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1

Rapid in situ hybridization technique using 16S rRNA segments for detecting and differentiating the closely related gram-positive organisms Bacillus polymyxa and Bacillus macerans  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A rapid, sensitive, inexpensive in situ hybridization technique, using 30-mer 16S rRNA probes, can specifically differentiate two closely related Bacillus spp., B. polymyxa and B. macerans. The 16S rRNA probes were labeled with a rhodamine derivative (Texas Red), and quantitative fluorescence measurements were made on individual bacterial cells. The microscopic fields analyzed were selected by phase-contrast microscopy, and the fluorescence imaging analyses were performed on 16 to 67 individual cells. The labeled 16S rRNA probe, POL, whose sequence was a 100% match with B. polymyxa 16S rRNA but only a 60% match with B. macerans 16S rRNA, gave quantitative fluorescence ratio measurements that were 34.8-fold higher for B. polymyxa cells than for B. macerans cells. Conversely, the labeled probe, MAC, which matched B. polymyxa 16S rRNA in 86.6% of its positions and B. macerans 16S rRNA in 100% of its positions, gave quantitative fluorescence measurements that were 59.3-fold higher in B. macerans cells than in B. polymyxa cells. Control probes, whose 16S rRNA sequence segment (P-M) was present in both B. polymyxa and B. macerans as well as a panprokaryotic probe (16S), having a 100% match with all known bacteria, hybridized equally well with both organisms. These latter hybridizations generated very high fluorescence signals, but their comparative fluorescence ratios (the differences between two organisms) were low. The control paneukaryotic probe (28S), which had less than 30% identity for both B. macerans and B. polymyxa, did not hybridize with either organism.

Jurtshuk, R. J.; Blick, M.; Bresser, J.; Fox, G. E.; Jurtshuk, P. Jr

1992-01-01

2

Polyhydroxyalkanoates in Gram-positive bacteria: insights from the genera Bacillus and Streptomyces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gram-positive bacteria, notably Bacillus and Streptomyces, have been used extensively in industry. However, these microorganisms have not yet been exploited for the production of the biodegradable polymers, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). Although PHAs have many potential applications, the cost of production means that medical applications are currently the main area of use. Gram-negative bacteria, currently the only commercial source of PHAs, have

Sabeel P. Valappil; Aldo R. Boccaccini; Christopher Bucke; Ipsita Roy

2007-01-01

3

Glutathione-independent isomerization of maleylpyruvate by Bacillus megaterium and other gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed Central

Maleylpyruvate, the ring fission product of gentisic acid, was found to be isomerized to fumarylpyruvate without a requirement for glutathione by an enzyme activity found in cell extracts of m-hydroxybenzoate-grown Bacillus megaterium 410. The isomerization reaction was detected as a shift in the absorbance maximum from 330 nm, the maximum for maleylpyruvate, to 345 nm, the maximum for fumarylpyruvate, when assayed at pH 8.0. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and dialysis of B. megaterium cell extracts resolved the isomerase activity from low-molecular-weight compounds such as glutathione but did not eliminate the isomerase activity. Iodoacetate and p-chloromercuribenzoate were potent inhibitors of the isomerase from B. megaterium. However, N-ethylmaleimide and iodoacetamide did not significantly inhibit this activity. In addition, fumaric acid was demonstrated as a product of gentisate oxidation by dialyzed cell extracts of B. megaterium. Glutathione-independent maleylpyruvate isomerases with properties similar to the isomerase found in B. megaterium were also found in other genera of gram-positive organisms. Eleven different organisms representing the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter, Corynebacterium, Nocardia, and Rhodococcus were all found to possess this novel type of glutathione-independent maleylpyruvate isomerase. PMID:3926749

Hagedorn, S R; Bradley, G; Chapman, P J

1985-01-01

4

Blue green alga mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles and its antibacterial efficacy against Gram positive organisms.  

PubMed

Biofunctionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) play an important role in design and development of nanomedicine. Synthesis of AuNPs from biogenic materials is environmentally benign and possesses high bacterial inhibition and bactericidal properties. In the present study, blue green alga Spirulina platensis protein mediated synthesis of AuNPs and its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria is discussed. AuNPs were characterized using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, High Resolution-Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Stable, well defined AuNPs of smaller and uniform shape with an average size of ~ 5 nm were obtained. The antibacterial efficacy of protein functionalized AuNPs were tested against Gram positive organisms Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25492207

Suganya, K S Uma; Govindaraju, K; Kumar, V Ganesh; Dhas, T Stalin; Karthick, V; Singaravelu, G; Elanchezhiyan, M

2015-02-01

5

The complete genome sequence of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large

F. Kunst; N. Ogasawara; I. Moszer; A. M. Albertini; G. Alloni; V. Azevedo; M. G. Bertero; P. Bessières; A. Bolotin; S. Borchert; R. Borriss; L. Boursier; A. Brans; M. Braun; S. C. Brignell; S. Bron; S. Brouillet; C. V. Bruschi; B. Caldwell; V. Capuano; N. M. Carter; S.-K. Choi; J.-J. Codani; I. F. Connerton; N. J. Cummings; R. A. Daniel; F. Denizot; K. M. Devine; A. Düsterhöft; S. D. Ehrlich; P. T. Emmerson; K. D. Entian; J. Errington; C. Fabret; E. Ferrari; D. Foulger; C. Fritz; M. Fujita; Y. Fujita; S. Fuma; A. Galizzi; N. Galleron; S.-Y. Ghim; P. Glaser; A. Goffeau; E. J. Golightly; G. Grandi; G. Guiseppi; B. J. Guy; K. Haga; J. Haiech; C. R. Harwood; A. Hénaut; H. Hilbert; S. Holsappel; S. Hosono; M.-F. Hullo; M. Itaya; L. Jones; B. Joris; D. Karamata; Y. Kasahara; M. Klaerr-Blanchard; C. Klein; Y. Kobayashi; P. Koetter; G. Koningstein; S. Krogh; M. Kumano; K. Kurita; A. Lapidus; S. Lardinois; J. Lauber; V. Lazarevic; S.-M. Lee; A. Levine; H. Liu; S. Masuda; C. Mauël; C. Médigue; N. Medina; R. P. Mellado; M. Mizuno; D. Moestl; S. Nakai; M. Noback; D. Noone; M. O'Reilly; K. Ogawa; A. Ogiwara; B. Oudega; S.-H. Park; V. Parro; T. M. Pohl; D. Portetelle; S. Porwollik; A. M. Prescott; E. Presecan; P. Pujic; B. Purnelle; G. Rapoport; M. Rieger; S. Reynolds; C. Rivolta; E. Rocha; B. Roche; M. Rose; Y. Sadaie; T. Sato; E. Scanlan; S. Schleich; R. Schroeter; F. Scoffone; J. Sekiguchi; A. Sekowska; S. J. Seror; P. Serror; B.-S. Shin; B. Soldo; A. Sorokin; E. Tacconi; T. Takagi; H. Takahashi; K. Takemaru; M. Takeuchi; A. Tamakoshi; T. Tanaka; P. Terpstra; A. Tognoni; V. Tosato; S. Uchiyama; M. Vandenbol; F. Vannier; A. Vassarotti; A. Viari; R. Wambutt; E. Wedler; H. Wedler; T. Weitzenegger; P. Winters; A. Wipat; H. Yamamoto; K. Yamane; K. Yasumoto; K. Yata; K. Yoshida; H.-F. Yoshikawa; E. Zumstein; H. Yoshikawa; A. Danchin

1997-01-01

6

The complete genome sequence of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus subtilis is the best-characterized member of the Gram-positive bacteria. Its genome of 4,214,810 base pairs comprises 4,100 protein-coding genes. Of these protein-coding genes, 53% are represented once, while a quarter of the genome corresponds to several gene families that have been greatly expanded by gene duplication, the largest family containing 77 putative ATP-binding transport proteins. In addition, a large

F. Kunst; N. Ogasawara; I. Moszer; A. M. Albertini; G. Alloni; V. Azevedo; M. G. Bertero; P. Bessières; A. Bolotin; S. Borchert; R. Borriss; L. Boursier; A. Brans; M. Braun; S. C. Brignell; S. Bron; S. Brouillet; C. V. Bruschi; B. Caldwell; V. Capuano; N. M. Carter; S.-K. Choi; J.-J. Codani; I. F. Connerton; A. Danchin

1997-01-01

7

Genetic determinants of antimicrobial resistance in Gram positive bacteria from organic foods.  

PubMed

Bacterial biocide resistance is becoming a matter of concern. In the present study, a collection of biocide-resistant, Gram-positive bacteria from organic foods (including 11 isolates from genus Bacillus, 25 from Enterococcus and 10 from Staphylococcus) were analyzed for genes associated to biocide resistance efflux pumps and antibiotic resistance. The only qac-genes detected were qacA/B (one Bacillus cereus isolate) and smr (one B. cereus and two Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolates). Efflux pump genes efrA and efrB genes were detected in Staphylococcus (60% of isolates), Bacillus (54.54%) and Enterococcus (24%); sugE was detected in Enterococcus (20%) and in one Bacillus licheniformis; mepA was detected in Staphylococcus (60%) and in one Enterococcus isolate (which also carried mdeA), and norE gene was detected only in one Enterococcus faecium and one S. saprophyticus isolate. An amplicon for acrB efflux pump was detected in all but one isolate. When minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined, it was found that the addition of reserpine reduced the MICs by eight fold for most of the biocides and isolates, corroborating the role of efflux pumps in biocide resistance. Erythromycin resistance gene ermB was detected in 90% of Bacillus isolates, and in one Staphylococcus, while ereA was detected only in one Bacillus and one Staphyloccus, and ereB only in one Staphylococcus. The ATP-dependent msrA gene (which confers resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramins) was detected in 60% of Bacillus isolates and in all staphylococci, which in addition carried msrB. The lincosamide and streptogramin A resistance gene lsa was detected in Staphylococcus (40%), Bacillus (27.27%) and Enterococcus (8%) isolates. The aminoglycoside resistance determinant aph (3_)-IIIa was detected in Staphylococcus (40%) and Bacillus (one isolate), aph(2_)-1d in Bacillus (27.27%) and Enterococcus (8%), aph(2_)-Ib in Bacillus (one isolate), and the bifunctional aac(6_)1e-aph(2_)-Ia in Staphylococcus (20%), Enterococcus (8%) and Bacillus (one isolate). Chloramphenicol resistance cat gene was detected in Enterococcus (8%) and Staphylococcus (20%), and blaZ only in Staphylococcus (20%). All other antibiotic or biocide resistance genes investigated were not detected in any isolate. Isolates carrying multiple biocide and antibiotic determinants were frequent among Bacillus (36.36%) and Staphylococcus (50%), but not Enterococcus. These results suggest that biocide and antibiotic determinants may be co-selected. PMID:24361832

Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Abriouel, Hikmate; Ortega Morente, Elena; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

2014-02-17

8

Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

2014-03-11

9

Studies on the O3-initiated disinfection from Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis in aquatic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of inactivation of Gram-positive strain, Bacillus subtilis in aquatic systems was investigated as function ozone aeration duration under varied conditions. Oxygen flow was in situ enriched with ozone using ozoniser, with [O3] ranging from (0.3 – 9.8) × 10 moles per liter of oxygen. The inactivation kinetics of B. subtilis followed pseudo–first-order kinetics with respect to microbe, under

Favourite N. Zuma; S. B. Jonnalagadda

2010-01-01

10

?(ECF) factors of gram-positive bacteria: a focus on Bacillus subtilis and the CMNR group.  

PubMed

The survival of bacteria to different environmental conditions depends on the activation of adaptive mechanisms, which are intricately driven through gene regulation. Because transcriptional initiation is considered to be the major step in the control of bacterial genes, we discuss the characteristics and roles of the sigma factors, addressing (1) their structural, functional and phylogenetic classification; (2) how their activity is regulated; and (3) the promoters recognized by these factors. Finally, we focus on a specific group of alternative sigma factors, the so-called ?(ECF) factors, in Bacillus subtilis and some of the main species that comprise the CMNR group, providing information on the roles they play in the microorganisms' physiology and indicating some of the genes whose transcription they regulate. PMID:24921931

Souza, Bianca Mendes; Castro, Thiago Luiz de Paula; Carvalho, Rodrigo Dias de Oliveira; Seyffert, Nubia; Silva, Artur; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco

2014-07-01

11

Genetic manipulation of Bacillus methanolicus, a gram-positive, thermotolerant methylotroph.  

PubMed Central

We report the fist genetic transformation system, shuttle vectors, and integrative vectors for the thermotolerant, methylotrophic bacterium Bacillus methanolicus. By using a polyethylene glycol-mediated transformation procedure, we have successfully transformed B. methanolicus with both integrative and multicopy plasmids. For plasmids with a single BmeTI recognition site, dam methylation of plasmid DNA (in vivo or in vitro) was found to enhance transformation efficiency from 7- to 11-fold. Two low-copy-number Escherichia coli-B, methanolicus shuttle plasmids, pDQ507 and pDQ508, are described. pDQ508 caries the replication origin cloned from a 17-kb endogenous B. methanolicus plasmid, pBM1. pDQ507 carries a cloned B. methanolicus DNA fragment, pmr-1, possibly of chromosomal origin, that supports maintenance of pDQ507 as a circular, extrachromosomal DNA molecule. Deletion analysis of pDQ507 indicated two regions required for replication, i.e., a 90-bp AT-rich segment containing a 46-bp imperfect, inverted repeat sequence and a second region 65% homologous to the B. subtilis dpp operon. We also evaluated two E. coli-B. subtilis vectors, pEN1 and pHP13, for use as E. coli-B. methanolicus shuttle vectors. The plasmids pHP13, pDQ507, and pDQ508 were segregationally and structurally stable in B. methanolicus for greater than 60 generations of growth under nonselective conditions; pEN1 was segregationally unstable. Single-stranded plasmid DNA was detected in B. methanolicus transformants carrying either pEN1, pHP13, or pDQ508, suggesting that pDQ508, like the B. subtilis plasmids, is replicated by a rolling-circle mechanism. These studies provide the basic tools for the genetic manipulation of B. methanolicus. PMID:9097439

Cue, D; Lam, H; Dillingham, R L; Hanson, R S; Flickinger, M C

1997-01-01

12

Modeling of rare earth element sorption to the Gram positive Bacillus subtilis bacteria surface.  

PubMed

In this study, rare earth element (REE) binding constants and site concentration on the Gram+ bacteria surfaces were quantified using a multi-site Langmuir isotherm model, along with a linear programming regression method (LPM), applied to fit experimental REE sorption data. This approach found one discrete REE binding site on the Gram+ Bacillus subtilis surface for the pH range of 2.5-4.5. Average log10 REE binding constants for a site j on these bacteria ranged from 1.08±0.04 to 1.40±0.04 for the light REE (LREE: La to Eu), and from 1.36±0.03 to 2.18±0.14 for the heavy REE (HREE: Gd to Lu) at the highest biomass concentration of 1.3 g/L of B. subtilis bacteria. Similar values were obtained for bacteria concentrations of 0.39 and 0.67 g/L indicating the independence of REE sorption constants on biomass concentration. Within the experimental pH range in this study, B. subtilis was shown to have a lower affinity for LREE (e.g. La, Ce, Pr, Nd) and a higher affinity for HREE (e.g. Tm, Yb, Lu) suggesting an enrichment of HREE on the surface of Gram+ bacteria. Total surface binding site concentrations of 6.73±0.06 to 5.67±0.06 and 5.53±0.07 to 4.54±0.03 mol/g of bacteria were observed for LREE and HREE respectively, with the exception of Y, which showed a total site concentration of 9.53±0.03, and a log K(REE,j) of 1.46±0.02 for a biomass content of 1.3 g/L. The difference in these values (e.g. a lower affinity and increased binding site concentration for LREE, and the contrary for the HREE) suggests a distinction between the LREE and HREE binding modes to the Gram+ bacteria reactive surface at low pH. This further implies that HREE may bind more than one monoprotic reactive group on the cell surface. A multisite Langmuir isotherm approach along with the LPM regression method, not requiring prior knowledge of the number or concentration of cell surface REE complexation sites, were able to distinguish between the sorption constant and binding site concentration patterns of LREE and HREE on the Gram+ B. subtilis surface. This approach quantified the enrichment of Tm, Yb and Lu on the bacteria surface and it has therefore proven to be a useful tool for the study of natural reactive sorbent materials controlling REE partitioning in the natural environment. PMID:24183437

Martinez, Raul E; Pourret, Olivier; Takahashi, Yoshio

2014-01-01

13

High osmolarity improves the electro-transformation efficiency of the gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high osmolarity electroporation method has been developed for the efficient transformation of Bacillus subtilis and B. licheniformis. The presence of high concentrations of the osmoticums, sorbitol and mannitol, in the electroporation, growth and recovery media resulted in an approximately 5000-fold increase in the transformation efficiency of B. subtilis, with a maximum value of 1.4×106 transformants per ?g DNA. The

Gang-Ping Xue; Jennifer S Johnson; Brian P Dalrymple

1999-01-01

14

A novel compound from the marine bacterium Bacillus pumilus S6-15 inhibits biofilm formation in Gram-positive and Gram-negative species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biofilm formation is a critical problem in nosocomial infections and in the aquaculture industries and biofilms show high resistance to antibiotics. The aim of the present study was to reveal a novel anti-biofilm compound from marine bacteria against antibiotic resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative biofilms. The bacterial extract (50 ?g ml) of S6-01 (Bacillus indicus = MTCC 5559) showed 80–90% biofilm inhibition against Escherichia

Chari Nithya; Muthu Gokila Devi; Shunmugiah Karutha Pandian

2011-01-01

15

Expanding the Use of a Fluorogenic Method to Determine Activity and Mode of Action of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriocins Against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Previously we described a rapid fluorogenic method to measure the activity of five bacteriocins produced by Mexican strains of Bacillus thuringiensis against B. cereus 183. Here we standardize this method to efficiently determine the activity of bacteriocins against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It was determined that the crucial parameter required to obtain reproducible results was the number of cells used in the assay, that is, ~4?×?108?cell/mL and ~7?×?108?cell/mL, respectively, for target Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Comparative analyses of the fluorogenic and traditional well-diffusion assays showed correlation coefficients of 0.88 to 0.99 and 0.83 to 0.99, respectively, for Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The fluorogenic method demonstrated that the five bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis have bacteriolytic and bacteriostatic activities against all microorganisms tested, including clinically significant bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, Proteus vulgaris, and Shigella flexneri reported previously to be resistant to the antimicrobials as determined using the well-diffusion protocol. These results demonstrate that the fluorogenic assay is a more sensitive, reliable, and rapid method when compared with the well-diffusion method and can easily be adapted in screening protocols for bacteriocin production by other microorganisms. PMID:22919330

de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M.; Barboza-Corona, J. Eleazar; Espino Monzón, A. N.; Pacheco Cano, R. D.; Balagurusamy, N.; Bideshi, Dennis K.; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén

2012-01-01

16

Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed Central

All organisms examined to date, respond to a sudden change in environmental temperature with a specific cascade of adaptation reactions that, in some cases, have been identified and monitored at the molecular level. According to the type of temperature change, this response has been termed heat shock response (HSR) or cold shock response (CSR). During the HSR, a specialized sigma factor has been shown to play a central regulatory role in controlling expression of genes predominantly required to cope with heat-induced alteration of protein conformation. In contrast, after cold shock, nucleic acid structure and proteins interacting with the biological information molecules DNA and RNA appear to play a major cellular role. Currently, no cold-specific sigma factor has been identified. Therefore, unlike the HSR, the CSR appears to be organized as a complex stimulon rather than resembling a regulon. This review has been designed to draw a refined picture of our current understanding of the CSR in Bacillus subtilis. Important processes such as temperature sensing, membrane adaptation, modification of the translation apparatus, as well as nucleoid reorganization and some metabolic aspects, are discussed in brief. Special emphasis is placed on recent findings concerning the nucleic acid binding cold shock proteins, which play a fundamental role, not only during cold shock adaptation but also under optimal growth conditions. PMID:12171653

Weber, Michael H W; Marahiel, Mohamed A

2002-01-01

17

Discovery of Novel Cell Wall-Active Compounds Using PywaC, a Sensitive Reporter of Cell Wall Stress, in the Model Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

The emergence of antibiotic resistance in recent years has radically reduced the clinical efficacy of many antibacterial treatments and now poses a significant threat to public health. One of the earliest studied well-validated targets for antimicrobial discovery is the bacterial cell wall. The essential nature of this pathway, its conservation among bacterial pathogens, and its absence in human biology have made cell wall synthesis an attractive pathway for new antibiotic drug discovery. Herein, we describe a highly sensitive screening methodology for identifying chemical agents that perturb cell wall synthesis, using the model of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We report on a cell-based pilot screen of 26,000 small molecules to look for cell wall-active chemicals in real time using an autonomous luminescence gene cluster driven by the promoter of ywaC, which encodes a guanosine tetra(penta)phosphate synthetase that is expressed under cell wall stress. The promoter-reporter system was generally much more sensitive than growth inhibition testing and responded almost exclusively to cell wall-active antibiotics. Follow-up testing of the compounds from the pilot screen with secondary assays to verify the mechanism of action led to the discovery of 9 novel cell wall-active compounds. PMID:24687489

Czarny, T. L.; Perri, A. L.; French, S.

2014-01-01

18

Lactobacillus hilgardii plasmid pLAB1000 consists of two functional cassettes commonly found in other gram-positive organisms.  

PubMed Central

A Lactobacillus hilgardii plasmid, pLAB1000, was studied to understand the organization of autonomous replicons from lactobacilli. Two cassettes could be identified. First, the replication region consisted of a sequence coding for a replication protein (Rep) and its corresponding target site, similar to those from plasmids pUB110, pC194 (Staphylococcus aureus), pFTB14, pBAA1 (Bacillus sp.), and pLP1 (Lactobacillus sp.). Sequence analysis indicated the possible synthesis of an antisense RNA that might regulate Rep production. The results also suggested that pLAB1000 replicates via a single-stranded DNA intermediate, and a putative lagging-strand initiation site was found that had similarities to those of alpha 3, St-1, and G4 isometric bacteriophages. The second cassette of pLAB1000 consisted of a sequence coding for a putative mobilization protein (Mob) and its corresponding RSA site. This cassette was similar to those found in pT181, pUB110, pE194 (S. aureus), and pG12 (Bacillus sp.), and it was found to be conserved among different Lactobacillus plasmid replicons. The origin and evolution of these functional cassettes are also discussed. Images PMID:2188951

Josson, K; Soetaert, P; Michiels, F; Joos, H; Mahillon, J

1990-01-01

19

Optimizing Identification of Clinically Relevant Gram-Positive Organisms by Use of the Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System  

PubMed Central

Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) can be used as a method for the rapid identification of microorganisms. This study evaluated the Bruker Biotyper (MALDI-TOF MS) system for the identification of clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms. We tested 239 aerobic Gram-positive organisms isolated from clinical specimens. We evaluated 4 direct-smear methods, including “heavy” (H) and “light” (L) smears, with and without a 1-?l direct formic acid (FA) overlay. The quality measure assigned to a MALDI-TOF MS identification is a numerical value or “score.” We found that a heavy smear with a formic acid overlay (H+FA) produced optimal MALDI-TOF MS identification scores and the highest percentage of correctly identified organisms. Using a score of ?2.0, we identified 183 of the 239 isolates (76.6%) to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 141 isolates (77.9%) were correctly identified. To maximize the number of correct identifications while minimizing misidentifications, the data were analyzed using a score of ?1.7 for genus- and species-level identification. Using this score, 220 of the 239 isolates (92.1%) were identified to the genus level, and of the 181 isolates resolved to the species level, 167 isolates (92.2%) could be assigned an accurate species identification. We also evaluated a subset of isolates for preanalytic factors that might influence MALDI-TOF MS identification. Frequent subcultures increased the number of unidentified isolates. Incubation temperatures and subcultures of the media did not alter the rate of identification. These data define the ideal bacterial preparation, identification score, and medium conditions for optimal identification of Gram-positive bacteria by use of MALDI-TOF MS. PMID:23426925

McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Shuey, Sunni; Winkler, David W.; Butler, Meghan A.

2013-01-01

20

Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci  

PubMed Central

Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of organisms defined by their morphological appearance and their inability to grow in the presence of oxygen; most clinical isolates are identified to species in the genus Peptostreptococcus. GPAC are part of the normal flora of all mucocutaneous surfaces and are often isolated from infections such as deep organ abscesses, obstetric and gynecological sepsis, and intraoral infections. They have been little studied for several reasons, which include an inadequate classification, difficulties with laboratory identification, and the mixed nature of the infections from which they are usually isolated. Nucleic acid studies indicate that the classification is in need of radical revision at the genus level. Several species of Peptostreptococcus have recently been described, but others still await formal recognition. Identification has been based on carbohydrate fermentation tests, but most GPAC are asaccharolytic and use the products of protein degradation for their metabolism; the introduction of commercially available preformed enzyme kits affords a physiologically more appropriate method of identification, which is simple and relatively rapid and can be used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Recent reports have documented the isolation in pure culture of several species, notably Peptostreptococcus magnus, from serious infections. Studies of P. magnus have elucidated several virulence factors which correlate with the site of infection, and reveal some similarities to Staphylococcus aureus. P. micros is a strongly proteolytic species; it is increasingly recognized as an important pathogen in intraoral infections, particularly periodontitis, and mixed anaerobic deep-organ abscesses. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns reveals major differences between species. Penicillins are the antibiotics of choice, although some strains of P. anaerobius show broad-spectrum ?-lactam resistance. PMID:9457430

Murdoch, D. A.

1998-01-01

21

Modeling the acid-base properties of bacterial surfaces: A combined spectroscopic and potentiometric study of the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

In this study, macroscopic and spectroscopic data were combined to develop a surface complexation model that describes the acid-base properties of Bacillus subtilis. The bacteria were freeze-dried and then resuspended in 0.1 M NaCl ionic medium. Macroscopic measurements included potentiometric acid-base titrations and electrophoretic mobility measurements. In addition, ATR-FTIR spectra of wet pastes from suspensions of Bacillus subtilis at different pH values were collected. The least-squares program MAGPIE was used to generate a surface complexation model that takes into account the presence of three acid-base sites on the surface: tripple bond COOH, tripple bond NH+, and tripple bond PO-, which were identified previously by XPS measurements. Both potentiometric titration data and ATR-FTIR spectra were used quantitatively, and electrostatic effects at the charged bacterial surface were accounted for using the constant capacitance model. The model was calculated using two different approaches: in the first one XPS data were used to constrain the ratio of the total concentrations of all three surface sites. The capacitance of the double layer, the total buffer capacity, and the deprotonation constants of the tripple bond NH+, tripple bond POH, and tripple bond COOH species were determined in the fit. A second approach is presented in which the ratio determined by XPS of the total concentrations of tripple bond NH+ to tripple bond PO- sites is relaxed. The total concentration of tripple bond PO- sites was determined in the fit, while the deprotonation constant for tripple bond POH was manually varied until the minimization led to a model which predicted an isoelectric point that resulted in consistency with electrophoretic mobility data. The model explains well the buffering capacity of Bacillus subtilis suspensions in a wide pH range (between pH=3 and pH=9) which is of considerable environmental interest. In particular, a similar quantitative use of the IR data opens up possibilities to model other bacterial surfaces at the laboratory scale and help estimate the buffering capacity of carboxylate-containing compounds in natural samples. PMID:17948795

Leone, Laura; Ferri, Diego; Manfredi, Carla; Persson, Per; Shchukarev, Andrei; Sjöberg, Staffan; Loring, John

2007-09-15

22

The effect of a cellulose dressing and topical vancomycin on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-positive organisms in chronic wounds: a case series.  

PubMed

High levels of persistent bacteria may contribute to wound chronicity and delayed healing. A prospective study was conducted to: 1) evaluate the effect of applying vancomycin topically on appropriately cultured chronic lower leg wounds, specifically methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-positive bacteria, and 2) evaluate its effect in combination with a cellulose dressing on healing. Twenty-three (23) outpatients (11 men, 12 women, average age 65 years [range 39-89 years]) with lower extremity wounds (15 venous ulcers, six chronic open wounds with a history of diabetes, and two chronic open trauma wounds) averaging 43.58 weeks' (range 5-121 weeks) duration and swab-cultured positive for MRSA or Gram-positive bacteria were provided 1 g vancomycin delivered by a cellulose dressing and changed every 72 hours. Patients served as their own control, and all wounds were debrided once a week. Wound surface area and bacterial and exudate levels were recorded weekly during the 3-week pretreatment period and compared to 3-week treatment period levels. Patients were followed until healed. Mean change in wound surface area was +14.5% (SD 71.91) per week before and -24.6% (SD 13.59) during the vancomycin treatment period (P = 0.014), average exudate levels decreased from 2.75 (range 1-4) to 1.81 (range 0-3) (P = 0.016), and the number of patients with positive wound cultures for MRSA or Gram-positive bacteria decreased from 23 to four after the 3-week study period. All wounds healed after an average of 8.18 weeks (SD 4.76, range 2-17 weeks). The results of this study suggest topical vancomycin applied using a dressing that retains moisture reduces wound bacterial load and may facilitate healing. Randomized, controlled clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of this treatment modality and explore the relationship between wound culture results and healing are warranted. PMID:23669259

Albaugh, Karen W; Biely, Scott A; Cavorsi, Joseph P

2013-05-01

23

Rapid method for distinction of gram-negative from gram-positive bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rapid method for distinction between gram-negative and grampositive bacteria by means of a 3% solution of potassium hydroxide is tested on 71 gram-positive and 55 gram-negative bacterial strains. The method proved reliable with one exception only, a Bacillus macerans strain. That strain was definately gram-negative on staining. Other Bacillus strains were proved gram-positive by the test, even those being

T. Gregersen

1978-01-01

24

Architecture and assembly of the Gram-positive cell wall  

PubMed Central

The bacterial cell wall is a mesh polymer of peptidoglycan – linear glycan strands crosslinked by flexible peptides – that determines cell shape and provides physical protection. While the glycan strands in thin “Gram-negative” peptidoglycan are known to run circumferentially around the cell, the architecture of the thicker “Gram-positive” form remains unclear. Using electron cryotomography, here we show that Bacillus subtilis peptidoglycan is a uniformly dense layer with a textured surface. We further show it rips circumferentially, curls and thickens at free edges, and extends longitudinally when denatured. Molecular dynamics simulations show that only atomic models based on the circumferential topology recapitulate the observed curling and thickening, in support of an “inside-to-outside” assembly process. We conclude that instead of being perpendicular to the cell surface or wrapped in coiled cables (two alternative models), the glycan strands in Gram-positive cell walls run circumferentially around the cell just as they do in Gram-negative cells. Together with providing insights into the architecture of the ultimate determinant of cell shape, this study is important because Gram-positive peptidoglycan is an important antibiotic target crucial to the viability of several important rod-shaped pathogens including Bacillus anthracis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Clostridium difficile. PMID:23600697

Beeby, Morgan; Gumbart, James C.; Roux, Benoît; Jensen, Grant J.

2013-01-01

25

Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gram-positive bacteria are common causes of bloodstream and other infections in hospitalized patients in the United States, and the percentage of nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacteria is increasing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are of particular concern. In the United States, approximately 60% of staphylococcal infections in the intensive care unit are now caused

Louis B. Rice

2006-01-01

26

Effects of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and other organisms on the probability of conception in New York State Holstein dairy cows.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of different types of clinical mastitis (CM) on the probability of conception in New York State Holstein cows. Data were available on 55,372 artificial inseminations (AI) in 23,695 lactations from 14,148 cows in 7 herds. We used generalized linear mixed models to model whether or not a cow conceived after a particular AI. Independent variables included AI number (first, second, third, fourth), parity, season when AI occurred, farm, type of CM (due to gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, or other organisms) in the 6 wk before and after an AI, and occurrence of other diseases. Older cows were less likely to conceive. Inseminations occurring in the summer were least likely to be successful. Retained placenta decreased the probability of conception. Conception was also less likely with each successive AI. The probability of conception associated with the first AI was 0.29. The probability of conception decreased to 0.26, 0.25, and 0.24 for the second, third, and fourth AI, respectively. Clinical mastitis occurring any time between 14 d before until 35 d after an AI was associated with a lower probability of conception; the greatest effect was an 80% reduction associated with gram-negative CM occurring in the week after AI. In general, CM due to gram-negative bacteria had a more detrimental effect on probability of conception than did CM caused by gram-positive bacteria or other organisms. Furthermore, CM had more effect on probability of conception immediately around the time of AI. Additional information about CM (i.e., its timing with respect to AI, and whether the causative agent is gram-positive or gram-negative bacteria, or other organisms) is valuable to dairy personnel in determining why some cows are unable to conceive in a timely manner. These findings are also beneficial for the management of mastitic cows (especially those with gram-negative CM) when mastitis occurs close to AI. PMID:20338432

Hertl, J A; Gröhn, Y T; Leach, J D G; Bar, D; Bennett, G J; González, R N; Rauch, B J; Welcome, F L; Tauer, L W; Schukken, Y H

2010-04-01

27

Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance Mechanisms of Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial peptides, or AMPs, play a significant role in many environments as a tool to remove competing organisms. In response, many bacteria have evolved mechanisms to resist these peptides and prevent AMP-mediated killing. The development of AMP resistance mechanisms is driven by direct competition between bacterial species, as well as host and pathogen interactions. Akin to the number of different AMPs found in nature, resistance mechanisms that have evolved are just as varied and may confer broad-range resistance or specific resistance to AMPs. Specific mechanisms of AMP resistance prevent AMP-mediated killing against a single type of AMP, while broad resistance mechanisms often lead to a global change in the bacterial cell surface and protect the bacterium from a large group of AMPs that have similar characteristics. AMP resistance mechanisms can be found in many species of bacteria and can provide a competitive edge against other bacterial species or a host immune response. Gram-positive bacteria are one of the largest AMP producing groups, but characterization of Gram-positive AMP resistance mechanisms lags behind that of Gram-negative species. In this review we present a summary of the AMP resistance mechanisms that have been identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria. Understanding the mechanisms of AMP resistance in Gram-positive species can provide guidelines in developing and applying AMPs as therapeutics, and offer insight into the role of resistance in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:25419466

McBride, Shonna M.

2014-01-01

28

Accentuate the (Gram) positive Victor Nizet  

E-print Network

research. Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN) is a leading agent of pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis throughout January 2010 # Springer-Verlag 2010 Keywords Gram-positive bacteria . Streptococcus . Special issue [7]. The mechanisms of SPN invasion to produce lower respiratory tract, pneumonia, and meningitis

Nizet, Victor

29

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOEpatents

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

1996-01-09

30

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOEpatents

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

1996-01-01

31

Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes  

DOEpatents

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01

32

Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes  

DOEpatents

The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

1999-06-29

33

Antimicrobial Resistance Among Epidemiologically Important Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The emergence of antimicrobial resistance among clinically relevant bacteria has resulted in profound changes in the approach\\u000a to treatment of infections caused by these pathogens. This chapter will focus on three epidemiologically important gram-positive\\u000a bacteria: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus species. Common infections due to these organisms, common resistance mechanisms, and available treatment options will be\\u000a reviewed.

Cassandra D. Salgado

34

Mechanical Consequences of Cell-Wall Turnover in the Elongation of a Gram-Positive Bacterium  

PubMed Central

A common feature of walled organisms is their exposure to osmotic forces that challenge the mechanical integrity of cells while driving elongation. Most bacteria rely on their cell wall to bear osmotic stress and determine cell shape. Wall thickness can vary greatly among species, with Gram-positive bacteria having a thicker wall than Gram-negative bacteria. How wall dimensions and mechanical properties are regulated and how they affect growth have not yet been elucidated. To investigate the regulation of wall thickness in the rod-shaped Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, we analyzed exponentially growing cells in different media. Using transmission electron and epifluorescence microscopy, we found that wall thickness and strain were maintained even between media that yielded a threefold change in growth rate. To probe mechanisms of elongation, we developed a biophysical model of the Gram-positive wall that balances the mechanical effects of synthesis of new material and removal of old material through hydrolysis. Our results suggest that cells can vary their growth rate without changing wall thickness or strain by maintaining a constant ratio of synthesis and hydrolysis rates. Our model also indicates that steady growth requires wall turnover on the same timescale as elongation, which can be driven primarily by hydrolysis rather than insertion. This perspective of turnover-driven elongation provides mechanistic insight into previous experiments involving mutants whose growth rate was accelerated by the addition of lysozyme or autolysin. Our approach provides a general framework for deconstructing shape maintenance in cells with thick walls by integrating wall mechanics with the kinetics and regulation of synthesis and turnover. PMID:23746506

Misra, Gaurav; Rojas, Enrique R.; Gopinathan, Ajay; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

2013-01-01

35

Virulence Plasmids of Nonsporulating Gram-Positive Pathogens  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Gram-positive bacteria are leading causes of many types of human infection, including pneumonia, skin and nasopharyngeal infections, as well as urinary tract and surgical wound infections among hospitalized patients. These infections have become particularly problematic because many of the species causing them have become highly resistant to antibiotics. The role of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria has been well studied; less well understood is the role of mobile elements in the evolution and spread of virulence traits among these pathogens. While these organisms are leading agents of infection, they are also prominent members of the human commensal ecology. It appears that these bacteria are able to take advantage of the intimate association between host and commensal, via virulence traits that exacerbate infection and cause disease. However, evolution into an obligate pathogen has not occurred, presumably because it would lead to rejection of pathogenic organisms from the host ecology. Instead, in organisms that exist as both commensal and pathogen, selection has favored the development of mechanisms for variability. As a result, many virulence traits are localized on mobile genetic elements, such as virulence plasmids and pathogenicity islands. Virulence traits may occur within a minority of isolates of a given species, but these minority populations have nonetheless emerged as a leading problem in infectious disease. This chapter reviews virulence plasmids in nonsporulating Gram-positive bacteria, and examines their contribution to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25544937

Van Tyne, Daria; Gilmore, Michael S.

2014-01-01

36

Bacteriocins of gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed Central

In recent years, a group of antibacterial proteins produced by gram-positive bacteria have attracted great interest in their potential use as food preservatives and as antibacterial agents to combat certain infections due to gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. They are ribosomally synthesized peptides of 30 to less than 60 amino acids, with a narrow to wide antibacterial spectrum against gram-positive bacteria; the antibacterial property is heat stable, and a producer strain displays a degree of specific self-protection against its own antibacterial peptide. In many respects, these proteins are quite different from the colicins and other bacteriocins produced by gram-negative bacteria, yet customarily they also are grouped as bacteriocins. Although a large number of these bacteriocins (or bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) have been reported, only a few have been studied in detail for their mode of action, amino acid sequence, genetic characteristics, and biosynthesis mechanisms. Nevertheless, in general, they appear to be translated as inactive prepeptides containing an N-terminal leader sequence and a C-terminal propeptide component. During posttranslational modifications, the leader peptide is removed. In addition, depending on the particular type, some amino acids in the propeptide components may undergo either dehydration and thioether ring formation to produce lanthionine and beta-methyl lanthionine (as in lantibiotics) or thio ester ring formation to form cystine (as in thiolbiotics). Some of these steps, as well as the translocation of the molecules through the cytoplasmic membrane and producer self-protection against the homologous bacteriocin, are mediated through specific proteins (enzymes). Limited genetic studies have shown that the structural gene for such a bacteriocin and the genes encoding proteins associated with immunity, translocation, and processing are present in a cluster in either a plasmid, the chromosome, or a transposon. Following posttranslational modification and depending on the pH, the molecules may either be released into the environment or remain bound to the cell wall. The antibacterial action against a sensitive cell of a gram-positive strain is produced principally by destabilization of membrane functions. Under certain conditions, gram-negative bacterial cells can also be sensitive to some of these molecules. By application of site-specific mutagenesis, bacteriocin variants which may differ in their antimicrobial spectrum and physicochemical characteristics can be produced. Research activity in this field has grown remarkably but sometimes with an undisciplined regard for conformity in the definition, naming, and categorization of these molecules and their genetic effectors. Some suggestions for improved standardization of nomenclature are offered. PMID:7603408

Jack, R W; Tagg, J R; Ray, B

1995-01-01

37

Disinfection of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria using D ynaJ ets® hydrodynamic cavitating jets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cavitating jet technologies (DynaJets®) were investigated as a means of disinfection of gram-negative Escherichia coli, Klebsiellapneumoniae, Pseudomonas syringae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The hydrodynamic cavitating jets were found to be very effective in reducing the concentrations of all of these species. In general, the observed rates of disinfection of gram-negative species were higher than for gram-positive species.

Gregory Loraine; Georges Chahine; Chao-Tsung Hsiao; Jin-Keun Choi; Patrick Aley

38

Linezolid: A Pharmacoeconomic Review of its Use in Serious Gram-Positive Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

Linezolid (Zyvox(R)), the first available oxazolidinone antibacterial agent, has good activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Randomised multicentre trials in patients with various types of serious Gram-positive infections showed that clinical cure rates with linezolid were similar to those with vancomycin or teicoplanin. In some subgroup analyses, which must

Greg L. Plosker; David P. Figgitt

2005-01-01

39

Sortase enzymes in Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Summary In Gram-positive bacteria proteins are displayed on the cell surface using sortase enzymes. These cysteine transpeptidases join proteins bearing an appropriate sorting signal to strategically positioned amino groups on the cell surface. Working alone, or in concert with other enzymes, sortases either attach proteins to the cross-bridge peptide of the cell wall or they link proteins together to form pili. Because surface proteins play a fundamental role in microbial physiology and are frequently virulence factors, sortase enzymes have been intensely studied since their discovery a little more than a decade ago. Based on their primary sequences and functions sortases can be partitioned into distinct families called class A to F enzymes. Most bacteria elaborate their surfaces using more than one type of sortase that function non-redundantly by recognizing unique sorting signals within their protein substrates. Here we review what is known about the functions of these enzymes and the molecular basis of catalysis. Particular emphasis is placed on ‘pilin’ specific class C sortases that construct structurally complex pili. Exciting new data have revealed that these enzymes are amazingly promiscuous in the substrates that they can employ and that there is a startling degree of diversity in their mechanism of action. We also review recent data that suggest that sortases are targeted to specific sites on the cell surface where they work with other sortases and accessory factors to properly function. PMID:22026821

Spirig, Thomas; Weiner, Ethan M.; Clubb, Robert T.

2013-01-01

40

The effect of recurrent episodes of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and other organisms on mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of recurrent episodes of different types of clinical mastitis (CM) caused by gram-positive (Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp.) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Pseudomonas) bacteria, and other organisms (Arcanobacterium pyogenes, Mycoplasma, Corynebacterium bovis, yeast, miscellaneous) on the probability of mortality and culling in Holstein dairy cows. Data from 30,233 lactations in cows of 7 dairy farms in New York State were analyzed. Cows were followed for the first 10 mo in lactation, or until death or culling occurred, or until the end of our study period. Generalized linear mixed models with a Poisson error distribution were used to study the effects of recurrent cases of the different types of CM and several other factors (herd, parity, month of lactation, current year and season, profitability, net replacement cost, other diseases) on cows' probability of death (model 1) or being culled (model 2). Primiparous and multiparous cows were modeled separately because they had different risks of mortality and culling and potentially different CM effects on mortality and culling. Approximately 30% of multiparous cows had at least one case of CM in lactation compared with 16.6% of primiparous cows. Multipara also had higher lactational incidence risks of second (10.7%) and third (4.4%) cases than primipara (3.7% and 1.1%, respectively). For primipara, CM increased the probability of death, with each successive case occurring in a month being increasingly lethal. In multipara, gram-negative CM increased the probability of death, especially when the gram-negative case was the first or second CM case in lactation. Primiparous cows with CM were more likely to be culled after CM than if they did not have CM, particularly after a second or third case. In multipara, any type of CM increased the probability of being culled. Gram-negative CM cases were associated with the numerically highest risk of culling. PMID:21943738

Hertl, J A; Schukken, Y H; Bar, D; Bennett, G J; González, R N; Rauch, B J; Welcome, F L; Tauer, L W; Gröhn, Y T

2011-10-01

41

Type IV Pili in Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Type IV pili (T4P) are surface-exposed fibers that mediate many functions in bacteria, including locomotion, adherence to host cells, DNA uptake (competence), and protein secretion and that can act as nanowires carrying electric current. T4P are composed of a polymerized protein, pilin, and their assembly apparatuses share protein homologs with type II secretion systems in eubacteria and the flagella of archaea. T4P are found throughout Gram-negative bacterial families and have been studied most extensively in certain model Gram-negative species. Recently, it was discovered that T4P systems are also widespread among Gram-positive species, in particular the clostridia. Since Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria have many differences in cell wall architecture and other features, it is remarkable how similar the T4P core proteins are between these organisms, yet there are many key and interesting differences to be found as well. In this review, we compare the two T4P systems and identify and discuss the features they have in common and where they differ to provide a very broad-based view of T4P systems across all eubacterial species. PMID:24006467

Craig, Lisa

2013-01-01

42

Effect of microwave irradiation on cellular disintegration of Gram positive and negative cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research investigated the effect of microwave irradiation (MWI) on cell disintegration in municipal secondary sludge\\u000a (MSS). A representative MSS Gram-positive bacterium (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were pure cultured separately and treated using MWI. Compared to untreated controls, MWI significantly increased the soluble\\u000a chemical oxygen demand (COD) (1.8–4.0-fold), soluble protein concentration (1.1–1.8-fold), and soluble

Bi Wen Zhou; Seung Gu Shin; KwangHyun Hwang; Johng-Hwa Ahn; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01

43

Longitudinal Assessment of Antimicrobial Susceptibility among Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Organisms Collected from Italy as Part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial between 2004 and 2011  

PubMed Central

The Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.) was initiated in 2004 to longitudinally monitor the activity of the broad-spectrum glycylcycline antimicrobial tigecycline, and a suite of comparator agents, against an array of clinically important bacterial pathogens worldwide. In this report, we examine the activity of tigecycline and comparators against a collection of 13,245 clinical isolates, both Gram-positive (n = 4,078 and Gram-negative (n = 9,167), collected from 27 centres in Italy between 2004 and 2011. Susceptibility was established according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Tigecycline and linezolid exhibited very good activity against Gram-positive pathogens, with MIC90s ranging from 0.06 to 0.25 mg/L and 1–4 mg/L, respectively; vancomycin and the carbapenems also showed good activity against select Gram-positive pathogens. Tigecycline was the most active agent against Gram-negative pathogens (except P. aeruginosa), with MIC90s ranging from 0.25–2 mg/L (16 mg/L for P. aeruginosa). Amikacin and the carbapenems also possessed good activity against many Gram-negative pathogens here. ESBL-positive E. coli increased in prevalence from 2004 to 2011, while ESBL-positive Klebsiella spp., vancomycin-resistant enterococci and MRSA decreased in prevalence. Linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin susceptibility were very stable over the course of this study, while susceptibility to ampicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftriaxone and levofloxacin varied over time according to pathogen; minocycline and cefepime susceptibility among several pathogens decreased during this study. PMID:24287463

Stefani, Stefania; Dowzicky, Michael J.

2013-01-01

44

Methods for targetted mutagenesis in gram-positive bacteria  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a method of targeted mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria. In particular, the present invention provides a method that effectively integrates a suicide integrative vector into a target gene in the chromosome of a Gram-positive bacterium, resulting in inactivation of the target gene.

Yang, Yunfeng

2014-05-27

45

An extreme-halophile archaebacterium possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase characteristic of the Gram-positive eubacteria  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focal point of phenylalanine biosynthesis is a dehydratase reaction which in different organisms may be prephenate dehydratase, arogenate dehydratase, or cyclohexadienyl dehydratase. Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and cyanobacterial divisions of the eubacterial kingdom exhibit different dehydratase patterns. A new extreme-halophile isolate, which grows on defined medium and is tentatively designated as Halobacterium vallismortis CH-1, possesses the interlock type of prephenate dehydratase present in Gram-positive bacteria. In addition to the conventional sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine, the phenomenon of metabolic interlock was exemplified by the sensitivity of prephenate dehydratase to allosteric effects produced by extra-pathway (remote) effectors. Thus, L-tryptophan inhibited activity while L-tyrosine, L-methionine, L-leucine and L-isoleucine activated the enzyme. L-Isoleucine and L-phenylalanine were effective at micromolar levels; other effectors operated at mM levels. A regulatory mutant selected for resistance to growth inhibition caused by beta-2-thienylalanine possessed an altered prephenate dehydratase in which a phenomenon of disproportionately low activity at low enzyme concentration was abolished. Inhibition by L-tryptophan was also lost, and activation by allosteric activators was diminished. Not only was sensitivity to feedback inhibition by L-phenylalanine lost, but the mutant enzyme was now activated by this amino acid (a mutation type previously observed in Bacillus subtilis). It remains to be seen whether this type of prephenate dehydratase will prove to be characteristic of all archaebacteria or of some archaebacterial subgroup cluster.

Jensen, R. A.; d'Amato, T. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

1988-01-01

46

Multiplex Identification of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Resistance Determinants Directly from Positive Blood Culture Broths: Evaluation of an Automated Microarray-Based Nucleic Acid Test  

PubMed Central

Background A multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test (BC-GP) test to identify 12 Gram-positive bacterial gene targets and three genetic resistance determinants directly from positive blood culture broths containing Gram-positive bacteria. Methods and Findings 1,252 blood cultures containing Gram-positive bacteria were prospectively collected and tested at five clinical centers between April, 2011 and January, 2012. An additional 387 contrived blood cultures containing uncommon targets (e.g., Listeria spp., S. lugdunensis, vanB-positive Enterococci) were included to fully evaluate the performance of the BC-GP test. Sensitivity and specificity for the 12 specific genus or species targets identified by the BC-GP test ranged from 92.6%–100% and 95.4%–100%, respectively. Identification of the mecA gene in 599 cultures containing S. aureus or S. epidermidis was 98.6% sensitive and 94.3% specific compared to cefoxitin disk method. Identification of the vanA gene in 81 cultures containing Enterococcus faecium or E. faecalis was 100% sensitive and specific. Approximately 7.5% (87/1,157) of single-organism cultures contained Gram-positive bacteria not present on the BC-GP test panel. In 95 cultures containing multiple organisms the BC-GP test was in 71.6% (68/95) agreement with culture results. Retrospective analysis of 107 separate blood cultures demonstrated that identification of methicillin resistant S. aureus and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus spp. was completed an average of 41.8 to 42.4 h earlier using the BC-GP test compared to routine culture methods. The BC-GP test was unable to assign mecA to a specific organism in cultures containing more than one Staphylococcus isolate and does not identify common blood culture contaminants such as Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, and Bacillus. Conclusions The BC-GP test is a multiplex test capable of detecting most leading causes of Gram-positive bacterial blood stream infections as well as genetic markers of methicillin and vancomycin resistance directly from positive blood cultures. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:23843749

Buchan, Blake W.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Manii, Ryhana; Cavagnolo, Robert; Pancholi, Preeti; Swyers, Lettie; Thomson, Richard B.; Anderson, Christopher; Kaul, Karen; Ledeboer, Nathan A.

2013-01-01

47

Characterization of a gram-positive bacterium from the proventriculus of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).  

PubMed

The cellular, cultural, and biochemical characteristics of eight isolates of a large gram-positive bacillus that are commonly observed as apparently normal flora in the proventriculus of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) were determined. The bacterium was highly pleomorphic and changed markedly in both diameter and length when subcultured on agar media. The bacterium was facultative anaerobic and capnophilic, hemolytic on blood agar, and formed flat colonies with irregular edges after incubation for several days. All isolates grew on sodium azide agar but did not grow on MacConkey agar. The isolates were catalase-negative and oxidase-negative and did not reduce nitrate. All isolates failed to utilize arginine, lysine, ornithine or tryptophane but produced acid from glucose, galactose, levulose, maltose, melibiose, starch, and sucrose. All isolates produced acetoin from glucose and hydrolyzed esculin. The eight isolates could not be identified to either genus or species level based on the descriptions of currently classified organisms in the division Firmicutes as described in Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. PMID:2241708

Scanlan, C M; Graham, D L

1990-01-01

48

Testing of different antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolated from plant tissue culture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Staphylococcus xylosus, S. aureus, S. cohnii, Bacillus sp., Corynebacterium sp., Pseudomonas vesicularis) were isolated from homogenized shoot tips of Drosera rotundifolia, Spatiphyllum sp., Syngonium cv. White butterfly, Nephrolepis exaltata cv. Teddy Junior. Growth inhibition of selected bacterial strains was examined using 28 different single antibiotics and 7 antibiotic mixtures. It was found that with the

W. Kneifel; W. Leonhardt

1992-01-01

49

[Mobilization transfer of the pUB110 plasmid between gram-positive bacteria].  

PubMed

The three factor crosses between the donor strain Bacillus subtilis 168 harbouring the plasmid pUB102-4, Bacillus thuringiensis strain carrying the mobilizing plasmid pAM beta 1 and recipient strain Lactobacillus fermenti were conducted in order to elaborate the optimal conditions of the plasmid pUB102-4 mobilization for transfer into gram-positive microorganisms and to elucidate the possible expression of endogluconase genes in a lactobacillus strain. The Lactobacillus fermenti transconjugants carrying the pUB102-4 plasmid were obtained in the three factor reciprocal crosses with the streptococcus recipient strain and Bacillus subtilis recipients. The presence of the plasmids in transconjugants was confirmed by colony hybridization with the [32P]-labelled plasmid DNA and KMC-ase activity in transconjugant cells. The proposed system of crosses using the high copy number plasmid derivatives of pUB110 mobilized with high frequency by the pAM beta 1 plasmid demonstrates the possibility to increase the circle of gram-positive host bacteria avoiding time and labour consuming operations. PMID:1745269

Kozlova, E V; Aminov, R I; Boronin, A M

1991-09-01

50

Glycopeptide resistance in gram-positive cocci: a review.  

PubMed

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens in the past two decades all over the world and have seriously limited the choices available to clinicians for treating infections caused by these agents. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, perhaps the most notorious among the nosocomial pathogens, was till recently susceptible to vancomycin and the other glycopeptides. Emergence of vancomycin nonsusceptible strains of S. aureus has led to a worrisome scenario where the options available for treating serious infections due to these organisms are very limited and not well evaluated. Vancomycin resistance in clinically significant isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci is also on the rise in many setups. This paper aims to highlight the genetic basis of vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus species and S. aureus. It also focuses on important considerations in detection of vancomycin resistance in these gram-positive bacteria. The problem of glycopeptide resistance in clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci and the phenomenon of vancomycin tolerance seen in some strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae has also been discussed. Finally, therapeutic options available and being developed against these pathogens have also found a mention. PMID:22778729

Sujatha, S; Praharaj, Ira

2012-01-01

51

Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for  

E-print Network

Screening genomes of Gram-positive bacteria for double-glycine-motif- containing peptides Secreted-positive bacteria, the double-glycine (GG) motif plays a key role in many peptide secretion systems involved Microbiology Comment #12;peptides and class II bacteriocins, produced by streptococci and lactic acid bacteria

52

Novel antimicrobial peptides that inhibit gram positive bacterial exotoxin synthesis.  

