized phylogenetically. Its antibacterial activity against three relevant foodborne pathogenic bacteria was studied; the main bioactive metabolites were analyzed using ultraviolet matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI MS). Bacillus CBMDC3f was phylogenetically characterized as Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis after rRNA analysis of the 16S subunit and the gyrA gene (access codes Genbank JX120508 and JX120516, respectively). Its antibacterial potential was evaluated against Listeria monocytogenes (9 strains), B. cereus (3 strains) and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC29213. Its cell suspension and cell-free supernatant (CFS) exerted significant anti-Listeria and anti-S. aureus activities, while the lipopeptides fraction (LF) also showed anti-B. cereus effect. The UV-MALDI-MS analysis revealed surfactin, iturin and fengycin in the CFS, whereas surfactin predominated in the LF. The CFS from CBMDC3f contained surfactin, iturin and fengycin with four, two and four homologues per family, respectively, whereas four surfactin, one iturin and one fengycin homologues were identified in the LF. For some surfactin homologues, their UV-MALDI-TOF/TOF (MS/MS; Laser Induced Decomposition method, LID) spectra were also obtained. Mass spectrometry analysis contributed with relevant information about the type of lipopeptides that Bacillus strains can synthesize. From our results, surfactin would be the main metabolite responsible for the antibacterial effect. PMID:25820813

  16. Triethyl-n-Hexylammonium Triethyl-n-Hexylboride: a New Antimicrobial Showing Activity Against Candida albicans and Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, K. S.; Storm, D. R.; Ford, W. T.

    1975-01-01

    The organic salt triethyl-n-hexylammonium triethyl-n-hexylboride (N2226B2226) has biostatic effects against two gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus, and the yeast Candida albicans. Escherichia coli and chicken embryo fibroblasts grown in tissue culture are more refractory to this compound. Images PMID:811160

  17. Antimicrobial activity of Calendula officinalis petal extracts against fungi, as well as Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical pathogens.

    PubMed

    Efstratiou, Efstratios; Hussain, Abdullah I; Nigam, Poonam S; Moore, John E; Ayub, Muhammad A; Rao, Juluri R

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of methanol and ethanol extracts of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) petals against clinical pathogens. The antimicrobial potential of C. officinalis extracts was evaluated against a panel of microorganisms isolated from patients at the Belfast City Hospital (BCH), including bacteria and fungi, using disc diffusion assay. Methanol extract of C. officinalis exhibited better antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria tested, than ethanol extract. Both methanol and ethanol extracts showed excellent antifungal activity against tested strains of fungi, while comparing with Fluconazole. PMID:22789794

  18. In vitro antibacterial activity of minocycline and effect of agar medium utilized in its susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Washington, J A; Yu, P K; Martin, W J

    1970-02-01

    The in vitro activity of minocycline against 1,028 bacterial strains was determined in parallel in Mueller Hinton Agar and Trypticase Soy Agar. The broad antibacterial effect of minocycline against gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacilli is confirmed. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for gram-positive bacteria in Mueller Hinton Agar were at least twofold less than in Trypticase Soy Agar. Minimal inhibitory concentrations for gram-negative bacilli in Mueller Hinton Agar were usually fourfold less than in Trypticase Soy Agar. PMID:4392357

  19. Results of the surveillance of Tedizolid activity and resistance program: in vitro susceptibility of gram-positive pathogens collected in 2011 and 2012 from the United States and Europe.

    PubMed

    Sahm, Daniel F; Deane, Jennifer; Bien, Paul A; Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Shaw, Karen J; Bartizal, Ken F

    2015-02-01

    The in vitro activity and spectrum of tedizolid and comparators were analyzed against 6884 Gram-positive clinical isolates collected from multiple US and European sites as part of the Surveillance of Tedizolid Activity and Resistance Program in 2011 and 2012. Organisms included 4499 Staphylococcus aureus, 537 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), 873 enterococci, and 975 ?-hemolytic streptococci. The MIC values that inhibited 90% of the isolates within each group (MIC90) were 0.25 ?g/mL for Staphylococcus epidermidis and ?-hemolytic streptococci and 0.5 ?g/mL for S. aureus, other CoNS, and enterococci. Of 16 isolates with elevated tedizolid or linezolid MIC values (intermediate or resistant isolates), 10 had mutations in the genes encoding 23S rRNA (primarily G2576T), 5 had mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins L3 or L4, and 5 carried the cfr multidrug resistance gene. Overall, tedizolid showed excellent activity against Gram-positive bacteria and was at least 4-fold more potent than linezolid against wild-type and linezolid-resistant isolates. Given the low overall frequency of isolates that would be resistant to tedizolid at the proposed break point of 0.5 ?g/mL (0.19%) and potent activity against contemporary US and European isolates, tedizolid has the potential to serve as a valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25488274

  20. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils from Palmarosa, Evening Primrose, Lavender and Tuberose

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, M. H.; Bhatt, K. R.; Thaker, V. S.

    2009-01-01

    Essential oils extracted from flower petals of palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini), evening primrose (Primula rosea), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and tuberose (Polianthus tuberosa) were tested for their antibacterial activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different concentrations of each essential oil ranging from 10-100% were tested. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria were found susceptible to the studied flower essential oils. With increase in concentration of essential oil, increase in zone of inhibition was observed thus dose-dependent response was clear for each essential oil. Essential oil extracted from Cymbopogon martini showed the highest activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria among the tested essential oils. PMID:20336210

  2. Antibacterial activity of essential oils from palmarosa, evening primrose, lavender and tuberose.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, M H; Bhatt, K R; Thaker, V S

    2009-03-01

    Essential oils extracted from flower petals of palmarosa (Cymbopogon martini), evening primrose (Primula rosea), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) and tuberose (Polianthus tuberosa) were tested for their antibacterial activities against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Different concentrations of each essential oil ranging from 10-100% were tested. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria were found susceptible to the studied flower essential oils. With increase in concentration of essential oil, increase in zone of inhibition was observed thus dose-dependent response was clear for each essential oil. Essential oil extracted from Cymbopogon martini showed the highest activity against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria among the tested essential oils. PMID:20336210

  3. In Vitro Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of Salicylanilide Benzoates

    PubMed Central

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Buchta, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    The resistance to antimicrobial agents brings a need of novel antimicrobial agents. We have synthesized and found the in vitro antibacterial activity of salicylanilide esters with benzoic acid (2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoates) in micromolar range. They were evaluated in vitro for the activity against eight fungal and eight bacterial species. All derivatives showed a significant antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations ?0.98??mol/L including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. The most active compounds were 5-chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoate and 4-chloro-2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoate. The antifungal activity is significantly lower. PMID:22666101

  4. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity of salicylanilide benzoates.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Buchta, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    The resistance to antimicrobial agents brings a need of novel antimicrobial agents. We have synthesized and found the in vitro antibacterial activity of salicylanilide esters with benzoic acid (2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoates) in micromolar range. They were evaluated in vitro for the activity against eight fungal and eight bacterial species. All derivatives showed a significant antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains with minimum inhibitory concentrations ? 0.98??mol/L including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. The most active compounds were 5-chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoate and 4-chloro-2-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl benzoate. The antifungal activity is significantly lower. PMID:22666101

  5. Antibacterial activity of human urine

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Donald

    1968-01-01

    The fate of bacteria in human urine was studied after inoculation of small numbers of Escherichia coli and other bacterial strains commonly implicated in urinary tract infection. Urine from normal individuals was often inhibitory and sometimes bactericidal for growth of these organisms. Antibacterial activity of urine was not related to lack of nutrient material as addition of broth did not decrease inhibitory activity. Antibacterial activity was correlated with osmolality, urea concentration and ammonium concentration, but not with organic acid, sodium, or potassium concentration. Between a pH range of 5.0-6.5 antibacterial activity of urine was greater at lower pH. Ultrafiltration and column chromatography to remove protein did not decrease antibacterial activity. Urea concentration was a more important determinant of antibacterial activity than osmolality or ammonium concentration. Increasing the urea of a noninhibitory urine to equal that of an inhibitory urine made the urine inhibitory. However, increasing osmolality (with sodium chloride) or increasing ammonium to equal the osmolality or ammonium of an inhibitory urine did not increase antibacterial activity. Similarly, dialysis to decrease osmolality or ammonium but preserve urea did not decrease inhibitory activity. Decreasing urea with preservation of ammonium and osmolality decreased antibacterial activity. Removal of ammonium with an ion exchanger did not decrease antibacterial activity, whereas conversion of urea to ammonium with urease and subsequent removal of the ammonium decreased antibacterial activity. Urine collected from volunteers after ingestion of urea demonstrated a marked increase in antibacterial activity, as compared with urine collected before ingestion of urea. PMID:4877682

  6. In vitro Antibacterial Activity of DR3355, the S-(––)Isomer of Ofloxacin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teruo Fujimoto; Susumu Mitsuhashi

    1990-01-01

    DR-3355, the S-(––)-isomer of ofloxacin, possessed generally twice higher activity than ofloxacin, and its action was bactericidal. The difference in antibacterial activity of these compounds was attributable to their inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase. DR-3355 was characterized by its higher potency against gram-positive cocci and obligate anaerobes than ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. DR-3355 was somewhat less potent than ciprofloxacin against Entewbacteriaceae

  7. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oil of Cosmos bipinnatus Cav. Leaves from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso; Ashafa, Anofi

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils isolated from the leaves of Cosmos bipinnatus and its antibacterial activity were analyzed by GC-MS and microbroth dilution assay respectively. The essential oil extracted from this plant was predominantly composed of monoterpenes (69.62%) and sesquiterpenes (22.73%). The antibacterial assay showed that the oil had significant inhibitory effects against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolates. The MIC of Gram-positive strains ranged between 0.16 and 0.31 mg/mL while those of Gram-negative bacteria ranged between 0.31 and 0.63 mg/mL. The Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to the essential oil than the Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the major components of this oil in other plants have been reported for antimicrobial activities. The antibacterial activity can be attributed to effects of the combination of several components of the oil. The results indicate that the C. bipinnatus might be exploited as natural antibacterial agent and have application in the treatment of several infectious diseases caused by these bacteria. Since this species is endemic to the eastern Free State, the plant could be collected during its bloom and used efficiently in the management of bacterial infections in South Africa. PMID:25587332

  8. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of sulfonamides. SAR and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boufas, Wahida; Dupont, Nathalie; Berredjem, Malika; Berrezag, Kamel; Becheker, Imčne; Berredjem, Hajira; Aouf, Nour-Eddine

    2014-09-01

    A series of substituted sulfonamide derivatives were synthesized from chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (CSI) in tree steps (carbamoylation, sulfamoylation and deprotection). Antibacterial activity in vitro of some newly formed compounds investigated against clinical strains Gram-positive and Gram-negative: Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus applying the method of dilution and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) methods. These compounds have significant bacteriostatic activity with totalities of bacterial strains used. DFT calculations with B3LYP/6-31G(d) level have been used to analyze the electronic and geometric characteristics deduced for the stable structure of three compounds presenting conjugation between a nitrogen atom N through its lone pair and an aromatic ring next to it. The principal quantum chemical descriptors have been correlated with the antibacterial activity.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis B. Rice

    2006-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are common causes of bloodstream and other infections in hospitalized patients in the United States, and the percentage of nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacteria is increasing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are of particular concern. In the United States, approximately 60% of staphylococcal infections in the intensive care unit are now caused

  10. Crystallography of Gram-Positive Bacterial Adhesins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vengadesan Krishnan; Sthanam V. L. Narayana

    \\u000a Both Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens display a multitude of proteins and protein assemblies (pili or fimbriae) on\\u000a their cell surfaces, which are often used for adherence and initiate colonization and pathogenesis. Adhesive proteins known\\u000a as MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules), anchored by a specific enzyme called sortase\\u000a in Gram-positive bacteria, target the host’s extracellular matrix proteins (ECM)

  11. Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Activity of Ethanol Extract of Mikania Cordata (Burm.F.) B.L. Robinson Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Md. Sekendar; Islam, Md. Saiful; Rahman, Md. Masudur; Islam, Md. Rabiul; Sayeed, Mohammed Aktar; Islam, Md. Rafikul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study to examine the antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of ethanol extract of leaves of Mikania cordata (Burm.f.) B.L. Robinson. To determine antibacterial activities, the extract was tested against four Gram positive and six Gram negative bacteria at three concentrations (500, 800, 1000 ?g disc-1) through disc diffusion method. The extract showed moderate antibacterial actions and that was increased by increasing the concentration of the sample. The maximum antimicrobial potential was obtained against Shigella flexneri and no sen sitivity was found for Klebsiella sp. Comparatively gram-positive bacteria demonstrated more susceptibility to the extract than gram-negative bacteria. Cytotoxic property of the sample was done using Brine shrimp lethality bioassay where it did not show noticeable toxicity. So, our present study reveals that the leaves extract of M. cordata possess considerable antibacterial properties along with lesser amount of cytotoxicity PMID:24826008

  12. Syntheses and Antibacterial Activity of N-Acylated Ciprofloxacin Derivatives Based on the Trimethyl Lock.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng; Miller, Patricia A; Miller, Marvin J

    2015-06-11

    Several N-acyl ciprofloxacin quinone derivatives based on a trimethyl lock structure were synthesized, and their in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria was evaluated. A few new analogues displayed enhanced activity against Gram-positive species compared to the parent drug. Additionally, studies of 8-Cip, which was the most potent compound tested, indicate that it may act through a dual-action mechanism. PMID:26101578

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity in seed extracts of Manilkara zapota, Anona squamosa, and Tamarindus indica.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Vijay; Seshadri, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Extracts prepared from seeds of Manilkara zapota, Anona squamosa, and Tamarindus indica were screened for their antibacterial activity by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. Acetone and methanol extracts of T. indica seeds were found active against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. MIC values of potent extracts against susceptible organisms ranged from 53-380 ?g/mL. Methanol extract of T. indica and acetone extract of M. zapota seeds were found to be bactericidal. PMID:21031260

  14. Mechanism of action of recombinant acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Asian honeybee against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lirong; Liu, Dandan; Li, Meilu; Jin, Feng; Din, Meihui; Parnell, Laurence D; Lai, Chao-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees, has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Asian honeybee Apis cerana cerana, was expressed by fusing with glutathione S-transferase (GST) in Escherichia coli BL21, isolated and purified. The agar dilution assays with inhibition zone showed that RAcc-royalisin, similar to nisin, inhibits the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin was associated with its concentration, and was weakened by heat treatment ranging from 55°C to 85°C for 15 min. Both RAcc-royalisin and nisin exhibited the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 62.5 µg/ml, 125 µg/ml, and 250 µg/ml against Gram-positive bacterial strains, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus flavus and Staphyloccocus aureus in the microplate assay, respectively. However, RAcc-royalisin did not show antimicrobial activity against tested Gram-negative bacterial and fungal strains. The antibacterial activity of RAcc-royalisin agrees well with the decrease in bacterial cell hydrophobicity, the leakage of 260-nm absorbing materials, and the observation by transmission electron microscopy, all indicating that RAcc-royalisin induced the disruption and dysfunction of cell walls and membranes. This is the first report detailing the antibacterial mechanism of royalisin against Gram-positive bacteria, and provides insight into the application of recombinant royalisin in food and pharmaceutical industries as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:23056609

  15. Acyl-sulfamates Target the Essential Glycerol-Phosphate Acyltransferase (PlsY) in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip; Yao, Jiangwei; Leonardi, Roberta; Maddox, Marcus M.; Luna, Vicki A.; Rock, Charles O.; Lee, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    PlsY is the essential first step in membrane phospholipid synthesis of Gram-positive pathogens. PlsY catalyzes the transfer of the fatty acid from acyl-phosphate to the 1-position of glycerol-3-phosphate to form the first intermediate in membrane biogenesis. A series of non-metabolizable, acyl-sulfamate analogs of the acyl-phosphate PlsY substrate were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus PlsY and for their Gram-positive antibacterial activities. From this series phenyl (8-phenyloctanoyl) sulfamate had the best overall profile, selectively inhibiting S. aureus phospholipid biosynthesis and causing the accumulation of both long-chain fatty acids and acyl-acyl carrier protein intermediates demonstrating that PlsY was the primary cellular target. Bacillus anthracis was unique in being more potently inhibited by long chain acyl-sulfamates than other bacterial species. However, it is shown that Bacillus anthracis PlsY is not more sensitive to the acyl-sulfamates than S. aureus PlsY. Metabolic profiling showed that B. anthracis growth inhibition by the acyl-sulfamates was not specific for lipid synthesis illustrating that the amphipathic acyl-sulfamates can also have off-target effects in Gram-positive bacteria. Nonetheless, this study further advances PlsY as a druggable target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics, through the discovery and validation of the probe compound phenyl (8-phenyloctanoyl) sulfamate as a S. aureus PlsY inhibitor. PMID:22795901

  16. Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activities of Quaternary Pyridinium

    E-print Network

    Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activities of Quaternary Pyridinium Functionalized Polynorbornenesa] They found that polymers with higher cationic functionality had stronger antibacterial activity. Sepa- rately, it was shown that methacrylate based polymers with pendant pyridinium moieties exhibited antibacterial activity

  17. In vitro activity and microbiological efficacy of tedizolid (TR-700) against Gram-positive clinical isolates from a phase 2 study of oral tedizolid phosphate (TR-701) in patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Prokocimer, Philippe; Bien, Paul; Deanda, Carisa; Pillar, Chris M; Bartizal, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Tedizolid (TR-700, formerly torezolid) is the active moiety of the prodrug tedizolid phosphate (TR-701), a next-generation oxazolidinone, with high potency against Gram-positive species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A recently completed randomized, double-blind phase 2 trial evaluated 200, 300, or 400 mg of oral tedizolid phosphate once daily for 5 to 7 days in patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections. This report examines the in vitro activity of tedizolid and Zyvox (linezolid) against Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline and describes the microbiological and clinical efficacy of tedizolid. Of 196 isolates tested, 81.6% were S. aureus, and of these, 76% were MRSA. The MIC(50) and MIC(90) of tedizolid against both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA were 0.25 ?g/ml, compared with a MIC(50) of 1 ?g/ml and MIC(90) of 2 ?g/ml for linezolid. For coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 7), viridans group streptococci (n = 15), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 3), the MICs ranged from 0.03 to 0.25 ?g/ml for tedizolid and from 0.12 to 1 ?g/ml for linezolid. The microbiological eradication rates at the test-of-cure visit (7 to 14 days posttreatment) in the microbiologically evaluable population (n = 133) were similar in all treatment groups, with overall eradication rates of 97.7% for all pathogens, 97.9% for MRSA, and 95.7% for MSSA. The clinical cure rates for MRSA and MSSA infections were 96.9% and 95.7%, respectively, across all dose groups. This study confirms the potent in vitro activity of tedizolid against pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, including MRSA, and its 4-fold-greater potency in comparison with linezolid. All dosages of tedizolid phosphate showed excellent microbiological and clinical efficacy against MRSA and MSSA. PMID:22687509

  18. In Vitro Activity and Microbiological Efficacy of Tedizolid (TR-700) against Gram-Positive Clinical Isolates from a Phase 2 Study of Oral Tedizolid Phosphate (TR-701) in Patients with Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Prokocimer, Philippe; Bien, Paul; DeAnda, Carisa; Pillar, Chris M.

    2012-01-01

    Tedizolid (TR-700, formerly torezolid) is the active moiety of the prodrug tedizolid phosphate (TR-701), a next-generation oxazolidinone, with high potency against Gram-positive species, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A recently completed randomized, double-blind phase 2 trial evaluated 200, 300, or 400 mg of oral tedizolid phosphate once daily for 5 to 7 days in patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections. This report examines the in vitro activity of tedizolid and Zyvox (linezolid) against Gram-positive pathogens isolated at baseline and describes the microbiological and clinical efficacy of tedizolid. Of 196 isolates tested, 81.6% were S. aureus, and of these, 76% were MRSA. The MIC50 and MIC90 of tedizolid against both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA were 0.25 ?g/ml, compared with a MIC50 of 1 ?g/ml and MIC90 of 2 ?g/ml for linezolid. For coagulase-negative staphylococci (n = 7), viridans group streptococci (n = 15), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (n = 3), the MICs ranged from 0.03 to 0.25 ?g/ml for tedizolid and from 0.12 to 1 ?g/ml for linezolid. The microbiological eradication rates at the test-of-cure visit (7 to 14 days posttreatment) in the microbiologically evaluable population (n = 133) were similar in all treatment groups, with overall eradication rates of 97.7% for all pathogens, 97.9% for MRSA, and 95.7% for MSSA. The clinical cure rates for MRSA and MSSA infections were 96.9% and 95.7%, respectively, across all dose groups. This study confirms the potent in vitro activity of tedizolid against pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, including MRSA, and its 4-fold-greater potency in comparison with linezolid. All dosages of tedizolid phosphate showed excellent microbiological and clinical efficacy against MRSA and MSSA. PMID:22687509

  19. Preparation and antibacterial activity of hybrid materials containing quaternary ammonium salts via sol–gel process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Marini; M. Bondi; R. Iseppi; M. Toselli; F. Pilati

    2007-01-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid coatings containing quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) bonded to the organic–inorganic network were prepared from tetraethoxysilane and triethoxysilane terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene) using a sol–gel process. They were applied as a thin layer (0.6–1?m) to PE films and the antibacterial activity of the coated films was tested against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538)

  20. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of ethanolic extracts from eleven spice plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ömer Ertürk

    2006-01-01

    Eleven ethanolic extracts from spices of Melissa officinalis, Mentha piperita, Laurus nobilis, Rhus coriaria, Dianthus coryophyllum, Piper nigrum, Capsicum annum,\\u000a Juniperus oxycedrus, Erica arborea, Colutea arborescens, and Cuminum cyminum collected from various regions of Turkey and local markets were assayed for the in vitro antibacterial activity against 3 Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis) and 2 Gram-negative bacteria

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Tropolone

    PubMed Central

    Trust, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Tropolone was shown to be bacteriostatic and bactericidal for a wide range of bacterial species. This antibacterial activity was quantitated using standard methods. Tropolone treatment of whole cells resulted in cell lysis characterized by bleb formation and subsequent loss of cell contents after rupture of the bleb. Although bleb formation and lysis did not occur in the presence of 20% sucrose, cell viability was lost. Spheroplasts and protoplasts also lysed in the presence of tropolone. These results indicate that tropolone acts on the cell wall or envelope and on the plasma membrane. PMID:1147585

  2. Hyaluronidases of Gram-positive bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne L. Hynes; Sheryl Lynne Walton

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial hyaluronidases, enzymes capable of breaking down hyaluronate, are produced by a number of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria that initiate infections at the skin or mucosal surfaces. Since reports of the hyaluronidases first appeared, there have been numerous suggestions as to the role of the enzyme in the disease process. Unlike some of the other more well studied virulence factors, much

  3. Antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive cocci

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Jeljaszewicz; G Mlynarczyk; A Mlynarczyk

    2000-01-01

    Gram-positive cocci still predominate as a cause of nosocomial- and community-acquired infections. These organisms frequently reveal a high natural, intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials. Additionally, these bacteria are able to acquire resistance to frequently used drugs rapidly through selective pressure of the environment and via the genetic evolution of bacteria. The wide application of antimicrobials in medical and veterinary practice, usage

  4. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1996-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  5. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1999-06-29

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  6. Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  7. Surface-conjugated antimicrobial peptide leucocin a displays high binding to pathogenic gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Norman, Lana; Thundat, Thomas; Stiles, Michael; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2014-01-22

    Leucocin A, a representative class IIa bacteriocin, is a ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that displays potent activity against specific gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial activity of such peptides is preceded by the binding event that can be utilized for studying specific peptide-bacteria interactions. In this study, 37-residue Leucocin A (LeuA) was synthesized using solid-phase peptide synthesis and covalently immobilized on gold substrates from either the N- or C-terminal. Both the peptide monolayers on gold substrates were incubated separately with five strains of gram-positive bacteria and displayed differential binding to different strains with highest binding to pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes . The C-terminally immobilized LeuA showed higher bacterial binding compared to the N-terminally attached LeuA. The full length immobilized LeuA (37-residue) was active as well as displayed higher bacterial binding (73 ± 6 bacteria/100 ?m(2)) compared to 24-residue inactive LeuA fragment (40 ± 8 bacteria/100 ?m(2)) from the C-terminal region. The high and specific bacterial binding ability of LeuA functionalized surfaces support the potential use of class IIa bacteriocins in antimicrobial peptide-based diagnostic platforms. PMID:24359454

  8. Glycerol Monolaurate Antibacterial Activity in Broth and Biofilm Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Schlievert, Patrick M.; Peterson, Marnie L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is an antimicrobial agent that has potent activity against gram-positive bacteria. This study examines GML antibacterial activity in comparison to lauric acid, in broth cultures compared to biofilm cultures, and against a wide range of gram-positive, gram-negative, and non-gram staining bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings GML is ?200 times more effective than lauric acid in bactericidal activity, defined as a ?3 log reduction in colony-forming units (CFU)/ml, against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in broth cultures. Both molecules inhibit superantigen production by these organisms at concentrations that are not bactericidal. GML prevents biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, as representative gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, tested in 96 well microtiter plates, and simultaneously is bactericidal for both organisms in mature biofilms. GML is bactericidal for a wide range of potential bacterial pathogens, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. In the presence of acidic pH and the cation chelator ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, GML has greatly enhanced bactericidal activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. Solubilization of GML in a nonaqueous delivery vehicle (related to K-Y Warming®) enhances its bactericidal activity against S. aureus. Both R and S, and 1 and 2 position lauric acid derivatives of GML exhibit bactericidal activity. Despite year-long passage of Staphylococcus aureus on sub-growth inhibitory concentrations of GML (0.5 x minimum bactericidal concentration), resistance to GML did not develop. Conclusions/Significance GML may be useful as a broad-spectrum human or animal topical microbicide and may be useful as an environmental surface microbicide for management of bacterial infections and contamination. PMID:22808139

  9. Synthesis and In-vitro Antibacterial Activities of Acetylanthracene and Acetylphenanthrene Derivatives of Some Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Shamsa, Fazel; Foroumadi, Alireza; Shamsa, Hashim; Samadi, Nasrin; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Shafiee, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Novel analogues of N-piperazinyl fluoroquinolones were prepared and evaluated against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, to study the effect of introducing bulky anthracene and phenanthrene moieties on the antibacterial effects of norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Although most of the novel synthesized compounds had lower antibacterial effects, some derivatives showed better activity in comparison with mother drugs based on molar concentration; for example, the 3-acetyl phenanthrene analogue of norfloxacin was more effective than E. coli and K. pneumonia. PMID:24250347

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640?mg/mL and 0.075 to 40?mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625?mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products. PMID:23049613

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Myristica fragrans against Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Zaleha; Shuhairi, Nadia Najwa; Md Fazly Shah Yap, Nordiyana; Harry Sibungkil, Carrie-Anne; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    Myristica fragrans Houtt is mostly cultivated for spices in Penang Island, Malaysia. The ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of flesh, mace and seed of Myristica fragrans was evaluated the bactericidal potential against three Gram-positive cariogenic bacteria (Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175, Streptococcus mitis ATCC 6249, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419) and three Gram-negative periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 29522, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586). Antibacterial activities of the extracts was determined by twofold serial microdilution, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranging from 1.25 to 640?mg/mL and 0.075 to 40?mg/mL. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was obtained by subculturing method. Among all extracts tested, ethyl acetate extract of flesh has the highest significant inhibitory effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with mean MIC value ranging from 0.625 to 1.25 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL; P = 0.017) and highest bactericidal effects at mean MBC value ranging from 0.625?mg/mL to 20 ± 0.00 (SD) mg/mL. While for seed and mace of Myristica fragrans, their ethanol extracts exhibited good antibacterial activity against both groups of test pathogens compared to its ethyl acetate extracts. All of the extracts of Myristica fragrans did not show any antibacterial activities against Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. Thus, our study showed the potential effect of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from flesh, seed and mace of Myristica fragrans to be new natural agent that can be incorporated in oral care products. PMID:23049613

  12. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles against Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, M; Khan, MS; Memic, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Background CuO is one of the most important transition metal oxides due to its captivating properties. It is used in various technological applications such as high critical temperature superconductors, gas sensors, in photoconductive applications, and so on. Recently, it has been used as an antimicrobial agent against various bacterial species. Here we synthesized different sized CuO nanoparticles and explored the size-dependent antibacterial activity of each CuO nanoparticles preparation. Methods CuO nanoparticles were synthesized using a gel combustion method. In this approach, cupric nitrate trihydrate and citric acid were dissolved in distilled water with a molar ratio of 1:1. The resulting solution was stirred at 100°C, until gel was formed. The gel was allowed to burn at 200°C to obtain amorphous powder, which was further annealed at different temperatures to obtain different size CuO nanoparticles. We then tested the antibacterial properties using well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration methods. Results XRD spectra confirmed the formation of single phase CuO nanoparticles. Crystallite size was found to increase with an increase in annealing temperature due to atomic diffusion. A minimum crystallite size of 20 nm was observed in the case of CuO nanoparticles annealed at 400°C. Transmission electron microscopy results corroborate well with XRD results. All CuO nanoparticles exhibited inhibitory effects against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The size of the particles was correlated with its antibacterial activity. Conclusion The antibacterial activity of CuO nanoparticles was found to be size-dependent. In addition, the highly stable minimum-sized monodispersed copper oxide nanoparticles synthesized during this study demonstrated a significant increase in antibacterial activities against both Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains. PMID:22848176

  13. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity of salicylanilide pyrazine-2-carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Buchta, Vladimír

    2012-07-01

    The development of new antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infectious diseases remains challenging due to the increasing impact of antibiotic resistance. Since salicylanilides and esters of pyrazine-2-carboxylic acid have been described as potential antimicrobials, we have designed and synthesized a series of 2-(phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl pyrazine-2-carboxylates. These were evaluated in vitro for the activity against fungi and Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. All derivatives showed significant antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains (MIC ? 0.98 ?mol/L) including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The most active molecule was 5-chloro-2-(3-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl pyrazine-2-carboxylate. With one exception these esters were at least partly active against fungi tested strains, in particular against mould strains (MIC ? 1.95 ?mol/L). The most active antifungal agent overall proved to be 2-(4-bromophenylcarbamoyl)-4-chlorophenyl pyrazine-2-carboxylate. PMID:22548336

  14. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliszewska, I.; Sadowski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been known to have inhibitory and bactericidal effects but the antimicrobial mechanism have not been clearly revealed. Here, we report on the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles of silver using wild strains of Penicillium isolated from environment. Kinetics of the formation of nanosilver was monitored using the UV-Vis. TEM micrographs showed the formation of silver nanoparticles in the range 10-100 nm. Obtained Ag nanoparticles were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against the gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. As results, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were effectively inhibited. Nanosilver is a promising candidate for development of future antibacterial therapies because of its wide spectrum of activity.

  15. Anti-bacterial Studies of Silver Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

    2011-01-01

    We discuss about the antibacterial activities of Silver nanoparticles and compare them on both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in this investigation. The activities of Silver nanoparticles synthesized by electrolysis method are more in Gram (-) than Gram (+) bacteria. First time, we increase its antibacterial activities by using electrical power while on electrolysis synthesis and it is confirmed from its more antibacterial activities (For Escherichia coli bacteria). We investigate the changes of inner unit cell Lattice constant of Silver nanoparticles prepared in two different methods and its effects on antibacterial activities. We note that slight change of the lattice constant results in the enhancement of its antibacterial activities.

  16. In Vitro Activity of Tigecycline against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Pathogens as Evaluated by Broth Microdilution and Etest

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris M. Pillar; Deborah C. Draghi; Michael J. Dowzicky; Daniel F. Sahm

    The current surveillance establishes the activity profile of tigecycline against recent clinical U.S. isolates of target pathogens. Findings from a distributed surveillance that utilized Etest yielded a tigecycline activity profile that varied from that observed in a separate centralized broth microdilution (BMD) surveillance (D. C. Draghi et al., Poster D-0701, 46th Intersci. Conf. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., San Francisco, CA). Differences

  17. Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Heracleum Transcaucasicum and Heracleum Anisactis Aerial Parts Essential Oil

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mohammadali; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Asnaashari, Solmaz; Nemati, Mahboob; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Two plant essential oils (EOs), including those from Heracleum transcaucasicum and Heracleum anisactiss (Umbeliferae) were studied to detect the chemical constituents and evaluated for their antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods: The EOs of H. transcaucasicum and H.anisactis (Apiacae) were obtained by hydrodistillation from aerial parts of the plants. The chemical analyses of the EOs were performed by GC/Mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Myristicin was found to be the principal constituent in both EOs. The susceptibility tests of EOs were performed by agar disc diffusion technique against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Results: Eight components comprising 99.97% of the total essential oil of H. transcaucasicum and a total of three compounds accounting for 98.5% of the total oil composition of aerial parts of H. anisactis were identified, of which myristicin was the main compound in both EOs. The EOs of H. transcaucasicum and H. anisactis showed weak antibacterial property against Gram-positive strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis with no measurable effect on Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: Our GC-MS study revealed myristicin to be the major constituent of H. transcaucasicum and H.anisactis aerial parts. In spite of all the information available on the antibacterial properties of plants essential oils, we were not able to find significant antibacterial activity for both EOs. PMID:24312869

  18. Synthesis of novel bisindolylmethane Schiff bases and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Imran, Syahrul; Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Naz, Farzana; Hussain, Memona; Tauseef, Saima

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop new antibacterial drugs, some novel bisindolylmethane derivatives containing Schiff base moieties were prepared and screened for their antibacterial activity. The synthesis of the bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives 3-26 was carried out in three steps. First, the nitro group of 3,3'-((4-nitrophenyl)-methylene)bis(1H-indole) (1) was reduced to give the amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2 without affecting the unsaturation of the bisindolylmethane moiety using nickel boride in situ generated. Reduction of compound 1 using various catalysts showed that combination of sodium borohydride and nickel acetate provides the highest yield for compound 2. Bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were synthesized by coupling various benzaldehydes with amino substituted bisindolylmethane 2. All synthesized compounds were characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The bisindolylmethane Schiff base derivatives were evaluated against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. Derivatives having halogen and nitro substituent display weak to moderate antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhi, S. paratyphi A and S. paratyphi B. PMID:25102118

  19. Do CVD grown graphene films have antibacterial activity on metallic substrates?

    E-print Network

    Dellieu, Louis; Reckinger, Nicolas; Didembourg, Christian; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Sarrazin, Michael; Deparis, Olivier; Matroule, Jean-Yves; Colomer, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the antibacterial activity of graphene requires consideration of both the graphene fabrication method and, for supported films, the properties of the substrate. Large-area graphene films produced by chemical vapor deposition were grown directly on copper substrates or transferred on a gold substrate and their effect on the viability and proliferation of the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli were assessed. The viability and the proliferation of both bacterial species were not affected when they were grown on a graphene film entirely covering the gold substrate, indicating that conductivity plays no role on bacterial viability and graphene has no antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli. On the other hand, antibacterial activity was observed when graphene coated the copper substrates, resulting from the release of bactericidal cupric ions in inverse proportion to the graphene surface coverage.

  20. New polymeric biocides: synthesis and antibacterial activities of polycations with pendant biguanide groups.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, T; Yamaguchi, H; Tazuke, S

    1984-01-01

    Acrylate monomers with pendant biguanide groups were successfully synthesized, and their homopolymers and copolymers were prepared with acrylamide. These cationic disinfectants of polymeric forms exhibited high antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas they were less active against gram-negative bacteria. It was found that the activity of the polymeric disinfectants was much higher than that of the monomeric species, and the difference in activity between the polymers and the monomers was discussed on the basis of their contributions to each elementary process of the lethal action. PMID:6385836

  1. Draft Genome Sequence Analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 Strain with Antagonistic Activity to Gram-Positive and Pseudomonas sp. Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lumeng; Hildebrand, Falk; Dingemans, Jozef; Ballet, Steven; Laus, George; Matthijs, Sandra; Berendsen, Roeland; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s) with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors. PMID:25369289

  2. In vitro Synergistic Activity of Some Chinolinic Compounds Combined with ?-Lactam Antibiotics against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Clinical Isolates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giampietro Ravagnan; Raffaele Piccolomini; Anna Maria Speciale; Giovanni Russo; Giulio Renzini

    1985-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of nalidixic acid-cephalexin (ratio 1:1) and cinoxacin-cefadroxil (ratio 1:2) combinations have been evaluated against 396 clinical isolates; many of them were nalidixic acid- or cinoxacin-resistant organisms (MIC > 100 ?g\\/ml). We have also tested the nalidixic acid-amoxicillin combination (ratio 1:1) against 225 amoxicillin-resistant bacterial strains (MIC > 800 ?g\\/ml). Synergy was found for 62–70% of the Enterobacteriaceae

  3. Synthesis, structure and in vitro antibacterial activities of new hybrid disinfectants quaternary ammonium compounds: Pyridinium and quinolinium stilbene benzenesulfonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kullapa Chanawanno; Suchada Chantrapromma; Theerasak Anantapong; Akkharawit Kanjana-Opas; Hoong-Kun Fun

    2010-01-01

    The series of pyridinium (1–10) and quinolinium (11–20) stilbene benzenesulfonates have been synthesized and their structures were investigated by UV–vis, FT-IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, compound 5 was also determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria has been determined. The quinolinium derivatives exhibited two very

  4. In vitro activities of antimicrobial cationic peptides; melittin and nisin, alone or in combination with antibiotics against Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dosler, Sibel; Gerceker, A Alev

    2012-06-01

    The In vitro activities of two antimicrobial cationic peptides, melittin and nisin alone and in combination with frequently used antibiotics (daptomycin, vancomycin, linezolid, ampicillin, and erythromycin), were assessed against clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Using the broth microdilution method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranges of melittin and nisin against all strains were 2-8 ?g/ml and 2-32 ?g/ml respectively. In combination studies performed with the microdilution checkerboard method using a fractional inhibitory concentration index of ? 0.5 as borderline, synergistic interactions occurred more frequently with nisin-ampicillin combination against MSSA and nisin-daptomycin combination against E. faecalis strains. The results of the time-killing curve analysis demonstrated that the concentration dependent rapid bactericidal activity of nisin, and that synergism or early synergism was detected in most strains when nisin or melittin was used in combination with antibiotics even at concentrations of 0.5 × MIC. PMID:22759757

  5. Antifungal and antibacterial activity of Haliclona sp. from the Persian Gulf, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nazemi, M; Alidoust Salimi, M; Alidoust Salimi, P; Motallebi, A; Tamadoni Jahromi, S; Ahmadzadeh, O

    2014-09-01

    In this study, antifungal and antibacterial activities of diethyl ether, methanol and aqueous extracts of Haliclona sp. were assessed (in vitro). The antibacterial activity of the extracts was determined by broth dilution methods against clinical Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spizizenii. The antifungal activity of the extracts was determined by using a broth microdilution test against clinical fungi Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Our results showed diethyl ether extract of Haliclona sp. was active on Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, methanol extract in comparison with diethyl ether extract had better activity against C. albicans (MIC: 0.75 mg/mL, MFC: 1.5mg/mL) and A. fumigatus (MIC: 2mg/mL, MFC: 3mg/mL). Aqueous extract had neither antifungal nor antibacterial activities. Based our results, Haliclona sp. can be considered as a source of novel antibiotic and antifungal. PMID:24934592

  6. Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria: knowing when to

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Tracy

    Lipoprotein biogenesis in Gram- positive bacteria: knowing when to hold `em, knowing when to fold Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins are a functionally diverse and important class of these proteins, their role in virulence in Gram-positive bacteria and their potential as vaccine candidates

  7. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanyan; Rogelj, Snezna; Zhang, Peng

    2010-02-01

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO2-NH2-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO2-NH2-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  8. Novel cajaninstilbene acid derivatives as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Lin, Jing; Huang, Mei-Yan; An, Lin-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Sun, Ping-Hua; Ye, Wen-Cai; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-07-15

    Discovery of novel antibacterial agents with new structural scaffolds that combat drug-resistant pathogens is an urgent task. Cajaninstilbene acid, which is isolated from pigeonpea leaves, has shown antibacterial activity. In this study, a series of cajaninstilbene acid derivatives were designed and synthesized. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, as well as nine strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are evaluated?and the related structure-activity relationships are discussed. Assays suggest that some of the synthetic cajaninstilbene acid derivatives exhibit potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacterial strains and MRSA. Among these compounds, 5b, 5c, 5j and 5k show better antibacterial activity than the positive control compounds. The results of MTT assays illustrate the low cytotoxicity of the active compounds. PMID:26093280

  9. In vitro antibacterial activities and mechanism of sugar fatty acid esters against five food-related bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Heyan; Hao, Tianyang; Li, Siran

    2015-11-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of sugar fatty acid esters, with different fatty acid and saccharide moieties, against five food-related bacteria including Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sucrose monocaprate showed the strongest antibacterial activity against all tested bacteria, especially Gram-positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria were 2.5 and 10mM, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) for Gram-positive bacteria were 10mM. Time-kill assay also showed that sucrose monocaprate significantly inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. The permeability of the cell membrane and intracellular proteins were both changed by sucrose monocaprate according to cell constituents' leakage, SDS-PAGE and scanning electron microscope assays. It is suggested that sucrose monocaprate, with both emulsifying and antibacterial activities, have a potential to serve as a safe multifunctional food additive in food industries. PMID:25977039

  10. Mannich bases of 7-piperazinylquinolones and kojic acid derivatives: synthesis, in vitro antibacterial activity and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Ghafouri, Ebrahim; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Samadi, Nasrin; Irannejad, Hamid; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2013-10-01

    Novel Mannich bases of 7-piperazinylquinolones with kojic acid and chlorokojic acid were designed as new quinolone antibacterials. All compounds showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Particularly, chlorokojic derivative 2b was the most potent compound against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC values?0.19 ?g/mL). Its activity was 4-8 times more than that of standard drug norfloxacin. The molecular docking study of compound 2b further supported the molecular basis of the designed compounds. PMID:23974018

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Fullerene Water Suspensions: Effects of

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Antibacterial Activity of Fullerene Water Suspensions: Effects of Preparation Method and Particle and tested for antibacterial activity using Bacillus subtilis as a test organism. All suspensions exhibited relatively strong antibacterial activity. Fractions containing smaller aggregates had greater antibacterial

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Pseudonocardia sp. JB05, a Rare Salty Soil Actinomycete against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Nesa; Behroozi, Reza; Farajzadeh, Davoud; Farsi, Mohammad; Akbari-Noghabi, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes many harmful and life-threatening diseases. Some strains of this bacterium are resistant to available antibiotics. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of indigenous actinomycetes to produce antibacterial compounds against S. aureus and characterize the structure of the resultant antibacterial compounds. Therefore, a slightly modified agar well diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity of actinomycete isolates against the test microorganisms. The bacterial extracts with antibacterial activity were fractionated by silica gel and G-25 sephadex column chromatography. Also, the active fractions were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. Finally, the partial structure of the resultant antibacterial compound was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One of the isolates, which had a broad spectrum and high antibacterial activity, was designated as Pseudonocardia sp. JB05, based on the results of biochemical and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentration for this bacterium was 40?AU?mL?1 against S. aureus. The antibacterial activity of this bacterium was stable after autoclaving, 10% SDS, boiling, and proteinase K. Thin layer chromatography, using anthrone reagent, showed the presence of carbohydrates in the purified antibacterial compound. Finally, FT-IR spectrum of the active compound illustrated hydroxyl groups, hydrocarbon skeleton, and double bond of polygenic compounds in its structure. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the efficient antibacterial activity by a local strain of Pseudonocardia. The results presented in this work, although at the initial stage in bioactive product characterization, will possibly contribute toward the Pseudonocardia scale-up for the production and identification of the antibacterial compounds. PMID:25202705

  13. Antibacterial activity of totarol and its potentiation.

    PubMed

    Kubo, I; Muroi, H; Himejima, M

    1992-10-01

    Antimicrobial activity of six diterpenoids isolated from the bark of Podocarpus nagi (Podocarpaceae) has been tested against twelve selected microorganisms. Totarol [1], the most abundant compound among the six, exhibited potent bactericidal activity only against Gram-positive bacteria, among which Propionibacterium acnes was the most sensitive bacterium. Totarol also showed strong activity against four other Gram-positive bacteria tested: Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacterium ammoniagenes, and Staphylococcus aureus (both penicillin-resistant and penicillin-susceptible strains). The bactericidal activity of totarol was enhanced when it was tested in combination with several other natural products. Noticeably, the activity of totarol against Sta. aureus was increased eightfold when tested in combination with 1/2MIC of anacardic acid [9]. The synergistic activity of anacardic acid caused the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of totarol to be lowered from 1.56 to 0.2 micrograms/ml. PMID:1453180

  14. Antibacterial activity of some selected medicinal plants of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Screening of the ethnobotenical plants is a pre-requisite to evaluate their therapeutic potential and it can lead to the isolation of new bioactive compounds. Methods The crude extracts and fractions of six medicinal important plants (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, Pistacia integerrima, Aesculus indica, and Toona ciliata) were tested against three Gram positive and two Gram negative ATCC bacterial species using the agar well diffusion method. Results The crude extract of P. integerrima and A. indica were active against all tested bacterial strains (12-23 mm zone of inhibition). Other four plant's crude extracts (Arisaema flavum, Debregeasia salicifolia, Carissa opaca, and Toona ciliata) were active against different bacterial strains. The crude extracts showed varying level of bactericidal activity. The aqueous fractions of A. indica and P. integerrima crude extract showed maximum activity (19.66 and 16 mm, respectively) against B. subtilis, while the chloroform fractions of T. ciliata and D. salicifolia presented good antibacterial activities (13-17 mm zone of inhibition) against all the bacterial cultures tested. Conclusion The methanol fraction of Pistacia integerrima, chloroform fractions of Debregeasia salicifolia &Toona ciliata and aqueous fraction of Aesculus indica are suitable candidates for the development of novel antibacterial compounds. PMID:21718504

  15. The synthesis and antibacterial activity of totarol derivatives. Part 3: Modification of ring-B.

    PubMed

    Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Gainsford, G J; Murphy, M P

    2000-07-01

    Ring-B derivatization of totarol (1) afforded the series of compounds 2-22 which were screened in vitro against: beta-lactamase-positive and high level gentamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Several of the derivatives retained much of the antibacterial activity of totatol against the first three of these organisms (all gram-positive), but none was more active. The gram-negative Klebsiella was resistant to all compounds examined. Totarol (1) was shown to uncouple oxidative phosphorylation in isolated mitochondria at 50 microM. PMID:10976514

  16. Activity-directed fractionation and isolation of four antibacterial compounds from Abrus precatorius L. roots.

    PubMed

    Zore, G B; Awad, V; Thakre, A D; Halde, U K; Meshram, N S; Surwase, B S; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2007-08-01

    Root extracts of the plant Abrus precatorius L. was tested for antibacterial activity. Various solvent fractions exhibited inhibitory activity against 13 gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Root extracts were analyzed by thin layer chromatography. The antibacterial activity was localized to specific chromatophores in the chloroform fraction through a bioautography assay. It was found localized to 4 chromatophores out of 7. The chromatophores were isolated from the TLC plates and rechecked for activity against Staphylococcus aureus A, using a disc diffusion assay. Among the four active principles isolated, AP 3 (Rf 0.87) exhibited maximum activity, i.e., 56% inhibition of growth of S. aureus A, in disc diffusion assay compared to the standard antibiotic Ampicillin. Results of this study suggest that chloroform extractable phytochemicals in A. precatorius L. may yield promising molecules with antibiotic activity. PMID:17680505

  17. Activity-directed-fractionation and isolation of four antibacterial compounds from Abrus precatorius L., roots.

    PubMed

    Zore, G B; Awad, V; Thakre, A D; Halde, U K; Meshram, N S; Surwase, B S; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2007-07-20

    Root extracts of the plant Abrus precatorius L., was tested for antibacterial activity. Various solvent fractions exhibited inhibitory activity against 13 gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Root extracts were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The antibacterial activity was localized to specific chromatophores in the chloroform fraction through a bioautography assay. It was found localized to four chromatophores out of seven. The chromatophores were isolated from the TLC plates and rechecked for activity against Slaphylococcus aureus A, using a disc diffusion assay. Among the four active principles isolated, AP 3 (Rf 0.87) exhibited maximum activity i.e. 56% inhibition of growth of S. aureus A, in disc diffusion assay compared to the standard antibiotic Ampicillin. Results of this study suggest that chloroform extractable phytochemicals in A. precatorius L. may yield promising molecules with antibiotic activity. PMID:17763102

  18. Current and novel antibiotics against resistant Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Federico; Salata, Robert A; Bonomo, Robert A

    2008-01-01

    The challenge posed by resistance among Gram-positive bacteria, epitomized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) and vancomycin-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus (VISA and VRSA) is being met by a new generation of antimicrobials. This review focuses on the new ?-lactams with activity against MRSA (ceftobiprole and ceftaroline) and on the new glycopeptides (oritavancin, dalbavancin, and telavancin). It will also consider the role of vancomycin in an era of existing alternatives such as linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline. Finally, compounds in early development are described, such as iclaprim, friulimicin, and retapamulin, among others. PMID:21694878

  19. Antibacterial activities and phytochemical analysis of Cassia fistula (Linn.) leaf

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Sujogya K.; Padhi, L. P.; Mohanty, G.

