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Sample records for grand forks minnesota

  1. Flooding in Grand Forks, North Dakota in 1997

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Flood waters inundated Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota.The picture is looking west to Grand Forks, North Dakota and the  USGS gage house is the small white square in the center of the picture....

  2. Building Portfolio: Grand Rapids, Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demarest, Donald

    1973-01-01

    Grand Rapids, Minnesota, built a high school on 196 lakefront acres. Outdoor openness is matched with an imaginative indoor open space'' concept. The school's philosophy centers on career education and is especially committed to programs in forestry and horticulture. (WM)

  3. City of Grand Forks GRAND FORKS is situated 75 miles south of the

    E-print Network

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    their travels between Winnipeg and Minneapolis. Today it plays a similar role as a regional center for retail Computing Heritage April 20 ­ 21, 2007 Alerus Center Grand Forks, North Dakota Call for Papers Hosted by of Midwest Computing Heritage" has been chosen to reflect on computing achievements in the MICS hosting

  4. 75 FR 56051 - Bemidji to Grand Rapids Minnesota 230 kV Transmission Line Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service Bemidji to Grand Rapids Minnesota 230 kV Transmission Line... Rapids, Minnesota 230 kV Transmission Line Project (``Project'') in Minnesota. The Final EIS was prepared... application of Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc. for RUS financing to construct a 230 kilovolt...

  5. Continuous water-quality monitoring and regression analysis to estimate constituent concentrations and loads in the Red River of the North at Fargo and Grand Forks, North Dakota, 2003-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.

    2014-01-01

    The Red River of the North (hereafter referred to as “Red River”) Basin is an important hydrologic region where water is a valuable resource for the region’s economy. Continuous water-quality monitors have been operated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Health, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, City of Fargo, City of Moorhead, City of Grand Forks, and City of East Grand Forks at the Red River at Fargo, North Dakota, from 2003 through 2012 and at Grand Forks, N.Dak., from 2007 through 2012. The purpose of the monitoring was to provide a better understanding of the water-quality dynamics of the Red River and provide a way to track changes in water quality. Regression equations were developed that can be used to estimate concentrations and loads for dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, and suspended sediment using explanatory variables such as streamflow, specific conductance, and turbidity. Specific conductance was determined to be a significant explanatory variable for estimating dissolved solids concentrations at the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks. The regression equations provided good relations between dissolved solid concentrations and specific conductance for the Red River at Fargo and at Grand Forks, with adjusted coefficients of determination of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. Specific conductance, log-transformed streamflow, and a seasonal component were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating sulfate in the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks. Regression equations provided good relations between sulfate concentrations and the explanatory variables, with adjusted coefficients of determination of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively. For the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks, specific conductance, streamflow, and a seasonal component were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating chloride. For the Red River at Grand Forks, a time component also was a statistically significant explanatory variable for estimating chloride. The regression equations for chloride at the Red River at Fargo provided a fair relation between chloride concentrations and the explanatory variables, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.66 and the equation for the Red River at Grand Forks provided a relatively good relation between chloride concentrations and the explanatory variables, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.77. Turbidity and streamflow were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating nitrate plus nitrite concentrations at the Red River at Fargo and turbidity was the only statistically significant explanatory variable for estimating nitrate plus nitrite concentrations at Grand Forks. The regression equation for the Red River at Fargo provided a relatively poor relation between nitrate plus nitrite concentrations, turbidity, and streamflow, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.46. The regression equation for the Red River at Grand Forks provided a fair relation between nitrate plus nitrite concentrations and turbidity, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.73. Some of the variability that was not explained by the equations might be attributed to different sources contributing nitrates to the stream at different times. Turbidity, streamflow, and a seasonal component were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimating total phosphorus at the Red River at Fargo and Grand Forks. The regression equation for the Red River at Fargo provided a relatively fair relation between total phosphorus concentrations, turbidity, streamflow, and season, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.74. The regression equation for the Red River at Grand Forks provided a good relation between total phosphorus concentrations, turbidity, streamflow, and season, with an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.87. For the Red River at Fargo, turbidity and streamflow were statistically significant explanatory variables for estimatin

  6. The origin and evolution of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, 1970-90.

    PubMed

    Sandstead, Harold H; Nielsen, Forrest H

    2009-01-01

    In the early 1960s William E. Cornatzer, MD, PhD suggested the need for increased USDA research concerning human nutrition and creation of the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory (later the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center). He shared ideas with Senator Milton R. Young of North Dakota who requested that the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) prepare a proposal for such a program. In 1963 Senator Young submitted the proposal that included construction of regional centers to the U.S. Senate. The Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory began operation in 1970. The attentions of Senator Young, Representative/Senator Mark Andrews, and Senator Quentin Burdick concerning the budgetary and construction needs facilitated development of the Center from its inception through 1990. Success of the enterprise rests on the creativity, industry, and other qualities of the Center's scientists and support staff, and collaborators at cooperating institutions. Their work resulted in a greater understanding of trace element nutrition and it role in human health. PMID:19056635

  7. The Western Progression of Lyme Disease: Infectious and Nonclonal Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Populations in Grand Forks County, North Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brandee L.; Russart, Nathan M.; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Vaughan, Jefferson A.

    2014-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ixodes scapularis, or reservoirs in eastern North Dakota despite the fact that it borders high-risk counties in Minnesota. Recent reports of B. burgdorferi and I. scapularis in North Dakota, however, prompted a more detailed examination. Spirochetes cultured from the hearts of five rodents trapped in Grand Forks County, ND, were identified as B. burgdorferi sensu lato through sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S rRNA gene-ileT intergenic spacer region, flaB, ospA, ospC, and p66. OspC typing revealed the presence of groups A, B, E, F, L, and I. Two rodents were concurrently carrying multiple OspC types. Multilocus sequence typing suggested the eastern North Dakota strains are most closely related to those found in neighboring regions of the upper Midwest and Canada. BALB/c mice were infected with B. burgdorferi isolate M3 (OspC group B) by needle inoculation or tick bite. Tibiotarsal joints and ear pinnae were culture positive, and B. burgdorferi M3 was detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the tibiotarsal joints, hearts, and ear pinnae of infected mice. Uninfected larval I. scapularis ticks were able to acquire B. burgdorferi M3 from infected mice; M3 was maintained in I. scapularis during the molt from larva to nymph; and further, M3 was transmitted from infected I. scapularis nymphs to naive mice, as evidenced by cultures and qPCR analyses. These results demonstrate that isolate M3 is capable of disseminated infection by both artificial and natural routes of infection. This study confirms the presence of unique (nonclonal) and infectious B. burgdorferi populations in eastern North Dakota. PMID:25304515

  8. Assessment of conservation easements, total phosphorus, and total suspended solids in West Fork Beaver Creek, Minnesota, 1999-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Kieta, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined conservation easements and their effectiveness at reducing phosphorus and solids transport to streams. The U.S. Geological Survey cooperated with the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources and worked collaboratively with the Hawk Creek Watershed Project to examine the West Fork Beaver Creek Basin in Renville County, which has the largest number of Reinvest In Minnesota land retirement contracts in the State (as of 2013). Among all conservation easement programs, a total of 24,218 acres of agricultural land were retired throughout Renville County, and 2,718 acres were retired in the West Fork Beaver Creek Basin from 1987 through 2012. Total land retirement increased steadily from 1987 until 2000. In 2000, land retirement increased sharply because of the Minnesota River Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, then leveled off when the program ended in 2002. Streamflow data were collected during 1999 through 2011, and total phosphorus and total suspended solids data were collected during 1999 through 2012. During this period, the highest peak streamflow of 1,320 cubic feet per second was in March 2010. Total phosphorus and total suspended solids are constituents that tend to increase with increases in streamflow. Annual flow-weighted mean total-phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.140 to 0.759 milligrams per liter, and annual flow-weighted mean total suspended solids concentrations ranged from 21.3 to 217 milligrams per liter. Annual flow-weighted mean total phosphorus and total suspended solids concentrations decreased steadily during the first 4 years of water-quality sample collection. A downward trend in flow-weighted mean total-phosphorus concentrations was significant from 1999 through 2008; however, flow-weighted total-phosphorus concentrations increased substantially in 2009, and the total phosphorus trend was no longer significant. The high annual flow-weighted mean concentrations for total phosphorus and total suspended solids in 2009 were affected by outlier concentrations documented in March 2009. Agricultural land-retirement data only were available through 2008; therefore, it was not possible to compare total phosphorus and total suspended solids concentrations to agricultural land-retirement data for 2009–11. A downward trend in annual flow-weighted mean total-phosphorus concentrations was related significantly to annual land retirement for 1999–2008. The relation between annual flow-weighted mean total suspended solids concentration and annual land retirement was not statistically significant for 1999–2008. If land-retirement data had been available for 2009–11, it is possible that the relation between total phosphorus and land retirement would no longer be evident because of the marked increase in flow-weighted concentrations during 2009. Alternatively, the increase in annual flow-weighted mean total-phosphorus concentrations during 2009–11 may be because of other factors, including industrial discharges, increases in drain tile installation, changes in land use including decreases in agricultural land retirement after 2008, increases in erosion, increases in phosphorus applications to fields, or unknown causes. Inclusion of land-retirement effects in agency planning along with other factors adds perspective with regard to the broader picture of interdependent systems and allows agencies to make informed decisions on the benefits of perpetual easements compared to limited duration easements.

  9. Groundwater and climate change: a sensitivity analysis for the Grand Forks aquifer, southern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. M.; Mackie, D. C.; Wei, M.

    The Grand Forks aquifer, located in south-central British Columbia, Canada was used as a case study area for modeling the sensitivity of an aquifer to changes in recharge and river stage consistent with projected climate-change scenarios for the region. Results suggest that variations in recharge to the aquifer under the different climate-change scenarios, modeled under steady-state conditions, have a much smaller impact on the groundwater system than changes in river-stage elevation of the Kettle and Granby Rivers, which flow through the valley. All simulations showed relatively small changes in the overall configuration of the water table and general direction of groundwater flow. High-recharge and low-recharge simulations resulted in approximately a +0.05 m increase and a -0.025 m decrease, respectively, in water-table elevations throughout the aquifer. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect higher-than-peak-flow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of 2.72 and 3.45 m, respectively. Simulated changes in river-stage elevation, to reflect lower-than-baseflow levels (by 20 and 50%), resulted in average changes in the water-table elevation of -0.48 and -2.10 m, respectively. Current observed water-table elevations in the valley are consistent with an average river-stage elevation (between current baseflow and peak-flow stages). L'aquifère de Grand Forks, situé en Colombie britannique (Canada), a été utilisé comme zone d'étude pour modéliser la sensibilité d'un aquifère à des modifications de la recharge et du niveau de la rivière, correspondant à des scénarios envisagés de changement climatique dans cette région. Les résultats font apparaître que les variations de recharge de l'aquifère pour différents scénarios de changement climatique, modélisées pour des conditions de régime permanent, ont un impact sur le système aquifère beaucoup plus faible que les changements du niveau des rivières Kettle et Granby, qui coulent dans la vallée. Toutes les simulations ont montré des différences relativement faibles dans la configuration d'ensemble de la nappe et dans la direction générale des écoulements. Des simulations de conditions de recharge forte et de recharge faible produisent respectivement une remontée de 0,05 m et un abaissement de 0,025 m, approximativement, des cotes de la nappe pour l'ensemble de l'aquifère. Des changements simulés de la cote du niveau de la rivière, pour refléter des niveaux plus hauts que ceux des pics de crues (de 20 et de 50%), produisent respectivement des remontées de la nappe de 2,72 et 3,45 m en moyenne. Des changements simulés de l'altitude du niveau de la rivière, pour refléter des niveaux plus bas que ceux de basses eaux (de 20 et de 50%), produisent respectivement des abaissements de la nappe de 0,48 et 2,10 m en moyenne. Les altitudes courantes observées de la nappe dans la vallée sont cohérentes avec une cote moyenne du niveau de la rivière (entre les niveaux courants de basses eaux et de crues). El acuífero de los Grand Forks, situado al sur de la Columbia Británica central (Canadá) ha sido utilizado como lugar de estudio para modelar la sensibilidad de un acuífero a los cambios en la recarga y el caudal de los ríos de acuerdo con escenarios previstos de cambio climático en la región. Los resultados sugieren que las variaciones en la recarga al acuífero bajo los diversos escenarios, que han sido modelados en régimen estacionario, tienen un impacto mucho menor en las aguas subterráneas que los cambios en el caudal de los ríos Kettle y Granby, que discurren por el valle. Todas las simulaciones muestran diferencias relativamente pequeñas en la configuración regional de los niveles freáticos y en la dirección general del flujo subterráneo. Las simulaciones de recarga elevada y baja causan un incremento de 0,05 m y un decremento de 0,025 m, respectivamente, en los niveles del acuífero. Los cambios de la elevación del río, simulados para reflejar niveles de flujo mayores q

  10. Twamley Room 414 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8178 -Grand Forks, ND 58202-8178 Phone (701) 777-2784; 1-800-CALL-UND (ext 2784) ; Fax (701) 777-3619

    E-print Network

    Delene, David J.

    Twamley Room 414 ­ 264 Centennial Drive Stop 8178 - Grand Forks, ND 58202-8178 Phone (701) 777 or Assistantships. Faculty Member ___________________ Student Name _____________________ Faculty Daytime phone

  11. Storm-water characterization and lagoon sediment analysis, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.G.; Vaughn, R.W.; Scott, P.T.

    1990-08-01

    Sampling was conducted in the wastewater treatment lagoons and stormwater runoff at Grand Forks AFB. The base was concerned about whether the unlined lagoons were creating a potential groundwater contamination problem and whether their stormwater runoff met North Dakota state stream standards. Lagoon sediment did not contain Extraction Procedure hazardous chemicals. Stormwater runoff exceeded state standards for boron, phosphates, and phenols and contained trace levels of methylene chloride. Characterization of lagoon influent showed it to be generally representative of domestic sewage, but also contained trace levels of boron, phenols, toluene, cyanide, chloroform, methylene chloride and ethyl benzene.

  12. 78 FR 29202 - Environmental Impact Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... the historic bridge; (2) rehabilitating the bridge on the existing alignment; (3) removal of the bridge and constructing a new bridge on the existing alignment; (4) rehabilitating the bridge and constructing a new bridge on new alignment; and (5) removal of the bridge and constructing a new bridge on...

  13. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-065-1578, United Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota. [Ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    Environmental and breathing zone samples were analyzed for ethylene-oxide at United Hospital, Grand Forks, North Dakota in January, 1985. The survey was requested by the management to determine if using ethylene-oxide for sterilization purposes posed a health risk. All employees (number not specified) in the central supply department were interviewed. These concentrations originated from an old sterilizer. The sterilizer was not normally used, but was operated on the day of the survey to stimulate a worst-case situation. None of the workers had any medical complaints. The author concludes that a health hazard due to ethylene-oxide does not exist at the facility. He recommends not using the old sterilizer until it has been refurbished and conducting periodic monitoring for ethylene/oxide with an infrared analyzer.

  14. Physical Characteristics of Stream Subbasins in the Des Moines River, Upper Des Moines River, and East Fork Des Moines River Basins, Southern Minnesota and Northern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanocki, Christopher A.

    2000-01-01

    Data that describe the physical characteristics of stream subbasins upstream from selected sites on streams in the Des Moines River, Upper Des Moines River, and East Fork Des Moines River Basins, located in southwestern Minnesota, and northwestern Iowa, are presented in this report. The physical characteristics are the drainage area of the subbasin, the percentage area of the subbasin covered only by lakes, the percentage area of the subbasin covered by both lakes and wetlands, the main-channel length, and the main-channel slope. Stream sites include outlets of subbasins of at least 5 square miles, and locations of U.S. Geological Survey high-flow, and continuous-record gaging stations.

  15. Seasonal Alterations in Park Visitation, Amenity Use, and Physical Activity — Grand Forks, North Dakota, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, LuAnn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Park amenities promote visitation and physical activity during summer. Physical activity declines during winter. Identifying park amenities that promote visitation during winter would increase year-round activity. The purpose of this study was to determine how park visitation, amenity choice, and physical activity intensity change across seasons. Methods Physical activity intensity of children and adults was assessed at 16 parks in Grand Forks, North Dakota, during summer and fall of 2012, and winter and spring of 2013. Results Park visitation was highest in spring and lowest in winter. Amenity use varied by season. Parks with water splash pads were visited more during summer, and playgrounds and open spaces were visited more during spring. Ice rinks were visited most in winter. Physical activity intensity was lowest in summer and highest in winter for each age group. The activity intensity observed for all young age groups ranged from 2.7 to 2.9 metabolic equivalents in summer and greater than 3 metabolic equivalents in all other seasons. Adults’ mean activity intensity was greater than 3 metabolic equivalents in winter. Conclusion Information on park visitation, amenity use, and activity intensity across seasons is valuable; it can be used when designing or redesigning parks in order to promote year-round physical activity. Redesigning parks in cold climates to include ice rinks, sledding hills, cross-country skiing, and indoor areas for physical activity would increase winter visitation and allow the park to serve as a year-round resource for physical activity. PMID:25211503

  16. 75 FR 56051 - Bemidji to Grand Rapids Minnesota 230 kV Transmission Line Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...Project. The Project is being jointly developed by Minnkota, Otter Tail Power Company, and Minnesota Power. DATES: Written comments...55722-0225. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Minnkota Power, Otter Tail Power, and Minnesota Power propose to construct a...

  17. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-046-1763, American Crystal Sugar Company, East Grand Forks, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Boiano, J.M.; Almaguer, D.

    1986-12-01

    Following a request from the American Federation of Grain Millers International Union and management of the American Crystal Sugar Company (ACSCO), employee exposures to airborne contaminants during beet processing and welding fumes during facility maintenance were determined at a sugar beet mill owned by ACSCO. Exposures in excess of the most stringent criteria were found for calcium oxide and calcium carbonate in lime kiln workers, sugar dust in sugar bin workers, insoluble hexavalent chromium and nickel during welding, total welding fumes in one case, and nickel during a metal coating spray process. Quartz was found in several settled dust samples and high volume air samples. Nickel and chromium exposure presented potential cancer risks. The authors conclude that workers were overexposed to calcium oxide, calcium carbonate, sugar dust, total welding fumes, hexavalent chromium, and nickel at this facility. Recommendations include particulate containment, ventilation, and respiratory protection where appropriate.

  18. Wildfire Impacts on Water Quality, Macroinvertebrates and Trout: An Initial Survey After the West Fork Complex Fire in the Upper Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, A.; Knipper, K. R.; Randall, J.; Hogue, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    Forest fires affect water quality in the disrupted watershed, which can devastate the aquatic ecosystem including sensitive trout (Salmonidae) and macroinvertebrate species. The West Fork Fire Complex consumed 88,724 acres of forest in the state of Colorado during the summer of 2013. The majority (88%) of the burn area was comprised of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii) trees killed previously by Spruce Beetle (Ips spp.). Damage to the soils was of moderate to high severity in the majority of the area (60%). The recent fire surrounded the Rio Grande, affecting water quality and habitat critical to insects and fish. The water quality of the Rio Grande (above and below the burn) and some of the effected tributaries is currently being monitored for both quality and quantity. Parameters important to the survival of aquatic life, such as flow, temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, turbidity, nutrients, and suspended and dissolved metals are being monitored along the Rio Grande and in tributaries. Macroinvertebrate and fish populations are sampled in the same locations. First year observations showed the ecosystem to be relatively resilient, with stable water quality and survival of insects and fish. However, an intense monsoon season this summer is driving extensive sediments into tributaries from steep, severely burned hillslopes. These monsoon events have caused acute and dramatic fish kills, where hundreds of trout were reported killed in one tributary in a single day event. Turbidity was observed as high as 488 NTU in the impacted stream with fish kill, whereas the turbidity was 25 NTU in a neighboring tributary outside of the burn area. Salmonids can be negatively impacted by relatively low turbidity, with prior studies noting that the turbidity threshold for rainbow trout is 70 NTU. Continued monitoring of water quality, macroinvertebrate populations, and fish populations is being undertaken to determine the key drivers of the acute fish kill events. This presentation will highlight the role of burn severity, steepness of slope, hill aspect, and storm intensity on water quality and aquatic response of fire-impacted streams of the Upper Rio Grande.

  19. Mercury in streams at Grand Portage National Monument (Minnesota, USA): assessment of ecosystem sensitivity and ecological risk.

    PubMed

    Rolfhus, Kristofer R; Wiener, James G; Haro, Roger J; Sandheinrich, Mark B; Bailey, Sean W; Seitz, Brandon R

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) in water, sediment, soils, seston, and biota were quantified for three streams in the Grand Portage National Monument (GRPO) in far northeastern Minnesota to assess ecosystem contamination and the potential for harmful exposure of piscivorous fish, wildlife, and humans to methylmercury (MeHg). Concentrations of total Hg in water, sediment, and soil were typical of those in forest ecosystems within the region, whereas MeHg concentrations and percent MeHg in these ecosystem components were markedly higher than values reported elsewhere in the western Great Lakes Region. Soils and sediment were Hg-enriched, containing approximately 4-fold more total Hg per unit of organic matter. We hypothesized that localized Hg enrichment was due in part to anthropogenic pollution associated with historic fur-trading activity. Bottom-up forcing of bioaccumulation was evidenced by MeHg concentrations in larval dragonflies, which were near the maxima for dragonflies sampled concurrently from five other national park units in the region. Despite its semi-remote location, GRPO is a Hg-sensitive landscape in which MeHg is produced and bioaccumulated in aquatic food webs to concentrations that pose ecological risks to MeHg-sensitive piscivores, including predatory fish, belted kingfisher, and mink. PMID:25666279

  20. LAKE FORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Fork of the Arkansas River Watershed has been adversely affected through mining, water diversion and storage projects, grazing, logging, and other human influences over the past 120 years. It is the goals of the LFWWG to improve the health of Lake fork by addressing th...

  1. Analysis of the results of hydraulic-fracture stimulation of two crystalline bedrock boreholes, Grand Portage, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Fredrick L.; Olson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture-stimulation procedures typical of those provided by contractors in the water-well industry were applied to two boreholes in basaltic and gabbroic rocks near Grand Portage, Minnesota.These boreholes were considered incapable of supplying adequate ground water for even a single household although geophysical logs showed both boreholes were intersected by many apparently permeable fractures. Tests made before and after stimulation indicated that the two boreholes would produce about 0.05 and 0.25 gallon per minute before stimulation, and about 1.5 and 1.2 gallons per minute after stimulation. These increases would be enough to obtain adequate domestic water supplies from the two boreholes but would not furnish enough water for more than a single household from either borehole. Profiles of high-resolution flow made during pumping after stimulation indicated that the stimulation enhanced previously small inflows or stimulated new inflow from seven fractures or fracture zones in one borehole and from six fractures or fracture zones in the other.Geophysical logs obtained after stimulation showed no specific changes in these 13 fractures that could be related to stimulation other than the increases in flow indicated by the flowmeter logs. The results indicate that the stimulation has increased inflow to the two boreholes by improving the connectivity of favorably orientated fractures with larger scale flow zones in the surrounding rocks. Three of four possible diagnostics related to measured pressure and flow during the stimulation treatments were weakly correlated with the increases in production associated with each treatment interval. These correlations are not statistically significant on the basis of the limited sample of 16 treatment intervals in two boreholes, but the results indicate that significant correlations might be established from a much larger data set.

  2. Water quality (2000-08) and historical phosphorus concentrations from paleolimnological studies of Swamp and Speckled Trout Lakes, Grand Portage Reservation, northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Jones, Perry M.; Edlund, Mark B.; Ramstack, Joy M.

    2010-01-01

    A paleolimnological approach was taken to aid the Grand Portage Reservation, in northeastern Minnesota, in determining reference conditions for lakes on the reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Grand Portage Band of Chippewa Indians and the Science Museum of Minnesota, conducted a study to describe water quality (2000-08) and historical total phosphorus concentrations (approximately 1781-2006) for Swamp and Speckled Trout Lakes. Results from this study may be used as a guide in establishing nutrient criteria in these and other lakes on the Grand Portage Reservation. Historical phosphorus concentrations were inferred through paleolimnological reconstruction methods involving diatom analysis and lead-210 dating of lake-sediment cores. Historical diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations in Swamp Lake ranged from 0.017 to 0.025 milligrams per liter (mg/L) based on diatom assemblages in sediment samples dated 1781-2005. Historical diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations in Speckled Trout Lake ranged from 0.008 to 0.014 mg/L based on diatom assemblages in sediment samples dated 1825-2006. In both lakes, historical changes in diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations did not exceed model error estimates, indicating that there has been minimal change in total phosphorus concentrations in the two lakes over about two centuries. Nutrient concentrations in monthly water samples collected May through October during 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2008 were compared to the diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations. Total phosphorus concentrations from water samples collected from Swamp Lake during 2000-08 ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.160 mg/L (median= 0.023 mg/L) compared to diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations of 0.018 to 0.020 mg/L for 2002 to 2005. Total phosphorus concentrations in water samples collected from Speckled Trout Lake during 2000-08 were similar to those of Swamp Lake, ranging from less than 0.002 to 0.147 mg/L (median=0.012 mg/L), whereas the diatom-inferred total phosphorus concentrations were smaller, ranging from 0.009 to 0.010 mg/L for 2003 to 2006. Differences in total phosphorus concentrations between the two lakes may be because of differences in watershed characteristics, particularly the number of wetlands in the two watersheds. Similarities between recent total phosphorus concentrations in water-quality samples and diatom-inferred total phosphorus indicate that diatom-inferred phosphorus reconstructions might be used to help establish reference conditions. Nutrient criteria for Grand Portage Reservation lakes may be established when a sampling program is designed to ensure representative phosphorus concentrations in water samples are comparable to diatom-inferred concentrations.

  3. Estimation of Monthly Evaporation from Lake Ashtabula in North Dakota, Orwell Lake in Minnesota, and Lake Traverse in Minnesota and South Dakota, 1931-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, Kevin C.