PubMed

Gram-positive bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus, cause serious human illnesses through combinations of surface virulence factors and secretion of exotoxins. Our prior studies using the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin and signal transduction inhibitors glycerol monolaurate and ?-globin and ?-globin chains of hemoglobin indicate that their abilities to inhibit exotoxin production by S. aureus are separable from abilities to inhibit growth of the organism. Additionally, our previous studies suggest that inhibition of exotoxin production, in absence of ability to kill S. aureus and normal flora lactobacilli, will prevent colonization by pathogenic S. aureus, while not interfering with lactobacilli colonization. These disparate activities may be important in development of novel anti-infective agents that do not alter normal flora. We initiated studies to explore the exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition activity of hemoglobin peptides further to develop potential agents to prevent S. aureus infections. We tested synthesized ?-globin chain peptides, synthetic variants of ?-globin chain peptides, and two human defensins for ability to inhibit exotoxin production without significantly inhibiting S. aureus growth. All of these peptides were weakly or not inhibitory to bacterial growth. However, the peptides were inhibitory to exotoxin production with increasing activity dependent on increasing numbers of positively-charged amino acids. Additionally, the peptides could be immobilized on agarose beads or have amino acid sequences scrambled and still retain exotoxin-synthesis-inhibition. The peptides are not toxic to human vaginal epithelial cells and do not inhibit growth of normal flora L. crispatus. These peptides may interfere with plasma membrane signal transduction in S. aureus due to their positive charges. PMID:24748386

Merriman, Joseph A; Nemeth, Kimberly A; Schlievert, Patrick M

2014-01-01

53

Buffering Capacity and Membrane H+ Conductance of Neutrophilic and Alkalophilic Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance were examined in three gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus alcalophilus. An acid pulse technique was used to measure both parameters. The buffering capacity and membrane H+ conductance of B. alcalophilus are influenced by the pH of the medium and the culture conditions. Suspensions of B. alcalophilus cells from both H. A. medium and l-malate medium cultures grown at pH 10.5 exhibited higher values for these parameters than cells grown at pH 8.5. B. alcalophilus grown aerobically had a lower buffering capacity and a lower membrane conductance for protons than the neutrophilic bacteria S. aureus and B. subtilis. Fermenting cells exhibited significantly higher values for both variables than respiring cells. PMID:9546171

Rius, Núria; Lorén, José G.

1998-01-01

54

Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal acti- vities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bacter- icidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), inclu- ding S. aureus strains resistant

2004-01-01

55

Evaluation of the nanosphere verigene gram-positive blood culture assay with the VersaTREK blood culture system and assessment of possible impact on selected patients.  

PubMed

The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay (Nanosphere, Northbrook, IL) is a molecular method for the rapid identification of Gram-positive organisms and resistance markers directly from blood culture bottles. A total of 148 VersaTREK REDOX 1 40-ml aerobic bottles demonstrating Gram-positive bacteria were tested. Results were compared with those from conventional biochemical and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) identifications. We obtained isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (24), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (14), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) (17), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermidis (MSSE) (9), other coagulase-negative staphylococci (19), Streptococcus salivarius (5), Streptococcus parasanguinis (2), Streptococcus sanguinis (1), Streptococcus cristatus (1), the Streptococcus bovis group (5), Streptococcus agalactiae (9), the Streptococcus anginosus group (1), Streptococcus pneumoniae (6), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE FCM) (16), vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis (3), Aerococcus viridans (2), Bacillus (6), Corynebacterium (8), Lactobacillus (2), Micrococcus (2), Neisseria mucosa (1), Escherichia coli (3), Candida tropicalis (1), Propionibacterium (1), and Rothia (1). Overall agreement with the culture results was 95%. A total of 137 of 138 (99%) monomicrobial cultures were concordant. We tested 9 polymicrobial samples and found 33% agreement. A chart review of 31 patients with MRSA, MSSA, or VRE demonstrated that the Nanosphere BC-GP assay might have led to more appropriate antibiotic selection for these patients an average of 42 h earlier. Additionally, contact isolation could have been initiated an average of 37 h earlier for patients with MRSA or VRE. The BC-GP assay may have a positive impact on patient care, health care costs, and antibiotic stewardship. PMID:24048531

Beal, Stacy G; Ciurca, Jane; Smith, Geremy; John, Jeffrey; Lee, Francesca; Doern, Christopher D; Gander, Rita M

2013-12-01

56

Conjugative type IV secretion systems in Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Bacterial conjugation presents the most important means to spread antibiotic resistance and virulence factors among closely and distantly related bacteria. Conjugative plasmids are the mobile genetic elements mainly responsible for this task. All the genetic information required for the horizontal transmission is encoded on the conjugative plasmids themselves. Two distinct concepts for horizontal plasmid transfer in Gram-positive bacteria exist, the most prominent one transports single stranded plasmid DNA via a multi-protein complex, termed type IV secretion system, across the Gram-positive cell envelope. Type IV secretion systems have been found in virtually all unicellular Gram-positive bacteria, whereas multicellular Streptomycetes seem to have developed a specialized system more closely related to the machinery involved in bacterial cell division and sporulation, which transports double stranded DNA from donor to recipient cells. This review intends to summarize the state of the art of prototype systems belonging to the two distinct concepts; it focuses on protein key players identified so far and gives future directions for research in this emerging field of promiscuous interbacterial transport. PMID:24129002

Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Arends, Karsten; Keller, Walter; Grohmann, Elisabeth

2013-01-01

57

Structural biology of gram-positive bacterial adhesins  

PubMed Central

The structural biology of Gram-positive cell surface adhesins is an emerging field of research, whereas Gram-negative pilus assembly and anchoring have been extensively investigated and are well understood. Gram-positive surface proteins known as MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and individual proteins that assemble into long, hair-like organelles known as pili have similar features at the primary sequence level as well as at the tertiary structural level. Some of these conserved features are essential for their transportation from the cytoplasm and for cell wall anchoring. More importantly, the MSCRAMMs and the individual pilins are assembled with building blocks that are variants of structural modules used for human immunoglobulins. MSCRAMMs target the host's extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibrinogen, and fibronectin, and they have received considerable attention from structural biologists in the last decade, who have primarily been interested in understanding their interactions with host tissue. The recent focus is on the newly discovered pili of Gram-positive bacteria, and in this review, we highlight the advances in understanding of the individual pilus constituents and their associations and stress the similarities between the individual pilins and surface proteins. PMID:21404359

Vengadesan, Krishnan; Narayana, Sthanam V L

2011-01-01

58

Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Myophage Mater  

PubMed Central

Bacillus megaterium is a ubiquitous, soil inhabiting Gram-positive bacterium that is a common model organism and is used in industrial applications for protein production. The following reports the complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of B. megaterium myophage Mater and describes the major features identified. PMID:25593262

Lancaster, Jacob C.; Hodde, Mary K.; Hernandez, Adriana C.

2015-01-01

59

Comparative genomics of the methionine metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria: a variety of regulatory systems  

PubMed Central

Regulation of the methionine biosynthesis and transport genes in bacteria is rather diverse and involves two RNA-level regulatory systems and at least three DNA-level systems. In particular, the methionine metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria was known to be controlled by the S-box and T-box mechanisms, both acting on the level of premature termination of transcription. Using comparative analysis of genes, operons and regulatory elements, we described the methionine metabolic pathway and the methionine regulons in available genomes of Gram-positive bacteria. A large number of methionine-specific RNA elements were identified. S-boxes were shown to be widely distributed in Bacillales and Clostridia, whereas methionine-specific T-boxes occurred mostly in Lactobacillales. A candidate binding signal (MET-box) for a hypothetical methionine regulator, possibly MtaR, was identified in Streptococcaceae, the only family in the Bacillus/Clostridium group of Gram-positive bacteria having neither S-boxes, nor methionine-specific T-boxes. Positional analysis of methionine-specific regulatory sites complemented by genome context analysis lead to identification of new members of the methionine regulon, both enzymes and transporters, and reconstruction of the methionine metabolism in various bacterial genomes. In particular, we found candidate transporters for methionine (MetT) and methylthioribose (MtnABC), as well as new enzymes forming the S-adenosylmethionine recycling pathway. Methionine biosynthetic enzymes in various bacterial species are quite variable. In particular, Oceanobacillus iheyensis possibly uses a homolog of the betaine–homocysteine methyltransferase bhmT gene from vertebrates to substitute missing bacterial-type methionine synthases. PMID:15215334

Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Vitreschak, Alexey G.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

2004-01-01

60

Recognition of U-rich RNA by Hfq from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes  

PubMed Central

Hfq is a post-transcriptional regulator that binds U- and A-rich regions of sRNAs and their target mRNAs to stimulate their annealing in order to effect translation regulation and, often, to alter their stability. The functional importance of Hfq and its RNA-binding properties are relatively well understood in Gram-negative bacteria, whereas less is known about the RNA-binding properties of this riboregulator in Gram-positive species. Here, we describe the structure of Hfq from the Gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in its RNA-free form and in complex with a U6 oligoribonucleotide. As expected, the protein takes the canonical hexameric toroidal shape of all other known Hfq structures. The U6 RNA binds on the “proximal face” in a pocket formed by conserved residues Q9, N42, F43, and K58. Additionally residues G5 and Q6 are involved in protein-nucleic and inter-subunit contacts that promote uracil specificity. Unlike Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) Hfq, Lm Hfq requires magnesium to bind U6 with high affinity. In contrast, the longer oligo-uridine, U16, binds Lm Hfq tightly in the presence or absence of magnesium, thereby suggesting the importance of additional residues on the proximal face and possibly the lateral rim in RNA interaction. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence quenching (TFQ) studies reveal, surprisingly, that Lm Hfq can bind (GU)3G and U6 on its proximal and distal faces, indicating a less stringent adenine-nucleotide specificity site on the distal face as compared to the Gram-positive Hfq proteins from Sa and Bacillus subtilis and suggesting as yet uncharacterized RNA-binding modes on both faces. PMID:25150227

Kovach, Alexander R.; Hoff, Kirsten E.; Canty, John T.; Orans, Jillian

2014-01-01

61

Optimization of Fluorescent Tools for Cell Biology Studies in Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The understanding of how Gram-positive bacteria divide and ensure the correct localization of different molecular machineries, such as those involved in the synthesis of the bacterial cell surface, is crucial to design strategies to fight bacterial infections. In order to determine the correct subcellular localization of fluorescent proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have previously described tools to express derivatives of four fluorescent proteins, mCherry, Citrine, CFP and GFP, to levels that allow visualization by fluorescence microscopy, by fusing the first ten amino acids of the S. pneumoniae protein Wze (the i-tag), upstream of the fluorescent protein. Here, we report that these tools can also be used in other Gram-positive bacteria, namely Lactococcus lactis, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, possibly due to optimized translation rates. Additionally, we have optimized the i-tag by testing the effect of the first ten amino acids of other pneumococcal proteins in the increased expression of the fluorescent protein Citrine. We found that manipulating the structure and stability of the 5? end of the mRNA molecule, which may influence the accessibility of the ribosome, is determinant to ensure the expression of a strong fluorescent signal. PMID:25464377

Henriques, Mafalda X.; Gomes, João Paulo; Filipe, Sérgio R.

2014-01-01

62

Synthetic Teichoic Acid Conjugate Vaccine against Nosocomial Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) are amphiphilic polymers that are important constituents of the cell wall of many Gram-positive bacteria. The chemical structures of LTA vary among organisms, albeit in the majority of Gram-positive bacteria the LTAs feature a common poly-1,3-(glycerolphosphate) backbone. Previously, the specificity of opsonic antibodies for this backbone present in some Gram-positive bacteria has been demonstrated, suggesting that this minimal structure may be sufficient for vaccine development. In the present work, we studied a well-defined synthetic LTA-fragment, which is able to inhibit opsonic killing of polyclonal rabbit sera raised against native LTA from Enterococcus faecalis 12030. This promising compound was conjugated with BSA and used to raise rabbit polyclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the opsonic activity of this serum was tested in an opsonophagocytic assay and specificity was confirmed by an opsonophagocytic inhibition assay. The conjugated LTA-fragment was able to induce specific opsonic antibodies that mediate killing of the clinical strains E. faecalis 12030, Enterococcus faecium E1162, and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strain MW2 (USA400). Prophylactic immunization with the teichoic acid conjugate and with the rabbit serum raised against this compound was evaluated in active and passive immunization studies in mice, and in an enterococcal endocarditis rat model. In all animal models, a statistically significant reduction of colony counts was observed indicating that the novel synthetic LTA-fragment conjugate is a promising vaccine candidate for active or passive immunotherapy against E. faecalis and other Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:25333799

Laverde, Diana; Wobser, Dominique; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Hogendorf, Wouter; van der Marel, Gijsbert; Berthold, Martin; Kropec, Andrea; Codee, Jeroen; Huebner, Johannes

2014-01-01

63

Transformation of the Gram-positive honey bee pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae, by electroporation.  

PubMed

In this study we developed an electrotransformation method for use with the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae-a deadly pathogen of honey bees. Combining multiple Bacillus electrotransformation methods to generate an initial protocol, we then optimized the following parameters for use with P. larvae: cell density of culture at harvest time, contents of the washing/electroporation solution, field strength of the electrical pulse, recovery growth medium, and recovery time period. With the optimized method, we achieved an average transformation efficiency of 1.9x10(5) transformants/mug DNA. The method is substantially different from the only other electrotransformation method for a Paenibacillus species found in the literature. This work should facilitate the study of the several previously discovered natural plasmids of P. larvae, and is a step toward developing a genetic system for this species. PMID:18687369

Murray, K Daniel; Aronstein, Katherine A

2008-10-01

64

Isolation and characterization of four novel Gram-positive bacteria associated with the rhizosphere of two endemorelict plants capable of degrading a broad range of aromatic substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four new Gram-positive, phenol-degrading strains were isolated from the rhizospheres of endemorelict plants Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae known to exude high amounts of phenolics in the soil. Isolates were designated Bacillus sp. PS1, Bacillus sp. PS11, Streptomyces sp. PS12, and Streptomyces sp. PN1 based on 16S rDNA sequence and biochemical analysis. In addition to their ability to tolerate and

Lidija Djokic; Tanja Narancic; Jasmina Nikodinovic-Runic; Miloje Savic; Branka Vasiljevic

2011-01-01

65

Fate study of water-borne gram positive vegetative bacterial cells with Raman microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an initial bacterial fate study of Gram positive vegetative cells suspended in water and stored at ambient room temperature via Raman spectroscopy monitoring. Two types of cells were considered for this study: vegetative cells of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis which contain the polyhydroxybutyric acid (PHBA) as an energy storage compound and Bacillus subtlilis cells which do not. The cells were cultured specifically for this project. Immediately following the culturing phase, the bacteria were extracted, cleaned and at the onset of the study were suspended in de-ionized water and stored at room temperature. Aliquots of suspensions were deposited onto aluminum slides at different times and allowed to dry for Raman analysis. Spectra from multiple regions of each dried spot and each deposit time were acquired along with the bright-field and fluorescence images. Results were examined to investigate the effect of suspension time on the spectral signatures as well as the fate behavior of the three types of cells investigated. The cells were monitored daily for over a 14 period during which time the onset of starvation induced sporulation was observed.

Guicheteau, Jason; Tripathi, Ashish; Minter, Jennifer; Wilcox, Phillip; Christesen, Steven

2010-04-01

66

Acquired inducible antimicrobial resistance in Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

A major contributor to the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is the expansion of acquired, inducible genetic elements. Although acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance is not new, the interest in its molecular basis has been accelerated by the widening distribution and often ‘silent’ spread of the elements responsible, the diagnostic challenges of such resistance and the mounting limitations of available agents to treat Gram-positive infections. Acquired, inducible antibiotic resistance elements belong to the accessory genome of a species and are horizontally acquired by transformation/recombination or through the transfer of mobile DNA elements. The two key, but mechanistically very different, induction mechanisms are: ribosome-sensed induction, characteristic of the macrolide–lincosamide–streptogramin B antibiotics and tetracycline resistance, leading to ribosomal modifications or efflux pump activation; and resistance by cell surface-associated sensing of ?-lactams (e.g., oxacillin), glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin) and the polypeptide bacitracin, leading to drug inactivation or resistance due to cell wall alterations. PMID:22913355

Chancey, Scott T; Zähner, Dorothea; Stephens, David S

2012-01-01

67

The lifestyle of Streptomyces, a genus of Gram-positive bacteria that belongs to the phylum Actinobacteria,  

E-print Network

The lifestyle of Streptomyces, a genus of Gram-positive bacteria that belongs to the phylum Streptomyces spp. also successfully inhabit a wide range of other niches, both terrestrial and aquatic metabolism of Streptomyces has made these organisms valuable providers of anti- biotics and other bioactive

Buttner, Mark

68

SubtiWiki--a comprehensive community resource for the model organism Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

In the post-genomic era, most components of a cell are known and they can be quantified by large-scale functional genomics approaches. However, genome annotation is the bottleneck that hampers our understanding of living cells and organisms. Up-to-date functional annotation is of special importance for model organisms that provide a frame of reference for studies with other relevant organisms. We have generated a Wiki-type database for the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis, SubtiWiki (http://subtiwiki.uni-goettingen.de/). This Wiki is centered around the individual genes and gene products of B. subtilis and provides information on each aspect of gene function and expression as well as protein activity and its control. SubtiWiki is accompanied by two companion databases SubtiPathways and SubtInteract that provide graphical representations of B. subtilis metabolism and its regulation and of protein-protein interactions, respectively. The diagrams of both databases are easily navigatable using the popular Google maps API, and they are extensively linked with the SubtiWiki gene pages. Moreover, each gene/gene product was assigned to one or more functional categories and transcription factor regulons. Pages for the specific categories and regulons provide a rapid overview of functionally related genes/proteins. Today, SubtiWiki can be regarded as one of the most complete inventories of knowledge on a living organism in one single resource. PMID:22096228

Mäder, Ulrike; Schmeisky, Arne G; Flórez, Lope A; Stülke, Jörg

2012-01-01

69

Desulfotomaculum spp. and related gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacteria in deep subsurface environments  

PubMed Central

Gram-positive spore-forming sulfate reducers and particularly members of the genus Desulfotomaculum are commonly found in the subsurface biosphere by culture based and molecular approaches. Due to their metabolic versatility and their ability to persist as endospores. Desulfotomaculum spp. are well-adapted for colonizing environments through a slow sedimentation process. Because of their ability to grow autotrophically (H2/CO2) and produce sulfide or acetate, these microorganisms may play key roles in deep lithoautotrophic microbial communities. Available data about Desulfotomaculum spp. and related species from studies carried out from deep freshwater lakes, marine sediments, oligotrophic and organic rich deep geological settings are discussed in this review. PMID:24348471

Aüllo, Thomas; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony; Ollivier, Bernard; Magot, Michel

2013-01-01

70

Fibrinogen-binding proteins of Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Fibrinogen (Fg), the major clotting protein in blood plasma, plays key roles in blood coagulation and thrombosis. In addition, this 340 kD glycoprotein is a stress inducible protein; its synthesis is dramatically upregulated during inflammation or under exposure to stress such systemic infections. This regulation of Fg expression indicates that Fg also participates in the host defense system against infections. In fact, a number of reported studies have demonstrated the involvement of both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of coagulation; the thrombotic and the fibrinolytic systems in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases. It is, therefore, perhaps not surprising that many pathogenic bacteria can interact with Fg and manipulate its biology. This review focuses on the major Fg-binding proteins (Fgbps) from Gram-positive bacteria with an emphasis on those that are known to have an effect on coagulation and thrombosis. PMID:17849038

Rivera, Jose; Vannakambadi, Ganesh; Höök, Magnus; Speziale, Pietro

2007-09-01

71

New antimicrobial approaches to gram positive respiratory infections.  

PubMed

Nowadays, we face growing resistance among gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens that cause respiratory infection in the hospital and in the community. The spread of penicillin- and macrolide-resistant pneumococci, Community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (Ca-MRSA), the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant staphylococci underline the need for underline the need for therapeutic alternatives. A number of new therapeutic agents, with activity against the above Gram (+) respiratory pathogens, as ceftaroline, ceftopibrole, telavancin, tedizolid have become available, either in clinical trials or have been approved for clinical use. Especially, the development of new oral antibiotics, as nemonaxacin, omadacyclin, cethromycin and solithromycin will give a solution to the lack of oral drugs for outpatient treatment. In the future the clinician needs to optimize the use of old and new antibiotics to treat gram (+) respiratory serious infections. PMID:24878422

Liapikou, Adamantia; Cilloniz, Catia; Mensa, Josep; Torres, Antonio

2014-05-27

72

MyD88Dependent Signaling Contributes to Protection following Bacillus anthracis Spore Challenge of Mice: Implications for Toll-Like Receptor Signaling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming, gram-positive organism that is the causative agent of the disease anthrax. Recognition of Bacillus anthracis by the host innate immune system likely plays a key protective role following infection. In the present study, we examined the role of TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 in the response to B. anthracis. Heat-killed Bacillus anthracis stimulated TLR2, but not

Molly A. Hughes; Candace S. Green; Lisa Lowchyj; Gloria M. Lee; Vanessa K. Grippe; Michael F. Smith; L.-Y. Huang; E. T. Harvill; T. J. Merkel

2005-01-01

73

Biochemical characterization of Gram-positive and Gram-negative plant-associated bacteria with micro-Raman spectroscopy.  

PubMed

Raman spectra of Gram-positive and Gram-negative plant bacteria have been measured with micro-Raman spectrometers equipped with 785 and 514.5 nm lasers. The Gram-positive bacteria Microbacterium testaceum, Paenibacillus validus, and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis have strong carotenoid bands in the regions 1155-1157 cm(-1) and 1516-1522 cm(-1) that differentiate them from other tested Gram-negative bacteria. In the Raman spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaterium excited with 785 nm laser, the Raman bands at 1157 and 1521 cm(-1) are weak in intensity compared to other Gram-positive bacteria, and these bands did not show significant resonance Raman enhancement in the spectrum recorded with 514.5 nm laser excitation. The Gram-positive bacteria could be separated from each other based on the bands associated with the in-phase C=C (v(1)) vibrations of the polyene chain of carotenoids. None of the Gram-negative bacteria tested had carotenoid bands. The bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas have a carotenoid-like pigment, xanthomonadin, identified in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae, and it is a unique Raman marker for the bacteria. The representative bands for xanthomonadin were the C-C stretching (v(2)) vibrations of the polyene chain at 1135-1136 cm(-1) and the in-phase C=C (v(1)) vibrations of the polyene chain at 1529-1531 cm(-1), which were distinct from the carotenoid bands of other tested bacteria. The tyrosine peak in the region 1170-1175 cm(-1) was the only other marker present in Gram-negative bacteria that was absent in all tested Gram-positives. A strong-intensity exopolysaccharide-associated marker at 1551 cm(-1) is a distinguishable feature of Enterobacter cloacae. The Gram-negative Agrobacterium rhizogenes and Ralstonia solanacearum were differentiated from each other and other tested bacteria on the basis of presence or absence and relative intensities of peaks. The principal components analysis (PCA) of the spectra excited with 785 nm laser differentiated the various strains of bacteria based on the unique pigments these bacteria do or do not possess. Raman spectroscopy of diverse plant bacteria that are pathogenic and non-pathogenic to plants, and isolated from plants and soil, indicates the possibilities of using the method in understanding plant-bacterial interactions at the cellular level. PMID:20412629

Paret, Mathews L; Sharma, Shiv K; Green, Lisa M; Alvarez, Anne M

2010-04-01

74

Novel bacterial lipoprotein structures conserved in low-GC content gram-positive bacteria are recognized by Toll-like receptor 2.  

PubMed

Bacterial lipoproteins/lipopeptides inducing host innate immune responses are sensed by mammalian Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). These bacterial lipoproteins are structurally divided into two groups, diacylated or triacylated lipoproteins, by the absence or presence of an amide-linked fatty acid. The presence of diacylated lipoproteins has been predicted in low-GC content gram-positive bacteria and mycoplasmas based on the absence of one modification enzyme in their genomes; however, we recently determined triacylated structures in low-GC gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, raising questions about the actual lipoprotein structure in other low-GC content gram-positive bacteria. Here, through intensive MS analyses, we identified a novel and unique bacterial lipoprotein structure containing an N-acyl-S-monoacyl-glyceryl-cysteine (named the lyso structure) from low-GC gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Streptococcus sanguinis, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Two of the purified native lyso-form lipoproteins induced proinflammatory cytokine production from mice macrophages in a TLR2-dependent and TLR1-independent manner but with a different dependence on TLR6. Additionally, two other new lipoprotein structures were identified. One is the "N-acetyl" lipoprotein structure containing N-acetyl-S-diacyl-glyceryl-cysteine, which was found in five gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus subtilis. The N-acetyl lipoproteins induced the proinflammatory cytokines through the TLR2/6 heterodimer. The other was identified in a mycoplasma strain and is an unusual diacyl lipoprotein structure containing two amino acids before the lipid-modified cysteine residue. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of novel TLR2-stimulating lyso and N-acetyl forms of lipoproteins that are conserved in low-GC content gram-positive bacteria and provide clear evidence for the presence of yet to be identified key enzymes involved in the bacterial lipoprotein biosynthesis. PMID:22303020

Kurokawa, Kenji; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa; Ichikawa, Rie; Masuda, Akiko; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Hanna; Chae, Jun-Ho; Shimizu, Takashi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kuwano, Koichi; Akira, Shizuo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Lee, Bok Luel

2012-04-13

75

Characterization of a pyridine-degrading branched Gram-positive bacterium isolated from the anoxic zone of an oil shale column  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the anoxic zone of an oil shale leachate column three pyridine-degrading bacterial strains were isolated. Two strains were Gram-negative facultative anaerobic rods and one strain was a branched Gram-positive bacterium. The branched Gram-positive strain had the best pyridine-degrading ability. This organism was aerobic, non-motile, catalase positive, oxidase negative, and had no flagellum. The G+C content of the DNA was

Sung-Taik Lee; Seung-Bong Lee; Yong-Ha Park

1991-01-01

76

Vancomycin-Resistant Gram-Positive Cocci Isolated from the Saliva of Wild Songbirds  

PubMed Central

We analyzed highly vancomycin-resistant Gram-positive bacteria isolated from the saliva of migratory songbirds captured, sampled, and released from a birdbanding station in western Kansas. Individual bacterial isolates were identified by partial 16S rRNA sequencing. Most of the bacteria in this study were shown to be Staphylococcus succinus with the majority being isolated from the American Robin. Some of these bacteria were shown to carry vanA, vanB, and vanC vancomycin-resistance genes and have the ability to form biofilms. One of the van gene-carrying isolates is also coagulase positive, which is normally considered a virulence factor. Other organisms isolated included Staphylococcus saprophyticus as well as Enterococcus gallinarum. Given the wide range of the American Robin and ease of horizontal gene transfer between Gram-positive cocci, we postulate that these organisms could serve as a reservoir of vancomycin-resistance genes capable of transferring to human pathogens. PMID:23224296

Ishihara, Shingo; Bitner, Jessica J.; Farley, Greg H.

2014-01-01

77

Nitric Oxide Stress Induces Different Responses but Mediates Comparable Protein Thiol Protection in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nonpathogenic Bacillus subtilis and the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus are gram-positive model organ- isms that have to cope with the radical nitric oxide (NO) generated by nitrite reductases of denitrifying bacteria and by the inducible NO synthases of immune cells of the host, respectively. The response of both microor- ganisms to NO was analyzed by using a two-dimensional gel approach.

Falko Hochgrafe; Carmen Wolf; Stephan Fuchs; Manuel Liebeke; Michael Lalk; Susanne Engelmann; Michael Hecker

2008-01-01

78

Thermophilic Gram-Positive Biocatalysts for Biomass Conversion to Ethanol  

SciTech Connect

Production of energy from renewable sources is receiving increased attention due to the finite nature of fossil fuels and the environmental impact associated with the continued large scale use of fossil energy sources. Biomass, a CO2-neutral abundant resource, is an attractive alternate source of energy. Biomass-derived sugars, such as glucose, xylose, and other minor sugars, can be readily fermented to fuel ethanol and commodity chemicals. Extracellular cellulases produced by fungi are commercially developed for depolymerization of cellulose in biomass to glucose for fermentation by appropriate biocatalysts in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. Due to the differences in the optimum conditions for the activity of the fungal cellulases and the growth and fermentation characteristics of the current industrial biocatalysts, SSF of cellulose is envisioned at conditions that are not optimal for the fungal cellulase activity leading to higher than required cost of cellulase in SSF. We have isolated bacterial biocatalysts whose growth and fermentation requirements match the optimum conditions for commercial fungal cellulase activity (pH 5.0 and 50 deg. C). These isolates fermented both glucose and xylose, major components of cellulose and hemicellulose, respectively, to L(+)-lactic acid. Xylose was metabolized through the pentose-phosphate pathway by these organisms as evidenced by the fermentation profile and analysis of the fermentation products of 13C1-xylose by NMR. As expected for the metabolism of xylose by the pentose-phosphate pathway, 13C-lactate accounted for more than 90% of the total 13C-labeled products. All three strains fermented crystalline cellulose to lactic acid with the addition of fungal cellulase (Spezyme CE) (SSF) at an optimum of about 10 FPU/g cellulose. These isolates also fermented cellulose and sugar cane bagasse hemicellulose acid hydrolysate simultaneously. Based on fatty acid profile and 16S rRNA sequence, these isolates cluster with Bacillus coagulans although B. coagulans type strain, ATCC 7050, failed to utilize xylose as a carbon source. For successful production of ethanol from pyruvate, both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AHD) need to be produced at optimal levels in these biocatalysts. A plasmid containing the S. ventriculi pdc gene and the adh gene from geobacillus stearothermophilus was constructed using plasmid pWH1520 that was successfully used for expression of pdc in B. megaterium. The resulting portable ethanol (PET) plasmid, pJAM423, was transformed into B. megaterium. After xylose induction, a significant fraction of cell cytoplasm was composed of the S. ventriculi PDC and G. stearothermophilus ADH proteins. In preliminary experiments, the amount of ethanol produced by b. megaterium with plasmid pJAM423 was about twice (20 mM) of the bacterium without the plasmid. These results show that the PET operon is functional in B. megaterium but high level ethanol production needs further genetic and metabolic engineering. A genetic transfer system for the second generation biocatalysts needs to be developed for transferring the plasmid pJAM423 and its derivatives for engineering these organisms for ethanol production from biomass derived sugars and cellulose to ethanol. One of the new biocatalysts, strain P4-102B was found to be transformable with plasmids and the method for introducing plasmid pJAM423 into this strain and expression of the encoded DNA is being optimized. These new second generation biocatalysts have the potential to reduce the cost of SSF by minimizing the amount of fungal cellulases, a significant cost component in the use of biomass as a renewable resource for production of fuels and chemicals.

Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O.; Maupin-Furlow, J.A.; Preston, J.F.; Aldrich, H.C.

2003-12-01

79

Antibacterial activity of oregano (Origanum vulgare Linn.) against gram positive bacteria.  

PubMed

The present investigation is focused on antibacterial potential of infusion, decoction and essential oil of oregano (Origanum vulgare) against 111 Gram-positive bacterial isolates belonging to 23 different species related to 3 genera. Infusion and essential oil exhibited antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. aureus, Micrococcus roseus, M. kristinae, M. nishinomiyaensis, M. lylae, M. luteus, M. sedentarius, M. varians, Bacillus megaterium, B. thuringiensis, B. alvei, B. circulans, B. brevis, B. coagulans, B. pumilus, B. laterosporus, B. polymyxa, B. macerans, B. subtilis, B. firmus, B. cereus and B. lichiniformis. The infusion exhibited maximum activity against B. laterosporus (17.5 mm mean zone of inhibition+/-1.5 Standard deviation) followed by B. polymyxa (17.0 mm+/-2.0 SD) and essential oil of oregano exhibited maximum activity against S. saprophyticus (16.8 mm+/-1.8 SD) followed by B. circulans (14.5 mm+/-0.5 SD). While all these tested isolates were found resistant to decoction of oregano. PMID:19783523

Saeed, Sabahat; Tariq, Perween

2009-10-01

80

Cultivation of aerobic chemoorganotrophic proteobacteria and gram-positive bacteria from a hot spring microbial mat.  

PubMed Central

The diversity of aerobic chemoorganotrophic bacteria inhabiting the Octopus Spring cyanobacterial mat community (Yellowstone National Park) was examined by using serial-dilution enrichment culture and a variety of enrichment conditions to cultivate the numerically significant microbial populations. The most abundant bacterial populations cultivated from dilutions to extinction were obtained from enrichment flasks which contained 9.0 x 10(2) primary producer (Synechococcus spp.) cells in the inoculum. Two isolates exhibited 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences typical of beta-proteobacteria. One of these isolates contained a 16S rRNA sequence identical to a sequence type previously observed in the mat by molecular retrieval techniques. Both are distantly related to a new sequence directly retrieved from the mat and contributed by a beta-proteobacterial community member. Phenotypically diverse gram-positive isolates genetically similar to Bacillus flavothermus were obtained from a variety of dilutions and enrichment types. These isolates exhibited identical 16S rRNA nucleotide sequences through a variable region of the molecule. Of the three unique sequences observed, only one had been previously retrieved from the mat, illustrating both the inability of the cultivation methods to describe the composition of a microbial community and the limitations of the ability of molecular retrieval techniques to describe populations which may be less abundant in microbial communities. PMID:8899976

Nold, S C; Kopczynski, E D; Ward, D M

1996-01-01

81

Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.  

PubMed

Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi. PMID:23095488

Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

2014-10-01

82

Detection of and Discrimination between Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Intraocular Samples by Using Nested PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nested PCR protocol has been developed for the detection of and discrimination between 14 species of gram-positive and -negative bacteria in samples of ocular fluids. First-round PCR with pan-bacterial oligo- nucleotide primers, based on conserved sequences of the 16S ribosomal gene, was followed by a gram-negative- organism-specific PCR, which resulted in a single 985-bp amplification product, and a multiplex

NORA M. CARROLL; EMMA E. M. JAEGER; SARAH CHOUDHURY; ANTHONY A. S. DUNLOP; MELVILLE M. MATHESON; PETER ADAMSON; NARCISS OKHRAVI; SUSAN LIGHTMAN

2000-01-01

83

Pharmacodynamics of telavancin (TD-6424), a novel bactericidal agent, against gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Telavancin (TD-6424) is a novel lipoglycopeptide that produces rapid and concentration-dependent killing of clinically relevant gram-positive organisms in vitro. The present studies evaluated the in vivo pharmacodynamics of telavancin in the mouse neutropenic thigh (MNT) and mouse subcutaneous infection (MSI) animal models. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic studies in the MNT model demonstrated that the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio was the best predictor of efficacy. Telavancin produced dose-dependent reduction of thigh titers of several organisms, including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), penicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis. The 50% effective dose (ED50) estimates for telavancin ranged from 0.5 to 6.6 mg/kg of body weight (administered intravenously), and titers were reduced by up to 3 log10 CFU/g from pretreatment values. Against MRSA ATCC 33591, telavancin was 4- and 30-fold more potent (on an ED50 basis) than vancomycin and linezolid, respectively. Against MSSA ATCC 13709, telavancin was 16- and 40-fold more potent than vancomycin and nafcillin, respectively. Telavancin, vancomycin, and linezolid were all efficacious and more potent against MRSA ATCC 33591 in the MSI model compared to the MNT model. This deviation in potency was, however, disproportionately greater for vancomycin and linezolid than for telavancin, suggesting that activity of telavancin is less affected by the immune status. The findings of these studies collectively suggest that once-daily dosing of telavancin may provide an effective approach for the treatment of clinically relevant infections with gram-positive organisms. PMID:15273119

Hegde, Sharath S; Reyes, Noe; Wiens, Tania; Vanasse, Nicole; Skinner, Robert; McCullough, Julia; Kaniga, Koné; Pace, John; Thomas, Roger; Shaw, Jeng-Pyng; Obedencio, Glen; Judice, J Kevin

2004-08-01

84

Aspects of eukaryotic-like signaling in Gram-positive cocci: a focus on virulence  

PubMed Central

Living organisms adapt to the dynamic external environment for their survival. Environmental adaptation in prokaryotes is thought to be primarily accomplished by signaling events mediated by two-component systems, consisting of histidine kinases and response regulators. However, eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases (STKs) have recently been described to regulate growth, antibiotic resistance and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. This article summarizes the role of STKs and their cognate phosphatases (STPs) in Gram-positive cocci that cause invasive infections in humans. Given that a large number of inhibitors to eukaryotic STKs are approved for use in humans, understanding how serine/threonine phosphorylation regulates virulence and antibiotic resistance will be beneficial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies against bacterial infections. PMID:21797690

Burnside, Kellie; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

2011-01-01

85

Gene replacement of adenylate kinase in the gram-positive thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus disrupts adenine nucleotide homeostasis and reduces cell viability.  

PubMed

Thermophilic bacteria are of great value for industry and research communities. Unfortunately, the cellular processes and mechanisms of these organisms remain largely understudied. In the present study, we investigate how the inactivation of adenylate kinase (AK) affects the adenine nucleotide homeostasis of a gram-positive moderate thermophile, Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain NUB3621-R. AK plays a major role in the adenine nucleotide homeostasis of living cells and has been shown to be essential for the gram-negative mesophile Escherichia coli. To study the role of AK in the maintenance of adenylate energy charge (EC) and cell viability of G. stearothermophilus, we generated a recombinant strain of this organism in which its endogenous gene coding for the essential protein adenylate kinase (AK) has been replaced with the adk gene from the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. PCR, DNA sequencing and Southern analysis were performed to confirm proper gene replacement and preservation of neighboring genes. The highest growing temperature for recombinant cells was almost 20 degrees C lower than for wild-type cells (56 vs. 75 degrees C). This temperature-sensitive phenotype was secondary to heat inactivation of B. subtilis AK, as evidenced by enzyme activity assays and EC measurements. At higher temperatures (65 degrees C), recombinant cells also had lower EC values (0.09) compared to wild-type cells (0.45), which reflects a disruption of adenine nucleotide homeostasis following AK inactivation. PMID:15647886

Couñago, Rafael; Shamoo, Yousif

2005-04-01

86

Antimicrobial activity of metal oxide nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria: a comparative study  

PubMed Central

Background Nanomaterials have unique properties compared to their bulk counterparts. For this reason, nanotechnology has attracted a great deal of attention from the scientific community. Metal oxide nanomaterials like ZnO and CuO have been used industrially for several purposes, including cosmetics, paints, plastics, and textiles. A common feature that these nanoparticles exhibit is their antimicrobial behavior against pathogenic bacteria. In this report, we demonstrate the antimicrobial activity of ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3 nanoparticles against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods and results Nanosized particles of three metal oxides (ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3) were synthesized by a sol–gel combustion route and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. X-ray diffraction results confirmed the single-phase formation of all three nanomaterials. The particle sizes were observed to be 18, 22, and 28 nm for ZnO, CuO, and Fe2O3, respectively. We used these nanomaterials to evaluate their antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) bacteria. Conclusion Among the three metal oxide nanomaterials, ZnO showed greatest antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria used in this study. It was observed that ZnO nanoparticles have excellent bactericidal potential, while Fe2O3 nanoparticles exhibited the least bactericidal activity. The order of antibacterial activity was demonstrated to be the following: ZnO > CuO > Fe2O3. PMID:23233805

Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, Mohammad; Khan, Mohammad S; Habib, Sami S; Memic, Adnan

2012-01-01

87

Ultrasound-Mediated DNA Transformation in Thermophilic Gram-Positive Anaerobes  

PubMed Central

Background Thermophilic, Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria (TGPAs) are generally recalcitrant to chemical and electrotransformation due to their special cell-wall structure and the low intrinsic permeability of plasma membranes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we established for any Gram-positive or thermophiles an ultrasound-based sonoporation as a simple, rapid, and minimally invasive method to genetically transform TGPAs. We showed that by applying a 40 kHz ultrasound frequency over a 20-second exposure, Texas red-conjugated dextran was delivered with 27% efficiency into Thermoanaerobacter sp. X514, a TGPA that can utilize both pentose and hexose for ethanol production. Experiments that delivered plasmids showed that host-cell viability and plasmid DNA integrity were not compromised. Via sonoporation, shuttle vectors pHL015 harboring a jellyfish gfp gene and pIKM2 encoding a Clostridium thermocellum ?-1,4-glucanase gene were delivered into X514 with an efficiency of 6×102 transformants/µg of methylated DNA. Delivery into X514 cells was confirmed via detecting the kanamycin-resistance gene for pIKM2, while confirmation of pHL015 was detected by visualization of fluorescence signals of secondary host-cells following a plasmid-rescue experiment. Furthermore, the foreign ?-1,4-glucanase gene was functionally expressed in X514, converting the host into a prototypic thermophilic consolidated bioprocessing organism that is not only ethanologenic but cellulolytic. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we developed an ultrasound-based sonoporation method in TGPAs. This new DNA-delivery method could significantly improve the throughput in developing genetic systems for TGPAs, many of which are of industrial interest yet remain difficult to manipulate genetically. PMID:20838444

Ji, Yuetong; He, Zhili; Pu, Yunting; Zhou, Jizhong; Xu, Jian

2010-01-01

88

Complete genome sequence of the industrial bacterium Bacillus licheniformis and comparisons with closely related Bacillus species  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  \\u000a Bacillus licheniformis is a Gram-positive, spore-forming soil bacterium that is used in the biotechnology industry to manufacture enzymes, antibiotics,\\u000a biochemicals and consumer products. This species is closely related to the well studied model organism Bacillus subtilis, and produces an assortment of extracellular enzymes that may contribute to nutrient cycling in nature.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the

Michael W Rey; Preethi Ramaiya; Beth A Nelson; Shari D Brody-Karpin; Elizabeth J Zaretsky; Maria Tang; Alfredo Lopez de Leon; Henry Xiang; Veronica Gusti; Ib Groth Clausen; Peter B Olsen; Michael D Rasmussen; Jens T Andersen; Per L Jørgensen; Thomas S Larsen; Alexei Sorokin; Alexander Bolotin; Alla Lapidus; Nathalie Galleron; S Dusko Ehrlich; Randy M Berka

2004-01-01

89

Genomics of Bacillus Species  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Members of the genus Bacillus are rod-shaped spore-forming bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, the low G+C gram-positive bacteria. The Bacillus genus was first described and classified by Ferdinand Cohn in Cohn (1872), and Bacillus subtilis was defined as the type species (Soule, 1932). Several Bacilli may be linked to opportunistic infections. However, pathogenicity among Bacillus spp. is mainly a feature of bacteria belonging to the Bacillus cereus group, including B. cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis. Here we review the genomics of B. cereus group bacteria in relation to their roles as etiological agents of two food poisoning syndromes (emetic and diarrhoeal).

Økstad, Ole Andreas; Kolstø, Anne-Brit

90

Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Extracts of Guava (Psidium guajava L.) on Two Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Aim. To determine the antimicrobial potential of guava (Psidium guajava) leaf extracts against two gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis) and two gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) which are some of foodborne and spoilage bacteria. The guava leaves were extracted in four different solvents of increasing polarities (hexane, methanol, ethanol, and water). The efficacy of these extracts was tested against those bacteria through a well-diffusion method employing 50??L leaf-extract solution per well. According to the findings of the antibacterial assay, the methanol and ethanol extracts of the guava leaves showed inhibitory activity against gram-positive bacteria, whereas the gram-negative bacteria were resistant to all the solvent extracts. The methanol extract had an antibacterial activity with mean zones of inhibition of 8.27 and 12.3?mm, and the ethanol extract had a mean zone of inhibition of 6.11 and 11.0?mm against B. cereus and S. aureus, respectively. On the basis of the present finding, guava leaf-extract might be a good candidate in the search for a natural antimicrobial agent. This study provides scientific understanding to further determine the antimicrobial values and investigate other pharmacological properties. PMID:24223039

Biswas, Bipul; Rogers, Kimberly; McLaughlin, Fredrick; Yadav, Anand

2013-01-01

91

Caenorhabditis elegans Immune Conditioning with the Probiotic Bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NCFM Enhances Gram-Positive Immune Responses  

PubMed Central

Although the immune response of Caenorhabditis elegans to microbial infections is well established, very little is known about the effects of health-promoting probiotic bacteria on evolutionarily conserved C. elegans host responses. We found that the probiotic Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM is not harmful to C. elegans and that L. acidophilus NCFM is unable to colonize the C. elegans intestine. Conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM significantly decreased the burden of a subsequent Enterococcus faecalis infection in the nematode intestine and prolonged the survival of nematodes exposed to pathogenic strains of E. faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates. Preexposure of nematodes to Bacillus subtilis did not provide any beneficial effects. Importantly, L. acidophilus NCFM activates key immune signaling pathways involved in C. elegans defenses against Gram-positive bacteria, including the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (via TIR-1 and PMK-1) and the ?-catenin signaling pathway (via BAR-1). Interestingly, conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM had a minimal effect on Gram-negative infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and had no or a negative effect on defense genes associated with Gram-negative pathogens or general stress. In conclusion, we describe a new system for the study of probiotic immune agents and our findings demonstrate that probiotic conditioning with L. acidophilus NCFM modulates specific C. elegans immunity traits. PMID:22585961

2012-01-01

92

Antimicrobial-resistant gram-positive bacteria in PD peritonitis and the newer antibiotics used to treat them.  

PubMed

The incidence of resistant gram-positive bacteria in nosocomial and, more recently, community-acquired infections is increasing. Staphylococci, because of their natural habitat on the skin, have always been the leading cause of peritonitis in patients receiving peritoneal dialysis (PD). These organisms have demonstrated a remarkable ability to develop resistance to antibiotics, first with penicillin, then antistaphylococcal penicillins (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), and more recently, strains expressing resistance to vancomycin (vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus) have emerged. Enterococci are normal inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract and occasionally cause PD peritonitis. In the past 15 years, vancomycin-resistant enterococci have emerged as significant pathogens in many areas. In the past 5 years, novel antibiotics that have activity on gram-positive bacteria, including vancomycin-resistant strains, have become available. The problem of resistant gram-positive bacteria in PD peritonitis, their therapy, and the role of these newer agents, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, and daptomycin, are reviewed. PMID:16022084

Salzer, William

2005-01-01

93

Phylogenetic diversity of Gram-positive bacteria cultured from Antarctic deep-sea sponges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gram-positive bacteria, specifically actinobacteria and members of the order Bacillales, are well-known producers of important\\u000a secondary metabolites. Little is known about the diversity of Gram-positive bacteria associated with Antarctic deep-sea sponges.\\u000a In this study, cultivation-based approaches were applied to investigate the Gram-positive bacteria associated with the Antarctic\\u000a sponges Rossella nuda, Rossella racovitzae (Porifera: Hexactinellida), and Myxilla mollis, Homaxinella balfourensis, Radiella

Yanjuan Xin; Manmadhan Kanagasabhapathy; Dorte Janussen; Song Xue; Wei Zhang

94

Efficacy of telavancin, a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, in experimental models of Gram-positive infection.  

PubMed

Telavancin is a parenteral lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with a dual mechanism of action contributing to bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. It has been approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible Gram-positive bacteria and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are unsuitable. Telavancin has been demonstrated to be efficacious in multiple animal models of soft tissue, cardiac, systemic, lung, bone, brain and device-associated infections involving clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus, heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and daptomycin non-susceptible methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The AUC0-24h/MIC ratio is the primary pharmacodynamically-linked pharmacokinetic parameter. The preclinical data for telavancin supports further investigative clinical evaluation of its efficacy in additional serious infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25382700

Hegde, Sharath S; Janc, James W

2014-12-01

95

In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Activities of Heteroaryl Isothiazolones against Resistant Gram-Positive Pathogens  

Microsoft Academic Search

The activities of several tricyclic heteroaryl isothiazolones (HITZs) against an assortment of gram-positive and gram-negative clinical isolates were assessed. These compounds target bacterial DNA replication and were found to possess broad-spectrum activities especially against gram-positive strains, including antibiotic- resistant staphylococci and streptococci. These included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-nonsusceptible staphylococci, and quinolone-resistant strains. The HITZs were more active than the

Michael J. Pucci; Jijun Cheng; Steven D. Podos; Christy L. Thoma; Jane A. Thanassi; Douglas D. Buechter; Gohar Mushtaq; Gerald A. Vigliotti; B. J. Bradbury; M. Deshpande

2007-01-01

96

Ultrasound-Mediated DNA Transformation in Thermophilic Gram-Positive Anaerobes  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThermophilic, Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria (TGPAs) are generally recalcitrant to chemical and electrotransformation due to their special cell-wall structure and the low intrinsic permeability of plasma membranes.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsHere we established for any Gram-positive or thermophiles an ultrasound-based sonoporation as a simple, rapid, and minimally invasive method to genetically transform TGPAs. We showed that by applying a 40 kHz ultrasound frequency over

Lu Lin; Houhui Song; Yuetong Ji; Zhili He; Yunting Pu; Jizhong Zhou; Jian Xu

2010-01-01

97

Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Positive Cocci: Implications for Surgical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

. Gram-positive infections are causing more serious infections than ever before in surgical patients, who are increasingly\\u000a aged, ill, and debilitated. Invasive procedures disrupt natural barriers to bacterial invasion, and indwelling catheters may\\u000a act as conduits for infection. The use of broad-spectrum antibiotics selects for the emergence of resistant pathogens. Potential\\u000a sites of nosocomial gram-positive infections include the urinary tract,

Philip S. Barie

1998-01-01

98

Quorum sensing by peptide pheromones and two component signal transduction systems in Gram-positive bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cell-density-dependent gene expression appears to be widely spread in bacteria. This quorum-sensing phenomenon has been well established in Gram-negative bacteria, where N-acyl homoserine lactones are the diffusible communication molecules that modulate cell-density-dependent phenotypes. Similarly, a variety of processes are known to be regulated in a cell-density- or growth-phase-dependent manner in Gram-positive bacteria. Examples of such quorum-sensing modes in Gram-positive bacteria

Michiel Kleerebezem; Luis E. N. Quadri; Oscar P. Kuipers; Willem M. de Vos

1997-01-01

99

Biological Characterization of Novel Inhibitors of the Gram-Positive DNA Polymerase IIIC Enzyme  

Microsoft Academic Search

Novel N-3-alkylated 6-anilinouracils have been identified as potent and selective inhibitors of bacterial DNA polymerase IIIC, the enzyme essential for the replication of chromosomal DNA in gram-positive bacteria. A nonradioactive assay measuring the enzymatic activity of the DNA polymerase IIIC in gram-positive bacteria has been assembled. The 6-anilinouracils described inhibited the polymerase IIIC enzyme at concentrations in the nanomolar range

Alexander Kuhl; Niels Svenstrup; Christoph Ladel; Michael Otteneder; Annegret Binas; Guido Schiffer; Michael Brands; Thomas Lampe; Karl Ziegelbauer; Helga Rubsamen-Waigmann; Dieter Haebich; Kerstin Ehlert

2005-01-01

100

Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and description of Bacillus massilioalgeriensis sp. nov.  

PubMed Central

Strain EB01T sp. nov. is the type strain of Bacillus massilioalgeriensis, a new species within the genus Bacillus. This strain, whose genome is described here, was isolated from sediment sample of the hypersaline lake Ezzemoul sabkha in northeastern Algeria. B. massilioalgeriensis is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacillus. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,269,577 bp long genome contains 5,098 protein-coding and 95 RNA genes, including 12 rRNA genes. PMID:25197482

Bendjama, Esma; Loucif, Lotfi; Diene, Seydina M.; Michelle, Caroline; Gacemi-Kirane, Djamila; Rolain, Jean-Marc

2014-01-01

101

Gene replacement of adenylate kinase in the gram-positive thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus disrupts adenine nucleotide homeostasis and reduces cell viability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermophilic bacteria are of great value for industry and research communities. Unfortunately, the cellular processes and mechanisms of these organisms remain largely understudied. In the present study, we investigate how the inactivation of adenylate kinase (AK) affects the adenine nucleotide homeostasis of a gram-positive moderate thermophile, Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain NUB3621-R. AK plays a major role in the adenine nucleotide homeostasis

Rafael Couñago; Yousif Shamoo

2005-01-01

102

Bacillus subtilis chromosome organization oscillates between two distinct patterns  

E-print Network

Bacillus subtilis chromosome organization oscillates between two distinct patterns Xindan Wang, 2014 (received for review April 23, 2014) Bacterial chromosomes have been found to possess one of two crescentus, the chromosome arms lie side-by-side, with the replication origin and terminus at opposite cell

Rudner, David

103

Evaluation of Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay performance for bacteremic patients.  

PubMed

The Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) Assay (Nanosphere Inc., Northbrook, IL) is a microarray-based test designed to rapidly identify directly from positive blood cultures multiple bacterial species and their antimicrobial resistance markers. Nonduplicate blood cultures from 118 patients admitted to Erasme Hospital were prospectively enrolled. All but six organisms were members of the panel (95.6 %). For the identification of pathogens and detection of the mecA gene, the agreement with routine methods was 87.6 % and 97.7 %, respectively. The performance of the BC-GP assay was lower with polymicrobial than with monomicrobial blood cultures. Another concern of the BC-GP assay was the misidentification of Streptococcus mitis as S. pneumoniae (3/8). The BC-GP assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple sepsis-causing bacteria and resistant genes from blood cultures, which could have an impact on patient management and healthcare cost. PMID:25260788

Dodémont, M; De Mendonça, R; Nonhoff, C; Roisin, S; Denis, O

2015-03-01

104

The type I macrophage scavenger receptor binds to gram-positive bacteria and recognizes lipoteichoic acid.  