    2011-01-01

    Cassia fistula Linn. which belongs to family Leguminosae is a medium-sized tree and its different parts are used in ayurvedic medicine as well as home remedies for common ailments. Sequential extraction was carried out using solvents viz. petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol, methanol and water from leaf of the plant were investigated for preliminary phytochemical and antibacterial property. Results of the study showed that all the extracts had good inhibitory activity against Gram-positive test organism. Although all five extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against test bacterial species, yet maximum activity was observed in ethanol extract. The minimum inhibitory concentration ranged in between 94 to 1 500 ?g/ml. Evaluation of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, glycosides, protein and amino acids, saponins, and triterpenoids revealed the presence of most of constituents in polar extracts (ethanol, methanol, and aqueous) compared with nonpolar extracts (petroleum ether and chloroform). Furthermore, the ethanol extract was subjected to TLC bioautography and time-kill study against Staphylococcus epidermidis. All the findings exhibit that the leaf extracts have broad-spectrum activity and suggest its possible use in treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:22171295

  20. Antibacterial activities and phytochemical analysis of Cassia fistula (Linn.) leaf.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sujogya K; Padhi, L P; Mohanty, G

    2011-01-01

    Cassia fistula Linn. which belongs to family Leguminosae is a medium-sized tree and its different parts are used in ayurvedic medicine as well as home remedies for common ailments. Sequential extraction was carried out using solvents viz. petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol, methanol and water from leaf of the plant were investigated for preliminary phytochemical and antibacterial property. Results of the study showed that all the extracts had good inhibitory activity against Gram-positive test organism. Although all five extracts showed promising antibacterial activity against test bacterial species, yet maximum activity was observed in ethanol extract. The minimum inhibitory concentration ranged in between 94 to 1 500 ?g/ml. Evaluation of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, glycosides, protein and amino acids, saponins, and triterpenoids revealed the presence of most of constituents in polar extracts (ethanol, methanol, and aqueous) compared with nonpolar extracts (petroleum ether and chloroform). Furthermore, the ethanol extract was subjected to TLC bioautography and time-kill study against Staphylococcus epidermidis. All the findings exhibit that the leaf extracts have broad-spectrum activity and suggest its possible use in treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:22171295

  1. Efficacy of telavancin, a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, in experimental models of Gram-positive infection.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Sharath S; Janc, James W

    2014-12-01

    Telavancin is a parenteral lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with a dual mechanism of action contributing to bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. It has been approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible Gram-positive bacteria and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are unsuitable. Telavancin has been demonstrated to be efficacious in multiple animal models of soft tissue, cardiac, systemic, lung, bone, brain and device-associated infections involving clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus, heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and daptomycin non-susceptible methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The AUC0-24h/MIC ratio is the primary pharmacodynamically-linked pharmacokinetic parameter. The preclinical data for telavancin supports further investigative clinical evaluation of its efficacy in additional serious infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25382700

  2. Apolipophorin III from honeybees (Apis cerana) exhibits antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo Yeon; Jin, Byung Rae

    2015-04-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is involved in lipid transport and innate immunity in insects. In this study, an apoLp-III protein that exhibits antibacterial activity was identified in honeybees (Apis cerana). A. cerana apoLp-III cDNA encodes a 193 amino acid sequence that shares high identity with other members of the hymenopteran insect apoLp-III family. A. cerana apoLp-III is expressed constitutively in the fat body, epidermis, and venom gland and is detected as a 23-kDa protein. A. cerana apoLp-III expression is induced in the fat body after injection with Escherichia coli, Bacillus thuringiensis, or Beauveria bassiana. However, recombinant A. cerana apoLp-III (expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells) binds directly to E. coli and B. thuringiensis but not to B. bassiana. Consistent with these findings, A. cerana apoLp-III exhibited antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These results provide insight into the role of A. cerana apoLp-III during the innate immune response following bacterial infection. PMID:25483322

  3. Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chancey, Scott T; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

    2012-08-01

    A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often 'silent' spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of ?-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

  4. The synthesis and antibacterial activity of totarol derivatives. Part 1: modifications of ring-C and pro-drugs.

    PubMed

    Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H; Gravestock, M B; Lynch, G P; Scott, G K

    1999-09-01

    A series of analogues of, and potential pro-drugs derived from, the potent antibacterial diterpene totarol (1) were synthesized in order to elucidate the minimum structural requirements for antibacterial activity and to seek compounds with good bioavailability in vivo. These analogues varied in the structural features of their aromatic rings and the prodrugs were O-glycosylated derivatives. They were tested in vitro against three gram-positive bacteria: beta-lactamase-positive and high level gentamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); and against the gram-negative multi-drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. None of the analogues was more potent than totarol itself, which is effective against these gram-positive bacteria at MIC values of 7 microM. The results were evaluated in terms of a structure-activity relationship and this showed that a phenolic moiety was essential for potent antibacterial activity. Amongst the pro-drugs, totaryl alpha-D-mannopyranoside (22) proved the most active in vitro (MIC 18 microM). The in vivo antibacterial activities of compounds 1, 22 and totarol beta-lactoside (23) were assessed in a mouse model of infection, but they were found to be ineffective. Compounds 1 and 22 were shown to be cytotoxic towards proliferating human cell cultures, CH 2983, HeLa, and MG 63, but only at concentrations of > 30 microM. PMID:10530944

  5. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, N; Judith Vijaya, J; John Kennedy, L; Priadharsini, K; Palani, P

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV-Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25686955

  6. Constituents, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of essential oils from Trachelospermum jasminoides flowers.

    PubMed

    Pansanit, Acharavadee; Pripdeevech, Patcharee

    2014-12-01

    The present work reports the chemical compositions, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of essential oils from T jasminoides flowers collected from two different geographical areas, Chiang Rai and Chiang Mai, Thailand. The essential oil of T. jasminoides from the Chiang Rai area had 99 compounds representing 97.9% of the total oil composition, with E-nerolidol and ?-phellandrene as the major constituents. In contrast, the essential oil of T. jasminoides collected from the Chiang Mai area contained 93 components representing 94.8% of the total oil, with trans-linalool oxide and citronellol as the major compounds. Flower oils of T. jasminoides exhibited greater antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria than Gram-positive bacteria. Both oils displayed antioxidant activities. PMID:25632487

  7. Antibacterial and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activities of polyhydroxylated xanthones from Garcinia succifolia.

    PubMed

    Duangsrisai, Susawat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Bessa, Lucinda J; Costa, Paulo M; Amat, Nurmuhammat; Kijjoa, Anake

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigation of the methanol extract of the wood of Garcinia succifolia Kurz (Clusiaceae) led to the isolation of 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1), 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2), 1,3,7-trihydroxyxanthone (3), 1,5,6-trihydroxyxanthone (4), 1,6,7-trihydroxyxanthone (5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone (6). All of the isolated xanthones were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against bacterial reference strains, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATTC 25923, Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853), and environmental drug-resistant isolates (S. aureus B1, Enteroccoccus faecalis W1, and E. coli G1), as well as for their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity. Only 1,5,6-trihydroxy-(4), 1,6,7-trihydroxy-(5), and 1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthones (6) exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, however none was active against vancomycin-resistant E. faecalis. Additionally, 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) showed synergism with oxacillin, but not with ampicillin. On the other hand, only 1,5-dihydroxyxanthone (1) and 1,7-dihydroxyxanthone (2) were found to exhibit the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 90.34 and 223 nM, respectively. PMID:25460314

  8. Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of respiratory diseases. 1. Screening of 68 plants against gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Caceres, A; Alvarez, A V; Ovando, A E; Samayoa, B E

    1991-02-01

    Respiratory ailments are important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Ethnobotanical surveys and literature reviews conducted in Guatemala during 1986-88 showed that 234 plants from 75 families, most of them of American origin, have been used for the treatment of respiratory ailments. Three Gram-positive bacteria causing respiratory infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes) were used to screen 68 of the most commonly used plants for activity. Twenty-eight of these (41.2%) inhibited the growth of one or more of the bacteria tested. Staphylococcus aureus was inhibited by 18 of the plant extracts, while 7 extracts were effective against Streptococcus pyogenes. Plants of American origin which exhibited antibacterial activity were: Gnaphalium viscosum, Lippia alba, Lippia dulcis, Physalis philadelphica, Satureja brownei, Solanum nigrescens and Tagetes lucida. These preliminary in vitro results provide scientific basis for the use of these plants against bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:2023428

  9. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of PEGylated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers†

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Analette I.; Reins, Rose Y.; McDermott, Alison M.; Trautner, Barbara W.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of a series of amino-terminated poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) groups. The antibacterial activity of the PAMAM dendrimers and their derivatives against the common ocular pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, was evaluated by their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). For the unmodified third and fifth generation (G3 and G5) amino-terminated dendrimers, the MICs against both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were in the range of 6.3–12.5 ?g mL?1, comparable to that of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 (1.3–12.5 ?g mL?1) and within the wide range of 0.047–128 ?g mL?1 for the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. PEGylation of the dendrimers decreased their antibacterial activities, especially for the Gram-positive bacteria (S. aureus). The reduction in potency is likely due to the decrease in the number of protonated amino groups and shielding of the positive charges by the PEG chains, thus decreasing the electrostatic interactions of the dendrimers with the negatively-charged bacterial surface. Interestingly, localization of a greater number of amino groups on G5 vs. G3 dendrimers did not improve the potency. Significantly, even a low degree of PEGylation, e.g. 6% with EG11 on G3 dendrimer, greatly reduced the cytotoxicity towards human corneal epithelial cells while maintaining a high potency against P. aeruginosa. The cytotoxicity of the PEGylated dendrimers to host cells is much lower than that reported for antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, the MICs of these dendrimers against P. aeruginosa are more than two orders of magnitude lower than other antimicrobial polymers reported to date. These results motivate further exploration of the potential of cationic dendrimers as a new class of antimicrobial agents that may be less likely to induce bacterial resistance than standard antibiotics. PMID:19756304

  10. Y-doped zinc oxide (YZO) nanoflowers, microstructural analysis and test their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar; Sudheer Pamidimarri, D V N; Kim, Deuk Young; Na, Jeong-Geol

    2015-08-01

    Self-assembled 3D flower-like yttrium-doped zinc oxide (YZO) microstructures composed of nanorods were prepared by hydrothermal-precipitation, and tested their antibacterial activity. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of YZO nanoflowers were characterized by various techniques, which confirmed a well-crystallized wurtzite hexagonal phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of YZO nanopowder showed the 3d core level spectra of yttrium (Y), which formed by two components at about 158.2eV (3d5/2) and 160.4eV (3d3/2). The antibacterial activity of YZO nanoflowers were investigated using both gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Enhancement in antibacterial activity was observed by the incorporation of yttrium (Y: 2at.%) of nanorod-based-flowers because of increased surface area. The prepared YZO nanocomposite showed potential as an antibacterial agent with applications in controlling the spread of infections and also the ability of fast antibacterial activity which can hinder the re-emergence of infection. PMID:26042696

  11. Antibacterial activity of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Raid A; Sulaiman, Ghassan M; Abdulrahman, Safa A; Marzoog, Thorria R

    2015-08-01

    In this study, (50-110nm) magnetic iron oxide (?-Fe2O3) nanoparticles were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation of iron target in dimethylformamide (DMF) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. The structural properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were investigated by using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-VIS absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effect of laser fluence on the characteristics of these nanoparticles was studied. Antibacterial activities of iron oxide nanoparticles were tested against Gram-positive; Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative; Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The results showed a noteworthy inhibition on both bacterial strains. The preparation conditions were found to affect significantly the antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles were used to capture rapidly S. aureus bacteria under the magnetic field effect. PMID:26042717

  12. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of acetonic extract from Paullinia cupana Mart. seeds.

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Rigano, Daniela; Conte, Barbara; Bruno, Maurizio; Rosselli, Sergio; Sorbo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the acetone extract from Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis Mart. (Sapindaceae) seeds, commonly called guarana, were assessed against selected bacterial and fungal strains. We tested the extract against both standard American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and clinically isolated (CI) bacterial strains and three fungal strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for bacteria and MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration for fungi were determined. The extract showed an activity against the nine bacterial strains tested, both CI and ATCC strains (MIC comprised between 32 and 128 ?m/mL and MBC between 128 and 512 ?m/mL), showing a significant antibacterial effect against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Also, the tested fungi were sensitive to the extract (MIC between 125 and 250 ?m/mL). The contemporaneous presence of different bioactivities in the extract from guarana suggests this plant as a source of bioactive substances. PMID:23672664

  13. Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2014-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

  14. In vitro effects on biofilm viability and antibacterial and antiadherent activities of silymarin.

    PubMed

    Evren, Ebru; Yurtcu, Erkan

    2015-07-01

    Limited treatment options in infectious diseases caused by resistant microorganisms created the need to search new approaches. Several herbal extracts are studied for their enormous therapeutic potential. Silymarin extract, from Silybum marianum (milk thistle), is an old and a new remedy for this goal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antibacterial and antiadherent effects of silymarin besides biofilm viability activity on standard bacterial strains. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), antiadherent/antibiofilm activity, and effects on biofilm viability of silymarin were evaluated against standard bacterial strains. MIC values were observed between 60 and >241 ?g/mL (0.25->1 mmol/L). Gram-positive bacteria were inhibited at concentrations between 60 and 120 ?g/mL. Gram-negative bacteria were not inhibited by the silymarin concentrations included in this study. MBC values for Gram-positive bacteria were greater than 241 ?g/mL. Adherence/biofilm formations were decreased to 15 ?g/mL silymarin concentration when compared with silymarin-untreated group. Silymarin reduced the biofilm viabilities to 13 and 46 % at 1 and 0.5 mmol/L concentrations, respectively. We demonstrated that silymarin shows antibacterial and antiadherent/antibiofilm activity against certain standard bacterial strains which may be beneficial when used as a dietary supplement or a drug. PMID:25937395

  15. Bioinspired synthesis of polydopamine/Ag nanocomposite particles with antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengjiao; Zhang, Guoxing; Xia, Tian; Li, Zhenni; Zhao, Kai; Deng, Ziwei; Guo, Dingzong; Peng, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Mussel-inspired chemistry (polydopamine) offers great opportunities to develop inexpensive and efficient process for many types of materials with complex shapes and functions in a mild and friendly environment. This paper describes a facile, yet green approach to synthesize polydopamine/silver (PDA/Ag) nanocomposite particles with a combination use of polydopamine chemistry and electroless metallization of Ag. In this approach, monodisperse spherical polydopamine particles are first synthesized by the oxidation and self-polymerization of dopamine (monomer) in an alkaline water-ethanol solution at room temperature, which are served as the active templates for secondary reactions due to the abundant catechol and amine groups on the surface. Subsequently, the silver precursor-[Ag(NH3)2](+) ions introduced are easily absorbed onto the surface of the PDA particles, and are immediately in situ reduced to metallic Ag nanoparticles with the help of these active catechol and amine groups. During the preparation, no additional reductants, toxic reagents and intricate instruments are needed. These as-synthesized PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles are ideal candidates for antibacterial application because they do not show significant cytotoxicity against HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells in the in vitro cytotoxicity assay, whereas demonstrate enhanced antibacterial abilities against Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria) in the antibacterial assays. Owing to their excellent cytocompatibilities and antibacterial activities, these PDA/Ag nanocomposite particles can be considered as the promising antibacterial materials for future biomedical applications. PMID:26117750

  16. Genetic features of circular bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maqueda, Mercedes; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Fernández, Matilde; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Valdivia, Eva; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the main genetic features of circular bacteriocins, which require the co-ordinated expression of several genetic determinants. In general terms, it has been demonstrated that the expression of such structural genes must be combined with the activity of proteins involved in maturation (cleavage/circularization) and secretion outside the cell via different transporter systems, as well as multifaceted immunity mechanisms essential to ensuring the bacteria's self-protection against such strong inhibitors. Several circular antibacterial peptides produced by Gram-positive bacteria have been described to date, including enterocin AS-48, from Enterococcus faecalis S-48 (the first one characterized), gassericin A, from Lactobacillus gasseri LA39, and a similar one, reutericin 6, from Lactobacillus reuteri LA6, butyrivibriocin AR10, from the ruminal anaerobe Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens AR10, uberolysin, from Streptococcus uberis, circularin A, from Clostridium beijerinckii ATCC 25752, and subtilosin A, from Bacillus subtilis. We summarize here the progress made in the understanding of their principal genetic features over the last few years, during which the functional roles of circular proteins with wide biological activity have become clearer. PMID:18034824

  17. Tuning the Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of Amphiphilic Polynorbornene Derivatives

    E-print Network

    Tuning the Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of Amphiphilic Polynorbornene Derivatives M polydispersities (PDI ) 1.1-1.3). The antibacterial activity determined by growth inhibition assays molecular weight on antibacterial and hemolytic activities were determined. The hydrophobicity of the repeat

  18. Studies on 3?-quaternary ammonium cephalosporins—IV. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of 3?-(2-alkyl-3-aminopyrazolium)cephalosporins related to FK037

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hidenori Ohki; Kohji Kawabata; Yoshiko Inamoto; Shinya Okuda; Toshiaki Kamimura; Kazuo Sakane

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis and in vitro antibacterial activity of 7?-[(Z)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-methoxyiminoacetamido] cephalosporins bearing various 2-alkyl-3-aminopyrazolium groups at the 3-position are described. Antibacterial activity against MRSA was affected by the nature of the substituent at the 2-position on the 3?-aminopyrazolium groups. Among the cephalosporins prepared in this study, 7?-[(Z)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-methoxyiminoacetamido]-3-[3-amino-2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-pyrazolio]methyl-3-cephem-4-carboxylate sulfate (23e, FK037) showed extremely potent broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-positive bacteria including MRSA,

  19. Oligomerization of esculin improves its antibacterial activity and modulates antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Mokdad-Bzeouich, Imen; Mustapha, Nadia; Chaabane, Fadwa; Ghedira, Zied; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Chebil, Latifa; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2015-03-01

    In this particular study, the antibacterial activity of esculin and oligomer fractions was assessed. MIC values of esculin and its oligomer fractions as well as of some antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains and against Escherichia coli multiresistant variants were determined by the standard broth microdilution method. Both esculin and oligoesculin fractions exhibited antibacterial effect against reference strains; Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium. It appears that E3 oligomer fraction had the greatest antibacterial activity against these reference strains. Besides, as E2 and E3 revealed the best antibacterial effect against multiresistant variants of E. coli, we decided to test the effect of each, combined to the antibiotic against which the variants were resistant. In the interaction study, E2 and E3 oligoesculin fractions were found to be effective in reducing the resistance of E. coli 6574 to ofloxacin and the resistance of E. coli 6228 to amoxicillin. Only E3 oligoesculin fraction showed a synergetic interaction with amoxicillin and tetracyclin against E. coli 6708, but no interaction was found either with E2 or E3 fractions against E. coli 6234. Our study allowed us to conclude that oligomerization of esculin increases its antibacterial potential, according to the degree of polymerization. PMID:25248728

  20. A novel and efficient one step synthesis of 2-amino-5-cyano-6-hydroxy-4-aryl pyrimidines and their anti-bacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Deshmukh; S. M. Salunkhe; D. R. Patil; P. V. Anbhule

    2009-01-01

    The first simple and efficient approach towards one step synthesis of 2-amino-5-cyano-6-hydroxy-4-aryl pyrimidines has been developed by three component condensation of aromatic aldehydes, ethyl cyanoacetate and guanidine hydrochloride in alkaline ethanol. The synthesized compounds evaluated for their anti-bacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The some of the compounds showed excellent zone of inhibition against tested bacteria.

  1. Chitosan Augments Photodynamic Inactivation of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria?†

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsuimin; Chien, Hsiung-Fei; Wang, Tze-Hsien; Huang, Ching-Tsan; Ker, Yaw-Bee; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) was shown to be a promising treatment modality for microbial infections. This study explores the effect of chitosan, a polycationic biopolymer, in increasing the PDI efficacy against Gram-positive bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pyogenes, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), as well as the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Chitosan at <0.1% was included in the antibacterial process either by coincubation with hematoporphyrin (Hp) and subjection to light exposure to induce the PDI effect or by addition after PDI and further incubation for 30 min. Under conditions in which Hp-PDI killed the microbe on a 2- to 4-log scale, treatment with chitosan at concentrations of as low as 0.025% for a further 30 min completely eradicated the bacteria (which were originally at ?108 CFU/ml). Similar results were also found with toluidine blue O (TBO)-mediated PDI in planktonic and biofilm cells. However, without PDI treatment, chitosan alone did not exert significant antimicrobial activity with 30 min of incubation, suggesting that the potentiated effect of chitosan worked after the bacterial damage induced by PDI. Further studies indicated that the potentiated PDI effect of chitosan was related to the level of PDI damage and the deacetylation level of the chitosan. These results indicate that the combination of PDI and chitosan is quite promising for eradicating microbial infections. PMID:21282440

  2. Novel antibacterial polypeptide laparaxin produced by Lactobacillus paracasei strain NRRL B-50314 via fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports the production and characterization of a novel antibacterial polypeptide, designated laparaxin, which is secreted by Lactobacillus paracasei NRRL B-50314. Crude laparaxin has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including: lactic acid bacteria ...

  3. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  4. Synthesis of N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles and their enhanced antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Alideertu; Huang, Jinfeng; Lan, Shi; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Linghan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhao, Tianyi; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Fengqi; Gao, Ge; Chen, Yuxin

    2011-07-01

    N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced antibacterial activity were synthesized through the encapsulation of silica nanoparticles as support with polymeric N-halamine. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). These N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles displayed powerful antibacterial performance against both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, and their antibacterial activities have been greatly improved compared with their bulk counterparts. Therefore, these N-halamine-functionalized silica-polymer core-shell nanoparticles have the potential for various significant applications such as in medical devices, healthcare products, water purification systems, hospitals, dental office equipment, food packaging, food storage, household sanitation, etc.

  5. Human odontoblast-like cells produce nitric oxide with antibacterial activity upon TLR2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Bellanger, Aurélie; Ducret, Maxime; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Richard, Béatrice; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Bleicher, Françoise; Carrouel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The penetration of cariogenic oral bacteria into enamel and dentin during the caries process triggers an immune/inflammatory response in the underlying pulp tissue, the reduction of which is considered a prerequisite to dentinogenesis-based pulp regeneration. If the role of odontoblasts in dentin formation is well known, their involvement in the antibacterial response of the dental pulp to cariogenic microorganisms has yet to be elucidated. Our aim here was to determine if odontoblasts produce nitric oxide (NO) with antibacterial activity upon activation of Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2), a cell membrane receptor involved in the recognition of cariogenic Gram-positive bacteria. Human odontoblast-like cells differentiated from dental pulp explants were stimulated with the TLR2 synthetic agonist Pam2CSK4. We found that NOS1, NOS2, and NOS3 gene expression was increased in Pam2CSK4-stimulated odontoblast-like cells compared to unstimulated ones. NOS2 was the most up-regulated gene. NOS1 and NOS3 proteins were not detected in Pam2CSK4-stimulated or control cultures. NOS2 protein synthesis, NOS activity and NO extracellular release were all augmented in stimulated samples. Pam2CSK4-stimulated cell supernatants reduced Streptococcus mutans growth, an effect counteracted by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. In vivo, the NOS2 gene was up-regulated in the inflamed pulp of carious teeth compared with healthy ones. NOS2 protein was immunolocalized in odontoblasts situated beneath the caries lesion but not in pulp cells from healthy teeth. These results suggest that odontoblasts may participate to the antimicrobial pulp response to dentin-invading Gram-positive bacteria through NOS2-mediated NO production. They might in this manner pave the way for accurate dental pulp healing and regeneration.

  6. Antibacterial activity of some lichen extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Karagöz; Nihal Doruöz; Zuhal Zeybek; Ali Aslan

    2009-01-01

    The aqueous and ethanol extracts prepared from some lichens species were evaluated for antibacterial activity against six standard strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and two environmental strains (Aeromonas) that were isolated from different lakes. The aqueous and ethanol extracts showed a variable range of antibacterial activity to both standard strains and

  7. Microwave-assisted synthesis and anti-bacterial activity of some 2Amino6-aryl-4-(2-thienyl)pyrimidines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Chandrasekaran; S. Nagarajan

    2005-01-01

    Some novel 2-amino-6-aryl-4-(2-thienyl)pyrimidines were synthesized from 3-aryl-1-thien-2ylprop-2-en-1-ones and guanidine hydrochloride in presence of alkali by conventional heating in alcoholic medium and microwave heating in solvent-free conditions. The compounds were evaluated for in vitro anti-bacterial activity. The anti-bacterial data revealed that compounds 5a–e had better activity against tested Gram-positive organisms than the reference ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin. However, the compounds were nearly

  8. Antimicrobial glycopeptides: synthesis and antibacterial activity of N-linked and O-linked smaller chain glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, K; Taleuzzamman, M; Kumar, V; Singh, S; Singh, J; Panda, B P; Ghosh, L K

    2014-04-01

    Our objective is to synthesize the smaller chain N-linked and O-linked glycopeptides using sugars belong to mono, di and polysaccharides, with the efforts mainly directed towards the identification of antibacterial compounds. 7 glycopeptides, viz., Arg-Asn-Mannose, Arg-Asn-Lactose, His-Asn-Mannose, His-Asn-Lactose (N-glycopeptides), Arg-Ser-Lactose, Arg-Thr-Lactose, Arg-Thr-Starch (O-glycopeptides) were prepared by dicyclohexyl carbodimide (DCC) coupling for amino acids using microwave oven (50W power; 15?min) and activated and coupled with respective sugar moieties using microwave oven at 120?W for 20-25?min. The column eluted compounds were tested for disc diffusion assay using 3 gram positive S. aureus, B. subtilis, S. caprae and 3 gram negative E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. sonnei strains at different concentrations predicted by pH and inhibitory concentrations. One of the test glycopeptide, His-Asn-Lactose was found to be very effective against all the microbial strains tested and 3 other Test Compounds, viz., His-Asn-Mannose, Arg-Thr-Lactose and Arg-Thr-Starch are also proved to be effective against 2?gram positive and 2?gram negative strains tested. Maximum activity was observed at a concentration of 450??g/ml (747.51?µM) for the N-glycopeptide His-Asn-Lactose with the corresponding zonal inhibition diameters (15?mm; 19?mm; 14?mm; 18?mm; 16?mm; 17?mm) against S. aureus, B. subtilis, S. caprae, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. sonnei. This is the first evidence based report that our N-glycopeptide, His-Asn-Lactose tested, has shown antibacterial action against both gram positive and gram negative strains. Further in vivo testing and clinical studies will make sure to position our potent small chain N-glycopeptide in the arsenal of new broad spectrum anti-gram positive and negative agent. PMID:24026960

  9. Structure-activity relationship of buffalo antibacterial hepcidin analogs.

    PubMed

    Chanu, Khangembam Victoria; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Satish

    2011-10-01

    Hepcidin is an anti-microbial peptide expressed predominantly in the liver of many species. Based on the amino acid sequence deduced from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) hepcidin cDNA (Accession no. EU399814), six peptides Hepc(1-25), Hepc(6-25), Hepc(7-25), Hepc(9-25), Hepc(11-25) and Hepc(15-25) were synthesized using solid-phase fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry. CD spectroscopy revealed different spectra of the peptides in different solvents and in all the cases beta-structure was found to be dominant with less alpha-helix as predicted. Quantitation of secondary structure indicated the highest beta-structure for all the six peptides in SDS solution, when used as mimetic for membrane-like environment. The CD spectra of all the peptides taken in water showed that degree of randomness decreased with increase in chain length of the peptide. Out of the six peptides, only Hepc(1-25), Hepc(6-25) and Hepc(7-25) showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacteria). The peptides did not show any sensitivity toward E. coli (Gram-negative bacteria). Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) showed the lowest value for Hepc(7-25) as an antibacterial agent, followed by Hepc(6-25) and Hepc(1-25). The peptides Hepc(9-25), Hepc(11-25) and Hepc(15-25) with more random structure did not show any antimicrobial activity The study demonstrated that 5 amino acids at N-terminal in buffalo hepcidin can be truncated without loss of antimicrobial activity and further reduction of length of the analog from 20 to 19 amino acids resulted increase in the activity because of increase in beta-structure of the peptide shown by CD spectroscopy. PMID:22165290

  10. Antibacterial activity in bovine lactoferrin-derived peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, K S; Milne, J M; Grieve, P A; Dionysius, D A; Smith, R

    1997-01-01

    Several peptides sharing high sequence homology with lactoferricin B (Lf-cin B) were generated from bovine lactoferrin (Lf) with recombinant chymosin. Two peptides were copurified, one identical to Lf-cin B and another differing from Lf-cin B by the inclusion of a C-terminal alanine (lactoferricin). Two other peptides were copurified from chymosin-hydrolyzed Lf, one differing from Lf-cin B by the inclusion of C-terminal alanyl-leucine and the other being a heterodimer linked by a disulfide bond. These peptides were isolated in a single step from chymosin-hydrolyzed Lf by membrane ion-exchange chromatography and were purified by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). They were characterized by N-terminal Edman sequencing, mass spectrometry, and antibacterial activity determination. Pure lactoferricin, prepared from pepsin-hydrolyzed Lf, was purified by standard chromatography techniques. This peptide was analyzed against a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria before and after reduction of its disulfide bond or cleavage after its single methionine residue and was found to inhibit the growth of all the test bacteria at a concentration of 8 microM or less. Subfragments of lactoferricin were isolated from reduced and cleaved peptide by reverse-phase HPLC. Subfragment 1 (residues 1 to 10) was active against most of the test microorganisms at concentrations of 10 to 50 microM. Subfragment 2 (residues 11 to 26) was active against only a few microorganisms at concentrations up to 100 microM. These antibacterial studies indicate that the activity of lactoferricin is mainly, but not wholly, due to its N-terminal region. PMID:8980754

  11. Effect of seasonality on chemical composition and antibacterial and anticandida activities of Argentine propolis. Design of a topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Isla, María Inés; Dantur, Yanina; Salas, Ana; Danert, Carolina; Zampini, Catiana; Arias, Myriam; Ordóńez, Roxana; Maldonado, Luis; Bedascarrasbure, Enrique; Nieva Moreno, María Inés

    2012-10-01

    The effect of seasonality on Argentine propolis collected during one year on its phenolic and flavonoid content and on the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative antibiotic resistant bacteria and Candida species was evaluated. Extracts of propolis samples collected in the summer and spring showed higher phenolic and flavonoid contents than the samples collected in other seasons (5.86 to 6.06 mg GAE/mL and 3.77 to 4.23 mg QE/mL, respectively). The propolis collected in summer and autumn showed higher antibacterial activity (30 microg/mL) than the other samples (MIC values between 30 and 120 microg/mL). No antibacterial activity was detected against Gram-negative bacteria. Also, these extracts were able to inhibit the development of five Candida species, with MFC values of 15-120 microg/mL. Pharmaceutical formulations containing the more active propolis extract were prepared. The hydrogel of acrylic acid polymer containing summer propolis extract as an antimicrobial agent showed microbiological, physical and functional stability during storage for 180 days. The pharmaceutical preparation, as well as the propolis extracts, was active against Candida sp. and antibiotic-multi-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. These results reveal that propolis samples collected by scraping in four seasons, especially in summer in Calingasta, San Juan, Argentina, can be used to obtain tinctures and hydrogels with antibacterial and antimycotic potential for topical use. PMID:23156997

  12. Daptomycin: a lipopeptide antibiotic for the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections.

    PubMed

    Steenbergen, Judith N; Alder, Jeff; Thorne, Grace M; Tally, Francis P

    2005-03-01

    Infections caused by drug-resistant pathogens are on the rise. Daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide with activity against most Gram-positive pathogens, including vancomycin-resistant enterococci and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is a newly US-FDA approved antimicrobial for complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI). Daptomycin has a unique mechanism of action that results in destruction of the membrane potential. The rapid bactericidal activity of daptomycin makes it an attractive antibiotic for serious Gram-positive infections. PMID:15705644

  13. Synthesis and structure–activity relationships of quaternary ammonium cephalosporins with 3-pyrazolylpyridinium derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kwan Young Chang; Sung Hoon Kim; Ghilsoo Nam; Jae Hong Seo; Joong Hyup Kim; Deok-Chan Ha

    2000-01-01

    Cephalosporins with 3-pyazolylpyridinium at C-3 position, which is supposed to exhibit synergic activity of ceftazidime and cefoselis, were synthesized and their antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative was inspected.

  14. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-01

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 ?mol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 ?mol/mL, respectively. PMID:25113876

  15. Synthesis and antibacterial activity evaluation of two androgen derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lauro, Figueroa-Valverde; Francisco, Díaz-Cedillo; Elodia, García-Cervera; Eduardo, Pool-Gómez; Maria, López-Ramos; Marcela, Rosas-Nexticapa; Lenin, Hau-Heredia; Bety, Sarabia-Alcocer

    2015-01-01

    In this study two androgen derivatives were synthesized using several strategies; the first stage an aza-steroid derivative (3) was developed by the reaction of a testosterone derivative (1) with thiourea (2) in presence of hydrogen chloride. The second step, involves the synthesis of an amino-steroid derivative (4) by the reaction of 1 with 2 using boric acid as catalyst. The third stage was achieved by the preparation of an aminoaza-androgen derivative (6) by the reaction of 3 with ethylenediamine using boric acid as catalyst. In addition, the compound 6 was made reacting with dihydrotestosterone to form a new androgen derivative (7) in presence of boric acid. The following step was achieved by the reaction of 7 with chloroacetyl chloride to synthesize an azetidinone-androgen derivative (8) using triethylamine as catalyst. Additionally, a thiourea-androgen derivative (9) was synthetized by the reaction of 4 with dihydrotestosterone using boric acid as catalyst. Finally, the compound 9 was made reacting with chloroacetyl chloride in presence of triethylamine to synthesize a new azetidinone-androgen derivative (10). On the other hand, antibacterial activity of compounds synthesized was evaluated on Gram negative (Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae) and Gram positive (Staphylococos aureus) bacteria. The results indicate that only the compound 3 and 8 decrease the growth bacterial of E. coli and V. cholerae. Nevertheless, growth bacterial of S. aureus was not inhibited by these compounds. These data indicate that antibacterial activity exerted by the compounds 3 and 8 depend of their structure chemical in comparison with the controls and other androgen derivatives that are involved in this study. PMID:25448363

  16. Actinomycetes from Moroccan habitats: isolation and screening for cytotoxic activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Anibou; A. Chait; A. Zyad; M. Taourirt; Y. Ouhdouch; A. Benherref

    2008-01-01

    In our screening for actinomycetes showing cytotoxic activities, 8 samples were collected from various Moroccan habitats,\\u000a 136 isolates were tested for their capacity to produce antibacterial compounds against gram positive bacteria. Thirty-seven\\u000a strains of these isolates were active against Gram-positive bacteria. Using the following steps of primary screening: antibacterial\\u000a activity, confrontation between the isolates and toxicity to Artemia salina; fifteen

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activities from leaf extracts of Cassia fistula l.: An ethnomedicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Bhalodia, Nayan R; Shukla, V J

    2011-04-01

    This study was carried out with an objective to investigate the antibacterial and antifungal potentials of leaves of Cassia fistula Linn. The aim of the study is to assess the antimicrobial activity and to determine the zone of inhibition of extracts on some bacterial and fungal strains. In the present study, the microbial activity of hydroalcohol extracts of leaves of Cassia fistula Linn. (an ethnomedicinal plant) was evaluated for potential antimicrobial activity against medically important bacterial and fungal strains. The antimicrobial activity was determined in the extracts using agar disc diffusion method. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of extracts (5, 25, 50, 100, 250 ?g/ml) of Cassia fistula were tested against two Gram-positive-Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes; two Gram-negative-Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa human pathogenic bacteria; and three fungal strains-Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus clavatus, Candida albicans. Zone of inhibition of extracts were compared with that of different standards like ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and chloramphenicol for antibacterial activity and nystatin and griseofulvin for antifungal activity. The results showed that the remarkable inhibition of the bacterial growth was shown against the tested organisms. The phytochemical analyses of the plants were carried out. The microbial activity of the Cassia fistula was due to the presence of various secondary metabolites. Hence, these plants can be used to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as leads in the development of new pharmaceuticals research activities. PMID:22171301

  18. ORIGINAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATION Differential Antibacterial Activity Against Pseudomonas

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH COMMUNICATION Differential Antibacterial Activity Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa spontaneously liberating CO. The nature of the metal in CO-RMs also modulates the anti-bacterial effect

  19. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activities of Yanglingmycin Analogues.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Bo; Dan, Wen-Jia; Tan, Fang-Fang; Cui, Li-Hui; Yuan, Zhi-Peng; Wu, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2014-10-30

    The synthesis of Yanglingmycin and its enantiomer, along with eighteen Yanglingmycin analogues is reported. The structures were confirmed mainly by analyses of NMR spectral data. Antibacterial activity assays showed that Yanglingmycin and some of its analogues exhibited significant antibacterial activities against two important agricultural pathogenic bacteria, Ralstonia solanacearum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, with MIC values ranging from 3.91 to 15.62 ?g/mL. The antibacterial activities exhibited by Yanglingmycin and its analogues are promising, suggesting potential in the development of compounds for novel bactericides. PMID:25355464

  20. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of Yanglingmycin analogues.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Bo; Dan, Wen-Jia; Tan, Fang-Fang; Cui, Li-Hui; Yuan, Zhi-Peng; Wu, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Ji-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of Yanglingmycin and its enantiomer, along with eighteen Yanglingmycin analogues is reported. The structures were confirmed mainly by analyses of NMR spectral data. Antibacterial activity assays showed that Yanglingmycin and some of its analogues exhibited significant antibacterial activities against two important agricultural pathogenic bacteria, Ralstonia solanacearum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 3.91 to 15.62?µg/mL. The antibacterial activities exhibited by Yanglingmycin and its analogues are promising, suggesting potential in the development of compounds for novel bactericides. PMID:25743192

  1. The Antibacterial Activity of Cassia fistula Organic Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Seyyednejad, Seyyed Mansour; Motamedi, Hossein; Vafei, Mouzhan; Bakhtiari, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cassia fistula, is a flowering plant and a member of Fabaceae family. Its leaves are compound of 4 - 8 pairs of opposite leaflets. There are many Cassia species around the world which are used in herbal medicine. Objectives: This study was designed to examine in vitro anti-bacterial activity of methanolic and ethanolic extracts of C. fistula native to Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: The microbial inhibitory effect of methanolic and ethanolic extracts of C. fistula was tested on 3 Gram positive: Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis and 5 Gram negative: Salmonella Typhi, Kelebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis bacterial species using disc diffusion method at various concentrations. The minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC) were measured by the tube dilution assay. Results: The extract of C. fistula was effective against B. cereus, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli and K. pneumoniae. The most susceptible microorganisms to ethanolic and methanolic extracts were E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Also B. cereus and S. aureus showed the least sensitivity to ethanolic and methanolic extracts, respectively. The MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) and MBC (minimum bactericidal concentration) of ethanolic extracts against S. aureus, E. coli, S. epidermidis and K. pneumoniae were also determined. Conclusions: With respect to the obtained results and regarding to the daily increase of the resistant microbial strains to the commercial antibiotics, it can be concluded that these extracts can be proper candidates of antibacterial substance against pathogenic bacterial species especially S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. epidermidis. PMID:25147664

  2. In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of Cassia fistula Linn. fruit pulp extracts.

    PubMed

    Bhalodia, N R; Nariya, P B; Acharya, R N; Shukla, V J

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study is to assess the antimicrobial activity Cassia fistula fruit pulp extracts on some bacterial and fungal strains. Hydro alcohol and chloroform extracts of Cassia fistula fruit pulp were evaluated for the potential antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial activity was determined in both the extracts using the agar disc diffusion method. Extracts were effective on tested microorganisms. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of solvent extracts (5, 25, 50, 100, 250 ?g/mL) of C. fistula were tested against two gram positive, two gram negative human pathogenic bacteria and three fungi, respectively. Crude extracts of C. fistula exhibited moderate to strong activity against most of the bacteria tested. The tested bacterial strains were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coil, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and fungal strains were Aspergillus. niger, Aspergillus. clavatus, Candida albicans. The antibacterial potential of the extracts were found to be dose dependent. The antibacterial activities of the C. fistula were due to the presence of various secondary metabolites. Hence, these plants can be used to discover bioactive natural products that may serve as leads in the development of new pharmaceuticals research activities. PMID:23049197

  3. Particle-Cell Contact Enhances Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Olesja; Ivask, Angela; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kurvet, Imbi; Kahru, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background It is generally accepted that antibacterial properties of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) are dictated by their dissolved fraction. However, dissolution-based concept alone does not fully explain the toxic potency of nanoparticulate silver compared to silver ions. Methodology/Principal Findings Herein, we demonstrated that the direct contact between bacterial cell and AgNPs' surface enhanced the toxicity of nanosilver. More specifically, cell-NP contact increased the cellular uptake of particle-associated Ag ions – the single and ultimate cause of toxicity. To prove that, we evaluated the toxicity of three different AgNPs (uncoated, PVP-coated and protein-coated) to six bacterial strains: Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, P. putida and P. aeruginosa and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. While the toxicity of AgNO3 to these bacteria varied only slightly (the 4-h EC50 ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 mg Ag/l), the 4-h EC50 values of protein-coated AgNPs for various bacterial strains differed remarkably, from 0.35 to 46 mg Ag/l. By systematically comparing the intracellular and extracellular free Ag+ liberated from AgNPs, we demonstrated that not only extracellular dissolution in the bacterial test environment but also additional dissolution taking place at the particle-cell interface played an essential role in antibacterial action of AgNPs. The role of the NP-cell contact in dictating the antibacterial activity of Ag-NPs was additionally proven by the following observations: (i) separation of bacterial cells from AgNPs by particle-impermeable membrane (cut-off 20 kDa, ?4 nm) significantly reduced the toxicity of AgNPs and (ii) P. aeruginosa cells which tended to attach onto AgNPs, exhibited the highest sensitivity to all forms of nanoparticulate Ag. Conclusions/Significance Our findings provide new insights into the mode of antibacterial action of nanosilver and explain some discrepancies in this field, showing that “Ag-ion” and “particle-specific” mechanisms are not controversial but, rather, are two faces of the same coin. PMID:23737965

  4. Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Some pathogenic bacteria actively trigger the suicide response in critical lineages of leukocytes that orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune responses; other bacteria proactively prevent PCD to benefit their own survival and persistence. Currently, the microbial virulence factors, which represent the keys to unlocking the suicide response in host cells, are a primary focus of this field. In this review, we discuss these bacterial “apoptosis regulatory molecules” and the apoptotic events they either trigger or prevent, the host target cells of this regulatory activity, and the possible ramifications for immunity to infection. Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridia species are discussed as important agents of human infection that modulate PCD pathways in eukaryotic cells. PMID:19081777

  5. Antibacterial Activity and Mechanism of a Scorpion Venom Peptide Derivative In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongjie; Fan, Zheng; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin

    2012-01-01

    BmKn2 is an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus martensii Karsch by our group. In this study, Kn2-7 was derived from BmKn2 to improve the antibacterial activity and decrease hemolytic activity. Kn2-7 showed increased inhibitory activity against both Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, Kn2-7 exhibited higher antibacterial activity against clinical antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In addition, the topical use of Kn2-7 effectively protected the skin of mice from infection in an S. aureus mouse skin infection model. Kn2-7 exerted its antibacterial activity via a bactericidal mechanism. Kn2-7 killed S. aureus and E. coli rapidly by binding to the lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in the S. aureus cell wall and the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the E. coli cell wall, respectively. Finally, the hemolytic activity of Kn2-7 was significantly decreased, compared to the wild-type peptide BmKn2. Taken together, the Kn2-7 peptide can be developed as a topical therapeutic agent for treating bacterial infections. PMID:22792229

  6. In Vitro antibacterial and in Vivo cytotoxic activities of Grewia paniculata

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Mahmuda; Dash, Pritesh Ranjan; Ali, Mohammad Shawkat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Grewia paniculata (Family: Malvaceae) has been used to treat inflammation, respiratory disorders and fever. It is additionally employed for other health conditions including colds, diarrhea and as an insecticide in Bangladesh. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of different extracts of Grewia paniculata. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity was evaluated against both gram negative and gram positive bacteria using disc diffusion method by determination of the diameter of zone of inhibition. Cytotoxic activity was performed by brine shrimp (Artemia salina) lethality bioassay. Results: In disc diffusion method, all the natural products (400 ?g/disc) showed moderate to potent activity against all the tested bacteria. The ethanol extract of bark (EEB) and ethanol fraction of bark (EFB) (400 ?g/disc) exhibited highest activity against Shigella dysenteriae with a zone of inhibition of 23±1.63 mm and 23±1.77 mm respectively. In the brine shrimp lethality bioassay all the extracts showed moderate cytotoxic activity when compared with the standard drug vincristin sulphate. For example, LC50 value of the ethanol fraction of bark (EFB) was 3.01 ?g/ml while the LC50 of vincristine sulphate was 0.52 ?g/ml. Conclusions: The results suggest that all the natural products possess potent antibacterial and moderate cytotoxic. PMID:25949950

  7. Heterogenetic Antigens of Gram-Positive Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Chorpenning, Frank W.; Dodd, Matthew C.

    1966-01-01

    Chorpenning, Frank W. (The Ohio State University, Columbus), and Matthew C. Dodd. Heterogenetic antigens of gram-positive bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 91:1440–1445. 1966.—Soluble antigens obtained by various methods from gram-positive bacteria were used to modify erythrocytes whose hemagglutinating reactions with immune rabbit sera and normal human sera were then studied. Antigens from all gram-positive organisms studied except corynbacteria altered red cells, causing them to react with specific bacterial antisera and with normal human sera; however, cross-absorption and inhibition tests indicated that at least three different specificites were involved. One of these antigens seemed to be similar to Rantz's streptococcal NSS, which is shared with Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus spp., and is therefore heterogenetic. Another was found in streptococci but was apparently not present in S. aureus and Bacillus spp. A third antigen, also heterogenetic, appeared to be shared by several species of Bacillus and by S. aureus, but not by streptococci or any gram-negative bacteria. The third antigen was heat-stable at pH 8.0, and appeared to be essentially polysaccharide in nature. Normal human sera varied in their content of antibodies which reacted with erythrocytes modified by extracts from gram-positive bacteria. Whereas some sera reacted very broadly with red cells modified by extracts of practically any gram-positive organism, other sera agglutinated only cells which had been modified by streptococcal antigen. PMID:4956340

  8. Synthesis, antibacterial, antioxidant activity and QSAR studies of novel 2-arylidenehydrazinyl-4-arylthiazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Sayed; Ahmed, Junaid Uddin; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of 2-arylidenehydrazinyl-4-arylthiazole analogues (3a-p) was designed and synthesized in excellent yields using a rapid, simple, efficient methodology. Sixteen novel compounds were screened for in vitro antimicrobial activities against eleven bacteria, namely, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Citrobacter freundii, Cronobacter sakazakii, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Yersinia pestis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All 16 compounds showed significant anti-bacterial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In particular, compound 3g showed potent inhibition of E. coli and K. pneumonia, compound 3i inhibited E. faecalis, compound 3n S. tythi and E. faecalis, and compound 3c E. coli and C. sakazakii. In fact, our results indicate that most of the compounds synthesized exhibit strong antibacterial activity. The qualitative structure-antibacterial activity relationships (QSAR) were studied using the physicochemical and quantum-chemical parameters of the ab initio Hartree-Fock model at the RHF/6-31G level of theory. A good qualitative correlation between predicted physicochemical parameters (log P and polar surface area (PSA)) and antibacterial activity has been found. The synthesized compounds were also evaluated for antioxidant activity. Compounds 3j, 3a and 3i exhibited the greatest antioxidant activity, with IC50 values of 0.66, 0.81, and 1.08 µM, respectively, which were comparable to that of ascorbic acid (IC50 0.87 µM). The promising antibacterial and antioxidant activities of some of these synthesized 2-arylidenehydrazinyl-4-arylthiazole derivatives, together with the results of quantum-chemical studies, could be helpful for the development of drugs to combat diseases caused by microorganisms and oxidative stress. PMID:25450634

  9. Antibacterial activity of Cuminum cyminum L. and Carum carvi L. essential oils.

    PubMed

    Iacobellis, Nicola S; Lo Cantore, Pietro; Capasso, Francesco; Senatore, Felice

    2005-01-12

    Essential oils extracted by hydrodistillation from fruits of Cuminum cyminum L. and Carum carvi L. were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS). The main components of C. cyminum oil were p-mentha-1,4-dien-7-al, cumin aldehyde, gamma-terpinene, and beta-pinene, while those of the C. carvi oil were carvone, limonene, germacrene D, and trans-dihydrocarvone. Antibacterial activity, determined with the agar diffusion method, was observed against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species in this study. The activity was particularly high against the genera Clavibacter, Curtobacterium, Rhodococcus, Erwinia, Xanthomonas, Ralstonia, and Agrobacterium, which are responsible for plant or cultivated mushroom diseases worldwide. In general, a lower activity was observed against bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. These results suggest the potential use of the above essential oils for the control of bacterial diseases. PMID:15631509

  10. Rational design of berberine-based FtsZ inhibitors with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Chan, Fung-Yi; Lu, Yu-Jing; Neves, Marco A C; Lui, Hok-Kiu; Wang, Yong; Chow, Ka-Yan; Chan, Kin-Fai; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Leung, Yun-Chung; Abagyan, Ruben; Chan, Tak-Hang; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the functional activity of Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z (FtsZ) protein, an essential and highly conserved bacterial cytokinesis protein, is a promising approach for the development of a new class of antibacterial agents. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid widely used in traditional Chinese and native American medicines for its antimicrobial properties, has been recently reported to inhibit FtsZ. Using a combination of in silico structure-based design and in vitro biological assays, 9-phenoxyalkyl berberine derivatives were identified as potent FtsZ inhibitors. Compared to the parent compound berberine, the derivatives showed a significant enhancement of antibacterial activity against clinically relevant bacteria, and an improved potency against the GTPase activity and polymerization of FtsZ. The most potent compound 2 strongly inhibited the proliferation of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, with MIC values between 2 and 4 µg/mL, and was active against the Gram-negative E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with MIC values of 32 and 64 µg/mL respectively. The compound perturbed the formation of cytokinetic Z-ring in E. coli. Also, the compound interfered with in vitro polymerization of S. aureus FtsZ. Taken together, the chemical modification of berberine with 9-phenoxyalkyl substituent groups greatly improved the antibacterial activity via targeting FtsZ. PMID:24824618

  11. The synthesis and antibacterial activity of totarol derivatives. Part 2: Modifications at C-12 and O-13.

    PubMed

    Evans, G B; Furneaux, R H

    2000-07-01

    Alterations of the C-12 and C-13 aromatic ring substituents of totarol (1) afforded the series of derivatives 2-14, and introduction of substituents at C-12 gave exclusively 2a-14a. The majority of these analogues were tested in vitro against the following organisms: beta-lactamase-positive and high level gentamycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. The results were evaluated in terms of structure-activity relationship which reveals that: (a) the phenolic moiety at C-13, in general, is essential for antibacterial activity at < 32 microg/mL against gram-positive species, and (b) derivatization at C-12 has an undesirable effect on the antibacterial activity of this class of compounds, while (c) all compounds tested are ineffective against the gram-negative Klebsiella pneumoniae. PMID:10976513

  12. Wall Teichoic Acids of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephanie; Santa Maria, John P.; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The peptidoglycan layers of many gram-positive bacteria are densely functionalized with anionic glycopolymers called wall teichoic acids (WTAs). These polymers play crucial roles in cell shape determination, regulation of cell division, and other fundamental aspects of gram-positive bacterial physiology. Additionally, WTAs are important in pathogenesis and play key roles in antibiotic resistance. We provide an overview of WTA structure and biosynthesis, review recent studies on the biological roles of these polymers, and highlight remaining questions. We also discuss prospects for exploiting WTA biosynthesis as a target for new therapies to overcome resistant infections. PMID:24024634

  13. In vitro antibacterial activity of selected medicinal plants from lower Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Zulqarnain; Rahim, Abdur; Ahmad, Khalid; Ullah, Faizan; Ullah, Hamid; Nishan, Umar

    2015-03-01

    The present studies cover antibacterial activity of the crude methanolic extracts of 11 medicinal plants viz. Adhatoda vasica, Bauhenia variegate, Bombax ceiba, Carrisa opaca, Caryopteris grata, Debregeasia salicifolia, Lantana camara, Melia azedarach, Phyllanthus emblica, Pinus roxburghii and Olea ferruginea collected from lower Himalayas against two Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus) and two Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aureginosa) bacterial strains. The extracts were applied at four different concentrations (120 mg/mL, 90mg/mL, 60mg/mL and 30mg/mL) in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by using agar well diffusion method. Antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus were observed formethanolic extracts of all the above mentioned plants. Greater antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was only exhibited by Phyllanthus emblica, Pinus roxburghii, Debregeasia salicifolia and Lantana camara. Escherichia coli was highly resistant to all the plant extracts at all concentrations. It is inferred that methanolic crude extracts of the above mentioned plantsexhibitantibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria, which proved the ethnobotanical importance of the selected plants that indigenous people use for cure against various diseases. PMID:25730791

  14. A new pentacyclic triterpene with potent antibacterial activity from Limnophila indica Linn. (Druce).

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Goutam; Mandal, Narayan C; Roy, Rajiv; Ghosh, Ranjan; Barman, Soma; Sarkar, Sajal; Jash, Shyamal K; Mondal, Sadhan