    2003-01-01

    Reservoirs on tributaries of the Red River of the North provide water for Fargo and Grand Forks, N. Dak., and other cities along the river. Adequate estimates of evaporative losses from the reservoirs are needed to determine the total water supply in the Basin. Many equations could be used to estimate lake or reservoir evaporation. However, in addition to measurements of air temperature, the equations require measurements of net radiation, wind speed, and relative humidity. Evaporation and air temperature data from energy budget evaporation sites at Wetland P1 in North Dakota and at Williams Lake in Minnesota are available. Air temperature data collected from climate stations near Lake Ashtabula in North Dakota, from Orwell Lake in Minnesota, and from Lake Traverse in Minnesota and South Dakota also are available. Therefore, the combined data sets were used to estimate monthly evaporation from Lake Ashtabula, Orwell Lake, and Lake Traverse. Averaged monthly mean air temperatures determined for each reservoir study site were used to calculate monthly evaporation data sets for 1931-2001. Results from the procedure that estimates reservoir evaporation indicate that slight downward trends in annual evaporation occurred from 1931-2001. The trends may have been caused by the selected time period of the study, which began with the drought conditions in the mid 1930's and ended with the more wet conditions in the late 1990's. Average annual evaporation values for each reservoir for 1931-2001 correspond well with published average annual lake evaporation values for 1946-55.

  4. 75 FR 75170 - Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.: Bemidji to Grand Rapids 230 kV Transmission Line Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ...Minnesota and the Boswell Substation near Grand Rapids, Minnesota. The Project is being jointly developed by Minnkota, Otter Tail Power Company, and Minnesota Power (The Utilities). ADDRESSES: To obtain copies of the ROD, or for further...

  5. 1. NORTH FORK OF THE TULE RIVER MIDDLE FORK BRANCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTH FORK OF THE TULE RIVER MIDDLE FORK BRANCH FLUME AND CONCRETE DIVERSION DAM SPILLING WATER. CONCRETE ABUTMENTS OF THE ORIGINAL HIGHWAY 190 BRIDGE OVER THE NORTH FORK ARE VISIBLE ON EITHER SIDE OF THE DAM. NEW HIGHWAY 190 BRIDGE IS VISIBLE ACROSS TOP OF PHOTO. VIEW TO NORTH. - Tule River Hydroelectric Project, Water Conveyance System, Middle Fork Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  6. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication remains obscure. To better understand the replication mechanism, new methods must be developed that allow for the observation and characterization of short-lived states and dynamic events at single replication forks. Over the last decade, great progress has been made toward this goal with the development of novel DNA nanomanipulation and fluorescence imaging techniques allowing for the direct observation of replication-fork dynamics both reconstituted in vitro and in live cells. This article reviews these new single-molecule approaches and the revised understanding of replisome operation that has emerged. PMID:23881939

  7. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  8. STRATAL PATTERNS OF THE WILLIAMS FORK (HUNTER CANYON) FORMATION, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-print Network

    Ost, Rebekah Corrie

    2010-12-31

    approximately twenty miles east of Grand Junction Colorado, (1) in Coal Canyon, (2) along highway 64 between I-70 and DeBeque Cutoff Road and (3) along I-70 between Palisade and DeBeque. In the study area, the Williams Fork Formation is approximately 500 m... fine to medium (Farrer Formation) to coarse grained (Tuscher Formation), while grain sizes in the Williams Fork Formation of Coal Canyon and the Grand Hogback area range from fine-lower at the base to a maximum of medium grain size (Fisher et al...

  9. President's House Price's Fork Road

    E-print Network

    Women's Softball Press Box Wright House Agnew Hall Solitude English Field Indoor Batting Facility President's House Price's Fork Road Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center HOKIE BIKE HUB Media Hall Cassell Coliseum Torgersen Hall Center For The Arts Dietrick Hall Rector Field House War Memorial

  10. Spring above Rhoads Fork, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Headwater springflow is common in the Limestone Pateau area in the Black Hills of western South Dakota. Most headwater springs in the Black Hills, like this one contributing to Rhoads Fork, generally occur near the base of the Madison Limestone along the eastern edge of the Limestone Plateau area....

  11. Minnesota and Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul. Environmental Education Board.

    Eight energy education activities are provided. Each activity includes an overview, a brief summary, lists of objectives and materials needed, teacher's notes, and student materials. The activities focus on: (1) using social studies skills to understand Minnesota energy data and to clarify and understand some Minnesota energy issues; (2) giving…

  12. Welcome to Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    There is more than snow in Minnesota: Summer brings the Aquatennial with sandcastle competitions, milk-carton-boat races and a torchlight parade, and the St. Paul Winter Carnival has ice carving and snow sculptures and another torchlight parade. But natives and visitors alike note that their favorite season is autumn, which in Minnesota brings…

  13. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  14. An Analysis and Evaluation of Islands of Differentiated Staffing in Grand Forks Public Schools, Grand Forks, North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, John A.; Williams, John D.

    Critics argue against differentiated staffing on the bases that (1) limited compensation ranges lower teacher morale, (2) the loss of the services of trained teachers and the impersonality of the large group organization lower student incentive to achieve, and (3) salary savings are at the expense of the quality of the instructional program. Since…

  15. Fifth-wheel fork truck adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1969-01-01

    Standard fifth wheel mounted on a rectangular steel structure adapted for use with a fork lift truck provides a fast, safe, and economical way of maneuvering semitrailers in close quarters at plants and warehouses. One operator can move and locate a semitrailer without dismounting from a fork lift truck.

  16. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Cryptanalysis of FORK-256 Krystian Matusiewicz1

    E-print Network

    Contini, Scott

    in one register influence many others. This is the case with the hash function Tiger [1] tailored for 64 of this paper. The paper is organized as follows. In the next section, we briefly describe FORK-256. Then

  18. Estimated Ground-Water Use in Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties, Minnesota, for 2030 and 2050

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winterstein, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, is studying six alternatives for delivering water to the Red River of the North Valley in North Dakota and to the cities of Breckenridge, Moorhead, and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. In order to evaluate these alternatives the Bureau of Reclamation needs estimates of ground-water use for 2030 and 2050 for six counties in Minnesota: Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, conducted a study to estimate ground-water use in these counties for 2030 and 2050. This report (1) describes the methods used to estimate ground-water use for the years 2030 and 2050 for six Minnesota counties: Becker, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Otter Tail, and Wilkin Counties, (2) presents the estimated domestic, commercial, industrial, and irrigation ground-water use for the years 2030 and 2050 for these six counties, and (3) compares the estimated ground-water use with published estimates of recharge to three surficial aquifers: Buffalo, Otter Tail surficial, and Pelican River sand plain. Between 74 and 82 percent of the reported ground-water use in the 6 years from 2000 to 2005 was used for irrigation of major crops. The next major use of ground-water was public water supply for domestic use, between 13 and 19 percent of the reported ground-water use. Together they account for 90 to 95 percent of the appropriated ground water in the 6-year period. The total estimated 2030 ground-water use for the six counties ranges from 27,826-36,177 million gallons per year (Mgal/yr), and the total estimated 2050 ground-water use ranges from 31,313-41,746 Mgal/yr. The estimated recharge to the Buffalo aquifer, Otter Tail surficial aquifer, and Pelican River sand-plain aquifer is 3,707, 51,000, and 4,900-8,900 Mgal/yr, respectively. The range of the estimated 2050 ground-water withdrawals from the Buffalo, Otter Tail surficial, and Pelican River sand-plain aquifers is 1,234-1,776 Mgal/yr from the Buffalo aquifer, 11,728-14,820 Mgal/yr from the Otter Tail surficial aquifer, and 3,385-4,298 Mgal/yr from the Pelican River sand-plain aquifer.

  19. Fertilizing Corn in Minnesota InMinnesota,cornisgrownonmoreacresthanany

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Mg Cu Ca Zn Fe P N B S K Fertilizing Corn in Minnesota InMinnesota,cornisgrownonmoreacresthanany othercrop.Nationally,Minnesotaranksamongthetop five in corn production. Average corn yields have im- proved production and profitability. Nitrogen Suggestions Minnesota corn growers receive substantial return

  20. Grand Canyon

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  The Grand Canyon     View Larger Image Northern Arizona and the Grand Canyon are captured in this pair of Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ... formats available at JPL December 31, 2000 - Grand Canyon and Lake Powell. project:  MISR ...

  1. DNA REPAIR. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage.

    PubMed

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R; Ira, Grzegorz

    2015-08-14

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Pol?, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer. PMID:26273056

  2. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the...

  3. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the...

  4. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the...

  5. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the...

  6. 33 CFR 207.370 - Big Fork River, Minn.; logging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. 207.370 Section 207.370...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.370 Big Fork River, Minn.; logging. (a) During the...

  7. 1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  8. 7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  9. 3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and third stops - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  10. 12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand drips, view from road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  11. 5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  12. 8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, handbuilt rock pile. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, hand-built rock pile. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  13. 2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first stop. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet Great Smoky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  15. 11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after stop 13. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  16. 6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop four. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  17. 9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  18. 15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK WITH GATE IN PLACE AND A FEW NEEDLES IN PLACE - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  19. Minnesota's Forest Trees. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, William R.; Fuller, Bruce L.

    This bulletin describes 46 of the more common trees found in Minnesota's forests and windbreaks. The bulletin contains two tree keys, a summer key and a winter key, to help the reader identify these trees. Besides the two keys, the bulletin includes an introduction, instructions for key use, illustrations of leaf characteristics and twig…

  20. CLEAR FORK OF THE BRAZOS SUSPENSION BRIDGE, CIRCA 1896, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLEAR FORK OF THE BRAZOS SUSPENSION BRIDGE, CIRCA 1896, SHOWING INCLINED STAY CABLES EXTENDING FROM TOP OF TOWER TO DECK. 3/4 VIEW FROM BELOW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  1. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island. 9.113 Section 9.113 Alcohol...Areas § 9.113 North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The...

  2. 27 CFR 9.113 - North Fork of Long Island.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false North Fork of Long Island. 9.113 Section 9.113 Alcohol...Areas § 9.113 North Fork of Long Island. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural...this section is “North Fork of Long Island.” (b) Approved maps. The...

  3. Development of the Pintle Release Fork Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    BOGER, R.M.; DALE, R.

    1999-08-27

    An improved method of attachment of the pintle to the piston in the universal sampler is being developed. The mechanism utilizes a forked release disk which captures two balls in a cavity formed by a hole in the piston and a groove in the pintle rod.

  4. VIRGINIA TECH 965 Prices Fork Road

    E-print Network

    VIRGINIA TECH 965 Prices Fork Road Office of the Undergraduate Admissions Mail Code 0202 Phone: 540-231-6267 Fax: 540-231-3242 Blacksburg, VA 24061 11/11 ELIGIBILITY FOR VIRGINIA IN-STATE TUITION PRIVILEGES by §23 -7.4 of the Code of Virginia. The provisions of §23 -7.4 of the Code of Virginia are set forth

  5. Man-induced gradient adjustment of the South Fork Forked Deer River, west Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.; Robbins, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    Channel modifications from 1968 to 1969 on the South Fork Forked Deer River in western Tennessee have caused upstream degradation, downstream aggradation, and bank failures along the altered channels, adjacent reaches, and tributaries. The result of these adjustments is a general decrease in gradient as the channel attempts to absorb the imposed increase in energy conditions created by channelization. Headward degradation at a rate of approximately 2.57 km/yr on the South Fork Forked Deer River caused from 1.52 m to about 3.14 m of incision over a 13.5 km reach from 1969 to 1981. As a consequence of substantially increased sediment supply, approximately 2.13 m of aggradation was induced downstream of this reach during the same period. This accumulation represents a 60% recovery of bed level at the downstream site since the completion of channel work in 1969. Gradient adjustment with time is described by exponential decay functions. The length of time required for adjustment to some new quasi-equilibrium condition is computed by these decay functions and is about 20 years from the completion of channel work. Adjusted slopes are less than predisturbed values, probably because straightened channels dissipate less energy by friction, allowing more energy for sediment transport. An equivalent sediment load, therefore, can be transported at a considerably gentler slope. The predisturbed slope exceeds the adjusted slope by an order of magnitude on the downstream reach of the South Fork Forked Deer River. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Minnesota's Children and Welfare Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Kids Count, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter issue focuses on welfare reform and programs that help low-income children in Minnesota, including articles on the basic values which should guide welfare reform; current welfare reform proposals; the cost of welfare; the role of charities and the religious community; an overview of programs in Minnesota which assist low-income…

  7. Powassan virus encephalitis, Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Birge, Justin; Sonnesyn, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Powassan virus (POWV) is a rare tick-borne agent of encephalitis in North America. Historically, confirmed cases occurred mainly in the northeastern United States. Since 2008, confirmed cases in Minnesota and Wisconsin have increased. We report a fatal case of POWV encephalitis in Minnesota. POWV infection should be suspected in tick-exposed patients with viral encephalitis. PMID:23017222

  8. Arrested replication forks guide retrotransposon integration.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jake Z; Rosado-Lugo, Jesus D; Cranz-Mileva, Susanne; Ciccaglione, Keith M; Tournier, Vincent; Zaratiegui, Mikel

    2015-09-25

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are an abundant class of genomic parasites that replicate by insertion of new copies into the host genome. Fungal LTR retrotransposons prevent mutagenic insertions through diverse targeting mechanisms that avoid coding sequences, but conserved principles guiding their target site selection have not been established. Here, we show that insertion of the fission yeast LTR retrotransposon Tf1 is guided by the DNA binding protein Sap1 and that the efficiency and location of the targeting depend on the activity of Sap1 as a replication fork barrier. We propose that Sap1 and the fork arrest it causes guide insertion of Tf1 by tethering the integration complex to target sites. PMID:26404838

  9. IMPACTS OF DROUGHT AND BARK BEETLES ON RED PINE FORESTS OF THE ANOKA PLAINS, MINNESOTA

    E-print Network

    Ayres, Matthew.P.

    IMPACTS OF DROUGHT AND BARK BEETLES ON RED PINE FORESTS OF THE ANOKA PLAINS, MINNESOTA Preliminary Department of Natural Resources, Grand Rapids, MN #12;Ayres et al.: Drought and bark beetles on Anoka Plains, there is limited ability to know when, or where, there will be consequential mortality of adult trees from drought

  10. BALD ROCK AND MIDDLE FORK FEATHER RIVER ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Buehler, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource assessment of the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas in California indicate several areas within the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area that have probable mineral-resource potential. A probable potential for placer gold exists at various localities, both in areas covered by Tertiary volcanic rocks and in small streams that drain into the Middle Fork of the Feather River. A probable potential for small deposits of chromite exists in tracts underlain by ultramafic rocks in the Melones fault zone. A probable potential for lead-silver deposits is recognized at the east end of the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area.

  11. Driveless gyroscope response of a quartz piezoelectric vibratory tuning fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, M.; Albassam, B.; Alduraibi, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we report on the observation of a gyroscope response in the absence of drive oscillator circuitry in a single ended quartz piezoelectric tuning fork. The tuning fork gyroscope was fabricated by conventional photolithography and wet etching techniques. The tuning fork length is 4 mm and the stem length is 2 mm; the tuning fork width and thickness are 0.4 mm and 0.35 mm, respectively. The measured gyroscope sensitivity and signal to noise ratio were 0.22 mV/°/s and 40, respectively, at a rotational rate of 60 °/s.

  12. 77 FR 66541 - Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black Warrior River, Locust Fork; Birmingham, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ...Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black Warrior River, Locust Fork; Birmingham...for a portion of the Locust Fork to the Black Warrior River, Birmingham, AL. This...which crosses the Locust Fork of the Black Warrior River, a navigable...

  13. 14. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Place of a thousand drips, view with three culvert pipes. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. 33 CFR 117.315 - New River, South Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New River, South Fork. 117.315 Section 117.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.315 New River, South Fork. (a) The...

  15. 9. 'CRIB DAM IN LAKE FORK RIVER AT HEADING OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 'CRIB DAM IN LAKE FORK RIVER AT HEADING OF LAKE FORK CANAL, UINTAH PROJECT. TWO SLUICEWAYS TWENTY FEET WIDE HAVE BEEN LEFT IN THE DAM TO PASS BOULDERS DURING HIGH WATER. THESE SLUICEWAYS ARE CLOSED BY LOGS AND HAY DURING LOW WATER.' Date unknown - Irrigation Canals in the Uinta Basin, Duchesne, Duchesne County, UT

  16. Dividing the workload at a eukaryotic replication fork

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    Dividing the workload at a eukaryotic replication fork Thomas A. Kunkel1 and Peter M. Burgers2 1, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA Efficient and accurate replication of the eukaryotic nuclear genome requires DNA polymerases (Pols) a, d and e. In all current replication fork models, polymerase a initiates

  17. CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,

    E-print Network

    CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

  18. New interpretation of Clarks Fork field, northern Bighorn basin, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.; Lindsley-Griffin, N.

    1986-08-01

    Clarks Fork field is located at the northern edge of the Bighorn basin (T9S, R22E) in Carbon County, Montana. Production was first established in 1944 by General Petroleum Corporation in the Cretaceous Peay Sandstone (basal Frontier) and was later extended to the Cretaceous Greybull (1949) and Lakota (1956) sandstones by British American. Total cumulative hydrocarbons from this field are 1,1789,193 bbl of oil and 3,061,522 mcf of gas, with Lakota sandstones being most productive. Lakota production occurs from a structural-stratigraphic trap in an east-west-trending channel on the axis of Clarks Fork anticline, geographically near the center of the township. Our structural reinterpretation of Clarks Fork field suggests that Elk Basin anticline is a northwest extension of the Elk Basin field anticline. The Elk Basin thrust truncates the north limb of the fold and does not strike to the northwest, as shown by earlier interpretations. They interpret a northwest-striking thrust in the center of the township as a splay off the Elk Basin thrust, and have named it the Clarks Fork thrust. The Clarks Fork anticline is located on the hanging wall of Clarks Fork thrust. Subsurface maps indicate the Clarks Fork area has not been fully developed. Stratigraphic traps in the Lakota and Greybull sandstones are present in several areas of the township. Structural traps in the center and northwest portions of the township may also exist.

  19. Replication fork barriers in the Xenopus rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wiesendanger, B; Lucchini, R; Koller, T; Sogo, J M

    1994-01-01

    To investigate replication fork progression along the tandemly repeated rRNA genes of Xenopus laevis and Xenopus borealis, rDNA replication intermediates from dividing tissue culture cells were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Analysis of the direction of replication in the rRNA coding regions revealed replication forks moving in both directions. However, in both frog species, polar replication fork barriers (RFB) arresting forks approaching the rRNA transcription units from downstream were identified. Whereas in X. borealis the RFB maps to a defined site close to the transcription terminator, in X. laevis the arrest of fork movement can occur at multiple positions throughout a 3' flanking repetitive spacer region. A short DNA element located near the respective RFB sites is shared between these two related frog species, suggesting its possible involvement in the arrest of replication fork movement. In a subset of rDNA repeats, these barriers cause an absolute block to replication fork progression, defining the sites where replicon fusion occurs, whereas in the remainder repeats, most probably in the non-transcribed gene copies, the replication machinery can pass the RFB sequences and replicate the rRNA transcription unit in a 3'-to-5' direction. Images PMID:7800497

  20. Citizens' Attitudes toward the University of Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Donald A.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A mailed survey was conducted of Minnesota citizens' views of goals and priorities for the University of Minnesota, their satisfaction with various aspects of the university and their familiarity with it. Responses were received from 409 of the 620 randomly selected citizens of Minnesota who were contacted. Key findings include: Most respondents…

  1. SEA LAMPREY SPAWNING: Wisconsin and Minnesota Streams

    E-print Network

    SEA LAMPREY SPAWNING: Wisconsin and Minnesota Streams Of Lake Superior Marine Biological Laboratory of Lake County, Minnesota · 19 6. Shoreline of St. Louis County, Minnesota 27 #12;#12;The 19^2 sea lamprey are pro- ducing or may produce sea lampreys in the future. 3. To determine the general characteristics

  2. Student Loan Default Rates in Minnesota, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    While Minnesota undergraduates are more likely to take out student loans, they are substantially less likely than their peers nationally to default on federal student loans. Fifty-four percent of Minnesota undergraduates took out student loans in 2007-2008, compared to 39 percent of undergraduates across the U.S. Minnesota undergraduates were also…

  3. Racial Disparity in Minnesota's Child Protection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erik P.; Clark, Sonja; Donald, Matthew; Pedersen, Rachel; Pichotta, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Minnesota has been recognized by several studies as a state with a significant amount of racial disparity in its child protection system. This study, using 2001 data from Minnesota's Social Services Information Service, was conducted to determine at which of the six decision points in Minnesota's child welfare system racial disparities are…

  4. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOEpatents

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  5. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE STIRRING FORK THAT MIXED COFFEE BEANS AS THEY WERE HUSKED - Hacienda Cafetalera Santa Clara, Coffee Mill, KM 19, PR Route 372, Hacienda La Juanita, Yauco Municipio, PR

  6. Little Known Facts about the Common Tuning Fork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, P. P.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the physical principles of the tuning fork which has a common use in teaching laboratories. Includes information on its vibration, frequency of vibration, elasticity, and reasons for having two prongs. (YDS)

  7. 9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  8. 8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  9. A Polarimetric Target Detector Using the Huynen Fork 

    E-print Network

    Marino, Armando; Cloude, Shane R.; Woodhouse, Iain H.

    The contribution of synthetic aperture radar polarimetry in target detection is described and found to add valuable information. A new target detection methodology that makes novel use of the polarization fork of the target is described...

  10. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...for strength by application of at least 39.5 J (350 in-lb) of energy in accordance with the fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet this...

  11. HOMESTEAD, LAKE FORK, AND LICK CREEK ROADLESS AREAS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Conyac, Martin D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey concluded that the Homestead, Lake Fork and Lick Creek Roadless Area, Oregon offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the bedrock. Probable mineral-resource potential is assigned to the west and north parts of the Lake Fork Roadless Area, where gold resources may occur in glacial deposits and alluvium transported into this area from sources outside the roadless area to the west.

  12. Minnesota's Soils and Their Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Clifton

    There is an increasing need for land planning and understanding soil is one step toward assuring proper land use. This publication, written by soil scientists and teachers, is designed as a reference for high school teachers. It is designed to be a comprehensive collection about Minnesota soils (although the information can be applied to other…

  13. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  14. Students & Alcohol University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Parents: Students & Alcohol University of Minnesota Duluth Questions Before Your Student Leaves to have alcohol in your room or apartment? ·What will you do if your roommate is drinking and partying too overwhelmed? ·What can we do to help? Campus Resources E chug - informal on-line alcohol assessment. http

  15. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    to the extent of being incapable of causing detrimental harm to an employee's respiratory system. SCOPEpage 1 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA FACILITIES MANAGEMENT RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PROGRAM Effective controls and/or work practices to ensure that recognized occupational respiratory hazards are minimized

  16. Reoccurrence of caribou in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Nelson, M.E.; Drabik, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    At least two caribou (Rangifer tarandus) were observed in Cook Co. of northeastern Minnesota from October 1980 through April 1981. This is the first record of caribou in the area since 1924. The nearest records of this species were 224 km NE of the present sightings, and the closest known established population of caribou is 240 km away.

  17. GRAND CHALLENGES Grand Challenges: Behavior as

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    - ior and, in turn, behavior shapes the path of evolution. A Grand Challenge for animal behaviorGRAND CHALLENGES Grand Challenges: Behavior as a Key Component of Integrative Biology in a Human of Anthropology; ô Department of Neurobiology Physiology Behavior, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

  18. 78 FR 28012 - Tier One Environmental Impact Statement for the Rochester, Minnesota to Twin Cities, Minnesota...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ...the Rochester, Minnesota to Twin Cities, Minnesota Passenger Rail Corridor (the Corridor) in Olmsted, Dodge, Goodhue, Rice, Dakota, Ramsey, and Hennepin Counties in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). The...

  19. 76 FR 35009 - Draft Oil and Gas Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for Big South Fork National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...Plan/Environmental Impact Statement for Big South Fork National River and Recreation...Plan/ Environmental Impact Statement for Big South Fork National River and Recreation...statement (OGMP/DEIS) for the proposed Big South Fork National River and...

  20. Quartz Tuning Forks and Acoustic Phenomena: Application to Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rysti, J.; Tuoriniemi, J.

    2014-11-01

    Immersed mechanical resonators are well suited for probing the properties of fluids, since the surrounding environment influences the resonant characteristics of such oscillators in several ways. Quartz tuning forks have gained much popularity in recent years as the resonators of choice for studies of liquid helium. They have many superior properties when compared to other oscillating bodies conventionally used for this purpose, such as vibrating wires. However, the intricate geometry of a tuning fork represents a challenge for analyzing their behavior in a fluid environment—analytical approaches do not carry very far. In this article the characteristics of immersed quartz tuning fork resonators are studied by numerical simulations. We account for the compressibility of the medium, that is acoustic phenomena, and neglect viscosity, with the aim to realistically model the oscillator response in superfluid helium. The significance of different tuning fork shapes is studied. Acoustic emission in infinite medium and acoustic resonances in confined volumes are investigated. The results can aid in choosing a quartz tuning fork with suitable properties for experiments, as well as interpreting measured data.

  1. Adaptation Forestry in Minnesota's Northwoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornett, M.; White, M.; Etterson, J.; Kavajecz, L.; Mead, J.; Handler, S.; Swanston, C.; Hall, K.

    2014-12-01

    Forest restoration and management goals are shifting in northern Minnesota in light of new information on climate trends. Adaptation forestry encompasses a combination of practices designed to favor native populations and species likely to persist under warmer, drier conditions. The overarching project goal is to increase the adaptive capacity of northern forests such that they continue to sustain a variety of services, including carbon sequestration, fiber production, watershed protection, and wildlife habitat. We are currently testing the feasibility and efficacy of adaptation forestry in the northern Great Lakes region in three common forest types: Boreal-Mixed, Pine, and Hardwoods. 12 sites (2,000 acres total) recently subjected to a range of structural treatments (gap creation, shelterwood, and clear-cut with reserves) were coupled with "adaptation plantings" of species that are likely to thrive under changed climate conditions (e.g., red oak, bur oak, white pine). Seedlings, ~110,000 total, originated from two source locations, one that reflects current adaptation to the climate of northern Minnesota and another from a more southern source in central Minnesota. To date, we have assessed results from two growing seasons by tracking survival, growth and phenological characteristics of planted seedlings. This project is a first step in determining whether adaptation management can be used as a tool to help northern forests transition to an uncertain future. Cooperation with state, federal, and academic partners may ultimately influence the adaptive capacity across millions of acres in the Great Lakes region.

  2. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION...2012 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision...2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision...Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Wallowa Mountains Office, PO Box...