PubMed Central

Macrophage scavenger receptors exhibit unusually broad binding specificity for polyanionic ligands and have been implicated in atherosclerosis and various host defense functions. Using a radiolabeled, secreted form of the type I bovine macrophage scavenger receptor in an in vitro binding assay, we have found that this receptor binds to intact Gram-positive bacteria, including Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus hirae, and Listeria monocytogenes. Competition binding studies using purified lipoteichoic acid, an anionic polymer expressed on the surface of most Gram-positive bacteria, show that lipoteichoic acids are scavenger receptor ligands and probably mediate binding of the receptor to Gram-positive bacteria. Lipoteichoic acids, for which no host cell receptors have previously been identified, are implicated in the pathogenesis of septic shock due to Gram-positive bacteria. Scavenger receptors may participate in host defense by clearing lipoteichoic acid and/or intact bacteria from tissues and the circulation during Gram-positive sepsis. Since scavenger receptors have been previously shown to bind to and facilitate bloodstream clearance of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), these receptors may provide a general mechanism for macrophage recognition and internalization of pathogens and their cell surface components. Images PMID:8127896

Dunne, D W; Resnick, D; Greenberg, J; Krieger, M; Joiner, K A

1994-01-01

105

Clinical implications of nosocomial gram-positive bacteremia and superimposed antimicrobial resistance.  

PubMed

The coexistence of a pathogen population with an ever-increasing resistance to many antibiotics and a patient population characterized by increasingly complex clinical problems has contributed to an increase in the bloodstream infections associated with gram-positive bacteria. This serious therapeutic challenge has already been associated with an increase in infection-related morbidity and mortality, a prolongation of hospital stays, and an escalation of healthcare costs. Vancomycin resistance, long prevalent among the enterococci, has emerged in strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Several cases of infection caused by S. aureus strains with intermediate-level resistance to vancomycin (MIC=8 microg/mL) have recently been reported. As glycopeptide resistance accelerates among the gram-positive bacteria, so does the potential for adverse clinical consequences associated with bloodstream infections caused by these pathogens. The patients least able to tolerate the effects of uncontrolled bloodstream infections are also those at the highest risk for the development of infections caused by glycopeptide-resistant pathogens. In this at-risk population, a poor outcome may be anticipated if effective antibiotic therapy is unavailable. Appropriate rationing of vancomycin and other antimicrobial agents that increase the selection of antibiotic-resistant strains of gram-positive bacteria and the rapid development of novel antimicrobial agents with reliable gram-positive activity must be immediate priorities if the threat posed by glycopeptide-resistant gram-positive pathogens is to be countered. PMID:9684655

Linden, P K

1998-05-29

106

Isolation and Characterization of Gram-Positive Biosurfactant-Producing Halothermophilic Bacilli From Iranian Petroleum Reservoirs  

PubMed Central

Background: Petroleum reservoirs have long been known as the hosts of extremophilic microorganisms. Some of these microorganisms are known for their potential biotechnological applications, particularly production of extra and intracellular polymers and enzymes. Objectives: Here, 14 petroleum liquid samples from southern Iranian oil reservoirs were screened for presence of biosurfactant?producing halothermophiles. Materials and Methods: Mixture of the reservoir fluid samples with a minimal growth medium was incubated under an N2 atmosphere in 40°C; 0.5 mL samples were transferred from the aqueous phase to agar plates after 72 hours of incubation; 100 mL cell cultures were prepared using the MSS-1 (mineral salt solution 1) liquid medium with 5% (w/v) NaCl. The time-course samples were analyzed by recording the absorbance at 600 nm using a spectrophotometer. Incubation was carried out in 40°C with mild shaking in aerobic conditions. Thermotolerance was evaluated by growing the isolates at 40, 50, 60 and 70°C with varying NaCl concentrations of 5% and 10% (w/v). Halotolerance was evaluated using NaCl concentrations of 5%, 10%, 12.5% and 15% (w/v) and incubating them at 40°C under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Different phenotypic characteristics were evaluated, as outlined in Bergey's manual of determinative bacteriology. Comparing 16S rDNA sequences is one of the most powerful tools for classification of microorganisms. Results: Among 34 isolates, 10 demonstrated biosurfactant production and growth at temperatures between 40°C and 70°C in saline media containing 5%?15% w/v NaCl. Using partial 16S rDNA sequencing (and amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis [ARDRA]) and biochemical tests (API tests 20E and 50 CHB), all the 10 isolates proved to be facultative anaerobic, Gram-positive moderate thermohalophiles of the genus Bacillus (B. thermoglucosidasius, B. thermodenitrificans, B. thermoleovorans, B. stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis), exhibiting surface-active behaviors. Conclusions: General patterns include decreasing the thermotolerance with increasing the salt concentrations and also more halotolerance in the aerobic environment compared with anaerobic conditions. The results demonstrated that Iranian petroleum reservoirs enjoy a source of indigenous extremophilic microorganisms with potential applications in microbial enhanced oil recovery and commercial enzyme production. PMID:25485045

Zargari, Saeed; Ramezani, Amin; Ostvar, Sassan; Rezaei, Rasool; Niazi, Ali; Ayatollahi, Shahab

2014-01-01

107

In Vitro Activities of the Lipopeptides Palmitoyl (Pal)-Lys-Lys-NH2 and Pal-Lys-Lys Alone and in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Cocci?  

PubMed Central

The in vitro activities of the lipopeptides palmitoyl (Pal)-Lys-Lys-NH2 and Pal-Lys-Lys against gram-positive cocci were investigated. Enterococci and streptococci demonstrated higher susceptibilities than staphylococci and Rhodococcus equi. A positive interaction was shown when the lipopeptides were combined with beta-lactams and vancomycin. These results suggest that lipopeptides are promising candidates for antimicrobial therapy for infections caused by gram-positive organisms. PMID:17060532

Kamysz, Wojciech; Silvestri, Carmela; Cirioni, Oscar; Giacometti, Andrea; Licci, Alberto; Della Vittoria, Agnese; Okroj, Marcin; Scalise, Giorgio

2007-01-01

108

Vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria isolated from human sources.  

PubMed Central

Recent reports of infections with vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria prompted us to study vancomycin-resistant isolates from human sources to characterize the types of bacteria displaying this phenotype. Thirty-six vancomycin-resistant gram-positive isolates, 14 from clinical specimens and 22 from stool samples, were identified. These isolates were tentatively identified as Lactobacillus spp. (25 strains), Leuconostoc spp. (6 strains), and Pediococcus spp. (3 strains) on the basis of morphology and physiological tests. Two isolates of indeterminate morphology could not be unambiguously assigned to a genus. Four isolates of vancomycin-resistant lactobacilli from normally sterile body sites were considered to be clinically significant. Vancomycin-resistant gram-positive bacteria may represent an emerging class of nosocomial pathogens. Better methods for distinguishing the various genera in the clinical microbiology laboratory are needed. PMID:3182995

Ruoff, K L; Kuritzkes, D R; Wolfson, J S; Ferraro, M J

1988-01-01

109

Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO2-NH2-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO2-NH2-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

Guo, Yanyan; Rogelj, Snezna; Zhang, Peng

2010-02-01

110

Stabilizing isopeptide bonds revealed in gram-positive bacterial pilus structure.  

PubMed

Many bacterial pathogens have long, slender pili through which they adhere to host cells. The crystal structure of the major pilin subunit from the Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes at 2.2 angstroms resolution reveals an extended structure comprising two all-beta domains. The molecules associate in columns through the crystal, with each carboxyl terminus adjacent to a conserved lysine of the next molecule. This lysine forms the isopeptide bonds that link the subunits in native pili, validating the relevance of the crystal assembly. Each subunit contains two lysine-asparagine isopeptide bonds generated by an intramolecular reaction, and we find evidence for similar isopeptide bonds in other cell surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria. The present structure explains the strength and stability of such Gram-positive pili and could facilitate vaccine development. PMID:18063798

Kang, Hae Joo; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Clow, Fiona; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N

2007-12-01

111

Protection from Lethal Gram-Positive Infection by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor–Dependent Phagocytosis  

PubMed Central

Infections with gram-positive bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Opsonin-dependent phagocytosis plays a major role in protection against and recovery from gram-positive infections. Inborn and acquired defects in opsonin generation and/or recognition by phagocytes are associated with an increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. In contrast, the physiological significance of opsonin-independent phagocytosis is unknown. Type I and II class A scavenger receptors (SR-AI/II) recognize a variety of polyanions including bacterial cell wall products such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), suggesting a role for SR-AI/II in innate immunity to bacterial infections. Here, we show that SR-AI/II–deficient mice (MSR-A?/?) are more susceptible to intraperitoneal infection with a prototypic gram-positive pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, than MSR-A+/+ control mice. MSR-A?/? mice display an impaired ability to clear bacteria from the site of infection despite normal killing of S. aureus by neutrophils and die as a result of disseminated infection. Opsonin-independent phagocytosis of gram-positive bacteria by MSR-A?/? macrophages is significantly decreased although their phagocytic machinery is intact. Peritoneal macrophages from control mice phagocytose a variety of gram-positive bacteria in an SR-AI/II–dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that SR-AI/II mediate opsonin-independent phagocytosis of gram-positive bacteria, and provide the first evidence that opsonin-independent phagocytosis plays a critical role in host defense against bacterial infections in vivo. PMID:10620613

Thomas, Christian A.; Li, Yongmei; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Silverstein, Samuel C.; El Khoury, Joseph

2000-01-01

112

Pili in Gram-positive bacteria: assembly, involvement in colonization and biofilm development  

PubMed Central

Various cell-surface multisubunit protein polymers, known as pili or fimbriae, have a pivotal role in the colonization of specific host tissues by many pathogenic bacteria. In contrast to Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria assemble pili by a distinct mechanism involving a transpeptidase called sortase. Sortase crosslinks individual pilin monomers and ultimately joins the resulting covalent polymer to the cell-wall peptidoglycan. Here we review current knowledge of this mechanism and the roles of Gram-positive pili in the colonization of specific host tissues, modulation of host immune responses and the development of bacterial biofilms. PMID:18083568

Mandlik, Anjali; Swierczynski, Arlene; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

2010-01-01

113

Comparative genome?wide analysis of small RNAs of major Gram?positive pathogens: from identification to application  

PubMed Central

Summary In the recent years, the number of drug? and multi?drug?resistant microbial strains has increased rapidly. Therefore, the need to identify innovative approaches for development of novel anti?infectives and new therapeutic targets is of high priority in global health care. The detection of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria has attracted considerable attention as an emerging class of new gene expression regulators. Several experimental technologies to predict sRNA have been established for the Gram?negative model organism Escherichia coli. In many respects, sRNA screens in this model system have set a blueprint for the global and functional identification of sRNAs for Gram?positive microbes, but the functional role of sRNAs in colonization and pathogenicity for Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis and Clostridium difficile is almost completely unknown. Here, we report the current knowledge about the sRNAs of these socioeconomically relevant Gram?positive pathogens, overview the state?of?the?art high?throughput sRNA screening methods and summarize bioinformatics approaches for genome?wide sRNA identification and target prediction. Finally, we discuss the use of modified peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) as a novel tool to inactivate potential sRNA and their applications in rapid and specific detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21255362

Mraheil, Mobarak A.; Billion, André; Kuenne, Carsten; Pischimarov, Jordan; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Engelmann, Susanne; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean?Christophe; Rupnik, Maja; Vorwerk, Sonja; Beier, Markus; Retey, Julia; Hartsch, Thomas; Jacob, Anette; Cemi?, Franz; Hemberger, Jürgen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Hain, Torsten

2010-01-01

114

In vitro conjugal transfer of tetracycline resistance from Lactobacillus isolates to other Gram-positive bacteria  

E-print Network

were able to transfer in vitro this resistance to Enterococcus faecalis at frequencies ranging from to transfer the tet(M) gene to other Gram-positive bacteria, including Enterococcus faecalis, Lactococcus strains were used: (i) E. faecalis JH2-2 [14] was grown in brain heart infusion 0378-1097 / 03 / $22.00 Ã?

Gent, Universiteit

115

Development of a five-hour radiometric serum antibacterial assay for gram-positive cocci  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary report on a 5-hr radiometric serum antibacterial assay (ABA) for Gram-positive cocci is presented. The method agreed within +- one twofold dilution with static ABA endpoints in 24/26 (92%) of the assays and with cidal ABA end-points in 23/26 (88%) of the assays performed.

Beckwith, D.G.; Guidon, P.T. Jr.

1981-03-01

116

BACTERIOCINS OF GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIA AND THEIR APPLICATION IN BIOTECHNOLOGY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Many Gram-positive bacteria produce small peptides (bacteriocins) that have antimicrobial activity. Some bacteriocins have a broad spectrum, but many are highly selective and can only inhibit closely related species or strains. Bacteriocin specificity is not well understood, but specific receptors...

117

Construction and evaluation of multisite recombinatorial (Gateway) cloning vectors for Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Background The Gateway recombinatorial cloning system allows easy and rapid joining of DNA fragments. Here we report the construction and evaluation of three different Gram-positive vectors that can be used with the Multisite Gateway cloning system to rapidly produce new gene arrangements in plasmid constructs for use in a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. Results Comparison of patterns of reporter gene expression with conventionally constructed clones show that the presence of residual recombination (att) sites does not have an effect on patterns of gene expression, although overall levels of gene expression may vary. Rapid construction of these new vectors allowed vector/gene combinations to be optimized following evaluation of plasmid constructs in different bacterial cells and demonstrates the benefits of plasmid construction using Gateway cloning. Conclusion The residual att sites present after Gateway cloning did not affect patterns of promoter induction in Gram-positive bacteria and there was no evidence of differences in mRNA stability of transcripts. However overall levels of gene expression may be reduced, possibly due to some post-transcriptional event. The new vectors described here allow faster, more efficient cloning in range of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:17880697

Perehinec, Tania M; Qazi, Saara NA; Gaddipati, Sanyasi R; Salisbury, Vyvyan; Rees, Catherine ED; Hill, Philip J

2007-01-01

118

Transformations of the gram-positive honey bee pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae, by electroporation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In this study we developed an electrotransformation method for use with the Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae—a deadly pathogen of honey bees. The method is substantially different from the only other electroporation method for a Paenibacillus species found in the literature. Using the ty...

119

Novel Cassette-Based Shuttle Vector System for Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virulent bacterial strains have developed complex metabolic and regulatory pathways to enable them to thrive in the in vivo environment during infection. Understanding how the regula- tory networks operate requires manipulation of many genes and expressing them temporally and spatially at different levels or under separate regulatory controls. In the case of gram- positive bacteria including staphylococci, the introduction of

Emmanuelle Charpentier; Ana I. Anton; Peter Barry; Berenice Alfonso; Yuan Fang; Richard P. Novick

2004-01-01

120

Microarray-Based Detection of 90 Antibiotic Resistance Genes of Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

A disposable microarray was developed for detection of up to 90 antibiotic resistance genes in gram-positive bacteria by hybridization. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by two specific oligonucleotides chosen from consensus sequences of gene families, except for nine genes for which only one specific oligonucleotide could be developed. A total of 137 oligonucleotides (26 to 33 nucleotides in length

Vincent Perreten; Lorianne Vorlet-Fawer; Peter Slickers; Ralf Ehricht; Peter Kuhnert; Joachim Frey

2005-01-01

121

Antibiotic utilization improvement with the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture assay.  

PubMed

New technologies offer rapid identification of organisms and antimicrobial resistance markers in blood cultures several hours faster than conventional methods. We sought to determine whether implementation of the Verigene® Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) assay paired with a well-defined results reporting algorithm would lead to earlier deescalation of empiric therapy for inpatients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia. The algorithm design focused on lessening the demand for pharmacist time by using electronic communications where possible. Our study compared inpatients with MSSA and VRE bacteremia from the time period before (pre-BC-GP) and after (post-BC-GP) implementation of the assay on June 25, 2013. The time from blood draw to identification and susceptibility results was decreased by 36.4 hours (P < 0.001) in the post-BC-GP group. The mean time from collection to the first dose of optimal antibiotics was reduced in the post-BC-GP group by 18.9 hours (P = 0.004) overall, with a 20.6-hour reduction (P = 0.009) for patients with MSSA and a 20.7-hour reduction (P = 0.077) for patients with VRE. Additionally, the percent of patients on empiric therapy who were placed on optimal antibiotics at any time after the Gram stain result was available increased from 64% (45/70) pre-BC-GP to 80% (43/54) post-BC-GP. The BC-GP led to an increased rate of deescalation of empiric antibiotics and a reduction in the time to optimal antibiotics for patients with MSSA and VRE bacteremia. PMID:25829639

Beal, Stacy G; Thomas, Cody; Dhiman, Neelam; Nguyen, Daniel; Qin, Huanying; Hawkins, Jennifer M; Dekmezian, Mhair; Benavides, Raul

2015-04-01

122

Antibiotic utilization improvement with the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture assay  

PubMed Central

New technologies offer rapid identification of organisms and antimicrobial resistance markers in blood cultures several hours faster than conventional methods. We sought to determine whether implementation of the Verigene® Gram-Positive Blood Culture (BC-GP) assay paired with a well-defined results reporting algorithm would lead to earlier deescalation of empiric therapy for inpatients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteremia. The algorithm design focused on lessening the demand for pharmacist time by using electronic communications where possible. Our study compared inpatients with MSSA and VRE bacteremia from the time period before (pre-BC-GP) and after (post-BC-GP) implementation of the assay on June 25, 2013. The time from blood draw to identification and susceptibility results was decreased by 36.4 hours (P < 0.001) in the post-BC-GP group. The mean time from collection to the first dose of optimal antibiotics was reduced in the post-BC-GP group by 18.9 hours (P = 0.004) overall, with a 20.6-hour reduction (P = 0.009) for patients with MSSA and a 20.7-hour reduction (P = 0.077) for patients with VRE. Additionally, the percent of patients on empiric therapy who were placed on optimal antibiotics at any time after the Gram stain result was available increased from 64% (45/70) pre-BC-GP to 80% (43/54) post-BC-GP. The BC-GP led to an increased rate of deescalation of empiric antibiotics and a reduction in the time to optimal antibiotics for patients with MSSA and VRE bacteremia. PMID:25829639

Beal, Stacy G.; Thomas, Cody; Dhiman, Neelam; Nguyen, Daniel; Qin, Huanying; Hawkins, Jennifer M.; Dekmezian, Mhair

2015-01-01

123

Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-Positive Nickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminated with high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerant microorganisms. Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positive heterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. These isolates were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomyces galbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatospora cystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional gene microarray containing gene probes for functions associated with biogeochemical cycling, metal homeostasis, and organic contaminant degradation showed little overlap among the four isolates. Fifteen of the genes were detected in all four isolates with only two of these related to metal resistance, specifically to tellurium. Each of the four isolates also displayed resistance to at least one of six antibiotics tested, with resistance to kanamycin, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin observed in at least two of the isolates. Further characterization of S. aureofaciens NR-3 and K. cystarginea NR-4 demonstrated that both isolates expressed Ni tolerance constitutively. In addition, both were able to grow in higher concentrations of Ni at pH 6 as compared with pH 7 (42.6 and 8.5 mM Ni at pH 6 and 7, respectively). Tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn was also examined in these two isolates; a similar pH-dependent metal tolerance was observed when grown with Co and Zn. Neither isolate was tolerant to Cd. These findings suggest that Ni is exerting a selection pressure at this site for metal-resistant actinomycetes.

Van Nostrand, J. D.; Khijniak, T. V.; Gentry, T. J.; Novak, M. T.; Sowder, A. G.; Zhou, J. Z.; Bertsch, P. M.; Morris, P. J.

2007-01-01

124

Alternating electric fields combined with activated carbon for disinfection of Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria in fluidized bed electrode system.  

PubMed

Strong electric fields for disinfection of wastewaters have been employed already for several decades. An innovative approach combining low strength (7 V/cm) alternating electric fields with a granular activated carbon fluidized bed electrode (FBE) for disinfection was presented recently. For disinfection performance of FBE several pure microbial cultures were tested: Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis as representatives from Gram positive bacteria and Erwinia carotovora, Pseudomonas luteola, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli YMc10 as representatives from Gram negative bacteria. The alternating electric field amplitude and shape were kept constant. Only the effect of alternating electric field frequency on disinfection performance was investigated. From the bacteria tested, the Gram negative strains were more susceptible and the Gram positive microorganisms were more resistant to FBE disinfection. The collected data indicate that the efficiency of disinfection is frequency and strain dependent. During 6 h of disinfection, the decrease above 2 Log units was achieved with P. luteola and E. coli at 10 kHz and at dual frequency shift keying (FSK) modulated signal with frequencies of 10 kHz and 140 kHz. FBE technology appears to offer a new way for selective bacterial disinfection, however further optimizations are needed on treatment duration, and energy input, to improve effectiveness. PMID:24012021

Racyte, Justina; Bernard, Séverine; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Yntema, Doekle R; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

2013-10-15

125

Lifesaving liver transplantation for multi-organ failure caused by Bacillus cereus food poisoning.  

PubMed

Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium that causes food poisoning presenting with either emesis or diarrhea. Diarrhea is caused by proteinaceous enterotoxin complexes, mainly hemolysin BL, non-hemolytic enterotoxin (NHE), and cytotoxin K. In contrast, emesis is caused by the ingestion of the depsipeptide toxin cereulide, which is produced in B. cereus contaminated food, particularly in pasta or rice. In general, the illness is mild and self-limiting. However, due to cereulide intoxication, nine severe cases with rhabdomyolysis and/or liver failure, five of them lethal, are reported in literature. Here we report the first case of life-threatening liver failure and severe rhabdomyolysis in this context that could not be survived without emergency hepatectomy and consecutive liver transplantation. PMID:25323120

Tschiedel, Eva; Rath, Peter-Michael; Steinmann, Jörg; Becker, Heinz; Dietrich, Rudolf; Paul, Andreas; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Dohna-Schwake, Christian

2015-02-01

126

Genomic and Enzymatic Results Show Bacillus cellulosilyticus Uses a Novel Set of LPXTA Carbohydrases to Hydrolyze Polysaccharides  

PubMed Central

Background Alkaliphilic Bacillus species are intrinsically interesting due to the bioenergetic problems posed by growth at high pH and high salt. Three alkaline cellulases have been cloned, sequenced and expressed from Bacillus cellulosilyticus N-4 (Bcell) making it an excellent target for genomic sequencing and mining of biomass-degrading enzymes. Methodology/Principal Findings The genome of Bcell is a single chromosome of 4.7 Mb with no plasmids present and three large phage insertions. The most unusual feature of the genome is the presence of 23 LPXTA membrane anchor proteins; 17 of these are annotated as involved in polysaccharide degradation. These two values are significantly higher than seen in any other Bacillus species. This high number of membrane anchor proteins is seen only in pathogenic Gram-positive organisms such as Listeria monocytogenes or Staphylococcus aureus. Bcell also possesses four sortase D subfamily 4 enzymes that incorporate LPXTA-bearing proteins into the cell wall; three of these are closely related to each other and unique to Bcell. Cell fractionation and enzymatic assay of Bcell cultures show that the majority of polysaccharide degradation is associated with the cell wall LPXTA-enzymes, an unusual feature in Gram-positive aerobes. Genomic analysis and growth studies both strongly argue against Bcell being a truly cellulolytic organism, in spite of its name. Preliminary results suggest that fungal mycelia may be the natural substrate for this organism. Conclusions/Significance Bacillus cellulosilyticus N-4, in spite of its name, does not possess any of the genes necessary for crystalline cellulose degradation, demonstrating the risk of classifying microorganisms without the benefit of genomic analysis. Bcell is the first Gram-positive aerobic organism shown to use predominantly cell-bound, non-cellulosomal enzymes for polysaccharide degradation. The LPXTA-sortase system utilized by Bcell may have applications both in anchoring cellulases and other biomass-degrading enzymes to Bcell itself and in anchoring proteins other Gram-positive organisms. PMID:23593409

Mead, David; Drinkwater, Colleen; Brumm, Phillip J.

2013-01-01

127

Evaluation of gemifloxacin (SB265805, LB20304a): in vitro activity against over 6000 Gram-positive pathogens from diverse geographic areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gemifloxacin (GEMI), formerly SB-265805 and LB20304, is a newer fluoroquinolone with broad-spectrum activity against a wide variety of bacterial pathogens. The present investigation extended earlier observations by sampling an additional 6790 Gram-positive organisms from more than 50 medical centres on three continents. The reference broth microdilution method with recommended medium supplements was used throughout. Selected results (number strains tested; MIC90

Ronald N Jones; Michael A Pfaller; Meredith E Erwin

2000-01-01

128

Ubiquitous detection of gram-positive bacteria with bioorthogonal magnetofluorescent nanoparticles.  

PubMed

The ability to rapidly diagnose gram-positive pathogenic bacteria would have far reaching biomedical and technological applications. Here we describe the bioorthogonal modification of small molecule antibiotics (vancomycin and daptomycin), which bind to the cell wall of gram-positive bacteria. The bound antibiotics conjugates can be reacted orthogonally with tetrazine-modified nanoparticles, via an almost instantaneous cycloaddition, which subsequently renders the bacteria detectable by optical or magnetic sensing. We show that this approach is specific, selective, fast and biocompatible. Furthermore, it can be adapted to the detection of intracellular pathogens. Importantly, this strategy enables detection of entire classes of bacteria, a feat that is difficult to achieve using current antibody approaches. Compared to covalent nanoparticle conjugates, our bioorthogonal method demonstrated 1-2 orders of magnitude greater sensitivity. This bioorthogonal labeling method could ultimately be applied to a variety of other small molecules with specificity for infectious pathogens, enabling their detection and diagnosis. PMID:21967150

Chung, Hyun Jung; Reiner, Thomas; Budin, Ghyslain; Min, Changwook; Liong, Monty; Issadore, David; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

2011-11-22

129

Lipoteichoic Acids, Phosphate-Containing Polymers in the Envelope of Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) are polymers of alternating units of a polyhydroxy alkane, including glycerol and ribitol, and phosphoric acid, joined to form phosphodiester units that are found in the envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Here we review four different types of LTA that can be distinguished on the basis of their chemical structure and describe recent advances in the biosynthesis pathway for type I LTA, d-alanylated polyglycerol-phosphate linked to di-glucosyl-diacylglycerol. The physiological functions of type I LTA are discussed in the context of inhibitors that block their synthesis and of mutants with discrete synthesis defects. Research on LTA structure and function represents a large frontier that has been investigated in only few Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24415723

Schneewind, Olaf

2014-01-01

130

Natural occurrence of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus in eukaryotic organisms: a case for symbiosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus, two members of the Bacillus cereussensu lato group, are most noted for their virulence in, respectively, arthropods and mammals including humans. Because of their pathogenicity to insects in particular, and their narrow host range, strains of B. thuringiensis have been utilised successfully as biocontrol agents of insect pests. Whereas B. cereus is not an established

Izabela Swiecicka

2008-01-01

131

Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Pathogens: Using Crystallography to Uncover Novel Features in Drug and Vaccine Candidates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proteins displayed on the cell surfaces of pathogenic organisms are the front-line troops of bacterial attack, playing critical roles in colonization, infection and virulence. Although such proteins can often be recognized from genome sequence data, through characteristic sequence motifs, their functions are often unknown. One such group of surface proteins is attached to the cell surface of Gram-positive pathogens through the action of sortase enzymes. Some of these proteins are now known to form pili: long filamentous structures that mediate attachment to human cells. Crystallographic analyses of these and other cell surface proteins have uncovered novel features in their structure, assembly and stability, including the presence of inter- and intramolecular isopeptide crosslinks. This improved understanding of structures on the bacterial cell surface offers opportunities for the development of some new drug targets and for novel approaches to vaccine design.

Baker, Edward N.; Proft, Thomas; Kang, Haejoo

132

Chapter 7 Culture media for non-sporulating Gram-positive food spoilage bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spoilage association especially of protein-rich foods can be dominated by Gram-positive bacteria, notably lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which affect vacuum packaged refrigerated processed meats and some dairy products.New food ecosystems are being created by novel packaging and processing technologies, resulting in spoilage associations differing from those previously reported. In addition, improvement in identifica-tion methods, allow the detection and isolation

W. H. Holzapfel

1995-01-01

133

Drosophila Toll is activated by Gram-positive bacteria through a circulating peptidoglycan recognition protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial infection activates two distinct intracellular signalling cascades in the immune-responsive fat body of Drosophila. Gram-positive bacteria and fungi predominantly induce the Toll signalling pathway, whereas Gram-negative bacteria activate the Imd pathway. Loss-of-function mutants in either pathway reduce the resistance to corresponding infections. Genetic screens have identified a range of genes involved in these intracellular signalling cascades, but how they

Tatiana Michel; Jean-Marc Reichhart; Jules A. Hoffmann; Julien Royet

2001-01-01

134

Procalcitonin Levels in Gram-Positive, Gram-Negative, and Fungal Bloodstream Infections  

PubMed Central

Procalcitonin (PCT) can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8?ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 3.4–44.1) bacteremias was significantly higher than in Gram-positive (2.1?ng/mL, IQR 0.6–7.6) or fungal (0.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.4–1) infections (P < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) for PCT of 0.765 (95% CI 0.725–0.805, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from Gram-positives at the best cut-off value of 10.8?ng/mL and an AUC of 0.944 (95% CI 0.919–0.969, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from fungi at the best cut-off of 1.6?ng/mL. Additional results showed a significant difference in median PCT values between Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria (17.1?ng/mL, IQR 5.9–48.5 versus 3.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.8–21.5; P < 0.0001). This study suggests that PCT may be of value to distinguish Gram-negative from Gram-positive and fungal bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, its utility to predict different microorganisms needs to be assessed in further studies. PMID:25852221

Ferranti, Marta; Moretti, Amedeo; Al Dhahab, Zainab Salim; Cenci, Elio; Mencacci, Antonella

2015-01-01

135

Potency and Bactericidal Activity of Iclaprim against Recent Clinical Gram-Positive Isolates?  

PubMed Central

The in vitro activity of iclaprim, a novel diaminopyrimidine derivative, was evaluated against 5,937 recent gram-positive clinical isolates collected in the United States and Europe. Iclaprim demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]), beta-hemolytic Streptococcus spp., and Enterococcus faecalis strains tested. In addition, iclaprim exhibited bactericidal activity against all S. aureus strains tested, including MRSA. PMID:19289528

Sader, Helio S.; Fritsche, Thomas R.; Jones, Ronald N.

2009-01-01

136

Identification of Aerobic Gram-Positive Bacilli by Use of Vitek MS  

PubMed Central

The accuracy of Vitek MS mass spectrometric identifications was assessed for 206 clinically significant isolates of aerobic Gram-positive bacilli representing 20 genera and 38 species. The Vitek MS identifications were correct for 85% of the isolates (56.3% to the species level, 28.6% limited to the genus level), with misidentifications occurring for 7.3% of the isolates. PMID:24501030

Navas, Maria; Pincus, David H.; Wilkey, Kathy; Sercia, Linda; LaSalvia, Margaret; Wilson, Deborah; Procop, Gary W.

2014-01-01

137

Inactivation of Gram-positive biofilms by low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is devoted to the evaluation of the efficiency of a new low-temperature plasma jet driven in ambient air by a dc-corona discharge to inactivate adherent cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria. The selected microorganisms were lactic acid bacteria, a Weissella confusa strain which has the particularity to excrete a polysaccharide polymer (dextran) when sucrose is present. Both adherent

F Marchal; H Robert; N Merbahi; C Fontagné-Faucher; M Yousfi; C E Romain; O Eichwald; C Rondel; B Gabriel

2012-01-01

138

Investigating lipoprotein biogenesis and function in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolormmi_7261 943..957  

E-print Network

Investigating lipoprotein biogenesis and function in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces of the cyto- plasmic membrane. Here we identify lipoproteins in the model Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor using bioinformatics coupled with pro- teomic and downstream analysis. We report that Streptomyces

Palmer, Tracy

139

Future treatment options for Gram-positive infections--looking ahead.  

PubMed

Multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections remain a significant therapeutic problem, especially those due to Staphylococcus aureus. Antimicrobial choice is only one aspect of the management of these infections. New immunotherapies, exploitation of novel antibiotic targets, topical therapies and new drug delivery systems may have a future role in the management of S. aureus infection. At present, injectable antimicrobials are the main area of drug development and clinical interest. Since 1999, five anti-Gram-positive agents (moxifloxacin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline) have become available in the EU. At present, three other anti-Gram-positive agents are being considered by the European Medicines Agency (ceftobiprole, gemifloxacin and iclaprim), and a further four have completed phase III clinical trials (ceftaroline, dalbavancin, oritavancin and telavancin). The antibacterial spectra of these agents, their in vitro potencies, bactericidal activities and pharmacokinetics are well known. The safety profiles for those agents that have received regulatory approval and entered clinical practice are also firmly established. Most of the agents are pharmacodynamically promising and effective in clinical trials. As in the past, drug safety is likely to be a major determinant of which of the most recent drugs receive regulatory approval, and, in the long term, which agents will be successful in clinical practice. PMID:19917023

Barton, E; MacGowan, A

2009-12-01

140

Multiple Responses of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria to Mixture of Hydrocarbons  

PubMed Central

Most of our knowledge about pollutants and the way they are biodegraded in the environment has previously been shaped by laboratory studies using hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial strains isolated from polluted sites. In present study Gram-positive (Mycobacterium sp. IBBPo1, Oerskovia sp. IBBPo2, Corynebacterium sp. IBBPo3) and Gram-negative (Chryseomonas sp. IBBPo7, Pseudomonas sp. IBBPo10, Burkholderia sp. IBBPo12) bacteria, isolated from oily sludge, were found to be able to tolerate pure and mixture of saturated hydrocarbons, as well as pure and mixture of monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Isolated Gram-negative bacteria were more tolerant to mixture of saturated (n-hexane, n-hexadecane, cyclohexane), monoaromatic (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene) and polyaromatic (naphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, fluorene) hydrocarbons than Gram-positive bacteria. There were observed cellular and molecular modifications induced by mixture of saturated, monoaromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These modifications differ from one strain to another and even for the same bacterial strain, according to the nature of hydrophobic substrate. PMID:24031541

Marilena L?z?roaie, Mihaela

2010-01-01

141

Critical cell wall hole size for lysis in Gram-positive bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gram-positive bacteria transport molecules necessary for their survival through holes in their cell wall. The holes in cell walls need to be large enough to let critical nutrients pass through. However, the cell wall must also function to prevent the bacteria's membrane from protruding through a large hole into the environment and lysing the cell. As such, we hypothesize that there exists a range of cell wall hole sizes that allow for molecule transport but prevent membrane protrusion. Here we develop and analyze a biophysical theory of the response of a Gram-positive cell's membrane to the formation of a hole in the cell wall. We predict a critical hole size in the range 15-24nm beyond which lysis occurs. To test our theory, we measured hole sizes in Streptococcus pyogenes cells undergoing enzymatic lysis via transmission electron microscopy. The measured hole sizes are in strong agreement with our theoretical prediction. Together, the theory and experiments provide a means to quantify the mechanisms of death of Gram-positive cells via enzymatically mediated lysis and provides insight into the range of cell wall hole sizes compatible with bacterial homeostasis.

Mitchell, Gabriel; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Nelson, Daniel; Weitz, Joshua

2013-03-01

142

Modelling the influence of pH and organic acid types on thermal inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores.  

E-print Network

), Clostridium sporogenes (Cameron et al. 1980), Bacillus stearothermophilus (Lopez et al. 1996). It has been of these two acids and malic acid on D-values was observed for Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus1 Modelling the influence of pH and organic acid types on thermal inactivation of Bacillus cereus

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

143

DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

2012-01-01

144

Sequence characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA from eight gram positive procaryotes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Complete nucleotide sequences are presented for 5S rRNA from Bacillus subtilis, B. firmus, B. pasteurii, B. brevis, Lactobacillus brevis, and Streptococcus faecalis, and 5S rRNA oligonucleotide catalogs and partial sequence data are given for B. cereus and Sporosarcina ureae. These data demonstrate a striking consistency of 5S rRNA primary and secondary structure within a given bacterial grouping. An exception is B. brevis, in which the 5S rRNA sequence varies significantly from that of other bacilli in the tuned helix and the procaryotic loop. The localization of these variations suggests that B. brevis occupies an ecological niche that selects such changes. It is noted that this organism produces antibiotics which affect ribosome function.

Woese, C. R.; Luehrsen, K. R.; Pribula, C. D.; Fox, G. E.

1976-01-01

145

Fighting infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens.  

PubMed

Growing bacterial resistance in Gram-positive pathogens means that what were once effective and inexpensive treatments for infections caused by these bacteria are now being seriously questioned, including penicillin and macrolides for use against pneumococcal infections and-in hospitals-oxacillin for use against staphylococcal infections. As a whole, multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive pathogens are rapidly becoming an urgent and sometimes unmanageable clinical problem. Nevertheless, and despite decades of research into the effects of antibiotics, the actual risk posed to human health by antibiotic resistance has been poorly defined; the lack of reliable data concerning the outcomes resulting from antimicrobial resistance stems, in part, from problems with study designs and the methods used in resistence determination. Surprisingly little is known, too, about the actual effectiveness of the many types of intervention aimed at controlling antibiotic resistance. New antibiotics active against MDR Gram-positive pathogens have been recently introduced into clinical practice, and the antibiotic pipeline contains additional compounds at an advanced stage of development, including new glycopeptides, new anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) beta-lactams, and new diaminopyrimidines. Many novel antimicrobial agents are likely to be niche products, endowed with narrow antibacterial spectra and/or targeted at specific clinical problems. Therefore, an important educational goal will be to change the current, long-lasting attitudes of both physicians and customers towards broad-spectrum and multipurpose compounds. Scientific societies, such as the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), must play a leading role in this process. PMID:19335367

Cornaglia, G

2009-03-01

146

Problems associated with the direct viable count procedure applied to gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Despite the numerous advantages of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) for identifying a single bacterial cell with 16S rRNA probes, problems are encountered with starving bacteria in natural samples. The original direct viable count procedure (DVC) includes a revivification step in the presence of an antibiotic inhibiting cell division. Cells elongate and accumulate ribosomes. This results in a natural amplification of 16S rRNA molecules (target of FISH). However, it is limited to gram-negative bacteria which are sensitive to nalidixic acid. The objective of this study was to develop a procedure for estimating the number of metabolically active gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis cells by the use of a method which combines the number of substrate-responsive cells and their identification by FISH. It was observed that no single published DVC method could apply to taxonomically different gram-positive bacteria. Since cells were not counted, the revivification step in presence of nalidixic acid will be referred to as revivification without cell division. For each species, different low-nutrient media and complex media, different fluoroquinolones and beta-lactam antibiotics, concentrations of antibiotics, combinations of antibiotics, temperature and time were evaluated using bacteria in different physiological states and in natural samples. Enumeration of bacteria by plate counts and direct FISH were compared. The improved procedure should yield information about the physiological state, the taxonomic identity, and the enumeration of viable gram-positive bacteria. The application of DVC to an entire ecosystem is presently still a challenge. PMID:10791758

Regnault, B; Martin-Delautre, S; Grimont, P A

2000-04-10

147

B. subtilis GS67 protects C. elegans from Gram-positive pathogens via fengycin-mediated microbial antagonism.  

PubMed

Studies on Caenorhabditis elegans have provided detailed insight into host-pathogen interactions. Usually, the E. coli strain OP50 is used as food source for laboratory studies, but recent work has shown that a variety of bacteria have dramatic effects on C. elegans physiology, including immune responses. However, the mechanisms by which different bacteria impact worm resistance to pathogens are poorly understood. Although pathogen-specific immune priming is often discussed as a mechanism underlying such observations, interspecies microbial antagonism might represent an alternative mode of action. Here, we use several natural Bacillus strains to study their effects on nematode survival upon pathogen challenge. We show that B. subtilis GS67 persists in the C. elegans intestine and increases worm resistance to Gram-positive pathogens, suggesting that direct inhibition of pathogens might be the primary protective mechanism. Indeed, chemical and genetic analyses identified the lipopeptide fengycin as the major inhibitory molecule produced by B. subtilis GS67. Specifically, a fengycin-defective mutant of B. subtilis GS67 lost inhibitory activity against pathogens and was unable to protect C. elegans from infections. Furthermore, we found that purified fengycin cures infected worms in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that it acts as an antibiotic. Our results reveal a molecular mechanism for commensal-mediated C. elegans protection and highlight the importance of interspecies microbial antagonism for the outcome of animal-pathogen interactions. Furthermore, our work strengthens C. elegans as an in vivo model to reveal protective mechanisms of commensal bacteria, including those relevant to mammalian hosts. PMID:25448001

Iatsenko, Igor; Yim, Joshua J; Schroeder, Frank C; Sommer, Ralf J

2014-11-17

148

Identification and Characterization of a Novel-type Ferric Siderophore Reductase from a Gram-positive Extremophile*  

PubMed Central

Iron limitation is one major constraint of microbial life, and a plethora of microbes use siderophores for high affinity iron acquisition. Because specific enzymes for reductive iron release in Gram-positives are not known, we searched Firmicute genomes and found a novel association pattern of putative ferric siderophore reductases and uptake genes. The reductase from the schizokinen-producing alkaliphile Bacillus halodurans was found to cluster with a ferric citrate-hydroxamate uptake system and to catalyze iron release efficiently from Fe[III]-dicitrate, Fe[III]-schizokinen, Fe[III]-aerobactin, and ferrichrome. The gene was hence named fchR for ferric citrate and hydroxamate reductase. The tightly bound [2Fe-2S] cofactor of FchR was identified by UV-visible, EPR, CD spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Iron release kinetics were determined with several substrates by using ferredoxin as electron donor. Catalytic efficiencies were strongly enhanced in the presence of an iron-sulfur scaffold protein scavenging the released ferrous iron. Competitive inhibition of FchR was observed with Ga(III)-charged siderophores with Ki values in the micromolar range. The principal catalytic mechanism was found to couple increasing Km and KD values of substrate binding with increasing kcat values, resulting in high catalytic efficiencies over a wide redox range. Physiologically, a chromosomal fchR deletion led to strongly impaired growth during iron limitation even in the presence of ferric siderophores. Inductively coupled plasma-MS analysis of ?fchR revealed intracellular iron accumulation, indicating that the ferric substrates were not efficiently metabolized. We further show that FchR can be efficiently inhibited by redox-inert siderophore mimics in vivo, suggesting that substrate-specific ferric siderophore reductases may present future targets for microbial pathogen control. PMID:21051545

Miethke, Marcus; Pierik, Antonio J.; Peuckert, Florian; Seubert, Andreas; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

2011-01-01

149

Melanin: a photoprotection for Bacillus thuringiensis based biopesticides.  

PubMed

Melanins are negatively-charged, hydrophobic, dark high molecular weight irregular biopolymers, composed of polymerized phenolic and/or indolic compounds. They are produced by most organisms. Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, soil bacterium and the most successful biological control agent that produces distinctly shaped crystals during sporulation that have insecticidal activity. However, one of the main disadvantages is that the insecticidal activity of B. thuringiensis formulation is unstable and rapidly loses its activity under field conditions due to UV radiation. Melanin absorbs radiation; therefore photoprotection of B. thuringiensis based on melanin has been studied and is herewith reviewed. PMID:25381045

Sansinenea, Estibaliz; Ortiz, Aurelio

2015-03-01

150

Draft genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens HB-26  

PubMed Central

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens HB-26, a Gram-positive bacterium was isolated from soil in China. SDS-PAGE analysis showed this strain secreted six major protein bands of 65, 60, 55, 34, 25 and 20 kDa. A bioassay of this strain reveals that it shows specific activity against P. brassicae and nematode. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The 3,989,358 bp long genome (39 contigs) contains 4,001 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes. PMID:25197462

Liu, Xiao-Yan; Min, Yong; Wang, Kai-Mei; Wan, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Cao, Chun-Xia; Zhou, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Ai-Bing; Liu, Cui-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Yang; Cheng, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zi-Wen

2014-01-01

151

Draft genome sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens HB-26.  

PubMed

Bacillus amyloliquefaciens HB-26, a Gram-positive bacterium was isolated from soil in China. SDS-PAGE analysis showed this strain secreted six major protein bands of 65, 60, 55, 34, 25 and 20 kDa. A bioassay of this strain reveals that it shows specific activity against P. brassicae and nematode. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the draft genome sequence and annotation. The 3,989,358 bp long genome (39 contigs) contains 4,001 protein-coding genes and 80 RNA genes. PMID:25197462

Liu, Xiao-Yan; Min, Yong; Wang, Kai-Mei; Wan, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Cao, Chun-Xia; Zhou, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Ai-Bing; Liu, Cui-Jun; Zhang, Guang-Yang; Cheng, Xian-Liang; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zi-Wen

2014-06-15

152

NClassG+: A classifier for non-classically secreted Gram-positive bacterial proteins  

PubMed Central

Background Most predictive methods currently available for the identification of protein secretion mechanisms have focused on classically secreted proteins. In fact, only two methods have been reported for predicting non-classically secreted proteins of Gram-positive bacteria. This study describes the implementation of a sequence-based classifier, denoted as NClassG+, for identifying non-classically secreted Gram-positive bacterial proteins. Results Several feature-based classifiers were trained using different sequence transformation vectors (frequencies, dipeptides, physicochemical factors and PSSM) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with Linear, Polynomial and Gaussian kernel functions. Nested k-fold cross-validation (CV) was applied to select the best models, using the inner CV loop to tune the model parameters and the outer CV group to compute the error. The parameters and Kernel functions and the combinations between all possible feature vectors were optimized using grid search. Conclusions The final model was tested against an independent set not previously seen by the model, obtaining better predictive performance compared to SecretomeP V2.0 and SecretPV2.0 for the identification of non-classically secreted proteins. NClassG+ is freely available on the web at http://www.biolisi.unal.edu.co/web-servers/nclassgpositive/ PMID:21235786

2011-01-01

153

Agreement Between Deoxyribonucleic Acid Base Composition and Taxometric Classification of Gram-Positive Cocci1  

PubMed Central

Silvestri, L. G. (Università Statale, Milan, Italy), and L. R. Hill. Agreement between deoxyribonucleic acid base composition and taxometric classification of gram-positive cocci. J. Bacteriol. 90:136–140. 1965.—It had been previously proposed, from taxometric analyses, that gram-positive, catalase-positive cocci be divided into two subgroups. Thirteen strains, representative of both subgroups, were examined for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base composition, determined from melting temperatures. Per cent GC (guanine + cytosine/total bases) values fell into two groups: 30.8 to 36.5% GC and 69 to 75% GC. Strains with low per cent GC values belonged to the Staphylococcus aureus–S. saprophyticus–S. lactis taxometric subgroups, and those with high per cent GC values belonged to the S. roseus–S. afermentans subgroup. The hypothetical nature of any classification is emphasized, and, in the present work, the hypothesis derived from taxometric analyses of division into two subgroups is confirmed by the study of DNA base ratios. The two subgroups correspond, respectively, to the genera Staphylococcus and Micrococcus. PMID:16562008

Silvestri, L. G.; Hill, L. R.

1965-01-01

154

Identification of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by fluorescence studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several type strains of bacteria including Vibrio fischeri, Azotobacter vinelandii, Enterobacter cloacae, and Corynebacterium xerosis, were cultured in the laboratory following standard diagnostic protocol based on their individual metabolic strategies. The bacterial cultures were not further treated and they were studied in their pristine state (pure culture - axenic). The fluorescent studies were applied using a continuous wave and a pulsed excitation light sources. Emission and excitation spectra were recorded for the continuous wave excitation and they all show similar spectral features with the exception of the gram positive bacteria showing vibronic structures. The vibrational modes involved in these vibronic bands have energy typical for carbon-carbon vibrations. The fluorescence is quenched in addition of water, even a very thin layer, which confirms that the observed spectral features originate from the outer parts of the bacteria. These results allow to conclude that the fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a method for studying the membranes of the bacteria and eventually to discriminate between gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The pulsed experiments show that the fluorescence lifetime is in the sub-microsecond range. The results indicate that the observed spectra are superposition of the emission with different lifetimes.

Demchak, Jonathan; Calabrese, Joseph; Tzolov, Marian

2011-03-01

155

Gram-Positive Nickel Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Riparian Sediments Contaminated with Ni and U on the Savannah River Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The natural attenuation of pollutants in riparian and wetland systems is driven in large part by the services provided by the diverse microbial communities that thrive in these nutritionally and chemically complex environments. For co-contaminated systems, the presence of heavy metals at excessive levels may alter the structure and function of microbial communities that are essential for the immobilization of inorganics and degradation of organic contaminants. We examined riparian sediments heavily contaminated with U and Ni (1000's of mg/kg) from a small stream on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site that received metallurgical process effluents wastewater over a thirty-year period associated with the production of nuclear materials. Four gram positive bacteria were isolated that displayed marked resistance (5000 mg/kg) to Ni relative to organisms from uncontaminated control locations: Arthrobacter oxydans, Streptomyces galbus, Streptomyces aureofaciens, and Kitasatospora cystarginea. The metal resistance of S. aureofaciens and K. cystarginea was further characterized in growth experiments for resistance to other metals. Ongoing geochemical characterization of U and Ni in terms of solid phase partitioning and aqueous phase speciation and solubility indicate that Ni is more chemically labile and, by extension, bioavailable than U in these aged-contaminated sediments. Accordingly, the isolation of Ni resistant organisms is consistent with greater selective pressure from Ni as a result of its greater bioavailability. These results are placed in context of environmental management and remediation of co-contaminated, biogeochemically complex environments.

Sowder, A. G.; Khijniak, T. V.; van Nostrand, J.; Bertsch, P. M.; Morris, P. J.

2002-12-01

156

Bacillus subtilis chromosome organization oscillates between two distinct patterns.  

PubMed

Bacterial chromosomes have been found to possess one of two distinct patterns of spatial organization. In the first, called "ori-ter" and exemplified by Caulobacter crescentus, the chromosome arms lie side-by-side, with the replication origin and terminus at opposite cell poles. In the second, observed in slow-growing Escherichia coli ("left-ori-right"), the two chromosome arms reside in separate cell halves, on either side of a centrally located origin. These two patterns, rotated 90° relative to each other, appear to result from different segregation mechanisms. Here, we show that the Bacillus subtilis chromosome alternates between them. For most of the cell cycle, newly replicated origins are maintained at opposite poles with chromosome arms adjacent to each other, in an ori-ter configuration. Shortly after replication initiation, the duplicated origins move as a unit to midcell and the two unreplicated arms resolve into opposite cell halves, generating a left-ori-right pattern. The origins are then actively segregated toward opposite poles, resetting the cycle. Our data suggest that the condensin complex and the parABS partitioning system are the principal driving forces underlying this oscillatory cycle. We propose that the distinct organization patterns observed for bacterial chromosomes reflect a common organization-segregation mechanism, and that simple modifications to it underlie the unique patterns observed in different species. PMID:25071173

Wang, Xindan; Montero Llopis, Paula; Rudner, David Z

2014-09-01

157

[Retrospective analysis of the Gram-positive bacteria-infected cases in the Department of Hematology].  

PubMed

This study was purposed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linezolid, vancomycin and teicoplanin for the treatment of patients infected by Gram-positive bacteria in the Department of Hematology by retrospective analysis. The patients with fever in our department from January to December in 2011 were selected for blood culture with Gram-positive bacteria and treated with linezolid, vancomycin or teicoplanin alone.Various parameters were recorded before and after treatment, such as fever time, respiratory symptoms, physical signs, radiographic changes, blood and biochemical routine, and adverse reactions. The efficacy and safety of linezolid, vancomycin and teicoplanin were compared according to the fever abating time, bacterial clearance rate, clinical efficiencies and adverse events. The patients were divided into linezolid group (15 patients), vancomycin group (17 patients) and teicoplanin group (20 patients). The results showed that the mean time of fever abating in linezolid group was (4.43 ± 3.15)d, bacterial clearance rate and clinical efficiency in linezolid group were 55.56% and 86.67%, respectively. The above three data in vancomycin group were (6.83 ± 4.67)d, 54.54% and 76.47% respectively, and were (5.57 ± 4.16)d, 41.67% and 80.00% in teicoplanin group respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between three groups (P > 0.05). There were one case of diarrhea and two cases of thrombocytopenia in the linezolid group, and one case of nausea and two cases of creatinine increase in the vancomycin group. There were three cases of thrombocytopenia in the teicoplanin group. The thrombocytopenia in five cases and the hemogram drop in patients with leukemia after treatment were overlapped, their drug treatment did not stop, but their thrombocytopoiesis recovered to normal-level, thus the drug treatment were considered as no relation with thrombocytopenia. It is concluded that the treatment efficacy between linezolid, vancomycin and teicoplanin for Gram-positive bacterial infections is not statistically different, but linezolid maybe have advantage over vancomycin and teicoplanin in fever abating time, bacterial clearance rate and clinical efficiency. PMID:24156452

Jing, Yu; Bo, Jian; Zhao, Yu; Li, Hong-Hua; Wang, Shu-Hong; Huang, Wen-Rong; Wang, Quan-Shun

2013-10-01

158

Sonodynamic Excitation of Rose Bengal for Eradication of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy based on photosensitizers activated by illumination is limited by poor penetration of visible light through skin and tissues. In order to overcome this problem, Rose Bengal was excited in the dark by 28?kHz ultrasound and was applied for inactivation of bacteria. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the sonodynamic technique is effective for eradication of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. The net sonodynamic effect was calculated as a 3-4 log10 reduction in bacteria concentration, depending on the cell and the Rose Bengal concentration and the treatment time. Sonodynamic treatment may become a novel and effective form of antimicrobial therapy and can be used for low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments and surgical accessories. PMID:23509759

Nakonechny, Faina; Nisnevitch, Michael; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Nisnevitch, Marina

2013-01-01

159

Sonodynamic excitation of Rose Bengal for eradication of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.  

PubMed

Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy based on photosensitizers activated by illumination is limited by poor penetration of visible light through skin and tissues. In order to overcome this problem, Rose Bengal was excited in the dark by 28?kHz ultrasound and was applied for inactivation of bacteria. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the sonodynamic technique is effective for eradication of gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative Escherichia coli. The net sonodynamic effect was calculated as a 3-4 log10 reduction in bacteria concentration, depending on the cell and the Rose Bengal concentration and the treatment time. Sonodynamic treatment may become a novel and effective form of antimicrobial therapy and can be used for low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments and surgical accessories. PMID:23509759

Nakonechny, Faina; Nisnevitch, Michael; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Nisnevitch, Marina

2013-01-01

160

Antimicrobial susceptibility of gram-positive udder pathogens from bovine mastitis milk in Switzerland.  