    2013-10-01

    A new pentacyclic triterpenoid constituent, characterized as 3-oxo-olean-12(13),18(19)-dien-29?-carboxylic acid (1) on the basis of detailed spectral studies, was isolated from the aerial parts and roots of Limnophila indica (Scrophulariaceae). Compound 1 exhibited considerable antibacterial activity against three Gram-positive bacteria viz. Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes (MICs within a range of 25-30 ?g/ml) and moderate activity against four Gram-negative bacteria Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pantoea ananatis (MICs within a range of 30-100 ?g/ml). The plant pathogenic bacterium P. ananatis and human pathogenic S. typhimurium responded at comparatively higher concentrations of the compound 1, which were 75 and 100 ?g/ml respectively. The compound inhibited the growth of Gram-positive B. subtilis and Gram-negative P. aeruginosa completely with a clear bactericidal mode of action at their MIC values. The compound upon treatment on both B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa released substantial amount of nucleic acid in the external medium and also effected the change of morphology towards pleomorphicity, thereby indicating its probable action on cell membrane. Furthermore, the triterpenoid 1 was found not to inhibit a probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LABW4 under in vitro condition and to possess no toxicity in Swiss albino mice. PMID:23876368

  15. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Cassia fistula L.: an ethnomedicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Duraipandiyan, V; Ignacimuthu, S

    2007-07-25

    Hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and water extracts from the flower of Cassia fistula (an ethnomedicinal plant) were tested against bacteria and fungi. All the extracts exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) between 0.078 and 2.5 mg/ml. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, only Pseudomonas aeruginosa was susceptible to the extracts. Ethyl acetate crude extract was fractionated using chromatographic techniques. A crystal was isolated, which was confirmed as 4-hydroxy benzoic acid hydrate using X-ray crystallography. It exhibited antifungal activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes (MIC 0.5 mg/ml) and Epidermophyton floccosum (MIC 0.5 mg/ml). PMID:17532583

  16. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides That Inhibit Gram Positive Bacterial Exotoxin Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, Joseph A.; Nemeth, Kimberly A.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and ?-globin and ?-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized ?-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of ?-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

  17. Apolipoprotein A-I from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) demonstrates antibacterial activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L Danielle; Brown, Gwynne; Gauthier, David; Reece, Kimberly; Kator, Howard; Van Veld, Peter

    2008-10-01

    HDL and apolipoprotein A-I from teleostean fishes demonstrate in vitro activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we purified ApoA-1 from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) plasma and examined its in vitro antibacterial activity against Streptococcus sp., Escherichia coli, and Mycobacterium marinum. In addition, we obtained sequence for a putative striped bass ApoA-1 gene, which when translated contained the identical sequence generated from N-terminal sequencing of the purified ApoA-1. The predicted secondary and tertiary structures contained the characteristic proline residues and high alpha-helical content conserved between mammals and fishes. Purified ApoA-1 exhibited antibacterial activity against the bacteria assayed. Concentrations of 125 microg/mL for E. coli, 250 microg/mL for Streptococcus sp., and 250 microg/mL for M. marinum, inhibited bacterial growth by 50% compared to control. ApoA-1 plasma concentrations in experimental and wild fish ranged from undetectable levels to greater than 5 mg/mL, indicating that striped bass ApoA-1 is an effective antibacterial agent at concentrations below the range of physiological concentrations in striped bass plasma. We therefore conclude that ApoA-1 could play a role in innate defense against bacterial pathogens in striped bass. PMID:18627791

  18. Assessment of total phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of Passiflora species.

    PubMed

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses. PMID:25028673

  19. Preparation and Antibacterial Activity Evaluation of 18-?-glycyrrhetinic Acid Loaded PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Behrad; Manoochehri, Saeed; Kamalinia, Golnaz; Samadi, Nasrin; Amini, Mohsen; Mostafavi, Seyyed Hossein; Maghazei, Shahab; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles loaded with 18-?-glycyrrhetinic acid (GLA) with appropriate physicochemical properties and antimicrobial activity. GLA loaded PLGA nanoparticles were prepared with different drug to polymer ratios, acetone contents and sonication times and the antibacterial activity of the developed nanoparticles was examined against different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. The antibacterial effect was studied using serial dilution technique to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of nanoparticles. Results demonstrated that physicochemical properties of nanoparticles were affected by the above mentioned parameters where nanoscale size particles ranging from 175 to 212 nm were achieved. The highest encapsulation efficiency (53.2 ± 2.4%) was obtained when the ratio of drug to polymer was 1:4. Zeta potential of the developed nanoparticles was fairly negative (-11±1.5). In-vitro release profile of nanoparticles showed two phases: an initial phase of burst release for 10 h followed by a slow release pattern up to the end. The antimicrobial results revealed that the nanoparticles were more effective than pure GLA against P. aeuroginosa, S. aureus and S. epidermidis. This improvement in antibacterial activity of GLA loaded nanoparticles when compared to pure GLA may be related to higher nanoparticles penetration into infected cells and a higher amount of GLA delivery in its site of action. Herein, it was shown that GLA loaded PLGA nanoparticles displayed appropriate physicochemical properties as well as an improved antimicrobial effect. PMID:25901144

  20. Assessment of Total Phenolic, Antioxidant, and Antibacterial Activities of Passiflora Species

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiya, Shiamala Devi; Bujang, Japar Sidik; Zakaria, Muta Harah

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaves and stems of Passiflora quadrangularis, P. maliformis, and P. edulis extracted using three solvents: petroleum ether, acetone, and methanol. The maximum extraction yields of antioxidant components from the leaves and stems were isolated using methanol extracts of P. edulis (24.28%) and P. quadrangularis (9.76%), respectively. Among the leaf extracts, the methanol extract of P. maliformis had the significantly highest TPC and the strongest antioxidant activity, whereas among the stem extracts, the methanol extract of P. quadrangularis showed the highest phenolic amount and possessed the strongest antioxidant activity. The antibacterial properties of the Passiflora species were tested using the disc diffusion method against 10 human pathogenic bacteria. The largest inhibition zone was observed for the methanol extract of P. maliformis against B. subtilis. Generally, extracts from the Passiflora species exhibit distinct inhibition against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative bacteria. Based on the generated biplot, three clusters of bacteria were designated according to their performance towards the tested extracts. The present study revealed that methanol extracts of the Passiflora contain constituents with significant phenolic, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical uses. PMID:25028673

  1. Antibacterial activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized with gum ghatti and gum olibanum: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Sashidhar, Rao Beedu

    2015-02-01

    Presently, silver nanoparticles produced by biological methods have received considerable significance owing to the natural abundance of renewable, cost-effective and biodegradable materials, thus implementing the green chemistry principles. Compared with the nanoparticles synthesized using chemical methods, most biogenic silver nanoparticles are protein capped, which imparts stability and biocompatibility, and enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, we compared the antibacterial effect of two biogenic silver nanoparticles produced with natural plant gums: gum ghatti and gum olibanum against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Bacterial interaction with nanoparticles was probed both in planktonic and biofilm modes of growth; employing solid agar and liquid broth assays for inhibition zone, antibiofilm activity, inhibition of growth kinetics, leakage of intracellular contents, membrane permeabilization and reactive oxygen species production. In addition, cytotoxicity of the biogenic nanoparticles was evaluated in HeLa cells, a human carcinoma cell line. Antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of the silver nanoparticles synthesized with gum ghatti (Ag NP-GT) was greater than that produced with gum olibanum (Ag NP-OB). This could be attributed to the smaller size (5.7?nm), monodispersity and zeta potential of the Ag NP-GT. The study suggests that Ag NP-GT can be employed as a cytotoxic bactericidal agent, whereas Ag NP-OB (7.5?nm) as a biocompatible bactericidal agent. PMID:25138141

  2. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  3. Antibacterial Effect of the Adhering Human Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain LB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MARIE-HELENE COCONNIER; VANESSA LIEVIN; MARIE-FRANCOISE BERNET-CAMARD; SYLVIE HUDAULT; ALAIN L. SERVIN

    1997-01-01

    The spent culture supernatant of the human Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB produces an antibacterial activity against a wide range of gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens. It decreased the in vitro viability of Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Kleb- siella pneumoniae, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter spp. In contrast, it did not inhibit lactobacilli and bifidobacteria.

  4. Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for

    E-print Network

    Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for double-glycine-motif- containing peptides Secreted-positive bacteria, the double-glycine (GG) motif plays a key role in many peptide secretion systems involved Microbiology Comment #12;peptides and class II bacteriocins, produced by streptococci and lactic acid bacteria

  5. Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Shonna M.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25419466

  6. Protein secretion and surface display in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2012-01-01

    The cell wall peptidoglycan of Gram-positive bacteria functions as a surface organelle for the transport and assembly of proteins that interact with the environment, in particular, the tissues of an infected host. Signal peptide-bearing precursor proteins are secreted across the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. Some precursors carry C-terminal sorting signals with unique sequence motifs that are cleaved by sortase enzymes and linked to the cell wall peptidoglycan of vegetative forms or spores. The sorting signals of pilin precursors are cleaved by pilus-specific sortases, which generate covalent bonds between proteins leading to the assembly of fimbrial structures. Other precursors harbour surface (S)-layer homology domains (SLH), which fold into a three-pronged spindle structure and bind secondary cell wall polysaccharides, thereby associating with the surface of specific Gram-positive microbes. Type VII secretion is a non-canonical secretion pathway for WXG100 family proteins in mycobacteria. Gram-positive bacteria also secrete WXG100 proteins and carry unique genes that either contribute to discrete steps in secretion or represent distinctive substrates for protein transport reactions. PMID:22411983

  7. Antifungal and antibacterial metabolites from a French poplar type propolis.

    PubMed

    Boisard, Séverine; Le Ray, Anne-Marie; Landreau, Anne; Kempf, Marie; Cassisa, Viviane; Flurin, Catherine; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    During this study, the in vitro antifungal and antibacterial activities of different extracts (aqueous and organic) obtained from a French propolis batch were evaluated. Antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution on three pathogenic strains: Candida albicans, C. glabrata, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Antibacterial activity was assayed using agar dilution method on 36 Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus. Organic extracts showed a significant antifungal activity against C. albicans and C. glabrata (MIC80 between 16 and 31?µg/mL) but only a weak activity towards A. fumigatus (MIC80 = 250?µg/mL). DCM based extracts exhibited a selective Gram-positive antibacterial activity, especially against S. aureus (SA) and several of its methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) strains (MIC100 30-97?µg/mL). A new and active derivative of catechin was also identified whereas a synergistic antimicrobial effect was noticed during this study. PMID:25873978

  8. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Muth, Günther; Espinosa, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of bacterial plasmids is the most efficient way of horizontal gene spread, and it is therefore considered one of the major reasons for the increase in the number of bacteria exhibiting multiple-antibiotic resistance. Thus, conjugation and spread of antibiotic resistance represents a severe problem in antibiotic treatment, especially of immunosuppressed patients and in intensive care units. While conjugation in gram-negative bacteria has been studied in great detail over the last decades, the transfer mechanisms of antibiotic resistance plasmids in gram-positive bacteria remained obscure. In the last few years, the entire nucleotide sequences of several large conjugative plasmids from gram-positive bacteria have been determined. Sequence analyses and data bank comparisons of their putative transfer (tra) regions have revealed significant similarities to tra regions of plasmids from gram-negative bacteria with regard to the respective DNA relaxases and their targets, the origins of transfer (oriT), and putative nucleoside triphosphatases NTP-ases with homologies to type IV secretion systems. In contrast, a single gene encoding a septal DNA translocator protein is involved in plasmid transfer between micelle-forming streptomycetes. Based on these clues, we propose the existence of two fundamentally different plasmid-mediated conjugative mechanisms in gram-positive microorganisms, namely, the mechanism taking place in unicellular gram-positive bacteria, which is functionally similar to that in gram-negative bacteria, and a second type that occurs in multicellular gram-positive bacteria, which seems to be characterized by double-stranded DNA transfer. PMID:12794193

  9. Moderately halophilic gram-positive bacterial diversity in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Ventosa, A; Márquez, M C; Garabito, M J; Arahal, D R

    1998-08-01

    Moderately halophilic bacteria are microorganisms that grow optimally in media containing 3%-15% (w/v) salt. They are represented by a heterogeneous group of microorganisms included in many different genera. Gram-negative moderately halophilic bacteria have been studied in more detail, but studies on gram-positive species are more scarce. Recent studies carried out by our research group on gram-positive moderate halophiles have permitted clarifying their taxonomic and phylogenetic position and describing new species. Thus, we have isolated six strains from ponds of salterns that show phenotypic and genotypic characteristics similar to those of Nesterenkonia halobia (formerly Micrococcus halobius), a moderately halophilic gram-positive coccus that was described on the basis of a single strain. Our data demonstrate quite clearly that they are members of this species and contribute to a better description of these moderately halophilic cocci. Similarly, a study of a large number of gram-positive moderately halophilic rods that were able to produce endospores led us to describe a new species, designated Bacillus salexigens. Further, isolates grouped in other three phenons, obtained by numerical taxonomy analysis and showing phenotypic features quite similar to those of this species, represent different genomovars, with very low DNA-DNA homology. Although they might represent additional new species, it will be necessary to determine new phenotypic features to differentiate them from previously described Bacillus species. We have also studied the viability of some old enrichments provided by B.E. Volcani, which were set up in 1936. We isolated 31 gram-positive motile endospore-forming rods that, according to their phenotypic characteristics, could represent a new species of the genus Bacillus. PMID:9783177

  10. Antibacterial activity-guided purification and identification of a novel C-20 oxygenated ent-kaurane from Rabdosia serra (MAXIM.) HARA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lianzhu; Zhu, Dashuai; Zou, Linwu; Yang, Bao; Zhao, Mouming

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this work was to conduct an activity-guided isolation of antibacterial compounds from Rabdosia serra. The ethanol extracts of R. serra leaf and stem were partitioned sequentially into petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, butanol and water fractions, respectively. The ethanol extract of leaf evidenced broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacterial, including Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. The ethyl acetate fractions of leaf and stem exhibited strong inhibition against gram-positive bacteria, and were then purified further. On the basis of antibacterial assay-guided purification, three phenolic compounds (rosmarinic acid, methyl rosmarinate and pedalitin) and four C-20 oxygenated ent-kauranes (effusanin E, lasiodin, rabdosichuanin D and a new compound namely effusanin F) were obtained, whose contents were determined by HPLC analysis. The broth microdilution method confirmed the important inhibition potential of C-20 oxygenated ent-kauranes with low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. Effusanin E, lasiodin and effusanin F could be useful for the development of new antibacterial agents. PMID:23561188

  11. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. PMID:26057244

  12. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using A. indicum leaf extract and their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashokkumar, S.; Ravi, S.; Kathiravan, V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract. It is observed that Abutilon indicum leaf extract can reduce silver ions into silver nanoparticles within 15 min of reaction time. The formation and stability of the reduced silver nanoparticles in the colloidal solution were monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometer analysis. The mean particle diameter of silver nanoparticles was calculated from the XRD pattern. FT-IR spectra of the leaf extract after the development of nanoparticles are determined to allow identification of possible functional groups responsible for the conversion of metal ions to metal nanoparticles. The AgNPs thus obtained showed highly potent antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive (Staphyloccocus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) microorganisms.

  13. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using A. indicum leaf extract and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, S; Ravi, S; Kathiravan, V; Velmurugan, S

    2015-01-01

    Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract. It is observed that Abutilon indicum leaf extract can reduce silver ions into silver nanoparticles within 15 min of reaction time. The formation and stability of the reduced silver nanoparticles in the colloidal solution were monitored by UV-Vis spectrophotometer analysis. The mean particle diameter of silver nanoparticles was calculated from the XRD pattern. FT-IR spectra of the leaf extract after the development of nanoparticles are determined to allow identification of possible functional groups responsible for the conversion of metal ions to metal nanoparticles. The AgNPs thus obtained showed highly potent antibacterial activity toward Gram-positive (Staphyloccocus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli) microorganisms. PMID:24997264

  14. Antibacterial activities of Dodonaea viscosa using contact bioautography technique.

    PubMed

    Khurram, Muhammad; Khan, Murad Ali; Hameed, Abdul; Abbas, Naz; Qayum, Abdul; Inayat, Humaira

    2009-01-01

    The crude ethanolic extract and n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions of Dodonaea viscosa were analyzed for antibacterial potential against four Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, and three Gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Preliminary screening showed inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The thin layer chromatograms of the fractions were then subjected to contact bioautography, which showed inhibition zone at different R(f) values against Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, indicating the presence of antibacterial components. The MIC of each fraction was determined through a 96-well micro-titer plate method. The non-viability of the organisms was ascertained by determining the MBC of the fractions. PMID:19325527

  15. Nitric oxide integrated polyethylenimine-based tri-block copolymer for efficient antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghong; Kim, Jihoon; Singha, Kaushik; Han, Dong-Keun; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2013-11-01

    The work demonstrated a successful synthesis of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing material and its antibacterial effect on Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli), Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The polymeric support composed of thermosensitive Pluronic F68 having good biocompatibility and branched polyethylenimine (BPEI) housed N-diazeniumdiolates (NONOates) which could store and release NO under appropriate physiological condition. The developed F68-BPEI-NONOates releases a sufficient amount of NO under physiological condition to elicit effective killing of E. coli, S. aureus and MRSA. The antibacterial ability of the released NO was compared to untreated control or unmodified F68 polymer by using confocal microscopy; F68-BPEI-NONOates demonstrated excellent antibacterial activity with in vitro low cytotoxicity. TEM investigation also revealed the destruction of bacteria membrane caused by NO. The effectiveness of F68-BPEI-NONOates against resistant strains such as MRSA provides a very simple but highly efficient strategy to combat drug-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:23932499

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of OPC-20011, a Novel Parenteral Broad-Spectrum 2-Oxaisocephem Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Makoto; Tamaoka, Hisashi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Mikio

    1998-01-01

    OPC-20011, a new parenteral 2-oxaisocephem antibiotic, has an oxygen atom at the 2- position of the cephalosporin frame. OPC-20011 had the best antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterococcus faecalis, and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: MICs at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited were 6.25, 6.25, and 0.05 ?g/ml, respectively. Its activity is due to a high affinity of the penicillin-binding protein 2? in MRSA, an affinity which was approximately 1,050 times as high as that for flomoxef. Against gram-negative bacteria, OPC-20011 also showed antibacterial activities similar to those of ceftazidime. The in vivo activities of OPC-20011 were comparable to or greater than those of reference compounds in murine models of systemic infection caused by gram-positive and -negative pathogens. OPC-20011 was up to 10 times as effective as vancomycin against MRSA infections in mice. This better in vivo efficacy is probably due to the bactericidal activity of OPC-20011, while vancomycin showed bacteriostatic activity against MRSA. OPC-20011 produced a significant decrease of viable counts in lung tissue at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg of body weight, an efficacy similar to that of ampicillin at a dose of 10 to 20 mg/kg on an experimental murine model of respiratory tract infection caused by non-ampicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae T-0005. The better therapeutic efficacy of OPC-20011 was considered to be due to its potent antibacterial activity and low affinity for serum proteins of experimental animals (29% in mice and 6.4% in rats). PMID:9797230

  17. Daptomycin: a novel lipopeptide antibiotic against Gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Vogt, Ferdinand; Sodian, Ralf; Weis, Florian

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the historical background of drug resistance of Gram-positive pathogens as well as to describe in detail the novel lipopeptide antibiotic daptomycin. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic aspects are reviewed and the current clinical use of daptomycin is presented. Daptomycin seems to be a reliable drug in the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections, infective right-sided endocarditis, and bacteremia caused by Gram-positive agents. Its unique mechanism of action and its low resistance profile, together with its rapid bactericidal action make it a favorable alternative to vancomycin in multi-drug resistant cocci. The role of daptomycin in the treatment of prosthetic material infections, osteomyelitis, and urogenital infections needs to be evaluated in randomized clinical trials. PMID:21694898

  18. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi - Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    ?van?arová, Monika; Moeder, Monika; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    A group of white rot fungi (Irpex lacteus, Panus tigrinus, Dichomitus squalens, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus) was investigated for the biodegradation of norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OF) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). The selected fluoroquinolones were readily degraded almost completely by I. lacteus and T. versicolor within 10 and 14d of incubation in liquid medium, respectively. The biodegradation products were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The analyses indicated that the fungi use similar mechanisms to degrade structurally related antibiotics. The piperazine ring of the molecules is preferably attacked via either substitution or/and decomposition. In addition to the degradation efficiency, attention was devoted to the residual antibiotic activities estimated using Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Only I. lacteus was able to remove the antibiotic activity during the course of the degradation of NOR and OF. The product-effect correlations evaluated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) enabled elucidation of the participation of the individual metabolites in the residual antibacterial activity. Most of the metabolites correlated with the antibacterial activity, explaining the rather high residual activity remaining after the biodegradation. PCA of ligninolytic enzyme activities indicated that manganese peroxidase might participate in the degradation. PMID:25592459

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Retinaldehyde against Propionibacterium acnes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Pechčre; J.-C. Pechčreb; L. Germaniera

    1999-01-01

    Background: Retinaldehyde has been shown to exert antibacterial activity in vitro. Aim: This study evaluates the effect of retinaldehyde on Propionibacterium acnes both in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Microbial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of retinaldehyde and retinoic acid were determined on reference strains of P. acnes. In vivo activity of daily topical application of 0.05% retinaldehyde on the P.

  20. Mercury(II) complexes of unsymmetric phosphorus ylides: Synthesis, spectroscopic and antibacterial activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabounchei, Seyyed Javad; Panahimehr, Mohammad; Hosseinzadeh, Marjan; Karamian, Roya; Asadbegy, Mostafa; Masumi, Azadeh

    2014-03-01

    The reaction of Ph2PCH2PPh2 (dppm) with 2-bromo-3-nitroacetophenone and 2,2?,4?-trichloroacetophenone in chloroform produce the new phosphonium salts [Ph2PCH2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H4NO2]Br (1) and [Ph2PCH2PPh2CH2C(O)C6H3Cl2]Cl (2). Further, by reaction of the monophosphonium salts of dppm with the strong base triethylaminethe corresponding bidentate phosphorus ylides, Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H4NO2 (3) and Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H3Cl2 (4) were obtained. The reaction of these ligands with mercury(II) halides in dry methanol led to the formation of the mononuclear complexes {HgX2[(Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H4NO2)]} [X = Cl (5), Br (6), I (7)] and {HgX2[(Ph2PCH2PPh2C(H)C(O)C6H3Cl2)]} [X = Cl (8), Br (9), I (10)]. Characterization of the obtained compounds was performed by elemental analysis, IR, 1H, 31P and 13C NMR. The structure of compound 1 being unequivocally determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The mass spectrum of compound 6 (as an instance) also demonstrates the synthesize of these compounds. In all complexes the title ylides are coordinated through the ylidic carbon and the phosphine atom. These compounds form five membered ring under complexation. The antibacterial effects of DMSO solutions of the ligands and their metal complexes were evaluated by the disc diffusion method against six Gram positive and negative bacteria. All compounds represent antibacterial activity against these bacteria with high levels of inhibitory potency exhibited against the Gram positive species.

  1. Conjugative type IV secretion systems in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation presents the most important means to spread antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among closely and distantly related bacteria. Conjugative plasmids are the mobile genetic elements mainly responsible for this task. All the genetic information required for the horizontal transmission is encoded on the conjugative plasmids themselves. Two distinct concepts for horizontal plasmid transfer in Gram-positive bacteria exist, the most prominent one transports single stranded plasmid DNA via a multi-protein complex, termed type IV secretion system, across the Gram-positive cell envelope. Type IV secretion systems have been found in virtually all unicellular Gram-positive bacteria, whereas multicellular Streptomycetes seem to have developed a specialized system more closely related to the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. This review intends to summarize the state of the art of prototype systems belonging to the two distinct concepts; it focuses on protein key players identified so far and gives future directions for research in this emerging field of promiscuous interbacterial transport. PMID:24129002

  2. Teichoic acids and related cell-wall glycopolymers in Gram-positive physiology and host interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Weidenmaier; Andreas Peschel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract | Most Gram-positive bacteria incorporate membrane- or peptidoglycan-attached carbohydrate-based polymers into their cell envelopes. Such cell-wall glycopolymers (CWGs) often have highly variable structures and have crucial roles in protecting, connecting and controlling the major envelope constituents. Further important roles of CWGs in host-cell adhesion, inflammation and immune activation have also been described in recent years. Identifying and harnessing highly

  3. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucila Saavedra; Fernando Sesma

    2011-01-01

    \\u000a The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become\\u000a an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and\\u000a human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic\\u000a host systems makes them attractive candidates for

  4. Thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidinedione derivatives as antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Dewal, Mahender B.; Wani, Amit S.; Vidaillac, Celine; Oupicky, David; Rybak, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Several thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidinediones have been synthesized and examined for antibacterial activity against a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens. Two compounds displayed potent activity (2–16 mg/L) against multi-drug resistant Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin, vancomycin-intermediate, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, VISA, VRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Only one of these agents possessed moderate activity (16–32 mg/L) against Gram-negative strains. An examination of the cytotoxicity of these agents revealed that they displayed low toxicity (40–50 mg/L) against mammalian cell and very low hemolytic activity (2–7%). Taken together, these studies suggest that thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidinediones are interesting scaffolds for the development of novel Gram-positive antibacterial agents. PMID:22405289

  5. Evaluation of antibacterial activity against Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Gaëlle; Fa˙, Fabienne; Linossier, Isabelle; Vallée-Réhel, Karine

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is a well-known pathogenic bacterium responsible for human gastrointestinal enteritis mainly due to the consumption of eggs and egg-products. The first aim of this work was to study several virulence factors of a strain isolated from egg content: SEovo. First, bacterial growth was studied at several temperatures and cell morphology was observed by scanning electronic microscopy. These experiments showed Salmonella's ability to grow at low temperatures and to produce exoproducts. Next, Salmonella motility was observed performing swimming, twitching, and swarming tests. Results indicated a positive flagellar activity and the cell ability to differentiate and become hyperflagellated under specific conditions. Moreover, SEovo adherence and biofilm formation was carried out. All of these tests enabled us to conclude that SEovo is a potential pathogen, thus it can be used as a model to perform antibacterial experiments. The second part of the study was dedicated to the evaluation of the antibacterial activity of different molecules using several methods. The antibacterial effect of silver and copper aluminosilicates was tested by two different kinds of methods. On the one hand, the effect of these two antibacterial agents was determined using microbiological methods: viable cell count and agar-well diffusion. And on the other hand, the antibacterial activity was evaluated using CLSM and SYTO Red/SYTOX Green dyeing. CLSM allowed for the evaluation of the biocide on sessile cells, whereas the first methods did not. Results showed that adhered bacteria were more resistant than planktonic counterparts and that CLSM was a good alternative to evaluate antibacterial activity on fixed bacteria without having to carry out a removing step. PMID:21717317

  6. Biotransformation of the antibiotic agent flumequine by ligninolytic fungi and residual antibacterial activity of the transformation mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cvan?arová, Monika; Moeder, Monika; Filipová, Alena; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2013-12-17

    Flumequine, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is applied preferably in veterinary medicine, for stock breeding and treatment of aquacultures. Formation of drug resistance is a matter of general concern when antibiotics such as flumquine occur in the environment. Thus, biodegradation of flumequine in solution was investigated using five different ligninolytic fungi. Irpex lacteus, Dichomitus squalens, and Trametes versicolor proved most efficient and transformed more than 90% of flumequine within 6 or even 3 days. Panus tigrinus and Pleurotus ostreatus required up to 14 days to remove >90% of flumequine. Analyses of the metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggest different transformation pathways for the different fungal strains. Structure proposals were elaborated for 8 metabolites. 7-Hydroxy-flumequine and flumequine ethyl ester were identified as common metabolites produced by all ligninolytic fungi. The largest variety of metabolites was formed by D. squalens. Residual antibacterial activity of the metabolite mixtures was tested using gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. While for the less efficient P. tigrinus and P. ostreatus cultures the antibacterial activities corresponded to the residual concentrations of flumequine, a remarkable antibacterial activity remained in the D. squalens cultures although flumequine was transformed to more than 90%. Obviously, antibacterially active transformation products were formed by this fungal strain. PMID:24261869

  7. Colloidal and antibacterial properties of novel triple-headed, double-tailed amphiphiles: Exploring structure-activity relationships and synergistic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Marafino, John N; Gallagher, Tara M; Barragan, Jhosdyn; Volkers, Brandi L; LaDow, Jade E; Bonifer, Kyle; Fitzgerald, Gabriel; Floyd, Jason L; McKenna, Kristin; Minahan, Nicholas T; Walsh, Brenna; Seifert, Kyle; Caran, Kevin L

    2015-07-01

    Two novel series of tris-cationic, tripled-headed, double-tailed amphiphiles were synthesized and the effects of tail length and head group composition on the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), thermodynamic parameters, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against six bacterial strains were investigated. Synergistic antibacterial combinations of these amphiphiles were also identified. Amphiphiles in this study are composed of a benzene core with three benzylic ammonium bromide groups, two of which have alkyl chains, each 8-16 carbons in length. The third head group is a trimethylammonium or pyridinium. Log of critical aggregation concentration (log[CAC]) and heat of aggregation (?Hagg) were both inversely proportional to the length of the linear hydrocarbon chains. Antibacterial activity increases with tail length until an optimal tail length of 12 carbons per chain, above which, activity decreased. The derivatives with two 12 carbon chains had the best antibacterial activity, killing all tested strains at concentrations of 1-2?M for Gram-positive and 4-16?M for Gram-negative bacteria. The identity of the third head group (trimethylammonium or pyridinium) had minimal effect on colloidal and antibacterial activity. The antibacterial activity of several binary combinations of amphiphiles from this study was higher than activity of individual amphiphiles, indicating that these combinations are synergistic. These amphiphiles show promise as novel antibacterial agents that could be used in a variety of applications. PMID:25936261

  8. Synthesis, antibacterial and antitubercular activities of some 7-[4-(5-amino-[1,3,4]thiadiazole-2-sulfonyl)-piperazin-1-yl] fluoroquinolonic derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Talath; A. K. Gadad

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, a series of 7-[4-(5-amino-1,3,4 thiadiazole-2-sulfonyl)]-1-piperazinyl fluoroquinolonic derivatives VIIa–d were synthesized in good yields and characterized by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FAB Mass spectral and elemental analyses. The compounds were evaluated for their preliminary in vitro antibacterial activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and selected compounds VIIa, b were screened for antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

  9. Analysis of effects of MCB3681, the antibacterially active substance of prodrug MCB3837, on human resident microflora as proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, A; Rashid, M-U; Kapsner, T; Panagiotidis, G; Weintraub, A; Nord, C E

    2015-08-01

    The water-soluble prodrug MCB3837 is rapidly converted to MCB3681, active against Gram-positive bacterial species, after intravenous infusion. The aim of this study was to prove the principle that MCB3681 is efficacious in vivo by demonstrating its effect on the resident microflora or colonizers of the human skin, nose, oropharynx and intestine. MCB3837 was infused at a daily dose of 6 mg/kg for 5 days. MCB3681 was active against clostridia, bifidobacteria, lactobacilli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus, thus proving the principle that MCB3681 is antibacterially efficacious in vivo without affecting the Gram-negative microflora. PMID:26047854

  10. Chemical modification of capuramycins to enhance antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Dubuisson, Tia; Protopopova, Marina; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Reddy, Venkata M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To extend capuramycin spectrum of activity beyond mycobacteria and improve intracellular drug activity. Methods Three capuramycin analogues (SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641) were conjugated with different natural and unnatural amino acids or decanoic acid (DEC) through an ester bond at one or more available hydroxyl groups. In vitro activity of the modified compounds was determined against Mycobacterium spp. and representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Intracellular activity was evaluated in J774A.1 mouse macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). Results Acylation of SQ997 and SQ641 with amino undecanoic acid (AUA) improved in vitro activity against most of the bacteria tested. Conjugation of SQ922 with DEC, but not AUA, improved its activity against Gram-positive bacteria. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginine ?-naphthyl amide, MICs of SQ997-AUA, SQ641-AUA and SQ922-DEC compounds improved even further against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In Gram-negative bacteria, EDTA-mediated permeabilization caused 4- to 16-fold enhancement of the activity of AUA-conjugated SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641. Conjugation of all three capuramycin analogues with AUA improved intracellular killing of H37Rv in murine macrophages. Conclusions Conjugation of capuramycin analogues with AUA or DEC enhanced in vitro activity, extended the spectrum of activity in Gram-positive bacteria and increased intracellular activity against H37Rv. PMID:21186194

  11. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity of biodegradable films prepared from Schiff bases of zein.

    PubMed

    Soliman, E A; Khalil, A A; Deraz, S F; El-Fawal, G; Elrahman, S Abd

    2014-10-01

    Pure zein is known to be very hydrophobic, but is still inappropriate for coating and film applications because of their brittle nature. In an attempt to improve the flexibility and the antimicrobial activity of these coatings and films, Chemical modification of zein through forming Schiff bases with different phenolic aldhydes was tried. Influence of this modifications on mechanical, topographical, wetting properties and antimicrobial activity of zein films were evaluated. The chemical structure of the Schiff bases films were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The results indicate an improvement in mechanical properties with chemically modification of zein to form Schiff bases leading to a reduction in the elastic modulus. An increase in the elongation at break has been observed, but with slight influence on tensile strength. Plasticized zein films have similar initial contact angle (?40°). An increase in reaction temperature and time increases film's affinity towards water. As shown by contact angle measurements, a noticeable relation was found between film composition and the hydrophilicity. Surface topography also varied by forming Schiff bases, becoming rougher than zein-based films. The antibacterial activities of zein and Schiff bases of zein-based films were investigated against gram-positive bacteria (Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Clostridium sporogenes) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella enterica). It was found that the antibacterial activity of the Schiff bases-based films was more effective than that of zein-based films. PMID:25328181

  12. Fatty acid composition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Adonis wolgensis L. extract

    PubMed Central

    Mohadjerani, Maryam; Tavakoli, Rahmatollah; Hosseinzadeh, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze the fatty acid content, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of hydro-methanolic extract of Adonis wolgensis L. (A. wolgensis L.) growing wild in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: Oils of A. wolgensis L. was obtained by means of Soxhlet apparatus from leaves and stems. Methyl esters were derived from the oily mixtures by trans-esterification process and were analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS systems. Phenolic compounds extraction was done with aqueous methanol (90%). This extract was investigated for antioxidant activity using DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power methods and was also tested against a panel of microorganisms. Results: Linolenic acid (45.83%) and oleic acid (47.54%) were the most abundant fatty acids in leaves and stems, respectively. Hydro-methanolic extract with the high amount of total phenolics (9.20 ±0.011 mg GAE per dry matter) was the potent antioxidant in the assays. Results obtained from measurements of MIC for extract, indicated that E. coli, S. aureus, and S. enteritidis were the most sensitive microorganisms tested, but no activity was observed against Gram-positive microorganism (B. subtilis). Conclusion: The results obtained from the present study indicated that the oil of A. wolgensis leaves and stems contained a high source of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). These results also showed that hydro-methanolic extract of this plant contained significant antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:25050298

  13. A novel green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using soluble starch and its antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yakout, Sobhy M; Mostafa, Ashraf A

    2015-01-01

    A green method of Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) preparation has been established. This method depends on reduction of silver nitrate with soluble starch. The formation of AgNPs was observed by the color change from colorless to dark brown through the starch addition into silver nitrate solution. It was observed that use of starch makes convenient method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles and can reduce silver ions into the produced silver nanoparticles within one hour of reaction time without using any harsh conditions. The prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-visible spectroscopy and evaluated for its antimicrobial activity. The synthesized green AgNPs showed a potential antibacterial activity that was stronger against Gram positive pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococus aureus and Streptococus pyogenes) than against Gram negative pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella typhi, Shigellasonnei and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Inhibition zones diameter of antibacterial activity depends upon nanoparticles concentration as AgNPs exhibited greater inhibition zone for S.aureus (16.4 mm) followed by P. aeruginosa and S. pyogenes while the least activity was observed for S. typhi (10.4 mm) at 40 ?l/ disc. These results suggested that AgNPs can be used as an effective antiseptic agents in medical fields and process of synthesis creates new opportunities in process development for the synthesis of safe and eco-friendly AgNPs.

  14. Synthesis, structure-activity relationship studies, and antibacterial evaluation of 4-chromanones and chalcones, as well as olympicin A and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li; Maddox, Marcus M; Alam, Md Zahidul; Tsutsumi, Lissa S; Narula, Gagandeep; Bruhn, David F; Wu, Xiaoqian; Sandhaus, Shayna; Lee, Robin B; Simmons, Charles J; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Hurdle, Julian G; Lee, Richard E; Sun, Dianqing

    2014-10-23

    On the basis of recently reported abyssinone II and olympicin A, a series of chemically modified flavonoid phytochemicals were synthesized and evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and a panel of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Some of the synthesized compounds exhibited good antibacterial activities against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration as low as 0.39 ?g/mL. SAR analysis revealed that the 2-hydrophobic substituent and the 4-hydrogen bond donor/acceptor of the 4-chromanone scaffold together with the hydroxy groups at 5- and 7-positions enhanced antibacterial activities; the 2',4'-dihydroxylated A ring and the lipophilic substituted B ring of chalcone derivatives were pharmacophoric elements for antibacterial activities. Mode of action studies performed on selected compounds revealed that they dissipated the bacterial membrane potential, resulting in the inhibition of macromolecular biosynthesis; further studies showed that selected compounds inhibited DNA topoisomerase IV, suggesting complex mechanisms of actions for compounds in this series. PMID:25238443

  15. Interleukin8Derived Peptide Has Antibacterial Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bjorstad; Huamei Fu; Anna Karlsson; Claes Dahlgren; Johan Bylund

    2005-01-01

    Received 18 January 2005\\/Returned for modification 28 February 2005\\/Accepted 10 June 2005 Chemokines are inflammatory mediators with effects on diverse processes associated with the immune response. Some of the proteins belonging to the CXC chemokine subfamily, one of four groups in the family, possess inherent antibacterial activity against a wide range of bacteria. The CXC chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) has not

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Honey on Cariogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi – Motamayel, Fatemeh; Hendi, Seyedeh Sare; Alikhani, Mohammad Yusof; Khamverdi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Honey has antibacterial activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of honey on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, solutions containing 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 50% and 100%(w/v) of natural Hamadan honey were prepared. Each blood (nutrient) agar plate was then filled with dilutions of the honey. The strains of bacteria were inoculated in blood agar for 24 hours at 37°C and were adjusted according to the McFarland scale (10×10 cfumcl?1). All assays were repeated 10 times for each of the honey concentrations. Data were analyzed by non parametric Chi-Square test. Statistical significance was set at ?=0.05. Results: Significant antibacterial activity was detected for honey on Streptococcus mutans in concentrations more than 20% and on Lactobacillus in 100% concentration (P<0.05). Conclusion: It seems that antibacterial activity of honey could be used for prevention and reduction of dental caries. PMID:23724198

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Some Indian Medicinal Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2008-01-01

    The preliminary phytochemical study and in vitro antibacterial activity of the ethanolic extracts of three plants having ethnomedicinal uses collected from tribal belt of Orissa, India, viz. Litsea glutinosa L.: Lauraceae (LG), Vitex peduncularis W.: Verbenaceae (VP), Elephantopus scaber L.: Asteraceae (ES) were investigated. The preliminary phytochemical analysis of the extracts revealed the presence of carbohydrate, tannin, alkaloid in LG,

  18. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of six essentials oils from the Alliaceae family.

    PubMed

    Mnayer, Dima; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Hamieh, Tayssir; Nehme, Nancy; Ferrant, Christine; Fernandez, Xavier; Chemat, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Six essential oils (EOs) from the Alliaceae family, namely garlic (Allium sativum), onion (Allium cepa), leek (Allium porrum), Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum), shallot (Allium ascalonicum) and chive (Allium schoenoprasum) were characterized by GC and GC-MS and evaluated for their functional food properties. Antibacterial properties were tested on five food-borne pathogens: Two Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Listeria monocytogenes (ATCC 19115) and three Gram-negative Salmonella Typhimurium (ATCC 14028), Escherichia coli (ATCC 8739) and Campylobacter jejuni (ATCC 33291) bacteria. Antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties were tested by means of Folin-Ciocalteu and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Garlic, Chinese chive and onion EOs had the highest antibacterial activity whereas shallot and leek EOs were the strongest antioxidants. Heating caused a decrease in the antioxidant activity of these Eos, as shown in the Total Polar Materials (TPM) test. Suggestions on relationships between chemical composition and biological activities are presented. Results show that the EOs could be of value in the food industry as alternatives to synthetic antioxidants. PMID:25470273

  19. Expression, purification and antibacterial activity of the channel catfish hepcidin mature peptide.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Wen, Ya

    2014-02-01

    Hepcidins are small cysteine-rich cationic antimicrobial peptides. The channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) hepcidin cDNA has been characterized, but recombinant protein expression and purification was not reported. I. punctatus hepcidin is comprised of 96 residues, with eight functionally important conserved cysteine residues located in the C-terminal region of the mature peptide, suggesting that this region is responsible for the antibacterial activity. In this study, a cDNA fragment (mCH) encoding the 25 amino acid mature peptide was cloned from channel catfish liver, and inserted into vector pET-32a(+) to produce a construct that expressed a hexahistidine-tagged thioredoxin (trxA) fusion protein that was cleavable using enterokinase. The trxA-mCH fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) at 25°C, using 1mM IPTG for induction. Greater than 80% of the fusion protein was expressed solubly, but was not biologically active. Removal of the trxA fusion partner by enterokinase resulted in mCH that exhibited antibacterial activity against two Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus), and two Gram-negative (E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. PMID:24269761

  20. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of Piperaceae extracts and nisin on Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Suelen P; Anjos, Márcia Maria Dos; Carrara, Vanessa S; Delima, Juliana N; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício G; Nakamura, Tânia U; Nakamura, Celso V; de Abreu Filho, Benício A

    2013-11-01

    Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris is a gram-positive aerobic bacterium. This bacterium resists pasteurization temperatures and low pH and is usually involved in the spoilage of juices and acidic drinks. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of nisin and the species Piper (Piperaceae) on A. acidoterrestris. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the broth microdilution method. The species Piper aduncum had the lowest MIC and an MBC of 15.6 ?g/mL and was selected for fractionation. Six fractions were obtained, and the dichloromethane fraction (F.3) had the lowest MIC/MBC (7.81 ?g/mL). The dichloromethane fraction was again fractionized, and a spectral analysis revealed that the compound was prenylated chromene (F.3.7). The checkerboard method demonstrated that the crude extract (CE) of P. aduncum plus nisin had a synergistic interaction (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] = 0.24). The bactericidal activity of (F.3.7) was confirmed by the time-kill curve. P. aduncum, nisin, and prenylated chromene exhibited strong antibacterial activity against the spores and vegetative cells of A. acidoterrestris. The results of this study suggest that extracts of the genus Piper may provide an alternative to the use of thermal processing for controlling A. spoilage. PMID:24138211

  1. Antibacterial, cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activities from Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera marine algae.

    PubMed

    Selim, Samy; Amin, Abeer; Hassan, Sherif; Hagazey, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Extracts from 2 algal species (Hypnea esperi and Caulerpa prolifera) from Suez Canal region, Egypt were screened for the production of antibacterial compounds against some pathogenic bacteria. The bacteria tested included Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Algal species displayed antibacterial activity. The methanolic extracts showed variable response by producing various zones of inhibition against studied bacteria. The tested Gram-negative bacteria were less affected by studied algal extracts than Gram-positive bacteria. We determined some biopotentials properties such as cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity of most potent algal active extracts. The secondary metabolites of only Hypnea esperi algal extract effectively prevented the blood clotting to the extent of 120 seconds. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) indicated that all potent tested algal extract C inhibits Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was between 1 and 1.4mg/ml. The algal isolates from Egypt have been found showing promising results against infectious bacteria instead of some synthetic antibiotics. PMID:25730785

  2. Daptomycin: a new drug class for the treatment of Gram-positive infections.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jeffrey D

    2005-02-01

    Daptomycin is the first member of a new class of bactericidal antibiotics, the cyclic lipopeptides. In September 2003, daptomycin was approved for the treatment of Gram-positive infections associated with complicated skin and skin structure infections. A key feature of daptomycin is its rapid, concentration-dependent bactericidal activity against significant Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, glycopeptide-intermediate and -resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium (VRE). Daptomycin also has a unique mechanism of action, no cross-resistance with any other class of antibiotic and a relatively prolonged concentration-dependent postantibiotic effect in vitro. In the United States, daptomycin has been approved for use at a dose of 4 mg/ kg once daily in the treatment of S. aureus (including methicillin-resistant strains), three beta-hemolytic streptococci (S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae and S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis) and E. faecalis associated with complicated skin and skin structure infections. In addition, daptomycin is undergoing a phase III evaluation for the treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to S. aureus. With its once-daily dosing, favorable safety profile and low potential for resistance, daptomycin is a powerful new antibiotic therapy against Gram-positive infections. PMID:15821781

  3. The Tat system of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Goosens, Vivianne J; Monteferrante, Carmine G; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2014-08-01

    The twin-arginine protein translocation (Tat) system has a unique ability to translocate folded and co-factor-containing proteins across lipid bilayers. The Tat pathway is present in bacteria, archaea and in the thylakoid membranes of chloroplasts and, depending on the organism and environmental conditions, it can be deemed important for cell survival, virulence or bioproduction. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of the Tat system with specific focus on Gram-positive bacteria. The 'universal minimal Tat system' is composed of a TatA and a TatC protein. However, this pathway is more commonly composed of two TatA-like proteins and one TatC protein. Often the TatA-like proteins have diverged to have two different functions and, in this case, the second TatA-like protein is usually referred to as TatB. The correct folding and/or incorporation of co-factors are requirements for translocation, and the known quality control mechanisms are examined in this review. A number of examples of crosstalk between the Tat system and other protein transport systems, such as the Sec-YidC translocon and signal peptidases or sheddases are also discussed. Further, an overview of specific Gram-positive bacterial Tat systems found in monoderm and diderm species is detailed. Altogether, this review highlights the unique features of Gram-positive bacterial Tat systems and pinpoints key questions that remain to be addressed in future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey. PMID:24140208

  4. Synthesis, micellisation and interaction of novel quaternary ammonium compounds derived from l-Phenylalanine with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine as model membrane in relation to their antibacterial activity, and their selectivity over human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Joondan, Nausheen; Caumul, Prakashanand; Akerman, Matthew; Jhaumeer-Laulloo, Sabina

    2015-02-01

    A series of quaternary ammonium compounds (QUATS) derived from l-Phenylalanine have been synthesized and their antibacterial efficiencies were determined against various strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The antibacterial activity increased with increasing chain length, exhibiting a cut-off effect at C14 for Gram-positive and C12 for Gram-negative bacteria. The l-Phenylalanine QUATS displayed enhanced antibacterial properties with a higher cut-off point compared to their corresponding l-Phenylalanine ester hydrochlorides. The CMC was correlated with the MIC, inferring that micellar activity contributes to the cut-off effect in antibacterial activity. The hemolytic activities (HC50) of the QUATS against human red blood cells were also determined to illustrate the selectivity of these QUATS for bacterial over mammalian cells. In general, the MIC was lower than the HC50, and assessment of the micellar contribution to the antibacterial and hemolytic evaluation in TBS as a common medium confirmed that these QUATS can act as antibacterial, yet non-toxic molecules at their monomer concentrations. The interaction of the QUATS with the phospholipid vesicles (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DPPC) in the presence of 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) as fluorescence probes showed that the presence of the quaternary ammonium moiety causes an increase in hydrophobic interactions, thus causing an increase in antibacterial activity. PMID:25618736

  5. Antibacterial activity of oleoyl-chitosan nanoparticles: A novel antibacterial dispersion system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ke Xing; Xi Guang Chen; Yan Yan Li; Cheng Sheng Liu; Chen Guang Liu; Dong Su Cha; Hyun Jin Park

    2008-01-01

    A novel chitosan antibacterial dispersion system was prepared by oleoyl-chitosan (O-chitosan) nanoparticles (OCNP), and the antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. Results showed that OCNP could be well distributed in nutrient broth and had strong antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of all OCNP samples ranged from 31.25 to 125mg\\/l against E. coli. For S.