  3. 77 FR 55796 - Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project; Daniel Boone National Forest, KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Forest Service Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project; Daniel Boone National Forest, KY AGENCY... Sand Lick Fork Watershed Restoration Project involves activities to improve water quality and reduce... watersheds to ensure water quality supports designated beneficial uses. Residential and community...

  4. Metabolism of DNA secondary structures at the eukaryotic replication fork.

    PubMed

    León-Ortiz, Ana María; Svendsen, Jennifer; Boulton, Simon J

    2014-07-01

    DNA secondary structures are largely advantageous for numerous cellular processes but can pose specific threats to the progression of the replication machinery and therefore genome duplication and cell division. A number of specialized enzymes dismantle these structures to allow replication fork progression to proceed faithfully. In this review, we discuss the in vitro and in vivo data that has lead to the identification of these enzymes in eukaryotes, and the evidence that suggests that they act specifically at replication forks to resolve secondary structures. We focus on the role of helicases, which catalyze the dissociation of nucleotide complexes, and on the role of nucleases, which cleave secondary structures to allow replication fork progression at the expense of local rearrangements. Finally, we discuss outstanding questions in terms of dismantling DNA secondary structures, as well as the interplay between diverse enzymes that act upon specific types of structures. PMID:24815912

  5. A multi-fork z-axis quartz micromachined gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lihui; Zhao, Ke; Sun, Yunan; Cui, Jianmin; Cui, Fang; Yang, Aiying

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-fork z-axis gyroscope is presented in this paper. Different from traditional quartz gyroscopes, the lateral electrodes of the sense beam can be arranged in simple patterns; as a result, the fabrication is simplified. High sensitivity is achieved by the multi-fork design. The working principles are introduced, while the finite element method (FEM) is used to simulate the modal and sensitivity. A quartz fork is fabricated, and a prototype is assembled. Impedance testing shows that the drive frequency and sense frequency are similar to the simulations, and the quality factor is approximately 10,000 in air. The scale factor is measured to be 18.134 mV/(°/s) and the nonlinearity is 0.40% in a full-scale input range of ±250 °/s. PMID:24048339

  6. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ...South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY AGENCY: National Park...South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY...SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public notice is hereby...South Fork National Recreation Area, Tennessee and Kentucky,...

  7. Hydraulic geometry and sediment data for the South Fork Salmon River, Idaho, 1985-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Rhea P.; O'Dell, Ivalou; Megahan, Walter F.

    1989-01-01

    Hydraulic geometry, suspended-sediment, and bedload samples were collected at three sites in the upper reach of the South Fork Salmon River drainage basin from April 1985 to June 1986. Sites selected were South Fork Salmon River near Krassel Ranger Station, Buckhorn Creek, and North Fork Lick Creek. Results of the data collection are presented in this report.

  8. 76 FR 35909 - Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 36 CFR 51.24, public... National Park Service Temporary Concession Contract for Big South Fork National Recreation Area, TN/KY... contract for the conduct of certain visitor services within Big South Fork National Recreation...

  9. Far field diffraction of an optical vortex beam by a fork-shaped grating

    E-print Network

    Dreischuh, Alexander

    , generated by means of fork-shaped binary computer-generated hologram (CGH), after a second fork], as information carriers [3] for multiplexing in free-space communications [4], for inter- ferometry [5-generated holograms [11], spiral zone plates [12] as well as fork-shaped gratings [13­15]. Some of them, when build

  10. Fundamental limits to force detection using quartz tuning forks Robert D. Grober,a)

    E-print Network

    Morse, A. Stephen

    Fundamental limits to force detection using quartz tuning forks Robert D. Grober,a) Jason Acimovic of the use of quartz tuning forks as force detectors in scanned probe microscopy. It is demonstrated-5 I. INTRODUCTION It is well established that quartz tuning forks can be used as sensors for acoustic

  11. Fundamental limits to force detection using quartz tuning forks Robert D. Grober,a)

    E-print Network

    Hespanha, João Pedro

    PROOF COPY 029007RSI Fundamental limits to force detection using quartz tuning forks Robert D explores the fundamental limits of the use of quartz tuning forks as force detectors in scanned probe Institute of Physics. S0034-6748 00 02907-5 It is well established that quartz tuning forks can be used

  12. Impedance Measurements of the Big Blade and Fork Antennas on Ground Screens

    E-print Network

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    1 Impedance Measurements of the Big Blade and Fork Antennas on Ground Screens at the LWDA Site, 2007 Abstract In this report, we present impedance measurements performed on the big blade and fork to the LWDA site the week of May 14, 2007, impedance measurements were performed on the big blade and fork

  13. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  14. Governance System Overview University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Governance System Overview University of Minnesota The University of Minnesota has one of the strongest and most active shared governance systems among large research universities, with faculty governance playing a particularly prominent role and, in recent years, having a successful collaborative

  15. MINNESOTA AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES RESEARCH CENTER

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    in Minnesota by preventing spread, controlling populations, and managing ecosystems; and to advance knowledge CENTER STRATEGIC PLAN 2015 -- 2025 Reducing AIS risks by advancing research-based solutions November 4 research enterprise that advances the knowledge and builds the capacity that Minnesota needs in order

  16. [The Minnesota Story, American Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn. Task Force on Minority Cultures.

    This student booklet, one of a series of readings on minority cultures, contains nine Indian folktales. Stories included are: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land, about the way Minnesota was formed; How We Got the Rainbow; How the Birds Came to Have Their Many Colors; The Study of Coyote and Moradjawinga (Earth Wanderer); The Four Winds, A Sioux legend,…

  17. Degrees of Excellence: Higher Education in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Mark; Rubinstein, Mitchell; Pile, Deborah; Bergstrom, Todd; Walter, Amy

    Degrees of Excellence is a publication that examines the forces behind the rising cost of higher education, and discusses several policy proposals put forward in Minnesota and elsewhere to improve performance and accountability in higher education. Several factors that have converged to strain public higher education budgets in Minnesota include…

  18. University of Minnesota Physical Plant Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    In March 1988, the Office of the Legislative Auditor for the State of Minnesota conducted a program evaluation and financial audit of physical plant operations at the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus. The auditors examined the physical plant's management, financial, and personnel controls and the effectiveness and efficiency of…

  19. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Minnesota, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Minnesota for 2010. In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Minnesota showed mostly gains in reading at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. In math,…

  20. 50 CFR 32.42 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minnesota. 32.42 Section 32.42 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING Refuge-Specific Regulations for Hunting and Fishing § 32.42 Minnesota. The following refuge units...

  1. Process Assessment: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaconis, Athena; Estrera, Elc; Hafford, Carol; Hernandez, Marc; Markovitz, Carrie; Muyskens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  2. Outcome Evaluation: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program. Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  3. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    PubMed Central

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance; Neelsen, Kai J.; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Zhao, Xiaobei; Lees, Michael; Sandelin, Albin; Pasero, Philippe; Lopes, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA unloading is delayed in the absence of nucleosome assembly. We propose that coupling of fork speed and PCNA unloading to nucleosome assembly provides a simple mechanism to adjust DNA replication and maintain chromatin integrity during transient histone shortage. PMID:24379417

  4. Polymerase Dynamics at the Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork*

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    Polymerase Dynamics at the Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork* Published, JBC Papers in Press, October discusses recent insights in the roles of DNA po- lymerases (Pol) and in eukaryotic DNA replication. A grow polymerase during undisturbed DNA replication. New evidence supporting this model comes from the use

  5. The Fork in the Road: Histone Partitioning During DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Annunziato, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    In the following discussion the distribution of histones at the replication fork is examined, with specific attention paid to the question of H3/H4 tetramer "splitting." After a presentation of early experiments surrounding this topic, more recent contributions are detailed. The implications of these findings with respect to the transmission of histone modifications and epigenetic models are also addressed. PMID:26110314

  6. East Fork Salmon River Habitat Enhancement Project: Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund several measures designed to enhance spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous (migratory) fish in two tributaries of Idaho's East Fork Salmon River. The project also will provide offsite mitigation for anadromous fish losses resulting from Snake and Columbia River hydroelectric developments. The East Fork Salmon River project is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (1982). The primary reasons for the decline in fish populations in the East Fork Salmon River drainage are the downstream development of hydroelectric facilities, compounded with the loss of habitat within the East Fork drainage due to past and present agricultural/ranching and mining activities. Stream banks in the drainage show the effects of grazing, including erosion and damage to vegetation. An abandoned power dam and a debris jam prevent fish from reaching parts of the drainage. Unstable banks along a stream diversion (cutoff channel) at an inactive mine add sediments to the stream, some with tailings materials from the mine. 61 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Reconsidering DNA Polymerases at the Replication Fork in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of DNA polymerase activities at the eukaryotic DNA replication fork was “established,” but recent genetic studies in this issue of Molecular Cell raise questions about which polymerases are copying the leading and lagging strand templates (Johnson et al, 2015). PMID:26186286

  8. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A.; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L.; Downs, Jessica A.; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein–DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein–DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin. PMID:26240319

  9. BOD1L Is Required to Suppress Deleterious Resection of Stressed Replication Forks.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Martin R; Reynolds, John J; Winczura, Alicja; Blackford, Andrew N; Borel, Valérie; Miller, Edward S; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Ryan, Ellis L; Davies, Nicholas J; Stankovic, Tatjana; Boulton, Simon J; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech; Stewart, Grant S

    2015-08-01

    Recognition and repair of damaged replication forks are essential to maintain genome stability and are coordinated by the combined action of the Fanconi anemia and homologous recombination pathways. These pathways are vital to protect stalled replication forks from uncontrolled nucleolytic activity, which otherwise causes irreparable genomic damage. Here, we identify BOD1L as a component of this fork protection pathway, which safeguards genome stability after replication stress. Loss of BOD1L confers exquisite cellular sensitivity to replication stress and uncontrolled resection of damaged replication forks, due to a failure to stabilize RAD51 at these forks. Blocking DNA2-dependent resection, or downregulation of the helicases BLM and FBH1, suppresses both catastrophic fork processing and the accumulation of chromosomal damage in BOD1L-deficient cells. Thus, our work implicates BOD1L as a critical regulator of genome integrity that restrains nucleolytic degradation of damaged replication forks. PMID:26166705

  10. RFWD3-Dependent Ubiquitination of RPA Regulates Repair at Stalled Replication Forks.

    PubMed

    Elia, Andrew E H; Wang, David C; Willis, Nicholas A; Boardman, Alexander P; Hajdu, Ildiko; Adeyemi, Richard O; Lowry, Elizabeth; Gygi, Steven P; Scully, Ralph; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-10-15

    We have used quantitative proteomics to profile ubiquitination in the DNA damage response (DDR). We demonstrate that RPA, which functions as a protein scaffold in the replication stress response, is multiply ubiquitinated upon replication fork stalling. Ubiquitination of RPA occurs on chromatin, involves sites outside its DNA binding channel, does not cause proteasomal degradation, and increases under conditions of fork collapse, suggesting a role in repair at stalled forks. We demonstrate that the E3 ligase RFWD3 mediates RPA ubiquitination. RFWD3 is necessary for replication fork restart, normal repair kinetics during replication stress, and homologous recombination (HR) at stalled replication forks. Mutational analysis suggests that multisite ubiquitination of the entire RPA complex is responsible for repair at stalled forks. Multisite protein group sumoylation is known to promote HR in yeast. Our findings reveal a similar requirement for multisite protein group ubiquitination during HR at stalled forks in mammalian cells. PMID:26474068

  11. Oak Grove Fork Habitat Improvement Project, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bettin, Scott

    1989-04-01

    The Lower Oak Grove Fork of the Clackamas River is a fifth-order tributary of the Clackamas River drainage supporting depressed runs of coho and chinook salmon, and summer and winter steelhead. Habitat condition rating for the Lower Oak Grove is good, but smelt production estimates are below the average for Clackamas River tributaries. Limiting factors in the 3.8 miles of the Lower Oak Grove supporting anadromous fish include an overall lack of quality spawning and rearing habitat. Beginning in 1986. measures to improve fish habitat in the Lower Oak Grove were developed in coordination with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODF&W) and Portland General Electric (PGE) fisheries biologists. Prior to 1986, no measures had been applied to the stream to mitigate for PGE's storage and regulation of flows in the Oak Grove Fork (Timothy Lake, Harriet Lake). Catchable rainbow trout are stocked by ODF&W two or three times a year during the trout fishing season in the lowermost portion of the Oak Grove Fork near two Forest Service campgrounds (Ripplebrook and Rainbow). The 1987 field season marked the third year of efforts to improve fish habitat of the Lower Oak Grove Fork and restore anadromous fish production. The efforts included the development of an implementation plan for habitat improvement activities in the Lower Oak Grove Fork. post-project monitoring. and maintenance of the 1986 improvement structures. No new structures were constructed or placed in 1987. Fiscal year 1988 brought a multitude of changes which delayed implementation of plans developed in 1987. The most prominent change was the withdrawal of the proposed Spotted Owl Habitat Area (SOHA) which overlapped the Oak Grove project implementation area. Another was the change in the Forest Service biologist responsible for implementation and design of this project.

  12. HOWARD FORK ACID ROCK DRAINAGE SOURCE INTERCEPTION STUDY; HOWARD FORK OF THE SAN MIGUEL RIVER NEAR OPHIR, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project proposes to analyze regional hydrogeology as it relates to mine workings which discharge significant heavy metals into the Howard Fork of the San Miguel River and recommend strategies to intercept and divert water away from mineralized zones. The study also includes...

  13. Pertussis Outbreak, Southeastern Minnesota, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Theofiles, Alexander G.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R.; Quest, Daniel J.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe clinical and laboratory findings from the 2012 southeastern Minnesota pertussis outbreak. Patients and Methods Patients were selected for 2 parts of the study. In the first part, nasopharyngeal swabs from a convenience sample of 265 unique patients were used for both the clinician-requested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and culture. B pertussis isolates were tested for macrolide susceptibility and typed using whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Pertactin gene sequences were analyzed to identify pertactin-deficient B pertussis. In the second part, all patients seen at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, who had PCR results positive for Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2012, were analyzed for patient demographic features and vaccination records. Results One hundred sixty patients had results positive for B pertussis, and 21 patients had results positive for B parapertussis. Among the 265 swabs cultured, B pertussis was detected by both culture and PCR in 11. One swab was positive for B pertussis by culture alone, and 13 were positive by PCR alone. Polymerase chain reaction detected B pertussis more frequently than did culture (P=.001). No macrolide resistance was detected. All 12 isolates tested had an altered pertactin gene, including 9 with a signal sequence deletion, 2 with insertion sequence disruptions, and 1 with a premature stop codon. Nine and 3 isolates were pertactin types prn1 and prn2, respectively. Whole genome sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis detected the presence of multiple B pertussis strains. The mean age of patients with pertussis was younger than that of those without pertussis (15.6 and 25.5 years, respectively; P=.002). Compared with those whose test results were negative for B pertussis, fewer patients with positive results had received whole-cell pertussis vaccine (P=.02). In the subgroup who had received acellular vaccine exclusively, the time since the most recent pertussis vaccination in those with results positive for B pertussis was longer than that in those with negative results (1363 vs 1010 days; P=.004). Conclusion The 2012 pertussis outbreak in southeastern Minnesota included multiple strains of B pertussis, all putatively lacking pertactin. Our findings may indicate decreased efficacy of (and waning immunity from) acellular vaccines as contributors to the outbreak. PMID:25282430

  14. A description of the hydrologic system and the effects of coal mining on water quality in the East Fork Little Chariton River and the alluvial aquifer between Macon and Huntsville, north-central Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The quality of surface and groundwater has been affected by abandoned strip mines and by abandoned underground mines in a 110-sq mi subbasin of the East Fork Little Chariton River. More than 14% of the area was strip mined for coal before 1979. The hydrologic system in the area was investigated and the effects of coal mining on quality of water in the river and alluvial aquifer were analyzed, with major emphasis on defining strip-mining effects. The groundwater gradient was from glacial drift or coal spring to alluvium to the East Fork Little Chariton River, and was greatest in spring and least in fall. Seepage from alluvium to the East Fork Little Chariton River occurs throughout the year, except during drought conditions when the only river flow is water released from Long Branch Lake. In the East Fork Little Chariton River median dissolved-solids concentrations increased from 153 mg/L near Macon to 630 mg/L near Huntsville and median sulfate concentrations increased from 36 mg/L near Macon to 360 mg/L near Huntsville. The median dissolved-solids concentration in water from the alluvium increased from 408 mg/L upstream from the strip mines to 641 mg/L near the mines and median dissolved-sulfate concentration increased from 140 to 350 mg/L. The sulfate-to-chloride ratio, used as the most sensitive indicator of strip-mining effects, increased markedly downstream in the East Fork Little Chariton River and nearby Middle Fork Little Chariton River, which also is affected by strip mining. There were no significant increases in sulfate-to-chloride ratio and dissolved-solids concentrations in comparable nearby subbasins of the Grand, Thompson, and Chariton Rivers where there was no mining. (Author 's abstract)

  15. 75 FR 39994 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00026

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ...Public Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA- 1921-DR), dated 07/02/2010. INCIDENT: Severe Storms, Tornadoes, and Flooding. INCIDENT PERIOD: 06/17/2010 through 06/26/2010. EFFECTIVE DATE: 07/02/2010. PHYSICAL...

  16. 76 FR 41552 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00031

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 07/07/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 05/21/2011 through 05/22/2011. Effective Date: 07/07/2011. Physical Loan...

  17. AGROFORESTRY IN MINNESOTA FACTSHEET SERIES #2

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    to poacher #12;CROPS FROM THE MINNESOTA FOREST Fruit Medicinal Herbs Nuts Woody Florals Other Products in forest grown mushrooms and Specialty herbs. Herbal Turtle currently cultivates Shiitake, Winecap

  18. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY

    E-print Network

    Li, Fang

    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY COURSE OFFERING Spring Semester 2014 Phcl4003 of pharmacology minor program. Course Co-directors/Co-instructors: Hiroshi Hiasa, hiasa001@umn.edu, 612

  19. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA BOARD OF REGENTS POLICY

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    by the Constitution of the State of Minnesota, is the governing body of the University planning documents, including: · University Plan, Performance, and Accountability Report -- The University Plan, Performance, and Accountability Report (Plan

  20. 40 CFR 81.415 - Minnesota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Visibility Is an Important Value § 81.415 Minnesota. Area name Acreage Public Law establishing Federal land manager Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wild 747,840 99-577 USDA-FS Voyageurs NP 114,964 99-261...

  1. Optimal information provision for maximizing flow in a forked lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takeaki; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2015-06-01

    In a forked road, the provision of inappropriate information to car drivers sometimes leads to undesirable situations such as one-sided congestion, which is called the hunting phenomenon in real traffic. To address such problems, we propose a forked exclusion model and investigate the behavior of traffic flow in two routes, providing various types of information to a limited number of traveling particles according to the share rate of information. To analytically understand the phenomena, we develop a coarse-grained representation of the model. By analyzing the model, we find the most effective types of information to minimize particles' travel time and the existence of an optimal share rate according to route conditions.

  2. Tuning fork microgyrometers: Narrow gap vs. wide gap design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, L.; Pierro, E.; Carbone, G.; Contursi, T.

    2009-04-01

    We analyse the performances of two different configurations of a tuning fork microgyrometer, the so called 'wide gap' design and 'narrow gap' design. In the former case the air gap between the vibrating forks and the walls of the surrounding frame is so large that the air flow around each fork is not influenced by the presence of the frame itself. This geometrical configuration results in a very low air damping, and, hence, allows the instrument to operate at atmospheric pressure. In the case of 'narrow gap' design the distance between the forks and the frame walls is instead very small. As a consequence, the instrument needs to operate under very low pressure conditions, since, at higher pressures, the presence of a thin layer of air would increase the air damping to very large values, and would not allow the correct operation of the instrument. Although the requirement of low pressure conditions represents a drawback of the narrow gap solution, we show that this instrument configuration, when compared to the wide gap design, allows to achieve a significantly smaller dynamic error and a significantly wider range of linearity. Indeed the thickness of the air gap represents an additional parameter that can be adjusted by the designer to optimise the performances of the instrument. An accurate analytical model of the sensor is presented in the paper, which constitutes a helpful designing tool for this kind of device. In particular we focus the attention on the two tines of the drive mode, which are indeed the structural components that more than others influence the instrument performances. We show that the optimal design of these fundamental elements can be obtained by neglecting the interaction with the remaining part of the sensor structure, and show how to design the instrument to minimise the amplitude error. The influence of air damping, structural damping and geometry on the system response in terms of bandwidth and dynamic error is also investigated.

  3. Presenting Feedback on the Minnesota Importance Questionnaire and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Janny M.; Blain, Michelle D.

    1992-01-01

    Describes visual method for condensing and presenting feedback to career counseling clients on their vocational needs and satisfaction as assessed by Minnesota Importance Questionnaire paired form and long-form Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. Describes instruments and their place in career counseling and illustrates use of satisfaction x…

  4. Replication forks are associated with the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, J P; Dijkwel, P A; Mullenders, L H; Hamlin, J L

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that DNA in eukaryotic cells is synthesized via replication complexes that are fixed to a proteinaceous nuclear matrix. This model has not been universally accepted because the matrix and its associated DNA are usually prepared under hypertonic conditions that could facilitate non-specific aggregation of macromolecules. We therefore investigated whether different ionic conditions can significantly affect the association of nascent DNA with the nuclear matrix in cultured mammalian cells. Matrices were prepared either by a high salt method or by hypotonic or isotonic LIS extraction. Chromosomal DNA was subsequently removed by digestion with either DNAse I or EcoRI. With all methods of preparation, we found that newly synthesized DNA preferentially partitioned with the nuclear matrix. Furthermore, when the matrix-attached DNA fraction was analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we found that it was markedly enriched for replication forks. We therefore conclude that attachment of DNA to the matrix in the vicinity of replication forks is not induced by conditions of high ionic strength, and that replication may, indeed, occur on or near the skeletal framework provided by the nuclear matrix. From a practical standpoint, our findings suggest a strategy for greatly increasing the sensitivity of two important new gel electrophoretic methods for the direct mapping of replication fork movement through defined chromosomal domains in mammalian cells. Images PMID:2336385

  5. Polymerase ? replicates both strands after homologous recombination-dependent fork restart.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Izumi; Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Keszthelyi, Andrea; Daigaku, Yasukazu; Skouteri, Meliti; Mohebi, Saed; Kunkel, Thomas A; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M

    2015-11-01

    To maintain genetic stability, DNA must be replicated only once per cell cycle, and replication must be completed even when individual replication forks are inactivated. Because fork inactivation is common, passive convergence of an adjacent fork is insufficient to rescue all inactive forks. Thus, eukaryotic cells have evolved homologous recombination-dependent mechanisms to restart persistent inactive forks. Completing DNA synthesis via homologous recombination-restarted replication (HoRReR) ensures cell survival, but at a cost. One such cost is increased mutagenesis because HoRReR is more error prone than canonical replication. This increased error rate implies the HoRReR mechanism is distinct from that of a canonical fork. Here we demonstrate, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, that a DNA sequence duplicated by HoRReR during S phase is replicated semiconservatively, but both the leading and lagging strands are synthesized by DNA polymerase ?. PMID:26436826

  6. Human RECQ1 promotes restart of replication forks reversed by DNA topoisomerase I inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Matteo; Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Kenig, Sasa; Vujanovic, Marko; Odreman, Federico; Glatter, Timo; Graziano, Simona; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Marino, Francesca; Lucic, Bojana; Biasin, Valentina; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Sidorova, Julia M.; Monnat, Raymond J.; Lopes, Massimo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitors are an important class of anticancer drugs. The cytotoxicity of TOP1 inhibitors can be modulated by replication fork reversal, in a process that requires PARP activity. Whether regressed forks can efficiently restart and the factors required to restart fork progression after fork reversal are still unknown. Here we combined biochemical and electron microscopy approaches with single-molecule DNA fiber analysis, to identify a key role for human RECQ1 helicase in replication fork restart after TOP1 inhibition, not shared by other human RecQ proteins. We show that the poly(ADPribosyl)ation activity of PARP1 stabilizes forks in their regressed state by limiting their restart by RECQ1. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into the roles of RECQ1 and PARP in DNA replication and offer molecular perspectives to potentiate chemotherapeutic regimens based on TOP1 inhibition. PMID:23396353

  7. DNA2 drives processing and restart of reversed replication forks in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Berti, Matteo; Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Vujanovic, Marko; Zellweger, Ralph; Moore, Hayley; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Cejka, Petr; Stewart, Sheila; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate processing of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks is paramount to genomic integrity and recent work points to replication fork reversal and restart as a central mechanism to ensuring high-fidelity DNA replication. Here, we identify a novel DNA2- and WRN-dependent mechanism of reversed replication fork processing and restart after prolonged genotoxic stress. The human DNA2 nuclease and WRN ATPase activities functionally interact to degrade reversed replication forks with a 5?-to-3? polarity and promote replication restart, thus preventing aberrant processing of unresolved replication intermediates. Unexpectedly, EXO1, MRE11, and CtIP are not involved in the same mechanism of reversed fork processing, whereas human RECQ1 limits DNA2 activity by preventing extensive nascent strand degradation. RAD51 depletion antagonizes this mechanism, presumably by preventing reversed fork formation. These studies define a new mechanism for maintaining genome integrity tightly controlled by specific nucleolytic activities and central homologous recombination factors. PMID:25733713

  8. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  9. Regression of Replication Forks Stalled by Leading-strand Template Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sankalp; Yeeles, Joseph T. P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The orderly progression of replication forks formed at the origin of replication in Escherichia coli is challenged by encounters with template damage, slow moving RNA polymerases, and frozen DNA-protein complexes that stall the fork. These stalled forks are foci for genomic instability and must be reactivated. Many models of replication fork reactivation invoke nascent strand regression as an intermediate in the processing of the stalled fork. We have investigated the replication fork regression activity of RecG and RuvAB, two proteins commonly thought to be involved in the process, using a reconstituted DNA replication system where the replisome is stalled by collision with leading-strand template damage. We find that both RecG and RuvAB can regress the stalled fork in the presence of the replisome and SSB; however, RuvAB generates a completely unwound product consisting of the paired nascent leading and lagging strands, whereas RuvC cleaves the Holliday junction generated by RecG-catalyzed fork regression. We also find that RecG stimulates RuvAB-catalyzed regression, presumably because it is more efficient at generating the initial Holliday junction from the stalled fork. PMID:25138216

  10. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-11-16

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  11. Interior Invests $286,000 in Minnesota Valley NWR

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Secretary Salazar (center) poses with youth employees and staff at Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Much of the labor performed on the recovery projects at the refuge is done by youth in the Minnesota Conservation Corps....