PubMed

We evaluated the susceptibility of the gram-positive mastitis pathogens S. aureus, Str. uberis, Str. dysgalactiae, E. faecalis and L. garviae to antibiotics that are of epidemiological interest or are critically important for mastitis therapy and human medicine. Penicillin resistance was found to be most frequent in S. aureus, and nearly 5 % of the Str. uberis strains displayed a decreased susceptibility to this antibiotic. Resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides was also detected in the strains tested. The detection of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and of a ciprofloxacin-resistant Str. dysgalactiae isolate corroborated the emergence of mastitis pathogens resistant to critically important antibiotics and underscores the importance of susceptibility testing prior to antibiotic therapy. The monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns and antibiogram analyses are strongly recommended for targeted antimicrobial treatment and to avoid the unnecessary use of the latest generation of antibiotics. PMID:23732380

Overesch, G; Stephan, R; Perreten, V

2013-06-01

161

Bacteriophage endolysins: A novel anti-infective to control Gram-positive pathogens  

PubMed Central

Endolysins (or lysins) are highly evolved enzymes produced by bacteriophage (phage for short) to digest the bacterial cell wall for phage progeny release. In Gram-positive bacteria, small quantities of purified recombinant lysin added externally results in immediate lysis causing log-fold death of the target bacterium. Lysins have been used successfully in a variety of animal models to control pathogenic antibiotic-resistant bacteria found on mucosal surfaces and infected tissues. Their specificity for the pathogen without disturbing the normal flora, the low chance of bacterial resistance, and their ability to kill colonizing pathogens on mucosal surfaces, a capacity previously unavailable, make them ideal anti-infectives in an age of mounting resistance. Here we review the current literature showing the effectiveness of these enzymes in controlling a variety of infections. PMID:20452280

Fischetti, Vincent A.

2010-01-01

162

Comparative in vitro activity of ceftobiprole against Gram-positive cocci.  

PubMed

The activity of ceftobiprole and comparator agents was evaluated against a collection of 880 isolates, comprising 200 meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, 200 meticillin-resistant S. aureus, 180 coagulase-negative staphylococci blood isolates, 100 Streptococcuspneumoniae and 200 macrolide-resistant beta-haemolytic streptococci (100 Streptococcus pyogenes and 100 Streptococcus agalactiae). Ceftobiprole showed excellent activity against staphylococci (minimum inhibitory concentrations Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:20554163

Betriu, Carmen; Culebras, Esther; Gómez, María; López-Fabal, Fátima; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Picazo, Juan J

2010-08-01

163

Microcins from Enterobacteria: On the Edge Between Gram-Positive Bacteriocins and Colicins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most bacteria and archaea produce gene-encoded antimicrobial peptides/proteins called bacteriocins, which are secreted by the producing bacteria to compete against other microorganisms in a given niche. They are considered important mediators of intra- and interspecies interactions and therefore a factor in ­maintaining the microbial diversity and stability. They are ribosomally synthesized, and most of them are produced as inactive precursor proteins, which in some cases are further enzymatically modified. Bacteriocins generally exert potent antibacterial activities directed against bacterial species closely related to the producing bacteria. Bacteriocins are abundant and diverse in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. This chapter focuses on colicins and microcins from enterobacteria (mainly Escherichia coli) and on bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Microcins are the lower-molecular-mass bacteriocins produced by Gram-negative bacteria with a repertoire of only 14 representatives. They form a very restricted family of bacteriocins, compared to the huge family of LAB bacteriocins that is constituted of several hundreds of peptides, with which microcins share common characteristics. Nevertheless, microcins also show similarities, particularly in their uptake mechanisms, with the higher-molecular-mass colicins, also produced by E. coli strains. On the edge between LAB bacteriocins and colicins, microcins appear to combine highly efficient strategies developed by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria at different levels, including uptake, translocation, killing of target cells, and immunity of the producing bacteria, making them important actors of bacterial competitions and fascinating models for novel concepts toward antimicrobial strategies and against resistance mechanisms.

Rebuffat, Sylvie

164

Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria.  

PubMed

Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 ?g/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

Rossmann, Friederike S; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

2015-01-01

165

In vitro activity of mersacidin (M87-1551), an investigational peptide antibiotic tested against gram-positive bloodstream isolates.  

PubMed

We measured the in vitro activity of mersacidin (formerly M87-1551) against 183 clinical isolates (vancomycin susceptible) and 12 additional vancomycin-resistant strains of Gram-positive bacteria. The activity for mersacidin increased an average twofold (range, 1.7- to 7.6-fold) in a calcium-enriched medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)90 for mersacidin was 8-32 times higher than vancomycin for staphylococci, 4-64 times higher for enterococci, and up to 32 times higher for other organisms tested. The MIC90 for MDL 62873, a comparison compound, was less than or equal to 0.5 micrograms/ml for all species except Staphylococcus haemolyticus (MIC90, 4 micrograms/ml), and it was greater than or equal to 4-fold more active than vancomycin. Against selected vancomycin-resistant strains, mersacidin had MICs greater than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml for enterococci, 4-32 micrograms/ml for Pediococcus, and less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml for Leuconostoc species. Mersacidin may have some clinical utility in documented infections caused by staphylococci, nonenteric streptococci, Pediococcus, and Leuconostoc. PMID:1424522

Barrett, M S; Wenzel, R P; Jones, R N

1992-01-01

166

Efficacy of a teat dip containing the bacteriocin lacticin 3147 to eliminate Gram-positive pathogens associated with bovine mastitis.  

PubMed

On most dairy farms teat dips are applied to the teats of cows either before or after milking in order to prevent pathogens from gaining access to the mammary gland via the teat canal. In the present experiments, a natural teat dip was developed using a fermentate containing the live bacterium Lactococcus lactis DPC 3251. This bacterium produces lacticin 3147, a two-component lantibiotic which was previously shown to effectively kill Gram-positive mastitis pathogens. Lacticin 3147 activity in the fermentate was retained at 53% of its original level following storage for 3 weeks at 4 degrees C. In the initial experiments in vitro, 105 colony-forming units/ml (cfu/ml) of either Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae or Streptococcus uberis were introduced into the lacticin-containing fermentate. Neither Staph. aureus nor Str. dysgalactiae could be detected after 30 min or 15 min, respectively, while Str. uberis was reduced approximately 100-fold after 15 min. Following these trials, preliminary experiments were performed in vivo on teats of lactating dairy cows. In these experiments, teats were coated with each of the challenge organisms and then dipped with the lacticin-containing fermented teat dip. Following a dip contact time of 10 min, staphylococci were reduced by 80% when compared with the undipped control teat. Streptococcal challenges were reduced by 97% for Str. dysgalactiae and by 90% for Str. uberis. These trials showed that the teat dip is able to reduce mastitis pathogens on the teats of lactating cows. PMID:19785910

Klostermann, Katja; Crispie, Fiona; Flynn, Jim; Meaney, William J; Paul Ross, R; Hill, Colin

2010-05-01

167

Biocompatible Fe3O4 increases the efficacy of amoxicillin delivery against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.  

PubMed

This paper reports the synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin- functionalized magnetite nanostructures (Fe3O4@AMO), revealing and discussing several biomedical applications of these nanomaterials. Our results proved that 10 nm Fe3O4@AMO nanoparticles does not alter the normal cell cycle progression of cultured diploid cells, and an in vivo murine model confirms that the nanostructures disperse through the host body and tend to localize in particular sites and organs. The nanoparticles were found clustered especially in the lungs, kidneys and spleen, next to the blood vessels at this level, while being totally absent in the brain and liver, suggesting that they are circulated through the blood flow and have low toxicity. Fe3O4@AMO has the ability to be easily circulated through the body and optimizations may be done so these nanostructures cluster to a specific target region. Functionalized magnetite nanostructures proved a great antimicrobial effect, being active against both the Gram positive pathogen S. aureus and the Gram negative pathogen E. coli. The fabricated nanostructures significantly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the active drug. This result has a great practical relevance, since the functionalized nanostructures may be used for decreasing the therapeutic doses which usually manifest great severe side effects, when administrated in high doses. Fe3O4@AMO represents also a suitable approach for the development of new alternative strategies for improving the activity of therapeutic agents by targeted delivery and controlled release. PMID:24759068

Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Gestal, Monica Cartelle; Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Mogoant?, Lauren?iu; Iordache, Florin; Bleotu, Coralia; Mogo?anu, George Dan

2014-01-01

168

Bacillus as PGPR in Crop Ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Gram-positive bacteria, in particular, members of group Bacillus, are among the best-studied experimental systems in bacteriology. Research, in Bacillus subtilis is remarkably diverse, including genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, and ecology, thus has an enormous impact on both basic\\u000a and applied biology. Multiple species of Bacillus and Paenibacillus occur in the agricultural fields that can promote the crop health in different

Ankit Kumar; Anil Prakash; B. N. Johri

169

Lysis of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by antibacterial porous polymeric monolith formed in microfluidic biochips for sample preparation.  

PubMed

Bacterial cell lysis is demonstrated using polymeric microfluidic biochips operating via a hybrid mechanical shearing/contact killing mechanism. These biochips are fabricated from a cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (X-PMMA) substrate by well-controlled, high-throughput laser micromachining. The unreacted double bonds at the surface of X-PMMA provide covalent bonding for the formation of a porous polymeric monolith (PPM), thus contributing to the mechanical stability of the biochip and eliminating the need for surface treatment. The lysis efficiency of these biochips was tested for gram-positive (Enterococcus saccharolyticus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and confirmed by off-chip PCR without further purification. The influence of the flow rate when pumping the bacterial suspension through the PPM, and of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance on the cell lysis efficiency was investigated at a cell concentration of 10(5) CFU/mL. It was shown that the contribution of contact killing to cell lysis was more important than that of mechanical shearing in the PPM. The biochip showed better lysis efficiency than the off-chip chemical, mechanical, and thermal lysis techniques used in this work. The biochip also acts as a filter that isolates cell debris and allows PCR-amplifiable DNA to pass through. The system performs more efficient lysis for gram-negative than for gram-positive bacteria. The biochip does not require chemical/enzymatic reagents, power consumption, or complicated design and fabrication processes, which makes it an attractive on-chip lysis device that can be used in sample preparation for genetics and point-of-care diagnostics. The biochips were reused for 20 lysis cycles without any evidence of physical damage to the PPM, significant performance degradation, or DNA carryover when they were back-flushed between cycles. The biochips efficiently lysed both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in about 35 min per lysis and PPM regeneration cycle. PMID:25059724

Aly, Mohamed Aly Saad; Gauthier, Mario; Yeow, John

2014-09-01

170

RmtC introduces G1405 methylation in 16S rRNA and confers high-level aminoglycoside resistance on Gram-positive microorganisms.  

PubMed

Seven plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methyltransferases (MTases), RmtA, RmtB, RmtC, RmtD, RmtE, ArmA, and NpmA, conferring aminoglycoside resistance have so far been found in Gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms. In the present study, by performing an RNase protection assay, primer extension, and HPLC, we confirmed that RmtC indeed methylates at the N7 position of nucleotide G1405 in 16S rRNA as found in ArmA and RmtB. RmtC has an MTase activity specific for the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit consisting of 16S rRNA and several ribosomal proteins, but not for the naked 16S rRNA, as seen in ArmA, RmtB, and NpmA. All seven 16S rRNA MTases have been found exclusively in Gram-negative bacilli to date, and no plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA MTase has been reported in Gram-positive pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, we checked whether or not the RmtC could function in Gram-positive bacilli, and found that RmtC could indeed confer high-level resistance to gentamicin and kanamycin in Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. 16S rRNA MTases seemed to be functional to some extent in any bacterial species, regardless of the provenance of the 16S rRNA MTase gene responsible for aminoglycoside resistance. PMID:20722735

Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Shibayama, Keigo; Kimura, Kouji; Yamane, Kunikazu; Suzuki, Satowa; Arakawa, Yoshichika

2010-10-01

171

High-Throughput System for the Presentation of Secreted and Surface-Exposed Proteins from Gram-Positive Bacteria in Functional Metagenomics Studies  

PubMed Central

Complex microbial ecosystems are increasingly studied through the use of metagenomics approaches. Overwhelming amounts of DNA sequence data are generated to describe the ecosystems, and allow to search for correlations between gene occurrence and clinical (e.g. in studies of the gut microbiota), physico-chemical (e.g. in studies of soil or water environments), or other parameters. Observed correlations can then be used to formulate hypotheses concerning microbial gene functions in relation to the ecosystem studied. In this context, functional metagenomics studies aim to validate these hypotheses and to explore the mechanisms involved. One possible approach is to PCR amplify or chemically synthesize genes of interest and to express them in a suitable host in order to study their function. For bacterial genes, Escherichia coli is often used as the expression host but, depending on the origin and nature of the genes of interest and the test system used to evaluate their putative function, other expression systems may be preferable. In this study, we developed a system to evaluate the role of secreted and surface-exposed proteins from Gram-positive bacteria in the human gut microbiota in immune modulation. We chose to use a Gram-positive host bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, and modified it to provide an expression background that behaves neutral in a cell-based immune modulation assay, in vitro. We also adapted an E. coli – B. subtilis shuttle expression vector for use with the Gateway high-throughput cloning system. Finally, we demonstrate the functionality of this host-vector system through the cloning and expression of a flagellin-coding sequence, and show that the expression-clone elicits an inflammatory response in a human intestinal epithelial cell line. The expression host can easily be adapted to assure neutrality in other assay systems, allowing the use of the presented presentation system in functional metagenomics of the gut and other ecosystems. PMID:23799065

Dobrijevic, Dragana; Di Liberto, Gaetana; Tanaka, Kosei; de Wouters, Tomas; Dervyn, Rozenn; Boudebbouze, Samira; Binesse, Johan; Blottière, Hervé M.; Jamet, Alexandre; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

2013-01-01

172

A Complex Genetic Switch Involving Overlapping Divergent Promoters and DNA Looping Regulates Expression of Conjugation Genes of a Gram-positive Plasmid  

PubMed Central

Plasmid conjugation plays a significant role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants. Understanding how conjugation is regulated is important to gain insights into these features. Little is known about regulation of conjugation systems present on plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria. pLS20 is a native conjugative plasmid from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Recently the key players that repress and activate pLS20 conjugation have been identified. Here we studied in detail the molecular mechanism regulating the pLS20 conjugation genes using both in vivo and in vitro approaches. Our results show that conjugation is subject to the control of a complex genetic switch where at least three levels of regulation are integrated. The first of the three layers involves overlapping divergent promoters of different strengths regulating expression of the conjugation genes and the key transcriptional regulator RcoLS20. The second layer involves a triple function of RcoLS20 being a repressor of the main conjugation promoter and an activator and repressor of its own promoter at low and high concentrations, respectively. The third level of regulation concerns formation of a DNA loop mediated by simultaneous binding of tetrameric RcoLS20 to two operators, one of which overlaps with the divergent promoters. The combination of these three layers of regulation in the same switch allows the main conjugation promoter to be tightly repressed during conditions unfavorable to conjugation while maintaining the sensitivity to accurately switch on the conjugation genes when appropriate conditions occur. The implications of the regulatory switch and comparison with other genetic switches involving DNA looping are discussed. PMID:25340403

Ramachandran, Gayetri; Singh, Praveen K.; Luque-Ortega, Juan Roman; Yuste, Luis; Alfonso, Carlos; Rojo, Fernando; Wu, Ling J.; Meijer, Wilfried J. J.

2014-01-01

173

Isolation of gram-positive rods that resemble but are clearly distinct from Actinomyces pyogenes from mixed wound infections.  

PubMed Central

Beginning in 1990, gram-positive rods resembling Actinomyces pyogenes were found with increasing frequency in mixed cultures from various infectious processes, most of them from patients with otitis, empyema, pilonidal cysts, perianal abscesses, and decubitus ulcers. Ribotyping and hybridization showed that these gram-positive rods could be divided into five groups not related to known Actinomyces species. Biochemical markers for reliable differentiation into these groups, however, could not be found. Therefore, naming new species is not warranted unless parameters are discovered that allow identification without DNA hybridization. These gram-positive rods have been isolated only in mixed cultures with anaerobes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus "milleri," enterococci, and gram-negative rods. Their exact role in these possibly synergistic infections needs further investigation. Images PMID:8501213

Wüst, J; Lucchini, G M; Lüthy-Hottenstein, J; Brun, F; Altwegg, M

1993-01-01

174

In vitro activities of daptomycin (LY146032) and paldimycin (U-70,138F) against anaerobic gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

The in vitro activities of daptomycin (LY146032), paldimycin (U-70,138F), vancomycin, and penicillin G against 344 clinical isolates of anaerobic gram-positive bacteria were determined by an agar dilution method in calcium-supplemented (50 micrograms/ml) Wilkins-Chalgren medium, using an inoculum of 10(5) CFU. Daptomycin demonstrated excellent activity against a broad range of anaerobic gram-positive cocci and bacilli, including Peptostreptococcus, Eubacterium, Bifidobacterium, Actinomyces, Propionibacterium, and Lactobacillus species and Clostridium difficile. Highly resistant strains (MIC, greater than or equal to 64 micrograms/ml) were encountered sporadically from different genera, but these accounted for only 3% of all isolates tested. Vancomycin showed similar activity but was less active against Lactobacillus species and Peptostreptococcus prevotii. Paldimycin was inactive against most genera of anaerobic gram-positive bacteria. Overall, penicillin G remained the most broadly active agent against these isolates. PMID:2840019

Chow, A W; Cheng, N

1988-05-01

175

Bacillus marcorestinctum sp. nov., a Novel Soil Acylhomoserine Lactone Quorum-Sensing Signal Quenching Bacterium  

PubMed Central

A Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, endospore-forming and rod-shaped bacterium was isolated from soil samples and designated strain LQQ. This organism strongly quenches the acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal. The LQQ strain exhibits phenotypic characteristics consistent with its classification in the genus Bacillus. It is positive in catalase and no special growth factor is needed. It uses glucose as sole carbon source. The DNA G + C content is 39.8 mol %. The closest relatives based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence are Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Brevibacillus brevis (syn. Bacillus brevis) with the similarity of 96.5%. The DNA–DNA hybridization data indicates a low level of genomic relatedness with the relative type strains of Bacillus thuringiensis (6.1%), Bacillus anthracis (10.5%) and Brevibacillus brevis (8.7%). On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data together with the genomic distinctiveness, the LQQ strain represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus marcorestinctum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LQQT. PMID:20386651

Han, Yan; Chen, Fang; Li, Nuo; Zhu, Bo; Li, Xianzhen

2010-01-01

176

Cellular fatty acid composition as an adjunct to the identification of asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods.  

PubMed

Cellular fatty acid (CFA) compositions of 561 asporogenous, aerobic gram-positive rods were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography as an adjunct to their identification when grown on blood agar at 35 degrees C. The organisms could be divided into two groups. In the first group (branched-chain type), which included coryneform CDC groups A-3, A-4, and A-5; some strains of B-1 and B-3; "Corynebacterium aquaticum"; Brevibacterium liquefaciens; Rothia dentocariosa; and Listeria spp., the rods had sizable quantities of antiesopentadecanoic (Ca15:0) and anteisoheptadecanoic (Ca17:0) acids. Other species with these types of CFA included B. acetylicum, which contained large amounts of isotridecanoic (Ci13:0) and anteisotridecanoic (Ca13:0) acids. CFAs useful for distinguishing among Jonesia denitrificans, Oerskovia spp., some strains of CDC groups B-1 and B-3, Kurthia spp., and Propionibacterium avidum were hexadecanoic (C 16:0) acid, isopentadecanoic (Ci15:0) acid, and Ca15:0). The second group (straight-chained type), which included Actinomyces pyogenes; Arcanobacterium haemolyticum; C. bovis; C. cystitidis; C. diphtheriae; C. flavescens, "C. gentalium"; C. jeikeium; C. kutscheri; C. matruchotii; C .minutissimum; C. mycetoides; C. pilosum; C. pseudodiphtheriticum; "C. pseudogenitalium"; C. pseudotuberculosis; C. renale; CDC groups 1, 2, ANF-1, D-2, E, F-1, F-2, G-1, G-2, and I-2; C. striatum; "C. tuberculostearicum"; C. ulcerans; C. vitarumen; C. xerosis; and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, was typified by significant quantities of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and oleic acids (C18:cis9), with differences in the amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2), stearic acid (C18:0), an unnamed peak (equivalent chain length, 14.966), and small quantities of other known saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. CFA composition of these organisms was sufficiently discriminatory to assist in classification but could not be used as the sole means of identification. PMID:1899679

Bernard, K A; Bellefeuille, M; Ewan, E P

1991-01-01

177

Genome sequence of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, a Gram-positive anaerobe capable of dehalogenation and metal reduction  

PubMed Central

Background The genome of the Gram-positive, metal-reducing, dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 was sequenced in order to gain insights into its metabolic capacities, adaptive physiology, and regulatory machineries, and to compare with that of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51, the phylogenetically closest strain among the species with a sequenced genome. Results The genome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 is composed of a 5,279,134-bp circular chromosome with 5,042 predicted genes. Genome content and parallel physiological studies support the cell's ability to fix N2 and CO2, form spores and biofilms, reduce metals, and use a variety of electron acceptors in respiration, including halogenated organic compounds. The genome contained seven reductive dehalogenase genes and four nitrogenase gene homologs but lacked the Nar respiratory nitrate reductase system. The D. hafniense DCB-2 genome contained genes for 43 RNA polymerase sigma factors including 27 sigma-24 subunits, 59 two-component signal transduction systems, and about 730 transporter proteins. In addition, it contained genes for 53 molybdopterin-binding oxidoreductases, 19 flavoprotein paralogs of the fumarate reductase, and many other FAD/FMN-binding oxidoreductases, proving the cell's versatility in both adaptive and reductive capacities. Together with the ability to form spores, the presence of the CO2-fixing Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and the genes associated with oxygen tolerance add flexibility to the cell's options for survival under stress. Conclusions D. hafniense DCB-2's genome contains genes consistent with its abilities for dehalogenation, metal reduction, N2 and CO2 fixation, anaerobic respiration, oxygen tolerance, spore formation, and biofilm formation which make this organism a potential candidate for bioremediation at contaminated sites. PMID:22316246

2012-01-01

178

Effect of betamethasone in combination with antibiotics on gram positive and gram negative bacteria.  

PubMed

Betamethasone is an anti-inflammatory steroid drug used in cases of anaphylactic and allergic reactions, of Alzheimer and Addison diseases and in soft tissue injuries. It modulates gene expression for anti-inflammatory activity suppressing the immune system response. This latter effect might decrease the effectiveness of immune system response against microbial infections. Corticosteroids, in fact, mask some symptoms of infection and during their use superimposed infections may occur. Thus, the use of glucocorticoids in patients with sepsis remains extremely controversial. In this study we analyzed the in vitro effect of a commercial formulation of betamethasone (Bentelan) on several Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria of clinical relevance. It was found to be an inhibitor of the growth of most of the strains examined. Also the effect of betamethasone in combination with some classes of antibiotics was evaluated. Antibiotic-steroid combination therapy is, in such cases, superior to antibiotic-alone treatment to impair bacterial growths. Such effect was essentially not at all observable on Staphylococcus aureus or Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS). PMID:25572750

Artini, M; Papa, R; Cellini, A; Tilotta, M; Barbato, G; Koverech, A; Selan, L

2014-01-01

179

Inactivation of Gram-positive biofilms by low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work is devoted to the evaluation of the efficiency of a new low-temperature plasma jet driven in ambient air by a dc-corona discharge to inactivate adherent cells and biofilms of Gram-positive bacteria. The selected microorganisms were lactic acid bacteria, a Weissella confusa strain which has the particularity to excrete a polysaccharide polymer (dextran) when sucrose is present. Both adherent cells and biofilms were treated with the low-temperature plasma jet for different exposure times. The antimicrobial efficiency of the plasma was tested against adherent cells and 48 h-old biofilms grown with or without sucrose. Bacterial survival was estimated using both colony-forming unit counts and fluorescence-based assays for bacterial cell viability. The experiments show the ability of the low-temperature plasma jet at atmospheric pressure to inactivate the bacteria. An increased resistance of bacteria embedded within biofilms is clearly observed. The resistance is also significantly higher with biofilm in the presence of sucrose, which indicates that dextran could play a protective role.

Marchal, F.; Robert, H.; Merbahi, N.; Fontagné-Faucher, C.; Yousfi, M.; Romain, C. E.; Eichwald, O.; Rondel, C.; Gabriel, B.

2012-08-01

180

Can procalcitonin differentiate Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci in clustered gram-positive bacteremia?  

PubMed

Procalcitonin (PCT) and pro-adrenomedullin (ProADM) have been proposed as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of infection. Between July 2009 and January 2012, we studied the role of these biomarkers in 163 patients with clustered gram-positive and gram-negative bacteremia. PCT levels were significantly higher in patients with Staphylococcus aureus and gram-negative bacteremia than those with coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) isolated from blood cultures (P = 0.29 and <0.001, respectively). ProADM levels were only significantly higher in patients with gram-negative bacteremia (median 1.46 nmol/L) than those with CoNS (median 1.01 nmol/L) (P = 0.04). Among patients with CoNS, PCT, and ProADM, levels failed to differentiate blood contamination (medians 0.24 ng/mL and 0.97 nmol/L) from true bacteremia (medians 0.26 ng/mL and 1.14 nmol/L) (P = 0.51 and 0.57, respectively). In cancer patients, PCT (and to a lesser extent, ProADM) was useful in differentiating CoNS from S. aureus and gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:23578976

Shomali, William; Hachem, Ray; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Bahu, Ramez; Helou, Gilbert El; Jiang, Ying; Hanania, Alex; Reitzel, Ruth; Raad, Issam

2013-06-01

181

Population biology of Gram-positive pathogens: high-risk clones for dissemination of antibiotic resistance  

PubMed Central

Infections caused by multi-resistant Gram positive bacteria represent a major health burden in the community as well as in hospitalized patients. Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium are well-known pathogens of hospitalized patients, frequently linked with resistance against multiple antibiotics, compromising effective therapy. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes are important pathogens in the community and S. aureus has recently emerged as an important community-acquired pathogen. Population genetic studies reveal that recombination prevails as a driving force of genetic diversity in E. faecium, E. faecalis, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes and thus, these species are weakly clonal. Although recombination has a relatively modest role driving the genetic variation of the core genome of S. aureus, the horizontal acquistion of resistance and virulence genes plays a key role in the emergence of new clinically relevant clones in this species. In this review we discuss the population genetics of E. faecium, E. faecalis, S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, and S. aureus. Knowledge of the population structure of these pathogens is not only highly relevant for (molecular) epidemiological research but also for identifying the genetic variation that underlies changes in clinical behaviour, to improve our understanding of the pathogenic behaviour of particular clones and to identify novel targets for vaccines or immunotherapy. PMID:21658083

Willems, Rob J. L.; Hanage, William P; Bessen, Debra E.; Feil, Edward J.

2011-01-01

182

Combination of Pantothenamides with Vanin Inhibitors as a Novel Antibiotic Strategy against Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The emergence of resistance against current antibiotics calls for the development of new compounds to treat infectious diseases. Synthetic pantothenamides are pantothenate analogs that possess broad-spectrum antibacterial activity in vitro in minimal media. Pantothenamides were shown to be substrates of the bacterial coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, causing cellular CoA depletion and interference with fatty acid synthesis. In spite of their potential use and selectivity for bacterial metabolic routes, these compounds have never made it to the clinic. In the present study, we show that pantothenamides are not active as antibiotics in the presence of serum, and we found that they were hydrolyzed by ubiquitous pantetheinases of the vanin family. To address this further, we synthesized a series of pantetheinase inhibitors based on a pantothenate scaffold that inhibited serum pantetheinase activity in the nanomolar range. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that addition of these pantetheinase inhibitors prevented hydrolysis of pantothenamides by serum. We found that combinations of these novel pantetheinase inhibitors and prototypic pantothenamides like N5-Pan and N7-Pan exerted antimicrobial activity in vitro, particularly against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes) even in the presence of serum. These results indicate that pantothenamides, when protected against degradation by host pantetheinases, are potentially useful antimicrobial agents. PMID:23877685

Jansen, Patrick A. M.; Hermkens, Pedro H. H.; Zeeuwen, Patrick L. J. M.; Botman, Peter N. M.; Blaauw, Richard H.; Burghout, Peter; van Galen, Peter M.; Mouton, Johan W.; Rutjes, Floris P. J. T.

2013-01-01

183

Combination of pantothenamides with vanin inhibitors as a novel antibiotic strategy against gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

The emergence of resistance against current antibiotics calls for the development of new compounds to treat infectious diseases. Synthetic pantothenamides are pantothenate analogs that possess broad-spectrum antibacterial activity in vitro in minimal media. Pantothenamides were shown to be substrates of the bacterial coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, causing cellular CoA depletion and interference with fatty acid synthesis. In spite of their potential use and selectivity for bacterial metabolic routes, these compounds have never made it to the clinic. In the present study, we show that pantothenamides are not active as antibiotics in the presence of serum, and we found that they were hydrolyzed by ubiquitous pantetheinases of the vanin family. To address this further, we synthesized a series of pantetheinase inhibitors based on a pantothenate scaffold that inhibited serum pantetheinase activity in the nanomolar range. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that addition of these pantetheinase inhibitors prevented hydrolysis of pantothenamides by serum. We found that combinations of these novel pantetheinase inhibitors and prototypic pantothenamides like N5-Pan and N7-Pan exerted antimicrobial activity in vitro, particularly against Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes) even in the presence of serum. These results indicate that pantothenamides, when protected against degradation by host pantetheinases, are potentially useful antimicrobial agents. PMID:23877685

Jansen, Patrick A M; Hermkens, Pedro H H; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Botman, Peter N M; Blaauw, Richard H; Burghout, Peter; van Galen, Peter M; Mouton, Johan W; Rutjes, Floris P J T; Schalkwijk, Joost

2013-10-01

184

Susceptibility of Gram-positive and -negative bacteria to novel nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle technology.  

PubMed

The rapidly evolving crisis of antibiotic resistance among microorganisms has contributed to the rise of patient morbidity and mortality from nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Therefore, innovative antimicrobial technology targeting mechanisms to which the bacteria are unlikely to evolve resistance is urgently needed. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) with efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Acinetobacter baumannii in vitro and in murine wound and abscess models. Although the prior findings suggest that the NO-np can be a useful therapeutic for skin and soft tissue infections, the antimicrobial spectrum of NO-np has yet to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the efficacy of a NO-np against several Gram-positive and -negative clinical isolates. We found that the NO-np were uniformly active against all of the Streptococcus pyogenes, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates examined, including strains that were both sensitive and resistant to commonly used antibiotics. We concluded that the NO-np have the potential to serve as a novel broad spectrum antimicrobial agent. PMID:21577055

Friedman, Adam; Blecher, Karin; Sanchez, David; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Philip; Friedman, Joel M; Martinez, Luis R; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

2011-01-01

185

Antimicrobial ent-pimarane diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

The dichloromethane crude extract from the roots of Viguiera arenaria (VaDRE) has been employed in an antimicrobial screening against several bacteria responsible for human pathologies. The main diterpenes isolated from this extract, as well as two semi-synthetic pimarane derivatives, were also investigated for the pathogens that were significantly inhibited by the extract (MIC values lower than 100 microg mL(-1)). The VaDRE extract was significantly active only against Gram-positive microorganisms. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (PA); PA sodium salt; ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3beta-ol; ent-15-pimarene-8 beta,19-diol; and ent-8(14),15-pimaradien-3beta-acetoxy displayed the highest antibacterial activities (MIC values lower than 10 microg mL(-1) for most pathogens). In conclusion, our results suggest that pimaranes are an important class of natural products for further investigations in the search of new antibacterial agents. PMID:19524643

Porto, Thiago Souza; Furtado, Niege A J C; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Martins, Carlos H G; Da Costa, Fernando B; Severiano, Marcela E; Silva, Aline N; Veneziani, Rodrigo C S; Ambrósio, Sérgio R

2009-10-01

186

Sortases and the Art of Anchoring Proteins to the Envelopes of Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

The cell wall envelopes of gram-positive bacteria represent a surface organelle that not only functions as a cytoskeletal element but also promotes interactions between bacteria and their environment. Cell wall peptidoglycan is covalently and noncovalently decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. The sum of these molecular decorations provides bacterial envelopes with species- and strain-specific properties that are ultimately responsible for bacterial virulence, interactions with host immune systems, and the development of disease symptoms or successful outcomes of infections. Surface proteins typically carry two topogenic sequences, i.e., N-terminal signal peptides and C-terminal sorting signals. Sortases catalyze a transpeptidation reaction by first cleaving a surface protein substrate at the cell wall sorting signal. The resulting acyl enzyme intermediates between sortases and their substrates are then resolved by the nucleophilic attack of amino groups, typically provided by the cell wall cross bridges of peptidoglycan precursors. The surface protein linked to peptidoglycan is then incorporated into the envelope and displayed on the microbial surface. This review focuses on the mechanisms of surface protein anchoring to the cell wall envelope by sortases and the role that these enzymes play in bacterial physiology and pathogenesis. PMID:16524923

Marraffini, Luciano A.; DeDent, Andrea C.; Schneewind, Olaf

2006-01-01

187

?, a New Subunit of RNA Polymerase Found in Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

RNA polymerase in bacteria is a multisubunit protein complex that is essential for gene expression. We have identified a new subunit of RNA polymerase present in the high-A+T Firmicutes phylum of Gram-positive bacteria and have named it ?. Previously ? had been identified as a small protein (?1) that copurified with RNA polymerase. We have solved the structure of ? by X-ray crystallography and show that it is not an ? subunit. Rather, ? bears remarkable similarity to the Gp2 family of phage proteins involved in the inhibition of host cell transcription following infection. Deletion of ? shows no phenotype and has no effect on the transcriptional profile of the cell. Determination of the location of ? within the assembly of RNA polymerase core by single-particle analysis suggests that it binds toward the downstream side of the DNA binding cleft. Due to the structural similarity of ? with Gp2 and the fact they bind similar regions of RNA polymerase, we hypothesize that ? may serve a role in protection from phage infection. PMID:25092033

Keller, Andrew N.; Yang, Xiao; Wiedermannová, Jana; Delumeau, Olivier; Krásný, Libor

2014-01-01

188

Exploiting what phage have evolved to control gram-positive pathogens  

PubMed Central

In the billion years that bacteriophage (or phage) have existed together with bacteria the phage have evolved systems that may be exploited for our benefit. One of these is the lytic system used by the phage to release their progeny from an infected bacterium. Endolysins (or lysins) are highly evolved enzymes in the lytic system produced to cleave essential bonds in the bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan for progeny release. Small quantities of purified recombinant lysin added externally to gram-positive bacteria results in immediate lysis causing log-fold death of the target bacterium. Lysins have now been used successfully in a variety of animal models to control pathogenic antibiotic resistant bacteria found on mucosal surfaces and in infected tissues. The advantages over antibiotics are their specificity for the pathogen without disturbing the normal flora, the low chance of bacterial resistance, and their ability to kill colonizing pathogens on mucosal surfaces, a capacity previously unavailable. Lysins therefore, may be a much-needed anti-infective (or enzybiotic) in an age of mounting antibiotic resistance. PMID:23050211

Fischetti, Vincent A.

2011-01-01

189

[Resistance to "last resort" antibiotics in Gram-positive cocci: The post-vancomycin era].  

PubMed

New therapeutic alternatives have been developed in the last years for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infections. Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are considered a therapeutic challenge due to failures and lack of reliable antimicrobial options. Despite concerns related to the use of vancomycin in the treatment of severe MRSA infections in specific clinical scenarios, there is a paucity of solid clinical evidence that support the use of alternative agents (when compared to vancomycin). Linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline are antibiotics approved in the last decade and newer cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline and ceftobiprole) and novel glycopeptides (dalvavancin, telavancin and oritavancin) have reached clinical approval or are in the late stages of clinical development. This review focuses on discussing these newer antibiotics used in the "post-vancomycin" era with emphasis on relevant chemical characteristics, spectrum of antimicrobial activity, mechanisms of action and resistance, as well as their clinical utility. PMID:24968051

Rincón, Sandra; Panesso, Diana; Díaz, Lorena; Carvajal, Lina P; Reyes, Jinnethe; Munita, José M; Arias, César A

2014-04-01

190

Restart of DNA replication in Gram-positive bacteria: functional characterisation of the Bacillus subtilis PriA initiator  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PriA protein was identified in Escherichia coli as a factor involved in the replication of extrachromo- somal elements such as bacteriophage ?X174 and plasmid pBR322. Recent data show that PriA plays an important role in chromosomal replication, by promoting reassembly of the replication machinery during reinitiation of inactivated forks. A gene encoding a product 32% identical to the E.coli

Patrice Polard; Stéphanie Marsin; Stephen McGovern; Marion Velten; Dale B. Wigley; S. Dusko; Claude Bruand

191

The clinical importance of gram-positive anaerobic cocci isolated at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, in 1987  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. The clinical importance of the gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) isolated in 1987 at St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, is assessed. Of about 800 anaerobic isolates, 209 (27 YO) were GPAC, of which 67 (32%) were from abscesses and 22 (11 YO) were in pure growth. Four species comprised 77% of the 168 isolates available for study: Pepto- streptococcus magnus (55

D. A. Murdoch; I. J. Mitchelmore; S. Tabaqchali

1994-01-01

192

In Vitro Activity and Killing Effect of Uperin 3.6 against Gram-Positive Cocci Isolated from Immunocompromised Patients  

PubMed Central

The in vitro activity of uperin 3.6, alone or combined with six antibiotics, against gram-positive cocci, including Rhodococcus equi, methicillin-resistant staphylococci, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, was investigated. All isolates were inhibited at concentrations of 1 to 16 mg/liter. Synergy was demonstrated when uperin 3.6 was combined with clarithromycin and doxycycline. PMID:16127075

Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Kamysz, Wojciech; Silvestri, Carmela; Licci, Alberto; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Nadolski, Piotr; Riva, Alessandra; Lukasiak, Jerzy; Scalise, Giorgio

2005-01-01

193

In Vitro Activity of Aurein 1.2 Alone and in Combination with Antibiotics against Gram-Positive Nosocomial Cocci?  

PubMed Central

This study was performed to evaluate the in vitro activity of the amphibian peptide aurein 1.2 and to investigate its interaction with six antibiotics against nosocomial gram-positive cocci. All isolates were inhibited at concentrations of 1 to 16 mg/liter. Synergy was demonstrated when aurein 1.2 was combined with clarithromycin and minocycline. PMID:17220421

Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Riva, Alessandra; Kamysz, Wojciech; Silvestri, Carmela; Nadolski, Piotr; Della Vittoria, Agnese; ?ukasiak, Jerzy; Scalise, Giorgio

2007-01-01

194

Dustborne and airborne gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria in high versus low ERMI homes  

EPA Science Inventory

The study aimed at investigating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in moldy and non-moldy homes, as defined by the home's Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) value. The ERMI values were determined from floor dust samples in 2010 and 2011 and homes were classified...

195

Variation of RAPD-fingerprint patterns using different DNA-extraction methods with Gram-positive bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the DNA-extraction method used on fingerprint patterns of RAPD was studied usingStaphylococcus epidermidis andStreptococcus faecalis. The three methods tested (Chelex, microwave and phenol\\/chloroform) led to significantly different RAPD patterns. The microwave technique generated reproducible patterns and seems the most suitable for RAPD analysis of Gram-positive bacteria.

Y. Abed; A. Davin; R. N. Charrel; C. Bollet; P. Micco

1995-01-01

196

Soluble bacterial constituents down-regulate secretion of IL-12 in response to intact Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Intact Gram-positive bacteria induce production of large amounts of IL-12 from freshly isolated human monocytes. Here the bacterial structures and signalling pathways involved were studied and compared with those leading to IL-6 production, and to IL-12 production in response to LPS after IFN-gamma pre-treatment. Intact bifidobacteria induced massive production of IL-12 (1 ng/ml) and IL-6 (>30 ng/ml) from human PBMC, whereas fragmented bifidobacteria induced IL-6, but no IL-12. IL-12 production induced by intact bifidobacteria was inhibited by pre-treatment with bifidobacterial sonicate, peptidoglycan, muramyl dipeptide, lipoteichoic acid, the soluble TLR2 agonist Pam(3)Cys-SK(4), or anti-TLR2 antibodies. Blocking of phagocytosis by cytochalasin, inhibition of the JNK or NF-kappaB pathways or treatment with Wortmannin also reduced the IL-12 response to intact Gram-positive bacteria. LPS induced moderate levels of IL-12 (0.31 ng/ml), but only from IFN-gamma pre-treated PBMC. This IL-12 production was enhanced by Wortmannin and unaffected by blocking the JNK pathway. Thus, intact Gram-positive bacteria trigger monocyte production of large amounts of IL-12 via a distinct pathway that is turned off by fragmented Gram-positive bacteria. This may be a physiological feedback, since such fragments may signal that further activation of the phagocyte via the IL-12/IFN-gamma loop is unnecessary. PMID:18832044

Barkman, Cecilia; Martner, Anna; Hessle, Christina; Wold, Agnes E

2008-01-01

197

In vitro activity of telavancin and comparators against selected groups of Gram-positive cocci.  

PubMed

Telavancin is a novel, rapidly cidal, dual-action glycopeptide. This study examined its in vitro activity against relevant Gram-positive pathogens, comprising 99 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 40 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), 79 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), 45 Enterococcus faecalis, 60 Enterococcus faecium, 40 ?-haemolytic streptococci and 60 Streptococcus pneumoniae. Except with VanA enterococci, telavancin MICs were tightly clustered and unimodal. Telavancin MICs for staphylococci ranged from ?0.03 mg/L to 0.5mg/L, with no shift for MRSA or MSSA in relation to vancomycin MIC. Nevertheless, and independently of species, CoNS with raised vancomycin MICs had reduced susceptibility to telavancin, however this was much more marked for teicoplanin. Modal telavancin MICs were 0.5mg/L and ?0.03 mg/L for glycopeptide-susceptible E. faecalis and E. faecium, respectively, with no rise for VanB isolates, but ranges rose to 4-16 mg/L and 1-4 mg/L for VanA isolates, respectively. Streptococci were consistently susceptible, with MICs of ?0.06 mg/L. Telavancin MICs by Etest agreed within 1 doubling dilution with those found previously by BSAC agar dilution in 96.2% of cases, although with slight bias towards lower values. In the few cases (13/345) where telavancin MICs by Etest were ?2 doubling dilutions different from those by agar dilution, the Etest value was always lower; this effect was greater for the other antibiotics tested. Telavancin had excellent activity, except against enterococci with VanA, with no erosion of this activity against MRSA with raised vancomycin MICs. MICs by Etest were nearly always within 1 dilution of those by BSAC agar dilution. PMID:23298432

Hope, Russell; Chaudhry, Aiysha; Adkin, Rachael; Livermore, David M

2013-03-01

198

Bacillus cereus and related species.  

PubMed Central

Bacillus cereus is a gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic spore-forming rod. It is a cause of food poisoning, which is frequently associated with the consumption of rice-based dishes. The organism produces an emetic or diarrheal syndrome induced by an emetic toxin and enterotoxin, respectively. Other toxins are produced during growth, including phospholipases, proteases, and hemolysins, one of which, cereolysin, is a thiol-activated hemolysin. These toxins may contribute to the pathogenicity of B. cereus in nongastrointestinal disease. B. cereus isolated from clinical material other than feces or vomitus was commonly dismissed as a contaminant, but increasingly it is being recognized as a species with pathogenic potential. It is now recognized as an infrequent cause of serious nongastrointestinal infection, particularly in drug addicts, the immunosuppressed, neonates, and postsurgical patients, especially when prosthetic implants such as ventricular shunts are inserted. Ocular infections are the commonest types of severe infection, including endophthalmitis, panophthalmitis, and keratitis, usually with the characteristic formation of corneal ring abscesses. Even with prompt surgical and antimicrobial agent treatment, enucleation of the eye and blindness are common sequelae. Septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections are other manifestations of severe disease. B. cereus produces beta-lactamases, unlike Bacillus anthracis, and so is resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics; it is usually susceptible to treatment with clindamycin, vancomycin, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and erythromycin. Simultaneous therapy via multiple routes may be required. PMID:8269390

Drobniewski, F A

1993-01-01

199

Quantification of Gram-positive bacteria: adaptation and evaluation of a preparation strategy using high amounts of clinical tissue  

PubMed Central

Background A preparation method for quantification of bacteria in tissues is obligatory to reduce tissue mass, concentrate the target, purify, remove inhibitory substances and to achieve constant target recovery rates. No preparation method has been available until now for a high mass of tissue applicable for routine use and analytical veterinary diagnostics. Results This study describes an easy-to-use tissue preparation protocol to quantify Gram-positive bacteria from a large volume of tissue matrix. A previously published sample preparation method (Matrix-Lysis) from food science was successfully adapted for clinical use on tissues from pigs, including cerebrum, spinal cord, lung, liver, ileum, colon, caecum, kidney and muscle tissue. This tissue preparation method now permits quantification of pathogens from 5 g of organic matrix, which is a 20–200 fold increase by weight compared to other methods. It is based on solubilization of the sample matrix with either a chaotrope plus detergent or divalent salts as solubilization agents. The method was designed as a modular system, offering the possibility to change lysis buffers, according to tissue solubilization characteristics and the intended detection method (molecular or culture). Using Listeria monocytogenes as model organism, viable cell quantification or DNA extraction and quantitative real-time PCR were performed after Matrix-Lysis to determine recovery rates and detection limit (LOD). The adapted Matrix-Lysis protocol resulted in high recovery rates (mean value: 76%?±?39%) for all tested organs, except kidney, and recovery was constant over 5 log scales for all tested buffer systems. The LOD for Matrix-Lysis with subsequent plate count method (PCM) was as low as 1 CFU/5 g, while for qPCR based detection the LOD was 102 bacterial cell equivalents (BCE)/5 g for two buffer systems. Conclusions This tissue preparation is inexpensive and can be easily used for routine and analytical veterinary diagnostics. Inoculation studies or hazard assessments can profit from this tissue preparation method and it is anticipated that this study will be a valuable source for further research on tissue preparation strategies. PMID:24589061

2014-01-01

200

Evaluation of the Andromas Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Aerobically Growing Gram-Positive Bacilli  

PubMed Central

Matrix-associated laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and simple microbial identification method. Previous reports using the Biotyper system suggested that this technique requires a preliminary extraction step to identify Gram-positive rods (GPRs), a technical issue that may limit the routine use of this technique to identify pathogenic GPRs in the clinical setting. We tested the accuracy of the MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy to identify a set of 659 GPR isolates representing 16 bacterial genera and 72 species by the direct colony method. This bacterial collection included 40 C. diphtheriae, 13 C. pseudotuberculosis, 19 C. ulcerans, and 270 other Corynebacterium isolates, 32 L. monocytogenes and 24 other Listeria isolates, 46 Nocardia, 75 Actinomyces, 18 Actinobaculum, 11 Propionibacterium acnes, 18 Propionibacterium avidum, 30 Lactobacillus, 21 Bacillus, 2 Rhodococcus equi, 2 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and 38 other GPR isolates, all identified by reference techniques. Totals of 98.5% and 1.2% of non-Listeria GPR isolates were identified to the species or genus level, respectively. Except for L. grayi isolates that were identified to the species level, all other Listeria isolates were identified to the genus level because of highly similar spectra. These data demonstrate that rapid identification of pathogenic GPRs can be obtained without an extraction step by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. PMID:22692743

Farfour, E.; Leto, J.; Barritault, M.; Barberis, C.; Meyer, J.; Dauphin, B.; Le Guern, A.-S.; Leflèche, A.; Badell, E.; Guiso, N.; Leclercq, A.; Le Monnier, A.; Lecuit, M.; Rodriguez-Nava, V.; Bergeron, E.; Raymond, J.; Vimont, S.; Bille, E.; Carbonnelle, E.; Guet-Revillet, H.; Lécuyer, H.; Beretti, J.-L.; Vay, C.; Berche, P.; Ferroni, A.; Nassif, X.

2012-01-01

201

Evaluation of the Andromas matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry system for identification of aerobically growing Gram-positive bacilli.  

PubMed

Matrix-associated laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid and simple microbial identification method. Previous reports using the Biotyper system suggested that this technique requires a preliminary extraction step to identify Gram-positive rods (GPRs), a technical issue that may limit the routine use of this technique to identify pathogenic GPRs in the clinical setting. We tested the accuracy of the MALDI-TOF MS Andromas strategy to identify a set of 659 GPR isolates representing 16 bacterial genera and 72 species by the direct colony method. This bacterial collection included 40 C. diphtheriae, 13 C. pseudotuberculosis, 19 C. ulcerans, and 270 other Corynebacterium isolates, 32 L. monocytogenes and 24 other Listeria isolates, 46 Nocardia, 75 Actinomyces, 18 Actinobaculum, 11 Propionibacterium acnes, 18 Propionibacterium avidum, 30 Lactobacillus, 21 Bacillus, 2 Rhodococcus equi, 2 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and 38 other GPR isolates, all identified by reference techniques. Totals of 98.5% and 1.2% of non-Listeria GPR isolates were identified to the species or genus level, respectively. Except for L. grayi isolates that were identified to the species level, all other Listeria isolates were identified to the genus level because of highly similar spectra. These data demonstrate that rapid identification of pathogenic GPRs can be obtained without an extraction step by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. PMID:22692743

Farfour, E; Leto, J; Barritault, M; Barberis, C; Meyer, J; Dauphin, B; Le Guern, A-S; Leflèche, A; Badell, E; Guiso, N; Leclercq, A; Le Monnier, A; Lecuit, M; Rodriguez-Nava, V; Bergeron, E; Raymond, J; Vimont, S; Bille, E; Carbonnelle, E; Guet-Revillet, H; Lécuyer, H; Beretti, J-L; Vay, C; Berche, P; Ferroni, A; Nassif, X; Join-Lambert, O

2012-08-01

202

Genome-wide gene order distances support clustering the gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Initially using 143 genomes, we developed a method for calculating the pair-wise distance between prokaryotic genomes using a Monte Carlo method to estimate the conservation of gene order. The method was based on repeatedly selecting five or six non-adjacent random orthologs from each of two genomes and determining if the chosen orthologs were in the same order. The raw distances were then corrected for gene order convergence using an adaptation of the Jukes-Cantor model, as well as using the common distance correction D? = ?ln(1-D). First, we compared the distances found via the order of six orthologs to distances found based on ortholog gene content and small subunit rRNA sequences. The Jukes-Cantor gene order distances are reasonably well correlated with the divergence of rRNA (R2 = 0.24), especially at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.2 (R2 = 0.52). Gene content is only weakly correlated with rRNA divergence (R2 = 0.04) over all distances, however, it is especially strongly correlated at rRNA Jukes-Cantor distances of less than 0.1 (R2 = 0.67). This initial work suggests that gene order may be useful in conjunction with other methods to help understand the relatedness of genomes. Using the gene order distances in 143 genomes, the relations of prokaryotes were studied using neighbor joining and agreement subtrees. We then repeated our study of the relations of prokaryotes using gene order in 172 complete genomes better representing a wider-diversity of prokaryotes. Consistently, our trees show the Actinobacteria as a sister group to the bulk of the Firmicutes. In fact, the robustness of gene order support was found to be considerably greater for uniting these two phyla than for uniting any of the proteobacterial classes together. The results are supportive of the idea that Actinobacteria and Firmicutes are closely related, which in turn implies a single origin for the gram-positive cell. PMID:25653643

House, Christopher H.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T.

2015-01-01

203

Homologous gene clusters of nicotine catabolism, including a new ?-amidase for ?-ketoglutaramate, in species of three genera of Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Gram-positive soil bacteria Arthrobacter nicotinovorans, Nocardioides sp. JS614 and Rhodococcus opacus were shown to contain similarly organized clusters of homologous genes for nicotine catabolism. An uncharacterized gene of a predicted nitrilase within these gene clusters was cloned from A. nicotinovorans and biochemical data unexpectedly showed that the protein exhibited ?-amidase activity toward ?-ketoglutaramate. Structural modelling of the protein suggested the presence of the catalytic triad Cys-Glu-Lys, characteristic of this class of enzymes, and supported ?-ketoglutaramate as substrate. A-ketoglutaramate could be generated by hydrolytic cleavage of the C-N bond of the trihydroxypyridine ring produced by nicotine catabolism in these bacteria. This ?-amidase, together with glutamate dehydrogenase, may form a physiologically relevant enzyme couple, leading to transformation of metabolically inert ?-ketoglutaramate derived from trihydroxypyridine into glutamate, a central compound of nitrogen metabolism. PMID:21288482

Cobzaru, Cristina; Ganas, Petra; Mihasan, Marius; Schleberger, Paula; Brandsch, Roderich

2011-04-01

204

Rifampin as adjuvant treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections: a systematic review of comparative clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed the bibliographic evidence from comparative trials regarding the role of rifampin as adjuvant treatment in the\\u000a treatment of Gram-positive infections [PubMed (1\\/1950–7\\/2006)]. Only studies reporting comparative outcome data in patients\\u000a treated with an antibiotic regimen with the addition or not of rifampin were included. Eight comparative studies were identified\\u000a [all were randomized controlled trials (RCTs)], five reporting on

I. A. Bliziotis; F. Ntziora; K. R. Lawrence; M. E. Falagas

2007-01-01

205

Palmitoleic Acid Isomer (C16:1?6) in Human Skin Sebum Is Effective against Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The percent lipid composition of pooled human sebum analyzed by thin-layer chromatography was: ceramides (13%), fatty acid (47%), cholesterol (7%), cholesterol esters (2%), squalene (11%), triglycerides (3%), and wax esters (17%). Total sebum lipids (2– 4 mg\\/ml), sonicated into bacterial culture medium, caused 4- to 5-fold log reduction in growth of gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus salivarius and the anaerobe

J. J. Wille; A. Kydonieus

2003-01-01

206

Evaluation of the revised MicroScan dried overnight gram-positive identification panel to identify Enterococcus species.  

PubMed

The revised MicroScan Dried Overnight Gram-Positive Identification panel was evaluated for its efficacy at identifying Enterococcus species in comparison with conventional biochemical tests. Supplemental testing of ampicillin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium for motility and the ability to acidify methyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside helped recognize E. gallinarum and increased the accuracy of the panel for identifying Enterococcus species to 98.5%. PMID:10523594

Iwen, P C; Rupp, M E; Schreckenberger, P C; Hinrichs, S H

1999-11-01

207

In Vitro Activity of Ozenoxacin against Quinolone-Susceptible and Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210–1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections. PMID:24080666

López, Y.; Tato, M.; Espinal, P.; Garcia-Alonso, F.; Gargallo-Viola, D.; Cantón, R.

2013-01-01

208

Sustained generation of electricity by the spore-forming, Gram-positive, Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain DCB2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain DCB2 gen- erates electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) when humic acids or the humate analog anthraquinone-2,6- disulfonate (AQDS) is added as an electron-carrying mediator. When utilizing formate as fuel, the Gram- positive, spore-forming bacterium generated up to 400 mW\\/m2 of cathode surface area in a single-chamber MFC with a platinum-containing air-fed cathode. Hydro- gen, lactate, pyruvate,

C. E. Milliken; H. D. May

2007-01-01

209

Molecular, technological and safety characterization of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages  

Microsoft Academic Search

The population of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages was characterized at species and strain level by molecular techniques and some technological and hygienic aspects were also considered. Staphylococcus xylosus was the predominant species (80.8%) followed by Staphylococcus warneri (8.3%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (5.8%) Staphylococcus carnosus (4.6%), and Kocuria varians (0.4%). Proteolytic activity was observed in 23% of the isolates.