  6. Oritavancin - a new semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide agent to tackle the challenge of resistant gram positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswadeep; Sarkar, Chayna; Schachter, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Natural glycopeptide antibiotics like vancomycin and teicoplanin have played a significant role in countering the threat posed by Gram-positive bacterial infections. The emergence of resistance to glycopeptides among enterococci and staphylococci has prompted the search for second-generation drugs of this class and semi-synthetic derivatives are currently under clinical trials. Antimicrobial resistance among Gram-positive organisms has been increasing steadily during the past several decades and the current development of antibiotics falls short of meeting the needs. Oritavancin (LY-333328 diphosphate), a promising novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide, has a mechanism of action similar to that of other glycopeptides. It has concentration-dependent activity against a variety of Gram-positive organisms specially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VISA), Streptococcus pneumoniae and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus. It is rapidly bactericidal against many species and in particular for enterococci where vancomycin and teicoplanin are only bacteriostatic even against susceptible strains. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin has not been fully described; however, oritavancin has a long half-life of about 195.4 hours and is slowly eliminated by renal means. Oritavancin is not metabolized by the liver in animals. Oritavancin will most probably be prescribed as a once-daily dose and it demonstrates concentration-dependent bactericidal activity. Oritavancin has demonstrated preliminary safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials. In a Phase III clinical trial, oritavancin has achieved the primary efficacy end point in the treatment of complicated Gram-positive skin and skin-structure infections. To date, adverse events have been mild and limited; the most common being administration site complaints, headache, rhinitis, dry skin, pain, increases in liver transaminases and accumulation of free cholesterol and phospholipids in phagocytic (macrophages) and nonphagocytic (fibroblast) cells. Oritavancin appears to be a promising antimicrobial alternative to vancomycin (with additional activity against Staphylococcus and Enterococcus resistant to vancomycin) for the treatment of complicated Gram-positive skin and skin-structure infections. Additional clinical data are required to fully explore its use. PMID:24035967

  7. Antioxidant and antibacterial activity of six edible wild plants (Sonchus spp.) in China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dao-Zong; Yu, Xin-Fen; Zhu, Zhuo-Ying; Zou, Zhuang-Dan

    2011-12-01

    The total phenolic and flavonoid, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of six Sonchus wild vegetables (Sonchus oleraceus L., Sonchus arvensis L., Sonchus asper (L.) Hill., Sonchus uliginosus M.B., Sonchus brachyotus DC. and Sonchus lingianus Shih) in China were investigated. The results revealed that S. arvensis extract and S. oleraceus extract contained the highest amount of phenolic and flavonoid, respectively. Among the methanol extracts of six Sonchus species, S. arvensis extract exhibited the highest radical (DPPH and ABTS+ scavenging power and lipid peroxidation inhibitory power. It also exhibited the highest reducing power at 500?µg?mL?ą by A (700)?=?0.80. The results of antibacterial test indicated that the S. oleraceus extract showed higher activity than the other five Sonchus wild vegetables extracts, both in Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and in a Gram-positive bacterium (Staphylococcus aureus). These results indicate that Sonchus wild food plants might be applicable in natural medicine and healthy food. PMID:21793765

  8. Isolation of the Entomopathogenic Fungal Strain Cod-MK1201 from a Cicada Nymph and Assessment of Its Antibacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Sangdee, Kusavadee; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Sangdee, Aphidech

    2015-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Cod-MK1201 was isolated from a dead cicada nymph. Three regions of ribosomal nuclear DNA, the internal transcribed spacers of nuclear ribosomal DNA repeats (ITS), the partial small subunit of rDNA (nrSSU) , and the partial large subunit of rDNA (nrLSU), and two protein-coding regions, the elongation factor 1? (EF-1?), and the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (rpb1) gene, were sequenced and used for fungal identification. The phylogenetic analysis of the ITS and the combined data set of the five genes indicated that the fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 is a new strain of Cordyceps sp. that is closely related to Cordyceps nipponica and C. kanzashiana. Crude extracts of mycelium-cultured Cod-MK1201 were obtained using distilled water and 50% (v/v) ethanol, and the antibacterial activity of each was determined. Both extracts had activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but the ethanol extract was the more potent of the two. The antibacterial activity of the protein fractions of these extracts was also determined. The protein fraction from the ethanol extract was more antibacterial than the protein fraction from the aqueous extract. Three antibacterial constituents including adenosine, the total phenolic content (TPC), and the total flavonoid content (TFC) was also determined. The results showed that the adenosine content, the TPC, and the TFC of the ethanol extract were more active than those of the aqueous extract. Moreover, synergism was detected between these antibacterial constituents. In conclusion, the entomopathogenic fungal isolate Cod-MK1201 represents a natural source of antibacterial agents. PMID:25746406

  9. Gram-positive cocci isolated from slaughtered poultry.

    PubMed

    Turtura, G C; Lorenzelli, P

    1994-06-01

    Gram-positive cocci were found in all meat samples of poultry slaughtered and processed for retail sale, at incidence rates ranging from 10(2) CFU/ml to 1.35 x 10(6) CFU/ml and a mode between 8 x 10(5) and 9 x 10(5) CFU/ml for 75% of the samples. The 93 isolated strains were identified as belonging to the following species: Enterococcus faecalis (48 strains), E. faecium (16), E. avium (7), E. durans (4), Aerococcus viridans (10), Streptococcus morbillorum (2), S. salivarius (1), S. sanguis (1), S. "milleri" (1), S. pneumoniae (1), S. acidominimus (1), and Gemella haemolysans (1). These species, which mainly colonize the intestinal tract, but may also be found in other parts of both the human and animal body, are pathogens or potentially such. Their presence is an indication of the fecal contamination of meat processed following gutting of slaughtered chickens (endogenous contamination). A count of the Gram-positive cocci and enterobacteria detected showed that enterococci were present in a far greater number than coliform bacteria. PMID:7921897

  10. Antibacterial activity against ?- lactamase producing Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants Staphylococcus aureus: fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study reports the antibacterial capacity of alkaloid compounds in combination with Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants bacteria isolated from clinical samples. The resistance of different bacteria strains to the current antibacterial agents, their toxicity and the cost of the treatment have led to the development of natural products against the bacteria resistant infections when applied in combination with conventional antimicrobial drugs. Method The antibacterial assays in this study were performed by using inhibition zone diameters, MIC, MBC methods, the time-kill assay and the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination. On the whole, fifteen Gram-positive bacterial strains (MRSA/ARSA) were used. Negative control was prepared using discs impregnated with 10 % DMSO in water and commercially available Methicillin and Ampicillin from Alkom Laboratories LTD were used as positive reference standards for all bacterial strains. Results We noticed that the highest activities were founded with the combination of alkaloid compounds and conventional antibiotics against all bacteria strains. Then, results showed that after 7 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculums. Conclusion The results of this study showed that alkaloid compounds in combination with conventional antibiotics (Methicillin, Ampicillin) exhibited antimicrobial effects against microorganisms tested. These results validate the ethno-botanical use of Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. (Malvaceae) in Burkina Faso. Moreover, this study demonstrates the potential of this herbaceous as a source of antibacterial agent that could be effectively used for future health care purposes. PMID:22716026

  11. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a `green chemistry' approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO- and NH2 + groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications.

  12. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a ‘green chemistry’ approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO? and NH2?+ groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications. PMID:24533676

  13. Green synthesis of silk sericin-capped silver nanoparticles and their potent anti-bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Bang, Nipaporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 'green chemistry' approach was introduced to synthesize silk sericin (SS)-capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under an alkaline condition (pH 11) using SS as a reducing and stabilizing agent instead of toxic chemicals. The SS-capped AgNPs were successfully synthesized at various concentrations of SS and AgNO3, but the yields were different. A higher yield of SS-capped AgNPs was obtained when the concentrations of SS and AgNO3 were increased. The SS-capped AgNPs showed a round shape and uniform size with diameter at around 48 to 117 nm. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy result proved that the carboxylate groups obtained from alkaline degradation of SS would be a reducing agent for the generation of AgNPs while COO- and NH2?+ groups stabilized the AgNPs and prevented their precipitation or aggregation. Furthermore, the SS-capped AgNPs showed potent anti-bacterial activity against various gram-positive bacteria (minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 0.008 mM) and gram-negative bacteria (MIC ranging from 0.001 to 0.004 mM). Therefore, the SS-capped AgNPs would be a safe candidate for anti-bacterial applications. PMID:24533676

  14. Chemical composition and antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Allium hirtifolium Boiss.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salmiah; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Talebpour, Amir Hossein; Zargar, Mohsen; Shameli, Kamyar; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahanshiri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Allium hirtifolium Boiss. known as Persian shallot, is a spice used as a traditional medicine in Iran and, Mediterranean region. In this study, the chemical composition of the hydromethanolic extract of this plant was analyzed using GC/MS. The result showed that 9-hexadecenoic acid, 11,14-eicosadienoic acid, and n-hexadecanoic acid are the main constituents. The antibacterial activity of the shallot extract was also examined by disk diffusion and microdilution broth assays. It was demonstrated that Persian shallot hydromethanolic extract was effective against 10 different species of pathogenic bacteria including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Specifically, the minimum concentration of the extract which inhibited bacterial growth (MIC values) was 1.88?mg/mL for most of the gram-positive bacteria. This concentration was not much different from the concentration that was safe for mammalian cells (1.50 mg/mL) suggesting that the hydromethanolic extract of Persian shallot may be a safe and strong antibacterial agent. PMID:23484141

  15. One-step synthesis of silver nanoparticles in an aqueous solution and their antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangyu; Zhang, Feng; Morikawa, Hideaki; Chen, Yueyue

    2014-03-01

    A one-step simple synthesis of silver colloid nanoparticles with controllable sizes is presented in this research. In the synthesis, an amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer (HBP-NH2) was applied as a stabilizer and a reductant. The syntheses, performed at various initial AgNO3 concentrations (0.28-0.56 g/l) in a 2 g/l HBP-NH2 aqueous solution, produced silver colloid nanoparticles having average sizes from 3 to 30 nm with narrow size distributions. The formation of silver colloid nanoparticles was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV/Visible Absorption Spectrophotometry, and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) measurements. The results indicated that both particle size and the UV absorption are strongly dependent on the initial AgNO3 concentrations. The silver colloid nanoparticles, prepared with a 0.35 g/l AgNO3 aqueous solution in the presences of 2 g/l HBP-NH2, showed good antibacterial activities against Gram-negative bacteria ( Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus). A very low concentration of nano-silver (as low as 3.0 ug/ml Ag) also gave excellent antibacterial performance.

  16. Electrodeposition, characterization, and antibacterial activity of zinc/silver particle composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Vidal, Y.; Suarez-Rojas, R.; Ruiz, C.; Torres, J.; ??lu, ?tefan; Méndez, Alia; Trejo, G.

    2015-07-01

    Composite coatings consisting of zinc and silver particles (Zn/AgPs) with antibacterial activity were prepared using an electrodeposition technique. The morphology, composition, and structure of the Zn/AgPs composite coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The antibacterial properties of the coatings against the microorganisms Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative bacterium and Staphylococcus aureus as a model Gram-positive bacterium were studied quantitatively and qualitatively. The results revealed that the dispersant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) assisted in the formation of a stable suspension of Ag particles in the electrolytic bath for 24 h. Likewise, a high concentration of CTAB in the electrolytic bath promoted an increase in the number of Ag particles occluded in the Zn/AgPs coatings. The Zn/AgPs coatings that were obtained were compact, smooth, and shiny materials. Antimicrobial tests performed on the Zn/AgPs coatings revealed that the inhibition of bacterial growth after 30 min of contact time was between 91% and 98% when the AgPs content ranged from 4.3 to 14.0 mg cm-3.

  17. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Activities of Allium hirtifolium Boiss

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Salmiah; Jalilian, Farid Azizi; Talebpour, Amir Hossein; Zargar, Mohsen; Shameli, Kamyar; Sekawi, Zamberi; Jahanshiri, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Allium hirtifolium Boiss. known as Persian shallot, is a spice used as a traditional medicine in Iran and, Mediterranean region. In this study, the chemical composition of the hydromethanolic extract of this plant was analyzed using GC/MS. The result showed that 9-hexadecenoic acid, 11,14-eicosadienoic acid, and n-hexadecanoic acid are the main constituents. The antibacterial activity of the shallot extract was also examined by disk diffusion and microdilution broth assays. It was demonstrated that Persian shallot hydromethanolic extract was effective against 10 different species of pathogenic bacteria including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Specifically, the minimum concentration of the extract which inhibited bacterial growth (MIC values) was 1.88?mg/mL for most of the gram-positive bacteria. This concentration was not much different from the concentration that was safe for mammalian cells (1.50?mg/mL) suggesting that the hydromethanolic extract of Persian shallot may be a safe and strong antibacterial agent. PMID:23484141

  18. Truncated antimicrobial peptides from marine organisms retain anticancer activity and antibacterial activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Ching; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Wu, Jen-Leih

    2013-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were recently determined to be potential candidates for treating drug-resistant bacterial infections. The aim of this study was to develop shorter AMP fragments that combine maximal bactericidal effect with minimal synthesis cost. We first synthesized a series of truncated forms of AMPs (anti-lipopolysaccharide factor from shrimp, epinecidin from grouper, and pardaxin from Pardachirus marmoratus). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of modified AMPs against ten bacterial species were determined. We also examined the synergy between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics. In addition, we measured the inhibitory rate of cancer cells treated with AMPs by MTS assay. We found that two modified antibacterial peptides (epinecidin-8 and pardaxin-6) had a broad range of action against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, epinecidin and pardaxin were demonstrated to have high antibacterial and anticancer activities, and both AMPs resulted in a significant synergistic improvement in the potencies of streptomycin and kanamycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Neither AMP induced significant hemolysis at their MICs. In addition, both AMPs inhibited human epithelial carcinoma (HeLa) and fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cell growth. The functions of these truncated AMPs were similar to those of their full-length equivalents. In conclusion, we have successfully identified shorter, inexpensive fragments with maximal bactericidal activity. This study also provides an excellent basis for the investigation of potential synergies between peptide and non-peptide antibiotics, for a broad range of antimicrobial and anticancer activities. PMID:23598079

  19. Phytochemical analysis & Antibacterial activity of Nerium oleander

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneshwari, L.; Arthy, E.; Anitha, C; Dhanabalan, K; Meena, M

    2007-01-01

    Nerium indicum [Family:Apocynaceae] is commonly known as Arali [Tam] found throughout India, and has been used in the treatment of cancer, cardiotonic, leprosy and skin diseases. Plant parts such as root, bark and leaves are used. The present study is therefore undertaken to analyse its phyto chemical constituents in solvents like Benene, Chloroform and Alcohol and to screen its antibacterial activity. The dried leaf sample is extracted with solvents by cold maceration. The phytochemical analysis showed the presence of Alkaloids, Terpenoids, Cardiac glycosides, Saponins, Tannins & Carbohydrates in all the solvents. All the extracts were screened for antibacterial activity by Disc Diffusion Method. Out of the cultures used Staphylococccus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium showed better zone of inhibition which is 10mm, 9mm & 7 mm respectively. PMID:22557246

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Murrayaquinone A and 6-Methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-carbazole-1,4(9H)-dione

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Biswanath; Chakraborty, Suchandra; Saha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of Murrayaquinone A (10), a naturally occurring carbazoloquinone alkaloid, and 6-methoxy-3,7-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-carbazole-1,4(9H)-dione (11), a synthetic carbazoloquinone, both obtained during the development of the synthesis of Carbazomycin G, having unique quinone moiety, was studied against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp.) bacteria. Compound 10 showed antibacterial activities against both of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus whereas compound 11 indicated the activity against Staphylococcus aureus only. Both compounds 10 and 11 exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 50??g?mL?1 against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24963299

  1. Antibacterial peptides in hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue from freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus: Characterization and expression pattern

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pikul Jiravanichpaisal; So Young Lee; Young-A Kim; Tove Andrén; Irene Söderhäll

    2007-01-01

    A 14 amino acid residues proline\\/arginine-rich antibacterial peptide designated as astacidin 2 was purified and characterized from hemocytes of the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Astacidin 2 has a broad range of antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The primary sequence of astacidin 2 is RPRPNYRPRPIYRP with an amidated C-terminal and the molecular mass is 1838Da determined by mass

  2. Chemical composition and in vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activity of Heracleum transcaucasicum and Heracleum anisactis roots essential oil

    PubMed Central

    Torbati, Mohammadali; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Nemati, Mahboob; Asnaashari, Solmaz; Fathiazad, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In vitro antioxidant and antibacterial activity and volatile compositions of two Heracleum species (Apiaceae) including Heracleum transcaucasicum and Heracleum anisactis roots Essential Oil (EO) were investigated. Methods: The volatile compositions of EOs were analyzed by GC/Mass spectroscopy. To detect the antioxidant activity of essential oils TLC-bioautography and DPPH radical scavenging assay by spectrophotometry was performed. Additionally, the antibacterial activity of two essential oils were studied and compared against four pathogenic bacteria by agar disc diffusion method and MIC values of the EOs were determined using the broth dilution method. Results: Myristicin was the dominant component in both EOs. It was identified as 96.87% and 95.15% of the essential oil composition of H. transcaucasicum and H. anisactis roots, respectively. The TLC-bioautography showed antioxidant spots in both EOs and IC50 of H. anisactis and H. transcaucasicum EO was found to be 54 ?g × ml (-1) and 77 ?g × ml (-1), respectively. Regarding the antimicrobial assay, H. anisactis EO exhibited weak to moderate antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria and also Escherichia coli, whereas the essential oil from H. transcaucasicum was inactive. Conclusion: Based on the results from this study, both tested EOs mainly consist of myristicin. Despite the presence of myristicin with known antibacterial property, the EO from H. transcacausicum showed no antibacterial activity. Thus it is supposed that the biological activity of plants is remarkably linked to the extracts’ chemical profile and intercomponents’ synergistic or antagonistic effect could play a crucial role in bioactivity of EOs and other plant extracts. PMID:25035849

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    PubMed Central

    Mezaini, Abdelkader; Chihib, Nour-Eddine; Dilmi Bouras, Abdelkader; Nedjar-Arroume, Naima; Hornez, Jean Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacteriocin production profiles showed that the maximal bacteriocin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml?1) with a bacteriocine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml?1) h?1. In addition, our findings showed that the bacteriocin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide pH range (4–8); this indicates that such bacteriocin may be useful in acidic as well as nonacidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food. PMID:20041021

  4. Glucosamine sulfate--environmental antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Alexander P

    2009-10-01

    We have recently showed antibacterial activity against E. coli in vitro of a trademark Mega-Gluflex-containing glucosamine sulfate (GS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The purpose of this study was to examine the antibacterial activity of GS as a new trademark Arthryl (Manufacturer Rottapharm Ltd, Ireland; Distributor in Israel Rafa Laboratories Ltd) in vitro. We used cabbage and chicken broths and milk (every media of 20 ml) left opened for 1 week with and without Arthryl supplements 1,500 mg, the content of one package of the medication. A similar volume (20 ml) is ingested in taking the medication. Experiments with three repeatable results were taken for consideration. Arthryl inhibited environmental bacterial colonies' growth in every media but fungi growth was not impaired. Milk stayed liquid for the whole week with supplement of the Arthryl compared with sour milk transformation without Arthryl. Sample B showed inhibitory properties of the bacterial colonies on the fungi growth. The sample with Arthryl showed progressive growth of fungi without bacterial growth after 10 days of follow up compared with bacterial growth on media without Arthryl. Glucosamine sulfate as a new trademark Arthryl has environmental antibacterial properties but does not inhibit growth of fungal colonies. PMID:19495827

  5. Flavones with antibacterial activity against cariogenic bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaru Sato; Shuu Fujiwara; Hironori Tsuchiya; Teruhisa Fujii; Munekazu Iinuma; Hideki Tosa; Yasutoshi Ohkawa

    1996-01-01

    Methanolic extracts obtained from 13 plants were studied for their antibacterial activity against cariogenic bacteria. Among them, the extract from Artocarpus heterophyllus showed the most intensive activity. Serial chromatographic purifications offered two active compounds which were identified as 6-(3-methyl-1-butenyl)-5,2?,4?-trihydroxy-3-isoprenyl-7-methoxyflavone and 5,7,2?,4?-tetrahydroxy-6-isoprenylflavone. Both isolates completely inhibited the growth of primary cariogenic bacteria at 3.13–12.5 ?g\\/ml. They also exhibited the growth inhibitory

  6. Telavancin: an antimicrobial with a multifunctional mechanism of action for the treatment of serious gram-positive infections.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Steven N; Rybak, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Telavancin is a once-daily lipoglycopeptide antibiotic structurally derived from vancomycin. It has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive bacteria, including strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. Telavancin's multifunctional mechanism of action, including inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis and disruption of membrane potential, account for this enhanced activity as well as rapid bactericidal properties. In vitro activity has been demonstrated against a wide range of gram-positive pathogens such as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as methicillin-resistant, glycopeptide-intermediate, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The agent also displays activity against many gram-positive anaerobic organisms. Predictable linear pharmacokinetics have been demonstrated over a wide range of doses, with the most common adverse effects being taste disturbance and nausea. Clinical experience with telavancin in phase II and III studies for complicated skin and skin structure infections has shown it to have similar efficacy and tolerability compared with vancomycin and antistaphylococcal penicillins, and recently telavancin received an approvable letter from the United States Food and Drug Administration for this indication. Telavancin appears to be a promising agent for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-positive pathogens, including drug-resistant pathogens. Further clinical experience will clarify its role in therapy. PMID:18363530

  7. Antibacterial activity of xanthorrhizol from Curcuma xanthorrhiza against oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J K; Shim, J S; Pyun, Y R

    2000-06-01

    The antibacterial activity of xanthorrhizol, isolated from the methanol extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza roots, was evaluated against oral microorganisms in comparison with chlorhexidine. PMID:10844172

  8. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial activities of K-4619, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside.

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Y; Hattori, Y; Koshi, T; Kobayashi, F; Oda, T; Mitsuhashi, S

    1984-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of K-4619 (3-de-O-methylsporaricin A sulfate) were compared with those of sporaricin A, amikacin, dibekacin, and gentamicin. K-4619 exhibited a high order of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Its activity against Providencia species and Serratia marcescens was the highest of all drugs tested. K-4619 was highly effective against bacteria that produce various aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes, except for 3-acetyltransferase I. The bactericidal activity of K-4619 was somewhat greater than that of amikacin. The activity of K-4619 against gram-negative bacteria increased at alkaline pH and was hardly affected by inoculum size, addition of horse serum, and composition of the medium. The in vivo protective effect of K-4619 against infections with Klebsiella pneumoniae, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa in mice was greater than that of sporaricin A. K-4619 was also active in mice infected with gentamicin- or amikacin-resistant strains bearing some of the aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes. PMID:6548350

  9. SCE-129, Antipseudomonal Cephalosporin: In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Kanji; Kondo, Masahiro; Nagatomo, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    SCE-129 [3-(4-carbamoyl-1-pyridiniomethyl)-7?-(d-?-sulfophenylacetamido)-ceph-3-em-4-carboxylate monosodium salt], a new semisynthetic cephalosporin, shows potent in vitro antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and some gram-positive bacteria, whereas it shows lower activity against many gram-negative rods. Against clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa this cephalosporin exhibited higher activity than did carbenicillin, and against the strains of Staphylococcus aureus, SCE-129 had similar activity to carbenicillin. Variations in pH, addition of horse serum, and type of growth medium had no significant effects on the activity of the cephalosporin; however, the inoculum size had some effect on the activity. SCE-129 is an effective bactericidal agent against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. The protective effects of SCE-129 in mice infected with P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were more potent than those of carbenicillin. The protective effects of SCE-129 on Pseudomonas infection in mice varied according to the dosage schedule and the challenge dose. In a multiple dose schedule, a smaller amount of SCE-129 was necessary than that in a single dose schedule. The effects of SCE-129 after subcutaneous or intraperitoneal administration were more potent than were those by intravenous administration. No protective effect was observed by oral administration. PMID:417670

  10. Evaluation of in-vitro antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory activity for different extracts of Rauvolfia tetraphylla L. root bark

    PubMed Central

    Ganga Rao, B.; Umamaheswara Rao, P.; Sambasiva Rao, E.; Mallikarjuna Rao, T.; Praneeth. D, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the in-vitro antibacterial activity and anti-inflammatory activity of orally administered different extracts (Hydro-alcoholic, methanolic, ethyl acetate and hexane) of Rauvolfia tetraphylla (R. tetraphylla) root bark in Carrageenan induced acute inflammation in rats. Methods In-vitro antibacterial activity was evaluated for extracts against four Gram positive and four Gram negative bacteria by using cylinder plate assay. Hydro-alcoholic extract (70% v/v ethanol) at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg doses and methanolic, ethyl acetate and hexane extracts at doses 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg were tested for anti-inflammatory activity in Carrageenan induced rat paw oedema model and paw thickness was measured every one hour up to 6 hrs. Results All extracts of R. tetraphylla root bark showed good zone of inhibition against tested bacterial strains. In Carrageenan induced inflammation model, hydro-alcoholic and methanolic extract of R. tetraphylla root bark at three different doses produced significant (P<0.001) reduction when compared to vehicle treated control group and hexane, ethyl acetate extracts. Conclusions In the present study extracts of R. tetraphylla root bark shows good in-vitro antibacterial activity and in-vivo anti-inflammatory activity in rats. PMID:23569853

  11. RX-P873, a Novel Protein Synthesis Inhibitor, Accumulates in Human THP-1 Monocytes and Is Active against Intracellular Infections by Gram-Positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-Negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Buyck, Julien M; Peyrusson, Frédéric; Tulkens, Paul M; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-08-01

    The pyrrolocytosine RX-P873, a new broad-spectrum antibiotic in preclinical development, inhibits protein synthesis at the translation step. The aims of this work were to study RX-P873's ability to accumulate in eukaryotic cells, together with its activity against extracellular and intracellular forms of infection by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, using a pharmacodynamic approach allowing the determination of maximal relative efficacies (Emax values) and bacteriostatic concentrations (Cs values) on the basis of Hill equations of the concentration-response curves. RX-P873's apparent concentration in human THP-1 monocytes was about 6-fold higher than the extracellular one. In broth, MICs ranged from 0.125 to 0.5 mg/liter (S. aureus) and 2 to 8 mg/liter (P. aeruginosa), with no significant shift in these values against strains resistant to currently used antibiotics being noted. In concentration-dependent experiments, the pharmacodynamic profile of RX-P873 was not influenced by the resistance phenotype of the strains. Emax values (expressed as the decrease in the number of CFU from that in the initial inoculum) against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa reached more than 4 log units and 5 log units in broth, respectively, and 0.7 log unit and 2.7 log units in infected THP-1 cells, respectively, after 24 h. Cs values remained close to the MIC in all cases, making RX-P873 more potent than antibiotics to which the strains were resistant (moxifloxacin, vancomycin, and daptomycin for S. aureus; ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa). Kill curves in broth showed that RX-P873 was more rapidly bactericidal against P. aeruginosa than against S. aureus. Taken together, these data suggest that RX-P873 may constitute a useful alternative for infections involving intracellular bacteria, especially Gram-negative species. PMID:26014952

  12. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antifungal activities of essential oil from Cordia verbenacea DC leaves

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Fabiola F. G.; Oliveira, Liana G. S.; Rodrigues, Fábio F. G.; Saraiva, Manuele E.; Almeida, Sheyla C. X.; Cabral, Mario E. S.; Campos, Adriana R.; Costa, Jose Galberto M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cordia verbenacea is a Brazilian coastal shrub popularly known as “erva baleeira”. The essential oil from fresh leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by CG/MS. The main components were identified as ?-caryophyllene (25.4%), bicyclogermacrene (11.3%), ?-cadinene (9.%) and ?-pinene (9.5%). In this study, the antimicrobial activity of Cordia verbenacea was evaluated. Materials and Methods: The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the essential oil was obtained using the broth microdilution assay (from 512 to 8 ?g/ml). Results: The results showed that the essential oil presented fungistatic activity against Candida albicans and Candida krusei and antibacterial activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and against multiresistant Gram-negative (Escherichia coli 27), in all tests the MIC was 64 ?g/ml. When the essential oil was associated to aminoglycosides (subinhibitory concentrations, MIC/8), a synergic and antagonic activity was verified. The synergic effect was observed to the amikacin association (MIC reduction from 256 mlto 64 ?g/ml) in all strains tested. Conclusion: The essential oil of Cordia verbenacea influences the activity of antibiotics and may be used as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against respiratory tract bacterial pathogens. PMID:22923954

  13. Screening seeds of Scottish plants for antibacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yashodharan Kumarasamy; Philip John Cox; Marcel Jaspars; Lutfun Nahar; Satyajit Dey Sarker

    2002-01-01

    Based on ethnopharmacological and taxonomic information, seeds of 21 Scottish plant species from 14 different families were obtained from authentic seed suppliers. Their n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts were assessed for antibacterial activity against 11 pathogenic bacterial species. Methanol extracts of 11 plant species showed significant antibacterial activity. Malva moschata and Prunus padus were active against five bacterial species, Reseda

  14. Superhydrophobic antibacterial cotton textiles.

    PubMed

    Shateri Khalil-Abad, Mohammad; Yazdanshenas, Mohammad E

    2010-11-01

    We present a facile and effective method to prepare superhydrophobic cotton textiles. Silver particles were produced on cotton fibers by treatment with aqueous KOH and AgNO(3), followed by reduction treatment with ascorbic acid in the presence of a polymeric steric stabilizer to generate a dual-size surface roughness. Further modification of the particle-containing cotton textiles with octyltriethoxysilane led to hydrophobic surfaces. Surfaces prepared showed a sticky property, which exhibits a static water contact angle of 151 degrees for a 10 microL droplet that water drop did not slid off even when the sample was held upside down. The modified cotton has potent antibacterial activity toward both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The Ag particles were uniformly and stably distributed on the substrate surface and killed bacteria. These modified cotton textiles are potentially useful; as superhydrophobic antibacterial fabrics in a wide variety of biomedical and general use applications. PMID:20709327

  15. Assessment of the in vitro Efficacy of the Novel Antimicrobial Peptide CECT7121 against Human Gram-Positive Bacteria from Serious Infections Refractory to Treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. D. Sparo; D. G. Jones; S. F. Sánchez Bruni

    2009-01-01

    Background: Resistant Gram-positive bacteria are causing increasing concern in clinical practice. This work investigated theefficacy of AP-CECT7121 (an antimicrobial peptide isolated from an environmental strain of Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121) against various pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria. Methods: Strains were isolated from intensive care unit patients unresponsive to standard antibiotic treatments. Inhibitory activity of AP-CECT7121 was assessed using the agar-well diffusion method. The

  16. Antibacterial activity of endophytic fungi from leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Irailton Prazeres; da Silva, Luís Cláudio Nascimento; da Silva, Márcia Vanusa; de Araújo, Janete Magali; Cavalcanti, Marilene da Silva; Lima, Vera Lucia de Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Endophytic fungi were isolated from healthy leaves of Indigofera suffruticosa Miller, a medicinal plant found in Brazil which is used in folk medicine to treat various diseases. Among 65 endophytic fungi isolated, 18 fungi showed activity against at least one tested microorganism in preliminary screening, and the best results were obtained with Nigrospora sphaerica (URM-6060) and Pestalotiopsis maculans (URM-6061). After fermentation in liquid media and in semisolid media, only N. sphaerica demonstrated antibacterial activity (in Potato Dextrose Broth-PDB and in semisolid rice culture medium). In the next step, a methanolic extract from rice culture medium (NsME) and an ethyl acetate extract (NsEAE) from the supernatant of PDB were prepared and both exhibited antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The best result was observed against Staphylococcus aureus, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 1.56 mg/mL and 6.25 mg/mL, respectively, for NsME and MIC and MBC values of 0.39 mg/mL and 3.12 mg/mL, respectively, for NsEAE. This study is the first report about the antimicrobial activity of endophytic fungi residing in I. suffruticosa leaves, in which the fungus N. sphaerica demonstrated the ability to produce bioactive agents with pharmaceutical potential, and may provide a new lead in the pursuit of new biological sources of drug candidates. PMID:25999918

  17. In vitro Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities of Methanol Extract of Kyllinga nemoralis

    PubMed Central

    Sindhu, T.; Rajamanikandan, S.; Srinivasan, P.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Kyllinga nemoralis. Six different in vitro antioxidant assays including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical, hydrogen peroxide radical, ferric reducing antioxidant power assay and reducing power were carried out to ensure the scavenging effect of the plant on free radicals. In addition, total antioxidant capacity assay, total phenolic contents, tannins, flavonoids and flavonol contents of the plant were also analysed by the standard protocols. Kyllinga nemoralis exhibited high antioxidant activity on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay (IC50= 90 ?g/ml), superoxide radical scavenging assay (IC50= 180 ?g/ml) and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging assay (IC50= 200 ?g/ml), compared with standards. These observations provide comprehensible supporting evidence for the antioxidant potential of the plant extract. Reducing power (IC50= 213.16 ?g/ml) and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (IC50= 223 ?g/ml) of the plant extract was remarkable. The methanol extract of K. nemoralis exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Standard in vitro antioxidant assays assessed the electron donating ability of the plant extract in scavenging free radicals. The inhibitory effect of the plant extract against bacterial pathogens may be due to the presence of phytochemicals. Thus, the results suggest that Kyllinga nemoralis is a potential source of antioxidants and could serve as the base for drug development. PMID:24843192

  18. THE ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF HEMOGLOBIN

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Derek; Hirsch, James G.

    1958-01-01

    Low concentrations of hemoglobin (0.1 µg./ml. or less) exert a lethal action on some Gram-negative bacteria under certain conditions in vitro. Hemoglobins from various mammals and the distinct genetic types of human hemoglobin all manifest similar bactericidal activity. The bactericidal effect is a function of the globin moiety of the molecule; native and acid or acid-alcohol denatured globins have the same degree of activity. Hemoglobins kill enterobacteriaceae only under precisely controlled conditions. The test medium must be low in ionic concentration and acid in reaction. Various strains of Escherichia and Salmonella are susceptible to the lethal effect of hemoglobin, while the few strains of Shigella, Klebsiella, and Proteus examined were resistant. Certain acid polysaccharides and basic amines or proteins block the bactericidal effect when incorporated in the test in low concentration. Present evidence also suggests that exposure of the microorganisms to certain cations such as magnesium renders them resistant to the lethal action of globin. Hemoglobin loses its bactericidal power when complexed with haptoglobin, and serum fractions rich in free haptoglobin protect otherwise susceptible bacteria from killing by hemoglobin. The reaction appears to be a bactericidal rather than a bacteriostatic one. At 38°C. maximal killing requires approximately 30 minutes; at temperatures of 28°C. or 0°C. the bactericidal action does not take place. The minimal concentration of hemoglobin required to kill 50 per cent of the microorganisms in the test is unrelated to the size of the bacterial inoculum. Under conditions suitable for bactericidal action, hemoglobin is adsorbed onto heat-killed susceptible strains of coliform bacteria; material possessing bactericidal activity can be eluted with dilute mineral acid. PMID:13491755

  19. Opioid Exacerbation of Gram-positive sepsis, induced by Gut Microbial Modulation, is Rescued by IL-17A Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingjing; Banerjee, Santanu; Li, Dan; Sindberg, Gregory M.; Wang, Fuyuan; Ma, Jing; Roy, Sabita

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the predominant cause of mortality in ICUs, and opioids are the preferred analgesic in this setting. However, the role of opioids in sepsis progression has not been well characterized. The present study demonstrated that morphine alone altered the gut microbiome and selectively induced the translocation of Gram-positive gut bacteria in mice. Using a murine model of poly-microbial sepsis, we further demonstrated that morphine treatment led to predominantly Gram-positive bacterial dissemination. Activation of TLR2 by disseminated Gram-positive bacteria induced sustained up-regulation of IL-17A and IL-6. We subsequently showed that overexpression of IL-17A compromised intestinal epithelial barrier function, sustained bacterial dissemination and elevated systemic inflammation. IL-17A neutralization protected barrier integrity and improved survival in morphine-treated animals. We further demonstrated that TLR2 expressed on both dendritic cells and T cells play essential roles in IL-17A production. Additionally, intestinal sections from sepsis patients on opioids exhibit similar disruption in gut epithelial integrity, thus establishing the clinical relevance of this study. This is the first study to provide a mechanistic insight into the opioid exacerbation of sepsis and show that neutralization of IL-17A might be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage Gram-positive sepsis in patients on an opioid regimen. PMID:26039416

  20. Screening of some Palestinian medicinal plants for antibacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Essawi; M Srour

    2000-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of organic and aqueous extracts of 15 Palestinian medicinal plants were carried against eight different species of bacteria: Bacillus subtilis, two Escherichia coli species, Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistant), two S. aureus (methicillin sensitive) species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus fecalis. Of the 15 plants tested, eight showed antibacterial activity. Each plant species has unique against different bacteria. The most

  1. Volatile compounds of Lamiaceae exhibit a synergistic antibacterial activity with streptomycin

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sthéfane G.; Alves, Lucas F.; Pinto, Maria Eduarda A.; Oliveira, Graziela T.; Siqueira, Ezequias P.; Ribeiro, Rosy I. M. A.; Ferreira, Jaqueline M. S.; Lima, Luciana A. R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections cause thousands of deaths in the world every year. In most cases, infections are more serious because the patient is already weakened, and often, the bacteria are already resistant to the antibiotics used. Counterparting this negative scenario, the interest in medicinal plants as an alternative to the synthetic antimicrobial drugs is blossoming worldwide. In the present work, we identified the volatile compounds of ethanol extracts of Melissa officinalis, Mentha sp., Ocimum basilicum, Plectranthus barbatus, and Rosmarinus officinalis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Also was evaluated antimicrobial activity of ethanol extracts against 6 bacteria of clinical interest, and was tested the interaction of these extracts with a commercial antibiotic streptomycin. Phytol was a compound identified in all extracts by GC/MS, being majoritary component in Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis. The Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ethanol extracts, and Plectranthus barbatus and Rosmarinus officinalis were the most active extracts. Ethanol extracts exhibited a synergetic effect with streptomycin. These results encourage additional studies, in order to evaluate the possibilities of using ethanol extracts of Lamiaceae family as natural source for antibacterial activity. PMID:25763039

  2. Antibacterial and membrane-damaging activities of mannosylated bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Yu; Chen, Ying-Jung; Fu, Yaw-Syan; Chang, Long-Sen

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether mannosylated BSA (Man-BSA) exerts antibacterial activity on Escherichia coli (gram-negative bacteria) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive bacteria) via its membrane-damaging effect. Man-BSA caused inhibition of growth of E. coli and S. aureus. Moreover, bactericidal action of Man-BSA on E. coli and S. aureus positively correlated with the increase in membrane permeability of the bacterial cells. Morphological examination showed that Man-BSA disrupted bacterial membrane integrity. Destabilization of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer and inhibition of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) biosynthesis in the cell wall increased the bactericidal effect of Man-BSA on E. coli and S. aureus. Man-BSA also induced leakage and fusion of membrane-mimicking liposomes in E. coli and S. aureus. Man-BSA showed similar binding affinity for LPS and LTA. LPS and LTA strongly suppressed the membrane-damaging activity of Man-BSA, whereas an increase in the Man-BSA concentration attenuated the inhibitory action of LPS and LTA. Taken together, our data indicate that Man-BSA's bactericidal activity depends strongly on its ability to induce membrane permeability. Moreover, the bactericidal action of Man-BSA proven in this study suggests that Man-BSA may serve as a prototype for the development of anti-infective agents targeting E. coli and S. aureus. PMID:25752952

  3. Recent developments in understanding the iron acquisition strategies of gram positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E

    2015-07-01

    Iron is a versatile redox-active catalyst and a required cofactor within a diverse array of biological processes. To almost all organisms, iron is both essential and potentially toxic, where homeostatic concentrations must be stringently maintained. Within the iron-restricted host, the survival and proliferation of microbial invaders is contingent upon exploiting the host iron pool. Bacteria express a multitude of complex, and often redundant means of acquiring iron, including surface-associated heme-uptake pathways, high affinity iron-scavenging siderophores and transporters of free inorganic iron. Within the last decade, our understanding of iron acquisition by Gram-positive pathogens has expanded substantively, from the discovery of the iron-regulated surface-determinant pathway and numerous unique siderophores through to the detailed elucidation of heme-iron extraction, and heme and siderophore coordination and transfer. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the iron acquisition strategies of notorious Gram-positive pathogens and highlights how both conserved and distinct tactics for acquiring iron contribute to the pathophysiology of these bacteria. Further, a focus on recent structural and mechanistic studies details how these iron acquisition systems may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25862688

  4. Anaerobic naphthalene degradation by Gram-positive, iron-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, Rita; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2011-12-01

    An anaerobic naphthalene-degrading culture (N49) was enriched with ferric iron as electron acceptor. A closed electron balance indicated the total oxidation of naphthalene to CO(2). In all growing cultures, the concentration of the presumed central metabolite of naphthalene degradation, 2-naphthoic acid, increased concomitantly with growth. The first metabolite of anaerobic methylnaphthalene degradation, naphthyl-2-methyl-succinic acid, was not identified in culture supernatants, which does not support a methylation to methylnaphthalene as the initial activation reaction of naphthalene, but rather a carboxylation, as proposed for other naphthalene-degrading cultures. Substrate utilization tests revealed that the culture was able to grow on 1-methyl-naphthalene, 2-methyl-naphthalene, 1-naphthoic acid or 2-naphthoic acid, whereas it did not grow on 1-naphthol, 2-naphthol, anthracene, phenanthrene, indane and indene. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses revealed that the microbial community of the culture was dominated by one bacterial microorganism, which was closely related (99% 16S sequence similarity) to the major organism in the iron-reducing, benzene-degrading enrichment culture BF [ISME J (2007) 1: 643; Int J Syst Evol Microbiol (2010) 60: 686]. The phylogenetic classification supports a new candidate species and genus of Gram-positive spore-forming iron-reducers that can degrade non-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons. It furthermore indicates that Gram-positive microorganisms might also play an important role in anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degradation. PMID:22066721

  5. Metabolic basis for the differential susceptibility of Gram-positive pathogens to fatty acid synthesis inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Joshua B.; Frank, Matthew W.; Subramanian, Chitra; Saenkham, Panatda; Rock, Charles O.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for the pursuit of bacterial type 2 fatty acid synthesis (FASII) as a target for antibacterial drug discovery in Gram-positive organisms is being debated vigorously based on their ability to incorporate extracellular fatty acids. The regulation of FASII by extracellular fatty acids was examined in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, representing two important groups of pathogens. Both bacteria use the same enzymatic tool kit for the conversion of extracellular fatty acids to acyl-acyl carrier protein, elongation, and incorporation into phospholipids. Exogenous fatty acids completely replace the endogenous fatty acids in S. pneumoniae but support only 50% of phospholipid synthesis in S. aureus. Fatty acids overcame FASII inhibition in S. pneumoniae but not in S. aureus. Extracellular fatty acids strongly suppress malonyl-CoA levels in S. pneumoniae but not in S. aureus, showing a feedback regulatory system in S. pneumoniae that is absent in S. aureus. Fatty acids overcame either a biochemical or a genetic block at acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in S. aureus, confirming that regulation at the ACC step is the key difference between these two species. Bacteria that possess a stringent biochemical feedback inhibition of ACC and malonyl-CoA formation triggered by environmental fatty acids are able to circumvent FASII inhibition. However, if exogenous fatty acids do not suppress malonyl-CoA formation, FASII inhibitors remain effective in the presence of fatty acid supplements. PMID:21876172

  6. Novel conductive polypyrrole/zinc oxide/chitosan bionanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimiasl, Saeideh; Zakaria, Azmi; Kassim, Anuar; Basri, Sri Norleha

    2015-01-01

    An antibacterial and conductive bionanocomposite (BNC) film consisting of polypyrrole (Ppy), zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs), and chitosan (CS) was electrochemically synthesized on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate by electrooxidation of 0.1 M pyrrole in aqueous solution containing appropriate amounts of ZnO NPs uniformly dispersed in CS. This method enables the room temperature electrosynthesis of BNC film consisting of ZnO NPs incorporated within the growing Ppy/CS composite. The morphology of Ppy/ZnO/CS BNC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. ITO-Ppy/CS and ITO-Ppy/ZnO/CS bioelectrodes were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared technique, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The electrical conductivity of nanocomposites was investigated by a four-probe method. The prepared nanocomposites were analyzed for antioxidant activity using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. The results demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of nanocomposites increased remarkably by addition of ZnO NPs. The electrical conductivity of films showed a sudden decrease for lower weight ratios of ZnO NPs (5 wt%), while it was increased gradually for higher ratios (10, 15, and 20 wt%). The nanocomposites were analyzed for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The results indicated that the synthesized BNC is effective against all of the studied bacteria, and its effectiveness is higher for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The thermal stability and physical properties of BNC films were increased by an increase in the weight ratio of ZnO NPs, promising novel applications for the electrically conductive polysaccharide-based nanocomposites, particularly those that may exploit the antimicrobial nature of Ppy/ZnO/CS BNCs. PMID:25565815

  7. Novel conductive polypyrrole/zinc oxide/chitosan bionanocomposite: synthesis, characterization, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimiasl, Saeideh; Zakaria, Azmi; Kassim, Anuar; Basri, Sri Norleha

    2015-01-01

    An antibacterial and conductive bionanocomposite (BNC) film consisting of polypyrrole (Ppy), zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs), and chitosan (CS) was electrochemically synthesized on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate by electrooxidation of 0.1 M pyrrole in aqueous solution containing appropriate amounts of ZnO NPs uniformly dispersed in CS. This method enables the room temperature electrosynthesis of BNC film consisting of ZnO NPs incorporated within the growing Ppy/CS composite. The morphology of Ppy/ZnO/CS BNC was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. ITO–Ppy/CS and ITO–Ppy/ZnO/CS bioelectrodes were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared technique, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The electrical conductivity of nanocomposites was investigated by a four-probe method. The prepared nanocomposites were analyzed for antioxidant activity using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. The results demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of nanocomposites increased remarkably by addition of ZnO NPs. The electrical conductivity of films showed a sudden decrease for lower weight ratios of ZnO NPs (5 wt%), while it was increased gradually for higher ratios (10, 15, and 20 wt%). The nanocomposites were analyzed for antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The results indicated that the synthesized BNC is effective against all of the studied bacteria, and its effectiveness is higher for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The thermal stability and physical properties of BNC films were increased by an increase in the weight ratio of ZnO NPs, promising novel applications for the electrically conductive polysaccharide-based nanocomposites, particularly those that may exploit the antimicrobial nature of Ppy/ZnO/CS BNCs. PMID:25565815

  8. A new broad spectrum antibacterial soap I. General properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Jungermann; David Taber

    1971-01-01

    The first soap germicide system to show activity against gram-negative organisms is described. Addition of a new germicidal\\u000a agent, 2-hydroxy-2?,4,4?-trichlorodiphenyl ether, combination of hexachlorophene and triclocarban which has been used in a\\u000a soap known to be effective against gram-positive organisms, has broadened its antibacterial spectrum without impairing its\\u000a mildness, safety and other desirable bar soap characteristics. Properties of the new

  9. In Vitro Antibacterial Properties of Pexiganan, an Analog of Magainin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YIGONG GE; DOROTHY L. MACDONALD; KENNETH J. HOLROYD; CLYDE THORNSBERRY; HANNAH WEXLER; MICHAEL ZASLOFF

    1999-01-01

    Pexiganan, a 22-amino-acid antimicrobial peptide, is an analog of the magainin peptides isolated from the skin of the African clawed frog. Pexiganan exhibited in vitro broad-spectrum antibacterial activity when it was tested against 3,109 clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative, anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. The pexiganan MIC at which 90% of isolates are inhibited (MIC90) was 32 mg\\/ml or less

  10. Synthesis, antibacterial activity, antibacterial mechanism and food applications of ZnO nanoparticles: a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu-E; Li, Zhen-Hua; Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Yi-Fan; Jin, Yong-Fang; Tang, Zhen-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination reduces the shelf-life of foods and presents serious risks to human health. Nanotechnology provides the opportunity for the development of new antibacterial agents. Nano-inorganic metal oxides have shown the potential to reduce bacterial contamination of foods. When the particle size of materials decreases from the micrometre to the nanometre range, nano-functional properties such as diffusivity, mechanical strength, chemical reactivity and biological properties are improved. Significantly, ZnO has been used in many applications with particular success. Many studies have shown that ZnO nanoparticles have enhanced antibacterial activity. This review discusses the main synthetic methods, antibacterial activity, antibacterial mechanisms and food applications of ZnO nanoparticles. PMID:24219062

  11. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of N-phosphonium chitosan as a novel polymeric antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Guo, Aijie; Wang, Feihu; Lin, Wentao; Xu, Xiaofen; Tang, Tingting; Shen, Yuanyuan; Guo, Shengrong

    2014-06-01

    N-phosphonium chitosans (NPCSs) with different degrees of substitution (3%, 13% and 21%) were synthesized and evaluated as novel polymeric antibacterial agents. Their antibacterial activities compared with hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan (HACC), parent chitosan and (5-carboxypentyl) triphenylphosphonium bromide (CTPB) were tested against Escherichia coli and two strains of drug-resistance Staphylococcus aureus by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and biofilm prevention assays. The results show that the NPCS with 3% or 13% substitution has lower MIC and MBC values and stronger ability to inhibit biofilm formation of all the three bacteria than HACC, chitosan and CTPB. In addition, the antibacterial activity of NPCSs increases with their substitution decreasing from 21% to 3%. Overall, the antibacterial activity of NPCS with 3% or 13% substitution is better than that of NPCS with 21% substitution, HACC with 22% substitution, chitosan and CTPB. It can be considered that NPCS with appropriate degree of substitution has favorable antibacterial activity and is a potential polymeric antibacterial agent. PMID:24680902

  12. In vitro antibacterial activity of ceftizoxime.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, O; Andreoni, S; Molinari, G L; Farinetti, F

    1985-04-01

    During 1983, the antibacterial activity of ceftizoxime has been tested in vitro against 325 strains of Enterobacteriaceae, Streptococcaceae, Micrococcaceae, Pseudomonaceae and Acinetobacter sp. isolated from material of human origin (blood, urine, faeces, sputum, various exudates). Except for S. faecalis and some strains of P. rettgeri, P. aeruginosa, A. calcoaceticus, Staphylococcus spp. all the strains examined were found to be sensitive to the antibiotic, whose MIC was 0.05-1.5 micrograms/ml in the great majority of cases. For 72 ceftizoxime-sensitive strains the MBC/MIC ratio was nearly always under 4:1, confirming the drug's bactericidal activity. On strains of Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, K. pneumoniae, S. marcescens, S. typhimurium) MIC of ceftizoxime achieved a minimum bactericidal time (MBT) between 3 and 4 hours of bacteria-antibiotic contact, and bacterial survival percentages were, in any case, very low as early as the 1st hour. PMID:3859380

  13. Cobra Cytotoxins: Structural Organization and Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dubovskii, P. V.; Utkin, Y. N.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxins (cytotoxins, CT) are ?-structured proteins isolated from the venom of cobra. They consist of 59–61 amino acid residues, whose antiparallel chains form three ‘fingers’. In contrast to neurotoxins with an overall similar fold, CTs are amphiphilic. The amphiphilicity is caused by positively charged lysine and arginine residues flanking the tips of the loops that consist primarily of hydrophobic amino acids. A similar distribution of amino acid residues is typical for linear (without disulfide bonds) cationic cytolytic peptides from the venoms of other snakes and insects. Many of them are now considered to be lead compounds in combatting bacterial infections and cancer. In the present review, we summarize the data on the antibacterial activity of CTs and compare it to the activity of linear peptides. PMID:25349711

  14. Cationic amphiphilic non-hemolytic polyacrylates with superior antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Punia, Ashish; He, Edward; Lee, Kevin; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2014-07-01

    Acrylic copolymers with appropriate compositions of counits having cationic charge with 2-carbon and 6-carbon spacer arms can show superior antibacterial activities with concomitant very low hemolytic effect. These amphiphilic copolymers represent one of the most promising synthetic polymer antibacterial systems reported. PMID:24854366

  15. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Argemone mexicana L. (Papaveraceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Mashiar Rahman; Jahangir Alam; Shamima Akhtar Sharmin; M. Mizanur Rahman; Atiqur Rahman; M. F. Alam

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of various extracts from stems of Argemone mexicana L. as antibacterial potential against a range of food-borne bacteria. The antibacterial activity of various extracts (hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and ethanol) of A. mexicana L. stems was determined in vitro, using agar diffusion method and MIC determination test against ten (five

  16. Antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine bacterial pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Thomas; V. Thomas; C. Wilhelm

    2006-01-01

    Cefquinome is known for its use as an antibacterial drug in cattle and pigs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine pathogenic bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cefquinome was determined for a total of 205 strains, which had recently been isolated in Europe from diseased horses (respiratory infection, foal septicaemia).

  17. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ) and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV) and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 ?g/ml) especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510). Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50) was reached with 22 and 60 ?g/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential. PMID:21489272

  18. Essential Oil Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Origanum vulgare subsp. glandulosum Desf. at Different Phenological Stages

    PubMed Central

    Chaabane, Hédia; Jemli, Maroua; Boulila, Abdennacer; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Variation in the quantity and quality of the essential oil (EO) of wild population of Origanum vulgare at different phenological stages, including vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, is reported. The oils of air-dried samples were obtained by hydrodistillation. The yield of oils (w/w%) at different stages were in the order of late vegetative (2.0%), early vegetative (1.7%), and flowering (0.6%) set. The oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 36, 33, and 16 components were identified and quantified in vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, representing 94.47%, 95.91%, and 99.62% of the oil, respectively. Carvacrol was the major compound in all samples. The ranges of major constituents were as follows: carvacrol (61.08–83.37%), p-cymene (3.02–9.87%), and ?-terpinene (4.13–6.34%). Antibacterial activity of the oils was tested against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria by the disc diffusion method and determining their diameter of inhibition and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. The inhibition zones and MIC values for bacterial strains, which were sensitive to the EO of O. vulgare subsp. glandulosum, were in the range of 9–36?mm and 125–600??g/mL, respectively. The oils of various phenological stages showed high activity against all tested bacteria, of which Bacillus subtilis was the most sensitive and resistant strain, respectively. Thus, they represent an inexpensive source of natural antibacterial substances that exhibited potential for use in pathogenic systems. PMID:24320986

  19. In vitro antibacterial activity and interactions with beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins of the new monocarbam antibiotic U-78608.