  12. Methane production in Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.; Crawford, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Rates of methane production in Minnesota peats were studied. Surface (10- to 25-cm) peats produced an average of 228 nmol of CH/sub 4/ per g (dry weight) per h at 25/sup 0/C and ambient pH. Methanogenesis rates generally decreased with depth in ombrotrophic peats, but on occasion were observed to rise within deeper layers of certain fen peats. Methane production was temperature dependent, increasing with increasing temperature (4 to 30/sup 0/C), except in peats from deeper layers. Maximal methanogenesis from these deeper regions occurred at 12/sup 0/C. Methane production rates were also pH dependent. Two peats with pHs of 3.8 and 4.3 had an optimum rate of methane production at pH 6.0. The addition to peat of glucose and H/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/ stimulated methanogenesis, whereas the addition of acetate inhibited methanogenesis. Cysteine-sulfide, nitrogen-phosphorus-trace metals, and vitamins-yeast extract affected methane production very little. Various gases were found to be trapped or dissolved (or both) within peatland waters. Dissolved methane increased linearly to a depth of 210 cm. The accumulation of metabolic end products produced within peat bogs appears to be an important mechanism limiting turnover in peatland environments.

  13. Decomposition in northern Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Farrish, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Decomposition in peatlands was investigated in northern Minnesota. Four sites, an ombrotrophic raised bog, an ombrotrophic perched bog and two groundwater minerotrophic fens, were studied. Decomposition rates of peat and paper were estimated using mass-loss techniques. Environmental and substrate factors that were most likely to be responsible for limiting decomposition were monitored. Laboratory incubation experiments complemented the field work. Mass-loss over one year in one of the bogs, ranged from 11 percent in the upper 10 cm of hummocks to 1 percent at 60 to 100 cm depth in hollows. Regression analysis of the data for that bog predicted no mass-loss below 87 cm. Decomposition estimates on an area basis were 2720 and 6460 km/ha yr for the two bogs; 17,000 and 5900 kg/ha yr for the two fens. Environmental factors found to limit decomposition in these peatlands were reducing/anaerobic conditions below the water table and cool peat temperatures. Substrate factors found to limit decomposition were low pH, high content of resistant organics such as lignin, and shortages of available N and K. Greater groundwater influence was found to favor decomposition through raising the pH and perhaps by introducing limited amounts of dissolved oxygen.

  14. Methane flux from Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crill, P.M.; Bartlett, K.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Gorham, E.; Verry, E.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Northern (> 40 deg N) wetlands have been suggested as the largest natural source of methane (CH{sub 4}) to the troposphere. To refine the authors estimates of source strengths from this region and to investigate climatic controls on the process, fluxes were measured from a variety of Minnesota peatlands during May, June, and August 1986. Late spring and summer fluxes ranged from 11 to 866 mg CH{sub 4}/sq/m/day, averaging 207 mg CH{sub 4} sq/m/day overall. At Marcell Forest, forested bogs and fen sites had lower fluxes than open bogs. In the Red Lake peatland, circumneutral fens, with standing water above the peat surface, produced more methane than acid bog sites in which the water table was beneath the moss surface. Peat temperature was an important control. Methane flux increased in response to increasing soil temperature. It is estimated that the methane flux from all peatlands north of 40 deg may be on the order of 70 to 90 Tg/yr though estimates of this sort are plagued by uncertainties in the areal extent of peatlands, length of the CH{sub 4} producing season, and the spatial and temporal variability of the flux. 60 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Floods in Canada and Northern Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During the first half of June, heavy rains inundated northern Minnesota and southern Canada, giving rise to floods that drove hundreds of people from their homes and drenched more than 300,000 acres of prime farmland. This false-color image of the flood (right) was acquired on June 15, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The worst of the flooding occurred on the border of Canada and Minnesota along the Roseau River, which now resembles a lake in the center of the image. The town of Roseau, Minnesota, which sits in the eastern end of the newly formed lake, was hit the hardest. Nearly all the buildings in the town took heavy water damage and many residents were forced to leave. Widespread flooding across an eight county region in Minnesota has drenched nearly 300,000 to 500,000 acres of farmland altogether. Many of the farmers hit lost 100 percent of their crops and will be unable to plant again for the season. Last week, President Bush declared northern Minnesota a disaster area. Normally, the Roseau River cannot even be seen on a MODIS image (left, acquired May 21, 2002), and the surrounding area is dry. In the false-color images, sage green, rusty orange, and blue is land, and water is black. Clouds are white and pink. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. Image grand tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegman, Edward J.; Poston, Wendy L.; Solka, Jeffrey L.

    1998-09-01

    The image grand tour is a method for visualizing multispectral or multiple registered images. In many settings, several registered images of the same scene are collected. This most often happens when multispectral images are collected, but may happen in other settings as well. A multispectral image can be viewed as an image in which each pixel has a multivariate vector attached. The desired goal is to combine the multivariate vector into a single value which may be rendered in gray scale as an image. One way of exploring multivariate data has been by means of the grand tour. The grand tour in a conventional sense is a continuous space-filling path through the set of two-dimensional planes. Data is then projected into the two-planes. Traditionally the data analyst views the grand tour until an interesting configuration of the data is viewed. In our image grand tour, the grand tour is a continuous space filling path through the set of one-planes, i.e. lines. The idea of the image grand tour is then to project the vector attached to each pixel into the one-dimensional space and render each as a gray-scale value. Thus we obtain a continuously changing gray scale image of the multispectral scene. As with conventional data analysis, we watch the scene until an interesting configuration of the image is seen. In this talk we will discuss some of the theory associated with one-dimensional grand tours. We illustrate this talk with multispectral (six bands) images of minefield, and illustrate how the grand tour can create linear combinations of the multispectral images which specifically highlight mines in a minefield.

  17. University of Minnesota Video Surveillance (CCTV) and Card Access (CA)

    E-print Network

    University of Minnesota Video Surveillance (CCTV) and Card Access (CA) Monitoring, Recording regarding the use of CCTV/Card Access on the University of Minnesota campuses. CCTV/Card Access is used of Minnesota affiliated campuses and centers state-wide in the use of CCTV/Card Access monitoring and recording

  18. Minnesota Measures: 2007 Report on Higher Education Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Office of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, Governor Tim Pawlenty and the Minnesota Legislature charged the Minnesota Office of Higher Education with developing an accountability system to measure the higher education sector's effectiveness in meeting state goals. Minnesota's leaders recognized that the knowledge, creativity and intellectual capacity of the state's people are the…

  19. Recommended Best Practices for Mold Investigations in Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    The Minnesota Department of Health developed this guidance at the request of the Minnesota Department of Children, Families and Learning. The goal of the document is to assist school district staff of Minnesota public schools in responding to problems related to indoor mold. Its focus is on practical, cost-effective methods to identify indoor mold…

  20. Minnesota Early Childhood Initiative: Building Nurturing Communities of Thriving Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Richard; Moore, Christopher; Curry, Rasheeda

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify model strategies used by the Minnesota Early Childhood Initiative to improve the well-being of young children. The Minnesota Early Childhood Initiative is comprised of coalitions of individuals and organizations in over 165 greater Minnesota communities. These coalitions have implemented more than 400…

  1. 76 FR 50171 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Henrys Fork Salinity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...Impact Statement for the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan, Sweetwater and...Statement (EIS) for the Henrys Fork Salinity Control Project Plan (SCPP). The NRCS...Improvements'' alternative assumes a salinity control project will be...

  2. Quartz Tuning Fork: Thermometer, Pressure- and Viscometer for Helium Liquids

    E-print Network

    R. Blaauwgeers; M. Blazkova; M. Clovecko; V. B. Eltsov; R. de Graaf; J. Hosio; M. Krusius; D. Schmoranzer; W. Schoepe; L. Skrbek; P. Skyba; R. E. Solntsev; D. E. Zmeev

    2006-08-17

    Commercial quartz oscillators of the tuning-fork type with a resonant frequency of ~32 kHz have been investigated in helium liquids. The oscillators are found to have at best Q values in the range 10^5-10^6, when measured in vacuum below 1.5 K. However, the variability is large and for very low temperature operation the sensor has to be preselected. We explore their properties in the regime of linear viscous hydrodynamic response in normal and superfluid 3He and 4He, by comparing measurements to the hydrodynamic model of the sensor.

  3. Burnup measurements with the Los Alamos fork detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bosler, G.E.; Rinard, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    The fork detector system can determine the burnup of spent-fuel assemblies. It is a transportable instrument that can be mounted permanently in a spent-fuel pond near a loading area for shipping casks, or be attached to the storage pond bridge for measurements on partially raised spent-fuel assemblies. The accuracy of the predicted burnup has been demonstrated to be as good as 2% from measurements on assemblies in the United States and other countries. Instruments have also been developed at other facilities throughout the world using the same or different techniques, but with similar accuracies. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Pollen sequence at Kirchner Marsh, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    1962-01-01

    A pollen diagram from Kirchner Marsh, southeastern Minnesota, records a continuous vegetation sequence from the time of Late Wisconsin ice retreat from the region. The late-glacial and early postglacial portions of the diagram are correlated with a radiocarbon-dated diagram from Madelia, Minnesota. Both diagrams show a series of maxima of pollen types in the early postglacial that suggest a significant climatic change at that time. The Kirchner diagram, in addition, shows high percentages of nonarboreal pollen later in the postglacial that indicate an advance of prairie elements into the area between 7200 and 5000 years ago.

  5. 76 FR 46721 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem Restoration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem... prepare an environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: The North Fork Ranger District, Salmon-Challis..., ID 83466. Comments may also be sent via e-mail to...

  6. EVALUATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT IN THE CLARK FORK-PEND OREILLE WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    (1) Analyze the nutrient concentration and algal standing crop trend in the Clark Fork River portion of the watershed; (2) Provide a web-based data access system for reporting Clark Fork River monitoring information; and (3) Evaluate the effectiveness of current nutrient reductio...

  7. STREAM CHANNEL SEDIMENT CONDITIONS IN THE SOUTH FORK SALMON RIVER, IDAHO, PROGRESS REPORT IV, JUNE 1974

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the South Fork Salmon River (17060208) studies is to determine the condition of the aquatic environment and provide measures needed to maintain or enhance this environment. Prior to 1965, the South Fork Salmon River steadily degraded in quality, due to acceleratio...

  8. On the sound field radiated by a tuning fork Daniel A. Russell

    E-print Network

    Russell, Daniel A.

    On the sound field radiated by a tuning fork Daniel A. Russell Science and Mathematics Department, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 Received 14 June 1999; accepted 25 April 2000 When a sounding. © 2000 American Association of Physics Teachers. I. INTRODUCTION If one rotates a sounding tuning fork

  9. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. 208...REGULATIONS § 208.26 Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. The...agent, shall operate the Altus Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood control as...

  10. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. 208...REGULATIONS § 208.26 Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. The...agent, shall operate the Altus Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood control as...

  11. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. 208...REGULATIONS § 208.26 Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. The...agent, shall operate the Altus Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood control as...

  12. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. 208...REGULATIONS § 208.26 Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. The...agent, shall operate the Altus Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood control as...

  13. 33 CFR 208.26 - Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. 208...REGULATIONS § 208.26 Altus Dam and Reservoir, North Fork Red River, Okla. The...agent, shall operate the Altus Dam and Reservoir in the interest of flood control as...

  14. Multi-Degree of Freedom Tuning Fork Gyroscope Demonstrating Shock Rejection

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    Multi-Degree of Freedom Tuning Fork Gyroscope Demonstrating Shock Rejection Adam R. Schofield}@uci.edu Abstract-- This paper presents a z-axis MEMS tuning fork rate gyroscope with multi-degree of freedom (DOF in amplitude versus a single output. I. INTRODUCTION For many applications, gyroscopes are subject to a wide

  15. Low-temperature high-resolution magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning fork

    E-print Network

    Chandrasekhar, Venkat

    heat dissipation. Using a tuning fork as a force transducer in a MFM overcomes many of the drawbacksLow-temperature high-resolution magnetic force microscopy using a quartz tuning fork Yongho Seo August 2005 We have developed a low-temperature high resolution magnetic force microscope MFM using

  16. 76 FR 46721 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem Restoration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...The North Fork Ranger District, Salmon-Challis National Forest, is proposing an integrated hazardous fuels and forest restoration project in the Upper North Fork drainage. The approximately 41,000 acre planning area is being considered for treatments consisting primarily of prescribed burning and mechanical thinning. The drainage area includes the communities of Moose Creek Estates, Royal Elk......

  17. 77 FR 39675 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker County, OR; North Fork Burnt River Mining

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... River Mining AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Correction--Notice of intent to prepare a supplement... changed to the Whitman District Ranger. This 2012 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision will replace and supercede the 2004 North Fork Burnt River Mining Record of Decision only where necessary...

  18. First report of anther smut caused by Microbotryum violaceum on forked catchfly in Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forked catchfly (Silene dichotoma Ehrh.), family Caryophyllaceae, is a common and native plant in rangelands and pastures in Turkey. It is also an introduced plant that is widely distributed in North America. In May, 2007 about 20 forked catchfly plants on the campus of Ondokuz Mayis University, i...

  19. Time of travel of solutes in the East Fork Trinity River, November 1975; and Elm Fork Trinity River, December 1975; Trinity River Basin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Dennis R.; Slade, R.M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In Texas, the time of travel of solutes in the East Fork Trinity River and the Elm Fork Trinity River was determined in 1975 by injecting a fluorescent dye (Rhodamine WT, 20-percent solution) that could be detected by fluorometric analysis of water samples collected at selected downstream sites. Plots of dye concentration versus time were made for each injection and sampling site. The graphs were then used to determine arrival times of the leading edge, the peak, and the trailing edge of the dye cloud. The study in November 1975 was conducted on the East Fork Trinity River from just below the Rockwall-Forney Dam at Lake Ray Hubbard to the confluence with the Trinity River, a distance of 27.0 miles. The study in December 1975 was conducted on the Elm Fork Trinity River from just below the dam at Lewisville Lake to the Spur 482 crossing, a distance of 25.7 miles. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. 77 FR 66865 - Record of Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ...Decision for the Oil and Gas Management Plan, Big South Fork National River and Recreation...Oil and Gas Management Plan (Plan) for Big South Fork National River and Recreation...plan will guide oil and gas management in Big South Fork National River and...

  1. ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1

    E-print Network

    ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO, a tributary of the upper South Fork Eel River, are bounded by two frequencies of periodic flooding. The upper, Williams 1978). On the tributaries of the upper South Fork Eel River, in Mendocino County, Cal- ifornia

  2. HIGH PERFORMANCE MATCHED-MODE TUNING FORK GYROSCOPE M.F. Zaman, A. Sharma, and F. Ayazi

    E-print Network

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    HIGH PERFORMANCE MATCHED-MODE TUNING FORK GYROSCOPE M.F. Zaman, A. Sharma, and F. Ayazi Integrated the perfect matched-mode operation of a type I non-degenerate z-axis tuning-fork gyroscope (i.e., 0 Hz frequency split between high-Q drive and sense modes). The matched-mode tuning fork gyroscope (M2 -TFG

  3. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 89, 214503 (2014) Stability of flow and the transition to turbulence around a quartz tuning fork

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Mark

    2014-01-01

    a quartz tuning fork in superfluid 4 He at very low temperatures D. I. Bradley, M. J. Fear, S. N. Fisher, A the transition between pure potential flow and turbulent flow around a quartz tuning fork resonator in superfluid describe experiments using commercially available miniature quartz tuning forks [17] to study

  4. Low temperature electrostatic force microscopy of a deep two-dimensional electron gas using a quartz tuning fork

    E-print Network

    Grütter, Peter

    a quartz tuning fork J. A. Hedberg,1,a A. Lal,1 Y. Miyahara,1 P. Grütter,1 G. Gervais,1 M. Hilke,1 L of the oscillator. We present measurements using a quartz tuning fork oscillator and a 2DEG with a cleaved edge overgrowth structure. The sensitivity of the quartz tuning fork as force sensor is demonstrated

  5. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line beginning at...

  6. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line beginning at...

  7. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line beginning at...

  8. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line beginning at...

  9. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River...the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line beginning at...

  10. Environment of deposition of Clear Fork Formation: Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    The Clear Fork Formation is Permian (Leonardian) in age and constitutes a major oil-bearing unit in the Permian basin of west Texas. In Yoakum County, west Texas, the upper Clear Fork carbonates record a subtidal upward-shoaling sequence of deposition. A small bryozoan-algal patch reef is situated within these carbonates near the southern edge of the North Basin platform. The reef is completely dolomitized, but paramorphic replacement has facilitated a study of the paleoecology, lateral variations, and community succession within this buildup. Build-ups of this type are scarcely known in strata of Permian age. The reef was apparently founded on a coquina horizon at the base of the buildup. The reef apparently had a low-relief, dome-shaped morphology. The trapping and binding of sediment by bryozoa appear to have been the main constructional process. A significant role was also played by encrusting forams and the early precipitation of submarine cements, both of which added rigidity to the structure. The reef also contains a low-diversity community of other invertebrates. Algal constituents predominate at the basinward edge of the buildup. The reef was formed entirely subaqueously on a broad, relatively shallow tropical marine carbonate shelf environment. An understanding of the lithofacies distribution and paragenesis within this sequence will provide information on porosity variations and the nature and distribution of permeability barriers. Such information is useful in reservoir modeling studies and for secondary recovery techniques in shelf-edge carbonate reservoirs of this type.

  11. Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    Fine sediment in spawning substrate has a major effect on salmon survival from egg to smolt. Basin-wide restoration plans have established targets for fine sediment levels in spawning habitat. The project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Fork John Day (NFJDR) and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years. The project is also investigating the potential relationship between surface fine levels and overwinter sedimentation. It will provide data to assess trends in substrate conditions in monitored reaches and whether trends are consistent with efforts to improve salmon habitat conditions. The data on the magnitude of overwinter sedimentation will also be used to estimate salmon survival from egg to emergence. In Sept. 1998, 1999, and Aug. 2000, sites for monitoring overwinter sedimentation were established in salmon spawning habitat in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek (a Grande Ronde tributary), the North Fork John Day River (NFJDR), and Granite Creek (a NFJDR tributary). Surface fine sediment levels were measured in these reaches via the grid method and visually estimated to test the relative accuracy of these two methods. In 1999 and 2000, surface fine sediment was also estimated via pebble counts at selected reaches to allow comparison of results among the methods. Overwintering substrate samples were collected in April 1999 and April-May 2000 to estimate the amount of overwinter sedimentation in clean gravels in spawning habitat. Monitoring methods and locations are described.

  12. 76 FR 47286 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00033

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...Assistance Only for the State of Minnesota (FEMA- 4009-DR), dated 07/28/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Flooding, and Tornadoes. Incident Period: 07/01/2011 through 07/11/2011. Effective Date: 07/28/2011. Physical Loan Application...

  13. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DULUTH Veterans Enrollment Certificate

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA DULUTH Veterans Enrollment Certificate Directions Check all boxes throughout the year. Your Social Security number is required to enter you into the Department of Veterans signature(s) in blue or black ink. Return this form on campus to: Veterans Resource Center 60 Solon Campus

  14. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA PRESS 2013 Digital State

    E-print Network

    Sobelman, Gerald E.

    Thomas J. Misa Charles Babbage Institute University of Minnesota www.cbi.umn.edu #12;Topics today 1.Mn oral histories ·150,000 photos ·"1 mile" of paper records ·4 staff + students ·www.cbi.umn.edu Charles Babbage (1791-1871) #12;What to see today? tinyurl.com/sia-misa ! #12;Univac West 7th/Shepard Rd (1956

  15. University of Minnesota Crookston Registration Queue

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    the new registration system. Tools for how to navigate through the new system are forthcoming. PleaseUniversity of Minnesota Crookston Registration Queue Summer Session and Fall Semester 2015 Students non-degree students April 24 ONLINE COURSE REGISTRATION PRIORITY Online degree-seeking students who

  16. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, Anne D., Ed.

    This book is a collection of six papers presented at a 1974 University of Minnesota symposium on child development. The six chapters deal with language acquisition, visual perception, effects of television viewing, the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), problem-solving strategies, and Piagetian concepts related to social development. The first…

  17. 77 FR 51101 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Minnesota dated 08/16/2012. Incident: Severe storms and flooding. Incident Period: 06/14/2012 through 06/21/2012. Effective Date: 08/16/2012. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/15/2012. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date:...

  18. Troubled Waters for the University of Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priesmeyer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    More than a year and a half after the University of Minnesota made headlines when an administrator halted the premiere of an environmental documentary, controversy and questions persist at the Twin Cities university. "Troubled Waters: A Mississippi River Story" took nearly four years to make. It explores how agricultural runoff and pollution…

  19. 75 FR 22167 - Minnesota Disaster #MN-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Minnesota Disaster MN-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State...

  20. FERTILIZER GUIDELINES FOR AGRONOMIC CROPS IN MINNESOTA

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    1 FERTILIZER GUIDELINES FOR AGRONOMIC CROPS IN MINNESOTA #12;2 #12;3 Understanding the Soil Test Report............................................... 5 Fertilizer Suggestions for: Alfalfa .................................................................................. 40 Table of Contents #12;4 #12;5 UNDERSTANDING THE SOIL TEST REPORT The concept of soil sampling

  1. Interactions of wolves and dogs in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, S.H.; Paul, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    This article reports on the nature and extent of wolf-dog interactions in Minnesota, based on investigations of complaints received by personnel of the federal government dealing with wolf-depredation control. Findings may indicate the wolf-dog interactions that can be expected in other recovery areas.

  2. Minnesota: Library Automation and Technology in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feye-Stukas, Jan

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of library automation in Minnesota. Topics include regional public library systems; library automation vendors; multitype library systems; postsecondary and academic libraries; state government libraries; the Internet; telecommunications and statewide online system legislation and funding; and state library agency involvement…

  3. Job Satisfaction among Minnesota High School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyd, Steven DuWayne

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported the demands of the high school principalship in the United States has deterred qualified candidates from accepting the position. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of job satisfaction among Minnesota high school principals within a potentially dwindling supply of qualified candidates as reported in other…

  4. MARSH LAKE, APPLETON, MINNESOTA ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    the dam with a fishway for fish passage. · Constructing a drawdown water control structure. · Breaching. The project includes modifications to the existing dam and other project structures, rerouting of the Pomme de-Federal sponsor. Construction of the Marsh Lake Dam initially began in the late 1930's by the State of Minnesota

  5. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Minnesota edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  6. A Guide to Minnesota Environmental Education Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wes, Comp.; Gruchow, Nancy, Comp.

    More than 400 areas in Minnesota, useful as sites for environmental studies, are catalogued in this guide. They include state parks and waysides, state forests, state wildlife management areas, waterfowl production areas, national forests, nature centers and preserves, metropolitan, county and city parks, outdoor education school sites, school…

  7. ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-CROOKSTON

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA-CROOKSTON 2900 University Ave Crookston, MN 56716 Specialist Doctoral 0 0 0 0 0 0 Certificate Programs: 2 0 Dual Enrollment (HLC Posted: 0412212010 and Related Clinical Sciences, Other (Bachelor of Applied Health) (Internet) Bachelor - 52.0201 Business

  8. A Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, John D.; Nyholm, Earl

    The dictionary of the Ojibwa or Chippewa language represents the speech of the Mille Lacs Band of Minnesota and contains over 7,000 Ojibwa terms. Each entry gives information on the word stem, grammatical classification, English gloss, form variations, and references to alternate forms. An introductory section describes the entry format and use,…

  9. Sociophonetics of Hmong American English in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Eden A.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a sociophonetic analysis of the English spoken by Hmong Americans living in the "Twin Cities" of Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. The Twin Cities has the largest urban population of Hmong Americans in the United States. Through studies of production and perception of vowels involved in sound changes, I investigate whether…

  10. Rio Grande project partnerships 

    E-print Network

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2008-01-01

    water quality. This three-year project, sched- uled to end March 2009, has reached more than 5,000 valley residents. See related story on pages 22 & 23. The Integrated Farm Management Program, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protec- tion Agency...://www.crwr.utexas.edu/riogrande.shtml Impacts of biological control of giant reed in the Lower Rio Grande Valley Giant reed, Arundo donax, was introduced to the Rio Grande area in the 1800s. It has since absorbed large quantities of water, greatly increases potential for flood damage...

  11. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression. PMID:24951952

  12. Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Transverse section through the Grand Lodge and Grand Chapter rooms of James H. Windrim and George Summers?s neoclassical competition design for the New Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 1867 - Masonic Temple, 1 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Electrically Excited Quartz Tuning Fork Devices

    PubMed Central

    Oria, Roger; Otero, Jorge; González, Laura; Botaya, Luis; Carmona, Manuel; Puig-Vidal, Manel

    2013-01-01

    Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF)-based Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) is an important field of research. A suitable model for the QTF is important to obtain quantitative measurements with these devices. Analytical models have the limitation of being based on the double cantilever configuration. In this paper, we present an electromechanical finite element model of the QTF electrically excited with two free prongs. The model goes beyond the state-of-the-art of numerical simulations currently found in the literature for this QTF configuration. We present the first numerical analysis of both the electrical and mechanical behavior of QTF devices. Experimental measurements obtained with 10 units of the same model of QTF validate the finite element model with a good agreement. PMID:23722828

  14. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program; Final...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS...Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program;...

  15. 40 CFR 272.1201 - Minnesota State-administered program; Final authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Minnesota State-administered program; Final...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS...Minnesota § 272.1201 Minnesota State-administered program;...

  16. 78 FR 26765 - Application to Export Electric Energy; ALLETE, Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ...Electric Energy; ALLETE, Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy...SUMMARY: ALLETE, Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power (Minnesota Power) has applied to renew its authority to transmit...

  17. Grand Staircase-Escalante

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument from Rainbow Point in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the d...

  18. Grand Ole Opry House

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Rivers in middle Tennessee crested May 2-3,2010, breaking records at many USGS-operated streamgages.The flood peak on the Cumberland River in downtown Nashville ranks as the highest observed during the past 73 years. Flooding on the Cumberland River damaged the Grand Ole Opry House, Bridgestone Aren...

  19. Employee Contract between State of Minnesota/Minnesota State Board for Community Colleges and Minnesota Community College Faculty Association, 1985-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Community Coll. Board, St. Paul.