B. Martín; M. Garriga; M. Hugas; S. Bover-Cid; M. T. Veciana-Nogués; T. Aymerich

2006-01-01

210

Soluble bacterial constituents down-regulate secretion of IL12 in response to intact Gram-positive bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intact Gram-positive bacteria induce production of large amounts of IL-12 from freshly isolated human monocytes. Here the bacterial structures and signalling pathways involved were studied and compared with those leading to IL-6 production, and to IL-12 production in response to LPS after IFN-? pre-treatment. Intact bifidobacteria induced massive production of IL-12 (1ng\\/ml) and IL-6 (>30ng\\/ml) from human PBMC, whereas fragmented

Cecilia Barkman; Anna Martner; Christina Hessle; Agnes E. Wold

2008-01-01

211

A Toll-Like Receptor 2Responsive Lipid Effector Pathway Protects Mammals against Skin Infections with Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

flake (flk), an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced recessive germ line mutation of C57BL\\/6 mice, impairs the clearance of skin infections by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus, gram-positive pathogens that elicit innate immune responses by activating Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) (K. Takeda and S. Akira, Cell. Microbiol. 5:143-153, 2003). Positional cloning and sequencing revealed that flk is a novel allele of the stearoyl coenzyme

Philippe Georgel; Karine Crozat; Xavier Lauth; Evgenia Makrantonaki; Holger Seltmann; Sosathya Sovath; Kasper Hoebe; Xin Du; Sophie Rutschmann; Zhengfan Jiang; Timothy Bigby; Victor Nizet; Christos C. Zouboulis; Bruce Beutler

2005-01-01

212

Mechanisms of the resistance and tolerance to beta-lactam and glycopeptide antibiotics in pathogenic gram-positive cocci.  

PubMed

Beta-lactams are the most frequently used antimicrobials in combating infections. In the case of gram-positive bacteria resistant to beta-lactams, glycopeptides are the first choice. The occurrence, mechanisms and genetic background of the resistance of pathogenic staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci to beta-lactam and glycopeptide antibiotics were discussed. The resistances to well-established antimicrobials, as well as new agents (ceftobiprole, oritavancin, telavancin, dalbavancin) were taken into consideration in the text. PMID:20205634

Mlynarczyk, A; Mlynarczyk, B; Kmera-Muszynska, M; Majewski, S; Mlynarczyk, G

2009-11-01

213

In Vitro Activities of Dalbavancin and Nine Comparator Agents against Anaerobic Gram-Positive Species and Corynebacteria  

PubMed Central

Dalbavancin is a novel semisynthetic glycopeptide with enhanced activity against gram-positive species. Its comparative in vitro activities and those of nine comparator agents, including daptomycin, vancomycin, linezolid, and quinupristin-dalfopristin, against 290 recent gram-positive clinical isolates strains, as determined by the NCCLS agar dilution method, were studied. The MICs of dalbavancin at which 90% of various isolates tested were inhibited were as follows: Actinomyces spp., 0.5 ?g/ml; Clostridium clostridioforme, 8 ?g/ml; C. difficile, 0.25 ?g/ml; C. innocuum, 0.25 ?g/ml; C. perfringens, 0.125 ?g/ml; C. ramosum, 1 ?g/ml; Eubacterium spp., 1 ?g/ml; Lactobacillus spp., >32 ?g/ml, Propionibacterium spp., 0.5 ?g/ml; and Peptostreptococcus spp., 0.25 ?g/ml. Dalbavancin was 1 to 3 dilutions more active than vancomycin against most strains. Dalbavancin exhibited excellent activity against gram-positive strains tested and warrants clinical evaluation. PMID:12760876

Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrell, Kerin; Fernandez, Helen T.

2003-01-01

214

Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

2011-12-01

215

Gram-positive and gram-negative subcellular localization using rotation forest and physicochemical-based features  

PubMed Central

Background The functioning of a protein relies on its location in the cell. Therefore, predicting protein subcellular localization is an important step towards protein function prediction. Recent studies have shown that relying on Gene Ontology (GO) for feature extraction can improve the prediction performance. However, for newly sequenced proteins, the GO is not available. Therefore, for these cases, the prediction performance of GO based methods degrade significantly. Results In this study, we develop a method to effectively employ physicochemical and evolutionary-based information in the protein sequence. To do this, we propose segmentation based feature extraction method to explore potential discriminatory information based on physicochemical properties of the amino acids to tackle Gram-positive and Gram-negative subcellular localization. We explore our proposed feature extraction techniques using 10 attributes that have been experimentally selected among a wide range of physicochemical attributes. Finally by applying the Rotation Forest classification technique to our extracted features, we enhance Gram-positive and Gram-negative subcellular localization accuracies up to 3.4% better than previous studies which used GO for feature extraction. Conclusion By proposing segmentation based feature extraction method to explore potential discriminatory information based on physicochemical properties of the amino acids as well as using Rotation Forest classification technique, we are able to enhance the Gram-positive and Gram-negative subcellular localization prediction accuracies, significantly. PMID:25734546

2015-01-01

216

Determination of the gram-positive bacterial content of soils and sediments by analysis of teichoic acid components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many gram-positive bacteria form substituted polymers of glycerol and ribitol phosphate esters known as teichoic acids. Utilizing the relative specificity of cold concentrated hydrofluoric acid in the hydrolysis of polyphosphate esters it proved possible to quantitatively assay the teichoic acid-derived glycerol and ribitol from gram-positive bacteria added to various soils and sediments. The lipids are first removed from the soils or sediments with a one phase chloroform-methanol extraction and the lipid extracted residue is hydrolyzed with cold concentrated hydrofluoric acid. To achieve maximum recovery of the teichoic acid ribitol, a second acid hydrolysis of the aqueous extract is required. The glycerol and ribitol are then acetylated after neutralization and analyzed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. This technique together with measures of the total phospholipid, the phospholipid fatty acid, the muramic acid and the hydroxy fatty acids of the lipopolysaccharide lipid A of the gram-negative bacteria makes it possible to describe the community structure environmental samples. The proportion of gram-positive bacteria measured as the teichoic acid glycerol and ribitol is higher in soils than in sediments and increases with depth in both.

Gehron, M. J.; Davis, J. D.; Smith, G. A.; White, D. C.

1984-01-01

217

Bioreduction of Cr(VI) by alkaliphilic Bacillus subtilis and interaction of the membrane groups  

PubMed Central

Detoxification of Cr(VI) under alkaline pH requires attention due to the alkaline nature of many effluents. An alkaliphilic gram-positive Bacillus subtilis isolated from tannery effluent contaminated soil was found to grow and reduce Cr(VI) up to 100% at an alkaline pH 9. Decrease in pH to acidic range with growth of the bacterium signified the role played by metabolites (organic acids) in chromium resistance and reduction mechanism. The XPS and FT-IR spectra confirmed the reduction of Cr(VI) by bacteria into +3 oxidation state. Chromate reductase assay indicated that the reduction was mediated by constitutive membrane bound enzymes. The kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction activity derived using the monod equation proved (Ks = 0.00032) high affinity of the organism to the metal. This study thus helped to localize the reduction activity at subcellular level in a chromium resistant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. PMID:23961119

Mary Mangaiyarkarasi, M.S.; Vincent, S.; Janarthanan, S.; Subba Rao, T.; Tata, B.V.R.

2010-01-01

218

In Vitro Activities of Daptomycin, Vancomycin, Quinupristin- Dalfopristin, Linezolid, and Five Other Antimicrobials against 307 Gram-Positive Anaerobic and 31 Corynebacterium Clinical Isolates  

PubMed Central

The activities of daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide, and eight other agents were determined against 338 strains of gram-positive anaerobic bacteria and corynebacteria by the NCCLS reference agar dilution method with supplemented brucella agar for the anaerobes and Mueller-Hinton agar for the corynebacteria. The daptomycin MICs determined on Ca2+-supplemented (50 mg/liter) brucella agar plates were one- to fourfold lower than those determined in unsupplemented media. Daptomycin was highly active (MICs, ?2 ?g/ml) against many strains including 36 of 37 peptostreptococci, 37 of 48 isolates of the Eubacterium group, and all strains of Propionibacterium spp., Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium difficile, and other Clostridium spp. It was fourfold or greater more active than vancomycin against Clostridium innocuum and 16 of 34 strains of vancomycin-resistant lactobacilli. Three strains of C. difficile for which quinupristin-dalfopristin and linezolid MICs were >8 ?g/ml were inhibited by <1 ?g of daptomycin per ml. Daptomycin MICs were ?4 ?g/ml for most strains of Clostridium clostridioforme, Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium tertium, and Clostridium ramosum; the isolates were generally more resistant to other antimicrobials. Daptomycin was two- to fourfold less active against Actinomyces spp. than vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, or linezolid. Twenty-nine of 31 strains of Corynebacterium spp., including Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium amycolatum, and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum, were inhibited by ?0.25 ?g of daptomycin per ml. For two strains of “Corynebacterium aquaticum,” 8 ?g of daptomycin per ml was required for inhibition. Daptomycin demonstrated very good activities against a broad range of gram-positive organisms including vancomycin-resistant C. innocuum and lactobacillus strains and quinupristin-dalfopristin- and linezolid-resistant C. difficile strains. PMID:12499210

Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerrin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

2003-01-01

219

Multicenter Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Gram-Positive Aerobic Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) is gaining momentum as a tool for bacterial identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Compared with conventional methods, this technology can more readily and conveniently identify a wide range of organisms. Here, we report the findings from a multicenter study to evaluate the Vitek MS v2.0 system (bioMérieux, Inc.) for the identification of aerobic Gram-positive bacteria. A total of 1,146 unique isolates, representing 13 genera and 42 species, were analyzed, and results were compared to those obtained by nucleic acid sequence-based identification as the reference method. For 1,063 of 1,146 isolates (92.8%), the Vitek MS provided a single identification that was accurate to the species level. For an additional 31 isolates (2.7%), multiple possible identifications were provided, all correct at the genus level. Mixed-genus or single-choice incorrect identifications were provided for 18 isolates (1.6%). Although no identification was obtained for 33 isolates (2.9%), there was no specific bacterial species for which the Vitek MS consistently failed to provide identification. In a subset of 463 isolates representing commonly encountered important pathogens, 95% were accurately identified to the species level and there were no misidentifications. Also, in all but one instance, the Vitek MS correctly differentiated Streptococcus pneumoniae from other viridans group streptococci. The findings demonstrate that the Vitek MS system is highly accurate for the identification of Gram-positive aerobic bacteria in the clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23658261

Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Bythrow, Maureen; Garner, Omai B.; Ginocchio, Christine C.; Jennemann, Rebecca; Lewinski, Michael A.; Manji, Ryhana; Mochon, A. Brian; Procop, Gary W.; Richter, Sandra S.; Sercia, Linda; Westblade, Lars F.; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Branda, John A.

2013-01-01

220

Transcriptional Organization and Posttranscriptional Regulation of the Bacillus subtilis BranchedChain Amino Acid Biosynthesis Genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Bacillus subtilis, the genes of the branched-chain amino acids biosynthetic pathway are organized in three genetic loci: the ilvBHC-leuABCD (ilv-leu) operon, ilvA, and ilvD. These genes, as well as ybgE, encoding a branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase, were recently demonstrated to represent direct targets of the global transcriptional regulator CodY. In the present study, the transcriptional organization and posttran- scriptional

Ulrike Mader; Susanne Hennig; Michael Hecker; Georg Homuth

2004-01-01

221

[Suitability of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as test organism bioindicators for detecting superheating of steam].  

PubMed

Biological indicators used to test sterilisation procedures for their efficacy consist of a so-called germ carrier to which the microorganisms used as test organisms adhere. In previous papers we demonstrated that carriers made of filter paper on contact with saturated steam show superheating while carriers made of glass fibre fleece as well as wetted filter paper do not. Using spores of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus as test organisms we have now investigated whether and to what extent carrier superheating affects the characteristic values (t50%) of these biological indicators. The indicators were exposed to saturated steam at 100 degrees C (B. subtilis) or 120 degrees C (B. stearothermophilus) under three different exposure conditions: 1. dry (i.e. conditioned to 45% relative humidity before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible; 2. dry with a substratum and a cover of filter card-board; 3. wet (moistened with twice distilled water before introduction into the sterilising chamber), freely accessible. For previously selected exposure periods, the incidence of indicators with surviving test organisms was determined. The reaction pattern of bioindicators with spores of B. stearothermophilus was different from that of bioindicators with spores of B. subtilis. For B. subtilis, the incidence of bioindicators exhibiting surviving test organisms depended on the nature of the carries as well as on the exposure conditions. On filter paper carriers, t50% increased in the order "wet, freely accessible", "dry, freely accessible", "dry, between filter card-board". On dry and wetted glass fibre fleece, resistance was approximately the same; when the indicators were sandwiched between layers of filter card-board, t50% increased. For B. stearothermophilus, t50% was largely dependent on the carrier material alone. The values obtained for filter paper were invariably much lower than those for glass fibre fleece. As the results show, using spores of B. subtilis it is possible to detect superheating, but the steam resistance of the spores is relatively low. Spores of B. stearothermophilus are of high steam resistance but they are practically unsuitable for detecting superheating. It is imperative to search for a test organism the resistance of which against steam is sufficiently high and which at the same time is capable of reacting to superheating (equivalent to reduced humidity) by a sufficiently large increase in resistance. PMID:9376061

Spicher, G; Peters, J

1997-02-01

222

Results of the surveillance of Tedizolid activity and resistance program: in vitro susceptibility of gram-positive pathogens collected in 2011 and 2012 from the United States and Europe.  

PubMed

The in vitro activity and spectrum of tedizolid and comparators were analyzed against 6884 Gram-positive clinical isolates collected from multiple US and European sites as part of the Surveillance of Tedizolid Activity and Resistance Program in 2011 and 2012. Organisms included 4499 Staphylococcus aureus, 537 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), 873 enterococci, and 975 ?-hemolytic streptococci. The MIC values that inhibited 90% of the isolates within each group (MIC90) were 0.25 ?g/mL for Staphylococcus epidermidis and ?-hemolytic streptococci and 0.5 ?g/mL for S. aureus, other CoNS, and enterococci. Of 16 isolates with elevated tedizolid or linezolid MIC values (intermediate or resistant isolates), 10 had mutations in the genes encoding 23S rRNA (primarily G2576T), 5 had mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins L3 or L4, and 5 carried the cfr multidrug resistance gene. Overall, tedizolid showed excellent activity against Gram-positive bacteria and was at least 4-fold more potent than linezolid against wild-type and linezolid-resistant isolates. Given the low overall frequency of isolates that would be resistant to tedizolid at the proposed break point of 0.5 ?g/mL (0.19%) and potent activity against contemporary US and European isolates, tedizolid has the potential to serve as a valuable therapeutic option in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:25488274

Sahm, Daniel F; Deane, Jennifer; Bien, Paul A; Locke, Jeffrey B; Zuill, Douglas E; Shaw, Karen J; Bartizal, Ken F

2015-02-01

223

Genome Sequencing of Bacillus subtilis SC-8, Antagonistic to the Bacillus cereus Group, Isolated from Traditional Korean Fermented-Soybean Food  

PubMed Central

Bacillus subtilis SC-8 is a Gram-positive bacterium displaying narrow antagonistic activity for the Bacillus cereus group. B. subtilis SC-8 was isolated from Korean traditional fermented-soybean food. Here we report the draft genome sequence of B. subtilis SC-8, including biosynthetic genes for antibiotics that may have beneficial effects for control of food-borne pathogens. PMID:22207744

Yeo, In-Cheol; Lee, Nam Keun

2012-01-01

224

Antimicrobial and Efflux Pump Inhibitory Activity of Caffeoylquinic Acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-Positive Pathogenic Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4?,5?-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4?,5?-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3?,5?-ODCQA, 4?,5?-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4?,5?-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3?,5?-ODCQA was ineffective. These intitial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. Conclusions/Significance These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the biological information for the inhibitory capabilities of 4?,5?-ODCQA and furthermore contributed evidence that CQAs show a preferential binding to Major Facilitator Super family efflux systems, a key multidrug resistance determinant in gram-positive bacteria. PMID:21483731

Fiamegos, Yiannis C.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Han, Haley; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Vervoort, Jacques; Lewis, Kim; Hamblin, Michael R.; Tegos, George P.

2011-01-01

225

Surface Proteins of Gram-Positive Bacteria and Mechanisms of Their Targeting to the Cell Wall Envelope  

PubMed Central

The cell wall envelope of gram-positive bacteria is a macromolecular, exoskeletal organelle that is assembled and turned over at designated sites. The cell wall also functions as a surface organelle that allows gram-positive pathogens to interact with their environment, in particular the tissues of the infected host. All of these functions require that surface proteins and enzymes be properly targeted to the cell wall envelope. Two basic mechanisms, cell wall sorting and targeting, have been identified. Cell well sorting is the covalent attachment of surface proteins to the peptidoglycan via a C-terminal sorting signal that contains a consensus LPXTG sequence. More than 100 proteins that possess cell wall-sorting signals, including the M proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes, protein A of Staphylococcus aureus, and several internalins of Listeria monocytogenes, have been identified. Cell wall targeting involves the noncovalent attachment of proteins to the cell surface via specialized binding domains. Several of these wall-binding domains appear to interact with secondary wall polymers that are associated with the peptidoglycan, for example teichoic acids and polysaccharides. Proteins that are targeted to the cell surface include muralytic enzymes such as autolysins, lysostaphin, and phage lytic enzymes. Other examples for targeted proteins are the surface S-layer proteins of bacilli and clostridia, as well as virulence factors required for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes (internalin B) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PspA) infections. In this review we describe the mechanisms for both sorting and targeting of proteins to the envelope of gram-positive bacteria and review the functions of known surface proteins. PMID:10066836

Navarre, William Wiley; Schneewind, Olaf

1999-01-01

226

Recognition of Gram-positive Intestinal Bacteria by Hybridoma- and Colostrum-derived Secretory Immunoglobulin A Is Mediated by Carbohydrates*  

PubMed Central

Humans live in symbiosis with 1014 commensal bacteria among which >99% resides in their gastrointestinal tract. The molecular bases pertaining to the interaction between mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) and bacteria residing in the intestine are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that commensals are naturally coated by SIgA in the gut lumen. Thus, understanding how natural SIgA interacts with commensal bacteria can provide new clues on its multiple functions at mucosal surfaces. Using fluorescently labeled, nonspecific SIgA or secretory component (SC), we visualized by confocal microscopy the interaction with various commensal bacteria, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, Escherichia coli, and Bacteroides strains. These experiments revealed that the interaction between SIgA and commensal bacteria involves Fab- and Fc-independent structural motifs, featuring SC as a crucial partner. Removal of glycans present on free SC or bound in SIgA resulted in a drastic drop in the interaction with Gram-positive bacteria, indicating the essential role of carbohydrates in the process. In contrast, poor binding of Gram-positive bacteria by control IgG was observed. The interaction with Gram-negative bacteria was preserved whatever the molecular form of protein partner used, suggesting the involvement of different binding motifs. Purified SIgA and SC from either mouse hybridoma cells or human colostrum exhibited identical patterns of recognition for Gram-positive bacteria, emphasizing conserved plasticity between species. Thus, sugar-mediated binding of commensals by SIgA highlights the currently underappreciated role of glycans in mediating the interaction between a highly diverse microbiota and the mucosal immune system. PMID:21454510

Mathias, Amandine; Corthésy, Blaise

2011-01-01

227

Antibiotic management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to antibiotic-resistant gram-positive bacterial infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gram-positive cocci, in particular Staphylococcus aureus, account for as much as one-third of all cases of hospital-acquired pneumonia, and treatment has become increasingly complex\\u000a as the proportion of resistant isolates has increased. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus is of particular concern because this pathogen is now associated with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated, community-acquired,\\u000a and healthcare-associated pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy for ventilator-associated pneumonia is challenging because

M. H. Kollef

2005-01-01

228

Identification, classification, and clinical relevance of catalase-negative, gram-positive cocci, excluding the streptococci and enterococci.  

PubMed Central

Several new genera and species of gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci that can cause infections in humans have been described. Although these bacteria were isolated in the clinical laboratory, they were considered nonpathogenic culture contaminants and were not thought to be the cause of any diseases. Isolation of pure cultures of these bacteria from normally sterile sites has led to the conclusion that these bacteria can be an infrequent cause of infection. This review describes the new bacteria and the procedures useful for clinical laboratories to aid in their identification. The clinical relevance and our experience with the various genera and species are reviewed and discussed. PMID:8665466

Facklam, R; Elliott, J A

1995-01-01

229

YabA of Bacillus subtilis controls DnaA-mediated replication initiation but not the transcriptional response to replication stress  

E-print Network

yabA encodes a negative regulator of replication initiation in Bacillus subtilis and homologues are found in many other Gram-positive species. YabA interacts with the ?-processivity clamp (DnaN) of DNA polymerase and with ...

Grossman, Alan D.

230

Tts, a processive beta-glucosyltransferase of Streptococcus pneumoniae, directs the synthesis of the branched type 37 capsular polysaccharide in Pneumococcus and other gram-positive species.  

PubMed

The type 37 capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a homopolysaccharide built up from repeating units of [beta-d-Glcp-(1-->2)]-beta-d-Glcp-(1-->3). The elements governing the expression of the tts gene, coding for the glucosyltransferase involved in the synthesis of the type 37 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide, have been studied. Primer extension analysis and functional tests demonstrated the presence of four new transcriptional start points upstream of the previously reported tts promoter (ttsp). Most interesting, three of these transcriptional start points are located in a RUP element thought to be involved in recombinational events (Oggioni, M. R., and Claverys, J. P. (1999) Microbiology 145, 2647-2653). Transformation experiments using either a recombinant plasmid containing the whole transcriptional unit of tts or chromosomal DNA from a type 37 pneumococcus showed that tts is the only gene required to drive the biosynthesis of a type 37 capsule in S. pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, namely Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Bacillus subtilis. The Tts synthase was overproduced in S. pneumoniae and purified as a membrane-associated enzyme. These membrane preparations used UDP-Glc as substrate to catalyze the synthesis of a high molecular weight polysaccharide immunologically identical to the type 37 capsule. In addition, UDP-Gal was also a substrate to produce type 37 polysaccharide since a strong UDP-Glc-4'-epimerase activity is associated to the membrane fraction of S. pneumoniae. These results indicated that Tts has a dual biochemical activity that leads to the synthesis of the branched type 37 polysaccharide. PMID:11264282

Llull, D; Garcia, E; Lopez, R

2001-06-15

231

Identification of a Ligand on the Wip1 Bacteriophage Highly Specific for a Receptor on Bacillus anthracis  

PubMed Central

Tectiviridae is a family of tailless bacteriophages with Gram-negative and Gram-positive hosts. The family model PRD1 and its close relatives all infect a broad range of enterobacteria by recognizing a plasmid-encoded conjugal transfer complex as a receptor. In contrast, tectiviruses with Gram-positive hosts are highly specific to only a few hosts within the same bacterial species. The cellular determinants that account for the observed specificity remain unknown. Here we present the genome sequence of Wip1, a tectivirus that infects the pathogen Bacillus anthracis. The Wip1 genome is related to other tectiviruses with Gram-positive hosts, notably, AP50, but displays some interesting differences in its genome organization. We identified Wip1 candidate genes for the viral spike complex, the structure located at the capsid vertices and involved in host receptor binding. Phage adsorption and inhibition tests were combined with immunofluorescence microscopy to show that the Wip1 gene product p23 is a receptor binding protein. His-p23 also formed a stable complex with p24, a Wip1 protein of unknown function, suggesting that the latter is involved with p23 in host cell recognition. The narrow host range of phage Wip1 and the identification of p23 as a receptor binding protein offer a new range of suitable tools for the rapid identification of B. anthracis. PMID:23893110

Kan, Sherry; Fornelos, Nadine; Schuch, Raymond

2013-01-01

232

Production of a bacteriocin by a poultry derived Campylobacter jejuni isolate with antimicrobial activity against Clostridium perfringens and other Gram positive bacteria.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We have purified a bacteriocin peptide (termed CUV-3), produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni (strain CUV-3) with inhibitory activity against Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Listeria mon...

233

Targeting agr- and agr-Like Quorum Sensing Systems for Development of Common Therapeutics to Treat Multiple Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections  

PubMed Central

Invasive infection by the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by a four gene operon, agr that encodes a quorum sensing system for the regulation of virulence. While agr has been well studied in S. aureus, the contribution of agr homologues and analogues in other Gram-positive pathogens is just beginning to be understood. Intriguingly, other significant human pathogens, including Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis contain agr or analogues linked to virulence. Moreover, other significant human Gram-positive pathogens use peptide based quorum sensing systems to establish or maintain infection. The potential for commonality in aspects of these signaling systems across different species raises the prospect of identifying therapeutics that could target multiple pathogens. Here, we review the status of research into these agr homologues, analogues, and other peptide based quorum sensing systems in Gram-positive pathogens as well as the potential for identifying common pathways and signaling mechanisms for therapeutic discovery. PMID:23598501

Gray, Brian; Hall, Pamela; Gresham, Hattie

2013-01-01

234

Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus.  

PubMed

Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

Corey, G Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L

2015-03-01

235

A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

2013-01-01

236

In vitro activity of the tribactam GV104326 against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic bacteria.  

PubMed Central

GV104326 is the first member of a new class of antibiotics (tribactams) selected for development. It combines a particularly broad spectrum (including gram-negative and gram-positive aerobes and anaerobes) with high potency, resistance to beta-lactamases, and complete stability to dehydropeptidases. Comparative MICs were determined for GV104326 against 415 recent clinical isolates (including beta-lactamase producers), using representative antibacterial agents (imipenem, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefpirome, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and erythromycin). GV104326 was particularly active against gram-positive bacteria; in general, its in vitro activity was equivalent to that of imipenem, equivalent to or better than that of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and superior to that of cefpirome, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin. Against gram-negative bacteria, GV104326 possessed activity similar to that of imipenem and cefpirome against enterobacteria and Haemophilus spp. but its activity was superior to that of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid. GV104326 showed excellent antianaerobe activity. GV104326 was stable to all clinically relevant beta-lactamases and was rapidly lethal to susceptible bacteria. In Escherichia coli, GV104326 bound predominantly to PBPs 1a and 2 and at low concentrations osmotically stable round forms were observed. GV104326 showed an affinity for PBPs 2 and 4 of Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:7840571

Di Modugno, E; Erbetti, I; Ferrari, L; Galassi, G; Hammond, S M; Xerri, L

1994-01-01

237

Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus  

PubMed Central

Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

Corey, G. Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L.

2015-01-01

238

Performances of VITEK 2 Colorimetric Cards for Identification of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Thepurpose of this study was to evaluate the new VITEK 2 identification cards that use colorimetric reading to identify gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (GP and GN cards, respectively) in comparison to fluorimetric cards (ID-GPC and ID-GNB, respectively). A total of 580 clinical isolates and stock collection strains belonging to 116 taxa were included in the study. Of the 249 gram-positive strains tested with both the ID-GPC and GP cards, 218 (87.5%) and 235 (94.4%) strains were correctly identified (to the genus and species level), respectively. Of the 331 gram-negative strains tested with the ID-GNB and GN cards, 295 (89.1%) and 321 (97%) strains were correctly identified, respectively. Another focus of the study was to apply the percentages of correct identifications obtained in this study to the list of bacteria isolated in our laboratory (32,739 isolates) in the year 2004. We obtained 97.9% correct identifications with the colorimetric cards and 93.9% with fluorescent cards. PMID:16145083

Wallet, Frédéric; Loïez, Caroline; Renaux, Emilie; Lemaitre, Nadine; Courcol, René J.

2005-01-01

239

Intracerebral abscess with dissecting pneumocephalus caused by a gas-producing gram-positive rod following craniotomy for glioblastoma multiforme resection.  

PubMed

Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), an indolent and slow-growing anaerobic gram-positive bacterium, has largely been known as a commensal organism of the normal skin flora. However, P. acnes is increasingly being recognized as the causative infectious organism complicating craniotomies and shunt insertions. To our knowledge, we present the first reported patient with an intracerebral abscess with dissecting pneumocephalus caused by P. acnes. A 58-year-old woman who was immunocompetent presented 3 weeks after a craniotomy for resection of a glioblastoma multiforme with worsening mental status, lethargy and left hemiparesis. Head CT scans and MRI demonstrated significant vasogenic edema and dissecting pneumocephalus in the resection cavity. A craniotomy was performed and purulent material was found in the subdural space and resection cavity. Cultures were positive for P. acnes. She completed a full course of intravenous antibiotics appropriate for the organism. The infection was eradicated and the patient survived albeit with persistent deficits. This case illustrates the importance of considering an underlying intracerebral abscess in patients with worsening neurological function and pneumocephalus on imaging several weeks after surgery. Our review of the literature underscores the great importance in early recognition and treatment with both surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy in achieving optimal patient recovery. PMID:23688444

Sarkiss, Christopher A; Soleymani, Teo; Caplan, Justin M; Dorsi, Michael J; Huang, Judy

2013-11-01

240

Assessment of the in vitro Efficacy of the Novel Antimicrobial Peptide CECT7121 against Human Gram-Positive Bacteria from Serious Infections Refractory to Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Resistant Gram-positive bacteria are causing increasing concern in clinical practice. This work investigated theefficacy of AP-CECT7121 (an antimicrobial peptide isolated from an environmental strain of Enterococcus faecalis CECT7121) against various pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria. Methods: Strains were isolated from intensive care unit patients unresponsive to standard antibiotic treatments. Inhibitory activity of AP-CECT7121 was assessed using the agar-well diffusion method. The

M. D. Sparo; D. G. Jones; S. F. Sánchez Bruni

2009-01-01

241

A Newly Discovered Bacteroides Conjugative Transposon, CTnGERM1, Contains Genes Also Found in Gram-Positive Bacteria  

PubMed Central

Results of a recent study of antibiotic resistance genes in human colonic Bacteroides strains suggested that gene transfer events between members of this genus are fairly common. The identification of Bacteroides isolates that carried an erythromycin resistance gene, ermG, whose DNA sequence was 99% identical to that of an ermG gene found previously only in gram-positive bacteria raised the further possibility that conjugal elements were moving into Bacteroides species from other genera. Six of seven ermG-containing Bacteroides strains tested were able to transfer ermG by conjugation. One of these strains was chosen for further investigation. Results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the conjugal element carrying ermG in this strain is an integrated element about 75 kb in size. Thus, the element appears to be a conjugative transposon (CTn) and was designated CTnGERM1. CTnGERM1 proved to be unrelated to the predominant type of CTn found in Bacteroides isolates—CTns of the CTnERL/CTnDOT family—which sometimes carry another type of erm gene, ermF. A 19-kbp segment of DNA from CTnGERM1 was cloned and sequenced. A 10-kbp portion of this segment hybridized not only to DNA from all the ermG-containing strains but also to DNA from strains that did not carry ermG. Thus, CTnGERM1 seems to be part of a family of CTns, some of which have acquired ermG. The percentage of G+C content of the ermG region was significantly lower than that of the chromosome of Bacteroides species—an indication that CTnGERM1 may have entered Bacteroides strains from some other bacterial genus. A survey of strains isolated before 1970 and after 1990 suggests that the CTnGERM1 type of CTn entered Bacteroides species relatively recently. One of the genes located upstream of ermG encoded a protein that had 85% amino acid sequence identity with a macrolide efflux pump, MefA, from Streptococcus pyogenes. Our having found >90% sequence identity of two upstream genes, including mefA, and the remnants of two transposon-carried genes downstream of ermG with genes found previously only in gram-positive bacteria raises the possibility that gram-positive bacteria could have been the origin of CTnGERM1. PMID:12902247

Wang, Yanping; Wang, Gui-Rong; Shelby, Aikiesha; Shoemaker, Nadja B.; Salyers, Abigail A.

2003-01-01

242

Daptomycin Activity against Uncommonly Isolated Streptococcal and Other Gram-Positive Species Groups  

PubMed Central

A total of 1,356 clinical isolates were tested against daptomycin by broth microdilution methods. Daptomycin was active against seven groups of viridans group streptococci (MIC50 and MIC90 values ranging from ?0.06 and ?0.06 ?g/ml [Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae] to 0.5 and 1 ?g/ml [Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus parasanguinis], respectively), beta-hemolytic streptococci serogroups C, F, and G (MIC50 and MIC90, ?0.06 to 0.25 and 0.12 to 0.25 ?g/ml, respectively), Corynebacterium spp. (MIC50 and MIC90, ?0.06 and 0.12 ?g/ml, respectively), and Micrococcus spp. (MIC50 and MIC90, ?0.06 and 0.25 ?g/ml, respectively). Listeria monocytogenes exhibited higher daptomycin MICs (MIC50 and MIC90, 2 and 4 ?g/ml, respectively) than other tested organisms. PMID:24080651

Flamm, Robert K.; Farrell, David J.; Jones, Ronald N.

2013-01-01

243

Differential sensitivity of aerobic gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) leads to dissimilar growth and TNT transformation: Results of soil and pure culture studies  

SciTech Connect

The effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on indigenous soil populations and pure bacterial cultures were examined. The number of colony-forming units (CFU) appearing when TNT-contaminated soil was spread on 0.3% molasses plates decreased by 50% when the agar was amended with 67 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, whereas a 99% reduction was observed when uncontaminated soil was plated. Furthermore, TNT-contaminated soil harbored a greater number of organisms able to grow on plates amended with greater than 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. The percentage of gram-positive isolates was markedly less in TNT-contaminated soil (7%; 2 of 30) than in uncontaminated soil (61%; 20 of 33). Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas corrugate, Pseudomonasfluorescens and Alcaligenes xylosoxidans made up the majority of the gram-negative isolates from TNT-contaminated soil. Gram-positive isolates from both soils demonstrated marked growth inhibition when greater than 8-16 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} was present in the culture media. Most pure cultures of known aerobic gram-negative organisms readily degraded TNT and evidenced net consumption of reduced metabolites. However, pure cultures of aerobic gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to relatively low concentrations of TNT as indicated by the 50% reduction in growth and TNT transformation which was observed at approximately 10 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}. Most non-sporeforming gram-positive organisms incubated in molasses media amended with 80 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1} or greater became unculturable, whereas all strains tested remained culturable when incubated in mineral media amended with 98 {mu}g TNT mL{sup -1}, indicating that TNT sensitivity is likely linked to cell growth. These results indicate that gram-negative organisms are most likely responsible for any TNT transformation in contaminated soil, due to their relative insensitivity to high TNT concentrations and their ability to transform TNT.

Fuller, M.E.; Manning, J.F. Jr.

1996-07-30

244

Plants used in Guatemala for the treatment of respiratory diseases. 1. Screening of 68 plants against gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Respiratory ailments are important causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Ethnobotanical surveys and literature reviews conducted in Guatemala during 1986-88 showed that 234 plants from 75 families, most of them of American origin, have been used for the treatment of respiratory ailments. Three Gram-positive bacteria causing respiratory infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes) were used to screen 68 of the most commonly used plants for activity. Twenty-eight of these (41.2%) inhibited the growth of one or more of the bacteria tested. Staphylococcus aureus was inhibited by 18 of the plant extracts, while 7 extracts were effective against Streptococcus pyogenes. Plants of American origin which exhibited antibacterial activity were: Gnaphalium viscosum, Lippia alba, Lippia dulcis, Physalis philadelphica, Satureja brownei, Solanum nigrescens and Tagetes lucida. These preliminary in vitro results provide scientific basis for the use of these plants against bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:2023428

Caceres, A; Alvarez, A V; Ovando, A E; Samayoa, B E

1991-02-01

245

In Vitro Activities of the New Semisynthetic Glycopeptide Telavancin (TD-6424), Vancomycin, Daptomycin, Linezolid, and Four Comparator Agents against Anaerobic Gram-Positive Species and Corynebacterium spp.  

PubMed Central

Telavancin is a new semisynthetic glycopeptide anti-infective with multiple mechanisms of action, including inhibition of bacterial membrane phospholipid synthesis and inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. We determined the in vitro activities of telavancin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, and ampicillin against 268 clinical isolates of anaerobic gram-positive organisms and 31 Corynebacterium strains using agar dilution methods according to National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards procedures. Plates with daptomycin were supplemented with Ca2+ to 50 mg/liter. The MICs at which 90% of isolates tested were inhibited (MIC90s) for telavancin and vancomycin were as follows: Actinomyces spp. (n = 45), 0.25 and 1 ?g/ml, respectively; Clostridium difficile (n = 14), 0.25 and 1 ?g/ml, respectively; Clostridium ramosum (n = 16), 1 and 4 ?g/ml, respectively; Clostridium innocuum (n = 15), 4 and 16 ?g/ml, respectively; Clostridium clostridioforme (n = 15), 8 and 1 ?g/ml, respectively; Eubacterium group (n = 33), 0.25 and 2 ?g/ml, respectively; Lactobacillus spp. (n = 26), 0.5 and 4 ?g/ml, respectively; Propionibacterium spp. (n = 34), 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml, respectively; Peptostreptococcus spp. (n = 52), 0.125 and 0.5 ?g/ml, respectively; and Corynebacterium spp. (n = 31), 0.03 and 0.5 ?g/ml, respectively. The activity of TD-6424 was similar to that of quinupristin-dalfopristin for most strains except C. clostridioforme and Lactobacillus casei, where quinupristin-dalfopristin was three- to fivefold more active. Daptomycin had decreased activity (MIC > 4 ?g/ml) against 14 strains of Actinomyces spp. and all C. ramosum, Eubacterium lentum, and Lactobacillus plantarum strains. Linezolid showed decreased activity (MIC > 4 ?g/ml) against C. ramosum, two strains of C. difficile, and 15 strains of Lactobacillus spp. Imipenem and piperacillin-tazobactam were active against >98% of strains. The MICs of ampicillin for eight Clostridium spp. and three strains of L. casei were >1 ?g/ml. The MIC90 of TD-6424 for all strains tested was ?2 ?g/ml. TD-6424 has potential for use against infections with gram-positive anaerobes and deserves further clinical evaluation. PMID:15155214

Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

2004-01-01

246

Long-term fertilization of organic manure led to the succession of Bacillus community in an alluvial-aquic soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term fertilization inevitably influences soil physic-chemical and biological properties. Our previous studies with a long-term fertilization experiment on an alluvial-aquic have revealed that specific Bacillus spp. was observed in organic manure-fertilized soils. The current study investigated the effects of long-term fertilization on the succession of Bacillus community in soils and their functions. The experiment included three fertilizer treatments: organic manure (OM), mineral fertilizers (NPK) and the control (without fertilizers). The results showed that long-term application of chemical fertilizers didn't increase the quantity of soil microbial population as much as organic fertilizers did, but it played an important role in maintaining the diversity and community structure of indigenous Bacilli. Correspondingly, long-term application of organic manure significantly increased the quantity while significantly decreased the diversity of Bacilli community. The ratio of Bacilli/bacteria was more constant in OM treatment than NPK indicating the stability of the response to long-term organic fertilizers. PCR-DGGE and clone library revealed the succession of Bacillus community after long-term application of organic manure and the dominant Bacillus spp occurred in the treatmen OM was Bacillus asahii. Our results also proved that Bacillus asahii was not derived from exogenous organic manure, but one of indigenous bacteria in the soil. Bacillus asahii was induced by the substrate after the application of organic manure, and gradually evolved into dominant Bacillus after 4 to 5 years. With an enzyme assay test of pure species and a soil incubation experiment, we came to a preliminary judgment, that the dominant Bacillus asahii didn't significantly influence the decomposition rate of cellulose and protein in the soil, but it promoted the decomposition of lipids, and could also improve the transformation process from fresh organic matter to humus. Applied organic manure led to the succession of soil microbial community, as a response, the changed microbial community and their activities influenced the turnover of exogenous and native soil organic matter, as well as the residuals of decomposition and microbial metabolisms.

Chen, Ruirui; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi; Hu, Junli; Wang, Ruirui

2014-05-01

247

Gram-positive cell walls stimulate synthesis of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 by human monocytes.  

PubMed

Purified cell walls representing a wide variety in teichoic acid and peptidoglycan structure prepared from eight different gram-positive bacterial species induced the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 from human monocytes in the presence of 10% plasma or serum. Significant amounts of cytokines began to be produced at concentrations above 100 ng to 1 microgram of cell walls per ml, with maximal production requiring 10 to 100 micrograms of cell wall material per ml. In the absence of plasma, the cytokine-inducing capacity of cell wall preparations was lower by at least an order of magnitude. The serum-derived cofactor was inactivated by heating at 90 degrees C for 30 min, suggesting that the activity is associated with a protein. On the other hand, replacement of normal with hypogammaglobulinemic plasma, inactivation of complement (at 56 degrees C), and blockade by the monoclonal antibody MY4 of the CD14 receptors on monocytes did not inhibit the production of TNF-alpha induced by whole cell walls. Cell walls also stimulated production of TNF-alpha induced by whole cell walls. Cell walls also stimulated production of TNF-alpha in the presence of polymyxin B, and macrophages derived from the lipopolysaccharide-insensitive cell line of C3He/HeJ mice also produced this cytokine when stimulated by cell walls. Both peptidoglycan and the soluble glycan-teichoic acid component prepared by an enzymatic method from the same wall preparation exhibited a serum-dependent induction of TNF-alpha from monocytes, while stem peptides and disacharride peptides had only poor, if any, activity. Cell walls may contribute to the septic shock induced by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7516310

Heumann, D; Barras, C; Severin, A; Glauser, M P; Tomasz, A

1994-07-01

248

Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of CuO nanoparticles against Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains  

PubMed Central

Background CuO is one of the most important transition metal oxides due to its captivating properties. It is used in various technological applications such as high critical temperature superconductors, gas sensors, in photoconductive applications, and so on. Recently, it has been used as an antimicrobial agent against various bacterial species. Here we synthesized different sized CuO nanoparticles and explored the size-dependent antibacterial activity of each CuO nanoparticles preparation. Methods CuO nanoparticles were synthesized using a gel combustion method. In this approach, cupric nitrate trihydrate and citric acid were dissolved in distilled water with a molar ratio of 1:1. The resulting solution was stirred at 100°C, until gel was formed. The gel was allowed to burn at 200°C to obtain amorphous powder, which was further annealed at different temperatures to obtain different size CuO nanoparticles. We then tested the antibacterial properties using well diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum bactericidal concentration methods. Results XRD spectra confirmed the formation of single phase CuO nanoparticles. Crystallite size was found to increase with an increase in annealing temperature due to atomic diffusion. A minimum crystallite size of 20 nm was observed in the case of CuO nanoparticles annealed at 400°C. Transmission electron microscopy results corroborate well with XRD results. All CuO nanoparticles exhibited inhibitory effects against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. The size of the particles was correlated with its antibacterial activity. Conclusion The antibacterial activity of CuO nanoparticles was found to be size-dependent. In addition, the highly stable minimum-sized monodispersed copper oxide nanoparticles synthesized during this study demonstrated a significant increase in antibacterial activities against both Gram-positive and -negative bacterial strains. PMID:22848176

Azam, Ameer; Ahmed, Arham S; Oves, M; Khan, MS; Memic, Adnan

2012-01-01

249

The effect of Indomethacin and Betamethasone on the cytokine response of human neonatal mononuclear cells to gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Intrauterine infections with gram-positive bacteria pose a serious threat to neonates since they can result in neonatal sepsis, induce a fetal inflammatory response and also cause preterm birth. Despite intensive care, prematurity remains a leading cause of neonatal death, and is often accompanied by a number of morbidities. In order to prevent premature birth, tocolytic agents like Indomethacin are administered. Betamethasone is used to promote lung maturation and prevent respiratory distress syndrome. A combination of both drugs is assumed to prevent premature delivery while simultaneously facilitating lung maturation. This study investigates the effect of Betamethasone, Indomethacin and a combination of both on the cytokine production of neonatal cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) after stimulation with lysates of the gram-positive pathogens Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis. The aim of the study is to determine the impact of these drugs on the function of the neonatal immune system which should aid clinicians in choosing the optimal therapy in case of preterm birth associated with intrauterine infection. Betamethasone reduced the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12p40, MIP-1? and TNF and increased the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, depending on the pathogen used for stimulation. In contrast to Betamethasone, Indomethacin almost exclusively increased IL-10 production. The combination of both drugs decreased the expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, MIP-1? and TNF while increasing IL-10 production, depending on the concentration of Indomethacin and the pathogen used for stimulation. Based on our results, the combination therapy with Indomethacin and Betamethasone has a similar effect on cytokine production as Betamethasone alone, which is generally administered in case of impending preterm birth. However, the combination therapy has the advantage of promoting lung maturation while simultaneously blocking preterm labor effectively. PMID:25743243

Ernst, Wolfgang; Kusi, Evelyn; Fill Malfertheiner, Sara; Reuschel, Edith; Deml, Ludwig; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit

2015-05-01

250

Molecular, technological and safety characterization of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages.  

PubMed

The population of Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci from slightly fermented sausages was characterized at species and strain level by molecular techniques and some technological and hygienic aspects were also considered. Staphylococcus xylosus was the predominant species (80.8%) followed by Staphylococcus warneri (8.3%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (5.8%) Staphylococcus carnosus (4.6%), and Kocuria varians (0.4%). Proteolytic activity was observed in 23% of the isolates. The species with the highest percentage of proteolytic strains was S. warneri. Lipolytic activity was found in 45.8% of the isolates and S. xylosus was the species with the highest percentage of lipolytic isolates. Biogenic amine production was not widely distributed (only 14.6% of the isolates). Tyramine was the most intense amine produced, although by only 4.6% of the isolates. Phenylethylamine was more frequently detected (10.8% of isolates) but at lower levels. Some strains also produced putrescine (3.3%), cadaverine (2.9%), histamine (1.3%) and tryptamine (0.4%). All isolates were susceptible to linezolid and vancomicin and over 70% were resistant to penicillin G, ampicillin and sulphonamides. Most of the mecA+ strains (only 4.6% of isolates) also displayed resistance to multiple antibiotics. A reduced enterotoxigenic potential was found. Only 3.3% of isolates showed staphylococcal enterotoxins genes, all identified as entC gene. The combination of RAPD-PCR and plasmid profiling allowed the discrimination of 208 different profiles among the 240 Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci characterized, indicating a great genetic variability. PMID:16297478

Martín, B; Garriga, M; Hugas, M; Bover-Cid, S; Veciana-Nogués, M T; Aymerich, T

2006-03-15

251

A high frequency of MDSCs in sepsis patients, with the granulocytic subtype dominating in gram-positive cases.  

PubMed

The causative microorganisms dictate the type of MDSC generated in sepsis patients, and a large proportion of PMN-MDSCs in gram-positive sepsis includes immunosuppressive myeloid blasts. MDSCs constitute a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that potently suppress immune responses. They were identified originally in cancer patients and have since been reported to occur also in chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, and even bacterial infections. Human MDSCs are commonly divided into Mo-MDSCs and granulocytic (PMN-MDSCs) subtypes. To what extent the bona fide cancer MDSCs are representative of the proposed MDSCs found in other diseases is not well known. PMN-MDSCs have been found previously to be enriched among LDGs in density gradient-centrifuged blood. In this study, we analyzed potential MDSCs in sepsis patients with different causative microorganisms, using total peripheral blood compared with density gradient-centrifuged blood. We found a high frequency of typical CD14(+)HLA-DR(low) Mo-MDSCs in all sepsis patients, whereas the typical PMN-MDSCs, as well as a prominent CD14(low) PMN-MDSC-like population, appeared preferentially in gram-positive cases. The CD14(low) PMN-MDSC variant was demonstrated to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro via a ROS-dependent mechanism, to display an increased IL-10:TNF-? ratio, and to present with signs of immaturity: blast morphology and low cytokine levels. We conclude that a spectrum of cells with MDSC features is enriched in sepsis and that the microbial origin of sepsis contributes to the substantial interindividual patient variation in the MDSC pattern. PMID:24929004

Janols, Helena; Bergenfelz, Caroline; Allaoui, Roni; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Rydén, Lisa; Björnsson, Sven; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Wullt, Marlene; Bredberg, Anders; Leandersson, Karin

2014-11-01

252

Antimicrobial resistance patterns to beta-lactams of gram-positive cocci isolated from bovine mastitis in Lithuania.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to isolate gram-positive cocci from cows with mastitis and to determine their resistance to beta-lactamic antibiotics. Eight hundred and nine strains were isolated and identified as staphylococci (n=516), streptococci (n=199) and enterococci (n=94) from sub-clinical and clinical cases of bovine mastitis in Lithuania. The most common causative agents of udder disease included: S. epidermidis (n=176), S. aureus (n=176), S. agalactiae (n=134), S. hyicus (136) and E. hirae (n=68). Isolates were analysed for antimicrobial resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, cephalexin, amoxicillin + clavulanate. The susceptibility patterns were analysed using the agar disk diffusion method. S. aureus showed the highest level of resistance to amoxicillin (81.3%), penicillin (76.7%) and ampicillin (78.4%). The corresponding values for CNS strains were 59.7%, 59.7% and 50.6% against penicillin, ampicillin and amoxicillin respectively. Streptococci were the most frequently resistant to amoxicillin (29.3%), and enterococci to penicillin (27%), amoxicillin (27.5%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (23.8%). The resistance of all tested mastitis pathogens to aminopenicillins and penicillin highly correlated (r=0.83). Compared with other antibiotics, amoxicillin and clavulanic acid combination tended to be more effective (p<0.05) against all tested bacteria in vitro. However, S. aureus, in 38.1% of cases, was resistant to this combination of antimicrobials. This study demonstrates that S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. hyicus, S. agalactiae and E. hirae remain the most frequent mastitis causative agents on Lithuanian cattle farms. The highest resistance in vitro to penicillins was demonstrated by S. aureus, S. hyicus and S. intermedius. Resistance to cephalosporins remains low, irrespective of bacterial species of gram-positive cocci. PMID:21957743

Klimiene, I; Ruzauskas, M; Spakauskas, V; Matusevicius, A; Mockeli?nas, R; Pereckiene, A; Butrimaite-Ambrozeviciene, C; Virgailis, M

2011-01-01

253

Isolation and Characterization of Four Gram-PositiveNickel-Tolerant Microorganisms from Contaminated Riparian Sediments  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities from riparian sediments contaminatedwith high levels of Ni and U were examined for metal-tolerantmicroorganisms. Isolation of four aerobic Ni-tolerant, Gram-positiveheterotrophic bacteria indicated selection pressure from Ni. Theseisolates were identified as Arthrobacter oxydans NR-1, Streptomycesgalbus NR-2, Streptomyces aureofaciens NR-3, and Kitasatosporacystarginea NR-4 based on partial 16S rDNA sequences. A functional genemicroarray containing gene probes for functions associated withbiogeochemical cycling, metal homeostasis, and organic contaminantdegradation showed little overlap among the four isolates. Fifteen of thegenes were detected in all four isolates with only two of these relatedto metal resistance, specifically to tellurium. Each of the four isolatesalso displayed resistance to at least one of six antibiotics tested, withresistance to kanamycin, gentamycin, and ciprofloxacin observed in atleast two of the isolates. Further characterization of S. aureofaciensNR-3 and K. cystarginea NR-4 demonstrated that both isolates expressed Nitolerance constitutively. In addition, both were able to grow in higherconcentrations of Ni at pH 6 as compared to pH 7 (42.6 and 8.5 mM Ni atpH 6 and 7, respectively). Tolerance to Cd, Co, and Zn was also examinedin these two isolates; a similar pH-dependent metal tolerance wasobserved when grown with Co and Zn. Neither isolate was tolerant to Cd.These findings suggest that Ni is exerting a selection pressure at thissite for metal-resistant actinomycetes.

Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Khijniak, Tatiana V.; Gentry, Terry J.; Novak, Michelle T.; Sowder, Andrew G.; Zhou, Jizhong Z.; Bertsch, PaulM.; Morris, Pamela J.

2006-08-30

254

Electrotransformation of Bacillus mojavensis with fluorescent protein markers  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Gram-positive endophytic bacteria are difficult to transform. To study endophytic interactions between Bacillus mojavensis and maize, a method was developed to transform this species by electroporation with three fluorescent protein expressing integrative plasmids: pSG1154, pSG1192, and pSG1193. The...

255

Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus MTCC B6033  

PubMed Central

Bacillus pumilus is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium isolated from the soil. B. pumilus strain B6033 was originally selected as a biocatalyst for the stereospecific oxidation of ?-lactams. Here, we present a 3.8-Mb assembly of its genome, which is the second fully assembled genome of a B. pumilus strain. PMID:24744340

Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jack; Ivancich, Anabella

2014-01-01

256

Genome Sequence of Bacillus pumilus MTCC B6033.  

PubMed

Bacillus pumilus is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium isolated from the soil. B. pumilus strain B6033 was originally selected as a biocatalyst for the stereospecific oxidation of ?-lactams. Here, we present a 3.8-Mb assembly of its genome, which is the second fully assembled genome of a B. pumilus strain. PMID:24744340

Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jack; Ivancich, Anabella; Loewen, Peter C

2014-01-01

257

Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Type Strain ATCC 14581  

PubMed Central

Bacillus megaterium is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium of biotechnological importance. Here, we report a 5.7-Mbp draft genome sequence of B. megaterium ATCC 14581, which is the type strain of the species. PMID:25395629

Arya, Gitanjali; Petronella, Nicholas; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Carrillo, Catherine D.

2014-01-01

258

Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Type Strain ATCC 14581.  

PubMed

Bacillus megaterium is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium of biotechnological importance. Here, we report a 5.7-Mbp draft genome sequence of B. megaterium ATCC 14581, which is the type strain of the species. PMID:25395629

Arya, Gitanjali; Petronella, Nicholas; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Carrillo, Catherine D; Shwed, Philip S

2014-01-01

259

Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Myophage Moonbeam  

PubMed Central

Moonbeam is a newly isolated myophage of Bacillus megaterium, a common Gram-positive bacterium that is routinely used for large-scale protein production. Bacteriophages have potential to be useful tools for industrial applications. Here, we describe the complete genome of Moonbeam and describe its features. PMID:25593264

Cadungog, Joshua N.; Khatemi, Brontee E.; Hernandez, Adriana C.