    PubMed Central

    Zurenko, G E; Truesdell, S E; Yagi, B H; Mourey, R J; Laborde, A L

    1990-01-01

    U-78608, a new monocarbam antibiotic, was evaluated for in vitro activity against 312 clinical isolates of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and subjected to several in vitro biochemical tests characterizing its interactions with beta-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). The antibacterial activity of the compound was compared directly with those of SQ 83,360 (pirazmonam) and aztreonam. U-78608, SQ 83,360, and aztreonam had generally poor activity against gram-positive aerobic bacteria and anaerobic bacteria. U-78608 demonstrated activity primarily against gram-negative aerobic bacteria, with potency generally comparable to that of SQ 83,360. U-78608 and SQ 83,360 were less active than aztreonam for some gram-negative species; however, both compounds were 8- to 64-fold more active than aztreonam against Acinetobacter species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas maltophilia. All three compounds resisted inactivation by several different beta-lactamases from gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Neither U-78608 nor SQ 83,360 exhibited significant inhibition of these enzymes, while aztreonam inhibited beta-lactamases from P. aeurginosa and Klebsiella oxytoca. All three compounds exhibited strong affinity to PBP 3 of Escherichia coli and moderate to negligible affinity to the other E. coli PBPs; quantitative measurements indicated that U-78608 had greater PBP 3 affinity than either SQ 83,360 or aztreonam. Images PMID:2193625

  20. A Novel Alkaloid from Marine-Derived Actinomycete Streptomyces xinghaiensis with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial and Cytotoxic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Wence; Zhang, Fenghua; Zhao, Xinqing; Hu, Jiehan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increasing emergence of drug-resistant bacteria and tumor cell lines, novel antibiotics with antibacterial and cytotoxic activities are urgently needed. Marine actinobacteria are rich sources of novel antibiotics, and here we report the discovery of a novel alkaloid, xinghaiamine A, from a marine-derived actinomycete Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B24674T. Xinghaiamine A was purified from the fermentation broth, and its structure was elucidated based on extensive spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR spectrum as well as mass spectrometry. Xinghaiamine A was identified to be a novel alkaloid with highly symmetric structure on the basis of sulfoxide functional group, and sulfoxide containing compound has so far never been reported in microorganisms. Biological assays revealed that xinghaiamine A exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activities to both Gram-negative persistent hospital pathogens (e.g. Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive ones, which include Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. In addition, xinghaiamine A also exhibited potent cytotoxic activity to human cancer cell lines of MCF-7 and U-937 with the IC50 of 0.6 and 0.5 µM, respectively. PMID:24098415

  1. Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities of Makaluvamine Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Nadkarni, Dwayaja H.; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The major virulence factor is its ability to form biofilms. Inhibition of S. mutans biofilms offers therapeutic prospects for the treatment and the prevention of dental caries. In this study, 14 analogs of makaluvamine, a marine alkaloid, were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against S. mutans and for their ability to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. All analogs contained the tricyclic pyrroloiminoquinone core of makaluvamines. The structural variations of the analogs are on the amino substituents at the 7-position of the ring and the inclusion of a tosyl group on the pyrrole ring N of the makaluvamine core. The makaluvamine analogs displayed biofilm inhibition with IC50 values ranging from 0.4 ?M to 88 ?M. Further, the observed bactericidal activity of the majority of the analogs was found to be consistent with the anti-biofilm activity, leading to the conclusion that the anti-biofilm activity of these analogs stems from their ability to kill S. mutans. However, three of the most potent N-tosyl analogs showed biofilm IC50 values at least an order of magnitude lower than that of bactericidal activity, indicating that the biofilm activity of these analogs is more selective and perhaps independent of bactericidal activity. PMID:25767719

  2. Synthesis, characterisation and antibacterial activity of PVA/TEOS/Ag-Np hybrid thin films.

    PubMed

    Bryaskova, Rayna; Pencheva, Daniela; Kale, Girish M; Lad, Umesh; Kantardjiev, T

    2010-09-01

    Novel hybrid material thin films based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) with embedded silver nanoparticles (AgNps) were synthesized using sol-gel method. Two different strategies for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles in PVA/TEOS matrix were applied based on reduction of the silver ions by thermal annealing of the films or by preliminary preparation of silver nanoparticles using PVA as a reducing agent. The successful incorporation of silver nanoparticles ranging from 5 to 7nm in PVA/TEOS matrix was confirmed by TEM and EDX analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRD analysis. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized hybrid materials against etalon strains of three different groups of bacteria -Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive bacteria), Escherichia coli (gram-negative bacteria), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-ferment gram-negative bacteria) has been studied as they are commonly found in hospital environment. The hybrid materials showed a strong bactericidal effect against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa and therefore have potential applications in biotechnology and biomedical science. PMID:20557895

  3. Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Babak; Rostami, Amir; Momeni, S S

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we describe the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using seed aqueous extract of Pistacia atlantica (PA) and its antibacterial activity. UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray energy dispersive spectrophotometer (EDAX) were performed to ascertain the formation of Ag-NPs. It was observed that the growths of Ag-NPs are stopped within 35 min of reaction time. The synthesized Ag-NPs were characterized by a peak at 446 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. XRD confirmed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles of 27 nm size. The XRD peaks at 38°, 44°, 64° and 77° can be indexed to the (111), (200), (220) and (311) Bragg's reflections of cubic structure of metallic silver, respectively. The FTIR result clearly showed that the extracts containing OH as a functional group act in capping the nanoparticles synthesis. Antibacterial activities of Ag-NPs were tested against the growth of Gram-positive (S. aureus) using SEM. The inhibition was observed in the Ag-NPs against S. aureus. The results suggest that the synthesized Ag-NPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. It is confirmed that Ag-NPs are capable of rendering high antibacterial efficacy and hence has a great potential in the preparation of used drugs against bacterial diseases. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), indicated that, the most strains of S. aureus was damaged and extensively disappeared by addition of Ag-NPs. The results confirmed that the (PA) is a very good eco friendly and nontoxic source for the synthesis of Ag-NPs as compared to the conventional chemical/physical methods. PMID:25022505

  4. Autocatalytic Intramolecular Isopeptide Bond Formation in Gram-Positive Bacterial Pili: A QM/MM Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiangqian; Hu, Hao; Melvin, Jeffrey A.; Clancy, Kathleen W.; McCafferty, Dewey G.; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-01

    Gram-positive pathogens possess external pili or fimbrae with which they adhere to host cells during the infection process. Unusual dual intramolecular isopeptide bonds between Asn and Lys side chains within the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of the pilus subunits have been observed initially in the Streptococcus pyogenes pilin subunit Spy0128 and subsequently in GBS52 from Streptococcus agalactiae, in the BcpA major pilin of Bacillus cereus and in the RrgB pilin of Streptococcus pneumoniae among others. Within each pilin subunit, intramolecular isopeptide bonds serve to stabilize the protein. These bonds provide a means to withstand large external mechanical forces, as well as possibly assisting in supporting a conformation favored for pilin subunit polymerization via sortase transpeptidases. Genome-wide analyses of pili-containing Gram-positive bacteria are known or suspected to contain isopeptide bonds in pilin subunits. For the autocatalytic formation of isopeptide crosslinks, a conservation of three amino acids including Asn, Lys, and a catalytically important acidic Glu (or Asp) residue are responsible. However, the chemical mechanism of how isopeptide bonds form within pilin remains poorly understood. Although it is possible that several mechanistic paths could lead to isopeptide bond formation in pili, the requirement of a conserved glutamate and highly organized positioning of residues within the hydrophobic environment of the active site were found in numerous pilin crystal structures such as Spy0128 and RrgB. This suggests a mechanism involving direct coupling of lysine side chain amine to the asparagine carboxamide mediated by critical acid/base or hydrogen bonding interactions with the catalytic glutamate residue. From this mechanistic perspective, we used the QM/MM minimum free-energy path method to examine the reaction details of forming the isopeptide bonds with the Spy0128 as a model pilin, specifically focusing on the role of the glutamate in catalysis. It was determined that the reaction mechanism likely consists of two major steps: the nucleophilic attack on C? by nitrogen in the unprotonated Lys ?-amino group and then two concerted proton transfers occur during the formation of the intramolecular isopeptide bond to subsequently release ammonia. More importantly, within the dual active sites of Spy0128, Glu117 and Glu258 residues function as crucial catalysts for each isopeptide bond formation, respectively, by relaying two proton transfers. This study also suggests that domain-domain interactions within Spy0128 may modulate the reactivity of residues within each active site. Our results may hopefully shed light on the molecular mechanisms of pilin biogenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21142157

  5. Dalbavancin and telavancin: novel lipoglycopeptides for the treatment of Gram-positive infections.

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Trapp, Shannon; Gin, Alfred S; DeCorby, Mel; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Rubinstein, Ethan; Hoban, Daryl J; Karlowsky, James A

    2008-02-01

    Two glycopeptide analogues of vancomycin and teicoplanin have been developed with improved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters. Dalbavancin was derived from teicoplanin, and telavancin is a derivative of vancomycin. The half-life of dalbavancin in humans is 147-258 h (6-11 days) allowing for weekly administration. Dalbavancin possesses more potent in vitro activity than vancomycin or teicoplanin. Dalbavancin has been investigated in uncomplicated and complicated skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) in clinical trials and has demonstrated equivalent or superior (versus vancomycin only) efficacy versus comparators. Telavancin exhibits a dual mechanism of action, low potential for resistance development and is active against resistant pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Clinical trials involving SSSIs have demonstrated equivalent or superior (versus vancomycin for MRSA) efficacy compared with a standard therapy. Both telavancin and dalbavancin show promise as alternative treatments for patients with serious infections caused by resistant Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:18251665

  6. Enhanced cell-wall damage mediated, antibacterial activity of core-shell ZnO@Ag heterojunction nanorods against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Suriyaraj, Shanmugam Prema; Vijayaraghavan, Thiruvenkatam; Selvakumar, Rajendran; Pullithadathail, Biji

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods have been synthesized by a synthetic strategy based on seed mediated growth. Formation of core-shell nanostructures was confirmed by UV- diffused reflectance spectroscopy (UV-DRS), X-ray diffraction studies, field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. UV-DRS analysis of hybrid core-shell nanorods suggests the possibility of interfacial electron transfer between surface anchored Ag nanoclusters and ZnO nanorods. Successful decoration of Ag nanoclusters with an average diameter of ~7 ± 0.5 nm was observed forming the heterojunctions on the surface of the ZnO nanorods. An enhanced antibacterial property was observed for the ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods against both Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa lbacteria. The synergetic antibacterial activity of ZnO@Ag nanorods was found to be more prominent against Gram-positive bacteria than Gram-negative bacteria. The plausible reason for this enhanced antibacterial activity of the core-shell nanorods can be attributed to the physical damage caused by the interaction of the material with outer cell wall layer due to the production of reactive oxygen species by interfacial electron transfer between ZnO nanorods and plasmonic Ag nanoclusters. Overall, the ZnO@Ag core-shell nanorods were found to be promising materials that could be developed further as an effective antibacterial agent against wide range of microorganisms to control spreading and persistence of bacterial infections. PMID:26152512

  7. 45S5Bioglass(®)-based scaffolds coated with selenium nanoparticles or with poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/selenium particles: Processing, evaluation and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Stevanovi?, Magdalena; Filipovi?, Nenad; Djurdjevi?, Jelena; Luki?, Miodrag; Milenkovi?, Marina; Boccaccini, Aldo

    2015-08-01

    In the bone tissue engineering field, there is a growing interest in the application of bioactive glass scaffolds (45S5Bioglass(®)) due to their bone bonding ability, osteoconductivity and osteoinductivity. However, such scaffolds still lack some of the required functionalities to enable the successful formation of new bone, e.g. effective antibacterial properties. A large number of studies suggest that selenium (Se) has significant role in antioxidant protection, enhanced immune surveillance and modulation of cell proliferation. Selenium nanoparticles (SeNp) have also been reported to possess antibacterial as well as antiviral activities. In this investigation, uniform, stable, amorphous SeNp have been synthesized and additionally immobilized within spherical PLGA particles (PLGA/SeNp). These particles were used to coat bioactive glass-based scaffolds synthesized by the foam replica method. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SeNp, 45S5Bioglass(®)/SeNp and 45S5Bioglass(®)/PLGA/SeNp showed a considerable antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, one of the main causative agents of orthopedic infections. The functionalized Se-coated bioactive glass scaffolds represent a new family of bioactive, antibacterial scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26047884

  8. Diversity and abundance of Gram positive bacteria in a tidal flat ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heike Stevens; Thorsten Brinkhoff; Beate Rink; John Vollmers; Meinhard Simon

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gram positive bacteria recently have been identified as important components of freshwater ecosystems and are also present in marine environments. However, their quantitative significance and possible role in the latter systems is still little studied, in par- ticular in coastal regions. Therefore, we investigated the abundance and composition of Gram positive bacteria in the Wadden Sea, a tidal flat

  9. Identification of Surprisingly Diverse Type IV Pili, across a Broad Range of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    E-print Network

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Identification of Surprisingly Diverse Type IV Pili, across a Broad Range of Gram-Positive Bacteria, Pennsylvania, United States of America Abstract Background: In Gram-negative bacteria, type IV pili (TFP) have apparent that Gram-positive bacteria also express type IV pili; however, little is known about

  10. Synergy of nitric oxide and silver sulfadiazine against gram-negative, gram-positive, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Privett, Benjamin J; Deupree, Susan M; Backlund, Christopher J; Rao, Kavitha S; Johnson, C Bryce; Coneski, Peter N; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2010-12-01

    The synergistic activity between nitric oxide (NO) released from diazeniumdiolate-modified proline (PROLI/NO) and silver(I) sulfadiazine (AgSD) was evaluated against Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis using a modified broth microdilution technique and a checkerboard-type assay. The combination of NO and AgSD was defined as synergistic when the fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) was calculated to be <0.5. Gram-negative species were generally more susceptible to the individual antimicrobial agents than the Gram-positive bacteria, while Gram-positive bacteria were more susceptible to combination therapy. The in vitro synergistic activity of AgSD and NO observed against a range of pathogens strongly supports future investigation of this therapeutic combination, particularly for its potential use in the treatment of burns and chronic wounds. PMID:20939612

  11. Phytochemical constituents and antibacterial activity of some green leafy vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-Daihan, Sooad

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity and photochemicals of five green leafy vegetables against a panel of five bacteria strains. Methods Disc diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity, while kanamycin was used as a reference antibiotic. The phytochemical screening of the extracts was performed using standard methods. Results All methanol extracts were found active against all the test bacterial strains. Overall maximum extracts shows antibacterial activity which range from 6 to 15 mm. Proteins and carbohydrates was found in all the green leaves, whereas alkaloid, steroids, saponins, flavonoids, tannins were found in most of the test samples. Conclusions The obtain result suggests that green leafy vegetables have moderate antibacterial activity and contain various pharmacologically active compounds and thus provide the scientific basis for the traditional uses of the studied vegetables in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:25182436

  12. Assessment of phytochemical content, polyphenolic composition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of Leguminosae medicinal plants in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many medicinal plants from Leguminosae family can be found easily in Malaysia. These plants have been used as traditional medicines by local ethnic groups, where they are prepared as decoction, pastes for wound infections, and some have been eaten as salad. This paper focused on the assessment of antioxidant potential, antibacterial activity and classes of phytochemicals of nine plants from the Leguminosae family. Methods Acacia auriculiformis, Bauhinia kockiana, Bauhinia purpurea, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Calliandra tergemina, Cassia surattensis, Leucaena leucocephala, Peltophorum pterocarpum, and Samanea saman were extracted with aqueous methanol and dichloromethane:methanol mixture to test for antioxidant and antibacterial activities. The Folin-Ciocalteu assay was conducted to quantify the total phenolic content and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay was used to determine the free radical quenching capacity. Antibacterial activity was assessed using disc diffusion (Kirby-Bauer) assay. Screening for major classes of phytochemical was done using standard chemical tests. Results B. kockiana flowers and C. pulcherrima leaves contained high total phenolic content (TPC) and strong DPPH radical scavenging ability with TPC of 8280 ± 498 mg GAE/100 g, IC50 of 27.0 ± 5.0 ?g/mL and TPC of 5030 ± 602 mg GAE/100 g, IC50 of 50.0 ± 5.0 ?g/mL respectively. Positive correlation was observed between TPC and free radical scavenging ability. Most extracts showed antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria at 1 mg, while none showed activity against Gram negative bacteria at the same dose. All extracts (except Samanea saman flower) showed antibacterial activity against two strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with MID values ranging between 100 ?g/disc and 500 ?g/disc. Conclusion The potential source of antioxidant and antibacterial agents, especially for MRSA infection treatments were found in B. kockiana, C. pulcherrima, C. tergemina and P. pterocarpum. These preliminary results would be a guide in the selection of potential candidates for further pharmacological study and in search of new drug candidate in treating MRSA infections. PMID:21306653

  13. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of minor groove binders: the role of non-cationic tail groups.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Abedawn I; Bourdin, Claire; Breen, David; Donoghue, Gavin; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Macmillan, Donna; Clements, Carol; Fox, Keith; Sekibo, Doreen A T

    2012-10-01

    The design and synthesis of a new class of minor groove binder (MGBs) in which, the cationic tail group has been replaced by a neutral, polar variant including cyanoguanidine, nitroalkene, and trifluoroacetamide groups. Antibacterial activity (against Gram positive bacteria) was found for both the nitroalkene and trifluoroacetamide groups. For the case of the nitroalkene tail group, strong binding of a minor groove binder containing this tail group was demonstrated by both DNA footprinting and melting temperature measurements, showing a correlation between DNA binding and antibacterial activity. The compounds have also been evaluated for binding to the hERG ion channel to determine whether non-cationic but polar substituents might have an advantage compared with conventional cationic tail groups in avoiding hERG binding. In this series of compounds, it was found that whilst non-cationic compounds generally had lower affinity to the hERG ion channel, all of the compounds studied bound weakly to the hERG ion channel, probably associated with the hydrophobic head groups. PMID:22948178

  14. [In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of antibacterial stainless steel containing copper].

    PubMed

    Guan, Junlin; Guo, Lei; Fu, Yuping; Chai, Hongwei

    2013-04-01

    To study the in vitro antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of 317L stainless steel containing 4.5% copper alloy (317L-Cu), we produced 317L-Cu stainless steel with epsilon-Cu phase. The cell proliferation of osteoblasts on material surface was detected in vitro. Escherichia coli was cultured with 317L-Cu for evaluating the antibacterial activity. We found that the 317L-Cu could effectively kill the Escherichia coli on material surface. The cell proliferation of osteoblasts on material surface was not different significantly, compared with titanium material. Our study clearly demonstrated that the 317L-Cu alloys had a significant antimicrobial activity and was biocompatible in vitro, so it would be suitable to be used as a new medical material with antibacterial activity. PMID:23858758

  15. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T), a Gram-positive diazotrophic rhizobacterium.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciana Fernandes; Bach, Evelise; Kalinowski, Jörn; Rückert, Christian; Wibberg, Daniel; Passaglia, Luciane M; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-08-10

    Paenibacillus riograndensis is a Gram-positive rhizobacterium which exhibits plant growth promoting activities. It was isolated from the rhizosphere of wheat grown in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of P. riograndensis strain SBR5(T). The genome of P. riograndensis SBR5(T) consists of a circular chromosome of 7,893,056bps. The genome was finished and fully annotated, containing 6705 protein coding genes, 87 tRNAs and 27 rRNAs. The knowledge of the complete genome helped to explain why P. riograndensis SBR5(T) can grow with the carbon sources arabinose and mannitol, but not myo-inositol, and to explain physiological features such as biotin auxotrophy and antibiotic resistances. The genome sequence will be valuable for functional genomics and ecological studies as well as for application of P. riograndensis SBR5(T) as plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium. PMID:25959170

  16. Structure of homoserine O-acetyltransferase from Staphylococcus aureus: the first Gram-positive ortholog structure.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Bharani; Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Viola, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Homoserine O-acetyltransferase (HTA) catalyzes the formation of L-O-acetyl-homoserine from L-homoserine through the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA. This is the first committed step required for the biosynthesis of methionine in many fungi, Gram-positive bacteria and some Gram-negative bacteria. The structure of HTA from Staphylococcus aureus (SaHTA) has been determined to a resolution of 2.45?Ĺ. The structure belongs to the ?/?-hydrolase superfamily, consisting of two distinct domains: a core ?/?-domain containing the catalytic site and a lid domain assembled into a helical bundle. The active site consists of a classical catalytic triad located at the end of a deep tunnel. Structure analysis revealed some important differences for SaHTA compared with the few known structures of HTA. PMID:25286936

  17. Extracellular Vesicles Produced by the Gram-positive Bacterium Bacillus subtilis are Disrupted by the Lipopeptide Surfactin

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa; Kessler, Anne; Cabezas-Sanchez, Pablo; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Previously, extracellular vesicle production in Gram-positive bacteria was dismissed due to the absence of an outer membrane, where Gram-negative vesicles originate, and the difficulty in envisioning how such a process could occur through the cell wall. However, recent work has shown that Gram-positive bacteria produce extracellular vesicles and that the vesicles are biologically active. In this study, we show that Bacillus subtilis produces extracellular vesicles similar in size and morphology to other bacteria, characterized vesicles using a variety of techniques, provide evidence that these vesicles are actively produced by cells, show differences in vesicle production between strains, and identified a mechanism for such differences based on vesicle disruption. We found that in wild strains of B. subtilis, surfactin disrupted vesicles while in laboratory strains harboring a mutation in the gene sfp, vesicles accumulated in the culture supernatant. Surfactin not only lysed B. subtilis vesicles, but also vesicles from Bacillus anthracis, indicating a mechanism that crossed species boundaries. To our knowledge, this is the first time a gene and a mechanism has been identified in the active disruption of extracellular vesicles and subsequent release of vesicular cargo in Gram-positive bacteria. We also identify a new mechanism of action for surfactin. PMID:24826903

  18. A novel beta-defensin structure: a potential strategy of big defensin for overcoming resistance by Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kouno, Takahide; Fujitani, Naoki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Demura, Makoto; Nitta, Katsutoshi; Kawano, Keiichi

    2008-10-01

    Big defensin is a 79-residue peptide derived from hemocytes of the Japanese horseshoe crab. It has antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of big defensin can be divided into an N-terminal hydrophobic half and a C-terminal cationic half. Interestingly, the trypsin cleaves big defensin into two fragments, the N-terminal and C-terminal fragments, which are responsible for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, respectively. To explore the antimicrobial mechanism of big defensin, we determined the solution structure of mature big defensin and performed a titration experiment with DPC micelles. Big defensin has a novel defensin structure; the C-terminal domain adopts a beta-defensin structure, and the N-terminal domain forms a unique globular conformation. It is noteworthy that the hydrophobic N-terminal domain undergoes a conformational change in micelle solution, while the C-terminal domain remains unchanged. Here, we propose that the N-terminal domain achieves its antimicrobial activity in a novel fashion and explain that big defensin has developed a strategy different from those of other beta-defensins to suppress the growth of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:18785751

  19. The effect of substituent, degree of acetylation and positioning of the cationic charge on the antibacterial activity of quaternary chitosan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sahariah, Priyanka; Gaware, Vivek S; Lieder, Ramona; Jónsdóttir, Sigríđur; Hjálmarsdóttir, Martha Á; Sigurjonsson, Olafur E; Másson, Már

    2014-08-01

    A series of water-soluble cationic chitosan derivatives were prepared by chemoselective functionalization at the amino group of five different parent chitosans having varying degrees of acetylation and molecular weight. The quaternary moieties were introduced at different alkyl spacer lengths from the polymer backbone (C-0, C-2 and C-6) with the aid of 3,6-di-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl protection of the chitosan backbone, thus allowing full (100%) substitution of the free amino groups. All of the derivatives were characterized using 1H-NMR, 1H-1H COSY and FT-IR spectroscopy, while molecular weight was determined by GPC. Antibacterial activity was investigated against Gram positive S. aureus and Gram negative E. coli. The relationship between structure and activity/toxicity was defined, considering the effect of the cationic group's structure and its distance from the polymer backbone, as well as the degree of acetylation within a molecular weight range of 7-23 kDa for the final compounds. The N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan with 100% quaternization showed the highest antibacterial activity with moderate cytotoxicity, while increasing the spacer length reduced the activity. Trimethylammoniumyl quaternary ammonium moieties contributed more to activity than 1-pyridiniumyl moieties. In general, no trend in the antibacterial activity of the compounds with increasing molecular weight or degree of acetylation up to 34% was observed. PMID:25196937

  20. The Effect of Substituent, Degree of Acetylation and Positioning of the Cationic Charge on the Antibacterial Activity of Quaternary Chitosan Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Sahariah, Priyanka; Gaware, Vivek S.; Lieder, Ramona; Jónsdóttir, Sigríđur; Hjálmarsdóttir, Martha Á.; Sigurjonsson, Olafur E.; Másson, Már

    2014-01-01

    A series of water-soluble cationic chitosan derivatives were prepared by chemoselective functionalization at the amino group of five different parent chitosans having varying degrees of acetylation and molecular weight. The quaternary moieties were introduced at different alkyl spacer lengths from the polymer backbone (C-0, C-2 and C-6) with the aid of 3,6-di-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl protection of the chitosan backbone, thus allowing full (100%) substitution of the free amino groups. All of the derivatives were characterized using 1H-NMR, 1H-1H COSY and FT-IR spectroscopy, while molecular weight was determined by GPC. Antibacterial activity was investigated against Gram positive S. aureus and Gram negative E. coli. The relationship between structure and activity/toxicity was defined, considering the effect of the cationic group’s structure and its distance from the polymer backbone, as well as the degree of acetylation within a molecular weight range of 7–23 kDa for the final compounds. The N,N,N-trimethyl chitosan with 100% quaternization showed the highest antibacterial activity with moderate cytotoxicity, while increasing the spacer length reduced the activity. Trimethylammoniumyl quaternary ammonium moieties contributed more to activity than 1-pyridiniumyl moieties. In general, no trend in the antibacterial activity of the compounds with increasing molecular weight or degree of acetylation up to 34% was observed. PMID:25196937

  1. Antibacterial activity of salicylanilide 4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzoates.

    PubMed

    Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Novotná, Eva; Mandíková, Jana; Trejtnar, František; Stolaková, Ji?ina

    2013-01-01

    The development of novel antimicrobial agents represents a timely research topic. Eighteen salicylanilide 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoates were evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. avium and M. kansasii, eight bacterial strains including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and for the inhibition of mycobacterial isocitrate lyase. Some compounds were further screened against drug-resistant M. tuberculosis and for their cytotoxicity. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for all mycobacterial strains were within 0.5-32 ?mol/L, with 4-chloro-2-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamoyl]phenyl 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoate superiority. Gram-positive bacteria including MRSA were inhibited with MICs ł 0.49 ?mol/L, while Gram-negative ones were much less susceptible. Salicylanilide 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoates showed significant antibacterial properties, for many strains being comparable to standard drugs (isoniazid, benzylpenicillin) with no cross-resistance. All esters showed mild inhibition of mycobacterial isocitrate lyase and four compounds were comparable to 3-nitropropionic acid without a direct correlation between in vitro MICs and enzyme inhibition. PMID:23529028

  2. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of bioactive petalostigma extracts: Toxicity, antibacterial and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Kalt, F. R.; Cock, I. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Petalostigma pubescens and Petalostigma triloculare were common components of pharmacopeia's of multiple Australian Aboriginal tribal groupings which traditionally inhabited the areas in which they grow. Among these groups, they had a myriad of medicinal uses in treating a wide variety of bacterial, fungal and viral infections. This study was undertaken to test P. pubescens and P. triloculare leaf and fruit extracts for the ability to inhibit bacterial and viral growth and thus validate Australian Aboriginal usage of these plants in treating bacterial and fungal diseases. Materials and Methods: P. pubescens, and P. triloculare leaves and fruit were extracted and tested for antimicrobial, antiviral activity and toxicity. The bioactive extracts were further examined by RP-HPLC and GC-MS to identify the component compounds. Results: The methanol, water and ethyl acetate leaf and fruit extracts of displayed potent antibacterial activity. The methanol and ethyl acetate extracts displayed the broadest specificity, inhibiting the growth of 10 of the 14 bacteria tested (71%) for the leaf extract and 9 of the 14 bacteria tested (64%) for the fruit extracts. The water extracts also had broad spectrum antibacterial activity, inhibiting the growth of 8 (57%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 bacteria tested, respectively. All antibacterial extracts were approximately equally effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, inhibiting the growth of 50-75% of the bacteria tested. The methanol, water and ethyl acetate extracts also displayed antiviral activity in the MS2 plaque reduction assay. The methanol and water extracts inhibited 26.6-49.0% and 85.4-97.2% of MS2 plaque formation, respectively, with the fruit extracts being more potent inhibitors. All ethyl acetate extracts inhibited 100% of MS2 plaque formation. All extracts were also non-toxic or of low toxicity. Analysis of these extracts by RP-HPLC showed that the P. triloculare ethyl acetate fruit extract was the least complex of the bioactive extracts. Subsequent analysis of this extract by GC-MS revealed that it contained 9 main compounds: acetic acid; 2,2-dimethoxybutane; 4-methyl-1,3-dioxane; decane; unadecane; 2-furanmethanol; 1,2-benzenediol; 1,2,3-benzenetriol; and benzoic acid. Conclusion: These studies validate Australian Aboriginal therapeutic usage of Petalostigma species and indicate their medicinal potential. PMID:24914307

  3. Comparative study of the in vitro antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin and thirteen other antimicrobial drugs with respect to recently isolated pathogens.

    PubMed

    Maccanti, O; Cosci, S; Bonadio, M

    1990-02-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin and 13 other antimicrobial drugs was evaluated with respect to 569 pathogens, mainly isolated from urine. Ciprofloxacin was found active in 96.1% of all of the Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains tested, amikacin in 90.6%, ceftazidime in 89.8%, ceftriaxone in 85.3%, piperacillin in 82.7%, tobramycin in 82.6%, gentamicin in 81.5%, aztreonam in 78.3%, nitrofurantoin in 72.6%, cotrimoxazole in 71.6%, cinoxacin in 71.0%, pipemidic acid in 70.6%, nalidixic acid in 66.7%, ampicillin in 50.1%. Ciprofloxacin was found to be the most active of the drugs studied against the bacterial strains which cause urinary, respiratory and other infections. PMID:2332781

  4. Synthesis and in vitro anti-bacterial evaluation of tetracyclic-ortho-fused 4 H-naphtho[1?,2?–5,6]pyrano[3,4- d](1,2,3)selenadiazole and its derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. V. Karnik; A. M. Kulkarni; N. J. Malviya; B. R. Mourya; B. L. Jadhav

    2008-01-01

    Synthesis of new heterocyclic compounds 3a–e containing naphthopyran and selenadiazole as the heterocyclic sub-units in the molecule is achieved using high yielding synthetic protocol. These molecules 3a–e have shown moderate anti-bacterial activity against some gram-positive and gram-negative bacterias.

  5. Efficacy of linezolid on gram-positive bacterial infection in elderly patients and the risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Li-qing; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Su-ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Linezolid is active against drug-resistant gram-positive bacteria. However, the efficacy and safety of linezolid in the treatment of the elderly have not been well characterized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of linezolid in the treatment of the elderly with gram-positive bacterial infection and to investigate the risk factors associated with the development of thrombocytopenia in these patients. Methodology: This was a retrospective analysis of 50 elderly patients who were treated with intravenous linezolid for gram-positive bacterial infection. Clinical data and bacteriological responses were assessed. Risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia in elderly patients were analyzed. Results: The overall clinical cure rate of linezolid was 74%, and the bacteriological eradication rate was 69%. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 24 patients, and thrombocytopenia was associated with both the duration of treatment (P = 0.005) and the baseline platelet count (P = 0.042). Based on a logistic regression analysis, the baseline platelet count <200×109/L (OR = 0.244; 95% CI = 0.068- 0.874; P = 0.030) was identified as the only significant risk factor for linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients. The mean platelet count decreased significantly from the 7th day of treatment, and decreased to the lowest value 1-2 days after the end of therapy. Conclusions : Linezolid is effective and safe for the elderly with gram-positive bacterial infections. Adverse effects such as thrombocytopenia are of greater concern. Platelet counts should be monitored in patients who are treated with linezolid and that measures should be taken in advance to avoid hemorrhagic tendencies. PMID:24353639

  6. A Toll-Like Receptor 2-Responsive Lipid Effector Pathway Protects Mammals against Skin Infections with Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Georgel, Philippe; Crozat, Karine; Lauth, Xavier; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Seltmann, Holger; Sovath, Sosathya; Hoebe, Kasper; Du, Xin; Rutschmann, Sophie; Jiang, Zhengfan; Bigby, Timothy; Nizet, Victor; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Beutler, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) (K. Takeda and S. Akira, Cell. Microbiol. 5:143-153, 2003). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 gene (Scd1). flake homozygotes show reduced sebum production and are unable to synthesize the monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) palmitoleate (C16:1) and oleate (C18:1), both of which are bactericidal against gram-positive (but not gram-negative) organisms in vitro. However, intradermal MUFA administration to S. aureus-infected mice partially rescues the flake phenotype, which indicates that an additional component of the sebum may be required to improve bacterial clearance. In normal mice, transcription of Scd1—a gene with numerous NF-?B elements in its promoter—is strongly and specifically induced by TLR2 signaling. Similarly, the SCD1 gene is induced by TLR2 signaling in a human sebocyte cell line. These observations reveal the existence of a regulated, lipid-based antimicrobial effector pathway in mammals and suggest new approaches to the treatment or prevention of infections with gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16040962

  7. Evidence for Direct Electron Transfer by a Gram-Positive Bacterium Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell?†

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, K. C.; Thrash, J. C.; Melnyk, R. A.; Bigi, J. P.; Byrne-Bailey, K. G.; Remis, J. P.; Schichnes, D.; Auer, M.; Chang, C. J.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in iron redox cycles and bioenergy production, the underlying physiological, genetic, and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer by Gram-positive bacteria remain insufficiently understood. In this work, we investigated respiration by Thermincola potens strain JR, a Gram-positive isolate obtained from the anode surface of a microbial fuel cell, using insoluble electron acceptors. We found no evidence that soluble redox-active components were secreted into the surrounding medium on the basis of physiological experiments and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Confocal microscopy revealed highly stratified biofilms in which cells contacting the electrode surface were disproportionately viable relative to the rest of the biofilm. Furthermore, there was no correlation between biofilm thickness and power production, suggesting that cells in contact with the electrode were primarily responsible for current generation. These data, along with cryo-electron microscopy experiments, support contact-dependent electron transfer by T. potens strain JR from the cell membrane across the 37-nm cell envelope to the cell surface. Furthermore, we present physiological and genomic evidence that c-type cytochromes play a role in charge transfer across the Gram-positive bacterial cell envelope during metal reduction. PMID:21908627

  8. Antibacterial activity of plastics coated with silver-doped organic-inorganic hybrid coatings prepared by sol-gel processes.

    PubMed

    Marini, M; De Niederhausern, S; Iseppi, R; Bondi, M; Sabia, C; Toselli, M; Pilati, F

    2007-04-01

    Silver-doped organic-inorganic hybrid coatings were prepared starting from tetraethoxysilane- and triethoxysilane-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polyethylene by the sol-gel process. They were applied as a thin layer (0.6-1.1 microm) to polyethylene (PE) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films and the antibacterial activity of the coated films was tested against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538) bacteria. The effect of several factors (such as organic-inorganic ratio, type of catalyst, time of post-curing, silver ion concentration, etc.) was investigated. Measurements at different contact times showed a rapid decrease of the viable count for both tested strains. The highest antibacterial activity [more than 6 log reduction within 6 h starting from 106 colony-forming units (cfu) mL-1] was obtained for samples with an organic-inorganic weight ratio of 80:20 and 5 wt % silver salt with respect to the coating. For the coatings prepared by an acid-catalyzed process, a high level of permanence of the antibacterial activity of the coated films was demonstrated by repeatedly washing the samples in warm water or by immersion in physiological saline solution at 37 degrees C for 3 days. The release of silver ions per square meter of coating is very similar to that previously observed for polyamides filled with metallic silver nanoparticles; however, when compared on the basis of Ag content, the concentration of silver ions released from the coating is much higher than that released from 1 mm thick specimens of polyamide (PA) filled with silver nanoparticles. Transparency and good adhesion of the coating to PE and PVC plastic substrates without any previous surface treatment are further interesting features. PMID:17335284

  9. Antibacterial and antioxidant activity of essential oil terpenes against pathogenic and spoilage-forming bacteria and cell structure-activity relationships evaluated by SEM microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Hatice; Baysal, Ayse H

    2014-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and antioxidant effect of the compounds ?-terpineol, linalool, eucalyptol and ?-pinene obtained from essential oils (EOs), against pathogenic and spoilage forming bacteria were determined. The antibacterial activities of these compounds were observed in vitro on four Gram-negative and three Gram-positive strains. S. putrefaciens was the most resistant bacteria to all tested components, with MIC values of 2% or higher, whereas E. coli O157:H7 was the most sensitive strain among the tested bacteria. Eucalyptol extended the lag phase of S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus at the concentrations of 0.7%, 0.6% and 1%, respectively. In vitro cell growth experiments showed the tested compounds had toxic effects on all bacterial species with different level of potency. Synergistic and additive effects were observed at least one dose pair of combination against S. Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus, however antagonistic effects were not found in these combinations. The results of this first study are encouraging for further investigations on mechanisms of antimicrobial activity of these EO components. PMID:25372394

  10. Injectable Bioadhesive Hydrogels with Innate Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Giano, Michael C.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Medina, Scott H.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Christensen, Joani M.; Yamada, Yuji; Brandacher, Gerald; Schneider, Joel P.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections cause significant postoperative morbidity and increased healthcare costs. Bioadhesives used to fill surgical voids and support wound healing are typically devoid of antibacterial activity. Here, we report novel syringe-injectable bioadhesive hydrogels with inherent antibacterial properties prepared from mixing polydextran aldehyde (PDA) and branched polyethylenimine (PEI). These adhesives kill both Gram-negative and Gram–positive bacteria, while sparing human erythrocytes. An optimal composition of 2.5 wt % oxidized dextran and 6.9 wt % PEI sets within seconds forming a mechanically rigid (~1700 Pa) gel offering a maximum adhesive stress of ~ 2.8 kPa. A murine infection model showed that the adhesive is capable of killing S. pyogenes introduced subcutaneously at the bioadhesive’s surface, with minimal inflammatory response. The adhesive was also effective in a cecal ligation and puncture model, preventing sepsis and significantly improving survival. These bioadhesives represent novel, inherently antibacterial materials for wound filling applications. PMID:24958189

  11. Antibacterial activity of quaternary ammonium salt grafted cotton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Ladhari; M. H. V. Baouab; Abdelbasset Ben Dekhil; Amina Bakhrouf; P. Niquette

    2007-01-01

    Cotton having good antibacterial activity can be obtained without the need for a binding chemical as a cross linker or the need for chemically pre-treated antibacterial agent. The procedure of synthesis consists in grafting an alkali-cellulose fibre by a quaternary ammonium salt: Epoxy propyltrimethylammonium chloride (EPTMAC). The characterization of grafted cotton (EPTMAC-Cotton) has been targeted on the nitrogen and the

  12. Isolating "Unknown" Bacteria in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory: A New Selective Medium for Gram-Positives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKillip, John L.; Drake, MaryAnne

    1999-01-01

    Describes the development, preparation, and use of a medium that can select against a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria while still allowing growth and differentiation of a wide range of Gram-positives. (WRM)

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Nanocomposites of Copper and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Ricardo J. B.; Daina, Sara; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Trindade, Tito

    2013-01-01

    The design of cheap and safe antibacterial materials for widespread use has been a challenge in materials science. The use of copper nanostructures combined with abundant biopolymers such as cellulose offers a potential approach to achieve such materials though this has been less investigated as compared to other composites. Here, nanocomposites comprising copper nanofillers in cellulose matrices have been prepared by in situ and ex situ methods. Two cellulose matrices (vegetable and bacterial) were investigated together with morphological distinct copper particulates (nanoparticles and nanowires). A study on the antibacterial activity of these nanocomposites was carried out for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, as pathogen microorganisms. The results showed that the chemical nature and morphology of the nanofillers have great effect on the antibacterial activity, with an increase in the antibacterial activity with increasing copper content in the composites. The cellulosic matrices also show an effect on the antibacterial efficiency of the nanocomposites, with vegetal cellulose fibers acting as the most effective substrate. Regarding the results obtained, we anticipate the development of new approaches to prepare cellulose/copper based nanocomposites thereby producing a wide range of interesting antibacterial materials with potential use in diverse applications such as packaging or paper coatings. PMID:24455681

  14. Quorum sensing by peptide pheromones and two component signal transduction systems in Gram-positive bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michiel Kleerebezem; Luis E. N. Quadri; Oscar P. Kuipers; Willem M. de Vos

    1997-01-01

    Cell-density-dependent gene expression appears to be widely spread in bacteria. This quorum-sensing phenomenon has been well established in Gram-negative bacteria, where N-acyl homoserine lactones are the diffusible communication molecules that modulate cell-density-dependent phenotypes. Similarly, a variety of processes are known to be regulated in a cell-density- or growth-phase-dependent manner in Gram-positive bacteria. Examples of such quorum-sensing modes in Gram-positive bacteria

  15. Increased Serum Concentration of Soluble CD14 Is a Prognostic Marker in Gram-Positive Sepsis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heinz Burgmann; Stefan Winkler; Gottfried J. Locker; Elisabeth Presterl; Klaus Laczika; Thomas Staudinger; Sylvia Knapp; Florian Thalhammer; Christoph Wenisch; Konstantin Zedwitz-Liebenstein; Michael Frass; Wolfgang Graninger

    1996-01-01

    Increased serum sCD14 concentrations are associated with poor outcome in Gram-negative sepsis and trauma patients. In the present study serum sCD14 concentrations were measured in patients with Gram-positive sepsis and compared with Gram-negative septic and nonseptic intensive care unit patients. Furthermore, serum sCD14 concentration was correlated with patient's outcome. Serum samples of 28 Gram-positive (8 nonsurvivors\\/20 survivors) and 10 Gram-negative

  16. Antibacterial Action of Structurally Diverse Cationic Peptides on Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CAROL L. FRIEDRICH; DIANNE MOYLES; TERRY J. BEVERIDGE; ROBERT E. W. HANCOCK

    2000-01-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides are ubiquitous in nature and are thought to be a component of the first line of defense against infectious agents. It is widely believed that the killing mechanism of these peptides on bac- teria involves an interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. Cationic peptides from different structural classes were used in experiments with Staphylococcus aureus and other medically

  17. Antibacterial and catalytic activities of green synthesized silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The aqueous beetroot extract was used as reducing agent for silver nanoparticles synthesis. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The surface plasmon resonance peak of synthesized nanoparticles was observed at 438 nm. As the concentration of beetroot extract increases, absorption spectra shows blue shift with decreasing particle size. The prepared silver nanoparticles were well dispersed, spherical in shape with the average particle size of 15 nm. The prepared silver nanoparticles are effective in inhibiting the growth of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The prepared silver nanoparticles reveal faster catalytic activity. This natural method for synthesis of silver nanoparticles offers a valuable contribution in the area of green synthesis and nanotechnology avoiding the presence of hazardous and toxic solvents and waste.

  18. T-antigen binding lectin with antibacterial activity from marine invertebrate, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra): possible involvement in differential recognition of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Nagaraj M; Goswami, Usha; Khan, M Islam

    2008-10-01

    In invertebrates, cellular and humoral components are evolved to maintain their body immunity and integrity. Both these factors respond to different antigens such as microorganisms, vertebrate erythrocytes and foreign proteins. In this article, we report a study of a lectin (HSL) involved in immune response in the echinoderm, sea cucumber (Holothuria scabra). Correlative studies indicate that the expression of this defensive lectin is induced by bacterial challenge, wherein cell wall glycoconjugates of bacteria are involved in lectin induction. HSL showed strong broad spectrum antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Under in vitro conditions, purified HSL mediate agglutination of the test bacteria, there by indicating a possible mode of action in physiological situation. PMID:18501924

  19. Screening seeds of Scottish plants for antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kumarasamy, Yashodharan; Cox, Philip John; Jaspars, Marcel; Nahar, Lutfun; Sarker, Satyajit Dey

    2002-11-01

    Based on ethnopharmacological and taxonomic information, seeds of 21 Scottish plant species from 14 different families were obtained from authentic seed suppliers. Their n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts were assessed for antibacterial activity against 11 pathogenic bacterial species. Methanol extracts of 11 plant species showed significant antibacterial activity. Malva moschata and Prunus padus were active against five bacterial species, Reseda lutea against four, Centaurium erythraea and Crithmum maritimum against three, Calluna vulgaris against two, and Armeria maritima, Centaurea scabiosa, Daucus carota, Rosa canina and Stellaria holostea against one bacterial species. C. erythraea and P. padus were also active against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:12413709

  20. Investigating lipoprotein biogenesis and function in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolormmi_7261 943..957

    E-print Network

    Palmer, Tracy

    Investigating lipoprotein biogenesis and function in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces the lipid- modified cysteine at the N-terminus of the mature lipoprotein. In all Gram-positive bacteria of the cyto- plasmic membrane. Here we identify lipoproteins in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces

  1. Experimental fossilisation of the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus SP7A: a long duration preservation study.

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Experimental fossilisation of the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus SP7A: a long of fossilised microbes in recent and ancient rocks, we experimentally silicified a Gram-positive bacterium of Gram-positive bacteria was extremely rapid, thus allowing very good preservation of Geobacillus SP7A

  2. Antibacterial action of chitosan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. R. Sudarshan; D. G. Hoover; D. Knorr

    1992-01-01

    The antibacterial action of chitosan hydroglutamate (CH), chitosan lactate (CL) and chitosan derived from fungal mycelia was examined against both gram?negative and gram?positive bacteria. Plate counts indicated inactivation rates of one? to five?log?cycles within one hour. Fungal chitosan had significantly less antibiotic effect than CH and CL. The antibacterial action of CH and CL was very similar and shown to

  3. Studies on the antibacterial activity of dodecylglycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of lipids has been known for many years, with dodecanoylglycerol (dodecanoic acid esterified to glycerol) being one of the most potential. However, the antibacterial potency of dodecylglycerol (DDG), the corresponding 1-O-alkyl glycerol ether, is considerably greater. The superior efficacy of DDG can be attributed, at least in part, to the greater chemical and metabolic stability of the ether bond as compared to esters. In an attempt towards elucidating the mode of action of DDG, the effect of DDG on bacterial lipid metabolism was examined using Streptococcus mutans BHT, a tolerant bacterium. The metabolic fate of the ether was also determined with the use of three radioactive tracers, /sup 14/C-glycerol, /sup 32/Pi, and /sup 14/C-DDG. Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of S. mutans BHI with growth inhibitory concentrations of DDG (10 and 20 ..mu..g/ml) inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C-glycerol into lipid. In vivo studies using /sup 14/C-DDG showed that the /sup 14/C-ether was readily incorporated almost exclusively into phosphatidic (PA) and lysophosphatidic (LPA) acids. When cells prelabelled with either /sup 14/C-glycerol or /sup 32/Pi were exposed to 10 and 20 /sup +/g/ml DDG for 2 h, the accumulation of PA and diphosphatidylglycerol (diPG) was greatly stimulated. However, diPG accumulated at the expense of its precursor, glycerol, which greatly decreased. These data suggest that the ether-containing PA inhibits the synthesis of CDP-diglyceride. Moreover, these results clearly demonstrate that DDG functions as a metabolic rather than physical effector, disputing the conventional notion that bactericidal lipids act as detergents, physically dissolving the cellular envelope.

  4. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activities of Antibacterial Peptides with a Spiropyran Fluorescence Probe

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Yu; Yang, Danling; Zou, Rongfeng; Wu, Junchen; Tian, He

    2014-01-01

    In this report, antibacterial peptides1-3 were prepared with a spiropyran fluorescence probe. The probe exhibits a change in fluorescence when isomerized from a colorless spiro-form (spiropyran, Sp) to a colored open-form (merocyanine, Mc) under different chemical environments, which can be used to study the mechanism of antimicrobial activity. Peptides 1-3 exhibit a marked decrease in antimicrobial activity with increasing alkyl chain length. This is likely due to the Sp-Mc isomers in different polar environments forming different aggregate sizes in TBS, as demonstrated by time-dependent dynamic light scattering (DLS). Moreover, peptides 1-3 exhibited low cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. These probe-modified peptides may provide a novel approach to study the effect of structural changes on antibacterial activity, thus facilitating the design of new antimicrobial agents to combat bacterial infection. PMID:25358905

  5. Study the Biological Activities of Tribulus Terrestris Extracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed A. Hussain; Abbas A. Mohammed; H. Ibrahim; Amir H. Abbas

    2009-01-01

    In this study the extracts of the Iraqi herb Tribulus terrestris (Al-Hassage or Al-Kutub) was done by using of polar and non polar solvents, then the biological activity of these extractants was studied in three fields, First, the antibacterial activity (in vitro) on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), and gram negative bacteria (E. coli, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aerugiuosa, and Klebsiella),

  6. Preparation, characterization, and antibacterial activity of ?-irradiated silver nanoparticles in aqueous gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darroudi, Majid; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Hakimi, Mohammad; Zamiri, Reza; Zak, Ali Khorsand; Hosseini, Hasan Ali; Zargar, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were obtained through ?-irradiation of aqueous solutions containing AgNO3 and gelatin as a silver source and stabilizer, respectively. The absorbed dose of ?-irradiation influences the particle diameter of the Ag-NPs, as evidenced from surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. When the ?-irradiation dose was increased (from 2 to 50 kGy), the mean particle size was decreased continuously as a result of ?-induced Ag-NPs fragmentation. The antibacterial properties of the Ag-NPs were tested against Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (Gram-positive) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a) (Gram-negative) bacteria. This approach reveals that the ?-irradiation-mediated method is a promising simple route for synthesizing highly stable Ag-NPs in aqueous solutions with good antibacterial properties for different applications.

  7. A Green Approach for the Synthesis of a Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle: Characterization and Antibacterial Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, S. K.; Sundrarajan, M.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the synthesis of a cerium oxide nanoparticle was carried out from Acalypha indica leaf extract. The synthesized nanoparticle was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) for structural confirmation. The studies clearly indicate that the synthesized CeO2 nanoparticle is a crystalline material with particle size between 25-30 nm. Further analysis was carried out by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), to provide evidence for the presence of Ce-O-Ce asymmetry stretching of the CeO2 nanoparticle. Thermo Gravimetric and Differential Scanning Calorimetry analyses gave the thermal properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles. Antibacterial studies were conducted using the synthesized CeO2. This result showed increasing rate of antibacterial behavior with gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

  8. Gram-Positive Bacteria Are Potent Inducers of Monocytic Interleukin-12 (IL-12) while Gram-Negative Bacteria Preferentially Stimulate IL-10 Production

    PubMed Central

    Hessle, Christina; Andersson, Bengt; Wold, Agnes E.