    The employee contract between the Minnesota State Board for Community Colleges and the Minnesota Community College Faculty Asssociation, the exclusive representative for all instructors, counselors, and librarians, is presented, covering the years 1985 through 1987. The 30 articles in the agreement set forth rights and provisions related to…

  20. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in tinnitus disorders.

    PubMed

    Collet, L; Moussu, M F; Disant, F; Ahami, T; Morgon, A

    1990-01-01

    The relation between Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and tinnitus was examined in 100 subjects with tinnitus disorders. The overall profile of tinnitus sufferers on the MMPI was normal. Higher scores on the depression scale were obtained in males. High hypochondria scores were related to long duration of tinnitus. High psychoasthenia scores were associated with hearing loss. Despite an analogy previously described between chronic pain and tinnitus, the psychometric parameters of tinnitus and of headaches are quite different. PMID:2350302

  1. Temperature mediated moose survival in Northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenarz, M.S.; Nelson, M.E.; Schrage, M.W.; Edwards, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The earth is in the midst of a pronounced warming trend and temperatures in Minnesota, USA, as elsewhere, are projected to increase. Northern Minnesota represents the southern edge to the circumpolar distribution of moose (Alces alces), a species intolerant of heat. Moose increase their metabolic rate to regulate their core body temperature as temperatures rise. We hypothesized that moose survival rates would be a function of the frequency and magnitude that ambient temperatures exceeded the upper critical temperature of moose. We compared annual and seasonal moose survival in northeastern Minnesota between 2002 and 2008 with a temperature metric. We found that models based on January temperatures above the critical threshold were inversely correlated with subsequent survival and explained >78 of variability in spring, fall, and annual survival. Models based on late-spring temperatures also explained a high proportion of survival during the subsequent fall. A model based on warm-season temperatures was important in explaining survival during the subsequent winter. Our analyses suggest that temperatures may have a cumulative influence on survival. We expect that continuation or acceleration of current climate trends will result in decreased survival, a decrease in moose density, and ultimately, a retreat of moose northward from their current distribution.

  2. 76 FR 46721 - Salmon-Challis National Forest, ID; Upper North Fork HFRA Ecosystem Restoration Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ...primarily of prescribed burning and mechanical thinning. The drainage area includes the communities of Moose Creek Estates, Royal Elk Ranch, Lost Trail Ski Area, Gibbonsville and North Fork which have widespread private land resources, and have been...

  3. ADAPTATION OPPORTUNITIES FOR SURFACE WATER RESOURCES IN THE ROARING FORK WATERSHED, COLORADO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will assess climate-related impacts to the Roring Fork River (near Aspen, Colorado) and identify adaptive opportunities for surface water users, to support a larger global change assessment by the city of Aspen, CO (the Canary Initiative).

  4. HENRY'S FORK AND SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO - WATER QUALITY REPORT, 1973

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reported problems in the Henrys Fork and Snake River Basin (17040202, 17040203, 17040201) include bacteria levels exceeding water quality standards, dissolved oxygen standards violations, and excessive algal blooms resulting in aesthetic problems and contributing to DO depression...

  5. 76 FR 20463 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Proposed Endangered Status for the Three Forks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...flow. Because the groundwater system feeding these springs comprises...heavy parasitism on the female reproductive system of the Three Forks springsnail...elimination of crayfish from an aquatic system is usually not possible...

  6. 77 FR 23059 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for Three Forks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ...heavy parasitism on the female reproductive system of the Three Forks springsnail...elimination of crayfish from an aquatic system is usually not possible (Helfrich...square meter, particularly in systems with high primary...

  7. 77 FR 71611 - Land Acquisitions; North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians of California AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of final agency...

  8. 75 FR 25197 - Shasta Trinity National Forest, South Fork Management Unit, California Salt Timber Harvest and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...South Fork Management Unit, California...Hazard Reduction Project AGENCY: USDA...for the Salt Project to supplement wildlife management indicator assemblage...the wildlife management indicator assemblage...for the Salt Project. DATES:...

  9. WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River

    E-print Network

    WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN For Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River March 2003 Appendix 99.2 GENERAL WATERSHED CHARACTERIZATION ........................................ 6 2.2.2 Geology/Landform/Stream Type Characterization of the Big Creek Watershed........ 9 2

  10. 75 FR 37308 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Grand River, Grand Haven, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ...Regulations; Grand River, Grand Haven, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...over the Grand River, at Grand Haven, MI. This deviation temporarily changes the...INFORMATION: The City of Grand Haven, MI, requested a temporary deviation from...

  11. ANSYS simulation of the capacitance coupling of quartz tuning fork gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qing; Feng, Lihui; Zhao, Ke; Cui, Fang; Sun, Yu-nan

    2013-12-01

    Coupling error is one of the main error sources of the quartz tuning fork gyroscope. The mechanism of capacitance coupling error is analyzed in this article. Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to simulate the structure of the quartz tuning fork by ANSYS software. The voltage output induced by the capacitance coupling is simulated with the harmonic analysis and characteristics of electrical and mechanical parameters influenced by the capacitance coupling between drive electrodes and sense electrodes are discussed with the transient analysis.

  12. The Sound Field around a Tuning Fork and the Role of a Resonance Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical two-tine tuning fork is barely audible when held vibrating at an arm's length. It is enough, however, to touch its base to a table or, better, to a resonance box and the emitted sound becomes much louder. An inquiring student may pose questions: (1) Why is a bare tuning fork such a weak emitter of sound? (2) What is the role of the…

  13. Spring constant of a tuning-fork sensor for dynamic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Manfred; Schmuck, Merlin; Schmidt, Nico; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present an overview of experimental and numerical methods to determine the spring constant of a quartz tuning fork in qPlus configuration. The simple calculation for a rectangular cantilever is compared to the values obtained by the analysis of the thermal excitation and by the direct mechanical measurement of the force versus displacement. To elucidate the difference, numerical simulations were performed taking account of the real geometry including the glue that is used to mount the tuning fork. PMID:23365793

  14. Note: Enhanced energy harvesting from low-frequency magnetic fields utilizing magneto-mechano-electric composite tuning-fork.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    A magnetic-field energy harvester using a low-frequency magneto-mechano-electric (MME) composite tuning-fork is proposed. This MME composite tuning-fork consists of a copper tuning fork with piezoelectric Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O3 (PZT) plates bonded near its fixed end and with NdFeB magnets attached at its free ends. Due to the resonance coupling between fork prongs, the MME composite tuning-fork owns strong vibration and high Q value. Experimental results show that the proposed magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite tuning-fork exhibits approximately 4 times larger maximum output voltage and 7.2 times higher maximum power than the conventional magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite cantilever. PMID:26133877

  15. Note: Enhanced energy harvesting from low-frequency magnetic fields utilizing magneto-mechano-electric composite tuning-fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Yang, Chao; Wang, Decai; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Jiajia

    2015-06-01

    A magnetic-field energy harvester using a low-frequency magneto-mechano-electric (MME) composite tuning-fork is proposed. This MME composite tuning-fork consists of a copper tuning fork with piezoelectric Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) plates bonded near its fixed end and with NdFeB magnets attached at its free ends. Due to the resonance coupling between fork prongs, the MME composite tuning-fork owns strong vibration and high Q value. Experimental results show that the proposed magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite tuning-fork exhibits approximately 4 times larger maximum output voltage and 7.2 times higher maximum power than the conventional magnetic-field energy harvester using the MME composite cantilever.

  16. Minnesota STAR Project: Meeting the Needs of Struggling Adult Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kimberly A.; Frank, Margaret M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on findings and implications from a two-year evaluation of the Minnesota STudent Achievement in Reading (STAR) Project. This long-term, job-embedded, professional development activity is provided for Minnesota Adult Basic Education (ABE) practitioners serving intermediate-level adult students reading between 4.0 to 8.9 grade…

  17. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minnesota State-Administered Program. 282.73 Section 282.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... was effective on December 31, 2001. (b) Minnesota has primary responsibility for enforcing...

  18. 69. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. Photocopy of photograph (original print in the Minnesota Historical society, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1984. #32375.) VIEW TO WEST, SHOWING DAMAGED BRIDGE AFTER CYCLONE. 1904. - Smith Avenue High Bridge, Smith Avenue between Cherokee Avenue & Cliff Street, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  19. Impact Evaluation of the Minnesota Reading Corps K-3 Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps (MRC) is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. The goal of MRC is to ensure that students become successful readers and meet reading proficiency targets by the end of the third grade. To meet this goal, the MRC program, and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, recruit, train, place and…

  20. General College Job Satisfaction Survey, University of Minnesota. Summer 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grahn, Joyce; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A study was undertaken in 1980 of employment attitudes among faculty at the General College of the University of Minnesota, an institution for nontraditional postsecondary education. The long form of the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used, with a new demographic questionnaire substituted. The survey sample consisted of 96 teaching,…

  1. 78 FR 25434 - Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 18, 2013, Minnesota Municipal Power Agency filed its request for exemption from Part 358 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's...

  2. Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel

    E-print Network

    Nekola, Jeffrey C.

    Images of Minute Minnesota Land Snails Matt Barthel January 2000 This disk contains diagnostic images representative of minute land snail taxa from Minnesota. The snails imaged are from throughout at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay (UWGB). The shells imaged were assigned to species (or subspecies) based

  3. Minnesota Undergraduate Demographics: Characteristics of Post-Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Tricia; Mehta, Shefali V.

    2006-01-01

    As Minnesota's state population changes, the undergraduate student population is also changing. This report is designed to present information about the characteristics of undergraduates who attend post-secondary institutions in Minnesota, based on data from a 2004 national survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Education. The report provides…

  4. Parents in the Workplace Report: Minnesota Business Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Thomas B.

    A recent survey of 473 Minnesota businesses conducted by Parents in the Workplace (a nonprofit organization based in St. Paul, Minnesota) revealed that most area businesses provide or are considering providing a wide range of child care related benefits for employees. Flexible scheduling of employees' work hours, part-time work, leave to care for…

  5. Housing Seasonal Workers for the Minnesota Processed Vegetable Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziebarth, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The place where we live and work is a reflection of a complex set of economic conditions and social relationships. Very little information is available regarding housing for Minnesota's migrant workers. It is estimated that approximately 20,000 people migrate to Minnesota each summer to work in the production and processing of green peas and sweet…

  6. The Teaching of Evolution and Creationism in Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Randy; Kraemer, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The evolution-related attitudes and actions of Minnesota high school biology teachers were studied to estimate the prevalence of creationism among biology teachers. Minnesota's high school biology teachers were questioned about the evolution education in public schools regarding the percentage of biology teachers who teach evolution, class-time…

  7. Minnesota 4-H Youth Program Quality Improvement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Margo; Grant, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development made an organizational decision in 2011 to invest in a system-wide approach to implement youth program quality into the 4-H program using the Youth Program Quality Assessment (YPQA) tool. This article describes the four key components to the Minnesota Youth Program Quality…

  8. 75 FR 16819 - Minnesota; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Minnesota; Emergency and Related Determinations AGENCY... declaration of an emergency for the State of Minnesota (FEMA-3310-EM), dated March 19, 2010, and related... an emergency declaration under the authority of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and...

  9. Manual for the Minnesota Satisfactoriness Scales. Minnesota Studies in Vocational Rehabilitation: XXVII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dennis L.; And Others

    Intended as a manual for the Minnesota Satisfaction Scales, this monograph describes the development of the 28-item questionnaire designed to be completed by a worker's supervisor to assess the satisfactoriness of an employee. The scales were developed from supervisor ratings of 2,373 workers, and norms are provided for the occupational groups of…

  10. Parallel sorter PROC fork(CHAN up,down, left.down,left.up, right.down,right.up)

    E-print Network

    Jones, Geraint

    Parallel sorter PROC fork(CHAN up,down, left.down,left.up, right.down,right.up) PROC fork.distribute(CHAN up, left.up, right.up) PROC fork.gather(CHAN down, left.down, right.down) PROC leaf(CHAN up, down, probe) PROC monitor(CHAN up.a, down.a, up.b, down.b, probe) PROC multiplex(CHAN probe[], all

  11. Karst database development in Minnesota: Design and data assembly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, Y.; Alexander, E.C., Jr.; Tipping, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    The Karst Feature Database (KFD) of Minnesota is a relational GIS-based Database Management System (DBMS). Previous karst feature datasets used inconsistent attributes to describe karst features in different areas of Minnesota. Existing metadata were modified and standardized to represent a comprehensive metadata for all the karst features in Minnesota. Microsoft Access 2000 and ArcView 3.2 were used to develop this working database. Existing county and sub-county karst feature datasets have been assembled into the KFD, which is capable of visualizing and analyzing the entire data set. By November 17 2002, 11,682 karst features were stored in the KFD of Minnesota. Data tables are stored in a Microsoft Access 2000 DBMS and linked to corresponding ArcView applications. The current KFD of Minnesota has been moved from a Windows NT server to a Windows 2000 Citrix server accessible to researchers and planners through networked interfaces. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  12. Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session, (Grand Forks, North Dakota 1985). Volume 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derbyshire, Desmond C., Ed.

    Preliminary versions of the papers from the 1985 Summer Institute of Linguistics presented at the University of North Dakota session include: "Referential Distance and Discourse Structure in Yagua" (Thomas E. Payne); "A Note on Ergativity, S', and S'' in Karitiana" (Daniel Everett); "Some Aspects of Zapotecan Clausal Syntax" (Stephen A. Marlett);…

  13. Measurements of bed load transport on Pacific Creek, Buffalo Fork and The Snake River in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, Susannah O.; Schmidt, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Dams disrupt the flow of both of water and sediment through a watershed. Channel morphology is a function of discharge and sediment load, and perturbations caused by dams often alter channel form, causing significant geomorphic and, potentially, ecological changes (e.g. Petts and Gurnell, 2005). At the first order, dams often produce a flow regime that is profoundly altered in the timing, magnitude, and frequency of flows (Magilligan and Nislow, 2005). Yet, the nature of channel adjustments will be specific to both the physical setting, size of the river, dam characteristics, and nature and severity of the flow regulation (Church 1995; Knighton, 1998).

  14. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  15. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  16. Bioavailability of mercury in East Fork Poplar Creek soils

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.O.; Turner, R.R.

    1995-05-01

    The initial risk assessment for the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a superfund site heavily contaminated with mercury, was based upon a reference dose for mercuric chloride, a soluble mercury compound not expected to be present in the floodplain, which is frequently saturated with water. Previous investigations had suggested mercury in the EFPC floodplain was less soluble and therefore less bioavailable than mercuric chloride, possibly making the results of the risk assessment unduly conservative. A bioavailability study, designed to measure the amount of mercury available for absorption in a child`s digestive tract, the most critical risk endpoint and pathway, was performed on twenty soils from the EFPC floodplain. The average percentage of mercury released during the study for the twenty soils was 5.3%, compared to 100% of the compound mercuric chloride subjected to the same conditions. Alteration of the procedure to test additional conditions possible during soil digestion did not appreciably alter the results. Therefore, use of a reference dose for mercuric chloride in the EFPC risk assessment without inclusion of a corresponding bioavailability factor may be unduly conservative.

  17. [Heritability of body weight and fork length for Oncorhynchus masou masou].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Yong; Jia, Zhi-Ying; Bai, Qing-Li; Chen, Shu-Qiang; Shi, Lian-Yu; Wang, Bing-Qian

    2013-02-01

    Body weight and body length have been considered as the most important production traits for the fish genetic improvement. For cold-water fish, body length was usually substituted by fork length. In order to estimate the heritability of body weight and fork length of the sixth generation Oncorhynchus masou masou, which was introduced into China, the method of unbalanced nest design and an artificial insemination technigue were used. Twenty-nine full-sib families and fourteen half-sib families were obtained. Body weight and fork length of O. masou masou were measured in 12 and 24 months after fertilization. Based on full-sib and half-sib families data, the causal components of phenotypic variance were calculated. The results showed that, (1) during the whole growth phase of O. masou masou, the coefficient variation (CV) of fork length was higher than body weight, and CV of 12-month old was higher than that of 24-month old; (2) body weight and fork length of O. masou masou among sires and dams among sires were significant difference (P<0.01) both at 12 months and at 24 months; (3) the maternal component estimates were significantly larger than those of paternal ones for body weight and fork length traits both at 12 months and at 24 months; (4) for 12 months of O. masou masou the heritabilities of body weight and fork length were 0.41~0.51 and 0.46~0.54, respectively. For 24 months the values were 0.55~0.60 and 0.53~0.59, respectively; and (5) it was concluded that the heritability of growth traits in O. masou masou was relatively high and this highlights the potential to improve its growth through selective breeding. This study shows important data supporting for further genetic improvement of O. masou masou. PMID:23448933

  18. Children's Report Card, 1999: Measuring Minnesota's Progress for Children and Youth. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Amy

    Minnesota Planning developed the Children's Report Card in 1994 to help the state and its 87 counties gauge the well-being of Minnesota's children and youth. The report was created as an extension of Minnesota Milestones, a long-range plan for the state and a tool to measure results which was developed by Minnesota Planning in 1992. For the first…

  19. Outcome Evaluation: Minnesota Reading Corps PreK Program. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. Its mission is to help every Minnesota child become a proficient reader by the end of third grade. To meet this goal, the Minnesota Reading Corps and its host organization, ServeMinnesota Action Network, engages a diverse group of AmeriCorps members to provide…

  20. 78 FR 75581 - Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ... COMMISSION Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application December 6, 2013. AGENCY: The.... Applicants: Minnesota Life Insurance Company (``Minnesota Life'' or ``Insurance Company''), Variable Annuity...., Washington, D.C. 20549- 1090. Applicants, c/o Daniel P. Preiner, Counsel, Minnesota Life Insurance...

  1. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Crist, D.; Spencer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

  2. The Grand Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona and the Grand Canyon are captured in this pair of MISR images from December 31, 2000 (Terra orbit 5525). The left-hand image is a true color view from the nadir (vertical) camera. The right-hand image is a stereo composite generated using data from MISR's vertical and 46-degree-forward cameras. Viewing the stereo image in 3-D requires the use of red/blue glasses with the red filter placed over your left eye. To facilitate stereo viewing, the images have been oriented with north at the left.

    In addition to the Grand Canyon itself, which is visible in the western (lower)half of the images, other landmarks include Lake Powell, on the left, and Humphreys Peak and Sunset Crater National Monument on the right. Meteor Crater appears as a small dark depression with a brighter rim, and is just visible along the upper right-hand edge. Can you find it?

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Tuning fork test utilization in detection of fractures: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted to find relevant publications on the validity, reliability and utilization of the tuning fork test in detection of stress and simple fractures. Medline 1966-1998, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) 1982-1997, Science Citation Index 1961-1997, Index to chiropractic literature 1980-1998 and Chiropractic Research Archives Collection 1984-1990 data bases were searched. Key words such as tuning fork, vibration, diapason, fracture, stress fracture were used. The literature regarding the utilization of the tuning fork test in detection of fractures is very scarce. There was no study found in the above data bases on the validity and or reliability of the tuning fork test in detection of simple acute fractures. This review of the literature indicates the necessity of such a study since the tuning fork test has been used on the field for diagnosis of simple acute fractures. Imagesp124-ap124-bp124-cp124-dp124-e

  4. South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  5. Community solutions to violence: a Minnesota managed care action plan.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D S

    1998-04-01

    Reducing violence is a critical health and economic priority. In Minnesota, as in other parts of the United States, violence is increasingly viewed as a public health problem. Helping people work together to prevent violence is one way that managed care organizations are collaborating with public health to improve the health of communities. In 1994, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota worked with community organizations to develop The Minnesota Action Plan to End Gun Violence, a broad-based solution to a community problem: violence in Minnesota. The goal of this initiative was to develop grassroots solutions to violence and to inspire community members to take action. Outcomes of the initiative included: participation by over 1,000 Minnesotans in 12 community violence prevention forums; a widely distributed action plan; Students Stop Guns, a school-based intervention to keep Minnesota schools gun-free; the Governor's Task Force on Violence as a Public Health Problem, which led to a commitment of resources to prevent violence and respond to the victims and consequences of violence, and the Health Care Coalition on Violence, to institutionalize strategies within the Minnesota health care environment. The project's qualitative evaluation resulted in lessons and advice on how to execute a collaborative health improvement initiative. These lessons have been widely shared with Minnesota community health advocates. PMID:9566945

  6. Regional Ecorisk Field investigation, upper Clark Fork River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Regional Ecorisk Field Investigation was conducted at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (Montana) to evaluate the relationships between plant communities and tailings deposits in riparian habitats and to evaluate food-chain transfer of trace elements to selected wildlife species. Stations were selected to represent a range of vegetation biomass (or cover) values and apparent impact of trace elements, with some areas of lush vegetation, some areas of mostly unvegetated soil (e.g., < 30 percent plant cover), and a gradient in between. For the evaluation of risk to wildlife, bioaccumulation of metals was evaluated in native or naturalized plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Potential reproductive effects in the deer mouse were evaluated by direct measurements. For other wildlife species, bioaccumulation data were interpreted in the context of food web exposure models. Total biomass and species richness of riparian plant communities are related to tailings content of soil as indicated by pH and metals concentrations. Risk to populations of omnivorous small mammals such as the deer mouse was not significant. Relative abundance and reproductive condition of the deer mouse were normal, even in areas of high metals enrichment. Based on exposure models and site-specific tissue residue data for dietary species, risk to local populations of predators such as red fox and American kestrel that feed on deer mice and terrestrial invertebrates is not significant. Risk to herbivores related to metals bioaccumulation in plant tissues is not significant. Population level effects in deer and other large wildlife are not expected because of the large home ranges of such species and compensatory demographic factors.

  7. The coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift measurement on a quartz tuning fork.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-01-01

    We have measured the coefficient of the voltage induced frequency shift (VIFS) of a 32.768 KHz quartz tuning fork. Three vibration modes were studied: one prong oscillating, two prongs oscillating in the same direction, and two prongs oscillating in opposite directions. They all showed a parabolic dependence of the eigen-frequency shift on the bias voltage applied across the fork, due to the voltage-induced internal stress, which varies as the fork oscillates. The average coefficient of the VIFS effect is as low as several hundred nano-Hz per millivolt, implying that fast-response voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-locked loops with nano-Hz resolution can be built. PMID:25414971

  8. 77 FR 11575 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ...Collections and Preservation, Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. NW., Grand Rapids, MI 49504, telephone (616) 929-1801...Collections and Preservation, Grand Rapids Public Museum, 272 Pearl St. NW., Grand Rapids, MI 49504, telephone (616)...

  9. 77 FR 64125 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Notification of a Public Meeting for the East Fork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...and Notification of a Public Meeting for the East Fork Elk Winter Range; WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...United States mining laws, to protect the East Fork Elk Winter Range and elk natural feeding grounds in Fremont County. This...

  10. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  11. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  12. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  13. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  14. 33 CFR 165.552 - Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean County, New Jersey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Oyster Creek... Coast Guard District § 165.552 Security Zone; Oyster Creek Generation Station, Forked River, Ocean... the Forked River in the vicinity of the Oyster Creek Generation Station, bounded by a line...

  15. RecD2 Helicase Limits Replication Fork Stress in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Brian W.; Bolz, Samantha A.; Wessel, Sarah R.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Keck, James L.

    2014-01-01

    DNA helicases have important roles in genome maintenance. The RecD helicase has been well studied as a component of the heterotrimeric RecBCD helicase-nuclease enzyme important for double-strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Interestingly, many bacteria lack RecBC and instead contain a RecD2 helicase, which is not known to function as part of a larger complex. Depending on the organism studied, RecD2 has been shown to provide resistance to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents while also contributing to mismatch repair (MMR). Here we investigated the importance of Bacillus subtilis RecD2 helicase to genome integrity. We show that deletion of recD2 confers a modest increase in the spontaneous mutation rate and that the mutational signature in ?recD2 cells is not consistent with an MMR defect, indicating a new function for RecD2 in B. subtilis. To further characterize the role of RecD2, we tested the deletion strain for sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. We found that loss of RecD2 in B. subtilis sensitized cells to several DNA-damaging agents that can block or impair replication fork movement. Measurement of replication fork progression in vivo showed that forks collapse more frequently in ?recD2 cells, supporting the hypothesis that RecD2 is important for normal replication fork progression. Biochemical characterization of B. subtilis RecD2 showed that it is a 5?-3? helicase and that it directly binds single-stranded DNA binding protein. Together, our results highlight novel roles for RecD2 in DNA replication which help to maintain replication fork integrity during normal growth and when forks encounter DNA damage. PMID:24443534

  16. Far field diffraction of an optical vortex beam by a fork-shaped grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Topuzoski, Suzana; Stefanov, Ivan; Janicijevic, Ljiljana; Dreischuh, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report experimental data confirming the analytically predicted transformation of the topological charge (TC) of an input optical vortex (OV) beam, generated by means of fork-shaped binary computer-generated hologram (CGH), after a second fork-shaped binary CGH. The final TC of the vortex is confirmed to be equal to the TC of the incident beam plus the diffraction order (with its sign) times the TC encoded in the binary grating. The radii of the transformed OVs in the far field also are found to agree fairly well with these predicted by the analytical theory.

  17. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  18. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Reinert, Brian L; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A; Hromas, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5' end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3' single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5' end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5' DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5' overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  19. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn; Jambois, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  20. Interior Invests $286,000 in Minnesota Valley NWR

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Secretary Salazar inspects new geothermal plumbing construction in parking lot of Minnesota Valley. Left to Jeanne Holler, Tom Melius and Assistant Secretary for Fish, Wildlife and Parks Tom Strickland look....

  1. 75 FR 32821 - Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Minnesota Disaster Number MN-00024 AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This... declaration remains unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008). James...

  2. How Energy Efficiency is Adding Jobs in St. Paul, Minnesota

    ScienceCinema

    Hannigan, Jim; Coleman, Chris; Oliver, LeAnn; Jambois, Louis

    2013-05-29

    Saint Paul, Minnesota is using an energy efficiency grant to provide commercial retrofits that will allow a local produce distribution company to dramatically reduce its energy costs and add dozens of new workers.