2015-01-01

260

Lagging strand replication of rolling-circle plasmids: Specific recognition of the ssoA-type origins in different gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Many bacterial plasmids replicate by a rolling-circle mechanism that involves the generation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates. Replication of the lagging strand of such plasmids initiates from their single strand origin (sso). Many different types of ssos have been identified. One group of ssos, termed ssoA, which have conserved sequence and structural features, function efficiently only in their natural hosts in vivo. To study the host specificity of sso sequences, we have analyzed the functions of two closely related ssoAs belonging to the staphylococcal plasmid pE194 and the streptococcal plasmid pLS1 in Staphylococcus aureus. The pLS1 ssoA functioned poorly in vivo in S. aureus as evidenced by accumulation of high levels of ssDNA but supported efficient replication in vitro in staphylococcal extracts. These results suggest that one or more host factors that are present in sufficient quantities in S. aureus cell-free extracts may be limiting in vivo. Mapping of the initiation points of lagging strand synthesis in vivo and in vitro showed that DNA synthesis initiates from specific sites within the pLS1 ssoA. These results demonstrate that specific initiation of replication can occur from the pLS1 ssoA in S. aureus although it plays a minimal role in lagging strand synthesis in vivo. Therefore, the poor functionality of the pLS1 in vivo in a nonnative host is caused by the low efficiency rather than a lack of specificity of the initiation process. We also have identified ssDNA promoters and mapped the primer RNAs synthesized by the S. aureus and Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerases from the pE194 and pLS1 ssoAs. The S. aureus RNA polymerase bound more efficiently to the native pE194 ssoA as compared with the pLS1 ssoA, suggesting that the strength of RNA polymerase–ssoA interaction may play a major role in the functionality of the ssoA sequences in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:9724733

Kramer, M. Gabriela; Espinosa, Manuel; Misra, Tapan K.; Khan, Saleem A.

1998-01-01

261

Purification and Characterization of Organic Solvent and Detergent Tolerant Lipase from Thermotolerant Bacillus sp. RN2  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to characterize the organic solvent and detergent tolerant properties of recombinant lipase isolated from thermotolerant Bacillus sp. RN2 (Lip-SBRN2). The isolation of the lipase-coding gene was achieved by the use of inverse and direct PCR. The complete DNA sequencing of the gene revealed that the lip-SBRN2 gene contains 576 nucleotides which corresponded to 192 deduced amino acids. The purified enzyme was homogeneous with the estimated molecular mass of 19 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The Lip-SBRN2 was stable in a pH range of 9–11 and temperature range of 45–60 °C. The enzyme was a non metallo-monomeric protein and was active against pNP-caprylate (C8) and pNP-laurate (C12) and coconut oil. The Lip-SBRN2 exhibited a high level of activity in the presence of 108% benzene, 102.4% diethylether and 112% SDS. It is anticipated that the organic solvent and detergent tolerant enzyme secreted by Bacillus sp. RN2 will be applicable as catalysts for reaction in the presence of organic solvents and detergents. PMID:21152301

Kanjanavas, Pornpimon; Khuchareontaworn, Sintawee; Khawsak, Paisarn; Pakpitcharoen, Arda; Pothivejkul, Khajeenart; Santiwatanakul, Somchai; Matsui, Kenji; Kajiwara, Tadahiko; Chansiri, Kosum

2010-01-01

262

Changes of the Quinolones Resistance to Gram-positive Cocci Isolated during the Past 8 Years in the First Bethune Hospital  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was to investigate the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci isolated in the First Bethune Hospital during the past 8 years. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were 50.8%?83.3% and 79.4%?81.5%during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci had increased. Monitoring of the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to guide rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

Xu, Jiancheng; Chen, Qihui; Yao, Hanxin; Zhou, Qi

263

Gram-Positive Bacteria Are Potent Inducers of Monocytic Interleukin-12 (IL-12) while Gram-Negative Bacteria Preferentially Stimulate IL-10 Production  

PubMed Central

Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 are two cytokines secreted by monocytes/macrophages in response to bacterial products which have largely opposite effects on the immune system. IL-12 activates cytotoxicity and gamma interferon (IFN-?) secretion by T cells and NK cells, whereas IL-10 inhibits these functions. In the present study, the capacities of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria to induce IL-10 and IL-12 were compared. Monocytes from blood donors were stimulated with UV-killed bacteria from each of seven gram-positive and seven gram-negative bacterial species representing both aerobic and anaerobic commensals and pathogens. Gram-positive bacteria induced much more IL-12 than did gram-negative bacteria (median, 3,500 versus 120 pg/ml at an optimal dose of 25 bacteria/cell; P < 0.001), whereas gram-negative bacteria preferentially stimulated secretion of IL-10 (650 versus 200 pg/ml; P < 0.001). Gram-positive species also induced stronger major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted IFN-? production in unfractionated blood mononuclear cells than did gram-negative species (12,000 versus 3,600 pg/ml; P < 0.001). The poor IL-12-inducing capacity of gram-negative bacteria was not remediated by addition of blocking anti-IL-10 antibodies to the cultures. No isolated bacterial component could be identified that mimicked the potent induction of IL-12 by whole gram-positive bacteria, whereas purified LPS induced IL-10. The results suggest that gram-positive bacteria induce a cytokine pattern that promotes Th1 effector functions. PMID:10816515

Hessle, Christina; Andersson, Bengt; Wold, Agnes E.

2000-01-01

264

Comparative In Vitro Activities of XRP 2868, Pristinamycin, Quinupristin-Dalfopristin, Vancomycin, Daptomycin, Linezolid, Clarithromycin, Telithromycin, Clindamycin, and Ampicillin against Anaerobic Gram-Positive Species, Actinomycetes, and Lactobacilli  

PubMed Central

A comparative study of the in vitro activities of XRP 2868, a new oral streptogramin, against 266 anaerobic gram-positive clinical isolates using the agar dilution method showed that the XRP 2868 MICs for 95% (254 of 266) of isolates were ?0.5 ?g/ml. XRP 2868 MICs for only two strains, one being Clostridium clostridioforme (MIC, 16 ?g/ml) and the other being Clostridium difficile (MIC, 32 ?g/ml), were >2 ?g/ml. Depending on its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, XRP 2868 has potential for use against infections with gram-positive anaerobes and deserves further clinical evaluation. PMID:15616322

Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.; Bryskier, Andre

2005-01-01

265

Usefulness of the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system for identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures  

PubMed Central

Using full 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing as the gold standard, 20 non?duplicating anaerobic Gram positive bacilli isolated from blood cultures were analysed by the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system. The MicroSeq system successfully identified 13 of the 20 isolates. Four and three isolates were misidentified at the genus and species level, respectively. Although the MicroSeq 500 16S rDNA bacterial identification system is better than three commercially available identification systems also evaluated, its database needs to be expanded for accurate identification of anaerobic Gram positive bacilli. PMID:16443743

Lau, S K P; Ng, K H L; Woo, P C Y; Yip, K?t; Fung, A M Y; Woo, G K S; Chan, K?m; Que, T?l

2006-01-01

266

Protein secretion in Bacillus species.  

PubMed Central

Bacilli secrete numerous proteins into the environment. Many of the secretory proteins, their export signals, and their processing steps during secretion have been characterized in detail. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms of protein secretion have been relatively poorly characterized. However, several components of the protein secretion machinery have been identified and cloned recently, which is likely to lead to rapid expansion of the knowledge of the protein secretion mechanism in Bacillus species. Comparison of the presently known export components of Bacillus species with those of Escherichia coli suggests that the mechanism of protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane is conserved among gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria differences are found in steps preceding and following the translocation process. Many of the secretory proteins of bacilli are produced industrially, but several problems have been encountered in the production of Bacillus heterologous secretory proteins. In the final section we discuss these problems and point out some possibilities to overcome them. PMID:8464403

Simonen, M; Palva, I

1993-01-01

267

Cerium oxide and iron oxide nanoparticles abolish the antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin against gram positive and gram negative biofilm bacteria.  

PubMed

Metal oxide nanoparticles have been suggested as good candidates for the development of antibacterial agents. Cerium oxide (CeO2) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been utilized in a number of biomedical applications. Here, the antibacterial activity of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles were evaluated on a panel of gram positive and gram negative bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm cultures. Additionally, the effect of combining CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles with the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin on tested bacteria was investigated. Thus, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles that are required to inhibit bacterial planktonic growth and bacterial biofilm, were evaluated, and were compared to the MICs of the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin alone or in the presence of CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Results of this study show that both CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles fail to inhibit bacterial growth and biofilm biomass for all the bacterial strains tested. Moreover, adding CeO2 or Fe2O3 nanoparticles to the broad spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin almost abolished its antibacterial activity. Results of this study suggest that CeO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles are not good candidates as antibacterial agents, and they could interfere with the activity of important antibiotics. PMID:24643389

Masadeh, Majed M; Karasneh, Ghadah A; Al-Akhras, Mohammad A; Albiss, Borhan A; Aljarah, Khaled M; Al-Azzam, Sayer I; Alzoubi, Karem H

2015-05-01

268

Identification of Multiple Soluble Fe(III) Reductases in Gram-Positive Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33  

PubMed Central

Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33 has been earlier shown to reduce Fe(III) and Cr(VI) anaerobically at 60°C optimally. Further, the Gram-positive thermophilic bacterium contains Cr(VI) reduction activity in both the membrane and cytoplasm. The soluble fraction prepared from T. indiensis cells grown at 60°C was found to contain the majority of Fe(III) reduction activity of the microorganism and produced four distinct bands in nondenaturing Fe(III) reductase activity gel. Proteins from each of these bands were partially purified by chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry (MS) with the help of T. indiensis proteome sequences. Two paralogous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases (LPDs), thioredoxin reductase (Trx), NADP(H)-nitrite reductase (Ntr), and thioredoxin disulfide reductase (Tdr) were determined to be responsible for Fe(III) reductase activity. Amino acid sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structural similarity analyses of the T. indiensis Fe(III) reductases were carried out with Cr(VI) reducing proteins from other bacteria. The two LPDs and Tdr showed very significant sequence and structural identity, respectively, with Cr(VI) reducing dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Thermus scotoductus and thioredoxin disulfide reductase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. It appears that in addition to their iron reducing activity T. indiensis LPDs and Tdr are possibly involved in Cr(VI) reduction as well. PMID:25180173

Pal, Subrata

2014-01-01

269

Use of Enzyme Tests in Characterization and Identification of Aerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Positive Cocci  

PubMed Central

The contribution of enzyme tests to the accurate and rapid routine identification of gram-positive cocci is introduced. The current taxonomy of the genera of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cocci based on genotypic and phenotypic characterization is reviewed. The clinical and economic importance of members of these taxa is briefly summarized. Tables summarizing test schemes and kits available for the identification of staphylococci, enterococci, and streptococci on the basis of general requirements, number of tests, number of taxa, test classes, and completion times are discussed. Enzyme tests included in each scheme are compared on the basis of their synthetic moiety. The current understanding of the activity of enzymes important for classification and identification of the major groups, methods of testing, and relevance to the ease and speed of identification are reviewed. Publications describing the use of different identification kits are listed, and overall identification successes and problems are discussed. The relationships between the results of conventional biochemical and rapid enzyme tests are described and considered. The use of synthetic substrates for the detection of glycosidases and peptidases is reviewed, and the advantages of fluorogenic synthetic moieties are discussed. The relevance of enzyme tests to accurate and meaningful rapid routine identification is discussed. PMID:9564566

Bascomb, Shoshana; Manafi, Mammad

1998-01-01

270

Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer  

PubMed Central

Chapter summary Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmidsare more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered as important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the present available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed. PMID:25606350

Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A.; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

2014-01-01

271

Novel tetrahydropyran-based bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors with potent anti-gram positive activity and improved safety profile.  

PubMed

Novel antibacterial drugs that are effective against infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens are urgently needed. In a previous report, we have shown that tetrahydropyran-based inhibitors of bacterial type II topoisomerases (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) display potent antibacterial activity and exhibit no target-mediated cross-resistance with fluoroquinolones. During the course of our optimization program, lead compound 5 was deprioritized due to adverse findings in cardiovascular safety studies. In the effort of mitigating these findings and optimizing further the pharmacological profile of this class of compounds, we have identified a subseries of tetrahydropyran-based molecules that are potent DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV inhibitors and display excellent antibacterial activity against Gram positive pathogens, including clinically relevant resistant isolates. One representative of this class, compound 32d, elicited only weak inhibition of hERG K(+) channels and hNaV1.5 Na(+) channels, and no effects were observed on cardiovascular parameters in anesthetized guinea pigs. In vivo efficacy in animal infection models has been demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains. PMID:25494934

Surivet, Jean-Philippe; Zumbrunn, Cornelia; Rueedi, Georg; Bur, Daniel; Bruyère, Thierry; Locher, Hans; Ritz, Daniel; Seiler, Peter; Kohl, Christopher; Ertel, Eric A; Hess, Patrick; Gauvin, Jean-Christophe; Mirre, Azely; Kaegi, Verena; Dos Santos, Marina; Kraemer, Stéphanie; Gaertner, Mika; Delers, Jonathan; Enderlin-Paput, Michel; Weiss, Maria; Sube, Romain; Hadana, Hakim; Keck, Wolfgang; Hubschwerlen, Christian

2015-01-22

272

Examine the characterization of biofilm formation and inhibition by targeting SrtA mechanism in Bacillus subtilis: a combined experimental and theoretical study.  

PubMed

Bacillus subtilis is one of the well-known biofilm-forming organisms associated with plants, animals, and also used as a model organism for all Bacillus sp. In B. subtilis, SrtA enzyme plays the imperative roles in mechanism of signaling pathway and microbial adherence toward the host. SrtA is highly considered as a universal drug target for all Gram positive pathogens. Because of unresolved 3D structure of SrtA in Gram positive bacteria including B. subtilis, we developed a homology model protein using structural alignments of similar SrtA from B. anthracis. While the structural model of SrtA is analyzed because of its significance in biofilm formation by screening the suitable active site based compounds and analyzing the ability of bacterial biofilm inhibition. Druggability site based screening able to retrieve the active compounds against SrtA and checked the activity of the screened compounds through experimental biochemical assays and in situ microscopic analysis. Here in this study we concluded the computationally screened SrtA inhibitors showed high level of biofilm inhibition despite difficulties in bacterial membrane rigidification. Hence this study leads a way to the new compounds that may be useful to treat the bacterial infections. PMID:25038633

Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

2014-08-01

273

A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

274

Identification of a gene cluster encoding an arginine ATP-binding-cassette transporter in the genome of the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain DSMZ 13240  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single gene cluster encoding components of a putative ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter for basic amino acids was identified in the incomplete genome sequence of the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus by BLAST searches. The cluster comprises three genes, and these were amplified from chromosomal DNA of G. stearothermophilus, ligated into plasmid vectors and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified

Rebecca Fleischer; Antje Wengner; Frank Scheffel; Heidi Landmesser; Erwin Schneider

2005-01-01

275

Comparison of the Bruker MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry System and Conventional Phenotypic Methods for Identification of Gram-Positive Rods  

PubMed Central

In recent years, MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry (MS) method has emerged as a promising and a reliable tool for bacteria identification. In this study we compared Bruker MALDI-TOF MS and conventional phenotypic methods to identify a collection of 333 Gram-positive clinical isolates comprising 22 genera and 60 species. 16S rRNA sequencing was the reference molecular technique, and rpoB gene sequecing was used as a secondary gene target when 16Sr RNA did not allow species identification of Corynebacterium spp. We also investigate if score cut-offs values of ?1,5 and ?1,7 were accurate for genus and species-level identification using the Bruker system. Identification at species level was obtained for 92,49% of Gram-positive rods by MALDI-TOF MS compared to 85,89% by phenotypic method. Our data validates the score ?1,5 for genus level and ?1,7 for species-level identification in a large and diverse collection of Gram-positive rods. The present study has proved the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS as an identification method in Gram-positive rods compared to currently used methods in routine laboratories. PMID:25184254

Barberis, Claudia; Almuzara, Marisa; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Ramírez, María Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

2014-01-01

276

Specific Inhibitors of Bacterial Adhesion: Observations From the Study of Gram-Positive Bacteria that Initiate Biofilm Formation on the Tooth Surface  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oral surfaces are bathed in secretory antibodies and other salivary macromolecules that are potential inhibitors of specific microbial adhesion. Indigenous Gram-positive bacteria that colonize teeth, including viridans streptococci and actinomyces, may avoid inhibition of adhesion by host secretory molecules through various strategies that involve the structural design and binding properties of bacterial adhesins and receptors. Further studies to define the

J. O. Cisar; Y. Takahashi; S. Ruhl; J. A. Donkersloot; A. L. Sandberg

1997-01-01

277

Overexpression, purification and characterization of organic solvent stable lipase from Bacillus licheniformis RSP-09.  

PubMed

The lipase gene (543 bp) from Bacillus licheniformis RSP-09, a thermophilic isolate, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). It encodes a polypeptide of 181 residues and has 96% identity with Bacillus pumilus B26 lipase gene. The recombinant lipase was purified 19-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity by His-tag chromatography. The molecular mass of the purified recombinant B. licheniformis RSP-09 lipase was found to be 24 kDa. The purified recombinant B. licheniformis RSP-09 lipase exhibited optimal activity at pH 10.0 and 40 degrees C. The apparent K(m) and V(max) values for pNPP were found to be 453 +/- 118 microM and 288.5 +/- 33.67 micromol min(-1) mg protein(-1), respectively. The purified recombinant lipase had a wide range of substrate specificity and exhibited tolerance to both detergents and organic solvents. Thus, enzyme has potential to be employed in detergents and biocatalysis in nonaqueous solvents. PMID:19270444

Madan, Bhawna; Mishra, Prashant

2009-01-01

278

Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria  

PubMed Central

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25136281

2014-01-01

279

Relative Roles of the Cellular and Humoral Responses in the Drosophila Host Defense against Three Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections  

PubMed Central

Background Two NF-kappaB signaling pathways, Toll and immune deficiency (imd), are required for survival to bacterial infections in Drosophila. In response to septic injury, these pathways mediate rapid transcriptional activation of distinct sets of effector molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, which are important components of a humoral defense response. However, it is less clear to what extent macrophage-like hemocytes contribute to host defense. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to dissect the relative importance of humoral and cellular defenses after septic injury with three different Gram-positive bacteria (Micrococcus luteus, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus), we used latex bead pre-injection to ablate macrophage function in flies wildtype or mutant for various Toll and imd pathway components. We found that in all three infection models a compromised phagocytic system impaired fly survival – independently of concomitant Toll or imd pathway activation. Our data failed to confirm a role of the PGRP-SA and GNBP1 Pattern Recognition Receptors for phagocytosis of S. aureus. The Drosophila scavenger receptor Eater mediates the phagocytosis by hemocytes or S2 cells of E. faecalis and S. aureus, but not of M. luteus. In the case of M. luteus and E. faecalis, but not S. aureus, decreased survival due to defective phagocytosis could be compensated for by genetically enhancing the humoral immune response. Conclusions/Significance Our results underscore the fundamental importance of both cellular and humoral mechanisms in Drosophila immunity and shed light on the balance between these two arms of host defense depending on the invading pathogen. PMID:21390224

Cho, Ju Hyun; Lee, Janice; Lafarge, Marie-Céline; Kocks, Christine; Ferrandon, Dominique

2011-01-01

280

A novel p-nitrophenol degradation gene cluster from a gram-positive bacterium, Rhodococcus opacus SAO101.  

PubMed

p-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is recognized as an environmental contaminant; it is used primarily for manufacturing medicines and pesticides. To date, several 4-NP-degrading bacteria have been isolated; however, the genetic information remains very limited. In this study, a novel 4-NP degradation gene cluster from a gram-positive bacterium, Rhodococcus opacus SAO101, was identified and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequences of npcB, npcA, and npcC showed identity with phenol 2-hydroxylase component B (reductase, PheA2) of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius A7 (32%), with 2,4,6-trichlorophenol monooxygenase (TcpA) of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (44%), and with hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase (ORF2) of Arthrobacter sp. strain BA-5-17 (76%), respectively. The npcB, npcA, and npcC genes were cloned into pET-17b to construct the respective expression vectors pETnpcB, pETnpcA, and pETnpcC. Conversion of 4-NP was observed when a mixture of crude cell extracts of Escherichia coli containing pETnpcB and pETnpcA was used in the experiment. The mixture converted 4-NP to hydroxyquinol and also converted 4-nitrocatechol (4-NCA) to hydroxyquinol. Furthermore, the crude cell extract of E. coli containing pETnpcC converted hydroxyquinol to maleylacetate. These results suggested that npcB and npcA encode the two-component 4-NP/4-NCA monooxygenase and that npcC encodes hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase. The npcA and npcC mutant strains, SDA1 and SDC1, completely lost the ability to grow on 4-NP as the sole carbon source. These results clearly indicated that the cloned npc genes play an essential role in 4-NP mineralization in R. opacus SAO101. PMID:15262926

Kitagawa, Wataru; Kimura, Nobutada; Kamagata, Yoichi

2004-08-01

281

A Novel p-Nitrophenol Degradation Gene Cluster from a Gram-Positive Bacterium, Rhodococcus opacus SAO101  

PubMed Central

p-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is recognized as an environmental contaminant; it is used primarily for manufacturing medicines and pesticides. To date, several 4-NP-degrading bacteria have been isolated; however, the genetic information remains very limited. In this study, a novel 4-NP degradation gene cluster from a gram-positive bacterium, Rhodococcus opacus SAO101, was identified and characterized. The deduced amino acid sequences of npcB, npcA, and npcC showed identity with phenol 2-hydroxylase component B (reductase, PheA2) of Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius A7 (32%), with 2,4,6-trichlorophenol monooxygenase (TcpA) of Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 (44%), and with hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase (ORF2) of Arthrobacter sp. strain BA-5-17 (76%), respectively. The npcB, npcA, and npcC genes were cloned into pET-17b to construct the respective expression vectors pETnpcB, pETnpcA, and pETnpcC. Conversion of 4-NP was observed when a mixture of crude cell extracts of Escherichia coli containing pETnpcB and pETnpcA was used in the experiment. The mixture converted 4-NP to hydroxyquinol and also converted 4-nitrocatechol (4-NCA) to hydroxyquinol. Furthermore, the crude cell extract of E. coli containing pETnpcC converted hydroxyquinol to maleylacetate. These results suggested that npcB and npcA encode the two-component 4-NP/4-NCA monooxygenase and that npcC encodes hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenase. The npcA and npcC mutant strains, SDA1 and SDC1, completely lost the ability to grow on 4-NP as the sole carbon source. These results clearly indicated that the cloned npc genes play an essential role in 4-NP mineralization in R. opacus SAO101. PMID:15262926

Kitagawa, Wataru; Kimura, Nobutada; Kamagata, Yoichi

2004-01-01

282

Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.  

PubMed

There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 ?g/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 ?g/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 ?g/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 ?g/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 ?g/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection. PMID:22155833

Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

2012-03-01

283

Antibacterial Activity of Sphingoid Bases and Fatty Acids against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity—the sphingoid bases d-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid—against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P < 0.0001) for each bacterial species except Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. d-Sphingosine (MBC range, 0.3 to 19.6 ?g/ml), dihydrosphingosine (MBC range, 0.6 to 39.1 ?g/ml), and phytosphingosine (MBC range, 3.3 to 62.5 ?g/ml) were active against all bacteria except S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 ?g/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 ?g/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 ?g/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection. PMID:22155833

Fischer, Carol L.; Drake, David R.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Brogden, Kim A.

2012-01-01

284

Enhanced antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammtory, and antiangiogenic due to its unique properties such as physical, chemical, and biological properties. The present study was aimed to investigate antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities of silver nanoparticles alone and in combination with conventional antibiotics against various human pathogenic bacteria. Here, we show that a simple, reliable, cost effective and green method for the synthesis of AgNPs by treating silver ions with leaf extract of Allophylus cobbe. The A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs (AgNPs) was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics or AgNPs, or combinations of AgNPs with an antibiotic was evaluated using a series of assays: such as in vitro killing assay, disc diffusion assay, biofilm inhibition, and reactive oxygen species generation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results suggest that, in combination with antibiotics, there were significant antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effects at lowest concentration of AgNPs using a novel plant extract of A. cobbe, otherwise sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics. The significant enhancing effects were observed for ampicillin and vancomycin against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. These data suggest that combining antibiotics and biogenic AgNPs can be used therapeutically for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria. This study presented evidence of antibacterial and anti-biofilm effects of A. cobbe-mediated synthesis of AgNPs and their enhanced capacity against various human pathogenic bacteria. These results suggest that AgNPs could be used as an adjuvant for the treatment of infectious diseases.

Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Kim, Jin-Hoi

2014-07-01

285

Prior statin use and 90-day mortality in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bloodstream infection: a prospective observational study.  

PubMed

In several studies on patients with bloodstream infection (BSI), prior use of statins has been associated with improved survival. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria alert the innate immune system in different ways. We, therefore, studied whether the relation between prior statin use and 90-day total mortality differed between Gram-positive and Gram-negative BSI. We conducted a prospective observational cohort study of 1,408 adults with BSI admitted to Levanger Hospital between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2011. Data on the use of statins and other medications at admission, comorbidities, functional status, treatment, and outcome were obtained from the patients' hospital records. The relation of statin use with 90-day mortality differed between Gram-negative and Gram-positive BSI (p-value for interaction 0.01). Among patients with Gram-negative BSI, statin users had significantly lower 90-day total mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.42, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.23-0.75, p?=?0.003]. The association remained essentially unchanged after adjusting for the effect of sex, age, functional status before the infection, and underlying diseases that were considered confounders (adjusted OR 0.38, 95 % CI 0.20-0.72, p?=?0.003). A similar analysis of patients with Gram-positive BSI showed no association of statin use with mortality (adjusted OR 1.22, 95 % CI 0.69-2.17, p?=?0.49). The present study suggests that prior statin use is associated with a lower 90-day total mortality in Gram-negative BSI, but not in Gram-positive BSI. PMID:25373530

Mehl, A; Harthug, S; Lydersen, S; Paulsen, J; Åsvold, B O; Solligård, E; Damås, J K; Edna, T-H

2015-03-01

286

Propeptide of Bacillus subtilis amylase enhances extracellular production of human interferon-? in Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis and related species are widely used industrially as hosts for producing enzymes. These species possess a high potential to\\u000a produce secreted proteins into the culture medium. Nevertheless, the secretion of heterologous proteins by these species is\\u000a frequently inefficient. In this study, the human interferon-?2b (hIFN-?2b) was used as a heterologous model protein, to investigate\\u000a the

Hiroshi Kakeshita; Yasushi Kageyama; Katsutoshi Ara; Katsuya Ozaki; Kouji Nakamura

2011-01-01

287

Complete genome sequence of the industrial bacterium Bacillus licheniformis and comparisons with closely related Bacillus species  

PubMed Central

Background Bacillus licheniformis is a Gram-positive, spore-forming soil bacterium that is used in the biotechnology industry to manufacture enzymes, antibiotics, biochemicals and consumer products. This species is closely related to the well studied model organism Bacillus subtilis, and produces an assortment of extracellular enzymes that may contribute to nutrient cycling in nature. Results We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 genome which comprises a circular chromosome of 4,222,336 base-pairs (bp) containing 4,208 predicted protein-coding genes with an average size of 873 bp, seven rRNA operons, and 72 tRNA genes. The B. licheniformis chromosome contains large regions that are colinear with the genomes of B. subtilis and Bacillus halodurans, and approximately 80% of the predicted B. licheniformis coding sequences have B. subtilis orthologs. Conclusions Despite the unmistakable organizational similarities between the B. licheniformis and B. subtilis genomes, there are notable differences in the numbers and locations of prophages, transposable elements and a number of extracellular enzymes and secondary metabolic pathway operons that distinguish these species. Differences include a region of more than 80 kilobases (kb) that comprises a cluster of polyketide synthase genes and a second operon of 38 kb encoding plipastatin synthase enzymes that are absent in the B. licheniformis genome. The availability of a completed genome sequence for B. licheniformis should facilitate the design and construction of improved industrial strains and allow for comparative genomics and evolutionary studies within this group of Bacillaceae. PMID:15461803

Rey, Michael W; Ramaiya, Preethi; Nelson, Beth A; Brody-Karpin, Shari D; Zaretsky, Elizabeth J; Tang, Maria; de Leon, Alfredo Lopez; Xiang, Henry; Gusti, Veronica; Clausen, Ib Groth; Olsen, Peter B; Rasmussen, Michael D; Andersen, Jens T; Jørgensen, Per L; Larsen, Thomas S; Sorokin, Alexei; Bolotin, Alexander; Lapidus, Alla; Galleron, Nathalie; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Berka, Randy M

2004-01-01

288

Tetrocarcins, novel antitumor antibiotics. I. Producing organism, fermentation and antimicrobial activity.  

PubMed

A novel antitumor antibiotic complex has been obtained from the culture broth of Actinomycete strain DO-11 (KY11091) isolated from a soil sample collected in Sendai, Miyagi, Japan. On the taxonomic studies the producing organism is described as Micromonospora chalcea KY11091. For the production of the antibiotics, soluble starch served as a good carbon source and yeast extract was the best nitrogen source tested. The antibiotic complex designated as tetrocarcins is active against Gram-positive bacteria, but is not active against Gram-negative bacteria. Tetrocarcin A showed bacteriocidal activity against Bacillus subtilis. PMID:6893706

Tomita, F; Tamaoki, T

1980-09-01

289

Characterization of biphenyl catabolic genes of gram-positive polychlorinated biphenyl degrader rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1  

SciTech Connect

Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1 is a gram-positive polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degrader which can degrade 10 ppm of PCB-48 (equivalent to Aroclor 1248), including tri-, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls, in a few days. We isolated the 7.6-kb EcoRI-BamHI fragment carrying the biphenyl catabolic genes of RHA1 and determined their nucleotide sequence. On the basis of deduced amino acid sequence homology, we identified six bph genes, bphA1A2A3A4, bphB, and bphC, that are responsible for the initial three steps of biphenyl degradation. The order of bph genes in RHA1 is bphA1A2A3A4-bphC-bphB. This gene order differs from that of other PCB degraders reported previously. The amino acid sequences deduced from the RHA1 bph genes have a higher degree of homology with the tod genes from Pseudomonas putida F1 (49 to 79%) than with the bph genes of Pseudomonas sp. strains KF707 and KKS102 (30-65%). FIn Escherichia coli, bphA gene activity was not observed even when expression vectors were used. The activities of bphB and bphC, however, were confirmed by observing the transformation of biphenyl to a meta-cleavage compound with the aid of benzene dioxygenase activity that complemented the bphA gene activity (S. Irie, S. Djoi, T. Yorifuji, M. Takagi, and K. Yano, J. Bacteriol. 169:5174-5179, 1987). The expected products of the cloned bph genes, except bphA3, were observed in E. coli in an in vitro transcription-translation system. Insertion mutations of bphA1 and bphC of Rhodococcus sp. strain RHA1 were constructed by gene replacement with cloned gene fragments. The bphA1 and bphC insertion mutants lost the ability to grow on biphenyl, demonstrating that the cloned bph genes are essential for biphenyl catabolism in this strain. 31 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Masai, Eiji; Hatta, Takashi; Kimbara, Kazuhide [Research Development Corporation of Japan, Shinsan (Japan)] [and others

1995-06-01

290

Application of a statistically enhanced, novel, organic solvent stable lipase from Bacillus safensis DVL-43.  

PubMed

This paper presents the molecular identification of a newly isolated bacterial strain producing a novel and organic solvent stable lipase, statistical optimization of fermentation medium, and its application in the synthesis of ethyl laurate. On the basis of nucleotide homology and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified as Bacillus safensis DVL-43 (Gen-bank accession number KC156603). Optimization of fermentation medium using Plackett-Burman design and response surface methodology led to 11.4-fold increase in lipase production. The lipase from B. safensis DVL-43 exhibited excellent stability in various organic solvents. The enzyme retained 100% activity after 24h incubation in xylene, DMSO and toluene, each solvent being used at a concentration of 25% (v/v). The use of partially purified DVL-43 lipase as catalyst in the synthesis of ethyl laurate, an esterification product of lauric acid and ethanol, resulted in 80% esterification in 12h under optimized conditions. The formation of ethyl laurate was confirmed using TLC and (1)H NMR. Organic solvent stable lipases exhibiting potential application in enzymatic esterification are in great demand in flavor, fine chemicals and pharma industries. We could not find any report on lipase production from B. safensis strain and its application in esterification. PMID:24534493

Kumar, Davender; Parshad, Rajinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar

2014-05-01

291

The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats.

Margulis, L.; Jorgensen, J. Z.; Dolan, S.; Kolchinsky, R.; Rainey, F. A.; Lo, S. C.

1998-01-01

292

The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: intestinal symbionts of animals.  

PubMed

In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named "Arthromitus" in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225-233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death's head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats. PMID:9448315

Margulis, L; Jorgensen, J Z; Dolan, S; Kolchinsky, R; Rainey, F A; Lo, S C

1998-02-01

293

Functional validation of putative toxin-antitoxin genes from the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae: phd-doc is the fourth bona-fide operon  

PubMed Central

Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TAs) loci usually consist of two genes organized as an operon, where their products are bound together and inert under normal conditions. However, under stressful circumstances the antitoxin, which is more labile, will be degraded more rapidly, thereby unleashing its cognate toxin to act on the cell. This, in turn, causes cell stasis or cell death, depending on the type of TAs and/or time of toxin exposure. Previously based on in silico analyses, we proposed that Streptococcus pneumoniae, a pathogenic Gram-positive bacterium, may harbor between 4 and 10 putative TA loci depending on the strains. Here we have chosen the pneumococcal strain Hungary19A-6 which contains all possible 10 TA loci. In addition to the three well-characterized operons, namely relBE2, yefM-yoeB, and pezAT, we show here the functionality of a fourth operon that encodes the pneumococcal equivalent of the phd-doc TA. Transcriptional fusions with gene encoding Green Fluorescent Protein showed that the promoter was slightly repressed by the Phd antitoxin, and exhibited almost background values when both Phd-Doc were expressed together. These findings demonstrate that phd-doc shows the negative self-regulatory features typical for an authentic TA. Further, we also show that the previously proposed TAs XreA-Ant and Bro-XreB, although they exhibit a genetic organization resembling those of typical TAs, did not appear to confer a functional behavior corresponding to bona fide TAs. In addition, we have also discovered new interesting bioinformatics results for the known pneumococcal TAs RelBE2 and PezAT. A global analysis of the four identified toxins-antitoxins in the pneumococcal genomes (PezAT, RelBE2, YefM-YoeB, and Phd-Doc) showed that RelBE2 and Phd-Doc are the most conserved ones. Further, there was good correlation among TA types, clonal complexes and sequence types in the 48 pneumococcal strains analyzed. PMID:25538695

Chan, Wai Ting; Yeo, Chew Chieng; Sadowy, Ewa; Espinosa, Manuel

2014-01-01

294

[Evaluation of rapid genotype assay for the identification of gram-positive cocci from blood cultures and detection of mecA and van genes].  

PubMed

Rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens grown in blood cultures of patients with sepsis is crucial for prompt initiation of appropriate therapy in order to decrease related morbidity and mortality rates. Although current automated blood culture systems led to a significant improvement in bacterial detection time, more rapid identification systems are still needed to optimise the establishment of treatment. Novel genotype technology which is developed for the rapid diagnosis of sepsis, is a molecular genetic assay based on DNA multiplex amplification with biotinylated primers followed by hybridization to membrane bound probes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of "Genotype® BC gram-positive? test for the identification of gram-positive cocci grown in blood cultures and rapid detection of mecA and van genes. This test uses DNA.STRIP® technology which includes a panel of probes for identification of 17 gram-positive bacterial species and is able to determinate the methicillin and vancomycin resistance mediating genes (mecA and vanA, vanB, vanC1, vanC2/C3) simultaneously, in a single test run. A total of 55 positive blood cultures from BACTECTM Plus/F (Becton Dickinson, USA) aerobic and pediatric blood culture vials were included in the study. The isolates which exhibit gram-positive coccus morphology by Gram staining were identified by Genotype ® BC gram-positive test (Hain Life Science, Germany). All of the samples were also identified with the use of Phoenix PMIC/ID Panel (Becton Dickinson, USA) and antibiotic susceptibilities were determined. Of the 55 blood culture isolates, 17 were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis [all were methicillin-resistant (MR)], 9 were S.aureus (one was MR), 18 were S.hominis (10 were MR), 4 were E.faecalis, 3 were E. faecium (one was vanconycin-resistant), 2 were S.saprophyticus (one was MR), 1 was S.warneri and 1 was S.haemolyticus, by Phoenix automated system. Genotype® BC gram-positive test results revealed consistency with Phoenix system regarding bacterial identification in 46 (83.6%) of the samples. The two bacteria identified as S.saprophyticus by the Phoenix system could not be identified by the Genotype® BC test since this species were not included in the identification panel of the system, however, mecA gene were detected in these two samples by Genotype® BC test. Genotype® BC test detected mecA gene in five samples which were not detected as methicillin resistant by the Phoenix system. Besides polymicrobial growth was determined in five samples by Genotype ® BC test, but not by the automated system. One E.faecium isolate with vanA gene was correctly identified by Genotype® BC test. In conclusion, Genotype® BC gram-positive test is a fast and reliable test for the identification of the most important gram-positive pathogens and mecA and van genes directly from positive blood culture bottles. This test was also found superior than the automated Phoenix system regarding the detection of polymicrobial growth. These data indicated that, routine use of DNA strip technology-based assay would be useful for clinical diagnosis in patients with sepsis. PMID:22090289

Gülhan, Bar??; Atmaca, Selahattin; Ozekinci, Tuncer; Suay, Adnan

2011-10-01

295

Selective growth promotion and growth inhibition of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by synthetic siderophore-?-lactam conjugates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conjugates of a carbacephalosporin with hydroxamate, spermexatol, N,N-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-L-lysine, mixed catecholate\\/hydroxamate and cyanuric acid-based siderophores were investigated for their potential to promote growth of siderophore indicator strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria under iron depleted conditions, for their antibacterial activity and for their ability to use iron transport path-ways to penetrate the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. The selective growth promotion of

Ute Möllmann; Arun Ghosh; Eric K. Dolence; Julia A. Dolence; Manuka Ghosh; Marvin J. Miller; R. Reissbrodt

1998-01-01

296

Differential Roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in Recognition of Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacterial Cell Wall Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 are implicated in the recognition of various bacterial cell wall components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To investigate in vivo roles of TLR2, we generated TLR2-deficient mice. In contrast to LPS unresponsiveness in TLR4-deficient mice, TLR2-deficient mice responded to LPS to the same extent as wild-type mice. TLR2-deficient macrophages were hyporesponsive to several Gram-positive bacterial

Osamu Takeuchi; Katsuaki Hoshino; Taro Kawai; Hideki Sanjo; Haruhiko Takada; Tomohiko Ogawa; Kiyoshi Takeda; Shizuo Akira

1999-01-01

297

Phylogenetic Placement of Dialister pneumosintes (formerly Bacteroides pneumosintes) within the Sporomusa Subbranch of the Clostridium Subphylum of the Gram-Positive Bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nucleotide sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of the type strain of Dialisfer pneumosinfes was determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that this species belongs to the Sporomusa branch of the Clostridum subphylum of the gram-positive bacteria and should therefore be excluded from the family Bacferoidaceae. Within this branch, which encompasses several other gram-negative taxa, such as Acidarninococcus, Pectinatus, Phascolar- cobacferium,

ANNE WILLEMS; MATTHEW D. COLLINS

1995-01-01

298

In vitro activity of gemifloxacin and contemporary oral antimicrobial agents against 27,247 Gram-positive and Gram-negative aerobic isolates: a global surveillance study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was a multi-centre, multi-country surveillance of 27,247 Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates collected from 131 study centres in 44 countries from 1997 to 2000. MICs of gemifloxacin were compared with penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefuroxime, azithromycin, clarithromycin, trimethoprim–sulphamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin and levofloxacin by broth microdilution. Penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae was extremely high in the Middle East (65.6%), Africa (64.0%)

S. K Bouchillon; D. J Hoban; J. L Johnson; B. M Johnson; D. L Butler; K. A Saunders; L. A Miller; J. A Poupard

2004-01-01

299

Lactobacillus plantarum gene clusters encoding putative cell-surface protein complexes for carbohydrate utilization are conserved in specific gram-positive bacteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gene clusters or operons, suggesting common functions, and interactions of multiple components. RESULTS: A novel gene cluster encoding exclusively

Roland Siezen; Jos Boekhorst; Lidia Muscariello; Douwe Molenaar; Bernadet Renckens; Michiel Kleerebezem

2006-01-01

300

Comparable Evaluation of Orally Active Beta-Lactam Compounds in Ampicillin-Resistant Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Rods: Role of Beta-Lactamases on Resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The antibacterial activity of the recently developed cephems cefixime and cefetamet-pivoxyl was evaluated in 408 gram-positive and gram-negative rods, all isolated recently from clinical specimens, and compared to that of other orally active agents such as ampicillin, amoxycillin + clavulanic acid, cefaclor, cefuroxime-axetil and to ceftriaxone. With regard to ampicillin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae ceftriaxone proved to be the most active agent, followed

Wolfgang Cullmann; Wolfgang Dick; Michaela Stieglitz; Wolfgang Opferkuch

1988-01-01

301

In situ probing of Gram-positive bacteria with high DNA G + C content using 23S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotides  

Microsoft Academic Search

235-rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were designed for the phylogenetic group Gram-positive bacteria with high G + C content of DNA ' (GPBHGC). A sequence idiosyncrasy in two adjacent base pairs in the stem of helix 69 in domain IV of the 235 rRNA is present in all hitherto analysed strains of GPBHGC. An oligonucleotide probe targeted to this region hybridized only

Carsten Roller; Michael Wagner; Rudolf Amann; Wolfgang Ludwig; K.-H. Schleifer

1994-01-01

302

Reliability of Disk Diffusion Test Results for the Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Nosocomial Gram-positive Microorganisms: Is E-test Method Better?  

PubMed Central

Disk diffusion test is the usual applicable method for assessing the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in most institutions and hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of resistant-reported results of disk diffusion test for 6 routinely used antibiotics against Gram-positive microorganisms of nosocomial origin, using E-test method. Over a 1-year period, clinical specimens (e.g. blood, tracheal secretions, wound secretions, urine, etc.) were obtained from hospitalized patients with defined nosocomial infection and were cultured. Isolated Gram-positive bacteria underwent disk diffusion test for cephalothin, oxacillin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, teicoplanin (only for Enterococci), and meropenem antibiotics. E-test method was performed for all isolates resistant or intermediately sensitive to the disks of any mentioned antibiotics. Data showed compatible results of disk diffusion test with the results of E-test method for cephalothin, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin. None of ciprofloxacin- and vancomycin-resistant isolates in disk diffusion test showed sensitivity in E-test method. Significant differences between the results of disk diffusion and E-test methods were observed for clindamycin and meropenem against S.aureus (p = 0.01 and 0.04, respectively) and Enterococcus spp (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). In order to increase the reliability of antimicrobial susceptibility results, it is recommended to perform E-test for nosocomial Gram-positive microorganisms that show antibiotic resistance by disk diffusion test and it is more important for clindamycin and meropenem. PMID:24250479

Khalili, Hossein; Soltani, Rasool; Negahban, Sorrosh; Abdollahi, Alireza; Gholami, Keirollah

2012-01-01

303

Solvent tolerant marine bacterium Bacillus aquimaris secreting organic solvent stable alkaline cellulase.  

PubMed

The organic solvent tolerant bacteria with their physiological abilities to decontaminate the organic pollutants have potentials to secrete extracellular enzymes of commercial importance. Of the 19 marine bacterial isolates examined for their solvent tolerance at 10vol.% concentration, one had the significant tolerance and showed a relative growth yield of 86% for acetone, 71% for methanol, 52% for benzene, 35% for heptane, 24% for toluene and 19% for ethylacetate. The phylogenetic analysis of this strain using 16S rDNA sequence revealed 99% homology with Bacillus aquimaris. The cellulase enzyme secreted by this strain under normal conditions showed an optimum activity at pH 11 and 45°C. The enzyme did show functional stability even at higher pH (12) and temperature (75°C) with residual activity of 85% and 95% respectively. The enzyme activity in the presence of different additives were in the following order: Co(+2)>Fe(+2)>NaOCl(2)>CuSO(4)>KCl>NaCl. The enzyme stability in the presence of solvents at 20vol.% concentration was highest in benzene with 122% followed by methanol (85%), acetone (75%), toluene (73%) and heptane (42%). The pre-incubation of enzyme in ionic liquids such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methanesulfonate and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide increased its activity to 150% and 155% respectively. The change in fatty acid profile with different solvents further elucidated the physiological adaptations of the strain to tolerate such extreme conditions. PMID:21388656

Trivedi, Nitin; Gupta, Vishal; Kumar, Manoj; Kumari, Puja; Reddy, C R K; Jha, Bhavanath

2011-04-01

304

Detergent Compatible, Organic Solvent Tolerant Alkaline Protease from Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942: Purification and Characterization.  

PubMed

Proteases are now recognised as most indispensable industrial biocatalyst owing to their diverse microbial sources and innovative applications. In the present investigation, a thermostable, organic solvent tolerant, alkaline serine protease from Bacillus circulans MTCC 7942 was purified and characterized. The protease was purified to 37-fold by three step purification scheme with 39% recovery. The optimum pH and temperature for protease was 10 and 60°C, respectively. The apparent molecular mass of purified enzyme was 43 kDa as revealed by SDS-PAGE. The Km and Vmax values using casein-substrate were 3.1 mg/mL and 1.8 µmol/min, respectively. The protease remained stable in the presence of organic solvents with higher (>3.2) log P value (cyclohexane, n-octane, n-hexadecane, n-decane and n-dodecane), as compared to organic solvents with lower (<3.2) log P value (acetone, butanol, benzene, chloroform, toluene). Remarkably, the protease showed profound stability even in the presence of organic solvents with less log P values (glycerol, DMSO, p-xylene), indicating the possibility for non-aqueous enzymatic applications. Besides, protease activity was improved in the presence of metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+)); enhanced by biosurfactants; hardly affected by bleaching-, oxidizing agents, chemical surfactants and stable in commercial detergents. In addition, protease-detergent formulation effectively washed the egg and blood stains as compared to detergent alone. The protease was suitable for various commercial applications like processing of gelatinous film and compatible additive of detergent formulation with its operative utility in hard water. PMID:25356983

Patil, Ulhas; Mokashe, Narendra; Chaudhari, Ambalal

2014-10-30

305

The anaerobic life of Bacillus subtilis: Cloning of the genes encoding the respiratory nitrate reductase system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis, generally regarded as an aerobe, grows under strict anaerobic conditions using nitrate as an electron acceptor and should be designated as a facultative anaerobe. Growth experiments demonstrated a lag phase of 24 to 36 hours after the shift from aerobic, to the onset of anaerobic respiratory growth. Anaerobically adapted cells grew without further lag

Tamara Hoffmann; Barbara Troup; Alexandra Szabo; Christoph Hungerer; Dieter Jahn

1995-01-01

306

Directed natural product biosynthesis gene cluster capture and expression in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

Bacilli are ubiquitous low G+C environmental Gram-positive bacteria that produce a wide assortment of specialized small molecules. Although their natural product biosynthetic potential is high, robust molecular tools to support the heterologous expression of large biosynthetic gene clusters in Bacillus hosts are rare. Herein we adapt transformation-associated recombination (TAR) in yeast to design a single genomic capture and expression vector for antibiotic production in Bacillus subtilis. After validating this direct cloning "plug-and-play" approach with surfactin, we genetically interrogated amicoumacin biosynthetic gene cluster from the marine isolate Bacillus subtilis 1779. Its heterologous expression allowed us to explore an unusual maturation process involving the N-acyl-asparagine pro-drug intermediates preamicoumacins, which are hydrolyzed by the asparagine-specific peptidase into the active component amicoumacin A. This work represents the first direct cloning based heterologous expression of natural products in the model organism B. subtilis and paves the way to the development of future genome mining efforts in this genus. PMID:25807046

Li, Yongxin; Li, Zhongrui; Yamanaka, Kazuya; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Weipeng; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto; Moore, Bradley S; Qian, Pei-Yuan

2015-01-01

307

Gene cloning and characterization of a thermostable organic-tolerant ?-amylase from Bacillus subtilis DR8806.  

PubMed

The gene encoding an extracellular ?-amylase from Bacillus subtilis DR8806 was cloned into pET28a(+) vector and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant enzyme with molecular mass of 76 kDa exhibited optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 70 °C with high stability in pH and temperature ranges of 4.0-9.0 and 45-75 °C. The enzyme showed a half-life of 125 min at 70 °C. The ?-amylase activity enhanced in the presence of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) ions, while Zn(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+) ions inhibited the activity. The recombinant ?-amylase exhibited high stability towards ioninc detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Organic solvents in reaction media increased the ?-amylase activity. TLC analysis showed that maltoriose and maltose were the major end products of enzymatic starch hydrolysis. Presenting various properties of recombinant ?-amylase makes it well suited as a potential candidate for industrial usages. PMID:25168843

Emtenani, Shamsi; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Emtenani, Shirin

2015-01-01

308

Comparative physiological and transcriptional analysis of weak organic acid stress in Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

The advent of 'omics' techniques bears significant potential for the assessment of the microbiological stability of foods. This requires the integration of molecular data with their implication for cellular physiology. Here we performed a comparative physiological and transcriptional analysis of Bacillus subtilis stressed with three different weak organic acids: the commonly used food preservatives sorbic- and acetic-acid, plus the well-known uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). The concentration of each compound needed to cause a similar reduction of the growth rate negatively correlated with their membrane solubility, and positively with the concentration of undissociated acid. Intracellular acidification was demonstrated by expressing a pH-sensitive GFP derivative. The largest drop in intracellular pH was observed in CCCP-stressed cells and was accompanied by the transcriptional induction of the general stress response (GSR) and SigM regulon, responses known to be induced by acidification. The GSR was induced by acetate, but not by sorbate in mildly-stressed cells. Microarray analysis further revealed that all three acids activate transcriptional programs normally seen upon nutrient limitation and cause diverse responses indicative of an adaptation of the cell envelope. Based on the responses observed and the utilized pH measurements, the inhibitory effect of sorbic acid seems to be more focused on the cell membrane than that of acetic acid or CCCP. PMID:25481064

Ter Beek, Alexander; Wijman, Janneke G E; Zakrzewska, Anna; Orij, Rick; Smits, Gertien J; Brul, Stanley

2015-02-01

309

Co-production of surfactin and a novel bacteriocin by Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis H4 isolated from Bikalga, an African alkaline Hibiscus sabdariffa seed fermented condiment.  

PubMed

Bikalga is a Hibiscus sabdariffa seed fermented condiment widely consumed in Burkina Faso and neighboring countries. The fermentation is dominated by Bacillus subtilis group species. Ten B. subtilis subsp. subtilis (six isolates) and Bacillus licheniformis (four isolates) isolated from traditional Bikalga were examined for their antimicrobial activity against a panel of 36 indicator organisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts. The Bacillus spp. isolates showed variable inhibitory abilities depending on the method used. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were inhibited in the agar spot assay while only Gram-positive pathogens were inhibited in the agar well diffusion assay. Cell free supernatants (CFS) of pure cultures of 3 B. subtilis subsp. subtilis (G2, H4 and F1) strains inhibited growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, while CFS of 2 B. licheniformis (E3 and F9) strains only inhibited M. luteus. The antimicrobial substance(s) produced by B. subtilis subsp. subtilis H4 was further characterized. The antimicrobial substance(s) produced by H4 was detected from mid-exponential growth phase. The activity was sensitive to protease and trypsin, but resistant to the proteolytic action of proteinase K and papain. Treatment with ?-amylase and lipase II resulted in a complete loss of antimicrobial effect, indicating that a sugar moiety and lipid moiety are necessary for the activity. Treatment with mercapto-ethanol resulted in a significant loss, indicative of the presence of disulfide bridges. The antimicrobial activity of H4 was heat resistant and active at pH3-10. PCR detection of yiwB, sboA, spoX, albA and spaS, etnS genes and genes coding for surfactins and plipastatins (fengycins) indicated a potential for subtilosin, subtilin and lipopeptide production, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out and a single band of approximately 4kDa had antimicrobial activity. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-TOFMS) analysis of the 4kDa band allowed identification of surfactin and a protein with a monoisotopic mass of 3346.59Da, which is dissimilar in size to subtilosin and subtilin. Surfactin is a cyclic lipoheptapeptide, which contains a ?-hydroxy fatty acid, but no di-sulfide bridges or sugar residues. The complete loss of activity upon amylase treatment indicates that surfactin was not responsible for the observed antimicrobial effect. However, it cannot completely be ruled out that surfactin acts synergistically with the detected protein, though further investigations are needed to confirm this. PMID:23466466

Compaoré, Clarisse S; Nielsen, Dennis S; Ouoba, Labia I I; Berner, Torben S; Nielsen, Kristian F; Sawadogo-Lingani, Hagrétou; Diawara, Bréhima; Ouédraogo, Georges A; Jakobsen, Mogens; Thorsen, Line

2013-04-01

310

Increased stability of an esterase from Bacillus stearothermophilus in ionic liquids as compared to organic solvents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three different ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]amide [BMIM][BTA], 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate [BMIM][PF6] and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BMIM][BF4] were used as reaction media for the transesterification of 1-phenylethanol catalysed by esterases from Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus stearothermophilus. No transesterification activity could be detected in the ionic liquids when the lyophilised powder of the esterases was used as biocatalysts. By immobilising the

Mattias Persson; Uwe T. Bornscheuer

2003-01-01

311

Overexpression, Purification and Characterization of Organic Solvent Stable Lipase from Bacillus licheniformis RSP09  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lipase gene (543 bp) from Bacillus licheniformis RSP-09, a thermophilic isolate, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). It encodes a polypeptide of 181 residues and has 96% identity with Bacillus pumilus B26 lipase gene. The recombinant lipase was purified 19-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity by His-tag chromatography. The molecular mass of the purified recombinant B. licheniformis RSP-09 lipase was

Bhawna Madan; Prashant Mishra

2009-01-01

312

Genome of a Gut Strain of Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

Bacillus subtilis is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, spore-forming bacterium. We present the genome sequence of an undomesticated strain, BSP1, isolated from poultry. The sequence of the BSP1 genome supports the view that B. subtilis has a biphasic lifestyle, cycling between the soil and the animal gastrointestinal tract, and it provides molecular-level insight into the adaptation of B. subtilis to life under laboratory conditions. PMID:23409263

Serra, Cláudia R.; Lapointe, Thomas; Pereira-Leal, José B.; Potot, Sébastien; Fickers, Patrick; Perkins, John B.; Wyss, Markus; Henriques, Adriano O.