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 are two cytokines secreted by monocytes/macrophages in response to bacterial products which have largely opposite effects on the immune system. IL-12 activates cytotoxicity and gamma interferon (IFN-?) secretion by T cells and NK cells, whereas IL-10 inhibits these functions. In the present study, the capacities of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria to induce IL-10 and IL-12 were compared. Monocytes from blood donors were stimulated with UV-killed bacteria from each of seven gram-positive and seven gram-negative bacterial species representing both aerobic and anaerobic commensals and pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria induced much more IL-12 than did gram-negative bacteria (median, 3,500 versus 120 pg/ml at an optimal dose of 25 bacteria/cell; P < 0.001), whereas gram-negative bacteria preferentially stimulated secretion of IL-10 (650 versus 200 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Gram-positive species also induced stronger major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted IFN-? production in unfractionated blood mononuclear cells than did gram-negative species (12,000 versus 3,600 pg/ml; P < 0.001). The poor IL-12-inducing capacity of gram-negative bacteria was not remediated by addition of blocking anti-IL-10 antibodies to the cultures. No isolated bacterial component could be identified that mimicked the potent induction of IL-12 by whole gram-positive bacteria, whereas purified LPS induced IL-10. The results suggest that gram-positive bacteria induce a cytokine pattern that promotes Th1 effector functions. PMID:10816515

  9. Comparison of the D-glutamate-adding enzymes from selected gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A W; Falk, P J; Thanassi, J; Discotto, L; Pucci, M J; Ho, H T

    1999-09-01

    The biochemical properties of the D-glutamate-adding enzymes (MurD) from Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated to detect any differences in the activity of this enzyme between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The genes (murD) that encode these enzymes were cloned into pMAL-c2 fusion vector and overexpressed as maltose-binding protein-MurD fusion proteins. Each fusion protein was purified to homogeneity by affinity to amylose resin. Proteolytic treatments of the fusion proteins with factor Xa regenerated the individual MurD proteins. It was found that these fusion proteins retain D-glutamate-adding activity and have Km and Vmax values similar to those of the regenerated MurDs, except for the H. influenzae enzyme. Substrate inhibition by UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine, the acceptor substrate, was observed at concentrations greater than 15 and 30 microM for E. coli and H. influenzae MurD, respectively. Such substrate inhibition was not observed with the E. faecalis and S. aureus enzymes, up to a substrate concentration of 1 to 2 mM. In addition, the two MurDs of gram-negative origin were shown to require monocations such as NH4+ and/or K+, but not Na+, for optimal activity, while anions such as Cl- and SO4(2-) had no effect on the enzyme activities. The activities of the two MurDs of gram-positive origin, on the other hand, were not affected by any of the ions tested. All four enzymes required Mg2+ for the ligase activity and exhibited optimal activities around pH 8. These differences observed between the gram-positive and gram-negative MurDs indicated that the two gram-negative bacteria may apply a more stringent regulation of cell wall biosynthesis at the early stage of peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway than do the two gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, the MurD-catalyzed reaction may constitute a fine-tuning step necessary for the gram-negative bacteria to optimally maintain its relatively thin yet essential cell wall structure during all stages of growth. PMID:10464212

  10. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Vaccinium corymbosum L. leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    Pervin, Mehnaz; Hasnat, Md Abul; Lim, Beong Ou

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the leaf extract of tropical medicinal herb and food plant Vaccinium corymbosum L. (V. corymbosum). Methods Free radical scavenging activity on DPPH, ABTS, and nitrites were used to analyse phenoic and flavonoid contents of leaf extract. Other focuses included the determination of antioxidant enzymatic activity (SOD, CAT and GPx), metal chelating activity, reduction power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and the prevention of oxidative DNA damage. Antibacterial activity was determined by using disc diffusion for seven strains of bacteria. Results Results found that V. corymbosum leaf extract had significant antibacterial activity. The tested extract displayed the highest activity (about 23.18 mm inhibition zone) against Salmonella typhymurium and the lowest antibacterial activity was observed against Enterococcus faecalis (about 14.08 mm inhibition zone) at 10 mg/ disc. The IC50 values for DPPH, ABTS and radical scavenging activity were 0.120, 0.049 and 1.160 mg/mL, respectively. V. corymbosum leaf extract also showed dose dependent reduction power, lipid peroxidation, DNA damage prevention and significant antioxidant enzymatic activity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that leaf extract of V. corymbosum could be used as an alternative therapy for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and help prevent various free radical related diseases.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of the extract of stem bark of diplotropis ferruginea benth.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Gs; Rocha, Nfm; Almeida, Jrgs; de Freitas, Apf; Lima, Eo; Filho, Jmb; de Freitas, Rm; Diniz, Melo Mff

    2011-10-01

    This is the first report about the antibacterial activity of Diplotropis ferruginea Benth. In this study, the ethanol extract of D. ferruginea was tested for its antimicrobial activity against strains gram-positive and gram-negative. In order to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration, assays were carried out by micro dilution method. The extract was screened for antimicrobial activity, and it showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:22224034

  12. Isolation and structural elucidation of armeniaspirols?A-C: potent antibiotics against gram-positive pathogens.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Cosima; Wink, Joachim; Kurz, Michael; Kogler, Herbert; Olivan, Helene; Sablé, Serge; Heyse, Winfried; Gerlitz, Martin; Toti, Luigi; Nußer, Antje; Rey, Astrid; Couturier, Cedric; Bauer, Armin; Brönstrup, Mark

    2012-12-01

    In an antibiotic lead discovery program, the known strain Streptomyces armeniacus DSM19369 has been found to produce three new natural products when cultivated on a malt-containing medium. The challenging structural elucidation of the isolated compounds was achieved by using three independent methods, that is, chemical degradation followed by NMR spectroscopy, a computer-assisted structure prediction algorithm, and X-ray crystallography. The compounds, named armeniaspirol?A-C (2-4), exhibit a compact, hitherto unprecedented chlorinated spiro[4.4]non-8-ene scaffold. Labeling experiments with [1-(13)C] acetate, [1,2-(13)C2] acetate, and [U-(13)C] proline suggest a biosynthesis through a rare two-chain mechanism. Armeniaspirols displayed moderate to high in vitro activities against gram-positive pathogens such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin resistant E. faecium (VRE). As analogue 2 was active in vivo in an MRSA sepsis model, and showed no development of resistance in a serial passaging experiment, it represents a new antibiotic lead structure. PMID:23143837

  13. Transport Capabilities of Eleven Gram-positive Bacteria: Comparative Genomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, Graciela L.; Barabote, Ravi D.; Zlotopolski, Vladimir; Tran, Can; Winnen, Brit; Hvorup, Rikki N.; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Nguyen, Elizabeth; Huang, Li-Wen; Kim, David S.; Saier, Milton H.

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of eleven Gram-positive bacteria that are important for human health and the food industry, nine low G+C lactic acid bacteria and two high G+C Gram-positive organisms, were analyzed for their complement of genes encoding transport proteins. Thirteen to eighteen percent of their genes encode transport proteins, larger percentages than observed for most other bacteria. All of these bacteria possess channel proteins, some of which probably function to relieve osmotic stress. Amino acid uptake systems predominate over sugar and peptide cation symporters, and of the sugar uptake porters, those specific for oligosaccharides and glycosides often outnumber those for free sugars. About 10% of the total transport proteins are constituents of putative multidrug efflux pumps with Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS)-type pumps (55%) being more prevalent than ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type pumps (33%), which, however, usually greatly outnumber all other types. An exception to this generalization is Streptococcus thermophilus with 54% of its drug efflux pumps belonging to the ABC superfamily and 23% belonging each to the Multidrug/Oligosaccharide/Polysaccharide (MOP) superfamily and the MFS. These bacteria also display peptide efflux pumps that may function in intercellular signalling, and macromolecular efflux pumps, many of predictable specificities. Most of the bacteria analyzed have no pmf-coupled or transmembrane flow electron carriers. The one exception is Brevibacterium linens, which in addition to these carriers, also has transporters of several families not represented in the other ten bacteria examined. Comparisons with the genomes of organisms from other bacterial kingdoms revealed that lactic acid bacteria possess distinctive proportions of recognized transporter types (e.g., more porters specific for glycosides than reducing sugars). Some homologues of transporters identified had previously been identified only in Gram-negative bacteria or in eukaryotes. Our studies reveal unique characteristics of the lactic acid bacteria such as the universal presence of genes encoding mechanosensitive channels, competence systems and large numbers of sugar transporters of the phosphotransferase system. The analyses lead to important physiological predictions regarding the preferred signalling and metabolic activities of these industrially important bacteria. PMID:17490609

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids against Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Andrew P.; Lawlor, Keelan C.

    2013-01-01

    New compounds are needed to treat acne and superficial infections caused by Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus due to the reduced effectiveness of agents used at present. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are attracting attention as potential new topical treatments for Gram-positive infections due to their antimicrobial potency and anti-inflammatory properties. This present study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of six LC-PUFAs against P. acnes and S. aureus to evaluate their potential to treat infections caused by these pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined against P. acnes and S. aureus, and the LC-PUFAs were found to inhibit bacterial growth at 32–1024 mg/L. Generally, P. acnes was more susceptible to the growth inhibitory actions of LC-PUFAs, but these compounds were bactericidal only for S. aureus. This is the first report of antibacterial activity attributed to 15-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (15-OHEPA) and 15-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (HETrE), while the anti-P. acnes effects of the six LC-PUFAs used herein are novel observations. During exposure to the LC-PUFAs, S. aureus cells were killed within 15–30 min. Checkerboard assays demonstrated that the LC-PUFAs did not antagonise the antimicrobial potency of clinical agents used presently against P. acnes and S. aureus. However, importantly, synergistic interactions against S. aureus were detected for combinations of benzoyl peroxide with 15-OHEPA, dihomo-?-linolenic acid (DGLA) and HETrE; and neomycin with 15-OHEPA, DGLA, eicosapentaenoic acid, ?-linolenic acid and HETrE. In conclusion, LC-PUFAs warrant further evaluation as possible new agents to treat skin infections caused by P. acnes and S. aureus, especially in synergistic combinations with antimicrobial agents already used clinically. PMID:24232668

  15. Anti-bacterial activity of Achatina CRP and its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandip; Barman, Soma; Mandal, Narayan Chandra; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-07-01

    The physiological role of C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein, is not well documented, despite many reports on biological effects of CRP in vitro and in model systems in vivo. It has been suggested that CRP protects mice against lethal toxicity of bacterial infections by implementing immunological responses. In Achatina fulica CRP is a constitutive multifunctional protein in haemolymph and considered responsible for their survival in the environment for millions of years. The efficacy of Achatina CRP (ACRP) was tested against both Salmonella typhimurium and Bacillus subtilis infections in mice where endogenous CRP level is negligible even after inflammatory stimulus. Further, growth curves of the bacteria revealed that ACRP (50 microg/mL) is bacteriostatic against gram negative salmonellae and bactericidal against gram positive bacilli. ACRP induced energy crises in bacterial cells, inhibited key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes such as phosphofructokinase in glycolysis, isocitrate dehydrogenase in TCA cycle, isocitrate lyase in glyoxylate cycle and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in gluconeogenesis. ACRP disturbed the homeostasis of cellular redox potential as well as reduced glutathione status, which is accompanied by an enhanced rate of lipid peroxidation. Annexin V-Cy3/CFDA dual staining clearly showed ACRP induced apoptosis-like death in bacterial cell population. Moreover, immunoblot analyses also indicated apoptosis-like death in ACRP treated bacterial cells, where activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) and caspase-3 was noteworthy. It is concluded that metabolic impairment by ACRP in bacterial cells is primarily due to generation of reactive oxygen species and ACRP induced anti-bacterial effect is mediated by metabolic impairment leading to apoptosis-like death in bacterial cells. PMID:25059037

  16. Structure activity relationship of substituted 1,5-naphthyridine analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-4).

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Meinke, Peter T; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Wei, Changqing; Peng, Xuanjia; Wang, Xiu; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Shibata, Takeshi; Ohata, Kohei; Takano, Hisashi; Kurasaki, Haruaki; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Nishimura, Akinori; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial resistance is rapidly growing, necessitating the need to discover new agents. Novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents targeting bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. This class of inhibitors binds to an alternative binding site relative to fluoroquinolones and shows no cross-resistance to quinolones. NBTIs consist of three structural motifs. A structure activity relationship of the left hand motif 1,5-naphthyridine of oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs is described. Fifty five compounds were evaluated against a panel of key Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains of bacteria, as well as for hERG activity and five compounds were tested for in vivo efficacy in murine model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. These studies suggest that only a narrow range (activating and deactivating) of substitutions at C-2 and C-7 are tolerated for optimal antibacterial activity and spectrum. An alkoxy (methoxy) and CN at C-2, and a halogen and hydroxyl at C-7, appeared to be preferred in this series. Substitutions on the other three carbons generally have detrimental effect on the activity. No clear hERG activity SAR emerged from these substitutions. PMID:25911300

  17. Antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo and pharmacokinetics of cefquinome (HR 111V), a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    PubMed Central

    Limbert, M; Isert, D; Klesel, N; Markus, A; Seeger, K; Seibert, G; Schrinner, E

    1991-01-01

    Cefquinome is a new injectable aminothiazolyl cephalosporin derivative. It is stable against chromosomally and plasmid-encoded beta-lactamases and has a broad antibacterial spectrum. Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Klebsiella spp., Enterobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., and Serratia marcescens) are inhibited at low concentrations. Cefquinome is also active against many strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococci and enterococci. Its in vitro activity against gram-negative anaerobes is very limited. The high in vitro activity of cefquinome is reflected by its high in vivo efficacy against experimental septicemia due to different gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. We studied the pharmacokinetic properties of cefquinome in mice, dogs, pigs, and calves. After single parenteral administrations, cefquinome displayed high peak levels, declining with half-lives of about 0.5, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.3 h, respectively. The areas under the concentration-time curve determined for dogs and mice showed linear correlations to the given doses. In dogs the urinary recovery was more than 70% within 24 h of dosing. Images PMID:2014969

  18. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation and antibacterial activities of new vanadium(IV, V) complexes containing chelidamic acid and novel thiourea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Farzanfar, Javad; Ghasemi, Khaled; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Delarami, Hojat Samareh; Ebrahimi, Ali; Hosseinpoor, Hona; Eskandari, Amir; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Three new thiourea ligands derived from the condensation of aroyl- and aryl-isothiocyanate derivatives with 2,6-diaminopyridine, named 1,1'-(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(3-(benzoyl)thiourea) (L1), 1,1'-(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)thiourea) (L2) and 1,1'-(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(3-(4-chlorophenyl)thiourea) (L3), their oxido-vanadium(IV) complexes, namely [VO(L1('))(H2O)] (C1), [VO(L2('))(H2O)] (C2) and [VO(L3('))(H2O)] (C3), and also, dioxo-vanadium(V) complex containing 4-hydroxy-2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (chelidamic acid, H2dipic-OH) and metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide, Met), named [H2Met][VO2(dipic-OH)]2·H2O (C4), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FTIR and (1)H NMR and UV-visible spectroscopies. Proposed structures for free thiourea ligands and their vanadium complexes were corroborated by applying geometry optimization and conformational analysis. Solid state structure of complex [H2Met][VO2(dipic-OH)]2·H2O (triclinic, P?) was fully determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In this complex, metformin is double protonated and acted as counter ion. The antibacterial properties of these compounds were investigated in vitro against standard Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. The experiments showed that vanadium(IV) complexes had the superior antibacterial activities than novel thiourea derivatives and vanadium(V) complex against all Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. PMID:25770009

  19. Antibacterial activity of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin derivatives of ?-octaarginine.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Nirupam; Capone, Stefania; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Leeds, Jennifer; Thompson, Katherine; Moser, Heinz E

    2015-02-01

    ?(3) -Octaarginine chains were attached to the functional groups NH and CO2 H of the antibacterial fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin (?1) and enrofloxacin (?2), respectively, in order to find out whether the activity increases by attachment of the polycationic, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) moiety. For comparison, simple amides, 3-5, of the two antimicrobial compounds and ?(3) -octaarginine amide (?R8 ) were included in the antibacterial susceptibility tests to clarify the impact of chemical modification on the microbiological activity of either scaffold (Table). PMID:25676502

  20. Antibacterial activity of various leaf extracts of Merremia emarginata

    PubMed Central

    Elumalai, EK; Ramachandran, M; Thirumalai, T; Vinothkumar, P

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial activity and phytochemical screening of the aqueous, methanol and petroleum ether leaf extracts of Merremia emarginata (M. emarginata). Methods The antibacterial activity of leaf extracts of M. emarginata were evaluated by agar well diffusion method against four selected bacterial species. Results The presence of tannins, flavonoids, amino acids, starch, glycosides and carbohydrates in the different leaf extracts was established. The methanol extract was more effective against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli, whereas aqueous extract was more effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusions : The results in the present study suggest that M. emarginata leaf can be used in treating diseases caused by the tested organisms. PMID:23569802

  1. [Interpretive reading of the antibiogram in gram positive cocci].

    PubMed

    Torres, Carmen; Cercenado, Emilia

    2010-10-01

    Resistance to methicillin in Staphylococcus is related to the expression of the mecA gene, and involves resistance to all beta-lactams, with the exception of the new cephalosporins, ceftobiprole and ceftaroline. Breakpoints for interpretation of this mechanism differ in S. aureus and in coagulase-negative species. For macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramins B, (MLS(B)) the most frequent mechanism among resistant strains is expression of methylases (erm genes). Topoisomerase changes caused by point mutations and expression of the efflux pump NorA determine resistance to quinolones, but there are great differences in the activity of different compounds, which makes interpretative reading difficult. Strains of S. aureus with intermediate susceptibility to glycopeptides (GISA strains) have been described, as well as highly-vancomycin-resistant isolates (vanA isolates). In Spain, there is a high percentage of S. pneumoniae strains intermediate or resistant to penicillin, and a low percentage of strains intermediate or resistant to third generation cephalosporins, due to mutations in genes encoding penicillin-binding proteins. The most frequent phenotype of resistance to MLS(B) in this species is caused by methylase production. Resistance to quinolones is still uncommon, and is mainly related to mutations in parC/parE (low level) and in gyrA. It is important to detect low level resistance due to its clinical implications. No strains of S. pyogenes resistant to penicillin have yet been described. In Spain the most common phenotype of resistance to macrolides in S. pyogenes is determined by efflux pumps (mef genes), affecting 14- and 15-membered macrolides. E. faecalis is usually susceptible to ampicillin, in contrast to E. faecium. Enterococci show intrinsic low-level resistance to aminoglycosides, but still remain susceptible to the combination of these antimicrobials and cell-wall active agents. Strains expressing different aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (high-level resistance) became resistant to the combination. Glycopeptide-resistant strains of enterococci are uncommon in Spain, but nosocomial outbreaks due to vanA enterococci and case reports due to vanB2 enterococci have been recently reported. PMID:20400208

  2. In vitro antibacterial activity of Tabernaemontana alternifolia (Roxb) stem bark aqueous extracts against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rise of antibiotic resistance among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), have caused concerns for the treatment of MRSA infections. Hence, search for an alternative therapy for these infections is inevitable. Folk Indian medicine refers to the use of leaf and stem bark powder of Tabernaemontana alternifolia (Roxb) in treatment of skin infections, but no scientific report establishes its antibacterial activity. Methods Direct aqueous extracts and sequential aqueous extracts of the stem bark of T. alternifolia (using petroleum ether and ethyl acetate as other solvents) were prepared by soxhlet extraction. The antibiotic sensitivity profiles of the clinical isolates were determined against 18 antibiotics using disc diffusion method. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The methicillin resistance among S. aureus (MRSA) was confirmed by PCR amplification of mecA gene. The disc diffusion method was used to determine the antibacterial activity of the extracts. The micro-dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract against the test organism. To further evaluate the therapeutic potential of the extract, cell cytotoxicity was checked on Vero cells by MTT assay. Chemical profiling of the extract was done by HPTLC method. Results The aqueous extracts of T. alternifolia stem bark exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive microorganisms, particularly against clinical isolates of MRSA and vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of extract against the isolates ranged from 600–800 ?g/ml. The extract did not exhibit cytotoxic activity against Vero cells even at the concentration of 4 mg/ml. The chemical profiling revealed presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, coumarins, saponins and steroids. Petroleum ether and ethyl acetate extracts did not exhibit antibacterial activity. Conclusion Our results offer a scientific basis for the traditional use of T. alternifolia in the treatment of skin infections, showing that the plant extract has an enormous potential as a prospective alternative therapy against MRSA skin infections. The present study lays the basis for future studies, to validate the possible use of T. alternifolia as a candidate in the treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:24066905

  3. Preparation and antibacterial activity of oligosaccharides derived from dandelion.

    PubMed

    Qian, Li; Zhou, Yan; Teng, Zhaolin; Du, Chun-Ling; Tian, Changrong

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we prepared oligosaccharides from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) by hydrolysis with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and investigated their antibacterial activity. The optimum hydrolysis conditions, as determined using the response surface methodology, were as follows: reaction time, 5.12h; reaction temperature, 65.53 °C and H2O2 concentration, 3.16%. Under these conditions, the maximum yield of the oligosaccharides reached 25.43%. The sugar content in the sample was 96.8%, and the average degree of polymerisation was approximately 9. The oligosaccharides showed high antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that dandelion-derived oligosaccharides have the potential to be used as antibacterial agents. PMID:24368113

  4. Effect of betamethasone in combination with antibiotics on gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Cellini, A; Tilotta, M; Barbato, G; Koverech, A; Selan, L

    2014-01-01

    Betamethasone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug used in cases of anaphylactic and allergic reactions, of Alzheimer and Addison diseases and in soft tissue injuries. It modulates gene expression for anti-inflammatory activity suppressing the immune system response. This latter effect might decrease the effectiveness of immune system response against microbial infections. Corticosteroids, in fact, mask some symptoms of infection and during their use superimposed infections may occur. Thus, the use of glucocorticoids in patients with sepsis remains extremely controversial. In this study we analyzed the in vitro effect of a commercial formulation of betamethasone (Bentelan) on several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria of clinical relevance. It was found to be an inhibitor of the growth of most of the strains examined. Also the effect of betamethasone in combination with some classes of antibiotics was evaluated. Antibiotic-steroid combination therapy is, in such cases, superior to antibiotic-alone treatment to impair bacterial growths. Such effect was essentially not at all observable on Staphylococcus aureus or Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS). PMID:25572750

  5. Isolation and identification of membrane vesicle-associated proteins in Gram-positive bacteria and mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Brown, Lisa; Casadevall, Arturo; Montalvo-Quirós, Sandra; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens naturally release membrane vesicles (MVs) under a variety of growth environments. For pathogenic bacteria there are strong evidences that released MVs are a delivery mechanism for the release of immunologically active molecules that contribute to virulence. Identification of membrane vesicle-associated proteins that can act as immunological modulators is crucial for opening up new horizons for understanding the pathogenesis of certain bacteria and for developing novel vaccines. In this protocol, we provide all the details for isolating MVs secreted by either mycobacteria or Gram-positive bacteria and for the subsequent identification of the protein content of the MVs by mass spectrometry. The protocol is adapted from Gram-negative bacteria and involves four main steps: (1) isolation of MVs from the culture media; (2) purification of MVs by density gradient ultrucentrifugation; (3) acetone precipitation of the MVs protein content and in-solution trypsin digestion and (4) mass spectrometry analysis of the generated peptides and protein identification. Our modifications are:•Growing Mycobacteria in a chemically defined media to reduce the number of unrelated bacterial components in the supernatant.•The use of an ultrafiltration system, which allows concentrating larger volumes.•In solution digestion of proteins followed by peptides purification by ziptip.

  6. Antibacterial Labdane Diterpenoids from Vitex vestita.

    PubMed

    Corlay, Nina; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Leborgne, Erell; Blanchard, Florent; Cachet, Xavier; Bignon, Jérôme; Roussi, Fanny; Butel, Marie-Jose; Awang, Khalijah; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-06-26

    A large-scale in vitro screening of tropical plants using an antibacterial assay permitted the selection of several species with significant antibacterial activities. Bioassay-guided purification of the dichloromethane extract of the leaves of the Malaysian species Vitex vestita, led to the isolation of six new labdane-type diterpenoids, namely, 12-epivitexolide A (2), vitexolides B and C (3 and 4), vitexolide E (8), and vitexolins A and B (5 and 6), along with six known compounds, vitexolides A (1) and D (7), acuminolide (9), 3?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (10), 8?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (11), and 6?-hydroxyanticopalic acid (12). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR analyses and HRMS experiments. Both variable-temperature NMR spectroscopic studies and chemical modifications were performed to investigate the dynamic epimerization of the ?-hydroxybutenolide moiety of compounds 1-4. Compounds were assayed against a panel of 46 Gram-positive strains. Vitexolide A (1) exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity with minimal inhibitory concentration values ranging from 6 to 96 ?M, whereas compounds 2 and 6-9 showed moderate antibacterial activity. The presence of a ?-hydroxyalkyl-?-hydroxybutenolide subunit contributed significantly to antibacterial activity. Compounds 1-4 and 6-9 showed cytotoxic activities against the HCT-116 cancer cell line (1 < IC50s < 10 ?M) and human fetal lung fibroblast MRC5 cell line (1 < IC50s < 10 ?M for compounds 1, 2, 7, 8, and 9). PMID:26034885

  7. Generation and characterization of the antibacterial activity of a novel hybrid

    E-print Network

    Lowenberger, Carl

    Generation and characterization of the antibacterial activity of a novel hybrid antimicrobial exhibits antibacterial activity at sub-micromolar concentrations with a target specificity that differs from either parent molecule. Antibacterial activity of the hybrid molecule was found to be greater

  8. Structural basis for the antibacterial activity of the 12-membered-ring

    E-print Network

    Yonath, Ada E.

    Structural basis for the antibacterial activity of the 12-membered-ring mono-sugar macrolide, Michigan THIS COPY WAS CREATED BY THE AUTHORS #12;Structural basis for the antibacterial activity of the 12 & Immunology, University if Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan Structural basis for the antibacterial activity

  9. Tuning the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of amphiphilic polynorbornene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ilker, M Firat; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N; Coughlin, E Bryan

    2004-12-01

    Amphiphilic cationic polynorbornene derivatives, soluble in water, were prepared from modular norbornene monomers, with a wide range of molecular weights (M(n) = 1600-137 500 g/mol) and narrow polydispersities (PDI = 1.1-1.3). The antibacterial activity determined by growth inhibition assays and the hemolytic activity against human red blood cells were measured and compared to determine the selectivity of the polymers for bacterial over mammalian cells. The effects of monomer repeat unit hydrophobicity and polymer molecular weight on antibacterial and hemolytic activities were determined. The hydrophobicity of the repeat unit was observed to have dramatic effects on antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Lipid membrane disruption activities of the polymers was confirmed by measuring polymer-induced dye leakage from large unilamellar vesicles. By tuning the overall hydrophobicity of the polymer through random copolymerizations of modular norbornene derivatives, highly selective, nonhemolytic antibacterial activities were obtained. For appropriate monomer composition, selectivity against bacteria versus human red blood cells was determined to be over 100. PMID:15571411

  10. Conjugation of a new series of dithiocarbazate Schiff base Copper(II) complexes with vectors selected to enhance antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Low, May Lee; Maigre, Laure; Dorlet, Pierre; Guillot, Régis; Pagčs, Jean-Marie; Crouse, Karen A; Policar, Clotilde; Delsuc, Nicolas

    2014-12-17

    A new series of six Schiff bases derived from S-methyldithiocarbazate (SMDTC) and S-benzyldithiocarbazate (SBDTC) with methyl levulinate (SMML, SBML), levulinic acid (SMLA, SBLA), and 4-carboxybenzaldehyde (SM4CB, SB4CB) were reacted with copper(II), producing complexes of general formula ML2 (M = Cu(II), L = ligand). All compounds were characterized using established physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. Crystal structures were determined for three Schiff bases (SMML, SBML, SBLA) and two Cu(II) complexes (Cu(SMML)2 and Cu(SMLA)2). In order to provide more insight into the behavior of the complexes in solution, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electrochemical experiments were performed. The parent ligands and their respective copper(II) complexes exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The most active ligand (SB4CB) and its analogous S-methyl derivative (SM4CB) were conjugated with various vector moieties: polyarginines (R1, R4, R9, and RW9), oligoethylene glycol (OEG), and an efflux pump blocker, phenylalanine-arginine-?-naphthylamide (PA?N). Nonaarginine (R9) derivatives showed the most encouraging synergistic effects upon conjugation and complexation with copper ion including enhanced water solubility, bacteria cell membrane permeability, and bioactivity. These Cu(II)-R9 derivatives display remarkable antibacterial activity against a wide spectrum of bacteria and, in particular, are highly efficacious against Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 0.5-1 ?M. This pioneer study clearly indicates that the conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to dithiocarbazate compounds greatly enhances their therapeutic potential. PMID:25382115

  11. Antibacterial activity of guava (Psidium guajava L.) and Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss.) extracts against foodborne pathogens and spoilage bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mahfuzul Hoque, M D; Bari, M L; Inatsu, Y; Juneja, Vijay K; Kawamoto, S

    2007-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of guava (Psidium guajava) and neem (Azadirachta indica) extracts against 21 strains of foodborne pathogens were determined--Listeria monocytogenes (five strains), Staphylococcus aureus (four strains), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (six strains), Salmonella Enteritidis (four strains), Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Bacillus cereus, and five food spoilage bacteria: Pseudomonas aeroginosa, P. putida, Alcaligenes faecalis, and Aeromonas hydrophila (two strains). Guava and neem extracts showed higher antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria compared to Gram-negative bacteria except for V. parahaemolyticus, P. aeroginosa, and A. hydrophila. None of the extracts showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ethanol extracts of guava showed the highest inhibition for L. monocytogenes JCM 7676 (0.1 mg/mL), S. aureus JCM 2151 (0.1 mg/mL), S. aureus JCM 2179 (0.1 mg/mL), and V. parahaemolyticus IFO 12711 (0.1 mg/mL) and the lowest inhibition for Alcaligenes faecalis IFO 12669, Aeromonas hydrophila NFRI 8282 (4.0 mg/mL), and A. hydrophila NFRI 8283 (4.0 mg/mL). The MIC of chloroform extracts of neem showed similar inhibition for L. monocytogenes ATCC 43256 (4.0 mg/mL) and L. monocytogenes ATCC 49594 (5.0 mg/mL). However, ethanol extracts of neem showed higher inhibition for S. aureus JCM 2151 (4.5 mg/mL) and S. aureus IFO 13276 (4.5 mg/mL) and the lower inhibition for other microorganisms (6.5 mg/mL). No significant effects of temperature and pH were found on guava and neem extracts against cocktails of L. monocytogenes and S. aureus. The results of the present study suggest that guava and neem extracts possess compounds containing antibacterial properties that can potentially be useful to control foodborne pathogens and spoilage organisms. PMID:18041957

  12. Discovery of inhibitors of Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase with the Fe(II)-form selectivity and antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Long; Chai, Sergio C.; Huang, Min; He, Hong-Zhen; Hurley, Thomas D.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang

    2009-01-01

    Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP) is a promising target to develop novel antibiotics, because all bacteria express MetAP from a single gene that carries out the essential function of removing N-terminal methionine from nascent proteins. Divalent metal ions play a critical role in the catalysis, and there is an urgent need to define the actual metal used by MetAP in bacterial cells. By high throughput screening, we identified a novel class of catechol-containing MetAP inhibitors that display selectivity for the Fe(II)-form of MetAP. X-ray structure revealed that the inhibitor binds to MetAP at the active site with the catechol coordinating to the metal ions. Importantly, some of the inhibitors showed antibacterial activity at low micromolar concentration on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our data indicate that Fe(II) is the likely metal used by MetAP in the cellular environment, and MetAP inhibitors need to inhibit this metalloform of MetAP effectively to be therapeutically useful. PMID:18785729

  13. Spiculisporic acid analogues of the marine-derived fungus, Aspergillus candidus strain HDf2, and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Guo, Zhi Kai; Li, Xiang Min; Chen, Fu Xiao; Zhan, Xia Fei; Shen, Ming Hui

    2015-07-01

    Two novel antibiotic spiculisporic acid analogues, named as spiculisporic acid F (1) and G (2), and two known compounds, (-)-spiculisporic acid (3) and secospiculisporic acid B (4), were isolated by bioactivity-guided fractionation from the fermentation broth of the sea urchin-derived Aspergillus candidus strain HDf2. Their structures were unambiguously established by comprehensive analysis of 1D and 2D NMR, and high-resolution MS spectra, and by comparison with known compounds. Biological experiments demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 displayed antibacterial activity against Gram-negative Pseudomonas solanacearum and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, but showed no cytotoxicity against SGC-7901 human gastric adenocarcinoma and SPC-A-1 human lung adenocarcinoma tumor cell lines. This is the first critical evidence identifying spiculisporic acid derivatives as a potential bio-control agent for the soil borne pathogen P. solanacearum (E. F. Smith) Smith. These findings provide further insight into the chemical and biological activity diversity of this class of compounds. PMID:25912731

  14. Antibacterial Activity of the Alkaloid-Enriched Extract from Prosopis juliflora Pods and Its Influence on in Vitro Ruminal Digestion

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Edilene T.; Pereira, Mara Lúcia A.; da Silva, Camilla Flávia P.G.; Souza-Neta, Lourdes C.; Geris, Regina; Martins, Dirceu; Santana, Antônio Euzébio G.; Barbosa, Luiz Cláudio A.; Silva, Herymá Giovane O.; Freitas, Giovana C.; Figueiredo, Mauro P.; de Oliveira, Fernando F.; Batista, Ronan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity of alkaloid-enriched extracts from Prosopis juliflora (Fabaceae) pods in order to evaluate them as feed additives for ruminants. As only the basic chloroformic extract (BCE), whose main constituents were juliprosopine (juliflorine), prosoflorine and juliprosine, showed Gram-positive antibacterial activity against Micrococcus luteus (MIC = 25 ?g/mL), Staphylococcus aureus (MIC = 50 ?g/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 50 ?g/mL), its influence on ruminal digestion was evaluated using a semi-automated in vitro gas production technique, with monensin as the positive control. Results showed that BCE has decreased gas production as efficiently as monensin after 36 h of fermentation, revealing its positive influence on gas production during ruminal digestion. Since P. juliflora is a very affordable plant, this study points out this alkaloid enriched extract from the pods of Prosopis juliflora as a potential feed additive to decrease gas production during ruminal digestion. PMID:23595000

  15. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of novel perfluoroalkyl-containing quaternary ammonium salts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jian-Ying Sun; Jing Li; Xiao-Long Qiu; Feng-Ling Qing

    2005-01-01

    A new series of perfluoroalkyl-containing quaternary ammonium compounds were prepared and examined for their antibacterial activities. The perfluoroalkyl-containing quaternary ammonium salts mainly exhibited excellent antibacterial activity for the Gram-positive strain such as Staphylococcus aureus, the MIC (minimal inhibitory concentration) values was between 2.5 and 10?g\\/mL and the MBC (minimal bactericidal concentration) values were 20?g\\/mL. They all showed weak activity against

  16. Enhancement of bismuth antibacterial activity with lipophilic thiol chelators.

    PubMed Central

    Domenico, P; Salo, R J; Novick, S G; Schoch, P E; Van Horn, K; Cunha, B A

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial properties of bismuth are greatly enhanced when bismuth is combined with certain lipophilic thiol compounds. Antibacterial activity was enhanced from 25- to 300-fold by the following seven different thiols, in order of decreasing synergy: 1,3-propanedithiol, dimercaprol (BAL), dithiothreitol, 3-mercapto-2-butanol, beta-mercaptoethanol, 1-monothioglycerol, and mercaptoethylamine. The dithiols produced the greatest synergy with bismuth at optimum bismuth-thiol molar ratios of from 3:1 to 1:1. The monothiols were generally not as synergistic and required molar ratios of from 1:1 to 1:4 for optimum antibacterial activity. The most-active mono- or dithiols were also the most soluble in butanol. The intensity of the yellow formed by bismuth-thiol complexes reflected the degree of chelation and correlated with antibacterial potency at high molar ratios. The bismuth-BAL compound (BisBAL) was active against most bacteria, as assessed by broth dilution, agar diffusion, and agar dilution analyses. Staphylococci (MIC, 5 to 7 microM Bi3+) and Helicobacter pylori (MIC, 2.2 microM) were among the most sensitive bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive (MIC, < 17 microM). Enterococci were relatively resistant (MIC, 63 microM Bi3+). The MIC range for anaerobes was 15 to 100 microM Bi3+, except for Clostridium difficile (MIC, 7.5 microM). Bactericidal activity averaged 29% above the MIC. Bactericidal activity increased with increasing pH and/or increasing temperature. Bismuth-thiol solubility, stability, and antibacterial activity depended on pH and the bismuth-thiol molar ratio. BisBAL was stable but ineffective against Escherichia coli at pH 4. Activity and instability (reactivity) increased with increasing alkalinity. BisBAL was acid soluble at a molar ratio of greater than 3:2 and alkaline soluble at a molar ratio of less than 2:3. In conclusion, certain lipophilic thiol compounds enhanced bismuth antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria. The activity, solubility, and stability of BisBAL were strongly dependent on the pH, temperature, and molar ratio. Chelation of bismuth with certain thiol agents enhanced the solubility and lipophilicity of this cationic heavy metal, thereby significantly enhancing its potency and versatility as an antibacterial agent. PMID:9257744

  17. Antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of Terminalia stenostachya and Terminalia spinosa.

    PubMed

    Mbwambo, Zakaria H; Erasto, Paul; Nondo, Ramadhani O S; Innocent, Esther; Kidukuli, Abdul W

    2011-04-01

    Plants that belong to the Combretaceae family have long history of use in the traditional medicine systems of Africa and Asia for treatment of diseases and conditions associated with HIV/AIDS-opportunistic infections. The objective of this study was to investigate the biological activities of extracts of Terminalia stenostachya Engl. & Diels and Terminalia spinosa Engl. (Combretaceae), to verify the rationale for their use by traditional health practitioners in the treatment of HIV/AIDS patients in Tanzania. Extracts of the leaves, stem barks and roots of T. stenostachya and extracts of stem barks and roots of T. spinosa have all shown strong activity against a number of standard microbial strains including Mycobacterium madagascariense and Mycobacterium indicus pranii, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio cholera, Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Pseuodomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. All extracts from the two plant species showed strong antimycobacterial activity against test organisms. The stem and root bark extracts were more active than leaves against both gram positive and negative bacteria. With the exception of two extracts from stem barks of T. spinosa, all other extracts from T. stenostachya and T. spinosa that were tested exhibited less activity against brine shrimp larvae with LC50 values ? 100 ?g/mL compared to cyclophosphamide, a standard anticancer drug. These results provide an indication that these plants may possess therapeutically potent antimicrobial compounds worth further development. PMID:25566609

  18. Effects of surface contamination and cleaning with hypochlorite wipes on the antibacterial activity of copper-alloyed antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takatsuna; Nishikubo, Hideyuki; Morikawa, Akifumi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sato, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Yasushi

    2014-01-01

    Effects of surface contamination and cleaning with hypochlorite wipes on the antibacterial activity of copper-alloyed stainless steel were studied. The antibacterial activity of copper alloyed stainless steel decreased with the increase in the amount of surface contaminant, and the bacterial counts from specimens contaminated with a contaminant, e.g. 1.6 × 10(-2) ?g/mm(2) of bovine serum albumin, were not significantly different from those from ordinary stainless steel specimens. The once contaminated surface could regain its antibacterial activity when it was sufficiently wiped clean with sterile wipes loaded with sodium hypochlorite solution. PMID:24975410

  19. Antibacterial immune response in Astacus leptodactylus (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Xylander, W E; Ullrich, G; Kaiser, H E

    1997-01-01

    Antibacterial substances (ABS) in the hemolymph of Astacus leptodactylus were studied by agar-plate lysis and inhibition tests. The results demonstrate ABS against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. ABS against Gram-positive bacteria were identified as a lysozyme with a molecular weight of 14 kDa, heat resistance (< 50 degrees C) and lability to freezing. ABS against Gram-negative bacteria lost 50% of their activity at 50 degrees C and completely at 70 degrees C but were stable to freezing. Both ABS are inducible; they are produced and stored in the granular and semigranular hemocytes. Lysozyme is found in treated and untreated animals, ABS against Gram-negative bacteria only after induction. PMID:9179616

  20. Antibacterial activity of cerium colloids against opportunistic microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Babenko, L P; Zholobak, N M; Shcherbakov, A B; Voychuk, S I; Lazarenko, L M; Spivak, M Ya

    2012-01-01

    The CeO2 sol with the size of nanoparticles 2-4 nm has been synthesized. It has been determined that the synthesized nanocrystalline cerium has antibacterial activity in vitro against different groups of opportunistic microorganisms: clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. The rate of viability depression of test-cultures depends on the concentration of cerium dioxide nanoparticles and time of incubation. It is shown that the sol interacts with the bacterial cell surface. It is suggested that the observed differences of antibacterial action of nanocrystalline cerium dioxide can be related to the structural characteristics of the cell surface. PMID:22830198

  1. [Triclocarban antibacterial activity on resistant staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci].

    PubMed

    Drugeon, H-B; Rouveix, B; Michaud-Nerard, A

    2012-06-01

    Triclocarban is an antiseptic of the anilide family. Its antibacterial activity was re-assessed in vitro against various susceptible and antibiotic resistant staphylococcus, streptococcus, and enterococcus strains. The results of this study show that, in vitro, the effectiveness of triclocarban antibacterial is maintained at very low MICs ranging from 0.5 to 8 mg/L for the various resistant strains studied. Triclocarban remains still very effective for the treatment of either initially bacterial skin and mucosal infections, or skin and mucosal at risk of super infection. PMID:22626523

  2. Structural characterization and antibacterial activity of oligoguanidine (polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dafu Wei; Qiangxiang Ma; Yong Guan; Fuzeng Hu; Anna Zheng; Xi Zhang; Zheng Teng; Hua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Polyguanidine oligomers, particularly polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) oligomer, are used extensively and safely as disinfectants and biocides. The antibacterial activity of PHMB is attributed to its interaction with cellar membrane components. However, the detailed molecular structures and components of polyguanidine oligomers are still vague and remain to be learned. In this paper, polyhexamethylene guanidine oligomer (PHMG) was prepared by polycondensation of

  3. Antibacterial activity of polymer coated cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal; Shah, Shreya; Shah, Hirsh; Rispoli, Fred J; McDonnell, Kevin T; Workeneh, Selam; Karakoti, Ajay; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have found numerous applications in the biomedical industry due to their strong antioxidant properties. In the current study, we report the influence of nine different physical and chemical parameters: pH, aeration and, concentrations of MgSO(4), CaCl(2), KCl, natural organic matter, fructose, nanoparticles and Escherichia coli, on the antibacterial activity of dextran coated cerium oxide nanoparticles. A least-squares quadratic regression model was developed to understand the collective influence of the tested parameters on the anti-bacterial activity and subsequently a computer-based, interactive visualization tool was developed. The visualization allows us to elucidate the effect of each of the parameters in combination with other parameters, on the antibacterial activity of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the toxicity of CeO(2) NPs depend on the physical and chemical environment; and in a majority of the possible combinations of the nine parameters, non-lethal to the bacteria. In fact, the cerium oxide nanoparticles can decrease the anti-bacterial activity exerted by magnesium and potassium salts. PMID:23110109

  4. Negligible Particle-Specific Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    Negligible Particle-Specific Antibacterial Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Zong-ming Xiu, Qing. KEYWORDS: Silver nanoparticles, toxicity, metallic nanoparticle, silver ion, E. coli As a broad of silver ions from the crystalline core of silver nanoparticles contribute to the toxicity

  5. Antibacterial activities of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and piperidinium salts.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Noritaka; Nakayama, Kyosuke; Kitazume, Tomoya

    2011-03-15

    The antibacterial activity of various types of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and piperidinium salts with both propargyl group and alkyl and/or silylalkyl chains of different lengths, are described. Especially, the MIC (?g/ml) of prepared each compound for Escherichia coli and other several bacteria was determined. PMID:21324694

  6. Evaluation of Antimicrobial Activity of the Methanol Extracts from 8 Traditional Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chang-Geun; Hah, Dae-Sik; Kim, Chung-Hui; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Euikyung

    2011-01-01

    The methanol extract of 12 medicinal plants were evaluated for its antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (5 strains) and Gram-negative bacteria (10 strains) by assay for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bacterial concentration (MBC) . The antibacterial activity was determined by an agar dilution method (according to the guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute) . All the compounds (12 extracts) of the 8 medicinal plants (leaf or root) were active against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative showed a more potent action than Gram positive bacteria. The MIC concentrations were various ranged from 0.6 ?g/ml to 5000 ?g/ml. The lowest MIC (0.6 ?g/ml) and MBC (1.22 ?g/ml) values were obtained with extract on 4 and 3 of the 15 microorganisms tested, respectively. PMID:24278548

  7. Antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of honey collected from Timergara (Dir, Pakistan).

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Naz, Sumaira; Sangeen, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In this study honeys of Acacia modesta, Prunus persica, Zizyphus sativa and Isodon rogosus plants were tested against two Gram-positive bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus), two Gram-negative bacterial strains (Klebsilla pneumonia and Escherichia coli) and two fungal strains (Alternaria alternata and Trichoderma harzianum) through Agar well diffusion method. The tested honeys showed high antimicrobial activities to the tested bacterial and fungal strains. All the tested honeys were more active against Gram-negative bacterial strains than the Gram-positive bacterial strains. They showed lower activity against the tested fungal strains as compared to all the tested bacterial strains. The given honeys showed free radical scavenging activity also. PMID:24374434

  8. Synthesis and characterization of silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposites by chemical reduction method and their antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shameli, Kamyar; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Zargar, Mohsen; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh; Moghaddam, Mansour Ghaffari

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of a small size were successfully synthesized using the wet chemical reduction method into the lamellar space layer of montmorillonite/chitosan (MMT/Cts) as an organomodified mineral solid support in the absence of any heat treatment. AgNO3, MMT, Cts, and NaBH4 were used as the silver precursor, the solid support, the natural polymeric stabilizer, and the chemical reduction agent, respectively. MMT was suspended in aqueous AgNO3/Cts solution. The interlamellar space limits were changed (d-spacing = 1.24–1.54 nm); therefore, AgNPs formed on the interlayer and external surface of MMT/Cts with d-average = 6.28–9.84 nm diameter. Characterizations were done using different methods, ie, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Silver/montmorillonite/chitosan bionanocomposite (Ag/MMT/Cts BNC) systems were examined. The antibacterial activity of AgNPs in MMT/Cts was investigated against Gram-positive bacteria, ie, Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria, ie, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the disc diffusion method using Mueller Hinton agar at different sizes of AgNPs. All of the synthesized Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were found to have high antibacterial activity. These results show that Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs can be useful in different biological research and biomedical applications, including surgical devices and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:21499424

  9. Functionalization of cotton fabrics by radiation induced grafting of quaternary salt to impart antibacterial property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, N. K.; Kumar, Virendra; Rao, M. S.; Bhardwaj, Y. K.; Sabharwal, S.