  3. 222Rn variations in Mystery Cave, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Krafthefer, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    222Rn concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured at 4- h intervals over a 2-y period in Mystery Cave, southeastern Minnesota. Continuous radon monitors and meteorological sensors connected to data loggers were installed at several locations along commercial tour routes. 222Rn concentrations ranged as high as 25 kBq m-3 in summer and 20 kBq m-3 in winter. Average winter concentrations were lower than summer by at least a factor of two. Seasonal radon variations were correlative with outside air temperatures. During the winter, radon concentrations were observed to fluctuate periodically by factors of 20 or more in under 24 h. Both the long- and short-term variations are correlative with temperature- induced mixing of cave air with surface air.

  4. Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Hennepin County) integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM system.

  5. Satellite inventory of Minnesota forest resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Marvin E.; Burk, Thomas E.; Ek, Alan R.; Coppin, Pol R.; Lime, Stephen D.; Walsh, Terese A.; Walters, David K.; Befort, William; Heinzen, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The methods and results of using Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to classify and estimate the acreage of forest covertypes in northeastern Minnesota are described. Portions of six TM scenes covering five counties with a total area of 14,679 square miles were classified into six forest and five nonforest classes. The approach involved the integration of cluster sampling, image processing, and estimation. Using cluster sampling, 343 plots, each 88 acres in size, were photo interpreted and field mapped as a source of reference data for classifier training and calibration of the TM data classifications. Classification accuracies of up to 75 percent were achieved; most misclassification was between similar or related classes. An inverse method of calibration, based on the error rates obtained from the classifications of the cluster plots, was used to adjust the classification class proportions for classification errors. The resulting area estimates for total forest land in the five-county area were within 3 percent of the estimate made independently by the USDA Forest Service. Area estimates for conifer and hardwood forest types were within 0.8 and 6.0 percent respectively, of the Forest Service estimates. A trial of a second method of estimating the same classes as the Forest Service resulted in standard errors of 0.002 to 0.015. A study of the use of multidate TM data for change detection showed that forest canopy depletion, canopy increment, and no change could be identified with greater than 90 percent accuracy. The project results have been the basis for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the Forest Service to define and begin to implement an annual system of forest inventory which utilizes Landsat TM data to detect changes in forest cover.

  6. An assessment of air toxics in Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, G C; Palmer, K; Wu, C Y; Oliaei, F; Hollerbach, C; Fenske, M J

    2000-01-01

    We used monitoring and modeling to assess the concentrations of air toxics in the state of Minnesota. Model-predicted concentrations for 148 hazardous air pollutants were from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cumulative Exposure Project (1990 data). Monitoring data consisted of samples of volatile organic compounds, carbonyls, and particulate matter [Less than and equal to] 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter collected at 25 sites throughout the state for varying periods of time (up to 8 years; 1991-1998). Ten pollutants exceeded health benchmark values at one or more sites by modeling, monitoring, or both (including acrolein, arsenic, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, carbon tetrachloride, chromium, chloroform, ethylene dibromide, formaldehyde, and nickel). Polycyclic organic matter also exceeded the benzo[a]pyrene health benchmark value assumed to represent this class of pollutants. The highest modeled and monitored concentrations of most pollutants were near the center of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area; however, many smaller cities throughout the state also had elevated concentrations. Where direct comparisons were possible, monitored values often tended to exceed model estimates. Upper-bound excess lifetime inhalation cancer risks were estimated to range from 2.7 [times] 10(-5) to 140. 9 [times] 10(-5) (modeling) and 4.7 [times] 10(-5) to 11.0 [times] 10(-5) (using a smaller set of monitored carcinogens). Screening noncancer hazard indices summed over all end points ranged from 0.2 to 58.1 (modeling) and 0.6 to 2.0 (with a smaller set of monitored pollutants). For common sets of pollutants, the concentrations, cancer risks, and noncancer hazard indices were comparable between model-based estimates and monitored values. The inhalation cancer risk was apportioned to mobile sources (54%), area sources (22%), point sources (12%), and background (12%). This study provides evidence that air toxics are a public health concern in Minnesota. PMID:11017885

  7. Recent sedimentation and surface-water flow patterns on the flood plain of the North Fork Forked Deer River, Dyer County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Diehl, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentation in the 19th and 20th centuries has had a major effect on surface-water drainage conditions along a 7-mile section of the North, Fork Forked Deer River flood plain, Dyer County, Tenn. During the century prior to 1930, 5 to 12 feet of sediment were deposited over much of the flood plain, resulting in channel obstruction and widespread flooding. The estimated bankfull capacity of the natural channel before it was channelized in 19 16 was comparable to the base flow of the river during the 1980's. Ditching of the river between 191i6 and 1;9,21 was followed by reductions in sedimentation rates over parts of the flood plain. However, the effects of sedimentation have persisted. Occlusions along the natural channel of the river have divided this stream reach into a series of sloughs. These sloughs continue to fill with sediment and are surrounded by ponds that have expanded since 1941. Degradation of the North Fork Forked Deer ditch may eventually reduce ponding over much of the flood plain. Active incision of headcuts in both banks of the ditch is enhancing the drainage of widespread ponded areas. These headcuts likely will have limited effect on drainage of most tributaries. The highest recent sedimentation rates, in places more than 0.2 foot per year, are concentrated near the flood-plain margin along tributary streams. In conjunction with beaver dams and debris, ongoing sedimentation has blocked flow in several tributaries, posing a flood hazard to agricultural land near the flood-plain margin. The occluded tributaries likely will continue to overflow unless they are periodically dredged or their sediment loads are reduced.

  8. Channelization and floodplain forests: Impacts of accelerated sedimentation and valley plug formation on floodplain forests of the Middle Fork Forked Deer River, Tennessee, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oswalt, S.N.; King, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the severe degradation of floodplain habitats resulting from channelization and concomitant excessive coarse sedimentation on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River in west Tennessee from 2000 to 2003. Land use practices have resulted in excessive sediment in the tributaries and river system eventually resulting in sand deposition on the floodplain, increased overbank flooding, a rise in the groundwater table, and ponding of upstream timber. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the composition of floodplain vegetation communities along the degraded river reach, (2) to isolate relationships among these communities, geomorphic features, and environmental variables and (3) evaluate successional changes based on current stand conditions. Vegetation communities were not specifically associated with predefined geomorphic features; nevertheless, hydrologic and geomorphic processes as a result of channelization have clearly affected vegetation communities. The presence of valley plugs and continued degradation of upstream reaches and tributaries on the impacted study reach has arrested recovery of floodplain plant communities. Historically common species like Liquidambar styraciflua L. and Quercus spp. L. were not important, with importance values (IV) less than 1, and occurred in less than 20% of forested plots, while Acer rubrum L., a disturbance-tolerant species, was the most important species on the site (IV = 78.1) and occurred in 87% of forested plots. The results of this study also indicate that channelization impacts on the Middle Fork Forked Deer River are more temporally and spatially complex than previously described for other river systems. Rehabilitation of this system necessitates a long-term, landscape-scale solution that addresses watershed rehabilitation in a spatially and temporally hierarchical manner. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. On the scene at Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Malone, Ginger; Akre, Mari; Hauck, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Transformational nursing leadership requires innovation and best practice synthesis to engage and advance nursing practice and outcomes. Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota is creating a sustainable culture of patient safety that expects collaborative practice involving families and all clinical disciplines. Leadership and practice structures are essential to ensure high-reliability processes and achieve breakthrough performance. Several infrastructural paths are described to illustrate how Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota integrates multiple approaches toward a common purpose of clinical excellence. PMID:19092524

  10. Grand slam on cancer.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    A winner of 59 Grand Slam championships including a record 9 Wimbledon singles titles, Martina Navratilova is the most successful woman tennis player of the modern era. Martina was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, named "Tour Player of the Year" seven times by the Women's Tennis Association, declared "Female Athlete of the Year" by the Associated Press, and ranked one of the "Top Forty Athletes of All-Time" by Sports Illustrated. Equally accomplished off the court, Martina is an author, philanthropist, TV commentator, and activist who has dedicated her life to educating people about prejudice and stereotypes. After coming out as a lesbian in 1981, Martina became a tireless advocate of equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and she has contributed generously to the LGBT community. Martina is the author of seven books, including most recently Shape Your Self: My 6-Step Diet and Fitness Plan to Achieve the Best Shape of your Life, an inspiring guide to healthy living and personal fitness. Martina was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010. PMID:24400624

  11. Wolf body mass cline across Minnesota related to taxonomy?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Paul, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    Recent genetic studies suggest that in northern Minnesota two species of wolves (Canis lupus L., 1758 or western wolf and Canis lycaon Schreber, 1775 (= Canis rufus Audubon and Bachman, 1851) or eastern wolf) meet and hybridize. However, little morphological information is available about these two types of wolves in Minnesota. We analyzed the mass of 950 female wolves and 1006 males older than 1 year from across northern Minnesota and found that it increased from 26.30 ?? 0.56 kg (mean ?? SE) for females and 30.60 ?? 0.72 kg for males in northeastern Minnesota to 30.01 ?? 0.43 kg for females and 35.94 ?? 0.45 kg for males in northwestern Minnesota (females: r2 = 0.79, P < 0.02; males: r2 = 0.63, P = 0.06). These mass differences add morphological information to the identities of eastern and western wolves and support the view that ranges of the two species meet in Minnesota. ?? 2008 NRC.

  12. 2015 Regents of the University of Minnesota. University of Minnesota Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this publication/material is available in alternative formats upon reque

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Resources Available to MN Poultry Producers As Minnesota responds to the devastating Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza outbreak, poultry producers have resources available for their needs. Minnesota poultry producers

  13. Minnesota Project: district heating and cooling through power plant retrofit and distribution network. Final report. Phase 1. [Minnesota Project

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    Appendices are presented for the Minnesota Project: District Heating and Cooling Through Power Plant Retrofit and Distribution Network. These are: SYNTHA results (SYNTHA II is a proprietary program of the SYNTHA Corporation); Market Survey Questionnaire: Environmental Review Procedures; Public Service Commission Regulation of District Heating; Energy Use Normalization Procedures; Power Plant Description; Letters of Commitment; Bond Opinion and Issuance; and Marvin Koeplin Letter, Chairman of Public Service Commission, Moorehead, Minnesota.

  14. BENZO(A)PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE I BINDS TO DNA AT REPLICATION FORKS (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution in replication forks of DNA lesions caused by the treatment of S phase calls with benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide-1 (BPDE-1) was studied in synchronized C3H10T1/2 cells. Sites of carcinogen modification of DNA were identified by polyclonal rabbit antibodies that were...

  15. Nucleoid occlusion prevents cell division during replication fork arrest in Bacillus subtilismmi_7369 866..882

    E-print Network

    Rudner, David

    Nucleoid occlusion prevents cell division during replication fork arrest in Bacillus subtilismmi of transcriptional responses and inhibition of cell division. Here, we used repressor proteins bound to operator, despite robust generation of RecA­GFP filaments and a strong block to cell division during the roadblock

  16. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, ?eslovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.

  17. EFFECTS OF HABITAT DEGRADATION ON BIOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS IN THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER BASIN, GEORGIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the streams of the lower Piedmont ecoregion in Georgia have been negatively impacted to some degree by habitat degradation due primarily to sedimentation. The South Fork of the Broad River watershed has been designated as sediment impacted under Section 303(d) of the Clea...

  18. Trends in Streamflow and Suspended Sediment After Logging, North Fork Caspar

    E-print Network

    Trends in Streamflow and Suspended Sediment After Logging, North Fork Caspar Creek1 Jack Lewis2 gaging stations before and after logging a second-growth redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) forest. About 50, but as antecedent wetness increased, percentage increases declined. In the first five to seven years after logging

  19. Inferring Causes of Biological Impairment in the Clear Fork Watershed, West Virginia (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clear Fork, WV case study illustrates a causal assessment in a watershed using the USEPA stressor identification process described on www.epa.gov/caddis. This case study demonstrates that a watershed-wide causal assessment has several advantages for making analysis practical,...

  20. LIFE HISTORY MONITORING OF SALMONIDS IN THE WEST FORK SMITH RIVER, UMPQUA BASIN, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a life-cycle monitoring basin for the Oregon Salmon Plan, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has estimated adult returns, distribution and smolt outmigration of coho, chinook and winter steelhead in the West Fork Smith River since 1998. In 2001/2002, the Environmenta...

  1. Water Quality and Conservation Practices in the South Fork of the Iowa River

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iowa’s South Fork watershed is dominated by corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max L. (Merr.)] rotations, and animal feeding operations are common. Artificial subsurface (tile) drainage is extensive; hydric soils cover 54% of the watershed. During spring and early summer, NO3-N concentrations o...

  2. 75 FR 25197 - Shasta Trinity National Forest, South Fork Management Unit, California Salt Timber Harvest and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Forest Service Shasta Trinity National Forest, South Fork Management Unit, California Salt Timber Harvest... statement for the Salt Timber Harvest and Fuels Reduction Project (Salt Project). A supplemental environmental impact statement will be prepared for the Salt Project to supplement wildlife management...

  3. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, ?eslovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. In more general terms, we suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal. PMID:26350214

  4. Conservation Practices and Water Quality in the Iowa River's South Fork Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Iowa River’s South Fork drains 87,000 ha under intensive, high-production agriculture. Corn-soybean rotations occupy about 85% of the watershed. About 100 swine CAFOs generate manure applied onto about a quarter of the watershed annually. Artificial drainage is extensive because the young glacia...

  5. Abstract--Annual mean fork length (FL) of the Pacific stock of chub mack

    E-print Network

    Japan, the effects of population 5.9 million tons in 1977, and the consec density and sea water exploited fish populations in Japan and and variations in fork length (FL) at has been managed by the total at age 0. A modified von Bertalanffy growth model that incorporated the effects of population density

  6. Extended Forking Genetic Algorithm for Order Representation (o-fGA)

    E-print Network

    Tsutsui, Shigeyoshi

    580 Japan 1-5 Yokoya, Seta Ooe, Matsubara, Osaka 580 Japan Matsubara, Osaka 580 Japan Ohtsu, Shiga 520-21 Japan Matsubara, Osaka 580 Japan Abstract There are two types of GAs with difference of binary coded GA, called the forking GA (fGA), as a kind of multi-population GA and showed

  7. Ross basin, upper Cement Creek in Watershed above North Fork Cement Creek

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Western view toward the Red Mountains near Silverton, Colorado, taken just upstream from the North Fork Cement Creek drainage in 2006. The photo illustrates acidic drainage (red drainage at right) and less acidic drainage (white drainage at left of photo) that originates from altered rocks and mine...

  8. 77 FR 47058 - Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Middle Fork American River Hydroelectric Project Placer County Water Agency; Notice of Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Public Meetings a. Date and Time of Meetings: Tuesday, August 28, 2012, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00...

  9. NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The South Fork Broad River (SFBR) drains about 635 km2 of the Georgia Piedmont. The SFBR watershed is primarily rural and undeveloped although the human population increased by about 25% between 1990 and 2000. Forestry and agriculture are the main land uses. Agriculture consis...

  10. Single-molecule studies of fork dynamics in Escherichia coli DNA replication

    E-print Network

    Single-molecule studies of fork dynamics in Escherichia coli DNA replication Nathan A Tanner1,4 & Antoine M van Oijen1 We present single-molecule studies of the Escherichia coli replication machinery. We and leading-strand synthesis. When coupled to the replicative helicase DnaB, Pol III mediates leading

  11. 77 FR 66541 - Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black Warrior River, Locust Fork; Birmingham, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Alliance Road Bridge Demolition; Black...: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone for a portion of the Locust Fork to the Black.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM...

  12. NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    We monitored concentrations of nutrients, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other parameters in 17 headwater streams, at three sites on the main stem, and in three major tributaries near their confluence with the South Fork Broad River on a monthly basis for over a year. Concent...

  13. Double Moutain Fork Brazos River between Lubbock and Buffalo Lakes, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joerns, J.O.

    1955-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study quantity, quality, and possible sources of the low flow and spring inflow of the Double Mountain Fork of the Brazos River between the Lubbock sewage disposal plant, 3 miles southeast of Lubbock, and a County Road crossing about 15 miles downstream and 4.2 miles northeast of Slaton, Lubbock County (fig. 1).

  14. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling.

    PubMed

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, ?eslovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-12-01

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. In more general terms, we suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal. PMID:26350214

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  16. Assessment of the Iowa River's South Fork Watershed: Part 1. Water Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The South Fork of the Iowa River drains 78,000 ha under intensive, high-production agriculture. About 100 swine CAFOs generate manure applied onto about a quarter of the watershed annually. Hydric soils cover 54% of the watershed because the young glacial terrain is poorly dissected. Artificial subs...

  17. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  2. WATER QUALITY AND CONSERVATION PRACTICES IN THE IOWA RIVER'S SOUTH FORK WATERSHED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Iowa River's South Fork, one of 12 ARS CEAP watersheds, drains 87,000 ha (218,000 ac) in Iowa. The area is intensively managed for high-production agriculture. About 85% of the area is under corn-soybean rotations. There are about 100 confined feeding operations generating manure that is applied...

  3. SOUTH FORK COEUR D'ALENE RIVER, NORTHERN IDAHO. DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METAL LOADINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study is to determine the current distribution of metals loadings to the South Fork Coeur dAlene River, Idaho (17010301, 17010303). Water quality and flow data obtained from EPA Region 10 for September 1986 and September 1987 are used to determine loadings du...

  4. CLARK FORK RIVER AND LAKE PEND OREILLE - IDHW-DOE WATER QUALITY STUDY, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under a cooperative agreement, U.S. Geological Survey technicians have been measuring river flow and suspended sediment loads and collecting water samples for laboratory analysis on a monthly basis since July 1984 for the Clark Fork River and Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho (17010213). ...

  5. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, ?eslovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteinsmore »retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.« less

  6. 77 FR 23059 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Determination of Endangered Status for Three Forks...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Forks springsnail as a candidate for listing on October 30, 2001 (66 FR 54808). We first identified the San Bernardino springsnail as a candidate for listing on December 6, 2007 (72 FR 69034). Candidates... Bernardino springsnail. In our most recent annual Candidate Notice of Review dated November 10, 2010 (75...

  7. Water Quality and Conservation Practices in the South Fork of the Iowa River

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The South Fork of the Iowa River drains 87,000 ha under intensive, high-production agriculture. About 100 swine confined animal feeding operation (CAFOs) generate manure applied onto about a quarter of the watershed annually. Hydric soils cover 54% of the watershed because the young glacial terrain ...

  8. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND ENTEROCOCCUS IN THE SOUTH FORK OF THE IOWA RIVER WATERSHED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined swine production has increased in Iowa over the last decade and there is uncertainty about the impact of these operations on water quality. We have monitored the populations of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus in the 78,000 ha South Fork of the Iowa River watershed from 2003 through 2005 t...

  9. 75 FR 47621 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the North Fork Rancheria's Proposed 305-Acre Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...This notice advises the public that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as lead agency, with the North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians (Tribe), California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), Madera Irrigation District, City of Madera, National Indian Gaming Commission (NIGC), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as cooperating agencies, intends to file a Final Environmental Impact......

  10. 75 FR 47621 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the North Fork Rancheria's Proposed 305-Acre Trust...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ...four bars and a lounge. The hotel would include 200 rooms, a...A) The proposed casino and hotel alternative; (B) a reduced-intensity...North Fork Rancheria's Hotel/Casino, Fee-to-Trust...Environmental, Cultural Resources Management and Safety, at the...

  11. Analysis of topoisomerase function in bacterial replication fork movement: Use of

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    ( ) supercoils in vivo. Materials and Methods Bacterial Strains and Plasmids. The bacterial strains usedAnalysis of topoisomerase function in bacterial replication fork movement: Use of DNA microarrays of ( ) supercoils in plasmid DNA in vivo, suggesting that topo IV can promote replication by removing ( ) supercoils

  12. Grand unified models and cosmology

    E-print Network

    Rachel Jeannerot

    2006-04-28

    The cosmological consequences of particle physics grand unified theories (GUTs) are studied. Cosmological models are implemented in realistic particle physics models. Models consistent from both particle physics and cosmological considerations are selected. (...)

  13. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Dissolved-Solids Load in Henrys Fork Upstream from the Confluence with Antelope Wash, Wyoming, Water Years 1970-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Katharine; Kenney, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Henrys Fork was estimated by using data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station 09229500, Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. The annual dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 ranged from 18,300 tons in 1977 to 123,300 tons in 1983. Annual streamflows for this period ranged from 14,100 acre-feet in 1977 to 197,500 acre-feet in 1983. The 25-percent trimmed mean dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 was 44,300 tons per year at Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. Previous simulations using a SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model for dissolved solids specific to water year 1991 conditions in the Upper Colorado River Basin predicted an annual dissolved-solids load of 25,000 tons for the Henrys Fork Basin upstream from Antelope Wash. On the basis of computed dissolved-solids load data from Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah, together with estimated annual dissolved-solids load from Antelope Wash and Peoples Canal, this prediction was adjusted to 37,200 tons. As determined by simulations with the Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model, approximately 56 percent (14,000 tons per year) of the dissolved-solids load at Henrys Fork upstream from Antelope Wash is associated with the 21,500 acres of irrigated agricultural lands in the upper Henrys Fork Basin.

  16. Direct comparisons of hand and mouth kinematics during grasping, feeding and fork-feeding actions

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, D. J.; Culham, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    While a plethora of studies have examined the kinematics of human reach-to-grasp actions, few have investigated feeding, another ethologically important real-world action. Two seminal studies concluded that the kinematics of the mouth during feeding are comparable to those of the hand during grasping (Castiello, 1997; Churchill et al., 1999); however, feeding was done with a fork or spoon, not with the hand itself. Here, we directly compared grasping and feeding kinematics under equivalent conditions. Participants were presented with differently sized cubes of cheese (10-, 20- or 30-mm on each side) and asked to use the hand to grasp them or to use a fork to spear them and then bring them to the mouth to bite. We measured the apertures of the hand during grasping and the teeth during feeding, as well as reaching kinematics of the arm in both tasks. As in many past studies, we found that the hand oversized considerably larger (~11–27 mm) than the food item during grasping; moreover, the amount of oversizing scaled with food size. Surprisingly, regardless of whether the hand or fork was used to transport the food, the mouth oversized only slightly larger (~4–11 mm) than the food item during biting and the oversizing did not increase with food size. Total movement times were longer when using the fork compared to the hand, particularly when using the fork to bring food to the mouth. While reach velocity always peaked approximately halfway through the movement, relative to the reach the mouth opened more slowly than the hand, perhaps because less time was required for the smaller oversizing. Taken together, our results show that while many aspects of kinematics share some similarity between grasping and feeding, oversizing may reflect strategies unique to the hand vs. mouth (such as the need to have the digits approach the target surface perpendicularly for grip stability during lifting) and differences in the neural substrates of grasping and feeding. PMID:26539101

  17. Simple force balance accelerometer/seismometer based on a tuning fork displacement sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart-Watson, D.; Tapson, J.

    2004-09-01

    Seismometers and microelectromechanical system accelerometers use the force-balance principle to obtain measurements. In these instruments the displacement of a mass object by an unknown force is sensed using a very high-resolution displacement sensor. The position of the object is then stabilized by applying an equal and opposite force to it. The magnitude of the stabilizing force is easily measured, and is assumed to be equivalent to the unknown force. These systems are critically dependent on the displacement sensor. In this article we use a resonant quartz tuning fork as the sensor. The tuning fork is operated so that its oscillation is lightly damped by the proximity of the movable mass object. Changes in the position of the mass object cause changes in the phase of the fork's resonance; this is used as the feedback variable in controlling the mass position. We have developed an acceleration sensor using this principle. The mass object is a piezoelectric bimorph diaphragm which is anchored around its perimeter, allowing direct electronic control of the displacement of its center. The tuning fork is brought very close to the diaphragm center, and is connected into a self-oscillating feedback circuit which has phase and amplitude as outputs. The diaphragm position is adjusted by a feedback loop, using phase as the feedback variable, to keep it in a constant position with respect to the tuning fork. The measured noise for this sensor is approximately 10.0 mg in a bandwidth of 100 Hz, which is substantially better than commercial systems of equivalent cost and size.

  18. Decrease in smoking prevalence--Minnesota, 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-02-11

    Following the landmark 1998 settlement of the lawsuit, State of Minnesota versus Philip Morris, Inc., et al., Minnesota implemented a series of tobacco control efforts to limit the harm caused by tobacco use. In 2001, quitline services for tobacco users without health insurance coverage for cessation services were introduced and statewide mass media campaigns publicizing them were initiated. In 2005, Minnesota imposed a $0.75 per pack tax on cigarettes, followed in 2009 by a $0.62 per pack increase in federal excise tax, contributing in large part to a more than $2 increase in the average price of cigarettes. In 2007, a comprehensive, statewide smoke-free law was passed. Using surveillance data from the Minnesota Adult Tobacco Survey (MATS) and cigarette pack sales data, this report examines the effects of these tobacco-related public health efforts. Compared with a 15% decline in national adult smoking prevalence since 1999, adult smoking prevalence in Minnesota decreased 27.1%, from 22.1% in 1999 to 16.1% in 2010. During the same period, per capita cigarette sales in Minnesota decreased 40%. In addition, in 2010 compared with 1999, a higher percentage of adults reported that smoking was restricted in their homes (87.2% versus 64.5%), and adults were less likely to report exposure to secondhand smoke (45.6% versus 67.2%). In the past decade, Minnesota has benefited from sustained tobacco control. Future progress in decreasing adult smoking and reducing exposure to secondhand smoke will depend on a concerted effort across the public health community to keep tobacco control a priority. PMID:21307824

  19. Minnesota court overturns ban on Medicaid coverage for abortion.

    PubMed

    1994-06-24

    Hennipin County District Court Judge William Posten issued a decision on June 16 striking down Minnesota's near ban on abortion coverage for low-income women. Ruling in Women of the State of Minnesota vs. Haas-Steffen, Judge Posten found that the state Constitution's rights of privacy and equality are more protective of women's reproductive choices than the corresponding federal rights. Holding that "the state's selective funding of childbirth over abortion impinges on an indigent woman's fundamental right to decide for herself whether to continue or terminate her pregnancy," the state district court permanently enjoined enforcement of the measure. Minnesota must now cover all medically necessary abortions for women receiving Medicaid. For more than 15 years, the statutes and regulations invalidated by Judge Posten have limited abortion coverage to cases of life endangerment or reported rape or incest. State officials have indicated that they will seek a stay and expedited review of Judge Posten's decision from the Minnesota Supreme Court. Filed on March 8, 1993, the Minnesota case is one of 5 such lawsuits brought by CRLP. Last December, in a similar case, the West Virginia Supreme Court struck down that state's ban on Medicaid coverage for abortions. Similar CRLP cases are still pending in Florida, Texas, and Montana. Plaintiffs--a class of Minnesota Medicaid-eligible women seeking abortions, Dr. Jane Hodgson, Pro-Choice Resources, Women's Health Center, Midwest Health Center for Women, and Meadowbrook Women's Clinic, on behalf of themselves and the women they serve--are represented by CRLP's Simon Heller, Janet Benshoof, and Lenora Lapidus, along with Minnesota attorney Linda Ojala. PMID:12345511

  20. Diabase dikes of the Midcontinent Rift in Minnesota: a record of Keweenawan magmatism and tectonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.C.; Chandler, V.C.