2013-01-01

313

Systematic Review of Membrane Components of Gram-Positive Bacteria Responsible as Pyrogens for Inducing Human Monocyte/Macrophage Cytokine Release  

PubMed Central

Fifty years after the elucidation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) as the principal structure of Gram-negative bacteria activating the human immune system, its Gram-positive counterpart is still under debate. Pyrogen tests based on the human monocyte activation have been validated for LPS detection as an alternative to the rabbit test and, increasingly, the limulus amebocyte lysate test. For full replacement, international validations with non-endotoxin pyrogens are in preparation. Following evidence-based medicine approaches, a systematic review of existing evidence as to the structural nature of the Gram-positive pyrogen was undertaken. For the three major constituents suggested, i.e., peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acids (LTA), and bacterial lipoproteins (LP), the questions to be answered and a search strategy for relevant literature was developed, starting in MedLine. The evaluation was based on the Koch–Dale criteria for a mediator of an effect. A total of 380 articles for peptidoglycan, 391 for LP, and 285 for LTA were retrieved of which 12, 8, and 24, respectively, fulfilled inclusion criteria. The compiled data suggest that for peptidoglycan two Koch–Dale criteria are fulfilled, four for LTA, and two for bacterial LP. In conclusion, based on the best currently available evidence, LTA is the only substance that fulfills all criteria. LTA has been isolated from a large number of bacteria, results in cytokine release patterns inducible also with synthetic LTA. Reduction in bacterial cytokine induction with an inhibitor for LTA was shown. However, this systematic review cannot exclude the possibility that other stimulatory compounds complement or substitute for LTA in being the counterpart to LPS in some Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22529809

Rockel, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas

2012-01-01

314

Rapid identification of Gram-positive pathogens and their resistance genes from positive blood culture broth using a multiplex tandem RT-PCR assay.  

PubMed

The early initiation of targeted antibiotic therapy in patients with bacteraemia and septic shock impacts favourably on outcomes. Rapid methods are therefore increasingly employed for bacterial identification directly from positive blood culture bottles, but with variable success. We evaluated the performance of the Gram Positive 12 multiplex tandem PCR (MT-PCR) assay (AusDiagnostics; catalogue no. 6202, version 07) containing targets for the identification of staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus, streptococci including Streptococcus pneumoniae, enterococci including Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium and their common antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, vanA, vanB). A total of 673 aerobic and anaerobic blood culture broths demonstrating Gram-positive cocci on microscopy were analysed in parallel with traditional phenotypic methods. Amplification of the internal control was inhibited in 79/673 (11.7?%) samples; however, MT-PCR identification was in concordance with phenotypic identification to the genus level in 96.6?% (537/556) of the remaining monomicrobial specimens and to the species level, where applicable, in 100?% (172/172) of samples. MT-PCR identification for 94.7?% (36/38) of polymicrobial samples matched traditional phenotypic identification. Meticillin and vancomycin susceptibility results determined by MT-PCR in blood culture broths demonstrated complete agreement with those determined by phenotypic methods in all 143 Staphylococcus aureus isolates and eight E. faecium isolates, respectively. Gram-positive pathogens and their key antibiotic resistance markers were reliably identified with the MT-PCR assay within 3 h of a positive blood culture result. PMID:23139396

Hazelton, Briony J; Thomas, Lee C; Unver, Tuba; Iredell, Jonathan R

2013-02-01

315

Effectiveness of a bundled intervention of decolonization and prophylaxis to decrease Gram positive surgical site infections after cardiac or orthopedic surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate studies assessing the effectiveness of a bundle of nasal decolonization and glycopeptide prophylaxis for preventing surgical site infections caused by Gram positive bacteria among patients undergoing cardiac operations or total joint replacement procedures. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed (1995 to 2011), the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, Embase, and clinicaltrials.gov were searched to identify relevant studies. Pertinent journals and conference abstracts were hand searched. Study authors were contacted if more data were needed. Eligibility criteria Randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, and cohort studies that assessed nasal decolonization or glycopeptide prophylaxis, or both, for preventing Gram positive surgical site infections compared with standard care. Participants Patients undergoing cardiac operations or total joint replacement procedures. Data extraction and study appraisal Two authors independently extracted data from each paper and a random effects model was used to obtain summary estimates. Risk of bias was assessed using the Downs and Black or the Cochrane scales. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q and I2 statistics. Results 39 studies were included. Pooled effects of 17 studies showed that nasal decolonization had a significantly protective effect against surgical site infections associated with Staphylococcus aureus (pooled relative risk 0.39, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.50) when all patients underwent decolonization (0.40, 0.29 to 0.55) and when only S aureus carriers underwent decolonization (0.36, 0.22 to 0.57). Pooled effects of 15 prophylaxis studies showed that glycopeptide prophylaxis was significantly protective against surgical site infections related to methicillin (meticillin) resistant S aureus (MRSA) compared with prophylaxis using ? lactam antibiotics (0.40, 0.20 to 0.80), and a non-significant risk factor for methicillin susceptible S aureus infections (1.47, 0.91 to 2.38). Seven studies assessed a bundle including decolonization and glycopeptide prophylaxis for only patients colonized with MRSA and found a significantly protective effect against surgical site infections with Gram positive bacteria (0.41, 0.30 to 0.56). Conclusions Surgical programs that implement a bundled intervention including both nasal decolonization and glycopeptide prophylaxis for MRSA carriers may decrease rates of surgical site infections caused by S aureus or other Gram positive bacteria. PMID:23766464

2013-01-01

316

Discovery of a New Class of Non-?-lactam Inhibitors of Penicillin-Binding Proteins with Gram-Positive Antibacterial Activity  

PubMed Central

Infections caused by hard-to-treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a serious global public-health concern, as MRSA has become broadly resistant to many classes of antibiotics. We disclose herein the discovery of a new class of non-?-lactam antibiotics, the oxadiazoles, which inhibit penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) of MRSA. The oxadiazoles show bactericidal activity against vancomycin- and linezolid-resistant MRSA and other Gram-positive bacterial strains, in vivo efficacy in a mouse model of infection, and have 100% oral bioavailability. PMID:24517363

2015-01-01

317

Physico-Chemical-Managed Killing of Penicillin-Resistant Static and Growing Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Vegetative Bacteria  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Systems and methods for the use of compounds from the Hofmeister series coupled with specific pH and temperature to provide rapid physico-chemical-managed killing of penicillin-resistant static and growing Gram-positive and Gram-negative vegetative bacteria. The systems and methods represent the more general physico-chemical enhancement of susceptibility for a wide range of pathological macromolecular targets to clinical management by establishing the reactivity of those targets to topically applied drugs or anti-toxins.

Richmond, Robert Chaffee (Inventor); Schramm, Jr., Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Farris, III, Alex F. (Inventor)

2012-01-01

318

Impact of Results of a Rapid Staphylococcus aureus Diagnostic Test on Prescribing of Antibiotics for Patients with Clustered Gram-Positive Cocci in Blood Cultures  

PubMed Central

In tropical northern Australia, approximately 20% of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We prospectively evaluated the impact on clinician antibiotic prescribing of the results obtained from performing the GeneXpert MRSA/SA test on 151 positive blood cultures with clustered Gram-positive cocci. The GeneXpert result led to earlier appropriate prescription of vancomycin for 54% of patients with MRSA; 25% of patients avoided vancomycin, and 16% of patients had all antibiotics ceased. PMID:22493335

Davies, Jane; Gordon, Claire L.; Tong, Steven Y. C.; Baird, Robert W.

2012-01-01

319

Gram-positive and Gram-negative protein subcellular localization by incorporating evolutionary-based descriptors into Chou?s general PseAAC.  

PubMed

Protein subcellular localization is defined as predicting the functioning location of a given protein in the cell. It is considered an important step towards protein function prediction and drug design. Recent studies have shown that relying on Gene Ontology (GO) for feature extraction can improve protein subcellular localization prediction performance. However, relying solely on GO, this problem remains unsolved. At the same time, the impact of other sources of features especially evolutionary-based features has not been explored adequately for this task. In this study, we aim to extract discriminative evolutionary features to tackle this problem. To do this, we propose two segmentation based feature extraction methods to explore potential local evolutionary-based information for Gram-positive and Gram-negative subcellular localizations. We will show that by applying a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier to our extracted features, we are able to enhance Gram-positive and Gram-negative subcellular localization prediction accuracies by up to 6.4% better than previous studies including the studies that used GO for feature extraction. PMID:25264267

Dehzangi, Abdollah; Heffernan, Rhys; Sharma, Alok; Lyons, James; Paliwal, Kuldip; Sattar, Abdul

2015-01-01

320

Potentiation of photoinactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria mediated by six phenothiazinium dyes by addition of azide ion.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) using phenothiazinium dyes is mediated by reactive oxygen species consisting of a combination of singlet oxygen (quenched by azide), hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. We recently showed that addition of sodium azide paradoxically potentiated APDI of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using methylene blue as the photosensitizer, and this was due to electron transfer to the dye triplet state from azide anion, producing azidyl radical. Here we compare this effect using six different homologous phenothiazinium dyes: methylene blue, toluidine blue O, new methylene blue, dimethylmethylene blue, azure A, and azure B. We found both significant potentiation (up to 2 logs) and also significant inhibition (>3 logs) of killing by adding 10 mM azide depending on Gram classification, washing the dye from the cells, and dye structure. Killing of E. coli was potentiated with all 6 dyes after a wash, while S. aureus killing was only potentiated by MB and TBO with a wash and DMMB with no wash. More lipophilic dyes (higher log P value, such as DMMB) were more likely to show potentiation. We conclude that the Type I photochemical mechanism (potentiation with azide) likely depends on the microenvironment, i.e. higher binding of dye to bacteria. Bacterial dye-binding is thought to be higher with Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive bacteria, when unbound dye has been washed away, and with more lipophilic dyes. PMID:25177833

Kasimova, Kamola R; Sadasivam, Magesh; Landi, Giacomo; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R

2014-11-01

321

Comparison of killing of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria by pure singlet oxygen. [Salmonella typhimurium; Escherichia coli; Sarcina lutea; Staphylococcus aureus; Streptococcus lactis; Streptococcus faecalis  

SciTech Connect

Gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria were found to display different sensitivities to pure singlet oxygen generated outside of cells. Killing curves for Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli strains were indicative of multihit killing, whereas curves for Sarcina lutea, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus lactis, and Streptococcus faecalis exhibited single-hit kinetics. The S. typhimurium deep rough strain TA1975, which lacks nearly all of the cell wall lipopolysaccharide coat and manifests concomitant enhancement of penetration by some exogenous substances, responded to singlet oxygen with initially faster inactivation than did the S. typhimurium wild-type strain, although the maximum rates of killing appeared to be quite similar. The structure of the cell wall thus plays an important role in susceptibility to singlet oxygen. The outer membrane-lipopolysaccharide portion of the gram-negative cell wall initially protects the bacteria from extracellular singlet oxygen, although it may also serve as a source for secondary reaction products which accentuate the rates of cell killing. S. typhimurium and E. coli strains lacking the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, showed no difference from strains containing glutathione in response to the toxic effects of singlet oxygen. Strains of Sarcina lutea and Staphylococcus aureus that contained carotenoids, however, were far more resistant to singlet oxygen lethality than were both carotenoidless mutants of the same species and other gram-positive species lacking high levels of protective carotenoids.

Dahl, T.A.; Midden, W.R. (Bowling Green State Univ., OH (USA)); Hartman, P.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

1989-04-01

322

Optimization of the Cell Wall Microenvironment Allows Increased Production of Recombinant Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen from B. subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stability of heterologous proteins secreted by gram-positive bacteria is greatly influenced by the micro- environment on the trans side of the cytoplasmic membrane, and secreted heterologous proteins are susceptible to rapid degradation by host cell proteases. In Bacillus subtilis, degradation occurs either as the proteins emerge from the presecretory translocase and prior to folding into their native conformation or

Joanne E. Thwaite; Les W. J. Baillie; Noel M. Carter; Keith Stephenson; Mark Rees; Colin R. Harwood; Peter T. Emmerson

2002-01-01

323

A Second PDZ-Containing Serine Protease Contributes to Activation of the Sporulation Transcription Factor  K in Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sporulation by the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis is a highly coordinated process, involving multiple pathways of intercellular signaling (for recent reviews, see references 19 and 27). Upon commitment to sporulate, the developing cell (the sporangium) divides asymmetrically to generate compart- ments of unequal size. The larger compartment is known as the mother cell, and the smaller one is referred to

Qi Pan; Richard Losick; David Z. Rudner

2003-01-01

324

Recent progress in Bacillus subtilis sporulation  

PubMed Central

The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can initiate the process of sporulation under conditions of nutrient limitation. Here, we review some of the last five years of work in this area, with a particular focus on the decision to initiate sporulation, DNA translocation, cell-cell communication, protein localization and spore morphogenesis. The progress we describe has implications not just for the study of sporulation but also for other biological systems where homologs of sporulation-specific proteins are involved in vegetative growth. PMID:22091839

Higgins, Douglas; Dworkin, Jonathan

2011-01-01

325

Assessing the interactions of a natural antibacterial clay with model Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and increasing accumulations of antibiotics in reclaimed water, drive the quest for new natural antimicrobials. We are studying the antibacterial mechanism(s) of clays that have shown an ability to destroy bacteria or significantly inhibit their growth. One possible mode of action is from soluble transition metal species, particularly reduced Fe, capable of generating deleterious oxygen radical species. Yet another possibility is related to membrane damage as a consequence of physical or electrostatic interaction between clay and bacteria. Both mechanisms could combine to produce cell death. This study addresses a natural antibacterial clay from the NW Amazon basin, South America (AMZ clay). Clay mineralogy is composed of disordered kaolinite (28.9%), halloysite (17.8%) illite (12%) and smectite (16.7%). Mean particle size is 1.6?m and total and specific surface area 278.82 and 51.23 m2/g respectively. The pH of a suspension (200mg/ml) is 4.1 and its Eh is 361mV after 24h of equilibration. The ionic strength of the water in equilibrium with the clay after 24 h. is 6 x10-4M. These conditions, affect the element solubility, speciation, and interactions between clay and bacteria. Standard microbiological methods were used to assess the viability of two model bacteria (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) after incubation with clay at 37 degC for 24 hrs. A threefold reduction in bacterial viability was observed upon treatment with AMZ clay. We separated the cells from the clay using Nycodenz gradient media and observed the mounts under the TEM and SEM. Results showed several membrane anomalies and structural changes that were not observed in the control cells. Additionally, clay minerals appeared in some places attached to cell walls. Experiments showed that exchanging AMZ clay with KCl caused loss of antibacterial property. Among the exchangeable -and potentially toxic- ions we measured Al+3, Cu+2, Zn+2, Ba+2 and Co+2. Besides being toxic at high concentrations, these species affect the electrophoretic interactions between clay and bacteria surfaces. Additionally, the cation exchange neutralizes the clay surface charge thus modifying further the behavior of particles in suspension. Therefore, we evaluated the clay and bacteria zeta potential (?) as an index for possible electrostatic forces and modeled the total interactions using DLVO theory. We suspended the particles in water equilibrated with clay (leachate). Results show that at pH 4, the ? of clays is -14 mV while it is -3mV for bacteria. The divalent ions and trivalent Aluminum, present in the AMZ leachate, compress the thickness of the double layer (hydration shell) thus decreasing electrostatic repulsion and allowing particles to come closer. The proximity of particles increases the probability of attractive forces to bind clays and cells. In summary, results indicate that a process other than simple chemical transfer from clay to bacteria is operating. The electrostatic attraction and physical proximity may enhance the toxic action of metals and interfere with the membrane properties or processes.

Londono, S. C.; Williams, L. B.

2013-12-01

326

Characterisation of a biosurfactant produced by a Bacillus cereus strain tolerant to cadmium and isolated from green coffee grain  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, a Gram-positive bacterium with bacillus-type morphology was isolated from low-quality coffee beans in a nutritive\\u000a medium supplemented with 178 ?M of Cd [Cd(NO3)2 4H2O]. PCR showed 99% similarity of the isolated bacteria with Bacillus cereus QD232. This bacterium produced a biosurfactant after 120 h of growth with an average production of 480 mg l?1 and was able to emulsify various

Juan Carlos Velázquez-Aradillas; Jeiry Toribio-Jiménez; Ma. del Carmen Ángeles González-Chávez; Francisco Bautista; Mariano E. Cebrián; Fernando José Esparza-García

2011-01-01

327

Genome analysis of Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae strain GrollT a highly versatile Gram-positive sulfate-reducing bacterium  

PubMed Central

Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae is a mesophilic member of the polyphyletic spore-forming genus Desulfotomaculum within the family Peptococcaceae. This bacterium was isolated from a freshwater ditch and is of interest because it can grow with a large variety of organic substrates, in particular several aromatic compounds, short-chain and medium-chain fatty acids, which are degraded completely to carbon dioxide coupled to the reduction of sulfate. It can grow autotrophically with H2 + CO2 and sulfate and slowly acetogenically with H2 + CO2, formate or methoxylated aromatic compounds in the absence of sulfate. It does not require any vitamins for growth. Here, we describe the features of D. gibsoniae strain GrollT together with the genome sequence and annotation. The chromosome has 4,855,529 bp organized in one circular contig and is the largest genome of all sequenced Desulfotomaculum spp. to date. A total of 4,666 candidate protein-encoding genes and 96 RNA genes were identified. Genes of the acetyl-CoA pathway, possibly involved in heterotrophic growth and in CO2 fixation during autotrophic growth, are present. The genome contains a large set of genes for the anaerobic transformation and degradation of aromatic compounds, which are lacking in the other sequenced Desulfotomaculum genomes. PMID:25197466

Kuever, Jan; Visser, Michael; Loeffler, Claudia; Boll, Matthias; Worm, Petra; Sousa, Diana Z.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Schaap, Peter J.; Muyzer, Gerard; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Parshina, Sofiya N.; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Detter, Janine; Woyke, Tanja; Chain, Patrick; Davenport, Karen W.; Rohde, Manfred; Spring, Stefan; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Stams, Alfons J.M.

2014-01-01

328

Communication of ? phage lysin plyG enzymes binding toward SrtA for inhibition of Bacillus anthracis: protein-protein interaction and molecular dynamics study.  

PubMed

Bacillus anthracis is a pathogenic, Gram-positive bacterium which chiefly affects the livestock of animals and humans through acute disease anthrax. All around the globe this bio-threat organism damages millions of lives in every year and also most of the drugs were not responding properly in inhibition against this diseased pathogen. In recent development, phage therapy is considered as alternative solution to treat this serious infectious disease. In this study, we elucidated the binding of ? phage lysin plyG enzymes toward the SrtA along with its activator peptide LPXTG. Through protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies, we showed the distinguished structure complementarity of SrtA and plyG complex. Especially, MD simulation relates strong and stable interaction occurs between the protein complex structures. These results suggest that additional experimental studies on our approach will lead to availability of better inhibitor against the SrtA. PMID:24978154

Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Bharathi Priya, Ramanathan; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

2014-10-01

329

Crystallization and first data collection of the putative transfer protein TraN from the Gram-positive conjugative plasmid pIP501.  

PubMed

Conjugative plasmid transfer is the most important route for the spread of resistance and virulence genes among bacteria. Consequently, bacteria carrying conjugative plasmids are a substantial threat to human health, especially hospitalized patients. Whilst detailed information about the process has been obtained for Gram-negative type-4 secretion systems, little is known about the corresponding mechanisms in Gram-positive (G+) bacteria. The successful purification and crystallization of the putative transfer protein TraN from the G+ conjugative model plasmid pIP501 of Enterococcus faecalis are presented. Native crystals diffracted to 1.8?Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline. The crystals belonged to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a=32.88, b=54.94, c=57.71?Å, ?=91.89° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. PMID:23143259

Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Fercher, Christian; Abajy, Mohammad Yaser; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Keller, Walter

2012-11-01

330

Myeloid Cell Sirtuin-1 Expression Does Not Alter Host Immune Responses to Gram-Negative Endotoxemia or Gram-Positive Bacterial Infection  

PubMed Central

The role of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) in innate immunity, and in particular the influence of SIRT1 on antimicrobial defense against infection, has yet to be reported but is important to define since SIRT1 inhibitors are being investigated as therapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer, Huntington’s disease, and autoimmune diseases. Given the therapeutic potential of SIRT1 suppression, we sought to characterize the role of SIRT1 in host defense. Utilizing both pharmacologic methods and a genetic knockout, we demonstrate that SIRT1 expression has little influence on macrophage and neutrophil antimicrobial functions. Myeloid SIRT1 expression does not change mortality in gram-negative toxin-induced shock or gram-positive bacteremia, suggesting that therapeutic suppression of SIRT1 may be done safely without suppression of myeloid cell-specific immune responses to severe bacterial infections. PMID:24386389

Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Marsh, Brenda J.; Timmer, Anjuli M.; Lin, Ann E.; Zainabadi, Kayvan; Czopik, Agnieszka; Guarente, Leonard; Nizet, Victor

2013-01-01

331

New potent antibacterials against Gram-positive multiresistant pathogens: effects of side chain modification and chirality in linezolid-like 1,2,4-oxadiazoles.  

PubMed

The effects of side chain modification and chirality in linezolid-like 1,2,4-oxadiazoles have been studied to design new potent antibacterials against Gram-positive multidrug-resistant pathogens. The adopted strategy involved a molecular modelling approach, the synthesis and biological evaluation of new designed compounds, enantiomers separation and absolute configuration assignment. Experimental determination of the antibacterial activity of the designed (S)-1-((3-(4-(3-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenyl)-oxazolidin-2-one-5-yl)methyl)-3-methylthiourea and (S)-1-((3-(3-fluoro-4-(3-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl)phenyl)-oxazolidin-2-one-5-yl)methyl)-3-methylthiourea against multidrug resistant linezolid bacterial strains was higher than that of linezolid. PMID:25464880

Fortuna, Cosimo G; Berardozzi, Roberto; Bonaccorso, Carmela; Caltabiano, Gianluigi; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Goracci, Laura; Guarcello, Annalisa; Pace, Andrea; Palumbo Piccionello, Antonio; Pescitelli, Gennaro; Pierro, Paola; Lonati, Elena; Bulbarelli, Alessandra; Cocuzza, Clementina E A; Musumarra, Giuseppe; Musumeci, Rosario

2014-12-15

332

Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper for identification of Gram-positive rods: development of a diagnostic algorithm for the clinical laboratory.  

PubMed

Reported matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification rates of Gram-positive rods (GPR) are low compared to identification rates of Gram-positive cocci. In this study, three sample preparation methods were compared for MALDI-TOF MS identification of 190 well-characterized GPR strains: direct transfer, direct transfer-formic acid preparation, and ethanol-formic acid extraction. Using the interpretation criteria recommended by the manufacturer, identification rates were significantly higher for direct transfer-formic acid preparation and ethanol-formic acid extraction than for direct transfer. Reducing the species cutoff from 2.0 to 1.7 significantly increased species identification rates. In a subsequent prospective study, 215 clinical GPR isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, and the results were compared to those for identification using conventional methods, with discrepancies being resolved by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene analysis. Using the direct transfer-formic acid preparation and a species cutoff of 1.7, congruencies on the genus and species levels of 87.4% and 79.1%, respectively, were achieved. In addition, the rate of nonidentified isolates dropped from 12.1% to 5.6% when using an extended database, i.e., the Bruker database amended by reference spectra of the 190 GPR of the retrospective study. Our data demonstrate three ways to improve GPR identification by the Bruker MALDI Biotyper, (i) optimize sample preparation using formic acid, (ii) reduce cutoff scores for species identification, and (iii) expand the database. Based on our results, we suggest an identification algorithm for the clinical laboratory combining MALDI-TOF MS with nucleic acid sequencing. PMID:24452159

Schulthess, Bettina; Bloemberg, Guido V; Zbinden, Reinhard; Böttger, Erik C; Hombach, Michael

2014-04-01

333

Evaluation of the Bruker MALDI Biotyper for Identification of Gram-Positive Rods: Development of a Diagnostic Algorithm for the Clinical Laboratory  

PubMed Central

Reported matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification rates of Gram-positive rods (GPR) are low compared to identification rates of Gram-positive cocci. In this study, three sample preparation methods were compared for MALDI-TOF MS identification of 190 well-characterized GPR strains: direct transfer, direct transfer-formic acid preparation, and ethanol-formic acid extraction. Using the interpretation criteria recommended by the manufacturer, identification rates were significantly higher for direct transfer-formic acid preparation and ethanol-formic acid extraction than for direct transfer. Reducing the species cutoff from 2.0 to 1.7 significantly increased species identification rates. In a subsequent prospective study, 215 clinical GPR isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS, and the results were compared to those for identification using conventional methods, with discrepancies being resolved by 16S rRNA and rpoB gene analysis. Using the direct transfer-formic acid preparation and a species cutoff of 1.7, congruencies on the genus and species levels of 87.4% and 79.1%, respectively, were achieved. In addition, the rate of nonidentified isolates dropped from 12.1% to 5.6% when using an extended database, i.e., the Bruker database amended by reference spectra of the 190 GPR of the retrospective study. Our data demonstrate three ways to improve GPR identification by the Bruker MALDI Biotyper, (i) optimize sample preparation using formic acid, (ii) reduce cutoff scores for species identification, and (iii) expand the database. Based on our results, we suggest an identification algorithm for the clinical laboratory combining MALDI-TOF MS with nucleic acid sequencing. PMID:24452159

Bloemberg, Guido V.; Zbinden, Reinhard; Böttger, Erik C.; Hombach, Michael

2014-01-01

334

A novel universal DNA labeling and amplification system for rapid microarray-based detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes in Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

A rapid and simple DNA labeling system has been developed for disposable microarrays and has been validated for the detection of 117 antibiotic resistance genes abundant in Gram-positive bacteria. The DNA was fragmented and amplified using phi-29 polymerase and random primers with linkers. Labeling and further amplification were then performed by classic PCR amplification using biotinylated primers specific for the linkers. The microarray developed by Perreten et al. (Perreten, V., Vorlet-Fawer, L., Slickers, P., Ehricht, R., Kuhnert, P., Frey, J., 2005. Microarray-based detection of 90 antibiotic resistance genes of gram-positive bacteria. J.Clin.Microbiol. 43, 2291-2302.) was improved by additional oligonucleotides. A total of 244 oligonucleotides (26 to 37 nucleotide length and with similar melting temperatures) were spotted on the microarray, including genes conferring resistance to clinically important antibiotic classes like ?-lactams, macrolides, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides and tetracyclines. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by at least 2 oligonucleotides designed from consensus sequences of gene families. The specificity of the oligonucleotides and the quality of the amplification and labeling were verified by analysis of a collection of 65 strains belonging to 24 species. Association between genotype and phenotype was verified for 6 antibiotics using 77 Staphylococcus strains belonging to different species and revealed 95% test specificity and a 93% predictive value of a positive test. The DNA labeling and amplification is independent of the species and of the target genes and could be used for different types of microarrays. This system has also the advantage to detect several genes within one bacterium at once, like in Staphylococcus aureus strain BM3318, in which up to 15 genes were detected. This new microarray-based detection system offers a large potential for applications in clinical diagnostic, basic research, food safety and surveillance programs for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:25451460

Strauss, Christian; Endimiani, Andrea; Perreten, Vincent

2015-01-01

335

Accuracy and Potential Usefulness of Triplex Real-Time PCR for Improving Antibiotic Treatment of Patients with Blood Cultures Showing Clustered Gram-Positive Cocci on Direct Smears?  

PubMed Central

Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing currently require 48 h when a first blood culture (BC) is positive for clustered gram-positive cocci on direct smear examination (DSE). Meanwhile, antibiotic treatment is often inadequate, reducing the chances of effective treatment or creating unnecessary selective pressure. A new real-time PCR (RT-PCR) technique that differentiates Staphylococcus aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and detects methicillin resistance in 90 min in BC bottles could help solve these problems. BC bottles from 410 patients with gram-positive cocci on DSE were processed by current methods, and patients' treatments were prospectively recorded. The RT-PCR assay was performed on aliquots of these BCs, which had been kept frozen. For the 121 patients who had true bacteremia, we established whether the faster availability of RT-PCR results could have led to the initiation of treatments different from those actually given. RT-PCR sensitivity and specificity were 100% for differentiating between S. aureus and CoNS and detecting methicillin resistance with two manufacturers' BC bottles. For 31/86 (36%) of the S. aureus-infected patients and for 8/35 (23%) of the CoNS-infected patients who either had suboptimal or nonoptimal treatment or were untreated 48 h after positivity was detected, the early availability of RT-PCR results could have allowed more effective treatment. Unnecessary glycopeptide treatments could have been avoided for 28 additional patients. The use of RT-PCR would increase treatment effectiveness in patients with staphylococcal bacteremia and reduce the selective pressure created by glycopeptides. PMID:18417663

Ruimy, Raymond; Dos-Santos, Marie; Raskine, Laurent; Bert, Frédéric; Masson, René; Elbaz, Sandrine; Bonnal, Christine; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Lefort, Agnès; Fantin, Bruno; Wolff, Michel; Hornstein, Michele; Andremont, Antoine

2008-01-01

336

Transcriptional Attenuation Controls Macrolide Inducible Efflux and Resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in Other Gram-Positive Bacteria Containing mef/mel(msr(D)) Elements  

PubMed Central

Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr) operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr) in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E)/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E)/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E)/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E). Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5?-TATACT-3?) and -35 (5?-TTGAAC-3?) boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5’ region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(E)L)] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(E)L was also influenced by mef(E)L-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5’ of mef(E) was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr)-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr) elements. PMID:25695510

Chancey, Scott T.; Bai, Xianhe; Kumar, Nikhil; Drabek, Elliott F.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Colon, Thomas; Ott, Sandra; Sengamalay, Naomi; Sadzewicz, Lisa; Tallon, Luke J.; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Hervé; Stephens, David S.

2015-01-01

337

Next generation sequencing reveals the expression of a unique miRNA profile in response to a gram-positive bacterial infection.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are proposed to play a key role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we report a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach profiling the expression of miRNAs in primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMEs) at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours post-infection with Streptococcus uberis, a causative agent of bovine mastitis. Analysing over 450 million sequencing reads, we found that 20% of the approximately 1,300 currently known bovine miRNAs are expressed in unchallenged BMEs. We also identified the expression of more than 20 potentially novel bovine miRNAs. There is, however, a significant dynamic range in the expression of known miRNAs. The top 10 highly expressed miRNAs account for >80% of all aligned reads, with the remaining miRNAs showing much lower expression. Twenty-one miRNAs were identified as significantly differentially expressed post-infection with S. uberis. Several of these miRNAs have characterised roles in the immune systems of other species. This miRNA response to the Gram-positive S. uberis is markedly different, however, to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced miRNA expression. Of 145 miRNAs identified in the literature as being LPS responsive, only 9 were also differentially expressed in response to S. uberis. Computational analysis has also revealed that the predicted target genes of miRNAs, which are down-regulated in BMEs following S. uberis infection, are statistically enriched for roles in innate immunity. This suggests that miRNAs, which potentially act as central regulators of gene expression responses to a Gram-positive bacterial infection, may significantly regulate the sentinel capacity of mammary epithelial cells to mobilise the innate immune system. PMID:23472090

Lawless, Nathan; Foroushani, Amir B K; McCabe, Matthew S; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Lynn, David J

2013-01-01

338

Detection of heavy metal ion resistance genes in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria isolated from a lead-contaminated site.  

PubMed

Resistance to a range of heavy metal ions was determined for lead-resistant and other bacteria which had been isolated from a battery-manufacturing site contaminated with high concentration of lead. Several Gram-positive (belonging to the genera Arthrobacter and Corynebacterium) and Gram-negative (Alcaligenes species) isolates were resistant to lead, mercury, cadmium, cobalt, zinc and copper, although the levels of resistance to the different metal ions were specific for each isolate. Polymerase chain reaction, DNA-DNA hybridization and DNA sequencing were used to explore the nature of genetic systems responsible for the metal resistance in eight of the isolates. Specific DNA sequences could be amplified from the genomic DNA of all the isolates using primers for sections of the mer (mercury resistance determinant on the transposon Tn501) and pco (copper resistance determinant on the plasmid pRJ1004) genetic systems. Positive hybridizations with mer and pco probes indicated that the amplified segments were highly homologous to these genes. Some of the PCR products were cloned and partially sequenced, and the regions sequenced were highly homologous to the appropriate regions of the mer and pco determinants. These results demonstrate the wide distribution of mercury and copper resistance genes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates obtained from this lead-contaminated soil. In contrast, the czc (cobalt, zinc and cadmium resistance) and chr (chromate resistance) genes could not be amplified from DNAs of some isolates, indicating the limited contribution, if any, of these genetic systems to the metal ion resistance of these isolates. PMID:9342884

Trajanovska, S; Britz, M L; Bhave, M

1997-01-01

339

A Systems Biological Approach Reveals Multiple Crosstalk Mechanism between Gram-Positive and Negative Bacterial Infections: An Insight into Core Mechanism and Unique Molecular Signatures  

PubMed Central

Background Bacterial infections remain a major threat and a leading cause of death worldwide. Most of the bacterial infections are caused by gram-positive and negative bacteria, which are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, respectively. Activation of these TLRs initiates multiple pathways that subsequently lead to effective immune response. Although, both the TLRs share common signaling mechanism yet they may exhibit specificity as well, resulting in the release of diverse range of inflammatory mediators which could be used as candidate biomolecules for bacterial infections. Results We adopted systems biological approach to identify signaling pathways mediated by TLRs to determine candidate molecules associated with bacterial infections. We used bioinformatics concepts, including literature mining to construct protein-protein interaction network, prioritization of TLRs specific nodes using microarray data and pathway analysis. Our constructed PPI network for TLR 2 (nodes: 4091 and edges: 66068) and TLR 4 (node: 4076 and edges: 67898) showed 3207 common nodes, indicating that both the TLRs might share similar signaling events that are attributed to cell migration, MAPK pathway and several inflammatory cascades. Our results propose the potential collaboration between the shared signaling pathways of both the receptors may enhance the immune response against invading pathogens. Further, to identify candidate molecules, the TLRs specific nodes were prioritized using microarray differential expressed genes. Of the top prioritized TLR 2 molecules, 70% were co-expressed. A similar trend was also observed within TLR 4 nodes. Further, most of these molecules were preferentially found in blood plasma for feasible diagnosis. Conclusions The analysis reveals the common and unique mechanism regulated by both the TLRs that provide a broad perspective of signaling events in bacterial infections. Further, the identified candidate biomolecules could potentially aid future research efforts concerning the possibility in differential diagnosis of gram-positive and negative bacterial infections. PMID:24587173

Thangam, Berla; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.

2014-01-01

340

Direct screening of recombinants in gram-positive bacteria using the secreted staphylococcal nuclease as a reporter.  

PubMed Central

A system for direct screening of recombinant clones in Lactococcus lactis, based on secretion of the staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) in the organism, was developed. The nuc gene (encoding SNase) was cloned on both rolling-circle and theta-replicating plasmids. L. lactis strains containing these nuc+ plasmids secrete SNase and are readily detectable by a simple plate test. A multicloning site (MCS) was introduced just after the cleavage site between leader peptide and the mature SNase, without affecting nuclease activity. Cloning foreign DNA fragments into any site of the MCS interrupts nuc and thus results in nuc mutant clones which are easily distinguished fron nuc+ clones on plates. The utility of this system for L. lactis was demonstrated by cloning an antibiotic resistance marker and Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA fragments into the MCS of the nucMCS cassette. Both cloning vectors containing the nucMCS cassette were also introduced into Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, in which direct screening of nuc mutant recombinant clones was also achieved. The potential uses of nuc as a secretion reporter system are discussed. Images PMID:8051029

Le Loir, Y; Gruss, A; Ehrlich, S D; Langella, P

1994-01-01

341

The Arthromitus stage of Bacillus cereus: Intestinal symbionts of?animals  

PubMed Central

In the guts of more than 25 species of arthropods we observed filaments containing refractile inclusions previously discovered and named “Arthromitus” in 1849 by Joseph Leidy [Leidy, J. (1849) Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4, 225–233]. We cultivated these microbes from boiled intestines of 10 different species of surface-cleaned soil insects and isopod crustaceans. Literature review and these observations lead us to conclude that Arthromitus are spore-forming, variably motile, cultivable bacilli. As long rod-shaped bacteria, they lose their flagella, attach by fibers or fuzz to the intestinal epithelium, grow filamentously, and sporulate from their distal ends. When these organisms are incubated in culture, their life history stages are accelerated by light and inhibited by anoxia. Characterization of new Arthromitus isolates from digestive tracts of common sow bugs (Porcellio scaber), roaches (Gromphodorhina portentosa, Blaberus giganteus) and termites (Cryptotermes brevis, Kalotermes flavicollis) identifies these flagellated, spore-forming symbionts as a Bacillus sp. Complete sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from four isolates (two sow bug, one hissing roach, one death’s head roach) confirms these as the low-G+C Gram-positive eubacterium Bacillus cereus. We suggest that B. cereus and its close relatives, easily isolated from soil and grown on nutrient agar, enjoy filamentous growth in moist nutrient-rich intestines of healthy arthropods and similar habitats. PMID:9448315

Margulis, Lynn; Jorgensen, Jeremy Z.; Dolan, Sona; Kolchinsky, Rita; Rainey, Frederick A.; Lo, Shyh-Ching

1998-01-01

342

The Pore-Forming Haemolysins of Bacillus Cereus: A Review  

PubMed Central

The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group contains diverse Gram-positive spore-forming bacteria that can cause gastrointestinal diseases and severe eye infections in humans. They have also been incriminated in a multitude of other severe, and frequently fatal, clinical infections, such as osteomyelitis, septicaemia, pneumonia, liver abscess and meningitis, particularly in immuno-compromised patients and preterm neonates. The pathogenic properties of this organism are mediated by the synergistic effects of a number of virulence products that promote intestinal cell destruction and/or resistance to the host immune system. This review focuses on the pore-forming haemolysins produced by B. cereus: haemolysin I (cereolysin O), haemolysin II, haemolysin III and haemolysin IV (CytK). Haemolysin I belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) family whose best known members are listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O, produced by L. monocytogenes and C. perfringens respectively. HlyII and CytK are oligomeric ß-barrel pore-forming toxins related to the ?-toxin of S. aureus or the ß-toxin of C. perfringens. The structure of haemolysin III, the least characterized haemolytic toxin from the B. cereus, group has not yet been determined. PMID:23748204

Ramarao, Nalini; Sanchis, Vincent

2013-01-01

343

Coupling of Fatty Acid and Phospholipid Synthesis in Bacillus subtilis?  

PubMed Central

plsX (acyl-acyl carrier protein [ACP]:phosphate acyltransferase), plsY (yneS) (acyl-phosphate:glycerol-phosphate acyltransferase), and plsC (yhdO) (acyl-ACP:1-acylglycerol-phosphate acyltransferase) function in phosphatidic acid formation, the precursor to membrane phospholipids. The physiological functions of these genes was inferred from their in vitro biochemical activities, and this study investigated their roles in gram-positive phospholipid metabolism through the analysis of conditional knockout strains in the Bacillus subtilis model system. The depletion of PlsX led to the cessation of both fatty acid synthesis and phospholipid synthesis. The inactivation of PlsY also blocked phospholipid synthesis, but fatty acid formation continued due to the appearance of acylphosphate intermediates and fatty acids arising from their hydrolysis. Phospholipid synthesis ceased following PlsC depletion, but fatty acid synthesis continued at a high rate, leading to the accumulation of fatty acids arising from the dephosphorylation of 1-acylglycerol-3-P followed by the deacylation of monoacylglycerol. Analysis of glycerol 3-P acylation in B. subtilis membranes showed that PlsY was an acylphosphate-specific acyltransferase, whereas PlsC used only acyl-ACP as an acyl donor. PlsX was found in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells but was associated with the cell membrane in intact organisms. These data establish that PlsX is a key enzyme that coordinates the production of fatty acids and membrane phospholipids in B. subtilis. PMID:17557823

Paoletti, Luciana; Lu, Ying-Jie; Schujman, Gustavo E.; de Mendoza, Diego; Rock, Charles O.

2007-01-01

344

A new organic solvent tolerant protease from Bacillus pumilus 115b  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five out of the nine benzene–toulene–ethylbenzene-xylene (BTEX) tolerant bacteria that demonstrated high protease activity\\u000a on skim milk agar were isolated. Among them, isolate 115b identified as Bacillus pumilus exhibited the highest protease production. The protease produced was stable in 25% (v\\/v) benzene and toluene and it was activated\\u000a 1.7 and 2.5- fold by n-dodecane and n-tetradecane, respectively. The gene encoding

Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd Rahman; Shalihah Mahamad; Abu Bakar Salleh; Mahiran Basri

2007-01-01

345

Mass and density measurements of live and dead Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial populations.  

PubMed

Monitoring cell growth and measuring physical features of food-borne pathogenic bacteria are important for better understanding the conditions under which these organisms survive and proliferate. To address this challenge, buoyant masses of live and dead Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria innocua were measured using Archimedes, a commercially available suspended microchannel resonator (SMR). Cell growth was monitored with Archimedes by observing increased cell concentration and buoyant mass values of live growing bacteria. These growth data were compared to optical density measurements obtained with a Bioscreen system. We observed buoyant mass measurements with Archimedes at cell concentrations between 10(5) and 10(8) cells/ml, while growth was not observed with optical density measurements until the concentration was 10(7) cells/ml. Buoyant mass measurements of live and dead cells with and without exposure to hydrogen peroxide stress were also compared; live cells generally had a larger buoyant mass than dead cells. Additionally, buoyant mass measurements were used to determine cell density and total mass for both live and dead cells. Dead E. coli cells were found to have a larger density and smaller total mass than live E. coli cells. In contrast, density was the same for both live and dead L. innocua cells, while the total mass was greater for live than for dead cells. These results contribute to the ongoing challenge to further develop existing technologies used to observe cell populations at low concentrations and to measure unique physical features of cells that may be useful for developing future diagnostics. PMID:24705320

Lewis, Christina L; Craig, Caelli C; Senecal, Andre G

2014-06-01

346

Mass and Density Measurements of Live and Dead Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacterial Populations  

PubMed Central

Monitoring cell growth and measuring physical features of food-borne pathogenic bacteria are important for better understanding the conditions under which these organisms survive and proliferate. To address this challenge, buoyant masses of live and dead Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria innocua were measured using Archimedes, a commercially available suspended microchannel resonator (SMR). Cell growth was monitored with Archimedes by observing increased cell concentration and buoyant mass values of live growing bacteria. These growth data were compared to optical density measurements obtained with a Bioscreen system. We observed buoyant mass measurements with Archimedes at cell concentrations between 105 and 108 cells/ml, while growth was not observed with optical density measurements until the concentration was 107 cells/ml. Buoyant mass measurements of live and dead cells with and without exposure to hydrogen peroxide stress were also compared; live cells generally had a larger buoyant mass than dead cells. Additionally, buoyant mass measurements were used to determine cell density and total mass for both live and dead cells. Dead E. coli cells were found to have a larger density and smaller total mass than live E. coli cells. In contrast, density was the same for both live and dead L. innocua cells, while the total mass was greater for live than for dead cells. These results contribute to the ongoing challenge to further develop existing technologies used to observe cell populations at low concentrations and to measure unique physical features of cells that may be useful for developing future diagnostics. PMID:24705320

Craig, Caelli C.; Senecal, Andre G.

2014-01-01

347

Biofilm-defective mutants of Bacillus subtilis.  

PubMed

Many bacteria can adopt organized, sessile, communal lifestyles. The gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis,forms biofilms on solid surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces, and biofilm development is dependent on environmental conditions. We demonstrate that biofilm formation by B. subtilis strain JH642 can be either activated or repressed by glucose, depending on the growth medium used, and that these glucose effects are at least in part mediated by the catabolite control protein, CcpA. Starting with a chromosomal Tn917-LTV3 insertional library, we isolated mutants that are defective for biofilm formation. The biofilm defects of these mutants were observable in both rich and minimal media, and both on polyvinylchloride abiotic surfaces and in borosilicate tubes. Two mutants were defective in flagellar synthesis. Chemotaxis was shown to be less important for biofilm formation than was flagellar-driven motility. Although motility is known to be required for biofilm formation in other bacteria, this had not previously been demonstrated for B. subtilis. In addition, our study suggests roles for glutamate synthase, GltAB, and an aminopeptidase, AmpS. The loss of these enzymes did not decrease growth or cellular motility but had dramatic effects on biofilm formation under all conditions assayed. The effect of the gltAB defect on biofilm formation could not be due to a decrease in poly-gamma-glutamate synthesis since this polymer proved to be nonessential for robust biofilm formation. High exogenous concentrations of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine or proline did not override the glutamate synthase requirement. This is the first report showing that glutamate synthase and a cytoplasmic aminopeptidase play roles in bacterial biofilm formation. Possible mechanistic implications and potential roles of biofilm formation in other developmental processes are discussed. PMID:16088219

Chagneau, Claudia; Saier, Milton H

2004-01-01

348

Antibacterial activity of silver-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria  

PubMed Central

Ag-doped nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (Ag:HAp-NPs) (Ca10-xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2, xAg?=?0.05, 0.2, and 0.3) with antibacterial properties are of great interest in the development of new products. Coprecipitation method is a promising route for obtaining nanocrystalline Ag:HAp with antibacterial properties. X-ray diffraction identified HAp as an unique crystalline phase in each sample. The calculated lattice constants of a?=?b?=?9.435 Å, c?=?6.876 Å for xAg?=?0.05, a?=?b?=?9.443 Å, c?=?6.875 Å for xAg?=?0.2, and a?=?b?=?9.445 Å, c?=?6.877 Å for xAg?=?0.3 are in good agreement with the standard of a?=?b?=?9.418 Å, c?=?6.884 Å (space group P63/m). The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectra of the sintered HAp show the absorption bands characteristic to hydroxyapatite. The Ag:HAp nanoparticles are evaluated for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Providencia stuartii, Citrobacter freundii and Serratia marcescens. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of these materials, regardless of the sample types, was greatest against S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, P. stuartii, and C. freundii. The results of qualitative antibacterial tests revealed that the tested Ag:HAp-NPs had an important inhibitory activity on P. stuartii and C. freundii. The absorbance values measured at 490 nm of the P. stuartii and C. freundii in the presence of Ag:HAp-NPs decreased compared with those of organic solvent used (DMSO) for all the samples (xAg?=?0.05, 0.2, and 0.3). Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of xAg in the samples. The Ag:HAp-NP concentration had little influence on the bacterial growth (P. stuartii). PMID:22721352

2012-01-01

349

Transcriptomic profiling of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 in response to maize root exudates  

PubMed Central

Background Plant root exudates have been shown to play an important role in mediating interactions between plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and their host plants. Most investigations were performed on Gram-negative rhizobacteria, while much less is known about Gram-positive rhizobacteria. To elucidate early responses of PGPR to root exudates, we investigated changes in the transcriptome of a Gram-positive PGPR to plant root exudates. Results Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is a well-studied Gram-positive PGPR. To obtain a comprehensive overview of FZB42 gene expression in response to maize root exudates, microarray experiments were performed. A total of 302 genes representing 8.2% of the FZB42 transcriptome showed significantly altered expression levels in the presence of root exudates. The majority of the genes (261) was up-regulated after incubation of FZB42 with root exudates, whereas only 41 genes were down-regulated. Several groups of the genes which were strongly induced by the root exudates are involved in metabolic pathways relating to nutrient utilization, bacterial chemotaxis and motility, and non-ribosomal synthesis of antimicrobial peptides and polyketides. Conclusions Here we present a transcriptome analysis of the root-colonizing bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 in response to maize root exudates. The 302 genes identified as being differentially transcribed are proposed to be involved in interactions of Gram-positive bacteria with plants. PMID:22720735

2012-01-01

350

Influence of temperature and organic load on chemical disinfection of Geobacillus steareothermophilus spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the influence of temperature and organic load on the effectiveness of domestic bleach (DB), Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF), and Virkon in inactivating Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores, which are a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores. The spores were suspended in light or heavy organic preparations and the suspension was applied to stainless steel carrier disks. The dried spore inoculum was covered with the disinfectants and the disks were then incubated at various temperatures. At ?20°C, the 3 disinfectants caused less than a 2.0 log10 reduction of spores in both organic preparations during a 24-h test period. At 4°C, the DB caused a 4.4 log10 reduction of spores in light organic preparations within 2 h, which was about 3 log10 higher than what was achieved with SDF or Virkon. In heavy organic preparations, after 24 h at 4°C the SDF had reduced the spore count by 4.5 log10, which was about 2 log10 higher than for DB or Virkon. In general, the disinfectants were most effective at 23°C but a 24-h contact time was required for SDF and Virkon to reduce spore counts in both organic preparations by at least 5.5 log10. Comparable disinfecting activity with DB only occurred with the light organic load. In summary, at temperatures as low as 4°C, DB was the most effective disinfectant, inactivating spores within 2 h on surfaces with a light organic load, whereas SDF produced the greatest reduction of spores within 24 h on surfaces with a heavy organic load. PMID:24082400

Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W.; Rohonczy, Liz

2013-01-01

351

Influence of temperature and organic load on chemical disinfection of Geobacillus steareothermophilus spores, a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the influence of temperature and organic load on the effectiveness of domestic bleach (DB), Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF), and Virkon in inactivating Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores, which are a surrogate for Bacillus anthracis spores. The spores were suspended in light or heavy organic preparations and the suspension was applied to stainless steel carrier disks. The dried spore inoculum was covered with the disinfectants and the disks were then incubated at various temperatures. At -20°C, the 3 disinfectants caused less than a 2.0 log10 reduction of spores in both organic preparations during a 24-h test period. At 4°C, the DB caused a 4.4 log10 reduction of spores in light organic preparations within 2 h, which was about 3 log10 higher than what was achieved with SDF or Virkon. In heavy organic preparations, after 24 h at 4°C the SDF had reduced the spore count by 4.5 log10, which was about 2 log10 higher than for DB or Virkon. In general, the disinfectants were most effective at 23°C but a 24-h contact time was required for SDF and Virkon to reduce spore counts in both organic preparations by at least 5.5 log10. Comparable disinfecting activity with DB only occurred with the light organic load. In summary, at temperatures as low as 4°C, DB was the most effective disinfectant, inactivating spores within 2 h on surfaces with a light organic load, whereas SDF produced the greatest reduction of spores within 24 h on surfaces with a heavy organic load. PMID:24082400

Guan, Jiewen; Chan, Maria; Brooks, Brian W; Rohonczy, Liz

2013-04-01

352

Efficacy of 5-day parenteral versus intramammary benzylpenicillin for treatment of clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro.  

PubMed

The efficacy of parenteral (intramuscular) or intramammary (IMM) benzylpenicillin treatment for clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to penicillin in vitro was investigated. Cows with clinical mastitis in 1 udder quarter were randomly placed into 2 treatment groups. The preliminary bacteriological diagnosis of intramammary infection (IMI) was based on on-farm culturing, and the bacteriological diagnoses were later confirmed by a quantitative PCR assay. Clinical mastitis caused by gram-positive bacteria susceptible to benzylpenicillin was treated with penicillin via either the parenteral route (20mg/kg) or IMM route (600mg) once per day for 5d. The outcome of the treatment was evaluated 3 to 4wk after the onset of the treatment. The affected quarter was examined to assess the clinical cure, and milk samples were collected from the affected quarter to determine the bacteriological cure and milk N-acetyl-?-d-glucosaminidase activity. The survival and the composite milk somatic cell counts of the treated cows were followed up for 6 and 3mo after treatment, respectively. A total of 140 cows with clinical mastitis were included in the study, 61 being treated with benzylpenicillin parenterally and 79 via the IMM route. From all quarters treated, 108 of 140 (77.1%) were cured clinically and 77 of 140 (55.0%) were cured bacteriologically. The route of treatment did not significantly affect the outcome of the treatment; 80.3% of the quarters with parenteral treatment and 74.7% of the quarters with IMM treatment showed a clinical cure, and 54.1 and 55.7% a bacteriological cure, respectively. The milk N-acetyl-?-d-glucosaminidase activity was significantly lower in the quarters with a clinical or bacteriological cure than in the quarters with no cure. The 6-mo survival and the proportion of cows with composite milk somatic cell counts <200,000/mL among the treated cows during the 3-mo follow-up period did not significantly differ between the treatment groups. In conclusion, the outcome of either parenteral or IMM benzylpenicillin treatment of clinical mastitis caused by penicillin-susceptible bacteria was similar. PMID:24485692

Kalmus, P; Simojoki, H; Orro, T; Taponen, S; Mustonen, K; Holopainen, J; Pyörälä, S

2014-04-01

353

Immediate and carryover effects of Gram-negative and Gram-positive toxin-induced mastitis on follicular function in dairy cows.  