    2011-11-01

    High energy gamma radiation has been used to covalently link polymer chains of a quaternary ammonium salt containing monomer, viz. [2-(Acryloyloxyethyl)]trimethylammonium chloride (AETC) to cotton fabric by mutual radiation grafting using 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) monomer as the grafting facilitator. Grafting yield was found to increase with the radiation dose and monomer concentration. The grafted samples have been characterized for water uptake, surface morphology and thermal stability and for their antibacterial efficacy against various bacteria and were found to possess significant antibacterial activity particularly against gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Hirokazu; Endou, Fumiko; Furukawa, Soichi; Matsufuji, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kouichi; Anzai, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Solvent extracts from the carnivorous plant Dionaea muscipula (Venus flytrap) were prepared using eight different organic solvents, and examined for antibacterial activity against food-related pathogenic and putrefactive bacteria. All solvent extracts showed higher antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria than against gram negative bacteria. The TLC-bioautography analysis of the extracts revealed that a yellow spot was detected at Rf value of 0.85, which showed strong antibacterial activity. The UV, MS, and NMR analyses revealed that the antibacterial compound was plumbagin. PMID:24077538

  11. Rattusin, an Intestinal ?-Defensin-Related Peptide in Rats with a Unique Cysteine Spacing Pattern and Salt-Insensitive Antibacterial Activities

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Amar A.; Ouellette, Andre J.; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are essential components of the innate immune system. As a major family of mammalian antimicrobial peptides, defensins are expressed mainly by mucosal epithelial cells and promyelocytes. Despite the capacity to kill a broad spectrum of bacteria through physical disruption of membranes, most defensins show substantially reduced antibacterial activities in the presence of monovalent and divalent cations, thereby limiting their therapeutic potential, particularly for the treatment of systemic infections. Genome-wide computational screening of the rat genome led to the identification of the gene for a novel ?-defensin-related peptide that we termed rattusin. Rattusin shares a highly conserved signal and prosequence with mammalian ?-defensins, but instead of the canonical ?-defensin six-cysteine motif, rattusin consists of five cysteines with a distinctive spacing pattern. Furthermore, rattusin is preferentially expressed in Paneth cells of the distal small intestine with potent antibacterial activity against a broad range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant strains. The MICs were mostly in the range of 2 to 4 ?M, with no appreciable toxicity to mammalian cells at up to 100 ?M. In contrast to classical ?- and ?-defensins, rattusin retained its activity in the presence of physiological concentrations of NaCl and Mg2+, making it an attractive antimicrobial candidate for both topical and systemic applications. PMID:23380721

  12. Antibacterial activity of Thymus maroccanus and Thymus broussonetii essential oils against nosocomial infection - bacteria and their synergistic potential with antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fadli, Mariam; Saad, Asmaa; Sayadi, Sami; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Mezrioui, Nour-Eddine; Pagčs, Jean-Marie; Hassani, Lahcen

    2012-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of the association between conventional antibiotics and essential oils (EOs) of endemic Moroccan thyme species, Thymus maroccanus and T. broussonetii, on antibiotic-resistant bacteria involved in nosocomial infections. Synergistic interactions between antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, pristinamycin, and cefixime) and EOs, and between T. maroccanus and T. Broussonetii EOs were determined by the checkerboard test. Serial dilutions of two antimicrobial agents were mixed together so that each row (and column) contained a fixed amount of the first agent and increasing amounts of the second one. The results indicate that the oils had a high inhibitory activity against tested bacteria, except for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In parallel with the increase of cellular killing, the release of 260nm-absorbing materials from bacterial cells, treated with EOs, increased in response to oil concentration. Out of 80 combinations tested between EOs and antibiotics, 71% showed total synergism, 20% had partial synergistic interaction and 9% showed no effect. Combination with carvacrol, the major constituent of T. maroccanus and T. broussonetii, showed also an interesting synergistic effect in combination with ciprofloxacin. The effect on Gram-positive bacteria was more important than on Gram-negative bacteria. These findings are very promising since the use of these combinations for nosocomial infections treatment is likely to reduce the minimum effective dose of the antibiotics, thus minimizing their possible toxic side effects and treatment cost. However, further investigations are needed to assess the potential for therapeutic application. PMID:22257599

  13. Antibacterial activity of lichen secondary metabolite usnic acid is primarily caused by inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maci?g-Dorszy?ska, Monika; W?grzyn, Grzegorz; Guzow-Krzemi?ska, Beata

    2014-04-01

    Usnic acid, a compound produced by various lichen species, has been demonstrated previously to inhibit growth of different bacteria and fungi; however, mechanism of its antimicrobial activity remained unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that usnic acid causes rapid and strong inhibition of RNA and DNA synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria, represented by Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus, while it does not inhibit production of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) in Escherichia coli, which is resistant to even high doses of this compound. However, we also observed slight inhibition of RNA synthesis in a Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio harveyi. Inhibition of protein synthesis in B. subtilis and S. aureus was delayed, which suggest indirect action (possibly through impairment of transcription) of usnic acid on translation. Interestingly, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly in B. subtilis and S. aureus, suggesting interference of usnic acid with elongation of DNA replication. We propose that inhibition of RNA synthesis may be a general mechanism of antibacterial action of usnic acid, with additional direct mechanisms, such as impairment of DNA replication in B. subtilis and S. aureus. PMID:24571086

  14. European surveillance study on antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Brazier; D. Chmelar; L. Dubreuil; G. Feierl; M. Hedberg; S. Kalenic; E. Könönen; B. Lundgren; H. Malamou-Ladas; E. Nagy; Ĺ. Sullivan; C. E. Nord

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms frequently isolated from local and systemic infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical strains isolated in 10 European countries were investigated. After identification of 299 GPAC to species level, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, imipenem, clindamycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method

  15. Impedimetric detection of pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria using an antimicrobial peptide from class IIa bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Etayash, Hashem; Jiang, Keren; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    Real-time, label-free detection of Gram-positive bacteria with high selectivity and sensitivity is demonstrated using an interdigitated impedimetric array functionalized with naturally produced antimicrobial peptide from class IIa bacteriocins. The antimicrobial peptide, leucocin A, was chemically synthesized and covalently immobilized on interdigitated gold microelectrodes via the interaction between the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide and free amines of a preattached thiolated linker. Exposing the peptide sensor to various concentrations of Gram-positive bacteria generated reproducible impedance spectra that detected peptide-bacteria interactions at a concentration of 1 cell/?L. The peptide sensor also selectively detected Listeria monocytogenes from other Gram-positive strains at a concentration of 10(3) cfu mL(-1). The study highlights that short peptide ligands from bacteriocin class offer high selectivity in bacterial detection and can be used in developing a robust, portable biosensor device to efficiently detect pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria in food samples. PMID:24400685

  16. The Pattern of Growth and Flagellar Development in Motile Gram-positive Cocci

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. F. HALE; K. A. BISSET

    1958-01-01

    SUMMARY: By the use of a staining technique which enables the flagella and cell walls to be demonstrated simultaneously, the distribution of flagella on the com- ponent cells of motile Gram-positive cocci has been examined. By comparison of these preparations with others made by the technique of Pennington (1950), which indicates the physiological age of cells according to the resistance

  17. Multistep Resistance Development Studies of Ceftaroline in Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria?

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Catherine; McGhee, Pamela; Appelbaum, Peter C.; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia

    2011-01-01

    Ceftaroline, the active component of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin with bactericidal activity against Gram-positive and -negative isolates. This study evaluated the potential for ceftaroline and comparator antibiotics to select for clones of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis with elevated MICs. S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes isolates in the present study were highly susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC range, 0.004 to 0.25 ?g/ml). No streptococcal strains yielded ceftaroline clones with increased MICs (defined as an increase in MIC of >4-fold) after 50 daily passages. Ceftaroline MICs for H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were 0.06 to 2 ?g/ml for four strains and 8 ?g/ml for a ?-lactamase-positive, efflux-positive H. influenzae with a mutation in L22. One H. influenzae clone with an increased ceftaroline MIC (quinolone-resistant, ?-lactamase-positive) was recovered after 20 days. The ceftaroline MIC for this isolate increased 16-fold, from 0.06 to 1 ?g/ml. MICs for S. aureus ranged from 0.25 to 1 ?g/ml. No S. aureus isolates tested with ceftaroline had clones with increased MIC (>4-fold) after 50 passages. Two E. faecalis isolates tested had ceftaroline MICs increased from 1 to 8 ?g/ml after 38 days and from 4 to 32 ?g/ml after 41 days, respectively. The parental ceftaroline MIC for the one K. pneumoniae extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-negative isolate tested was 0.5 ?g/ml and did not change after 50 daily passages. PMID:21343467

  18. Antibacterial activity of Nymphaea nouchali (Burm. f) flower

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present work aimed to find out the antibacterial activity of Nymphaea nouchali flower on human and plant pathogenic bacteria. Methods Antibacterial potency of methanol, acetone, ethyl acetate and petroleum spirit extracts of Nymphaea nouchali flower has been tested against four human pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis (FO 3026) Escherichia coli (IFO 3007), Klebsiella pneumonia (ATTC 10031) and Sarcina lutea (IFO 3232) and one plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris (IAM 1671) by disc diffusion assay. Zone of inhibition produced by different extracts against the test bacteria was measured and compared with standard antibiotic disc. Results Methanol extract possessed better antibacterial activity against two pathogenic bacteria, B. subtilis (FO 3026) and S. lutea (IFO 3232) than commercial antibiotic nalidixic acid. Acetone extract showed moderate sensitivity whereas B. subtilis (FO 3026), S. lutea (IFO 3232) and X. campestris (IAM 1671) showed resistance to ethyl acetate and petroleum spirit extracts. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of various extracts were ranged between 128–2048 ?gml-1. Conclusions Nymphaea nouchali flower could be a potential candidate for future development of novel broad spectrum antibacterial herbal formulation. PMID:24099586

  19. Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Corey, G. Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

  20. Multidrug resistance in hydrocarbon-tolerant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Mihaela Marilena; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    New Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from Poeni oily sludge, using enrichment procedures. The six Gram-positive strains belong to Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus genera. The eight Gram-negative strains belong to Shewanella, Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Klebsiella genera. Isolated bacterial strains were tolerant to saturated (i.e., n-hexane, n-heptane, n-decane, n-pentadecane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (i.e., benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene isomers, ethylbenzene, propylbenzene) and polyaromatic (i.e., naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons, and also resistant to different antimicrobial agents (i.e., ampicillin, kanamycin, rhodamine 6G, crystal violet, malachite green, sodium dodecyl sulfate). The presence of hydrophilic antibiotics like ampicillin or kanamycin in liquid LB-Mg medium has no effects on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria resistance to toxic compounds. The results indicated that Gram-negative bacteria are less sensitive to toxic compounds than Gram-positive bacteria, except one bacteria belonging to Lysinibacillus genus. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by ampicillin or kanamycin to isolated bacterial strains. Gram-negative bacteria possessed between two and four catabolic genes (alkB, alkM, alkB/alkB1, todC1, xylM, PAH dioxygenase, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase), compared with Gram-positive bacteria (except one bacteria belonging to Bacillus genus) which possessed one catabolic gene (alkB/alkB1). Transporter genes (HAE1, acrAB) were detected only in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:21478643

  1. Comparison of antibacterial activity of Ag nanoparticles synthesized from leaf extract of Parthenium hystrophorus L in aqueous media and Gentamicin sulphate: in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mohammad F; Yadav, Deepak; Kapoor, Sumeet; Chander, Jagdish; Samim, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Monodisperse silver (Ag) nanoparticles were synthesized by using Parthenium hystrophorus L leaf extract in aqueous media. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffracto-meter (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and dynamics light scattering (DLS). Size-dependent antibacterial activities of Ag nanoparticles were tested against Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus. Ag nanoparticles having 20?±?2?nm size in diameter show maximum zone of inhibition (23?±?2.2?mm) in comparison to 40?nm and 70?nm diameter nanoparticles for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The zone of inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus were 19?±?1.8?mm, 15?±?1.5?mm and 11?±?1?mm for 20?nm, 40?nm, and 70?nm, respectively. In addition, affect of concentration of 20?nm size Ag nanoparticles on Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus species were also reported and results were compared with 10?µg/ml dose of Gentamicin sulphate. The Parthenium hystrophorus L leaf extract capped 20?±?2?nm Ag nanoparticles (7.5?µg/ml) shows statistically significant antibacterial activity than Gentamicin sulphate (10?µg/ml) against Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24111829

  2. Spectroscopic studies and antibacterial activities of some new 16-membered octaazamacrocyclic complexes derived from thiocarbohydrazide and pentane-2,4-dione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D. P.; Kumar, Krishan; Chopra, Rimpi Mehani ne'e.

    2011-02-01

    A series of macrocyclic complexes of the type [M(C 12H 20N 8S 2)X 2]; where M = Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II); X = Cl -, NO 3-, CH 3COO - has been synthesized by template condensation of thiocarbohydrazide and pentane-2,4-dione in the presence of divalent metal salts in methanolic medium. The complexes have been characterized with the help of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic measurements, electronic, NMR, IR, EPR and MS spectral studies. The low value of molar conductance indicates them to be non-electrolytes. On the basis of various studies a distorted octahedral geometry may be proposed for all of these complexes. These metal complexes were also tested for their in vitro antibacterial activities against some Gram-positive bacterial strains, i.e., Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus and two Gram-negative bacterial strains, i.e., Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida. The results obtained were compared with standard antibiotics, Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin and found that some of the synthesized complexes show good antibacterial activities as compared to the standard antibiotics.

  3. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, V; Phadatare, A G; Mukne, Alka

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25035540

  4. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V.; Phadatare, A. G.; Mukne, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25035540

  5. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of selected essential oils and some of their main compounds.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Juergen; Schmidt, Erich; Bail, Stefanie; Jirovetz, Leopold; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tanya; Atanasova, Teodora; Stoyanova, Albena

    2010-09-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils of cabreuva (Myrocarpus fastigiatus Allemao, Fabaceae) from Brazil, cedarwood (Juniperus ashei, Cupressaceae) from Texas, Juniper berries (Juniperus communis L., Cupressaceae) and myrrh (Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl., Burseraceae) were analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of these essential oils and some of their main compounds were tested against eleven different strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by using agar diffusion and agar serial dilution methods. Animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria were selected. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all tested organisms, except Pseudomonas, using both test methods. Higher activity was observed against Gram-positive strains in comparison with Gram-negative bacteria. Cabreuva oil from Brazil showed similar results, but in comparison with the other oils tested, only when higher concentrations of oil were used. PMID:20922991

  6. A Continuum of Anionic Charge: Structures and Functions of d-Alanyl-Teichoic Acids in Gram-Positive Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Francis C.; Baddiley, James

    2003-01-01

    Teichoic acids (TAs) are major wall and membrane components of most gram-positive bacteria. With few exceptions, they are polymers of glycerol-phosphate or ribitol-phosphate to which are attached glycosyl and d-alanyl ester residues. Wall TA is attached to peptidoglycan via a linkage unit, whereas lipoteichoic acid is attached to glycolipid intercalated in the membrane. Together with peptidoglycan, these polymers make up a polyanionic matrix that functions in (i) cation homeostasis; (ii) trafficking of ions, nutrients, proteins, and antibiotics; (iii) regulation of autolysins; and (iv) presentation of envelope proteins. The esterification of TAs with d-alanyl esters provides a means of modulating the net anionic charge, determining the cationic binding capacity, and displaying cations in the wall. This review addresses the structures and functions of d-alanyl-TAs, the d-alanylation system encoded by the dlt operon, and the roles of TAs in cell growth. The importance of dlt in the physiology of many organisms is illustrated by the variety of mutant phenotypes. In addition, advances in our understanding of d-alanyl ester function in virulence and host-mediated responses have been made possible through targeted mutagenesis of dlt. Studies of the mechanism of d-alanylation have identified two potential targets of antibacterial action and provided possible screening reactions for designing novel agents targeted to d-alanyl-TA synthesis. PMID:14665680

  7. Investigation of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Dudu; Chen, Jiaxi

    2015-03-01

    Pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were synthesized by using bovine serum albumin as the structure-directing agent. The morphology and crystal phase of the pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The antibacterial behaviors of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were investigated using Escherichia coli (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) as model organisms. The results indicated that the synthesized pseudo boehmite nanoparticles showed high antibacterial activity when compared to plain aluminum oxide, which was assessed by measuring the growth inhibition and testing the zone of inhibition. The plausible mechanism of antibacterial behavior was attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species by pseudo boehmite nanoparticles.

  8. Investigation of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles as an antibacterial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Wu, Dudu; Chen, Jiaxi

    2015-06-01

    Pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were synthesized by using bovine serum albumin as the structure-directing agent. The morphology and crystal phase of the pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractograms and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The antibacterial behaviors of pseudo boehmite nanoparticles were investigated using Escherichia coli (gram-negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) as model organisms. The results indicated that the synthesized pseudo boehmite nanoparticles showed high antibacterial activity when compared to plain aluminum oxide, which was assessed by measuring the growth inhibition and testing the zone of inhibition. The plausible mechanism of antibacterial behavior was attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species by pseudo boehmite nanoparticles.

  9. Chemical constituents and antibacterial activity of Melastoma malabathricum L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keng-Chong Wong; Dafaalla Mohamed Hag Ali; Peng-Lim Boey

    2012-01-01

    The aqueous methanolic extracts of Melastoma malabathricum L. exhibited antibacterial activity when assayed against seven microorganisms by the agar diffusion method. Solvent fractionation afforded active chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions from the leaves and the flowers, respectively. A phytochemical study resulted in the identification of ursolic acid (1), 2?-hydroxyursolic acid (2), asiatic acid (3), ?-sitosterol 3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside (4) and the glycolipid

  10. Chemical constituents and antibacterial activity of Melastoma malabathricum L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keng-Chong Wong; Dafaalla Mohamed Hag Ali; Peng-Lim Boey

    2011-01-01

    The aqueous methanolic extracts of Melastoma malabathricum L. exhibited antibacterial activity when assayed against seven microorganisms by the agar diffusion method. Solvent fractionation afforded active chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions from the leaves and the flowers, respectively. A phytochemical study resulted in the identification of ursolic acid (1), 2?-hydroxyursolic acid (2), asiatic acid (3), ?-sitosterol 3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside (4) and the glycolipid

  11. Characterisation of antibacterial activity of peptides isolated from the venom of the spider

    E-print Network

    Richner, Heinz

    Characterisation of antibacterial activity of peptides isolated from the venom of the spider antibacterial peptides, isolated from the venom of the neotropical wandering spider Cupiennius salei is reported that are comparable to those of other known antibacterial peptides, like insect defensins and cecropins, found

  12. Quaternization of N-Aryl Chitosan Derivatives: Synthesis, Charaterization and Antibacterial Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Sajomsang; W. H. Daly

    Chitosan (Ch) is aminoglucopyranans composed of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine (GlcN) residues. Chitosan is non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible polymer reported to exhibit a great variety of useful biological properties. It has been shown to be an effective agent against an array of common bacteria (Gram-positive as well as Gram- negative) and fungi. 1 However, the biological activity of chitosan can

  13. Cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of extractives from Wedelia calendulacea.

    PubMed

    Mottakin, A K M; Chowdhury, R; Haider, M S; Rahman, K M; Hasan, C M; Rashid, M A

    2004-06-01

    The cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of petroleum ether, chloroform and methanol extracts of Wedelia calendulacea were assayed by brine shrimp lethality bioassay and standardized disk diffusion method against 19 bacterial strains. Three diterpenes isolated from the plant were also evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activities. The LC50 for the crude extracts against the brine shrimp nauplii were found to be 4.59 microg/ml, 7.99 microg/ml and 14.88 microg/ml, respectively, whereas the positive control, vincristine sulfate showed an LC50 of 0.58 microg/ml. Among the crude extracts and pure compounds tested, (-)-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid isolated from the chloroform extract showed the highest inhibitory activity against most of the bacterial strains with mean zone of inhibition of 10-21 mm at 200 microg/disc. PMID:15158994

  14. Antibacterial activity of anthraquinone derivatives from Heterophyllaea pustulata (Rubiaceae).

    PubMed

    Comini, L R; Montoya, S C Núńez; Páez, P L; Argüello, Gustavo A; Albesa, I; Cabrera, J L

    2011-02-01

    Photosensitizing anthraquinones isolated from Heterophyllaea pustulata Hook f. (Rubiaceae), namely soranjidiol, rubiadin, damnacanthal and 5,5'-bisoranjidiol, showed antibacterial activity (bacteriostatic/bactericide) on Staphylococcus aureus. The mechanism of action seems to involve an increase in the levels of superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)) and/or singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O(2)). Moreover, the effect of actinic irradiation as a boosting agent for the production of both reactive species of oxygen as well as its influence on antibacterial activity was assessed. The routine susceptibility assay (minimum inhibitory concentration determination) was carried out by means of the broth macrodilution method. Bactericide activity was determined counting the colony-forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL) in plate. The O(2)(·-) production was determined by means of an indirect photobiological assay (Nitroblue Tetrazolium test), and the production of (1)O(2) was followed using an indirect steady-state method, with methionine as the (1)O(2) chemical quencher. PMID:20965744

  15. Antibacterial cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa: a structure-activity study.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Gibbons, Simon; Giana, Anna; Pagani, Alberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Stavri, Michael; Smith, Eileen; Rahman, M Mukhlesur

    2008-08-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has long been known to contain antibacterial cannabinoids, whose potential to address antibiotic resistance has not yet been investigated. All five major cannabinoids (cannabidiol (1b), cannabichromene (2), cannabigerol (3b), Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (4b), and cannabinol (5)) showed potent activity against a variety of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains of current clinical relevance. Activity was remarkably tolerant to the nature of the prenyl moiety, to its relative position compared to the n-pentyl moiety (abnormal cannabinoids), and to carboxylation of the resorcinyl moiety (pre-cannabinoids). Conversely, methylation and acetylation of the phenolic hydroxyls, esterification of the carboxylic group of pre-cannabinoids, and introduction of a second prenyl moiety were all detrimental for antibacterial activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that the prenyl moiety of cannabinoids serves mainly as a modulator of lipid affinity for the olivetol core, a per se poorly active antibacterial pharmacophore, while their high potency definitely suggests a specific, but yet elusive, mechanism of activity. PMID:18681481

  16. Antibacterial Activity of a Cardanol from Thai Apis mellifera Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Boonsai, Pattaraporn; Phuwapraisirisan, Preecha; Chanchao, Chanpen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Propolis is a sticky, dark brown resinous residue made by bees that is derived from plant resins. It is used to construct and repair the nest, and in addition possesses several diverse bioactivities. Here, propolis from Apis mellifera from Nan province, Thailand, was tested for antibacterial activity against Gram+ve (Staphylococcus aureus and Paenibacillus larvae) and Gram-ve (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Materials and methods: The three bacterial isolates were confirmed for species designation by Gram staining and analysis of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA. Propolis was sequentially extracted by methanol, dichloromethane and hexane. The antibacterial activity was determined by agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assays using streptomycin as a positive control. The most active crude extract was further purified by quick column and adsorption chromatography. The apparent purity of each bioactive fraction was tested by thin layer chromatography. The chemical structure of the isolated bioactive compound was analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Results: Crude methanol extract of propolis showed the best antibacterial activity with a minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) value of 5 mg/mL for S. aureus and E. coli and 6.25 mg/mL for P. larvae. After quick column chromatography, only three active fractions were inhibitory to the growth of S. aureus and E. coli with MIC values of 6.25 and 31.3 µg/mL, respectively. Further adsorption chromatography yielded one pure bioactive fraction (A1A) with an IC50 value of 0.175 µg/mL for E. coli and 0.683 µg/mL for P. larvae, and was determined to be cardanol by NMR analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed unusual shaped (especially in dividing cells), damaged and dead cells in cardanol-treated E. coli. Conclusion: Thai propolis contains a promising antibacterial agent. PMID:24578609

  17. Antibacterial activity of Zuccagnia punctata Cav. ethanolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Zampini, Iris C; Vattuone, Marta A; Isla, Maria I

    2005-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate antibacterial activity of Zuccagnia punctata ethanolic extract against 47 strains of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria and to identify bioactive compounds. Inhibition of bacterial growth was investigated using agar diffusion, agar macrodilution, broth microdilution and bioautographic methods. Zuccagnia punctata extract was active against all assayed bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 25 to 200 microg/mL. Minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were identical or two-fold higher than the corresponding MIC values. Contact bioautography, indicated that Zuccagnia punctata extracts possess one major antibacterial component against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and at least three components against. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Activity-guided fractionation of 1he ethanol extract on a silica gel column yielded a compound (2',4'-dihydroxychalcone), which exhibited strong antibacterial activity with MIC values between 0.10 and 1.00 microg/mL for Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, Morganella morganii, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. These values are lower than imipenem (0.25-16 microg/mL). Zuccagnia punctata might provide promising therapeutic agents against infections with multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16137849

  18. Antibacterial activity of different natural honeys from Transylvania, Romania.

    PubMed

    Vica, Mihaela Laura; Glevitzky, Mirel; Dumitrel, Gabriela-Alina; Junie, Lia Monica; Popa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Honey is used in food industry and medicine due to its nutritive, therapeutic and dietetic qualities. The microbiological characteristics of 10 unpasteurized honey samples of known origin, collected from Transylvania beekeepers (Romania) were determined. The antibacterial activity of these types of honey against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella enteritidis, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella choleraesuis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis subsp. spizizenii and Listeria monocytogenes strains was studied. The most sensitive to the antibacterial activity were the two staphylococus strains (the largest diameter of inhibition zone was 18 mm) and B. subtilis strains (13.5 mm). The strains of B. cereus, E. coli, L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. were found to present resistance to some of the honey samples. Manna, sunflower and polyfloral honeys presented high antibacterial activity while acacia and linden honeys had a lower activity in terms of the number of sensible strains. Statistical analysis shows that the type of strains and the type of honey have influence on the diameter of inhibition. PMID:24380618

  19. The mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Seob; Han, Sin-Hee; Lee, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Guk; Park, Chung-Berm; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Keum, Joon-Ho; Kim, Sung-Bae; Mun, Su-Hyun; Seo, Yun-Soo; Myung, Noh-Yil; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2012-08-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) is a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid derived from the radix of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. TET performs a wide spectrum of biological activities. The radix of S. tetrandrae has been used traditionally in Asia, including Korea, to treat congestive circulatory disorders and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanism of antibacterial activity of tetrandrine against Staphylococcus aureus. The mechanism was investigated by studying the effects of TET in combination with detergent or membrane potential un-couplers. In addition, the direct involvement of peptidoglycan (PGN) was assessed in titration assays. TET activity against S. aureus was 125-250??g/mL, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the two reference strains was 250??g/mL. The OD(600) of each suspension treated with a combination of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), tris(hydroxymethyl) aminomethane (TRIS), and Triton X-100 (TX) with TET (0.25×MIC) had been reduced from 43% to 96%. Additional structure-function studies on the antibacterial activity of TET in combination with other agents may lead to the discovery of more effective antibacterial agents. PMID:22845553

  20. Antibacterial activity and ototoxicity in guinea pigs, and nephrotoxicity in rats of arbekacin.

    PubMed

    Kurebe, M; Yokota, M; Niizato, T; Kai, F; Yoshida, T; Okamoto, R; Mitsuhashi, S

    1986-10-01

    Arbekacin (HBK), 1-N[(S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl]-3',4'-dideoxykanamycin B, showed broad antibacterial spectra against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was also effective against gentamycin- or tobramycin-resistant bacteria. HBK was resistant to various aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes except for AAC (2') and AAC (6')-IV, both of which slowly inactivated it. Even at higher dosages (150 mg/kg i.m. or greater, which resulted in some deaths), HBK never decreased the pinna reflex in guinea pigs, while 150 mg/kg or more of dibekacin (DKB) or amikacin (AMK) caused loss of this reflex. HBK has less ototoxicity than do DKB and AMK. This was confirmed by histopathological examination of the inner ear. The degree of nephrotoxicity of HBK was suggested to be similar to that of DKB as judged from serum biochemical tests, urinalysis, and histopathological findings. PMID:3814212

  1. Antibacterial activity of polyphenol components in oolong tea extract against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, H; Matsumoto, M; Tanaka, T; Maeda, M; Nakai, M; Hamada, S; Ooshima, T

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activity of oolong tea extract on oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, and to identify the response to its components. Antibacterial activity was found when the extract was added to S. mutans cells in chemically defined medium but not in complex broth media. Further, pretreatment with bovine serum albumin reduced the antibacterial activity. The extract showed antibacterial activity against all of the oral streptococci examined, with the highest activity against S. mutans MT8148R. This activity was found to originate from a monomeric polyphenol-rich fraction, and it was stronger than that of pure polyphenols. Moreover, some combinations of monomeric polyphenols showed the highest level of antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the antibacterial activity of oolong tea extract is caused by a synergistic effect of monomeric polyphenols, which can easily bind to proteins. PMID:14684970

  2. Protein(s) from the Gram-Positive Bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis Induces a Hypersensitive Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, C; Castro, J; Muńoz, F; Arce-Johnson, P; Delgado, J

    1998-04-01

    ABSTRACT The gram-positive tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis induced a local necrotic response on four-o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. This necrosis response was characteristic of the hypersensitive response (HR). The cell-free culture supernatant from strain CMM623 also induced a necrosis that was phenotypically similar to that induced by the bacteria. Inhibitors of plant metabolism suppressed the necrotic reaction of both M. jalapa and tobacco. The HR-inducing activity present in the supernatant was heat stable, sensitive to proteases, and had an apparent molecular mass in the range of 35 to 50 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The properties observed for the necrosis-inducing activity resembled harpin and PopA described from gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. PMID:18944953

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Corynebacterium species and other non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli to 18 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, F; Zapardiel, J; Nieto, E

    1995-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 265 strains of Corynebacterium species and other non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli to 18 antimicrobial agents were tested. Most strains were susceptible to vancomycin, doxycycline, and fusidic acid. Corynebacterium jeikeium and Corynebacterium urealyticum were the most resistant organisms tested. Resistance to beta-lactams, clindamycin, erythromycin, azythromycin, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was common among strains of Corynebacterium xerosis and Corynebacterium minutissimum. Ampicillin resistance among Listeria monocytogenes was more prevalent than previously reported. Optochin, fosfomycin, and nitrofurantoin showed very little activity against most organisms tested, but the use of nitrofurantoin as a selective agent in culture medium may prevent the recovery of some isolates. Except for the unvarying activity of vancomycin against Corynebacterium species, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the latter to other antibiotics are usually unpredictable, such that susceptibility tests are necessary for selecting the best antimicrobial treatment. PMID:7695308

  4. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used as orthopedic and dental implants. In this work, zinc (Zn) was implanted into oxalic acid etched titanium using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition of Zn-implanted titanium. The results indicate that the depth profile of zinc in Zn-implanted titanium resembles a Gaussian distribution, and zinc exists in the form of ZnO at the surface whereas in the form of metallic Zn in the interior. The Zn-implanted titanium can significantly stimulate proliferation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as initial adhesion, spreading activity, ALP activity, collagen secretion and extracellular matrix mineralization of the rat mesenchymal stem cells. The Zn-implanted titanium presents partly antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The ability of the Zn-implanted titanium to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as well as the antibacterial effect on E. coli can be improved by increasing implantation time even to 2 h in this work, indicating that the content of zinc implanted in titanium can easily be controlled within the safe concentration using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. The Zn-implanted titanium with excellent osteogenic activity and partly antibacterial effect can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic and dental implants. PMID:24632388

  5. When Ribonucleases Come into Play in Pathogens: A Survey of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jester, Brian C.; Romby, Pascale; Lioliou, Efthimia

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that RNA stability plays critical roles in bacterial adaptation and survival in different environments like those encountered when bacteria infect a host. Bacterial ribonucleases acting alone or in concert with regulatory RNAs or RNA binding proteins are the mediators of the regulatory outcome on RNA stability. We will give a current update of what is known about ribonucleases in the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis and will describe their established roles in virulence in several Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria that are imposing major health concerns worldwide. Implications on bacterial evolution through stabilization/transfer of genetic material (phage or plasmid DNA) as a result of ribonucleases' functions will be covered. The role of ribonucleases in emergence of antibiotic resistance and new concepts in drug design will additionally be discussed. PMID:22550495

  6. Small regulatory RNAs from low-GC Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brantl, Sabine; Brückner, Reinhold

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that act by base-pairing were first discovered in so-called accessory DNA elements—plasmids, phages, and transposons—where they control replication, maintenance, and transposition. Since 2001, a huge body of work has been performed to predict and identify sRNAs in a multitude of bacterial genomes. The majority of chromosome-encoded sRNAs have been investigated in E. coli and other Gram-negative bacteria. However, during the past five years an increasing number of sRNAs were found in Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we outline our current knowledge on chromosome-encoded sRNAs from low-GC Gram-positive species that act by base-pairing, i.e., an antisense mechanism. We will focus on sRNAs with known targets and defined regulatory mechanisms with special emphasis on Bacillus subtilis. PMID:24576839

  7. Gram-positive DsbE Proteins Function Differently from Gram-negative DsbE Homologs

    E-print Network

    Bardwell, James

    Gram-positive DsbE Proteins Function Differently from Gram-negative DsbE Homologs A STRUCTURE 07103 Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a Gram-positive bacte- rium, encodes a secreted Dsb-like protein oxidoreductase is an oxidant, unlike Gram-negative bacteria DsbE proteins, which have been shown to be weak

  8. Peptostreptococcus barnesae sp. nov., a Gram-positive, anaerobic, obligately purine utilizing coccus from chicken feces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holle Schiefer-Ullrich; Jan R. Andreesen

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic, Gram-positive cocci were obtained from chicken feces by direct isolation, which grew on the purines uric acid, xanthine, 6,8-dihydroxypurine, guanine, and hypoxanthine. Adenine and glycine were fermented, but not as readily. Acetate, formate, ammonia, and CO2 were products. The isolated strains were nutritionally non-fastidious, however, they required selenite, molybdate, and tungstate as micronutrients. The cells were spherical and 0.5–0.9

  9. Volatile organic compound analysis by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry for Gram-positive bacteria differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dolch, M E; Hornuss, C; Klocke, C; Praun, S; Villinger, J; Denzer, W; Schelling, G; Schubert, S

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 50 % of all clinically proven infections in critically ill patients are caused by Gram-positive bacteria. The timely and appropriate treatment of these infections is vital in order to avoid negative outcomes. Hence, fast and reliable methods are needed for the early detection and identification of microorganisms. Recently, direct mass spectrometry-based analysis of volatile organic compounds emitted by microorganisms has been employed to study Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report a feasibility study of ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry (IMR-MS) for in vitro growth detection and species differentiation of selected Gram-positive bacteria that are frequently isolated in blood culture samples, namely, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry was used to analyze the headspace above cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria incubated at 37 °C starting with 10(2) colony-forming units (CFU)/ml. Measurements to determine the presence of volatile organic compounds were performed 4, 8, and 24 h after incubation, respectively. The detection of microbial growth was accomplished already after 8 h in cultures containing E. faecalis. After 24 h of incubation, characteristic mass spectra were obtained for all species. Processing these mass spectra by hierarchic clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) enabled us to differentiate between bacterial species. IMR-MS in conjunction with a cumulative end-point model provides the means for rapid growth detection and differentiation of Gram-positive bacteria on the species level, typically within an analysis time of less than 3 min per sample. PMID:22782437

  10. Genome Sequence of the Diazotrophic Gram-Positive Rhizobacterium Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5T

    PubMed Central

    Beneduzi, Anelise; Campos, Samanta; Ambrosini, Adriana; de Souza, Rocheli; Granada, Camille; Costa, Pedro; Arruda, Letícia; Moreira, Fernanda; Vargas, Luciano K.; Weiss, Vinícius; Tieppo, Eduardo; Faoro, Helisson; de Souza, Emanuel M.; Pedrosa, Fábio O.; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5T, a nitrogen-fixing Gram-positive rhizobacterium isolated from a wheat field in the south of Brazil, has a great potential for agricultural applications due to its plant growth promotion effects. Here we present the draft genome sequence of P. riograndensis SBR5T. Its 7.37-Mb genome encodes determinants of the diazotrophic lifestyle and plant growth promotion, such as nitrogen fixation, antibiotic resistance, nitrate utilization, and iron uptake. PMID:22038959

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-Positive Nickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joy D. Van Nostrand; Tatiana V. Khijniak; Terry J. Gentry; Michelle T. Novak; Andrew G. Sowder; Jizhong Z. Zhou; Paul M. Bertsch; Pamela J. Morris

    2007-01-01

    Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminated with high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerant microorganisms.\\u000a Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positive heterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. These isolates\\u000a were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomyces galbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatospora cystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional gene microarray containing

  12. The complete genome sequence of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Kunst; N. Ogasawara; I. Moszer; A. M. Albertini; G. Alloni; V. Azevedo; M. G. Bertero; P. Bessičres; A. Bolotin; S. Borchert; R. Borriss; L. Boursier; A. Brans; M. Braun; S. C. Brignell; S. Bron; S. Brouillet; C. V. Bruschi; B. Caldwell; V. Capuano; N. M. Carter; S.-K. Choi; J.-J. Codani; I. F. Connerton; N. J. Cummings; R. A. Daniel; F. Denizot; K. M. Devine; A. Düsterhöft; S. D. Ehrlich; P. T. Emmerson; K. D. Entian; J. Errington; C. Fabret; E. Ferrari; D. Foulger; C. Fritz; M. Fujita; Y. Fujita; S. Fuma; A. Galizzi; N. Galleron; S.-Y. Ghim; P. Glaser; A. Goffeau; E. J. Golightly; G. Grandi; G. Guiseppi; B. J. Guy; K. Haga; J. Haiech; C. R. Harwood; A. Hénaut; H. Hilbert; S. Holsappel; S. Hosono; M.-F. Hullo; M. Itaya; L. Jones; B. Joris; D. Karamata; Y. Kasahara; M. Klaerr-Blanchard; C. Klein; Y. Kobayashi; P. Koetter; G. Koningstein; S. Krogh; M. Kumano; K. Kurita; A. Lapidus; S. Lardinois; J. Lauber; V. Lazarevic; S.-M. Lee; A. Levine; H. Liu; S. Masuda; C. Mauël; C. Médigue; N. Medina; R. P. Mellado; M. Mizuno; D. Moestl; S. Nakai; M. Noback; D. Noone; M. O'Reilly; K. Ogawa; A. Ogiwara; B. Oudega; S.-H. Park; V. Parro; T. M. Pohl; D. Portetelle; S. Porwollik; A. M. Prescott; E. Presecan; P. Pujic; B. Purnelle; G. Rapoport; M. Rieger; S. Reynolds; C. Rivolta; E. Rocha; B. Roche; M. Rose; Y. Sadaie; T. Sato; E. Scanlan; S. Schleich; R. Schroeter; F. Scoffone; J. Sekiguchi; A. Sekowska; S. J. Seror; P. Serror; B.-S. Shin; B. Soldo; A. Sorokin; E. Tacconi; T. Takagi; H. Takahashi; K. Takemaru; M. Takeuchi; A. Tamakoshi; T. Tanaka; P. Terpstra; A. Tognoni; V. Tosato; S. Uchiyama; M. Vandenbol; F. Vannier; A. Vassarotti; A. Viari; R. Wambutt; E. Wedler; H. Wedler; T. Weitzenegger; P. Winters; A. Wipat; H. Yamamoto; K. Yamane; K. Yasumoto; K. Yata; K. Yoshida; H.-F. Yoshikawa; E. Zumstein; H. Yoshikawa; A. Danchin

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large

  13. Cell to cell communication by autoinducing peptides in gram-positive bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark H. J. Sturme; Michiel Kleerebezem; Jiro Nakayama; Antoon D. L. Akkermans; Elaine E. Vaughan; Willem M. de Vos

    2002-01-01

    While intercellular communication systems in Gram-negative bacteria are often based on homoserine lactones as signalling molecules,\\u000a it has been shown that autoinducing peptides are involved in intercellular communication in Gram-positive bacteria. Many of\\u000a these peptides are exported by dedicated systems, posttranslationally modified in various ways, and finally sensed by other\\u000a cells via membrane-located receptors that are part of two-component regulatory

  14. The complete genome sequence of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Kunst; N. Ogasawara; I. Moszer; A. M. Albertini; G. Alloni; V. Azevedo; M. G. Bertero; P. Bessičres; A. Bolotin; S. Borchert; R. Borriss; L. Boursier; A. Brans; M. Braun; S. C. Brignell; S. Bron; S. Brouillet; C. V. Bruschi; B. Caldwell; V. Capuano; N. M. Carter; S.-K. Choi; J.-J. Codani; I. F. Connerton; A. Danchin

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large

  15. Modulating the activity of short arginine-tryptophan containing antibacterial peptides with N-terminal metallocenoyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Albada, H Bauke; Chiriac, Alina-Iulia; Wenzel, Michaela; Penkova, Maya; Bandow, Julia E; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary A series of small synthetic arginine and tryptophan containing peptides was prepared and analyzed for their antibacterial activity. The effect of N-terminal substitution with metallocenoyl groups such as ferrocene (FcCO) and ruthenocene (RcCO) was investigated. Antibacterial activity in different media, growth inhibition, and killing kinetics of the most active peptides were determined. The toxicity of selected derivatives was determined against erythrocytes and three human cancer cell lines. It was shown that the replacement of an N-terminal arginine residue with a metallocenoyl moiety modulates the activity of WRWRW-peptides against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. MIC values of 2–6 µM for RcCO-W(RW)2 and 1–11 µM for (RW)3 were determined. Interestingly, W(RW)2-peptides derivatized with ferrocene were significantly less active than those derivatized with ruthenocene which have similar structural but different electronic properties, suggesting a major influence of the latter. The high activities observed for the RcCO-W(RW)2- and (RW)3-peptides led to an investigation of the origin of activity of these peptides using several important activity-related parameters. Firstly, killing kinetics of the RcCO-W(RW)2-peptide versus killing kinetics of the (RW)3 derivative showed faster reduction of the colony forming units for the RcCO-W(RW)2-peptide, although MIC values indicated higher activity for the (RW)3-peptide. This was confirmed by growth inhibition studies. Secondly, hemolysis studies revealed that both peptides did not lead to significant destruction of erythrocytes, even up to 500 µg/mL for (RW)3 and 250 µg/mL for RcCO-W(RW)2. In addition, toxicity against three human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HT29, MCF7) showed that the (RW)3-peptide had an IC50 value of ~140 µM and the RcW(RW)2 one of ~90 µM, indicating a potentially interesting therapeutic window. Both the killing kinetics and growth inhibition studies presented in this work point to a membrane-based mode of action for these two peptides, each having different kinetic parameters. PMID:23209509

  16. Critical cell wall hole size for lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gabriel J.; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Nelson, Daniel C.; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria can transport molecules necessary for their survival through holes in their cell wall. The holes in cell walls need to be large enough to let critical nutrients pass through. However, the cell wall must also function to prevent the bacteria's membrane from protruding through a large hole into the environment and lysing the cell. As such, we hypothesize that there exists a range of cell wall hole sizes that allow for molecule transport but prevent membrane protrusion. Here, we develop and analyse a biophysical theory of the response of a Gram-positive cell's membrane to the formation of a hole in the cell wall. We predict a critical hole size in the range of 15–24 nm beyond which lysis occurs. To test our theory, we measured hole sizes in Streptococcus pyogenes cells undergoing enzymatic lysis via transmission electron microscopy. The measured hole sizes are in strong agreement with our theoretical prediction. Together, the theory and experiments provide a means to quantify the mechanisms of death of Gram-positive cells via enzymatically mediated lysis and provides insights into the range of cell wall hole sizes compatible with bacterial homeostasis. PMID:23303219

  17. Multiple Responses of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria to Mixture of Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Marilena L?z?roaie, Mihaela

    2010-01-01

    Most of our knowledge about pollutants and the way they are biodegraded in the environment has previously been shaped by laboratory studies using hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains isolated from polluted sites. In present study Gram-positive (Mycobacterium sp. IBBPo1, Oerskovia sp. IBBPo2, Corynebacterium sp. IBBPo3) and Gram-negative (Chryseomonas sp. IBBPo7, Pseudomonas sp. IBBPo10, Burkholderia sp. IBBPo12) bacteria, isolated from oily sludge, were found to be able to tolerate pure and mixture of saturated hydrocarbons, as well as pure and mixture of monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Isolated Gram-negative bacteria were more tolerant to mixture of saturated (n-hexane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene) and polyaromatic (naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons than Gram-positive bacteria. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by mixture of saturated, monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These modifications differ from one strain to another and even for the same bacterial strain, according to the nature of hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24031541

  18. Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates as Natural Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    Actinopyga lecanora, a type of sea cucumber commonly known as stone fish with relatively high protein content, was explored as raw material for bioactive peptides production. Six proteolytic enzymes, namely alcalase, papain, pepsin, trypsin, bromelain and flavourzyme were used to hydrolyze A. lecanora at different times and their respective degrees of hydrolysis (DH) were calculated. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of the A. lecanora hydrolysates, against some common pathogenic Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas sp.) were evaluated. Papain hydrolysis showed the highest DH value (89.44%), followed by alcalase hydrolysis (83.35%). Bromelain hydrolysate after one and seven hours of hydrolysis exhibited the highest antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 51.85%, 30.07% and 30.45%, respectively compared to the other hydrolysates. Protein hydrolysate generated by papain after 8 h hydrolysis showed maximum antibacterial activity against S. aureus at 20.19%. The potent hydrolysates were further fractionated using RP-HPLC and antibacterial activity of the collected fractions from each hydrolysate were evaluated, wherein among them only three fractions from the bromelain hydrolysates exhibited inhibitory activities against Pseudomonas sp., P. aeruginosa and E. coli at 24%, 25.5% and 27.1%, respectively and one fraction of papain hydrolysate showed antibacterial activity of 33.1% against S. aureus. The evaluation of the relationship between DH and antibacterial activities of papain and bromelain hydrolysates revealed a meaningful correlation of four and six order functions. PMID:23222684

  19. Antibacterial Action of Spermine: Effect on Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Fair, William R.; Wehner, Nancy

    1971-01-01

    The basic polyamine spermine was tested for antibacterial activity at two pH levels by the modified cup method against a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms isolated from urine. At pH 6.4, with concentrations ranging from 39 to 2,500 ?g per 0.1 ml, there were no clear zones of inhibition seen with any of the gram-negative test organisms, although some adverse effect on growth within the area of the cylinder was noted in 36%. Three of 17 gram-positive strains were inhibited at this pH. Spermine was more active at pH 7.4, but even at the highest concentrations only 16% of the gram-negative and 47% of the gram-positive bacteria tested showed definite zones of inhibition. It is concluded that spermine probably plays little, if any, role in natural resistance to urinary tract infections in vivo. Images PMID:5540673

  20. pH-Dependent Metal Ion Toxicity Influences the Antibacterial Activity of Two Natural Mineral Mixtures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanya M. Cunningham; Jennifer L. Koehl; Jack S. Summers; Shelley E. Haydel; Christophe Herman

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundRecent studies have demonstrated that several mineral products sold for medicinal purposes demonstrate antimicrobial activity, but little is known about the physicochemical properties involved in antibacterial activity.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsUsing in vitro mineral suspension testing, we have identified two natural mineral mixtures, arbitrarily designated BY07 and CB07, with antibacterial activity against a broad-spectrum of bacterial pathogens. Mineral-derived aqueous leachates also exhibited antibacterial

  1. The alternating pattern of stereochemistry in the nonactin macrocycle is required for antibacterial activity and efficient ion binding

    PubMed Central

    Kusche, Brian R.; Smith, Adrienne E.; McGuirl, Michele A.; Priestley, Nigel D.

    2010-01-01

    Nonactin is a polyketide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseus ETH A7796. It is active against a range of Gram positive organisms, acting as an ionophore that has a high selectivity for K+ ions. Among the polyketides, nonactin has a unique structure. It is a 32-membered, cyclic tetraester generated from four monomers of nonactic acid, two of which are (+)-nonactic acid and two of which are (?)-nonactic acid. The monomers are arranged (+)-(?)-(+)-(?) in the macrocycle so that nonactin has S4 symmetry and is achiral. As the structure of nonactin is unique, so is the biosynthesis of the compound. There is much evidence that after an early achiral intermediate, there are two mirror image biosynthesis pathways, one for the synthesis of each enantiomer of nonactic acid. Emerging evidence suggests that the two pathways arose from gene duplication followed by divergent evolution. The central question, therefore, raised by both the structure and the biosynthesis of nonactin concerns the benefit, if any, to the producing organism in initially selecting for, and then maintaining, two independent pathways for nonactic acid synthesis and for generating only the achiral diastereoisomer of nonactin. To understand why achiral nonactin is the naturally generated diastereoisomer we prepared through synthesis two alternate diastereoisomers of nonactin, one prepared solely from (+)-nonactic acid and one prepared solely from (?)-nonactic acid, referred to here as ‘all-(+)-nonactin’ and ‘all-(?)-nonactin’ respectively. Both all-(+)-nonactin and all-(?)-nonactin were more than 500-fold less active against Gram positive organisms than nonactin confirming that the biosynthesis of both nonactic acid enantiomers, and their incorporation into nonactin, is necessary for biological activity. To understand the lack of antibacterial activity we used isothermal calorimetry to measure the association constant Ka, ?G, ?H and ?S of formation for the K+, Na+ and NH4+ complexes of nonactin and all-(?)-nonactin. The natural diastereoisomer had a high selectivity for K+ to which it bound approximately 880-fold better than all-(?)-nonactin. We used a picrate partitioning assay to confirm that all-(?)-nonactin, unlike nonactin, could not partition K+ ions into organic solvent. To complement the thermodynamic data we used a simple experimental model to mimic ion transport. Using two concentric glass tubes we arranged for two aqueous samples to be separated by a CHCl3 layer. By following the co-transport of picrate anion from one aqueous layer to the other, through the organic phase, we were able to measure the rates of K+ transport that were facilitated by the ionophores. Whereas nonactin allowed for efficient K+ transport, all-(?)-nonactin was completely ineffective. Modeling of the K+ complexes of nonactin and all-(?)-nonactin suggested that only in the case of the natural diastereoisomer, where the monomer stereochemistry is alternated around the macrocycle, can the hydrogen atoms at C3 and C6 of each monomer be on the inside of the cavity occupied by the ion. The latter conformation is unavailable to all-(?)-nonactin and so steric interactions prevent the closing of the macrocycle around the ion sufficiently to form optimum K–O bond lengths. The data show conclusively that both enantiomers of nonactic acid are needed for the formation of an ionophore that has antibacterial activity, can selectively and strongly bind K+, can allow for the partitioning of K+ into an organic phase and that can support the transport of K+ across a membrane model. The requirement for both enantiomers of nonactic acid to be present in the nonactin structure for the latter to have activity is reflected in the fact that S. griseus has maintained two, mirror image biosynthesis pathways. PMID:19902940

  2. Antibacterial activities effectuated by co-continuous epoxy-based polymer materials.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takuya; Yasuda, Koji; Tominaga, Yuichi; Otsuka, Koji; Hosoya, Ken

    2013-07-01

    We report antibacterial activities of the epoxy-resin-based monolithic media (epoxy monoliths) having macroporous co-continuous structure as well as hydrophobic and/or hydrophilic surface. Utilizing epoxy monoliths containing ammonium groups, the antibacterial experiments were examined using Escherichia coli. As the results, the monolithic media prepared with an epoxy monomer having nitrogen atoms clearly showed antibacterial activities, while those prepared using the monomer without nitrogen atom showed less antibacterial activities. Additionally, the quaternization of the epoxy polymers were expressed significant antibacterial activities. Further studies elucidated that the observed antibacterial activities involved the steep effect based on pH changing of solution and hydrophobic interactions by the quaternary ammonium. PMID:23466542

  3. In vitro antibacterial effect of wasp (Vespa orientalis) venom

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of antibacterial resistance against several classes of antibiotics is an inevitable consequence of drug overuse. As antimicrobial resistance spreads throughout the globe, new substances will always be necessary to fight against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. Venoms of many animals have recently gained attention in the search for new antimicrobials to treat infectious diseases. Thefore, the present study aimed to study the antibacterial effects of wasp (Vespa orientalis) crude venom. Two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and two gram-negative ones (Escherichia coli and Klesiella pneumonia) were compared for their sensitivity to the venom by determining the inhibition zone (Kirby-Bauer method) and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). A microbroth kinetic system based on continuous monitoring of changes in the optical density of bacterial growth was also used for determination of antimicrobial activity. Results The venom exhibited a well-recognized antimicrobial property against the tested bacterial strains. The inhibition zones were determined to be 12.6, 22.7, 22.4 and 10.2 mm for S. aureus, B. subtilis, E. coli and K. pneumonia, respectively. The corresponding MIC values were determined to be 64, 8, 64 and 128 ?g/mL, respectively. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of the venom were respectively determined to be 63.6 and 107 ?g/mL for S. aureus, 4.3 and 7.0 ?g/mL for B. subtilis, 45.3 and 65.7 ?g/mL for E. coli and 74.4 and 119.2 ?g/mL for K. pneumonia. Gram-positive bacteria were generally more sensitive to the venom than gram-negative ones. Conclusions Results revealed that the venom markedly inhibits the growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and could be considered a potential source for developing new antibacterial drugs. PMID:24955088

  4. Seasonal effect on Brazilian propolis antibacterial activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M Sforcin; A Fernandes; C. A. M Lopes; V Bankova; S. R. C Funari

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of microorganisms towards the antibiotic action of propolis has been widely investigated. Since reports dealing with seasonal effect on propolis activity are not available, this assay was carried out aiming to observe the in vitro antimicrobial activity of propolis, collected during the four seasons, on bacterial strains isolated from human infections. Dilution of ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP)

  5. Surfaces of Fluorinated Pyridinium Block Copolymers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan,S.; Ward, R.; Hexemer, A.; Sohn, K.; Lee, K.; Angert, E.; Fischer, D.; Kramer, E.; Ober, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymers were quaternized with 1-bromohexane and 6-perfluorooctyl-1-bromohexane. Surfaces prepared from these polymers were characterized by contact angle measurements, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fluorinated pyridinium surfaces showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to their nonfluorinated counterparts. Even a polymer with a relatively low molecular weight pyridinium block showed high antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect was found to be related to the molecular composition and organization in the top 2-3 nm of the surface and increased with increasing hydrophilicity and pyridinium concentration of the surface.