    1985-01-01

    Swarms of both reversed-polarity (R, older) and normal-polarity (N, younger) basaltic dikes help to define the evolution of the Minnesota portion of the Midcontinent Rift of North America. Each swarm, representing fissure-feeders for a package of overlying plateau lavas now eroded away, shows the direction of least principal stress at that time and place in the complex evolution of this abortive but nearly-successful rift. Paleomagnetic pole determinations for Carlton county (CC) and Grand Portage (GP) R dikes are coincident along the Logan Loop of the Proterozoic track, showing essential contemporaneity, though their trends are different (N.30/sup 0/E vs. N. 70-90/sup 0/E.) and they are 250 km apart. These poles match that of the R lavas of the North Shore Volcanic Group (NSVG) and imply a younger age than the R Logan sills and dikes. The geochemistry of the dikes (71 analyses) also correlates well with NSVG flows, ranging from olivine tholeiites to transitional basalts and basaltic andesites and is similar to tholeiites of Columbia River, Parana, and Tertiary No. Atlantic provinces. Though each swarm shows a range of compositions, some are dominantly more evolved, whereas others contain more primitive dikes with higher Al, Mg/Fe, Cr and Ni and lower Fe, Ti, P and LIL's. An early major episode of rifting during the R polarity interval was followed by at least one major N episode in Minnesota before the final one along the present Lake Superior syncline axis. Rifting directions and mantle sources were different for each episode as shown by cross-trending dike sets, indicating complex rift development.

  1. 75 FR 81555 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Sulfur Dioxide SIP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ...Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Sulfur Dioxide SIP Revision for Marathon Petroleum St. Paul Park AGENCY: Environmental Protection...sulfur dioxide State Implementation Plan revision request for Marathon Petroleum in St. Paul Park, Minnesota. This submittal...

  2. 75 FR 6224 - Northern States Power Company of Minnesota; Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ... Northern States Power Company of Minnesota; Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant Environmental Assessment... environmental assessment and published a finding of no significant impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security... Northern States Power Company of Minnesota (NSPM) for operation of Monticello Nuclear Generating...

  3. 76 FR 80395 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Minnesota Indian Affairs Council, Bemidji, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ...affiliated with the human remains may contact the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council...affiliation with the human remains should contact the Minnesota Indian Affairs Council at...identify these human remains as pre-contact American [[Page 80396

  4. 76 FR 72196 - CRD Hydroelectric LLC; Western Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; Notice of Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ...Hydroelectric LLC; Western Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; Notice of Application for Transfer...transferor) and Western Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (transferee) filed an application...Project, No. 12576, located on the Des Monies River in Marion County, Iowa....

  5. The University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital Research Fund 2015 Request for Proposals

    E-print Network

    The University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital Research Fund 2015 Request for Proposals at the University of Minnesota through the Masonic Children's Hospital Research Fund. Two types of awards

  6. 75 FR 45568 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...revises the Minnesota SIP by updating information regarding the heat and steam distributor facility located in Fridley, Minnesota. The source...5. [FR Doc. 2010-18565 Filed 8-2-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

  7. ANALYZING THE EFFECTS OF COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS TO PREVENT CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE IN MINNESOTA

    E-print Network

    Schober, Daniel John

    2008-08-20

    that Stop It Now! Minnesota facilitated numerous changes to the environment to prevent child sexual abuse. Preventative behavior in the form of Helpline calls increased, and reports of CSA in Minnesota decreased. These results suggest that Stop It Now...

  8. Biomass of shrub - dominated wetlands in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly-McCarthy, B.J.; Grigal, D.F.

    1985-12-01

    Aboveground-shrub biomass was estimated in 34 shrub-dominated wetlands in northern Minnesota, representing a range of stocking. Salix was dominant in most wetlands, although a few were dominated by Alnus rugosa and Betula pumila. Shrub biomass ranged from 0.5 to 71.5 Mg/ha with an arithmetic mean of 11.2 Mg/ha. Biomass was distributed lognormally among the wetlands, with a geometric mean of 6.9 Mg/ha. Biomass estimates within wetlands had high uncertainty (10 to 85 percent of the mean) because of both clumpy distribution and large differences in size of shrubs. Eighty percent of the stands were on organic soils (Histosols), with two-thirds on minerotrophic and the remainder on weakly minerotrophic peatlands. Relationships of biomass to basal area and age were statistically significant. Differences in biomass were compared among wetlands grouped by soil or water chemistry. Stand age was a statistically significant covariate, but almost no significant differences in biomass were found among groups based on either criteria. Biomass of the shrubs in these wetlands was about four-fold greater than shrub biomass in mature forests in the area, but only slightly more than 5 percent of total biomass in those forests. These natural stands can be considered to set minimum boundary conditions for biomass production from wetlands. 20 references.

  9. Geologic map of the Dillon quadrangle, Summit and Grand Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Karl S.

    1997-01-01

    New 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping along the Interstate-70 urban corridor in western Colorado, in support of the USGS Central Region State/USGS Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project, is contributing to a more complete understanding of the stratigraphy, structure, tectonic evolution, and hazard potential of this rapidly developing region. The 1:24,000-scale Dillon quadrangle is near the headwaters of the Blue River and straddles features of the Blue River graben (Kellogg, 1999), part of the northernmost reaches of the Rio Grande rift, a major late Oligocene to recent zone of extension that extends from Colorado to Mexico. The Williams Range thrust fault, the western structural margin of the Colorado Front Range, cuts through the center of the quadrangle, although is mostly covered by surficial deposits. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle underlie the Williams Fork Mountains and the ridge immediately east of South Fork Middle Fork River, and include biotite-sillimanite schist and gneiss, amphibolite, and migmatite that are intruded by granite inferred to be part of the 1,667-1,750 Ma Routt Plutonic Suite (Tweto, 1987). The oldest exposed sedimentary unit is the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, but Pennsylvanian Maroon Formation, a sequence of red sandstone, conglomerate, and interbedded shale, underlies the southern part of the quadrangle. The thickest sequence of sedimentary rocks is Cretaceous in age and includes at least 500 m of the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale. Surficial deposits include (1) an old, deeply dissected landslide deposit, possibly as old as Pliocene, on the west flank of the Williams Fork Mountains, (2) deeply weathered, very coarse gravel deposits underlying a mesa in the southwest part of the quadrangle (the Mesa Cortina subdivision. The gravels are gold bearing and were mined by hydraulic methods in the 1800s), (3) moderately to deeply weathered, widespread, bouldery material that is a combination of till of the Bull Lake glaciation, debris-flow deposits, landslide deposits, and possibly pre-Bull Lake till, (4) glacial deposits of both Bull Lake (middle Pleistocene) and Pinedale (late Pleistocene)glaciations, (5) recent landslide deposits, and (6)extensive colluvial and alluvial deposits.

  10. Geologic map of the Dillon quadrangle, Summit and Grand Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Karl S.

    2002-01-01

    New 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping along the Interstate-70 urban corridor in western Colorado, in support of the USGS Central Region State/USGS Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project, is contributing to a more complete understanding of the stratigraphy, structure, tectonic evolution, and hazard potential of this rapidly developing region. The 1:24,000-scale Dillon quadrangle is near the headwaters of the Blue River and straddles features of the Blue River graben (Kellogg, 1999), part of the northernmost reaches of the Rio Grande rift, a major late Oligocene to recent zone of extension that extends from Colorado to Mexico. The Williams Range thrust fault, the western structural margin of the Colorado Front Range, cuts through the center of the quadrangle, although is mostly covered by surficial deposits. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle underlie the Williams Fork Mountains and the ridge immediately east of South Fork Middle Fork River, and include biotite-sillimanite schist and gneiss, amphibolite, and migmatite that are intruded by granite inferred to be part of the 1,667-1,750 Ma Routt Plutonic Suite (Tweto, 1987). The oldest exposed sedimentary unit is the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, but Pennsylvanian Maroon Formation, a sequence of red sandstone, conglomerate, and interbedded shale, underlies the southern part of the quadrangle. The thickest sequence of sedimentary rocks is Cretaceous in age and includes at least 500 m of the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale. Surficial deposits include (1) an old, deeply dissected landslide deposit, possibly as old as Pliocene, on the west flank of the Williams Fork Mountains, (2) deeply weathered, very coarse gravel deposits underlying a mesa in the southwest part of the quadrangle (the Mesa Cortina subdivision. The gravels are gold bearing and were mined by hydraulic methods in the 1800s), (3) moderately to deeply weathered, widespread, bouldery material that is a combination of till of the Bull Lake glaciation, debris-flow deposits, landslide deposits, and possibly pre-Bull Lake till, (4) glacial deposits of both Bull Lake (middle Pleistocene) and Pinedale (late Pleistocene)glaciations, (5) recent landslide deposits, and (6)extensive colluvial and alluvial deposits.

  11. Winning and Losing Tree Species of Reassembly in Minnesota’s Mixed and Broadleaf Forests

    PubMed Central

    Hanberry, Brice B.; Palik, Brian J.; He, Hong S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined reassembly of winning and losing tree species, species traits including shade and fire tolerance, and associated disturbance filters and forest ecosystem types due to rapid forest change in the Great Lakes region since 1850. We identified winning and losing species by changes in composition, distribution, and site factors between historical and current surveys in Minnesota’s mixed and broadleaf forests. In the Laurentian Mixed Forest, shade-intolerant aspen replaced shade-intolerant tamarack as the most dominant tree species. Fire-tolerant white pine and jack pine decreased, whereas shade-tolerant ashes, maples, and white cedar increased. In the Eastern Broadleaf Forest, fire-tolerant white oaks and red oaks decreased, while shade-tolerant ashes, American basswood, and maples increased. Tamarack, pines, and oaks have become restricted to sites with either wetter or sandier and drier soils due to increases in aspen and shade-tolerant, fire-sensitive species on mesic sites. The proportion of shade-tolerant species increased in both regions, but selective harvest reduced the applicability of functional groups alone to specify winners and losers. Harvest and existing forestry practices supported aspen dominance in mixed forests, although without aspen forestry and with fire suppression, mixed forests will transition to a greater composition of shade-tolerant species, converging to forests similar to broadleaf forests. A functional group framework provided a perspective of winning and losing species and traits, selective filters, and forest ecosystems that can be generalized to other regions, regardless of species identity. PMID:23613911

  12. Association of Pine Wood Nematode with Stressed Trees in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin

    E-print Network

    Association of Pine Wood Nematode with Stressed Trees in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin M. J. 1982. Association of pine wood nematode with stressed trees in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. Plant Disease 66:934- 937. Trees infected with the pine wood nematode BursapheJenchus xylophiJusin Minnesota

  13. American Society of Mammalogists Seasonal Weight Changes, Mortality, and Population Structure of Raccoons in Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    of Raccoons in Minnesota Author(s): L. David Mech, Donald M. Barnes, John R. Tester Reviewed work(s): Source, MORTALITY, AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF RACCOONS IN MINNESOTA L. DAVIDMECH,DONALDM. BARNES,ANDJOHNR. TESTER ABSTRACT.-A population of raccoons (Procyon lotor) in east-central Minnesota was studied from September

  14. The University of Notre Dame The Developmental History of Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    The University of Notre Dame The Developmental History of Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota Author Midland Naturalist. http://www.jstor.org #12;The Developmental History of Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota* Raymond L. Lindeman The Anoka Sand Plain of east centralMinnesota is liberallysprinkledwith lakes, bogs

  15. 78 FR 75581 - Minnesota Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...period. Second, Minnesota Life recaptures all of the Credit...recaptured. Third, Minnesota Life will recapture all of the Credit...annuitization were elected, a pro rata portion of the Credit Enhancements...recaptured. Since Minnesota Life does not recapture the...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION AT THE EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK SITE, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historic accidental release of mercury-contaminated material associated with nuclear weapons production at East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) resulted in stream and floodplain contamination. he EFPC is designated as an Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) operable unit under the Comprehensive ...

  17. Using Caffeine as a Water Quality Indicator in the Ambient Monitoring Program for Third Fork Creek Watershed, Durham, North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Porché L

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine has been suggested as a chemical indicator for domestic wastewater in freshwater systems, although it is not included in water quality monitoring programs. The Third Fork Creek watershed in Durham, NC, is highly urbanized, with a history of receiving untreated wastewater from leaking and overflowing sanitary sewers. The poor water quality originating in the Third Fork Creek watershed threatens its intended uses and jeopardizes drinking water, aquatic life, and recreational activities provided by Jordan Lake. Organic waste contaminants have been detected in both Third Fork Creek watershed and Jordan Lake; however, the sampling periods were temporary, resulting in a few samples collected during nonstorm periods. It is recommended that (1) the concentration of caffeine and other organic waste contaminants are determined during storm and nonstorm periods and (2) caffeine is monitored regularly with traditional water quality indicators to evaluate the health of Third Fork Creek watershed. PMID:26157335

  18. 76 FR 29721 - Lost River and Challis-Yankee Fork Ranger Districts, Salmon-Challis National Forest; ID; Lost...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ...Challis-Yankee Fork Ranger Districts, Salmon- Challis National Forest; ID; Lost...National Forest System lands managed by the Salmon-Challis National Forest. This project...Lands Center, 1206 S. Challis Street, Salmon, ID 83467; telephone:...

  19. 77 FR 39208 - Notice of Extension of Public Comment Period for Draft Environmental Impact Statement: North Fork...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ...Statement: North Fork Eagle Creek Wells Special Use Authorization AGENCY...operation of four municipal supply water wells located on National Forest...adverse impacts to surface water and groundwater resources from well operations. The...

  20. Spatial and Temporal influence of Redondo Peak headwaters in the East Fork Jemez River using Principal Component Analysis approach, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Rodrigo; Meixner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Valles Caldera is a volcanic collapse feature located in the Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico, southwestern United States. This region is characterized by a bimodal precipitation pattern, i.e. spring snowmelt and summer monsoon rains. Two main streams flow through the Valles Caldera: San Antonio and East Fork Jemez. The junction of these two rivers form the Jemez River which is an important contributor to the Rio Grande that supplies water to cities located in southwestern U.S. Redondo Peak is located in the center of the Valles Caldera that has several springs that drain around all sides of the peak with different hydrologic responses. The main catchments (headwaters) identified in Redondo Peak are: La Jara, Upper Jaramillo, History Grove and Upper Redondo. The main questions that are going to be answered in this research are: Do these head waters affect the chemistry in East Fork Jemez river? and if so, how does this influence vary in space and time? A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed using analyzed water samples for water isotopes and major anions and cations. These samples were collected from the flumes located at each catchment in Redondo Peak, and at different locations along the East Fork Jemez. Samples from the most consistent analytes from 2011 to 2013 were used in this present work. A first PCA was performed to assess how different the La Jara catchment is from Upper Redondo, Upper Jaramillo and History Grove based on the geochemistry of each basin. Prior the analysis the data needs to be normalized in order to avoid biasing towards extreme values. Since La Jara is the reference site for this analysis, its mean and standard deviation were used to normalized the data set of the other catchments. In order to simplify this analysis the two first principal components for each catchment were used to do the projections regardless how much of the variability can be explained. However future analyses are going to be performed with those principal components that explain at least 90% of the variability of the data set. This analysis showed that Upper Jaramillo and History Grove spaces plotted close to La Jara space, suggesting that these three catchment share one or several end members, whereas Upper Redondo space is more scatter therefore is more than likely speak of different source of water. In order to observe a temporal variability the Euclidian Distance from the mean of the reference site to the other sites was calculated. Throughout the year the catchments seem to be similar in composition early the year, spring time, whereas in summer a remarkable difference is noticed from one catchment to the other. The proposed methodology is going to be applied using data from the East Fork Jemez river in different locations to evaluate what is going to be the influence of the these headwaters on these locations.

  1. FANCD2-Controlled Chromatin Access of the Fanconi-Associated Nuclease FAN1 Is Crucial for the Recovery of Stalled Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2Ub) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2Ub isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation. PMID:25135477

  2. SU(6) grand unified model

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, J.X.

    1986-03-14

    A model of grand unified theory based on SU(6) gauge group is proposed. It can accommodate two generations of ordinary fermions with V-A weak coupling and two generations of weird fermions with V+A weak coupling. In this model, a new discrete symmetry is introduced that insures existence of fermions with lower masses when SU(6) gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. Simple Higgs fields with appropriate vacuum expectation values are chosen, so that the masses of weird fermions are heavier than those of ordinary fermions. This model also gives the same value of Weinberg angle, sin sq of Theta/sub w/ = 3/8, as in the usual SU(5) grand unified model at the grand unified scale.

  3. The Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort Study: Design and Baseline Results

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Jean; Chen, Vincent; Perry, Cheryl; Oswald, John; Willmorth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Minnesota Adolescent Community Cohort (MACC) Study is a population-based, longitudinal study that enrolled 3636 youth from Minnesota and 605 youth from comparison states age 12 to 16 years in 2000–2001. Participants have been surveyed by telephone semi-annually about their tobacco-related attitudes and behaviors. The goals of the study are to evaluate the effects of the Minnesota Youth Tobacco Prevention Initiative and its shutdown on youth smoking patterns, and to better define the patterns of development of tobacco use in adolescents. A multilevel sample was constructed representing individuals, local jurisdictions and the entire state, and data are collected to characterize each of these levels. This paper presents the details of the multilevel study design. We also provide baseline information about MACC participants including demographics and tobacco-related attitudes and behaviors. This paper describes smoking prevalence at the local level, and compares MACC participants to the state as a whole. PMID:21360063

  4. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show,...

  5. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show,...

  6. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show,...

  7. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show,...

  8. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand...Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...WATERS § 100.906 Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show,...

  9. RECQ1 is required for cellular resistance to replication stress and catalyzes strand exchange on stalled replication fork structures.

    PubMed

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L; Brosh, Robert M; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-11-15

    RECQ1 is the most abundant of the five human RecQ helicases, but little is known about its biological significance. Recent studies indicate that RECQ1 is associated with origins of replication, suggesting a possible role in DNA replication. However, the functional role of RECQ1 at damaged or stalled replication forks is still unknown. Here, for the first time, we show that RECQ1 promotes strand exchange on synthetic stalled replication fork-mimicking structures and comparatively analyze RECQ1 with the other human RecQ helicases. RECQ1 actively unwinds the leading strand of the fork, similar to WRN, while RECQ4 and RECQ5? can only unwind the lagging strand of the replication fork. Human replication protein A modulates the strand exchange activity of RECQ1 and shifts the equilibrium more to the unwinding mode, an effect also observed for WRN. Stable depletion of RECQ1 affects cell proliferation and renders human cells sensitive to various DNA damaging agents that directly or indirectly block DNA replication fork progression. Consequently, loss of RECQ1 activates DNA damage response signaling, leads to hyper-phosphorylation of RPA32 and activation of CHK1, indicating replication stress. Furthermore, depletion of RECQ1 leads to chromosomal condensation defects and accumulation of under-condensed chromosomes. Collectively, our observations provide a new insight into the role of RECQ1 in replication fork stabilization and its role in the DNA damage response to maintain genomic stability. PMID:23095637

  10. Cancer mortality in agricultural regions of Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Schreinemachers, D M; Creason, J P; Garry, V F

    1999-03-01

    Because of its unique geology, Minnesota can be divided into four agricultural regions: south-central region one (corn, soybeans); west-central region two (wheat, corn, soybeans); northwest region three (wheat, sugar beets, potatoes); and northeast region four (forested and urban in character). Cancer mortality (1980-1989) in agricultural regions one, two, and three was compared to region four. Using data compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics, cancer mortality was summarized by 5-year age groups, sex, race, and county. Age-standardized mortality rate ratios were calculated for white males and females for all ages combined, and for children aged 0-14. Increased mortality rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were observed for the following cancer sites: region one--lip (men), standardized rate ratio (SRR) = 2.70 (CI, 1.08-6.71); nasopharynx (women), SRR = 3.35 (CI, 1.20-9.31); region two--non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (women), SRR = 1.35 (CI, 1.09-1.66); and region three--prostate (men), SRR = 1.12 (CI, 1.00-1.26); thyroid (men), SRR = 2.95 (CI, 1.35-6.44); bone (men), SRR = 2.09 (CI, 1. 00-4.34); eye (women), SRR = 5.77 (CI, 1.90-17.50). Deficits of smoking-related cancers were noted. Excess cancers reported are consistent with earlier reports of agriculturally related cancers in the midwestern United States. However, reports on thyroid and bone cancer in association with agricultural pesticides are few in number. The highest use of fungicides occurs in region three. Ethylenebisdithiocarbamates, whose metabolite is a known cause of thyroid cancer in rats, are frequently applied. This report provides a rationale for evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of this suspect agent in humans. PMID:10064550

  11. Technical Assistance Project for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.

    2006-12-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request for technical assistance from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy supported the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in its response to this request through the Technical Assistance Project. Discussion with the MPCA identified the following as the highest-priority questions: What is the effect of (1) size of Renewable Energy Reserve (RER) and (2) duration of allocation award on (a) NOx emissions in Minnesota and (b) retail electricity prices? What data is available on the response of wind energy development to financial incentives? This report addresses those questions.

  12. DNA polymerase ? modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Anna M.; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P.

    2013-11-01

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase ? (pol?) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of pol? in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking pol? than in cells expressing pol?. This provides the first direct evidence that pol? modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated pol?-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of pol?. Pol?-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  13. Landslide Sediment Production in the Middle Fork Eel River: 1940-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente, J. A.; Snavely, W. P.; Miller, A. R.; Elder, D.

    2003-12-01

    A sequential air photo analysis was conducted by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and North State Resources in the 753 square mile Middle Fork Eel River basin, under contract to US Environmental Protection Agency as part of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessment. All landslides visible on air photos which appeared to deliver sediment to the stream system were mapped, and the delivered volume estimated. Landslides on undisturbed hillslopes were classified as natural, those within recently burned areas as fire-related, those in harvest units as harvest-related, and those adjacent to roads as road-related. About 5% of the landslides were field verified. Data were then summed for three air photo intervals, spanning the period 1940-2002. A total of 4,122 landslides were inventoried, delivering a total of 24,969,836 cubic yards of sediment to the stream system, and occupying 13,526 acres. The photo interval 1940-1969 accounted for 79% of the delivered volume, 1970-1984 for 8%, and 1985-2002 for 13%. This pattern is similar to that observed in many NW California watersheds where the storms of 1955 and 1964 generated large volumes of landslide sediment. Landslide volume per unit area delivered to streams from 1940-2002 averaged 0.84 cubic yards/acre/year for the Middle Fork Eel, and was highest in the Black Butte River, and Williams-Thatcher subwatersheds which exhibited rates of 1.55 and 1.31 cubic yards/acre/year respectively. The lowest delivery rates were in Upper Middle Fork (0.29), and Round Valley (0.44). Natural landslides accounted for 89.9% of the total, fire-related for 1.9%, harvest-related for 0.4%, road-related for 3.4%, and undetermined 4.4%. A large proportion of the total delivered sediment originated from the toes of large deep seated landslides adjacent to streams. Many of these landslides exhibited multiple years of activity, shedding debris slides of varying sizes at different times. The mapped active landslides are concentrated near streams, but do not display any obvious affinity with specific bedrock units. The landslide sediment delivery rate in the Middle Fork Eel basin determined by this study (0.84 cuyd/ac/yr) compares to published values for other parts of the Eel basin as follows: North Fork Eel 0.16 (USFS, 2003); Middle Fork Eel 5.93 (USGS, 1986, total sediment); South Fork Eel 2.26 (Tetra Tech, 1998). Different techniques were used in each study, making direct comparison problematic. A model employed by the USFS in 2001 predicted landslide rates (cubic yards/acre/year) very similar to those measured by this study: Black Butte River 1.55 measured versus 1.33 predicted; Elk/Dos Rios 0.45 vs 0.96; Upper Middle Fork 0.29 versus 0.62; Williams Thatcher 1.31 vs 1.17.

  14. Orbital angular momentum entanglement via fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Lu, L L; Xu, P; Zhong, M L; Bai, Y F; Zhu, S N

    2015-01-26

    We report a compact scheme for the generation and manipulation of photon pairs entangled in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) from the fork-poling quadratic nonlinear crystal. The ?(2)-modulation in this crystal is designed for fulfilling a tilted quasi-phase-matching geometry to ensure the efficient generation of entangled photons as well as for transferring of topological charge of the crystal to the photon pairs. Numerical results show that the OAM of photon pair is anti-correlated and the degree of OAM entanglement can be enhanced by modulating the topological charge of crystal, which indicates a feasible extension to high-dimensional OAM entanglement. These studies suggest that the fork-poling nonlinear photonic crystal a unique platform for compact generation and manipulation of high-dimensional and high-order OAM entanglement, which may have potential applications in quantum communication, quantum cryptography and quantum remote sensing. PMID:25835879

  15. Backwater at bridges and densely wooded flood plains, west fork Amite River near Liberty, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colson, B.E.; Ming, C.O.; Arcement, George J.

    1979-01-01

    Floodflow data that will provide a base for evaluating digital models relating to open-channel flow were obtained at 22 sites on streams in Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Thirty-five floods were measured. Analysis of the data indicated methods currently in use would be inaccurate where densely vegetated flood plains are crossed by highway embankments and single-opening bridges. This atlas presents flood information at the site on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS. Water depths , velocities, and discharges through bridge openings on West Fork Amite River near Liberty, MS for floods of December 6, 1971 , and March 25, 1973, are shown, together with peak water-surface elevations along embankments and along cross sections. Manning 's roughness coefficient values in different parts of the flood plain are shown on maps, and flood-frequency relations are shown on a graph. (USGS).

  16. External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Quartz Tuning Fork Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of Broad Absorption Features

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrate mid-infrared spectroscopy of large molecules with broad absorption features using a tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. Absorption spectra for two different Freons are measured over the range 1130-1185 cm-1 with 0.2 cm-1 resolution via laser photoacoustic spectroscopy with quartz tuning forks as acoustic transducers. The measured spectra are in excellent agreement with published reference absorption spectra.