PubMed

This study compared immediate and carryover effects of mastitis induced by Gram-negative endotoxin (E. coli LPS) and Gram-positive exosecretions (Staph. aureus ex.) on preovulatory follicle function. Synchronized, uninfected cyclic lactating Holstein cows were treated with PGF(2?) on day 6 of the cycle and 36 h later, a dose of either E. coli LPS (n = 8), S. aureus ex. (n = 10), or saline (n = 9) was administered into the mammary gland. Follicular fluids and granulosa cells were aspirated 6 h later from the preovulatory follicles and cows were treated with GnRH. This (cycle 1; immediate effect) was repeated three times (excluding the mammary injections) to induce three 7 d cycles (cycles 2, 3, and 4; carryover effect). E. coli LPS increased body temperature, plasma cortisol concentration, and somatic cell count (SCC), whereas S. aureus ex. induced a minor, subclinical elevation of SCC and slight rise (NS) in body temperature and cortisol concentration. Follicular estradiol, androstenedione, and progesterone concentrations in the E. coli LPS group decreased (P < 0.05) in cycle 1 to about 40%, 13%, and 35%, respectively, of control levels, whereas in the S. aureus ex. group, only estradiol decreased (P < 0.05), to 56% of control concentrations. In cycles 3 and 4, follicular steroids in the E. coli LPS group returned to control concentrations, whereas in the S. aureus ex. group, follicular concentrations of estradiol and androstenedione were lower (P < 0.10) than in controls. In the control group, the concentrations of all follicular and circulating steroids remained stable (P > 0.05) throughout the study. Follicle size was similar in all groups, but the S. aureus ex. treatment caused a decrease (P < 0.02) in the number of follicles developed in cycles 3 and 4. The mRNA expression of steroidogenic genes and LHCGR in the granulosa cells was not affected (P > 0.05) by either treatment during the study, except for a tendency toward lower (P < 0.1) expression in cycle 1 and lower (P < 0.05) expression in cycle 4 of the latter in the S. aureus ex. group. Strain levels, such as SCC and body temperature, following toxin injection correlated well with the magnitude of the immediate decline in follicular steroids. As is typical for Gram-negative clinical events, E. coli LPS-induced acute mastitis caused immediate, short-term, but not long-term impairment of follicular responses, whereas the Gram-positive S. aureus ex.-induced subclinical mastitis exhibited both immediate and carryover disruptive effects on preovulatory follicle function. PMID:21705051

Lavon, Y; Leitner, G; Moallem, U; Klipper, E; Voet, H; Jacoby, S; Glick, G; Meidan, R; Wolfenson, D

2011-09-15

354

Evaluation of the BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus Test for Rapid Identification of Gram-Positive Cocci from VersaTREK Blood Culture Bottles  

PubMed Central

The ability of the rapid BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus (BNSA) immunochromatographic test (Alere Scarborough, Inc., ME) to accurately differentiate S. aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and other Gram-positive cocci (GPC) directly from VersaTREK blood culture bottles was evaluated. A total of 319 positive patient blood culture bottles with GPC seen in clusters with Gram staining were tested using the BNSA test and a direct tube coagulase test (DTCT). The BNSA test was accurate for the detection and differentiation of S. aureus from CoNS and other GPC within 30 min from the time of blood culture positivity and demonstrated a test sensitivity and specificity of 95.8% and 99.6%, respectively. BNSA test results were faxed to the antimicrobial stewardship pharmacist by noon each day in order to evaluate empirical antimicrobial therapy and facilitate more rapid changes or modifications if necessary. Same-day reporting of BNSA test results in conjunction with an antimicrobial stewardship program was more impactful in improving treatment for inpatients with documented S. aureus bacteremia than in reducing empirical vancomycin use in inpatients with CoNS during the first 24 h following reporting. PMID:23804393

Dhiman, Neelam; Trienski, Tamara L.; DiPersio, Linda P.

2013-01-01

355

Antimicrobial Effect of the Triterpene 3?,6?,16?-Trihydroxylup-20(29)-ene on Planktonic Cells and Biofilms from Gram Positive and Gram Negative Bacteria  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the antimicrobial effect of 3?,6?,16?-trihydroxylup-20(29)-ene (CLF1), a triterpene isolated from Combretum leprosum Mart., in inhibiting the planktonic growth and biofilms of Gram positive bacteria Streptococcus mutans and S. mitis. The antimicrobial activity was assessed by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The antibiofilm potential was determined by quantifying total biomass and enumerating biofilm-entrapped viable bacteria. In addition, the acute toxicity of CLF1 on Artemia sp. nauplii was also determined. The results showed that CLF1 was able in inhibiting the growth of S. mutans and S. mitis with MIC and MBC of 7.8??g/mL and 15.6??g/mL, respectively. CLF1 was highly effective on biofilms of both bacteria. Only 7.8??g/mL CLF1 was enough to inhibit by 97% and 90% biomass production of S. mutans and S. mitis, respectively. On the other hand, such effects were not evident on Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella oxytoca. The toxicity tests showed that the LC50 of CLF1 was 98.19??g/mL. Therefore, CLF1 isolated from C. leprosum may constitute an important natural agent for the development of new therapies for caries and other infectious diseases caused by S. mutans and S. mitis. PMID:25093179

Evaristo, Francisco Flávio Vasconcelos; Albuquerque, Maria Rose Jane R.; dos Santos, Hélcio Silva; Bandeira, Paulo Nogueira; Ávila, Fábio do Nascimento; da Silva, Bruno Rocha; Vasconcelos, Ariana Azevedo; Rabelo, Érica de Menezes; Nascimento-Neto, Luiz Gonzaga; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

2014-01-01

356

Evaluation of the BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus test for rapid identification of Gram-positive cocci from VersaTREK blood culture bottles.  

PubMed

The ability of the rapid BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus (BNSA) immunochromatographic test (Alere Scarborough, Inc., ME) to accurately differentiate S. aureus from coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and other Gram-positive cocci (GPC) directly from VersaTREK blood culture bottles was evaluated. A total of 319 positive patient blood culture bottles with GPC seen in clusters with Gram staining were tested using the BNSA test and a direct tube coagulase test (DTCT). The BNSA test was accurate for the detection and differentiation of S. aureus from CoNS and other GPC within 30 min from the time of blood culture positivity and demonstrated a test sensitivity and specificity of 95.8% and 99.6%, respectively. BNSA test results were faxed to the antimicrobial stewardship pharmacist by noon each day in order to evaluate empirical antimicrobial therapy and facilitate more rapid changes or modifications if necessary. Same-day reporting of BNSA test results in conjunction with an antimicrobial stewardship program was more impactful in improving treatment for inpatients with documented S. aureus bacteremia than in reducing empirical vancomycin use in inpatients with CoNS during the first 24 h following reporting. PMID:23804393

Dhiman, Neelam; Trienski, Tamara L; DiPersio, Linda P; DiPersio, Joseph R

2013-09-01

357

Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Gram-positive cocci in blood cultures by direct inoculation into the BD Phoenix system.  

PubMed

Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of the causative agent(s) of bloodstream infections are essential for the selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. To speed up the identification and AST of the causative agent, the fluid from blood culture bottles of a Bactec 9240 instrument (Becton Dickinson) containing Gram-positive cocci was mixed with saponin. After a 15-min incubation, the bacteria were harvested and transferred to the appropriate panel of a BD Phoenix automated microbiology system (Becton Dickinson) for identification and AST. With this approach (referred to as the direct method), we concordantly/correctly identified 56 (82%) of 68 monomicrobial cultures using the results obtained with the method currently used in our laboratory (current method) as comparator. Two (3%) isolates could not be identified and ten (15%) were misidentified. Complete agreement, concerning clinical susceptibility categories and MIC values, between the AST results determined with the direct method and the current method was found for 32 (55%) of 58 isolates. The E-test indicated that the direct method yielded a correct susceptibility profile for 13 of the remaining 26 blood culture isolates. Therefore, a concordant/correct susceptibility profile (with all antimicrobial agents tested) was obtained for 45 (77%) of 58 cultures. The overall error rate amounted to 1.9%, with the majority (1.3%) of errors being minor. Importantly, the results obtained with the direct method were available 12-24h earlier than those obtained with the current method. PMID:19681952

Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Castagna, B; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

2010-07-01

358

Amino acid modified xanthone derivatives: novel, highly promising membrane-active antimicrobials for multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections.  

PubMed

Antibiotic resistance is a critical global health care crisis requiring urgent action to develop more effective antibiotics. Utilizing the hydrophobic scaffold of xanthone, we identified three components that mimicked the action of an antimicrobial cationic peptide to produce membrane-targeting antimicrobials. Compounds 5c and 6, which contain a hydrophobic xanthone core, lipophilic chains, and cationic amino acids, displayed very promising antimicrobial activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, including MRSA and VRE, rapid time-kill, avoidance of antibiotic resistance, and low toxicity. The bacterial membrane selectivity of these molecules was comparable to that of several membrane-targeting antibiotics in clinical trials. 5c and 6 were effective in a mouse model of corneal infection by S. aureus and MRSA. Evidence is presented indicating that 5c and 6 target the negatively charged bacterial membrane via a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. These results suggest that 5c and 6 have significant promise for combating life-threatening infections. PMID:25474410

Koh, Jun-Jie; Lin, Shuimu; Aung, Thet Tun; Lim, Fanghui; Zou, Hanxun; Bai, Yang; Li, Jianguo; Lin, Huifen; Pang, Li Mei; Koh, Wee Luan; Salleh, Shuhaida Mohamed; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Zhou, Lei; Qiu, Shengxiang; Pervushin, Konstantin; Verma, Chandra; Tan, Donald T H; Cao, Derong; Liu, Shouping; Beuerman, Roger W

2015-01-22

359

Diversity of Bacillus-like organisms isolated from deep-sea hypersaline anoxic sediments  

PubMed Central

Background The deep-sea, hypersaline anoxic brine lakes in the Mediterranean are among the most extreme environments on earth, and in one of them, the MgCl2-rich Discovery basin, the presence of active microbes is equivocal. However, thriving microbial communities have been detected especially in the chemocline between deep seawater and three NaCl-rich brine lakes, l'Atalante, Bannock and Urania. By contrast, the microbiota of these brine-lake sediments remains largely unexplored. Results Eighty nine isolates were obtained from the sediments of four deep-sea, hypersaline anoxic brine lakes in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: l'Atalante, Bannock, Discovery and Urania basins. This culture collection was dominated by representatives of the genus Bacillus and close relatives (90% of all isolates) that were investigated further. Physiological characterization of representative strains revealed large versatility with respect to enzyme activities or substrate utilization. Two third of the isolates did not grow at in-situ salinities and were presumably present as endospores. This is supported by high numbers of endospores in Bannock, Discovery and Urania basins ranging from 3.8 × 105 to 1.2 × 106 g-1 dw sediment. However, the remaining isolates were highly halotolerant growing at salinities of up to 30% NaCl. Some of the novel isolates affiliating with the genus Pontibacillus grew well under anoxic conditions in sulfidic medium by fermentation or anaerobic respiration using dimethylsulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide as electron acceptor. Conclusion Some of the halophilic, facultatively anaerobic relatives of Bacillus appear well adapted to life in this hostile environment and suggest the presence of actively growing microbial communities in the NaCl-rich, deep-sea brine-lake sediments. PMID:18541011

Sass, Andrea M; McKew, Boyd A; Sass, Henrik; Fichtel, Jörg; Timmis, Kenneth N; McGenity, Terry J

2008-01-01

360

Targeting of Bacillus anthracis interaction factors for human macrophages using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus anthracis, a gram-positive, endospore-forming, aerobic rod-shaped bacterium, interacts with macrophages at various stages of the disease. Spore germination and the outgrowth of vegetative bacilli are crucial steps enabling the bacteria to proliferate actively and to synthesize the virulence factors leading to a massive septicemia. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis and MALDI-TOF\\/MS were carried out to identify

Gwi-Moon Seo; Seong-Joo Kim; Ji-Chon Kim; Deok-Hwa Nam; Moon-Young Yoon; Bon-Sung Koo; Young Gyu Chai

2004-01-01

361

Biodegradation of feather waste by extracellular keratinases and gelatinases from Bacillus spp  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, three feather degrading bacterial strains were isolated from agroindustrial residues from a Brazilian poultry\\u000a farm. Three Gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacteria and were identified as B. subtilis 1271, B. licheniformis 1269 and B. cereus 1268 using biochemical, physiologic and molecular methods. These Bacillus spp. strains grew and produced keratinases and peptidases using chicken feather as the sole source

Ana Maria Mazotto; Ana Cristina N. de Melo; Andrew Macrae; Alexandre Soares Rosado; Raquel Peixoto; Sabrina M. L. Cedrola; Sônia Couri; Russolina B. Zingali; Ana Lúcia V. Villa; Leon Rabinovitch; Jeane Q. Chaves; Alane B. Vermelho

2011-01-01

362

Isolation and characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis strains from different grain habitats in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium and it produces insecticidal crystal (cry) proteins during sporulation. Because the genetic diversity and toxic potential of Bt strains differ from region to region, strains have been collected and characterized all over the world. The aim of this study is to isolate Bt strains in grain-related habitats in Turkey and to characterize

Özgür Apaydin; A. Fazil Yenidünya; ?ebnem Harsa; Hatice Güne?

2005-01-01

363

Efficient constitutive expression of thermostable 4-?-glucanotransferase in Bacillus subtilis using dual promoters  

Microsoft Academic Search

4-?-Glucanotransferases possess strong transglycosylation activity which has been used in various carbohydrate chemistry fields.\\u000a Due to safety issues of the recombinant enzymes we chose Bacillus subtilis as an expression host to produce a thermostable 4-?-glucanotransferase from Thermus scotoductus (TS?GT). The HpaII promoter in the Gram-positive bacterial vector pUB110 was used first to express TS?GT gene in B. subtilis. However, the

Hee-Kwon Kang; Jun-Hyuck Jang; Jae-Hoon Shim; Jong-Tae Park; Young-Wan Kim; Kwan-Hwa Park

2010-01-01

364

Bacillus thuringiensis : Applications in Agriculture and Insect Resistance Management – A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a sporulating, Gram-positive facultative-aerobic soil bacterium. Its principal characteristic is the synthesis, during\\u000a sporulation, of a crystalline inclusion containing proteins known as ?-endotoxins or Cry proteins. These proteins have insecticidal\\u000a properties. The considerable diversity of these toxins, their efficacy and their relatively cheap production have made Bt the most widely used biopesticide in the world. It

Vincent Sanchis; Denis Bourguet

365

Bacillus thuringiensis : applications in agriculture and insect resistance management. A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a sporulating, Gram-positive facultative-aerobic soil bacterium. Its principal characteristic is the synthesis, during\\u000a sporulation, of a crystalline inclusion containing proteins known as ?-endotoxins or Cry proteins. These proteins have insecticidal\\u000a properties. The considerable diversity of these toxins, their efficacy and their relatively cheap production have made Bt the most widely used biopesticide in the world. It

Vincent Sanchis; Denis Bourguet

2008-01-01

366

The Relationship Between DNA Replication and the Induction of Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

6-(p-Hydroxyphenylazo)uracil (HPUra), which is thought to be a specific inhibitor of DNA replication in many Gram-positive bacteria, has been used to investigate the relationship between DNA replication and the induction of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. Gene frequency analysis of samples removed from sporulating cultures indicates that sporulating cells terminate their final round of DNA replication at the same time as

G. DUNN; P. JEFFS; N. H. MANN; D. M. TORGERSEN; M. YOUNG

1978-01-01

367

Functional dissection of YabA, a negative regulator of DNA replication initiation in Bacillus subtilis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The regulation of initiation of DNA replication is crucial to ensure that the genome is replicated only once per cell cycle. In the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the function of the YabA protein in initiation control was assigned based on its interaction with the DnaA initiator and the DnaN sliding clamp in the yeast two-hybrid and on the overinitiation phenotype

Marie-Francoise Noirot-Gros; M. Velten; M. Yoshimura; S. McGovern; T. Morimoto; S. D. Ehrlich; N. Ogasawara; P. Polard; Philippe Noirot

2006-01-01

368

Draft Genome Sequence of a Phosphate-Accumulating Bacillus sp., WBUNB004.  

PubMed

The draft genome sequence of a nitrate- and phosphate-removing, Gram-positive Bacillus sp. with optimum growth at 37°C and pH 7 in nitrate broth (HiMedia M439) isolated from rhizosphere of a water lily, with a genome size of 5,465,157 bp and a G+C content of 35.0%, is reported here. PMID:23469361

Debroy, Shreya; Mukherjee, Pallavi; Roy, Sujata; Thakur, Ashoke Ranjan; Raychaudhuri, Shaon

2013-01-01

369

Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, function and structure of the biofilm matrix. PMID:24988880

Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

2014-01-01

370

Efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis, Paecilomyces marquandii,and Streptomyces costaricanus with and without Organic Amendments against Meloidogyne hapla Infecting Lettuce  

PubMed Central

Chitin, wheat mash, or brewery compost were incorporated into unfumigated and methyl bromide-fumigated organic soils placed in microplots formed from cylindrical drainage tiles (0.25 m-diam. clay tile). After 3 weeks, Meloidogyne hapla and cell or spore suspensions of Bacillus thuringiensis, Paecilomyces marquandii, and Streptomyces costaricanus were individually added to the soils of designated microplots. A B. thuringiensis + S. costaricanus combination was also tested. Lettuce seedlings, cv. Montello, were transplanted into the soils 3 to 4 days later. All the bacterial and fungal antagonists applied without a soil amendment, except the B. thuringiensis + S. costaricanus treatment, reduced root galling and increased lettuce head weight in the unfumigated organic soil, but not in the fumigated soil. All three amendments were also effective against M. hapla and reduced root galling in fumigated and unfumigated soils. Wheat mash amendment increased lettuce head weight in the unfumigated soil. In general, no antagonist × amendment interaction was detected. Soil populations of B. thuringiensis were maintained at ?4.0 log10 colony-forming units/g organic soil during the first 14 days after planting. However, viable cells of B. thuringiensis were not detected after 49 days. PMID:19270951

Chen, J.; Abawi, G. S.; Zuckerman, B. M.

2000-01-01

371

Effect of organic solvents on the structure and activity of moderately halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease.  

PubMed

Halophilic enzymes have been manifested for their stability and catalytic abilities under harsh operational conditions. These have been documented to withstand denaturation in presence of high temperature, pH, presence of organic solvents and chaotropic agents. The present study aims at understanding the stability and activity of a halophilic Bacillus sp. EMB9 protease in organic solvents. The protease was uniquely stable in polar solvents. A clear correlation was evident between the protease function and conformational transitions, validated by CD and fluorescence spectral studies. The study affirms that preservation of protein structure, possibly due to charge screening of the protein surface by Ca(2+) and Na(+) ions provides stability against organic solvents and averts denaturation. Salt was also found to exert a protective effect on dialyzed protease against chaotropism of solvents. Presence of 1 % (w/v) NaCl restored the activity in the dialyzed protease and prevented denaturation in methanol, toluene and n-decane. The work will have further implication on discerning protein folding in saline as well as non-aqueous environments. PMID:25134948

Sinha, Rajeshwari; Khare, S K

2014-11-01

372

Comparative analysis of antimicrobial activities of valinomycin and cereulide, the Bacillus cereus emetic toxin.  

PubMed

Cereulide and valinomycin are highly similar cyclic dodecadepsipeptides with potassium ionophoric properties. Cereulide, produced by members of the Bacillus cereus group, is known mostly as emetic toxin, and no ecological function has been assigned. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial activity of valinomycin produced by Streptomyces spp. and cereulide was performed at a pH range of pH 5.5 to pH 9.5, under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Both compounds display pH-dependent activity against selected Gram-positive bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria innocua, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987. Notably, B. cereus strain ATCC 14579 and the emetic B. cereus strains F4810/72 and A529 showed reduced sensitivity to both compounds, with the latter two strains displaying full resistance to cereulide. Both compounds showed no activity against the selected Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria was highest at alkaline pH values, where the membrane potential (??) is the main component of the proton motive force (PMF). Furthermore, inhibition of growth was observed in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Determination of the ??, using the membrane potential probe DiOC(2)(3) (in the presence of 50 mM KCl) in combination with flow cytometry, demonstrated for the first time the ability of cereulide to dissipate the ?? in sensitive Gram-positive bacteria. The putative role of cereulide production in the ecology of emetic B. cereus is discussed. PMID:21357430

Tempelaars, Marcel H; Rodrigues, Susana; Abee, Tjakko

2011-04-01

373

Update of the telavancin activity in vitro tested against a worldwide collection of Gram-positive clinical isolates (2013), when applying the revised susceptibility testing method.  

PubMed

A revised broth microdilution susceptibility testing method for telavancin was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Telavancin activity was assessed against Gram-positive pathogens collected worldwide (2013) using the revised method. A total of 12,346 isolates from 90 sites were included as part of the Telavancin International Surveillance Program for the Americas, Europe, and Asia-Pacific. Telavancin had MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.03 and 0.06?g/mL, respectively, against staphylococci, regardless of methicillin susceptibility, and inhibited all Staphylococcus aureus at ?0.12?g/mL (revised FDA breakpoint). Telavancin was 8-fold more active than daptomycin (MIC50/90, 0.25/0.5?g/mL) and 16- to 32-fold more active than vancomycin (MIC50/90, 1/1?g/mL) and linezolid (MIC50/90, 1/1?g/mL) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus. All 692 vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis were inhibited by telavancin (MIC50/90, 0.12/0.12?g/mL) at ?0.25?g/mL (FDA breakpoint), except for 1 strain (MIC, 0.5?g/mL). All Enterococcus faecium and E. faecalis with telavancin MIC values of ?0.5 and ?1?g/mL, respectively, had a VanA phenotype. A comparison data analysis based on the MIC90 demonstrated that telavancin was at least 8-fold more potent than comparators against vancomycin-susceptible enterococci. Streptococci showed telavancin MIC50 values of ?0.015?g/mL, except for Streptococcus agalactiae (MIC50, 0.03?g/mL). These in vitro results obtained by the recently approved susceptibility testing method establish a new benchmark of telavancin activity worldwide. PMID:25618421

Mendes, Rodrigo E; Farrell, David J; Sader, Helio S; Streit, Jennifer M; Jones, Ronald N

2015-04-01

374

Enzymes produced by halotolerant spore-forming gram-positive bacterial strains isolated from a resting habitat (Restinga de Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: focus on proteases.  

PubMed

The screening for hydrolases-producing, halotolerant, and spore-forming gram-positive bacteria from the root, rhizosphere, and non-rhizosphere soil of Blutaparon portulacoides, a plant found in the Restinga de Jurubatiba located at the northern region of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, resulted in the isolation of 22 strains. These strains were identified as Halobacillus blutaparonensis (n?=?2), Oceanobacillus picturae (n?=?5), and Oceanobacillus iheyensis (n?=?15), and all showed the ability to produce different extracellular enzymes. A total of 20 isolates (90.9 %) showed activity for protease, 5 (22.7 %) for phytase, 3 (13.6 %) for cellulase, and 2 (9.1 %) for amylase. Some bacterial strains were capable of producing three (13.6 %) or two (9.1 %) distinct hydrolytic enzymes. However, no bacterial strain with ability to produce esterase and DNase was observed. The isolate designated M9, belonging to the species H. blutaparonensis, was the best producer of protease and also yielded amylase and phytase. This strain was chosen for further studies regarding its protease activity. The M9 strain produced similar amounts of protease when grown either without or with different NaCl concentrations (from 0.5 to 10 %). A simple inspection of the cell-free culture supernatant by gelatin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed the presence of three major alkaline proteases of 40, 50, and 70 kDa, which were fully inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) (two classical serine protease inhibitors). The secreted proteases were detected in a wide range of temperature (from 4 to 45 °C) and their hydrolytic activities were stimulated by NaCl (up to 10 %). The serine proteases produced by the M9 strain cleaved gelatin, casein, albumin, and hemoglobin, however, in different extensions. Collectively, these results suggest the potential use of the M9 strain in biotechnological and/or industrial processes. PMID:25227686

D Santos, Anderson Fragoso; Pacheco, Clarissa Almeida; Valle, Roberta D Santos; Seldin, Lucy; D Santos, André Luis Souza

2014-12-01

375

Structural basis for the De-N-acetylation of Poly-?-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in Gram-positive bacteria.  

PubMed

Exopolysaccharides are required for the development and integrity of biofilms produced by a wide variety of bacteria. In staphylococci, partial de-N-acetylation of the exopolysaccharide poly-?-1,6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG) by the extracellular protein IcaB is required for biofilm formation. To understand the molecular basis for PNAG de-N-acetylation, the structure of IcaB from Ammonifex degensii (IcaBAd) has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution. The structure of IcaBAd reveals a (?/?)7 barrel common to the family four carbohydrate esterases (CE4s) with the canonical motifs circularly permuted. The metal dependence of IcaBAd is similar to most CE4s showing the maximum rates of de-N-acetylation with Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Zn(2+). From docking studies with ?-1,6-GlcNAc oligomers and structural comparison to PgaB from Escherichia coli, the Gram-negative homologue of IcaB, we identify Arg-45, Tyr-67, and Trp-180 as key residues for PNAG binding during catalysis. The absence of these residues in PgaB provides a rationale for the requirement of a C-terminal domain for efficient deacetylation of PNAG in Gram-negative species. Mutational analysis of conserved active site residues suggests that IcaB uses an altered catalytic mechanism in comparison to other characterized CE4 members. Furthermore, we identified a conserved surface-exposed hydrophobic loop found only in Gram-positive homologues of IcaB. Our data suggest that this loop is required for membrane association and likely anchors IcaB to the membrane during polysaccharide biosynthesis. The work presented herein will help guide the design of IcaB inhibitors to combat biofilm formation by staphylococci. PMID:25359777

Little, Dustin J; Bamford, Natalie C; Pokrovskaya, Varvara; Robinson, Howard; Nitz, Mark; Howell, P Lynne

2014-12-26

376

Adsorption and Fenton regeneration of SBA-15 for di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate leached from PVC sheets by Gram-positive strains LHM1 and LHM2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioleaching of Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) from PVC sheets was studied with newly isolated, Gram-positive strains LHM1 and LHM2 capable of growing on DEHP as the sole carbon source. According to 16S rRNA gene analysis, strains LHM1 and LHM2 were closely related (more than 97% similarity) to Chryseomicrobium imtechense MW 10(T) and Lysinibacillus fusiformis NBRC 15717(T), respectively. The biodeteriorated PVC sheets by the strains LHM1 and LHM2 had thicker biofilm development. Despite their metabolic capability of degrading DEHP as the sole carbon source, the strains LHM1 and LHM2 did not metabolize all DEHP leached out of the PVC sheets. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the biodeterioration by strains LHM1 and LHM2 resulted in less amount of and weakly bonded DEHP present in PVC sheets, in comparison to the virgin PVC sheet. Therefore, PVC biodeterioration by strains LHM1 and LHM2 might play an important role in stability of PVC sheets and fate and effect of leached DEHP on the environmental receptors. In response to this, an advanced adsorption with SBA-15 was assessed as a potential alternative DEHP remediation with arsenic as a co-contaminant. SBA-15 had an excellent arsenic adsorption showing >90% arsenic removal when arsenic was present as a singular contaminant. Adsorption effectiveness was irrelevant to the solid/liquid (S/L) ratio. However, when arsenic was present together with DEHP, arsenic adsorption to bare SBA-15 was reduced by 10 - 40%, with lesser S/L ratio having greater arsenic removal. On the contrary, bare SBA-15 only adsorbed ~30% of DEHP on average. When DEHP was present as a co-solute with arsenic, DEHP adsorption to bare SBA-15 was increased. For SBA-15 regeneration, adsorbed arsenic was recovered with EDTA elution, whereas adsorbed DEHP was destructed with Fenton oxidation.

Hwang, S.; Latorre, I.; Caban, M.; Soto, B.; Montalvo-Rodríguez, R.; Hernández-Maldonado, A.

2012-12-01

377

Relationship between in vitro susceptibility test results and treatment outcomes for gram-positive mastitis pathogens following treatment with cephapirin sodium.  

PubMed

The selection of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of mastitis has often been based on results of in vitro susceptibility testing. However, the results of in vitro susceptibility tests have been shown to be poor predictors of treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine if an association existed between results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests and outcomes of mastitis caused by gram-positive pathogens recovered from quarters that received treatment with cephapirin sodium. Mastitis pathogens were obtained from a multi-site clinical trial that evaluated the benefits of using an on-farm culturing system. Target pathogens (n = 187) comprised coagulase-negative staphylocci (65%), Streptococcus spp. (14%), other pathogens (12%), and Staphylococcus aureus (11%), which were recovered from quarters that received treatment using cephapirin sodium. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile to cephapirin was determined using the broth micro-dilution technique. The overall bacteriological cure rate achieved by cephapirin treatment was 82%. Bacteriological outcomes (cure or treatment failure) were not associated with pathogen type. A recurrent case of mastitis was observed in 10 quarters classified as cures and 3 quarters classified as treatment failures. Recurrence of mastitis was not associated with bacteriological outcomes or susceptibility test results. In vitro susceptibility to cephapirin was exhibited by 94.8 and 91.2% of pathogens recovered from quarters classified as cures and treatment failures, respectively. Bacteriological outcomes of mastitis treated using cephapirin were not associated with in vitro susceptibility test results or in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration values. In this population, there was an 82% probability of treatment success when the isolate was susceptible but only a 27% probability of treatment failure when the isolate was resistant. Based on this research, results of in vitro susceptibility tests should not be used as the primary guide for treatment decisions regarding intramammary cephapirin sodium. PMID:19447991

Apparao, M D; Ruegg, P L; Lago, A; Godden, S; Bey, R; Leslie, K

2009-06-01

378

Antimicrobial activity of ceftobiprole against gram-negative and gram-positive pathogens: results from INVITA-A-CEFTO Brazilian study.  

PubMed

Ceftobiprole is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin with potent activity against staphylococci, including those resistant to oxacillin, as well as against most gram-negative bacilli including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, the in vitro activity of ceftobiprole and comparator agents was tested against bacterial isolates recently collected from Brazilian private hospitals. A total of 336 unique bacterial isolates were collected from hospitalized patients between February 2008 and August 2009. Each hospital was asked to submit 100 single bacterial isolates responsible for causing blood, lower respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infections. Bacterial identification was confirmed and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI microdilution method at a central laboratory. The CLSI M100-S21 (2011) was used for interpretation of the antimicrobial susceptibility results. Among the 336 pathogens collected, 255 (75.9%) were gram-negative bacilli and 81 (24.1%) were gram-positive cocci. Although ceftobiprole MIC50 values for oxacillin resistant strains were two-fold higher than for methicillin susceptible S. aureus, ceftobiprole inhibited 100% of tested S. aureus at MICs < 4 µg/mL. Polymyxin B was the only agent to show potent activity against Acinetobacter spp. (MIC50/90, 0.5/1 µg/mL), and P. aeruginosa (MIC50/90, 1/2 µg/mL). Resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins varied from 55.3-68.5% and 14.3-28.5% among E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, respectively; with ceftobiprole MIC50 > 6 µg/mL for both species. Our results showed that ceftobiprole has potent activity against staphylococci and E. faecalis, which was superior to that of vancomycin. Our data also indicates that ceftobiprole demonstrated potency comparable to that of cefepime and ceftazidime against key gram-negative species. PMID:21861004

Cereda, Rosângela Ferraz; Azevedo, Heber Dias; Girardello, Raquel; Xavier, Danilo Elias; Gales, Ana C

2011-01-01

379

Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov., a round-spore-forming bacillus isolated from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A round-spore-forming Bacillus species that produces an exosporium was isolated from the surface of the Mars Odyssey spacecraft. This novel species has been characterized on the basis of phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. According to the results of these analyses, this strain belongs to the genus Bacillus and is a Gram-positive, aerobic, rod-shaped, endospore-forming eubacterium. Ultrathin sections of the spores showed the presence of an exosporium, spore coat, cortex and core. 16S rDNA sequence similarities between this strain, Bacillus fusiformis and Bacillus silvestris were approximately 96% and DNA-DNA reassociation values with these two bacilli were 23 and 17%, respectively. Spores of the novel species were resistant to desiccation, H2O2 and UV and gamma radiation. Of all strains tested, the spores of this strain were the most consistently resistant and survived all of the challenges posed, i.e. exposure to conditions of desiccation (100% survival), H2O2 (26% survival), UV radiation (10% survival at 660 J m(-2)) and gamma radiation (0.4% survival). The name proposed for this novel bacterium is Bacillus odysseyi sp. nov.; the type strain is 34hs-1T (=ATCC PTA-4993T=NRRL B-30641T=NBRC 100172T).

La Duc, Myron T.; Satomi, Masataka; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

2004-01-01

380

Identification of the Bacillus anthracis ? Phage Receptor  

PubMed Central

Bacillus anthracis, a gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium, is the etiological agent of anthrax. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus group, which also contains Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. Most B. anthracis strains are sensitive to phage ?, but most B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains are resistant to the lytic action of phage ?. Here, we report the identification of a protein involved in the bacterial receptor for the ? phage, which we term GamR (Gamma phage receptor). It is an LPXTG protein (BA3367, BAS3121) and is anchored by the sortase A. A B. anthracis sortase A mutant is not as sensitive as the parental strain nor as the sortase B and sortase C mutants, whereas the GamR mutant is resistant to the lytic action of the phage. Electron microscopy reveals the binding of the phage to the surface of the parental strain and its absence from the GamR mutant. Spontaneous B. anthracis mutants resistant to the phage harbor mutations in the gene encoding the GamR protein. A B. cereus strain that is sensitive to the phage possesses a protein similar (89% identity) to GamR. B. thuringiensis 97-27, a strain which, by sequence analysis, is predicted to harbor a GamR-like protein, is resistant to the phage but nevertheless displays phage binding. PMID:16166537

Davison, Sophie; Couture-Tosi, Evelyne; Candela, Thomas; Mock, Michèle; Fouet, Agnès

2005-01-01

381

Emergence of Carbapenem resistant Gram negative and vancomycin resistant Gram positive organisms in bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients: A descriptive study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to evaluate drug resistance amongst bacteremic isolates of febrile neutropenic patients with particular emphasis on emergence of carbapenem resistant Gram negative bacteria and vancomycin resistant Enterococcus species. METHODS: A descriptive study was performed by reviewing the blood culture reports from febrile neutropenic patients during the two study periods i.e., 1999–00 and 2001–06. Blood cultures were

Seema Irfan; Faiza Idrees; Vikram Mehraj; Faizah Habib; Salman Adil; Rumina Hasan

2008-01-01

382

Protist-Type Lysozymes of the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans Contribute to Resistance against Pathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis  

PubMed Central

Pathogens represent a universal threat to other living organisms. Most organisms express antimicrobial proteins and peptides, such as lysozymes, as a protection against these challenges. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans harbours 15 phylogenetically diverse lysozyme genes, belonging to two distinct types, the protist- or Entamoeba-type (lys genes) and the invertebrate-type (ilys genes) lysozymes. In the present study we characterized the role of several protist-type lysozyme genes in defence against a nematocidal strain of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. Based on microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR gene expression analysis, we identified protist-type lysozyme genes as one of the differentially transcribed gene classes after infection. A functional genetic analysis was performed for three of these genes, each belonging to a distinct evolutionary lineage within the protist-type lysozymes (lys-2, lys-5, and lys-7). Their knock-out led to decreased pathogen resistance in all three cases, while an increase in resistance was observed when two out of three tested genes were overexpressed in transgenic lines (lys-5, lys-7, but not lys-2). We conclude that the lysozyme genes lys-5, lys-7, and possibly lys-2 contribute to resistance against B. thuringiensis, thus highlighting the particular role of lysozymes in the nematode's defence against pathogens. PMID:21931778

Boehnisch, Claudia; Wong, Daniel; Habig, Michael; Isermann, Kerstin; Michiels, Nicolaas K.; Roeder, Thomas; May, Robin C.; Schulenburg, Hinrich

2011-01-01

383

In vitro activity of ceftaroline against gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens isolated from patients in Canadian hospitals in 2009.  

PubMed

The in vitro activities of ceftaroline and comparative agents were determined for a collection of the most frequently isolated bacterial pathogens from hospital-associated patients across Canada in 2009 as part of the ongoing CANWARD surveillance study. In total, 4,546 isolates from 15 sentinel Canadian hospital laboratories were tested using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution method. Compared with other cephalosporins, including ceftobiprole, cefepime, and ceftriaxone, ceftaroline exhibited the greatest potency against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), with a MIC?? of 0.25 ?g/ml. Ceftaroline also demonstrated greater potency than ceftobiprole against community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (MIC??, 0.5 ?g/ml) and health care-associated MRSA (MIC??, 1 ?g/ml) and was at least 4-fold more active than other cephalosporins against Staphylococcus epidermidis; all isolates of MSSA and MRSA tested were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC, ?1 ?g/ml). Against streptococci, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, ceftaroline MICs (MIC??, ?0.03 ?g/ml) were comparable to those of ceftobiprole; however, against penicillin-nonsusceptible, macrolide-nonsusceptible, and multidrug-nonsusceptible isolates of S. pneumoniae, ceftaroline demonstrated 2- to 4-fold and 4- to 16-fold more potent activities than those of ceftobiprole and ceftriaxone, respectively. All isolates of S. pneumoniae tested were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC, ?0.25 ?g/ml). Among Gram-negative isolates, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity (MIC??, ?0.5 ?g/ml) against Escherichia coli (92.2% of isolates were susceptible), Klebsiella pneumoniae (94.1% of isolates were susceptible), Proteus mirabilis (97.7% of isolates were susceptible), and Haemophilus influenzae (100% of isolates were susceptible). Ceftaroline demonstrated less potent activity (MIC??, ?4 ?g/ml) against Enterobacter spp., Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella oxytoca, Serratia marcescens, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Overall, ceftaroline demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a recent collection of the most frequently encountered Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates from patients attending hospitals across Canada in 2009. PMID:21402844

Karlowsky, James A; Adam, Heather J; Decorby, Melanie R; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe R S; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

2011-06-01

384

Bacillus subtilis spore display of laccase for evolution under extreme conditions of high concentrations of organic solvent.  

PubMed

Protein libraries were displayed on the spore coat of Bacillus subtilis, and this method was demonstrated as a tool for directed evolution under extreme conditions. Escherichia coli, yeast, and phage display suffer from protein folding, and viability issues. On the other hand, spores avoid folding concerns by the natural sporulation process, and they remain viable under harsh chemical and physical environments. The naturally occurring B. subtilis spore coat protein, CotA, was evolved for improved activity under conditions of high organic solvent concentrations. CotA is a laccase, which is a copper-containing oxidase enzyme. A CotA library was expressed on the spore coat, and ? 3000 clones were screened at 60% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A Thr480Ala variant (Thr480Ala-CotA) was identified that was 2.38-fold more active than the wild-type CotA. In addition, Thr480Ala-CotA was more active with different concentrations of DMSO ranging from 0 to 70%. The mutant was also found to be more active compared with the wild-type CotA in different concentrations of methanol, ethanol, and acetonitrile. PMID:25392937

Jia, Han; Lee, Frederick S; Farinas, Edgardo T

2014-12-01

385

Purification and characterization of an organic-solvent-tolerant cellulase from a halotolerant isolate, Bacillus sp. L1.  

PubMed

A halotolerant isolate Bacillus sp. L1 producing extracellular cellulase was isolated from Yuncheng, China. Production of the enzyme started from mid-exponential phase of bacterial growth and reached a maximum level during the post-stationary phase. The cellulase was purified to homogeneity with molecular mass of 45 kDa. Substrate specificity test indicated that it was an endoglucanase for soluble cellulose. Optimal enzyme activity was found to be at 60 °C, pH 8.0, and 7.5 % NaCl. Furthermore, it was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (30-80 °C), pH (7.0-9.0), and NaCl concentration (2.5-15 %), thus showing its excellent thermostable, alkali-stable, and halotolerant nature. The cellulase activity was greatly inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, indicating that it was a metalloenzyme. Significant inhibition by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and phenylarsine oxide revealed that serine and cysteine residues were essential for the enzyme catalysis. Moreover, the cellulase was highly active in the presence of surfactants, and it showed high stability in the presence of water-insoluble organic solvents with log P (ow)at least 0.88. Results from this study indicate that the purified cellulase from isolate L1 may have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its useful properties. PMID:22438110

Li, Xin; Yu, Hui-Ying

2012-08-01

386

Bacillus thuringiensis Conjugation in Simulated Microgravity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0-g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1-g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence.

Beuls, Elise; van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

2009-10-01

387

Bacillus thuringiensis conjugation in simulated microgravity.  

PubMed

Spaceflight experiments have suggested a possible effect of microgravity on the plasmid transfer among strains of the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis, as opposed to no effect recorded for Gram-negative conjugation. To investigate these potential effects in a more affordable experimental setup, three ground-based microgravity simulators were tested: the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV), the Random Positioning Machine (RPM), and a superconducting magnet. The bacterial conjugative system consisted in biparental matings between two B. thuringiensis strains, where the transfer frequencies of the conjugative plasmid pAW63 and its ability to mobilize the nonconjugative plasmid pUB110 were assessed. Specifically, potential plasmid transfers in a 0 g position (simulated microgravity) were compared to those obtained under 1 g (normal gravity) condition in each device. Statistical analyses revealed no significant difference in the conjugative and mobilizable transfer frequencies between the three different simulated microgravitational conditions and our standard laboratory condition. These important ground-based observations emphasize the fact that, though no stimulation of plasmid transfer was observed, no inhibition was observed either. In the case of Gram-positive bacteria, this ability to exchange plasmids in weightlessness, as occurs under Earth's conditions, should be seen as particularly relevant in the scope of spread of antibiotic resistances and bacterial virulence. PMID:19845449

Beuls, Elise; Van Houdt, Rob; Leys, Natalie; Dijkstra, Camelia; Larkin, Oliver; Mahillon, Jacques

2009-10-01

388

Screening micro-organisms for cadmium absorption from aqueous solution and cadmium absorption properties of Arthrobacter nicotianae.  

PubMed

To obtain basic information on how microbial cells absorb cadmium from aqueous solution, we examined cadmium absorption in various micro-organisms. Of 51 micro-organism strains tested, we found that some Gram-positive bacteria, such as, Arthrobacter nicotianae and Bacillus subtilis, and some actinomycetes, such as, Streptomyces flavoviridis and S. levoris were highly capable of absorbing cadmium from an aqueous solution. A. nicotianae absorbed the largest amount of cadmium, over 800 ?mol cadmium per gram of dry wt. cells. However, cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae was affected by the solution pH, cadmium concentration, and cell density. The absorption of cadmium was very rapid. Some factors that affected cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae cells were also discussed. PMID:25273147

Tsuruta, Takehiko; Umenai, Daishi; Hatano, Tomonobu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Keiko

2014-10-01

389

A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF PLANT EXTRACTS WITH THE ANTIBIOTICS ON ORGANISMS OF HOSPITAL ORIGIN  

PubMed Central

Thirty five plants belonging to twenty families were studied for their antimicrobial activity. Among the plants tested, 43 % showed antimicrobial activity. Fifteen plants belonging to 10 families exhibited activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. Four plants namely Azadirachta indica, Garadenia jasminoides, Magnifera indica, and Wrightia tinctora showed an appreciable activity against the gram positive bacteria and seven plants against gram negative organisms. Leaf extract of Tabermontana coronaria showed a maximum zone of inhibition (24 mm) against Staphylococcus aureus and the leaf extract of Sida cordifolia showed a maximum zone (20 mm) against Corynebacteriun diphtheriae. Mentha piperanta gave a maximum zone size against E,coli (22 mm) and Vibrio cholerae (20mm). The inhibitory percentage of the leaf extracts against various pathogens were observed to be Staphylococcus aureus (40%), E.coli (28%), Shigella sp (25%), Salmonella  sp (22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis (20%), Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris (17%), Vibrio cholera (14%) and Corynebacterium diphtheriae (11%). The results suggested that the leaf extracts of various plants has significant antibacterial activity against the tested microorganisms. The present study is done to compare the activity of the plant extracts with the activity of currently used antibiotics against the selected organisms. PMID:22557227

Thangavel, M.; Raveendran, Meera; Kathirvel, M.

2006-01-01

390

Bacillus coagulans  

MedlinePLUS

... vaccines to improve their effectiveness. Bacillus coagulans produces lactic acid and, as a result, is often misclassified as lactic acid bacteria such as lactobacillus. In fact, some commercial ...

391

Optimization of physical factors affecting the production of thermo-stable organic solvent-tolerant protease from a newly isolated halo tolerant Bacillus subtilis strain Rand  

PubMed Central

Background Many researchers have reported on the optimization of protease production; nevertheless, only a few have reported on the optimization of the production of organic solvent-tolerant proteases. Ironically, none has reported on thermostable organic solvent-tolerant protease to date. The aim of this study was to isolate the thermostable organic solvent-tolerant protease and identify the culture conditions which support its production. The bacteria of genus Bacillus are active producers of extra-cellular proteases, and the thermostability of enzyme production by Bacillus species has been well-studied by a number of researchers. In the present study, the Bacillus subtilis strain Rand was isolated from the contaminated soil found in Port Dickson, Malaysia. Results A thermostable organic solvent-tolerant protease producer had been identified as Bacillus subtilis strain Rand, based on the 16S rRNA analysis conducted, as well as the morphological characteristics and biochemical properties. The production of the thermostable organic solvent-tolerant protease was optimized by varying various physical culture conditions. Inoculation with 5.0% (v/v) of (AB600 = 0.5) inoculum size, in a culture medium (pH 7.0) and incubated for 24 h at 37°C with 200 rpm shaking, was the best culture condition which resulted in the maximum growth and production of protease (444.7 U/ml; 4042.4 U/mg). The Rand protease was not only stable in the presence of organic solvents, but it also exhibited a higher activity than in the absence of organic solvent, except for pyridine which inhibited the protease activity. The enzyme retained 100, 99 and 80% of its initial activity, after the heat treatment for 30 min at 50, 55, and 60°C, respectively. Conclusion Strain Rand has been found to be able to secrete extra-cellular thermostable organic solvent-tolerant protease into the culture medium. The protease exhibited a remarkable stability towards temperature and organic solvent. This unique property makes it attractive and useful to be used in industrial applications. PMID:19356254

Abusham, Randa A; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha RA; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Basri, Mahiran

2009-01-01

392

Characterization of Bacillus Probiotics Available for Human Use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacillus species (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus clausii, Bacillus pumilus) carried in five commercial probiotic products consisting of bacterial spores were characterized for potential attributes (colonization, immuno- stimulation, and antimicrobial activity) that could account for their claimed probiotic properties. Three B. cereus strains were shown to persist in the mouse gastrointestinal tract for up to 18 days postadministration, demonstrating that these organisms

L. H. Duc; Huynh A. Hong; Teresa M. Barbosa; Adriano O. Henriques

2004-01-01

393

Evidence for the placement of the gram-negative Catonella morbi (Moore and Moore) and Johnsonella ignava (Moore and Moore) within the Clostridium subphylum of the gram-positive bacteria on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences.  

PubMed

Comparative 16S rRNA analysis was used to determine the phylogenetic positions of Catonella morbi and Johnsonella ignava, which are members of two monospecific genera of gram-negative anaerobic bacilli isolated from human gingival crevices. Both of these genera were found to belong to cluster XIVa (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, A. Willems, J. J. Cordoba, J. Fernandez-Garayzabal, P. Garcia, J. Cai, H. Hippe, and J. A. E. Farrow, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 44:812-826, 1994) of the Clostridium subphylum of gram-positive bacteria. Within this cluster, which contains several Clostridium, Coprococcus, Eubacterium, and Ruminococcus species, C. morbi and J. ignava formed two distinct lines that were separate from all other taxa. Our findings support the separate generic status of the genera Catonella and Johnsonella and show that these genera do not belong to the family Bacteroidaceae but instead belong to the gram-positive Clostridium subphylum. PMID:7547310

Willems, A; Collins, M D

1995-10-01

394

A Functional dlt Operon, Encoding Proteins Required for Incorporation of D-Alanine in Teichoic Acids in Gram-Positive Bacteria, Confers Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Streptococcus pneumoniae  

Microsoft Academic Search

Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the few species within the group of low-G C gram-positive bacteria reported to contain no D-alanine in teichoic acids, although the dltABCD operon encoding proteins responsible for D-alanylation is present in the genomes of two S. pneumoniae strains, the laboratory strain R6 and the clinical isolate TIGR4. The annotation of dltA in R6 predicts a

Marta Kovacs; Alexander Halfmann; Iris Fedtke; Manuel Heintz; Andreas Peschel; Waldemar Vollmer; Regine Hakenbeck; Reinhold Bruckner

2006-01-01

395

Comparative In Vitro Activities of SMT19969, a New Antimicrobial Agent, against Clostridium difficile and 350 Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Aerobic and Anaerobic Intestinal Flora Isolates  

PubMed Central

The comparative in vitro activity of SMT19969, a novel, narrow-spectrum, nonabsorbable agent, was studied against 50 ribotype-defined Clostridium difficile strains, 174 Gram-positive and 136 Gram-negative intestinal anaerobes, and 40 Gram-positive aerobes. SMT19969 was one dilution more active against C. difficile isolates (MIC range, 0.125 to 0.5 ?g/ml; MIC90, 0.25 ?g/ml), including ribotype 027 strains, than fidaxomicin (range, 0.06 to 1 ?g/ml; MIC90, 0.5 ?g/ml) and two to six dilutions lower than either vancomycin or metronidazole. SMT19969 and fidaxomicin were generally less active against Gram-negative anaerobes, especially the Bacteroides fragilis group species, than vancomycin and metronidazole, suggesting that SMT19969 has a lesser impact on the normal intestinal microbiota that maintain colonization resistance. SMT19969 showed limited activity against other Gram-positive anaerobes, including Bifidobacteria species, Eggerthella lenta, Finegoldia magna, and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, with MIC90s of >512, >512, 64, and 64 ?g/ml, respectively. Clostridium species showed various levels of susceptibility, with C. innocuum being susceptible (MIC90, 1 ?g/ml) and C. ramosum and C. perfringens being nonsusceptible (MIC90, >512 ?g/ml). Activity against Lactobacillus spp. (range, 0.06 to >512 ?g/ml; MIC90, >512 ?g/ml) was comparable to that of fidaxomicin and varied by species and strain. Gram-positive aerobic cocci (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, and streptococci) showed high SMT19969 MIC90 values (128 to >512 ?g/ml). PMID:23877700

Citron, Diane M.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Merriam, C. Vreni

2013-01-01

396

Ceftriaxone activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens isolated in US clinical microbiology laboratories from 1996 to 2000: results from The Surveillance Network® (TSN®) Database-USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ceftriaxone was introduced into clinical practice in the USA in 1985 and was the first extended-spectrum (third-generation) cephalosporin approved for once-daily treatment of patients with Gram-positive or Gram-negative infections. Review of ceftriaxone activity is important given its continued use since the mid-1980s and reports of emerging resistance among all antimicrobial agent classes. We reviewed the activity of ceftriaxone and relevant

J. A. Karlowsky; M. E. Jones; D. C. Mayfield; C. Thornsberry; D. F. Sahm

2002-01-01

397

Phylogenetic Evidence that the Gram-Negative Nonsporulating Bacterium Tissierella (Bacteroides) praeacuta Is a Member of the Clostridium Subphylum of the Gram-Positive Bacteria and Description of Tissierella creatinini sp. nov  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 16s rRNA gene sequence of the type strain of Tissierella praeancta (formerly Bacteroides praeacutus) was determined by PCR direct sequencing. A comparative sequence analysis showed that T. praeacuta is a member of the Clostridium subphylum of the gram-positive bacteria and has a close phylogenetic affinity with the species that form Clostridiumduster XII (M. D. Collins, P. A. Lawson, k

J. A. E. FARROW; P. A. LAWSON; H. HIPPE; U. GAUGLITZ; M. D. COLLINS

398

Potentiometric titrations of Bacillus subtilis cells to low pH and a comparison of modeling approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

To provide constraints on the speciation of bacterial surface functional groups, we have conducted potentiometric titrations using the gram-positive aerobic species Bacillus subtilis, covering the pH range 2.1 to 9.8. Titration experiments were conducted using an auto-titrator assembly, with the bacteria suspended in fixed ionic strength (0.01 to 0.3 M) NaClO4 solutions. We observed significant adsorption of protons over the

Jeremy B. Fein; Jean-François Boily; Nathan Yee; Drew Gorman-Lewis; Benjamin F. Turner

2005-01-01

399

Cloning and enhancing production of a detergent- and organic-solvent-resistant nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis VTCC-DVN-12-01 by using an eight-protease-gene-deficient Bacillus subtilis WB800  

PubMed Central

Background Nattokinases/Subtilisins (EC 3.4.21.62) belong to the second large family of serine proteases, which gain significant attention and play important role in many biotechnology processes. Thus, a number of nattokinases/subtilisins from various Bacillus species, especially from B. subtilis strains, extensively have been investigated to understand their biochemical and physical properties as well as to improve the production for industrial application. The purpose of this study was to clone a nattokinase gene from Bacillus subtilis strain VTCC-DVN-12-01, enhance its production in B. subtilis WB800, which is deficient in eight extracellular proteases and characterize its physicochemical properties for potential application in organic synthesis and detergent production. Results A gene coding for the nattokinase (Nk) from B. subtilis strain VTCC-DVN-12-01 consisted of an ORF of 1146 nucleotides, encoding a pre-pro-protein enzyme (30-aa pre-signal peptide, 76-aa pro-peptide and 275-aa mature protein with a predicted molecular mass of 27.7 kDa and pI 6.6). The nattokinase showed 98-99% identity with other nattokinases/subtilisins from B. subtilis strains in GenBank. Nk was expressed in B. subtilis WB800 under the control of acoA promoter at a high level of 600 mg protein per liter culture medium which is highest yield of proteins expressed in any extracellular-protease-deficient B. subtilis system till date. Nk was purified to homogeneity with 3.25 fold purification, a specific activity of 12.7 U/mg, and a recovery of 54.17%. The purified Nk was identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry through three peptides, which showed 100% identity to corresponding peptides of the B. subtilis nattokinase (CAC41625). An optimal activity for Nk was observed at 65°C and pH 9. The nattokinase was stable at temperature up to 50°C and in pH range of 5–11 and retained more than 85% of its initial activity after incubation for 1 h. Mg2+ activated Nk up to 162% of its activity. The addition of Triton X-100, Tween 20, and Tween 80 showed an activation of Nk up to 141% of its initial activity but SDS strongly inhibited. The enzyme was highly resistant to organic solvents. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that an eight-protease-gene-deficient Bacillus subtilis WB800 could overproduce the nattokinase from B. subtilis VTCC-DVN-12-01. Due to high resistance to detergents and organic solvents of this nattokinase, it could be potentially applied in organic synthesis and detergent production. PMID:24021098

2013-01-01

400

Three biotechnical processes using Ashbya gossypii, Candida famata, or Bacillus subtilis compete with chemical riboflavin production.  

PubMed

Chemical riboflavin production, successfully used for decades, is in the course of being replaced by microbial processes. These promise to save half the costs, reduce waste and energy requirements, and use renewable resources like sugar or plant oil. Three microorganisms are currently in use for industrial riboflavin production. The hemiascomycetes Ashbya gossypii, a filamentous fungus, and Candida famata, a yeast, are naturally occurring overproducers of this vitamin. To obtain riboflavin production with the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis requires at least the deregulation of purine synthesis and a mutation in a flavokinase/FAD-synthetase. It is common to all three organisms that riboflavin production is recognizable by the yellow color of the colonies. This is an important tool for the screening of improved mutants. Antimetabolites like itaconate, which inhibits the isocitrate lyase in A. gossypii, tubercidin, which inhibits purine biosynthesis in C. famata, or roseoflavin, a structural analog of riboflavin used for B. subtilis, have been applied successfully for mutant selections. The production of riboflavin by the two fungi seems to be limited by precursor supply, as was concluded from feeding and gene-overexpression experiments. Although flux studies in B. subtilis revealed an increase both in maintenance metabolism and in the oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway, the major limitation there seems to be the riboflavin pathway. Multiple copies of the rib genes and promoter replacements are necessary to achieve competitive productivity. PMID:10855708

Stahmann, K P; Revuelta, J L; Seulberger, H

2000-05-01