  6. Synthesis of well–dispersed silver nanorods of different aspect ratios and their antimicrobial properties against gram positive and negative bacterial strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the present contribution, we describe the synthesis of highly dispersed silver nanorods (NRs) of different aspect ratios using a chemical route. The shape and size of the synthesized NRs were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. Longitudinal and transverse absorptions bands confirm the rod type structure. The experimentally recorded UV-visible spectra of NRs solutions were fitted by using an expression of the extinction coefficient for rod like nano structures under the dipole approximation. Simulated and experimentally observed UV-visible spectra were compared to determine the aspect ratios (R) of NRs. The average values of R for NR1, NR2 and NR3 solutions are estimated to be 3.0?±?0.1, 1.8?±?0.1 and 1.2?±?0.1, respectively. These values are in good agreement with those obtained by TEM micrographs. The silver NRs of known aspect ratios are used to study antimicrobial activities against B. subtilis (gram positive) and E. coli (gram negative) microbes. We observed that the NRs of intermediate aspect ratio (R?=?1.8) have greater antimicrobial effect against both, B. subtilis (gram positive) and E. coli (gram negative). The NRs of aspect ratio, R?=?3.0 has better antimicrobial activities against gram positive than on the gram negative. PMID:24358993

  7. Synthesis of well-dispersed silver nanorods of different aspect ratios and their antimicrobial properties against Gram positive and negative bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Animesh K; Forster, Stefan; Kumar, Sumeet; Vats, Siddharth; Negi, Sangeeta; Fischer, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    In the present contribution, we describe the synthesis of highly dispersed silver nanorods (NRs) of different aspect ratios using a chemical route. The shape and size of the synthesized NRs were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectroscopy. Longitudinal and transverse absorptions bands confirm the rod type structure. The experimentally recorded UV-visible spectra of NRs solutions were fitted by using an expression of the extinction coefficient for rod like nano structures under the dipole approximation. Simulated and experimentally observed UV-visible spectra were compared to determine the aspect ratios (R) of NRs. The average values of R for NR1, NR2 and NR3 solutions are estimated to be 3.0 ± 0.1, 1.8 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.1, respectively. These values are in good agreement with those obtained by TEM micrographs. The silver NRs of known aspect ratios are used to study antimicrobial activities against B. subtilis (gram positive) and E. coli (gram negative) microbes. We observed that the NRs of intermediate aspect ratio (R = 1.8) have greater antimicrobial effect against both, B. subtilis (gram positive) and E. coli (gram negative). The NRs of aspect ratio, R = 3.0 has better antimicrobial activities against gram positive than on the gram negative. PMID:24358993

  8. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Dendrimers as Antibacterial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Slomberg, Danielle L.; Chudasama, Shalini L.; Lu, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of a series of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers was evaluated against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A direct comparison of the bactericidal efficacy between NO-releasing and control PPI dendrimers (i.e., non-NO-releasing) revealed both enhanced biocidal action of NO-releasing dendrimers and reduced toxicity against mammalian fibroblast cells. Antibacterial activity for the NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers was shown to be a function of both dendrimer size (molecular weight) and exterior functionality. In addition to minimal toxicity against fibroblasts, NO-releasing PPI dendrimers modified with styrene oxide exhibited the greatest biocidal activity (?9.999% killing) against all bacterial strains tested. The N-diazeniumdiolate NO donor-functionalized PPI dendrimers presented in this study hold promise as effective NO-based therapeutics for combating bacterial infections. PMID:23013537

  9. Antibacterial tetraoxygenated xanthones from the immature fruits of Garcinia cowa.

    PubMed

    Auranwiwat, Chiramet; Trisuwan, Kongkiat; Saiai, Aroonchai; Pyne, Stephen G; Ritthiwigrom, Thunwadee

    2014-10-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the acetone extract from the immature fruits of Garcinia cowa led to the isolation of two novel tetraoxygenated xanthones, garcicowanones A (1) and B (2), together with eight known tetraoxygeanted xanthones. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. All isolated compounds were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus TISTR 688, Bacillus subtilis TISTR 008, Micrococcus luteus TISTR 884, Staphylococcus aureus TISTR 1466, Escherichia coli TISTR 780, Pseudomonas aeruginosa TISTR 781, Salmonella typhimurium TISTR 292 and Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228. ?-Mangostin showed potent activity (MIC 0.25-1 ?g/mL) against three Gram-positive strains and garcicowanone A and ?-mangostin exhibited strong antibacterial activity against B. cereus with the same MIC values of 0.25 ?g/mL. PMID:25110196

  10. Synthesis and Antibacterial Evaluation of Novel Water-Soluble Organic Peroxides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenqiu; Liu, Xuejun; Knaebel, David; Luck, Linda; Li, Yuzhou

    1998-01-01

    A set of new water-soluble organic peroxides has been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity as part of an effort to develop new antibacterial agents for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The water solubility of these new dialkyl peroxides and peroxyesters was achieved by incorporating either a quaternary ammonium group or a polyethylene glycol moiety. These peroxides are effective against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and have a prolonged activity compared to that of benzoyl peroxide and other peroxide-type antiseptic agents. Among them 4-[[(tert-butylperoxy)carbonyl]benzyl]triethylammonium chloride and [10-(tert-butylperoxy)decyl]trimethylammonium bromide have the broadest antimicrobial spectrums. We have shown that the oxidizing properties of the dioxy group of these compounds are responsible for their antibacterial activities. PMID:9559807

  11. Antibacterial, antidiarrhoeal, and cytotoxic activities of methanol extract and its fractions of Caesalpinia bonducella (L.) Roxb leaves

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Caesalpinia bonducella is an important medicinal plant for its traditional uses against different types of diseases. Therefore, the present study investigated the antimicrobial, antidiarrhoeal, and cytotoxic activities of the methanol extract and ethyl acetate, chloroform, and petroleum ether (pet. ether) fractions of C. bonducella leaves. Methods The antibacterial potentialities of methanol extract and its fractions of C. bonducella leaves were investigated by the disc diffusion method against four gram-positive and five gram-negative bacteria at 300, 500 and 800 ?g/disc. Kanamycin (30 ?g/disc) was used as the standard drug. Antidiarrhoeal activities of leaf extracts were evaluated at two doses (200 and 400 mg/kg) and compared with loperamide in a castor oil-induced diarrhoeal model in rat. The fractions were subjected to a brine shrimp lethality test to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Results The methanol extract and other three fractions exhibited better activities at higher concentrations. Amongst, the chloroform fraction showed maximum activity at all three concentrations (300, 500, and 800 ?g/disc) against almost all bacteria. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa showed better sensitivities to all extracts at all three concentrations excluding the pet. ether fraction. Bacillus megaterium and Klebsiella spp. were two bacteria amongst nine that showed lowest sensitivity to the extracts. Maximum zone of inhibition (25-mm) was obtained by the methanol extract at an 800 ?g/disc concentration against S. aureus. In the antidiarrhoeal test, all fractions exhibited dose-dependent actions, which were statistically significant (p?antibacterial activities along with moderate cytotoxicities that may lead to new drug development. PMID:23663985

  12. Antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E; Thomas, V; Wilhelm, C

    2006-06-15

    Cefquinome is known for its use as an antibacterial drug in cattle and pigs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of cefquinome against equine pathogenic bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cefquinome was determined for a total of 205 strains, which had recently been isolated in Europe from diseased horses (respiratory infection, foal septicaemia). The bactericidal activity was tested against 19 strains using the time killing method. The post-antibiotic effect (PAE) and post-antibiotic sub-MIC effect (PA SME) were determined against 12 strains. Cefquinome showed high activity against Actinobacillus equuli and streptococci (MIC(90) of 0.016 and 0.032microg/mL), Enterobacteriaceae (MIC(90)=0.125microg/mL) and staphylococci (MIC(90)=0.5microg/mL). The activity was limited against Rhodococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Cefquinome was shown to be a time dependent bactericidal antibiotic against the target pathogens, killing occurring at a concentration close to the MIC. A PAE of 0.5-10h was calculated against streptococci whereas no PAE was observed for Escherichia coli. A longer PA SME was determined for streptococci (3.3 to >24h with a killing effect) and E. coli (0.5-13.9h). Cefquinome was shown to have a broad spectrum of activity which covers many equine pathogens. PMID:16455213

  13. Activation of antibacterial autophagy by NADPH oxidases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ju Huang; Veronica Canadien; Grace Y. Lam; Benjamin E. Steinberg; Mary C. Dinauer; Michael Glogauer; Sergio Grinstein; John H. Brumell

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in immunity to microbial pathogens. The autophagy system can target bacteria in phagosomes, promoting phagosome maturation and preventing pathogen escape into the cytosol. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling from phagosomes was found to initiate their targeting by the autophagy system, but the mechanism by which TLR signaling activates autophagy is unclear. Here we show that

  14. Molecular cloning, expression, purification and characterization of vitellogenin in scallop Patinopecten yessoensis with special emphasis on its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Biao; Liu, Zhihong; Zhou, Liqing; Ji, Guangdong; Yang, Aiguo

    2015-04-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg), the major precursor of the egg-yolk proteins, has been found to play an immune role in fish and protochordate amphioxus, however, no study on the immune function of Vg in invertebrates has ever been studied before. In this study, the complete cDNA of Vg was identified from the scallop Patinopecten yessoensis (termed PyVg). The cDNA contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 6888?bp, encoding a polypeptide of 2295 amino acid protein, which had an N-terminal signal peptide followed by the mature Vg. The mature Vg had the domains Vitellogenin_N, domain of unknown function 1943 (DUF1943) and von Willebrand factor type D domain (VWD) as well as the consensus cleavage site (R-X-R/K-R) and conserved motif (KTIGNAG). Tissue distribution assay revealed that PyVg transcripts were predominantly present in the ovary and hepatopancreas, and its expression profile in ovary well reflected the annual cycle of vitellogenesis. Interestingly, bacterial challenge caused a significant change in PyVg expression, hinting an involvement of PyVg in the acute phase response in P. yessoensis. Consistently, recombinant DUF1943 and VWD domains both could interact with LTA and LPS on bacterial wall, and purified native PyVg displayed a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Overall, these data indicate that Vg is a pattern recognition molecule with bacterial growth-inhibiting activity in the scallop. PMID:25499034

  15. Comparative genomics of the methionine metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria: a variety of regulatory systems

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Vitreschak, Alexey G.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2004-01-01

    Regulation of the methionine biosynthesis and transport genes in bacteria is rather diverse and involves two RNA-level regulatory systems and at least three DNA-level systems. In particular, the methionine metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria was known to be controlled by the S-box and T-box mechanisms, both acting on the level of premature termination of transcription. Using comparative analysis of genes, operons and regulatory elements, we described the methionine metabolic pathway and the methionine regulons in available genomes of Gram-positive bacteria. A large number of methionine-specific RNA elements were identified. S-boxes were shown to be widely distributed in Bacillales and Clostridia, whereas methionine-specific T-boxes occurred mostly in Lactobacillales. A candidate binding signal (MET-box) for a hypothetical methionine regulator, possibly MtaR, was identified in Streptococcaceae, the only family in the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Gram-positive bacteria having neither S-boxes, nor methionine-specific T-boxes. Positional analysis of methionine-specific regulatory sites complemented by genome context analysis lead to identification of new members of the methionine regulon, both enzymes and transporters, and reconstruction of the methionine metabolism in various bacterial genomes. In particular, we found candidate transporters for methionine (MetT) and methylthioribose (MtnABC), as well as new enzymes forming the S-adenosylmethionine recycling pathway. Methionine biosynthetic enzymes in various bacterial species are quite variable. In particular, Oceanobacillus iheyensis possibly uses a homolog of the betaine–homocysteine methyltransferase bhmT gene from vertebrates to substitute missing bacterial-type methionine synthases. PMID:15215334

  16. Glycerol Monolaurate Inhibits the Effects of Gram Positive Select Agents on Eukaryotic Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2008-01-01

    Many exotoxins of gram positive bacteria, such as superantigens (staphylococcal enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 [TSST-1], and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins) and anthrax toxin are bioterrorism agents that cause diseases by immunostimulation or cytotoxicity. Glycerol monolaurate (GML), a fatty acid monoester found naturally in humans, has been reported to prevent synthesis of gram positive bacterial exotoxins. This study explored the ability of GML to inhibit the effects of exotoxins on mammalian cells and prevent rabbit lethality from TSS. GML (?10 ug/ml) inhibited superantigen (5 ug/ml) immunoproliferation, as determined by inhibition of 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (1 × 106 cells/ml) as well as phospholipase C?1, suggesting inhibition of signal transduction. The compound (20 ug/ml) prevented superantigen (100 ug/ml) induced cytokine secretion by human vaginal epithelial cells (HVECs) as measured by ELISA. GML (250 ug) inhibited rabbit lethality due to TSST-1 administered vaginally. GML (10 ug/ml) inhibited HVEC and macrophage cytotoxicity by anthrax toxin, prevented erythrocyte lysis by purified hemolysins (staphylococcal ? and ?) and culture fluids containing streptococcal and Bacillus anthracis hemolysins, and was non-toxic to mammalian cells (up to 100 ug/ml) and rabbits (250 ug). GML stabilized mammalian cell membranes, as erythrocyte lysis was reduced in the presence of hypotonic aqueous solutions (0 to 0.05 M saline) or staphylococcal ? and ?-hemolysins when erythrocytes were pretreated with GML. GML may be useful in management of gram positive exotoxin illnesses; its action appears to be membrane stabilization with inhibition of signal transduction. PMID:16475828

  17. A biotemplated nickel nanostructure: Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ashtari, Khadijeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fasihi, Javad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mollania, Nasrin [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeh, Khosro, E-mail: khajeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biological Science, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using electroless deposition. • Bacterium surface was activated by red-ox reaction of its surface amino acids. • Interfacial changes at cell surfaces were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. • TEM and AFM depicted morphological changes. • Antibacterial activity of nanostructure was examined against different bacteria strains. - Abstract: Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using the electroless deposition procedure and activation of bacterium cell surface by red-ox reaction of surface amino acids. The electroless deposition step occurred in the presence of Ni(II) and dimethyl amine boran (DMAB). Interfacial changes at bacteria cell surfaces during the coating process were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence of tryptophan residues was completely quenched after the deposition of nickel onto bacteria surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) depicted morphological changes on the surface of the bacterium. It was found that the Ni coated nanostructure was mechanically stable after ultrasonication for 20 min. Significant increase in surface roughness of bacteria was also observed after deposition of Ni clusters. The amount of coated Ni on the bacteria surface was calculated as 36% w/w. The antibacterial activity of fabricated nanostructure in culture media was examined against three different bacteria strains; Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Xantomonas campestris. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined as 500 mg/L, 350 mg/L and 200 mg/L against bacteria, respectively.

  18. Sequencing and Characterization of the xyl Operon of a Gram-Positive Bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophila

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yasuo; Takase, Kazuma; Yamato, Ichiro; Abe, Keietsu

    1998-01-01

    The xyl operon of a gram-positive bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophila (previously called Pediococcus halophilus), was cloned and sequenced. The DNA was about 7.7 kb long and contained genes for a ribose binding protein and part of a ribose transporter, xylR (a putative regulatory gene), and the xyl operon, along with its regulatory region and transcription termination signal, in this order. The DNA was AT rich, the GC content being 35.8%, consistent with the GC content of this gram-positive bacterium. The xyl operon consisted of three genes, xylA, encoding a xylose isomerase, xylB, encoding a xylulose kinase, and xylE, encoding a xylose transporter, with predicted molecular weights of 49,400, 56,400, and 51,600, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the XylR, XylA, XylB, and XylE proteins were similar to those of the corresponding proteins in other gram-positive and -negative bacteria, the similarities being 37 to 64%. Each polypeptide of XylB and XylE was expressed functionally in Escherichia coli. XylE transported d-xylose in a sodium ion-dependent manner, suggesting that it is the first described xylose/Na+ symporter. The XylR protein contained a consensus sequence for binding catabolites of glucose, such as glucose-6-phosphate, which has been discovered in glucose and fructose kinases in bacteria. Correspondingly, the regulatory region of this operon contained a putative binding site of XylR with a palindromic structure. Furthermore, it contained a consensus sequence, CRE (catabolite-responsive element), for binding CcpA (catabolite control protein A). We speculate that the transcriptional regulation of this operon resembles the regulation of catabolite-repressible operons such as the amy, lev, xyl, and gnt operons in various gram-positive bacteria. We discuss the significance of the regulation of gene expression of this operon in T. halophila. PMID:9647823

  19. Homologous Recombination in Low dC + dG Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Humberto Sanchez; Begońa Carrasco; Silvia Ayora; Juan C. Alonso

    Homologous recombination is a process involved in the maintenance of chromosome integrity,\\u000a in shaping the evolution of pathogens, in the resistance to antibiotic treatment, and profoundly affecting\\u000a evolution. In low dC + dG Gram-positive bacteria genetic recombination of a non-replicative\\u000a \\u000a homologous DNA, which enters into the cell via transduction or conjugation, proceeds mainly by the\\u000a double-strand break repair machinery, and this process

  20. Mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobial drugs in pathogenic Gram-positive cocci.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, B; Mlynarczyk, A; Kmera-Muszynska, M; Majewski, S; Mlynarczyk, G

    2010-09-01

    Many species of Gram-positive cocci are pathogenic. The most important are staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci. Widespread usage of antibiotics was the main cause for the appearance and spread of resistance to almost all antimicrobials. The occurrence, mechanisms, and genetic background of resistance to antimicrobial drugs other than beta-lactams and glycopeptides among pathogenic staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci are discussed in the text. Well-established agents (such as macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins, aminoglycosides, quinolones, mupirocin, chloramphenicol) as well as new agents (linezolid, daptomycin, quinupristine/dalfopristine, ratapamulin, tigecycline, iclaprim and new generations of quinolones) are considered. PMID:20370697

  1. Metabolites produced by Pseudomonas sp enable a Gram-positive bacterium to achieve extracellular electron transfer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    The Hai Pham; Peter Aelterman; Peter Clauwaert; Liesje De Schamphelaire; Lynn Vanhaecke; Katrien De Maeyer; Monica Hoefte; Willy Verstraete; Korneel Rabaey

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed the abundance of Pseudomonas sp. in the\\u000a microbial community of a microbial fuel cell (MFC). These bacteria can\\u000a transfer electrons to the electrode via self-produced phenazine-based\\u000a mediators. A MFC fed with acetate where several Pseudomonas sp. were\\u000a present was found to be rich in a Gram-positive bacterium, identified as\\u000a Brevibacillus sp. PTH1. Remarkably, MFCs operated with only

  2. Structure–Activity Relationship Study of the Cleistriosides and Cleistetrosides for Antibacterial/Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Two known cleistriosides and six known cleistetrosides were synthesized and evaluated for anticancer and antibacterial activities. This study, for the first time, reports anticancer activity and comprehensively the antibacterial activity for these oligosaccharide natural products. In addition, two new unnatural cleistetroside analogues were synthesized and tested. Biological activities for the 10 oligosaccharides against B. subtilis were found to range between 4 and >64 ?M and for NCI-H460 human lung cancer epithelial cells between 7.5 and 90.9 ?M. Similar activities were found for seven of the oligosaccharides against the NCI panel of 60 cell lines. The degree of acylation and location of the specific acetate groups had significant effects on the anticancer and antibacterial activity of both the cleistriosides and the cleistetrosides. PMID:23543830

  3. Antibacterial activity of seed proteins of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Talas-O?ra?, T; Ipekçi, Z; Bajroviç, K; Gözükirmizi, N

    2005-01-01

    A low molecular weight cationic peptide was isolated from Robinia pseudoacacia seed and tested in vitro against seven bacteria (Corynebacterium michiganense, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae, Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris, and Escherichia coli). The peptide inhibited the growth of the tested strains. The effective concentrations required for 50% inhibition of bacterial growth ranged between 20 and 120 microg ml(-1) protein. S. aureus was found to be the most sensitive strain, however, E. coli was not affected much when compared with others. Reduction of antibacterial activity of the peptide with CaCl2 addition into the growth medium was also observed. PMID:15664465

  4. Interconverting flavonostilbenes with antibacterial activity from Sophora alopecuroides.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chuan-Xing; Luo, Jian-Guang; Ren, Xiao-Pu; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Five flavonostilbenes (alopecurones H, I, J, K and L) and five known ones were isolated from roots of Sophora alopecuroides, in addition to ten other phenolic compounds. A non-enzymatic interconversion of the lavandulyl-substituted flavonostilbenes was observed among alopecurones A, H, I, and K through a Wessely-Moser rearrangement reaction; this was proven by 1D and 2D NMR, HPLC-CD-PDA and HRMS analyses. Bioassay results suggested that flavonostilbenes exhibit significant antibacterial and anti-biofilm formation activities against Staphylococcus epidermidis with MIC values ranging from 3.1 to 12.5?g/mL. PMID:25813880

  5. effect of fruit juices and pomace extracts on the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judit Krisch; László Galgóczy; Mónika Tölgyesi; Tamás Papp; Csaba Vágvölgyi

    Extracts and juices of cultivated and wild fruits belonging to the families Rosaceae, Grossulariaceae, Moraceae, Berberidaceae, Polygonaceae, Caprifoliaceae and Cornaceae were examined for their growth reducing activity on four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus var. my- coides, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens). In vitro antibacterial activities were evaluated by microdilution plate assays. Black currant (Ribes nigrum), cornelian cherry (Cornus mas)

  6. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications. PMID:24619247

  7. Antibacterial activity of large-area monolayer graphene film manipulated by charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Hongqin; Zhang, Miao; Zheng, Xiaohu; Di, Zengfeng; Liu, Xuanyong; Wang, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Graphene has attracted increasing attention for potential applications in biotechnology due to its excellent electronic property and biocompatibility. Here we use both Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) to investigate the antibacterial actions of large-area monolayer graphene film on conductor Cu, semiconductor Ge and insulator SiO2. The results show that the graphene films on Cu and Ge can surprisingly inhibit the growth of both bacteria, especially the former. However, the proliferation of both bacteria cannot be significantly restricted by the graphene film on SiO2. The morphology of S. aureus and E. coli on graphene films further confirms that the direct contact of both bacteria with graphene on Cu and Ge can cause membrane damage and destroy membrane integrity, while no evident membrane destruction is induced by graphene on SiO2. From the viewpoint of charge transfer, a plausible mechanism is proposed here to explain this phenomenon. This study may provide new insights for the better understanding of antibacterial actions of graphene film and for the better designing of graphene-based antibiotics or other biomedical applications. PMID:24619247

  8. Antibacterial activity of the soy isoflavone genistein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyunki; Landauer, Michael R; Foriska, Mark A; Ledney, G David

    2006-01-01

    Genistein, a radioprotective soy isoflavone and protein kinase inhibitor, blocks the invasion of pathogenic bacteria in mammalian epithelial cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the direct effect of genistein on the survival and growth of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri and selected opportunistic bacteria in vitro as a prelude to in vivo use for managing postirradiation sepsis. We evaluated the opportunistic bacterial enteropathogens Escherichia coli, Shigella sonnei, and Staphylococcus aureus as well as Klebsiella pneumoniae and the non-pathogenic organism, Bacillus anthracis (Sterne). The latter two bacteria are found in the environment and may be of concern in irradiated individuals. A standard in vitro test was employed to evaluate the direct effect of genistein on the bacteria. This test involved determining bacterial colony forming unit (CFU) counts at a single concentration of genistein. In the CFU assays, significant reductions in CFUs were found for S. aureus and B. anthracis when cultured in the presence of 100 muM genistein. However, L. reuteri, E. coli, S. sonnei, and K. pneumoniae were not altered by in vitro culturing in the presence of 100 muM genistein. These results demonstrate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of genistein. Furthermore, the use of genistein in combination with probiotics may augment the effectiveness of antimicrobial therapies currently used in the management of infections, including those induced by ionizing irradiation. PMID:16847837

  9. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Ten Aromatic Plants against Human Pathogenic Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Petar D. Marin

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 aromatic plants Matricaria chamommilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Citrus limon and C. aurantium have been determined. Antibacterial activity of these oils and their components; i.e. linalyl acetate, linalool, limonene, ?- pinene, ?-pinene, 1,8-cineole, camphor, carvacrol, thymol and menthol were

  10. Antibacterial activity of dental composites containing quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine nanoparticles against Streptococcus mutans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurit Beyth; Ira Yudovin-Farber; Ran Bahir; Abraham J. Domb; Ervin I. Weiss

    2006-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (PEI) nanoparticles embedded at 1%w\\/w with clinically used bonding, flowable and hybrid dental composite resins and cured by light polymerization was studied. The antibacterial activity was tested with Streptoccocus mutans by: (i) the agar diffusion test (ADT); (ii) the direct contact test; (iii) bacterial growth in the materials elute; (iv) and scanning electron

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Extracts of Myrtus communis Against Food-Borne Pathogenic and Spoilage Bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahassine Amensour; Samira Bouhdid; Juana Fernández-López; Mohamed Idaomar; Nadia Skali Senhaji; Jamal Abrini

    2010-01-01

    The following study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of several leaf and berry extracts against a range of food-borne pathogens and food spoilage bacteria. The methanol, ethanol, and ethyl acetate extracts of Myrtus communis leaves and berries were examined for in vitro antibacterial activity. The methanolic leaf extract of M. communis, which was seen to have antibacterial activity against

  12. Synthesis, characterization and anti-bacterial activities of pure and Co-doped BaSO4 nanoparticles via chemical precipitation route.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Soundhirarajan, P; Venkatesan, A; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad

    2015-02-25

    In the present study, we reported that the synthesis and characterization of pure and diverse mole Co-doped BaSO4 nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) brought out the information about the synthesized products is orthorhombic structure and highly crystalline in nature. The average grain size of the samples was determined by using the Debye-Scherer's equation. The existence of functional groups and band area of the samples were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The direct and indirect band gap energy of pure and doped samples was carried out using UV-VIS-DRS. The surface micrograph, morphological distribution and elemental compositions of the synthesized products were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray (EDS). Thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques were analyzed thermal behaviour of pure and Co-doped samples. Finally, antibacterial activities found the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria are more active in transporter, dehydrogenize and periplasmic enzymatic activities of pure and doped samples. PMID:25218222

  13. Synthesis, characterization and anti-bacterial activities of pure and Co-doped BaSO4 nanoparticles via chemical precipitation route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Soundhirarajan, P.; Venkatesan, A.; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we reported that the synthesis and characterization of pure and diverse mole Co-doped BaSO4 nanoparticles have been synthesized by chemical precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) brought out the information about the synthesized products is orthorhombic structure and highly crystalline in nature. The average grain size of the samples was determined by using the Debye-Scherer's equation. The existence of functional groups and band area of the samples were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The direct and indirect band gap energy of pure and doped samples was carried out using UV-VIS-DRS. The surface micrograph, morphological distribution and elemental compositions of the synthesized products were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray (EDS). Thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques were analyzed thermal behaviour of pure and Co-doped samples. Finally, antibacterial activities found the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria are more active in transporter, dehydrogenize and periplasmic enzymatic activities of pure and doped samples.

  14. Evaluation of antibacterial properties of Barium Zirconate Titanate (BZT) nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Simin; Aghayan, Mahdi; Ghorani-Azam, Adel; Behdani, Mohammad; Asoodeh, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    So far, the antibacterial activity of some organic and inorganic compounds has been studied. Barium zirconate titanate [Ba(ZrxTi1-x)O3] (x = 0.05) nanoparticle is an example of inorganic materials. In vitro studies have provided evidence for the antibacterial activity of this nanoparticle. In the current study, the nano-powder was synthesized by sol-gel method. X-ray diffraction showed that the powder was single-phase and had a perovskite structure at the calcination temperature of 1000 °C. Antibacterial activity of the desired nanoparticle was assessed on two gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus PTCC1431 and Micrococcus luteus PTCC1625) and two gram-negative (Escherichia coli HP101BA 7601c and clinically isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacteria according to Radial Diffusion Assay (RDA). The results showed that the antibacterial activity of BZT nano-powder on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria was acceptable. The minimum inhibitory concentration of this nano-powder was determined. The results showed that MIC values for E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus were about 2.3 ?g/mL, 7.3 ?g/mL, 3 ?g/mL and 12 ?g/mL, respectively. Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was also evaluated and showed that the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae, M. luteus and S. aureus could be decreased at 2.3, 14, 3 and 18 ?g/mL of BZT. Average log reduction in viable bacteria count in time-kill assay ranged between 6 Log10 cfu/mL to zero after 24 h of incubation with BZT nanoparticle. PMID:25763046

  15. Nonsporing, anaerobic, gram-positive rods in saliva and the gingival crevice of humans.

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, B; Russell, C

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative examination of anaerobically isolated flora of the gingival crevice and saliva was carried out. It was found that half the organisms were anaerobes and that there were twice as many gram-positive organisms as there were gram-negative ones. Rods were predominant in the gingival crevice (60.5%) and cocci in saliva (69.1%). Of the total organisms, nonsporing, gram-positive anaerobic rods accounted for 24% in the gingival crevice and 9.7% in saliva. These organisms were characterized on the basis of the type of fatty acids produced from glucose and various biochemical reactions. They belonged to the following genera: Actinomyces, Propionibacterium, Arachnia, Lactobacillus, Eubacterium, and Bifidobacterium. Bifidobacteria were present only in saliva. Although members of the other genera were present both in the gingival crevice and saliva, there were considerable differences in the proportion of any particular organism (in relation to the total anaerobic viable count) between the two sites. The result of this study also indicates a greater than previously appreciated level of Propionibacterium and Arachnia in the human mouth. PMID:646354

  16. Small things considered: the small accessory subunits of RNA polymerase in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Andy; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2015-07-01

    The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase core enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria consists of seven subunits. Whilst four of them (?2??(')) are essential, three smaller subunits, ?, ? and ? (?9-21.5 kDa), are considered accessory. Both ? and ? have been viewed as integral components of RNAP for several decades; however, ? has only recently been described. Functionally these three small subunits carry out a variety of tasks, imparting important, supportive effects on the transcriptional process of Gram-positive bacteria. While ? is thought to have a wide range of roles, reaching from maintaining structural integrity of RNAP to ? factor recruitment, the only suggested function for ? thus far is in protecting cells from phage infection. The third subunit, ?, has been shown to have distinct influences in maintaining transcriptional specificity, and thus has a key role in cellular fitness. Collectively, all three accessory subunits, although dispensable under laboratory conditions, are often thought to be crucial for proper RNAP function. Herein we provide an overview of the available literature on each subunit, summarizing landmark findings that have deepened our understanding of these proteins and their function, and outline future challenges in understanding the role of these small subunits in the transcriptional process. PMID:25878038

  17. Sample preparation of Gram-positive bacteria for identification by matrix assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra C Smole; Lisa A King; Peter E Leopold; Robert D Arbeit

    2002-01-01

    A new sample preparation method was developed for fresh, whole-cell Gram-positive bacteria to be analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption\\/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI ToF MS). With fresh, whole-cell Gram-negative bacteria of the Enterobacteriaceae family, we had previously achieved spectra consisting of >50 peaks and mass ranges of 2–25 kDa. Because similar spectral quantity could not be achieved for Gram-positive bacteria,

  18. Sexual ornamentation reflects antibacterial activity of ejaculates in mallards.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Melissah; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; McGraw, Kevin J; Giraudeau, Mathieu

    2011-10-23

    Bacteria present in ejaculates can impair sperm function and reduce male reproductive success. Thus, selection should favour the evolution of antimicrobial defences to limit the detrimental effects of sperm-associated bacteria. Additionally, current hypotheses suggest that ornamental traits may signal information about the infection status of an individual or the ability of an individual to resist bacterial-induced sperm damage. However, despite the evolutionary implications of ejaculate antimicrobials, and the putative importance of pathogens for the evolution of male ornamentation, tests of these hypotheses are lacking. We examined the antibacterial activity of semen from mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) and tested whether the bactericidal capacity of semen was associated with bill coloration, a sexually selected trait. We show that mallard semen exhibits significant antibacterial activity, as measured by the in vitro capacity to kill Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that males with more colourful bills have semen with superior bacterial-killing ability. These results suggest that females could use male phenotypic traits to avoid sexually transmitted pathogens and acquire partners whose sperm suffer less bacteria-induced damage. PMID:21490006

  19. Synthesis, antibacterial activities, and theoretical studies of dicoumarols.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Hou, Zheng; Chen, Guang-Hui; Li, Fen; Zhou, Ying; Xue, Xiao-Yan; Li, Zhou-Peng; Jia, Min; Zhang, Zi-Dan; Li, Ming-Kai; Luo, Xiao-Xing

    2014-08-01

    Four dicoumarols (DC, 2-PyDC, 3-PyDC and 4-PyDC) were synthesized and characterized via IR, (1)H NMR, HRMS, and single crystal X-ray crystallography. Two classical intramolecular O-H···O hydrogen bonds (HBs) stabilized their structures. The total HB energies in DC, 2-PyDC, 3-PyDC and 4-PyDC were calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) [B3LYP/6-31G*] method. The in vitro antibacterial activity of DC, 2-PyDC, 3-PyDC and 4-PyDC against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 29213), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA XJ 75302), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (Mu50 ATCC 700699), and USA 300 (Los Angeles County clone, LAC) was evaluated by observing the minimum inhibitory concentration and time-kill curves. The results showed that among all the compounds, 2-PyDC exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity. PMID:24947818

  20. Selective antibacterial and apoptosis-modulating activities of mastic.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Hiroshi; Kishino, Kaori; Kobayashi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ken; Iida, Satora; Shimetani, Akiko; Nakamura, Yuko; Takahashi, Keiso; Ikarashi, Takeshi; Fukamachi, Haruka; Satoh, Kazue; Nakashima, Hideki; Shimizu, Takahisa; Takeda, Ken; Watanabe, Shuji; Nakamura, Wataru

    2009-01-01

    Mastic is a resinous exudate obtained from the stem and the main leaves of Pistacia lentiscus. We have reported the antiplaque effect of mastic-containing chewing gum on the oral cavity. We hypothesize that mastic may be a multifunctional food which has some beneficial pharmaceutical properties. The aim of this study was to assess the biological activity of solid and liquid types of mastic by cytotoxicity against fibroblasts, radical-scavenging activities and inhibitory effect on cell death of oral polymorphonuclear leukocytes (OPMNs). Mastic showed selective antibacterial action against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella melaninogenica, but no anti-HIV activity. Among a total of thirteen human cell types, promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 was the most sensitive to the cytotoxicity of mastic, followed by myeloblastic leukemia (ML-1, KG-1), erythroleukemia (K-562), oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-2, HSC-3, HSC-4), hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), glioblastoma (T98G, U87MG) and normal oral cells (gingival fibroblast, pulp cell, periodontal ligament fibroblast, most resistant). Mastic did not induce the differentiation of myelogenous leukemic cells into maturing cells with higher nitroblue tetrazolium-reducing activity, but induced apoptotic cell death, characterized by internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activation and a decline in the intracellular concentration of putrescine. The cytotoxicity of mastic against leukemic cells did not diminish during its storage. On the other hand, mastic inhibited the spontaneous apoptosis of OPMNs. Mastic showed hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity. The selective antibacterial and apoptosis-modulating activity of mastic suggests its possible beneficial effects on oral health. PMID:19414406

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Mangrove Leaf Extracts against Human Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, G; Mulla, N S S; Ansari, Z A; Mohandass, C

    2012-07-01

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extract of mangroves, namely, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia alba and Exoecaria agallocha from Chorao island, Goa was investigated against human bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis. As compared to aqueous, ethanol extract showed broad-spectrum activity. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria Salmonella typhi was inhibited by the ethanol extract of S. alba leaf whereas the other two resistant bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sp. were inhibited by the ethanol extract of leaves of all the species. The aqueous extract of S. alba and E. agallocha showed their activity against P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis, respectively. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of saponins, glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, phenol and volatile oils in the leaves of mangroves. Further studies using different solvents for extraction are necessary to confirm that mangroves are a better source for the development of novel antibiotics. PMID:23626390

  2. Antibacterial Activity of Mangrove Leaf Extracts against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, G.; Mulla, N. S. S.; Ansari, Z. A.; Mohandass, C.

    2012-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extract of mangroves, namely, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia alba and Exoecaria agallocha from Chorao island, Goa was investigated against human bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp., Salmonella typhi, Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis. As compared to aqueous, ethanol extract showed broad-spectrum activity. The multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria Salmonella typhi was inhibited by the ethanol extract of S. alba leaf whereas the other two resistant bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sp. were inhibited by the ethanol extract of leaves of all the species. The aqueous extract of S. alba and E. agallocha showed their activity against P. vulgaris and P. mirabilis, respectively. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of saponins, glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, phenol and volatile oils in the leaves of mangroves. Further studies using different solvents for extraction are necessary to confirm that mangroves are a better source for the development of novel antibiotics. PMID:23626390

  3. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of the tubers infusion and extracts of Cyperus rotundus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soumaya Kilani; Mohamed Ben Sghaier; Ilef Limem; Ines Bouhlel; Jihed Boubaker; Wissem Bhouri; Ines Skandrani; Aicha Neffatti; Ribai Ben Ammar; Marie Genvičve Dijoux-Franca; Kamel Ghedira; Leila Chekir-Ghedira

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro antibacterial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and apoptotic activities from tubers extracts of Cyperus rotundus (Cyperaceae) were investigated. Antibacterial activity of different extracts was evaluated against five bacterial reference strains. A marked inhibitory effect was observed against Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis with total oligomers flavonoids (TOFs) and ethyl acetate extracts. In addition to their antibacterial activity, the

  4. New diorganotin(IV) complexes with 3-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenylamino)-1,3-diphenylprop-2-en-1-one: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, structural studies and antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Tahereh; Naseh, Mohamad; Bruno, Giuseppe; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Motamedi, Hossein

    2012-10-01

    New organotin(IV) complexes, Ph2SnL (1) and Me2SnL (2), have been synthesized from reaction of corresponding diorganotin(IV) dichlorides with a Schiff base, 3-(2-hydroxy-5-methylphenylamino)-1,3-diphenylprop-2-en-1-one (H2L), derived from condensation of 2-amino-4-methylphenol with dibenzoylmethane. The synthesized compounds have been investigated by elemental analysis and IR, 1H NMR, and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy. Spectroscopic studies show that the Schiff base acts as a tridentate dianionic ligand and coordinates via the nitrogen and phenolic and enolic oxygen atoms. The structures of H2L and 2 have been also confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Schiff base exists as the keto-amine tautomeric form in solid state with two intramolecular hydrogen bonds of the Nsbnd H⋯O type and also intermolecular hydrogen bonds of Osbnd H⋯O type that create a dimer. In the structure of 2, tin center is surrounded by two O and one N atoms from the ligand and two C atoms of methyl groups and the sixth coordination site is occupied by phenolic oxygen atom of another molecule, thus a dimeric molecule with a Sn2O2 four-membered ring is formed. The in vitro antibacterial activity of ligand and complexes has been evaluated against Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria. H2L showed no activity but the diphenyltin(IV) complex exhibited good activities along with the standard antibacterial drugs.

  5. Humoral responses in Rhodnius prolixus: bacterial feeding induces differential patterns of antibacterial activity and enhances mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides in the midgut

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The triatomine, Rhodnius prolixus, is a major vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. It has a strictly blood-sucking habit in all life stages, ingesting large amounts of blood from vertebrate hosts from which it can acquire pathogenic microorganisms. In this context, the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the midgut of the insect is vital to control possible infection, and to maintain the microbiota already present in the digestive tract. Methods In the present work, we studied the antimicrobial activity of the Rhodnius prolixus midgut in vitro against the Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively. We also analysed the abundance of mRNAs encoding for defensins, prolixicin and lysozymes in the midgut of insects orally infected by these bacteria at 1 and 7 days after feeding. Results Our results showed that the anterior midgut contents contain a higher inducible antibacterial activity than those of the posterior midgut. We observed that the main AMP encoding mRNAs in the anterior midgut, 7 days after a blood meal, were for lysozyme A, B, defensin C and prolixicin while in the posterior midgut lysozyme B and prolixicin transcripts predominated. Conclusion Our findings suggest that R. prolixus modulates AMP gene expression upon ingestion of bacteria with patterns that are distinct and dependent upon the species of bacteria responsible for infection. PMID:24885969

  6. Mechanism of action of recombinant Acc-royalisin from royal jelly of Chinese honeybee against gram-positive bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of royalisin, an antimicrobial peptide from the royal jelly produced by honeybees has been addressed extensively. However, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In this study, a recombinant royalisin, RAcc-royalisin from the royal jelly of Chinese honeybee Apis cerana...

  7. Antibacterial activity and biodegradability assessment of chemically grafted nanofibrillated cellulose.

    PubMed

    Missoum, Karim; Sadocco, Patrizia; Causio, Jessica; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Bras, Julien

    2014-12-01

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) and their derivatives were prepared using three chemical surface modification strategies. All grafting was characterized by FTIR and contact angle measurements in order to evaluate the efficiency of grafting. Antibacterial activities of neat and grafted samples were investigated against two kinds of bacteria (i.e. Gram+ (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram- (Klebsiella pneumoniae)). All the grafted samples displayed promising results with at least bacteriostatic effect or bactericidal properties. They also strongly enhanced the photo-catalytic antimicrobial effect of TiO2. This study proves that it is better to use grafted NFC either alone or for functionalization with TiO2 if anti-bacterial properties are desired. The cellulose backbone is known to be easily biodegradable in different biodegradation conditions and environments. The chemical surface modifications applied on NFC in the present work did not negatively influence this valuable property of cellulose but help for monitoring this property, which could be very useful for paper, packaging and composites. PMID:25491853

  8. Gram-negative bacteremia induces greater magnitude of inflammatory response than Gram-positive bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Bacteremia is recognized as a critical condition that influences the outcome of sepsis. Although large-scale surveillance studies of bacterial species causing bacteremia have been published, the pathophysiological differences in bacteremias with different causative bacterial species remain unclear. The objective of the present study is to investigate the differences in pathophysiology and the clinical course of bacteremia caused by different bacterial species. Methods We reviewed the medical records of all consecutive patients admitted to the general intensive care unit (ICU) of a university teaching hospital during the eight-year period since introduction of a rapid assay for interleukin (IL)-6 blood level to routine ICU practice in May 2000. White blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6 blood level, and clinical course were compared among different pathogenic bacterial species. Results The 259 eligible patients, as well as 515 eligible culture-positive blood samples collected from them, were included in this study. CRP, IL-6 blood level, and mortality were significantly higher in the septic shock group (n = 57) than in the sepsis group (n = 127) (P < 0.001). The 515 eligible culture-positive blood samples harbored a total of 593 isolates of microorganisms (Gram-positive, 407; Gram-negative, 176; fungi, 10). The incidence of Gram-negative bacteremia was significantly higher in the septic shock group than in the sepsis group (P < 0.001) and in the severe sepsis group (n = 75, P < 0.01). CRP and IL-6 blood level were significantly higher in Gram-negative bacteremia (n = 176) than in Gram-positive bacteremia (n = 407) (P < 0.001, <0.0005, respectively). Conclusions The incidence of Gram-negative bacteremia was significantly higher in bacteremic ICU patients with septic shock than in those with sepsis or severe sepsis. Furthermore, CRP and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in Gram-negative bacteremia than in Gram-positive bacteremia. These findings suggest that differences in host responses and virulence mechanisms of different pathogenic microorganisms should be considered in treatment of bacteremic patients, and that new countermeasures beyond conventional antimicrobial medications are urgently needed. PMID:20202204

  9. Synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel C12 ethyl ketolides.

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthew T; Hiebert, Christy; Seid, Mehran; Chu, Daniel T; Barker, Lynn; Langhorne, Mike; Shawar, Ribhi; Kidney, Jolene; Desai, Manoj C; Plattner, Jacob J

    2006-08-15

    A novel series of C(12) ethyl erythromycin derivatives have been discovered which exhibit in vitro and in vivo potency against key respiratory pathogens, including those resistant to erythromycin. The C(12) modification involves replacing the natural C(12) methyl group in the erythromycin core with an ethyl group via chemical synthesis. From the C(12) ethyl macrolide core, a series of C(12) ethyl ketolides were prepared and tested for antibacterial activity against a panel of relevant clinical isolates. Several compounds were found to be potent against macrolide-sensitive and -resistant bacteria, whether resistance was due to ribosome methylation (erm) or efflux (mef). In particular, the C(12) ethyl ketolides 4k,4s,4q,4m, and 4t showed a similar antimicrobial spectrum and comparable activity to the commercial ketolide telithromycin. The in vivo efficacy of several C(12) ethyl ketolides was demonstrated in a mouse infection model with Streptococcus pneumoniae as pathogen. PMID:16697203

  10. Porphyrin-based honeycomb films and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanran; Liu, Yan; Li, Guihua; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-06-10

    Micrometer-sized porous honeycomb-patterned thin films based on hybrid complexes formed via electrostatic interaction between Mn(III) meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphine chloride (an acid form, {MnTPPS}) and dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DODMABr). The morphology of the microporous thin films can be well regulated by controlling the concentration of MnTPPS-DODMA complexes, DODMABr, and polystyrene (PS), respectively. The formation of the microporous thin films was largely influenced by different solvents. The well-ordered microporous films of MnTPPS-DODMA complexes exhibit a more efficient antibacterial activity under visible light than those of hybrid complexes of nanoparticles modified with DODMABr, implying that well-ordered microporous films containing porphyrin composition can improve photochemical activity and more dominance in applications in biological medicine fields. PMID:24846091

  11. Human Urinary Composition Controls Antibacterial Activity of Siderocalin.

    PubMed

    Shields-Cutler, Robin R; Crowley, Jan R; Hung, Chia S; Stapleton, Ann E; Aldrich, Courtney C; Marschall, Jonas; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-26

    During Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, cells in the human urinary tract release the antimicrobial protein siderocalin (SCN; also known as lipocalin 2, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin/NGAL, or 24p3). SCN can interfere with E. coli iron acquisition by sequestering ferric iron complexes with enterobactin, the conserved E. coli siderophore. Here, we find that human urinary constituents can reverse this relationship, instead making enterobactin critical for overcoming SCN-mediated growth restriction. Urinary control of SCN activity exhibits wide ranging individual differences. We used these differences to identify elevated urinary pH and aryl metabolites as key biochemical host factors controlling urinary SCN activity. These aryl metabolites are well known products of intestinal microbial metabolism. Together, these results identify an innate antibacterial immune interaction that is critically dependent upon individualistic chemical features of human urine. PMID:25861985

  12. Antibacterial activities of a new combination of essential oils against marine bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavi; George Wilson; David Raftos; Seyed Saeed Mirzargar; Reza Omidbaigi

    2011-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of essential oils and herbal extracts have been demonstrated against a range of bacterial species.\\u000a In this study, the antibacterial effects of a new combination of essential oils from the herbs Thymus vulgaris, Salvia officinalis, Eucalyptus globulus and Mentha piperita were assayed against common bacterial isolates (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeroginosa) and fifteen novel marine

  13. Antibacterial activity of bactericide-immobilized filler for resin-based restoratives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Imazato; Noboru Ebi; Yusuke Takahashi; Tomoyuki Kaneko; Shigeyuki Ebisu; Roy R. B. Russell

    2003-01-01

    This study examined the antibacterial activity of prepolymerized resin filler, in which the bactericide quaternary ammonium was immobilized. The experimental filler was prepared by grinding prepolymerized resin blocks of methacrylate monomers, silica particles, and the antibacterial monomer methacryloyloxydodecylpyridinium bromide (MDPB). The number of Streptococcus mutans after incubation for 18h in contact with the experimental filler with or without protein adsorption

  14. A comparison between the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of new quaternary ammonium polymers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Marchisio; P. Bianciardi; T. Longo; P. Ferruti; E. Ranucci; M. G. Neri

    1995-01-01

    —New quaternary ammonium polymers, which in a previous work had shown relevant antibacterial properties, have been investigated as regards to their hemolytic activity (HA) in comparison with a low molecular weight commercial antibacterial agent, Steramine G (SG). All polymers exhibit negligible, or at most modest, HA at dosages and contact times at which SG is strongly hemolytic.

  15. Antibacterial activity of leaf essential oils and their constituents from Cinnamomum osmophloeum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shang-Tzen Chang; Pin-Fun Chen; Shan-Chwen Chang

    2001-01-01

    The antibacterial activities of the essential oils from leaves of two Cinnamomum osmophloeum clones (A and B) and their chemical constituents were investigated in this study. The nine strains of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella sp., and Vibrio parahemolyticus, were used in the antibacterial tests. Results

  16. Phenolic Composition, Antioxidant Capacity and Antibacterial Activity of Selected Irish Brassica Vegetables

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit K. Jaiswal; Gaurav Rajauria; Nissreen Abu-Ghannam; Shilpi Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Vegetables belonging to the Brassicaceae family are rich in polyphenols, flavonoids and glucosinolates, and their hydrolysis products, which may have antibacterial, antioxidant and anticancer properties. In the present study, phenolic composition, antibacterial activity and antioxidant capacity of selected Brassica vegetables, including York cabbage, Brussels sprouts, broccoli and white cabbage were evaluated after extraction with aqueous methanol. Results obtained showed that

  17. Biocompatible Fe3O4 increases the efficacy of amoxicillin delivery against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Mogoant?, Lauren?iu; Iordache, Florin; Bleotu, Coralia; Mogo?anu, George Dan

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin- functionalized magnetite nanostructures (Fe3O4@AMO), revealing and discussing several biomedical applications of these nanomaterials. Our results proved that 10 nm Fe3O4@AMO nanoparticles does not alter the normal cell cycle progression of cultured diploid cells, and an in vivo murine model confirms that the nanostructures disperse through the host body and tend to localize in particular sites and organs. The nanoparticles were found clustered especially in the lungs, kidneys and spleen, next to the blood vessels at this level, while being totally absent in the brain and liver, suggesting that they are circulated through the blood flow and have low toxicity. Fe3O4@AMO has the ability to be easily circulated through the body and optimizations may be done so these nanostructures cluster to a specific target region. Functionalized magnetite nanostructures proved a great antimicrobial effect, being active against both the Gram positive pathogen S. aureus and the Gram negative pathogen E. coli. The fabricated nanostructures significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active drug. This result has a great practical relevance, since the functionalized nanostructures may be used for decreasing the therapeutic doses which usually manifest great severe side effects, when administrated in high doses. Fe3O4@AMO represents also a suitable approach for the development of new alternative strategies for improving the activity of therapeutic agents by targeted delivery and controlled release. PMID:24759068

  18. In-vitro susceptibility of gram-positive cocci to LY146032 teicoplanin, sodium fusidate, vancomycin, and rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Pohlod, D J; Saravolatz, L D; Somerville, M M

    1987-08-01

    LY146032, a new antimicrobial agent with activity against Gram-positive cocci, was tested against methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staph. epidermidis, Staph. saprophyticus, and Streptococcus faecalis. MIC90s in cation-supplemented Mueller Hinton broth by the microdilution broth method were less than 1.0 mg/l for all organisms tested. Increasing or decreasing the inoculum size did not appreciably effect the MIC50 or MIC90 for any organism group nor did decreasing the incubation temperature. The addition of sodium chloride to the test system did not appreciably effect the susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus to LY146032. All organisms were 4 to 32 times more susceptible to LY146032 than to vancomycin. The Staph. aureus had LY146032 susceptibility patterns which were similar to those of teicoplanin and sodium fusidate. LY146032 was 4-16 times more active than teicoplanin against Staph. saprophyticus and Staph. epidermidis while teicoplanin was 8-16 times more active than LY146032 against Str. faecalis. PMID:2822646

  19. Antimicrobial Activities of Amine and Guanidine Functionalized Cholic Acid Derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHUNHONG LI; MATTHEW R. LEWIS; AMY B. GILBERT; MARK D. NOEL; DAVID H. SCOVILLE; GLENN W. ALLMAN; PAUL B. SAVAGE

    1999-01-01

    Compounds in a series of cholic acid derivatives, designed to mimic the activities of polymyxin B and its derivatives, act as both potent antibiotics and effective permeabilizers of the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria. Some of these compounds rival polymyxin B in antibacterial activity against gram-negative bacteria and are also very active against gram-positive organisms. Other compounds interact synergistically with

  20. Studies on Properties of Rice Straw/Polymer Nanocomposites Based on Polycaprolactone and Fe3O4 Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Shameli, Kamyar; Saki, Elnaz; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2014-01-01

    Modified rice straw/Fe3O4/polycaprolactone nanocomposites (ORS/Fe3O4/PCL-NCs) have been prepared for the first time using a solution casting method. The RS/Fe3O4-NCs were modified with octadecylamine (ODA) as an organic modifier. The prepared NCs were characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The XRD results showed that as the intensity of the peaks decreased with the increase of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs content in comparison with PCL peaks, the Fe3O4-NPs peaks increased from 1.0 to 60.0 wt. %. The TEM and SEM results showed a good dispersion of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs in the PCL matrix and the spherical shape of the NPs. The TGA analysis indicated thermal stability of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs increased after incorporation with PCL but the thermal stability of ORS/Fe3O4/PCL-NCs decreased with the increase of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs content. Tensile strength was improved with the addition of 5.0 wt. % of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs. The antibacterial activities of the ORS/Fe3O4/PCL-NC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) by diffusion method using nutrient agar. The results indicated that ORS/Fe3O4/PCL-NC films possessed a strong antibacterial activity with the increase in the percentage of ORS/Fe3O4-NCs in the PCL. PMID:25318051