  17. Brief reconnaissance study for the addition of hydropower for Carr Fork Dam, Sassafras, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, T.G. Jr.

    1982-05-24

    The feasibility of retrofitting the Carr Fork Dam near Hazard, KY for power generation was examined. This dam has a developable head of 80 ft and was built in 1975 to provide flood protection. The study of environmental, institutional, safety, and economic factors showed that the total investment cost would be $909,600 and that hydroelectric power development at this site is not feasible unless a higher price could be obtained for the power sold. (LCL)

  18. On Bandwidth Characteristics of Tuning Fork Micro-Gyroscope with Mechanically Coupled Sense Mode

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yunfang; Li, Hongsheng; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Wang, Haipeng

    2014-01-01

    The bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope with mechanically coupled sense mode were investigated in this paper to provide some references for mechanical bandwidth design. The concept of sense mode mechanical coupling is introduced first. Theoretical frequency response analyses were then carried out on the mechanical part of the gyroscope. Equations representing the relationships between the differential output signal and the frequency of the input angular rate were deduced in full frequency range and further simplified in low frequency range. Based on these equations, bandwidth characteristics under ideal and non-ideal conditions are discussed. Analytical results show that under ideal conditions, the bandwidth characteristics of a tuning fork micro-gyroscope are similar to those of a single mass micro-gyroscope, but under non-ideal conditions, especially when sense mass and/or stiffness are asymmetric, the bandwidth characteristics would be quite different because the in-phase mode would participate in the anti-phase vibration response. Experimental verifications were carried out on two micro-gyroscope prototypes designed in our laboratory. The deduced equations and analytical results can be used in guiding the mechanical bandwidth design of tuning fork micro-gyroscopes with mechanically coupled sense mode. PMID:25051030

  19. Validation of a Monte Carlo Model of the Fork Detector with a Calibrated Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, Alessandro; Mihailescu, Liviu-Cristian

    2014-02-01

    The investigation of experimental methods for safeguarding spent fuel elements is one of the research areas at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK•CEN. A version of the so-called Fork Detector has been designed at SCK•CEN and is in use at the Belgian Nuclear Power Plant of Doel for burnup determination purposes. The Fork Detector relies on passive neutron and gamma measurements for the assessment of the burnup and safeguards verification activities. In order to better evaluate and understand the method and in view to extend its capabilities, an effort to model the Fork detector was made with the code MCNPX. A validation of the model was done in the past using spent fuel measurement data. This paper reports about the measurements carried out at the Laboratory for Nuclear Calibrations (LNK) of SCK•CEN with a 252Cf source calibrated according to ISO 8529 standards. The experimental data are presented and compared with simulations. In the simulations, not only was the detector modeled but also the measurement room was taken into account based on the available design information. The results of this comparison exercise are also presented in this paper.

  20. Far-travelled permian chert of the North Fork terrane, Klamath mountains, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, E.A.; Irwin, W.P.; Blome, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    Permian chert in the North Fork terrane and correlative rocks of the Klamath Mountains province has a remanent magnetization that is prefolding and presumably primary. Paleomagnetic results indicate that the chert formed at a paleolatitude of 8.6?? ?? 2.5?? but in which hemisphere remains uncertain. This finding requires that these rocks have undergone at least 8.6?? ?? 4.4?? of northward transport relative to Permian North America since their deposition. Paleontological evidence suggests that the Permian limestone of the Eastern Klamath terrane originated thousands of kilometers distant from North America. The limestone of the North Fork terrane may have formed at a similar or even greater distance as suggested by its faunal affinity to the Eastern Klamath terrane and more westerly position. Available evidence indicates that convergence of the North Fork and composite Central Metamorphic-Eastern Klamath terranes occurred during Triassic or Early Jurassic time and that their joining together was a Middle Jurassic event. Primary and secondary magnetizations indicate that the new composite terrane containing these and other rocks of the Western Paleozoic and Triassic belt behaved as a single rigid block that has been latitudinally concordant with the North American craton since Middle Jurassic time.

  1. Fork sensing and strand switching control antagonistic activities of RecQ helicases

    PubMed Central

    Klaue, Daniel; Kobbe, Daniela; Kemmerich, Felix; Kozikowska, Alicja; Puchta, Holger; Seidel, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    RecQ helicases have essential roles in maintaining genome stability during replication and in controlling double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Little is known about how the different RecQ helicases found in higher eukaryotes achieve their specialized and partially opposing functions. Here, we investigate the DNA unwinding of RecQ helicases from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtRECQ2 and AtRECQ3 at the single-molecule level using magnetic tweezers. Although AtRECQ2 predominantly unwinds forked DNA substrates in a highly repetitive fashion, AtRECQ3 prefers to rewind, that is, to close preopened DNA forks. For both enzymes, this process is controlled by frequent strand switches and active sensing of the unwinding fork. The relative extent of the strand switches towards unwinding or towards rewinding determines the predominant direction of the enzyme. Our results provide a simple explanation for how different biological activities can be achieved by rather similar members of the RecQ family. PMID:23771268

  2. Thomas Moran: "The Grand Canyon."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for introducing students in grades four through six to Thomas Moran's painting, "The Grand Canyon." The goal of the lesson is to illustrate the importance of the American West as a subject for artists in the nineteenth century. (JDH)

  3. GRAND DANUBE NO SINGLE SUPPLEMENT

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    GRAND DANUBE PASSAGE NO SINGLE SUPPLEMENT FOR SOLO TRAVELERS CRUISE THE featuring PRAGUE & SOFIA and informa- tion. Single supplement waived for solo travelers! (Limited availability.) AUGUST 22-SEPTEMBER 5 by delving into the rich culture of Prague, and explore its Old Town, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Embark

  4. CCR Grand Rounds and Eminent Lectures

    Cancer.gov

    CCR Grand Rounds NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Grand Rounds is a weekly lecture series addressing current research in clinical and molecular oncology. Speakers are leading national and international researchers and clinicians. Fridays, 12:00 noon

  5. Grande Ronde Subbasin Plan December 31, 2004

    E-print Network

    ...................................................................................................................................2 3.2.3 Aquatic Focal Species Population Delineation and Characterization ........................................................................................................................30 5.2 Aquatic Species and Habitats Problem Statement, Objectives and Strategies Kuchenbecker, Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program #12;Grande Ronde Subbasin Plan Supplement December 2004

  6. Reducing Lead in Drinking Water: A Manual for Minnesota's Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Health, St. Paul.

    This manual was designed to assist Minnesota's schools in minimizing the consumption of lead in drinking water by students and staff. It offers step-by-step instructions for testing and reducing lead in drinking water. The manual answers: Why is lead a health concern? How are children exposed to lead? Why is lead a special concern for schools? How…

  7. Total Energy Management: Award Winning Projects of Minnesota Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Energy and Economic Development, St. Paul.

    The Total Energy Management (TEM) for Minnesota Schools program is a unified, planned approach to reducing the energy use and costs of an individual school or school district. The program is designed to increase energy awareness and improve school energy efficiency through: (1) careful energy accounting; (2) changes in operations and maintenance…

  8. Minnesota State Colleges and Universities '99 Session: Mandates and Curiosities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System, St. Paul.

    This publication highlights and explains relevant Minnesota legislative developments affecting higher education. For each bill, there is a summary provided in plain English, followed by copies of related portions of the legislation. The bills presented are: (1) Higher Education Omnibus Funding Bill (H.F. 2380); (2) Bonding Omnibus Bill (H.F.…

  9. Survey of occupational hazards in Minnesota veterinary practices in 2012.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Heather N; Holzbauer, Stacy M; Smith, Kirk E; Scheftel, Joni M

    2016-01-15

    OBJECTIVE To identify the scope of occupational hazards encountered by veterinary personnel and compare hazard exposures between veterinarians and technicians working in small and large animal practices. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. POPULATION Licensed veterinarians and veterinary staff in Minnesota. PROCEDURES A survey of Minnesota veterinary personnel was conducted between February 1 and December 1, 2012. Adult veterinary personnel working in clinical practice for > 12 months were eligible to participate. Information was collected on various workplace hazards as well as on workplace safety culture. RESULTS 831 eligible people responded, representing approximately 10% of Minnesota veterinary personnel. A greater proportion of veterinarians (93%; 368/394) reported having received preexposure rabies vaccinations than did veterinary technicians (54%; 198/365). During their career, 226 (27%) respondents had acquired at least 1 zoonotic infection and 636 (77%) had been injured by a needle or other sharps. Recapping of needles was reported by 87% of respondents; the most common reason reported by veterinarians (41%; 142/345) and veterinary technicians (71%; 238/333) was being trained to do so at school or work. Recent feelings of depression were reported by 204 (25%) respondents. A greater proportion of technicians (42%; 155/365) than veterinarians (21%; 81/394) indicated working in an environment in which employees experienced some form of workplace abuse. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Veterinary personnel in Minnesota were exposed to several work-related hazards. Practice staff should assess workplace hazards, implement controls, and incorporate instruction on occupational health into employee training. PMID:26720089

  10. Divorce and Special Education in Minnesota. PHP-c104

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    When parents divorce, they sometimes have questions about which parent has rights in special education. The federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Minnesota state special education laws and regulations clearly describe parental rights and the school district's duty to meet them. Most rights are unchanged by divorce. The…

  11. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, A.M.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Winter, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Climatic data are presented for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies, including: water surface temperature, dry-bulb and wet-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations. (USGS)

  12. Climatic data for Williams Lake, Hubbard County, Minnesota, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturrock, A.M.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Scarborough, J.L.; Winter, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    Research on the hydrology of Williams Lake, north-central Minnesota includes study of evaporation. Presented here are those climatic data needed for energy-budget and mass-transfer studies, including: water-surface temperature, dry-bulb air temperatures, wind speed, precipitation, and solar and atmospheric radiation. Data are collected at raft and land stations. (USGS)

  13. 40 CFR 282.73 - Minnesota State-Administered Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with section 9004 of RCRA, 42 U.S.C. 6991c, and 40 CFR part 281, subpart E. If Minnesota obtains.... 282.73 Section 282.73 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... property M. S. 115B.175Voluntary Response Actions; Liability Protection; Procedures M. S. 115B.177Owner...

  14. Report of the Minnesota Inter-Institutional Television Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Inter-Institutional Television.

    In 1965, the Minnesota legislature called for a feasibility study of inter-institutional educational television in higher education. Recommendations resulting from the study, with approval of the Statewide Advisory Committee, were: (1) empower the Liaison and Facilities Commission to manage the project and its funds; (2) provide each 4-year…

  15. 4 www.umcrookston.edu The University of Minnesota is

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    of M, Crookston offers degrees in Applied Health Applied Studies, Business, Manufacturing Management (originally, male plural) Alumnae ­ refers to female, plural Applied studies ­ degree option designed to meet ­ University of Minnesota Abbreviations and Definitions Used in the Torch Lucas explains. "I began searching

  16. Variant Influenza Associated with Live Animal Markets, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Choi, M J; Morin, C A; Scheftel, J; Vetter, S M; Smith, K; Lynfield, R

    2015-08-01

    Variant influenza viruses are swine-origin influenza A viruses that cause illness in humans. Surveillance for variant influenza A viruses, including characterization of exposure settings, is important because of the potential emergence of novel influenza viruses with pandemic potential. In Minnesota, we have documented variant influenza A virus infections associated with swine exposure at live animal markets. PMID:24931441

  17. Shades of Green: Flood control study focused on Duluth, Minnesota

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the aftermath of the economically and environmentally painful flood of 2012, the city of Duluth and the CSC examined ecologically based options to reduce runoff velocities and flood volume in the watershed with assistance and input of Minnesota Duluth's Natural Resources Resea...

  18. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 1999 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids Count Minnesota, Minneapolis.

    This Kids Count report examines statewide trends in the well-being of Minnesota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 12 indicators of well-being: (1) child poverty rate; (2) children in families receiving food stamps; (3) children eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch; (4) births to teenage mothers; (5) low birth weight…

  19. University of Minnesota Medical School Goals and Priorities

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    and sustain a world---class medical school and academic health system that ranks in the top decile nationallyUniversity of Minnesota Medical School Goals and Priorities 2014-2015 Overview: o In 2013 the Medical School developed a strategic plan, Strategic Vision 2025, that set a course for sustained growth

  20. Minnesota Talented Youth Mathematics Project: Evaluation Report 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Peggy A.

    Fifty-seven outstanding students, grades seven to nine, entered the first or second year of the Minnesota Talented Youth Mathematics Project. First year students earned credit for two years of high school algebra in one year; second year students earned high school credit for either transformational or traditional geometry and trigonometry.…

  1. Higher Education in Times of Financial Distress: The Minnesota Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severns, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Like many states, Minnesota has incurred large budget deficits during the past two years. Those deficits have, in turn, led to changes in a number of areas of state government, particularly higher education. Faculty have incurred pay freezes and layoffs, programs have closed, and tuition increased. Campuses within the MnSCU system have been…

  2. Minnesota's Child Support System Fails To Meet Children's Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Kids Count, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This newsletter issue provides an evaluation of child support systems and services of the 87 counties in Minnesota. No county in the state collects enough to support children, child support is often late or not paid in full, children whose parents never married are especially dependent on the child support systems, and child support services vary…

  3. Improved Density Functionals for Water University of Minnesota

    E-print Network

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Improved Density Functionals for Water University of Minnesota NSF ITR-0428774 The ubiquitous attention has focused on using density functional theory (DFT) as a means to study these systems, however the high expense of these simulations has restricted the choice of available density functionals to less

  4. Coordinators of Special Needs in Minnesota. Position Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, Gordon; Weatherman, Richard

    A study was conducted to provide information on the job requirements for Minnesota coordinators of special needs, those people at the local school district level who are responsible for services to handicapped and/or disadvantaged students in vocational education. Information on the coordinator job came from three major sources: the state Plan for…

  5. Minnesota Career Focus. Careers & Training: A Guide for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Economic Security, St. Paul.

    This guide to Minnesota training resources for adults seeking new employment opportunities provides an overview of careers, wages, job availability, and necessary training. Occupations are described in these areas: medical careers; office professions; technical careers; art, writing, and media careers; service careers---food, hair, police;…

  6. First Report of Charcoal Rot of Sunflower in Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field of oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. hybrid 'Pioneer 63M82') was observed with uneven maturation in west central Minnesota near Aldrich (Todd County) in late September, 2009. The field's soil type was sandy loam and cropping history was oats in 2008 preceded by four years of alfalfa. M...

  7. Open Doorway to Truth: Legacy of the Minnesota Tobacco Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Richard D.; Ebbert, Jon O.; Muggli, Monique E.; Lockhart, Nikki J.; Robertson, Channing R.

    2009-01-01

    More than a decade has passed since the conclusion of the Minnesota tobacco trial and the signing of the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) by 46 US State Attorneys General and the US tobacco industry. The Minnesota settlement exposed the tobacco industry's long history of deceptive marketing, advertising, and research and ultimately forced the industry to change its business practices. The provisions for public document disclosure that were included in the Minnesota settlement and the MSA have resulted in the release of approximately 70 million pages of documents and nearly 20,000 other media materials. No comparable dynamic, voluminous, and contemporaneous document archive exists. Only a few single events in the history of public health have had as dramatic an effect on tobacco control as the public release of the tobacco industry's previously secret internal documents. This review highlights the genesis of the release of these documents, the history of the document depositories created by the Minnesota settlement, the scientific and policy output based on the documents, and the use of the documents in furthering global public health strategies. PMID:19411441

  8. Income and Poverty. What the 1990 Census Says about Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichy, John; Craig, William J.

    This report is a look at what the 1990 Census has to say about income and poverty in Minnesota and its major metropolitan area, the Twin Cities (Minneapolis and Saint Paul). The report is organized into five parts, each addressing a different variation on the central theme of income and poverty: (1) Income Overview; (2) Income Types; (3) Poverty…

  9. University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    University of Minnesota Academic Health Center Complementary and Alternative Medicine Survey and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative health care. As stated in a recent NIH document, "CAM practices and Alternative Medicine. Our Academic Health Center (AHC) is the recipient of a NIH CAM education grant. We need

  10. Impact Evaluation: Minnesota Reading Corps K-3 Program. Appendices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovitz, Carrie E.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Hedberg, Eric C.; Silberglitt, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Minnesota Reading Corps (MRC) is the largest AmeriCorps State program in the country. The goal of MRC is to ensure that students become successful readers and meet reading proficiency targets by the end of the third grade. Starting in 2011, the "Corporation for National and Community Service" (CNCS) sponsored a randomized controlled…

  11. General Christopher C. Andrews: Leading the Minnesota Forestry Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Anna M.

    2002-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, America's burgeoning population certainly did grab all the timber it could. Vast pine forests stretched from Maine to Dakota, and the lumber industry voraciously consumed them from east to west. In 1800, the Minnesota territory was sparsely sprinkled with fur traders and American Indians. By 1850, its bounteous forests…

  12. EXCESS CANCER MORTALITY IN AGRICULTURAL REGIONS OF MINNESOTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of its unique geology, Minnesota can be divided into four agricultural regions: south-central region one (corn, soybeans); west-central region two (wheat, corn, soybeans); northwest region three (wheat, sugar beets, potatoes); and northeast region four (forested and urban...

  13. Status, distribution, and movements of martens in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Rogers, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    The decline of martens in Minnesota is reviewed and a recent increase documented. Adjacent and partially overlapping home ranges of 4.3 to 19.9 sq km were determined by telemetry for a female and three males. Habitat use is described. If current trapping and timber management practices persist, martens should continue to increase.

  14. A Heritage Deferred: The German-Americans in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasrud, Clarence A., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers explores aspects of the lives of German-American immigrants in Minnesota. Part 1, "The Ethnic Experience," consists of the following papers: "Was There a Single German-American Experience?" (Bonney); "The Most Diversified Ethnic Group" (Johnson); "Unraveling the Mystery of Ethnic Identity" (Ward); and "Some…

  15. Minnesota Measures: 2014 Report on Higher Education Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, John; Bak, Leonid; Djurovich, Alexandra; Edlund, Melissa; Fergus, Meredith; Grimes, Tricia; Trost, Jennifer; Williams-Wyche, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a resource of accurate, timely and comprehensive facts about higher education in Minnesota. It includes comparisons over time as well as national and peer institution comparisons to add context for the interpretation of the data. It is expected to be used by a number of stakeholder groups such as legislators, educators and…

  16. Survey of Computer Facilities in Minnesota and North Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Donald

    In order to attain a better understanding of the data processing manpower needs of business and industry, a survey instrument was designed and mailed to 570 known and possible computer installations in the Minnesota/North Dakota area. The survey was conducted during the spring of 1975, and concentrated on the kinds of equipment and computer…

  17. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 2000 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Linda

    This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of Minnesota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 11 indicators of child well-being: (1) child poverty rate; (2) children receiving free or reduced-price school lunch; (3) children in families receiving food stamps; (4) births to teenage mothers; (5) low birth weight rates;…

  18. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 2001 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Linda

    This KIDS COUNT data book examines trends in the well-being of Minnesota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 12 indicators of child well-being: (1) children in poverty; (2) children in families receiving food stamps; (3) children receiving free or reduced-price school lunch; (4) children born to teenage mothers; (5) children born at…

  19. University of Minnesota Andrew Boss Laboratory of Meat Science

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    University of Minnesota Andrew Boss Laboratory of Meat Science www.ansci.umn.edu/meat-science-lab Meat and Dairy Salesroom (ABLMS Room 166), Open Wednesday, 2-5pm We gladly accept pre-orders by phone Ground Beef $3.99/lb Short Ribs - English or Flanken Style $4.99/lb Stew Meat - Boneless $4.99/lb PORK

  20. Training Internal Medicine Residents in the Community: The Minnesota Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parenti, Connie M.; Moldow, Charles F.

    1995-01-01

    The University of Minnesota internal medicine residency program of ambulatory general medicine rotations in rural communities and urban managed care settings is described. Development and structure of rotations, objectives, teaching strategies, faculty development, evaluation system, and elements of successful implementation are discussed.…

  1. Biochar effects on phosphorus pools in three soils from Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This greenhouse study was set up to assess the changes in the soil phosphorus (P) pools of three soils used for agricultural production in Minnesota as a result of biochar application and crop nutrient uptake. The soils included: excessively well-drained Hubbard loamy sand; poorly drained, calcareou...

  2. 15/Oct/2010 1Univ. Minnesota Seminar Interstellar Ices

    E-print Network

    Boogert, Adwin

    . Minnesota Seminar Greenberg et al. ApJ 455, L177 (1995): launched processed ice sample in earth orbit (polyoxymethylene, -(CH2-O)n- ·HMT (hexamethylenetetramine, C6H12N4) ·Amino acids (glycine) ·Urea (H2NCONH2) ·PAHs

  3. University of Minnesota Duluth High School Official Application Addendum

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    University of Minnesota Duluth High School Official Application Addendum for freshman applicants) Applicant Name: Date of Birth: High School: To be completed by high school official Applicant ranks to review by the student. Application forms, high school transcripts, test data, letters

  4. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Capital Equipment Asset Disposal Form

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Capital Equipment Asset Disposal Form Route this form to: Inventory Services Suite 4 WBOB West Bank Campus Mail Fax 612/626-8220 U Wide Form: UM 1393 GS 82343 Rev: 03 Approver (print name): (Administrator, RRC Manager, Department Head, or Dean) Form Approver (signature

  5. UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Capital Equipment Asset Disposal Form

    E-print Network

    UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Capital Equipment Asset Disposal Form Route this form to: Inventory Services Suite 4 WBOB West Bank Campus Mail Fax 612/626-8220 U Wide Form: UM 1393 GS 82343 Rev: 03 obtain signature below) : Form Approver (print name): (Administrator, RRC Manager, Department Head

  6. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 2003 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Linda

    This KIDS COUNT data book examines trends in the well-being of Minnesotas children. The statistical portrait is based on 11 indicators of child well-being: (1) children living in poverty; (2) children in families receiving food stamps; (3) children receiving free or reduced-price school lunch; (4) children born to teenage mothers; (5) children…

  7. Minnesota Kids: A Closer Look. 2002 Data Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Linda

    This KIDS COUNT data book examines trends in the well-being of Minnesota's children. The statistical portrait is based on 11 indicators of child well-being: (1) children living in poverty; (2) children in families receiving food stamps; (3) children receiving free or reduced-price school lunch; (4) children born to teenage mothers; (5) children…

  8. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Liberal Education Requirements

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Liberal Education Requirements Bolded course areas indicate Completed Credits Required Courses Remaining The Environment 3 semester credits Civic Life and Ethics 3 Biological Science with a Lab 4 semester credits Physical Science with a Lab 4 semester credits Social

  9. University of Minnesota Twin Cities 2014-16 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    Undergraduate Certificate 52 Applied Business Certificate 54 Construction Management B.A.Sc. 56 Contstruction;Autism Spectrum Disorders Certificate 95 Business and Marketing Education B.S. 97 Career and TechnicalUniversity of Minnesota Twin Cities 2014-16 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG This file serves as an official

  10. Minnesota Department of Education Special Education Primer for Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information and resources on special education for charter school sponsors and charter school directors. This document is the result of collaborative input from individuals who work in and with charter schools in Minnesota. It also represents the collaborative efforts of the following divisions of the…

  11. Grand rip and grand bang/crunch cosmological singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Jambrina, L.

    2014-09-01

    The present accelerated expansion of the Universe has enriched the list of possible scenarios for its fate, singular or not. In this paper a unifying framework for analyzing such behaviors is proposed, based on generalized power and asymptotic expansions of the barotropic index w, or equivalently of the deceleration parameter q, in terms of the time coordinate. Besides well-known singular and nonsingular future behaviors, other types of strong singularities appear around the phantom divide in flat models, with features similar to those of big rip or big bang/crunch, which we have dubbed "grand rip" and "grand bang/crunch," respectively, since energy density and pressure diverge faster than t-2 in coordinate time. In addition to this, the scale factor does not admit convergent generalized power series around these singularities with a finite number of terms with negative powers.

  12. Grand Rip and Grand Bang/Crunch cosmological singularities

    E-print Network

    L. Fernández-Jambrina

    2015-01-26

    The present accelerated expansion of the universe has enriched the list of possible scenarios for its fate, singular or not. In this paper a unifying framework for analyzing such behaviors is proposed, based on generalized power and asymptotic expansions of the barotropic index $w$, or equivalently of the deceleration parameter $q$, in terms of the time coordinate. Besides well known singular and non-singular future behaviors, other types of strong singularities appear around the phantom divide in flat models, with features similar to those of big rip or big bang/crunch, which we have dubbed grand rip and grand bang/crunch respectively, since energy density and pressure diverge faster than $t^{-2}$ in coordinate time. In addition to this, the scale factor does not admit convergent generalized power series around these singularities with a finite number of terms with negative powers.

  13. Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera and its resurgent granite porphyry intrusion, east-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Dusel-Bacon, C.; Aleinikoff, J. N.; Slack, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Named for the Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River, the Middle Fork caldera encompasses a 10 x 20 km area of rhyolite welded tuff and granite porphyry ~100 km west of the Yukon border. Intracaldera tuff has ?4 mm quartz and feldspar phenocrysts and cm-sized fiamme; its maximum exposed thickness is 850 m. Less densely welded tuff near the caldera margins locally contains 1-2 cm K-feldspar megacrysts and pumice clasts to 6 cm. Zircon from intracaldera tuff yields a SHRIMP-RG U-Pb age of 68.7 ± 1.1 Ma (all ages 95% confidence). Granite porphyry occupies much of an 8 x 12 km area having 650 m of relief within the western part of the caldera fill. Zircon from the porphyry gives a SHRIMP-RG U-Pb age of 68.4 ± 1.0 Ma. These ages agree with a previous 40Ar/39Ar biotite age of 69.1 ± 0.5 Ma for proximal outflow tuff. The crystal-rich intracaldera tuff contains embayed quartz, plagioclase>K-feldspar, biotite, and Fe-Ti oxide phenocrysts in a very fine-grained crystalline groundmass. The porphyry carries 40-50% of larger phenocrysts of the same phases (skeletal quartz to 1 cm; K-feldspar to 2 cm, rarely to 4 cm) in a fine-grained groundmass characterized by abundant 50-100 ?m quartz. Compositions of 3 tuff and 3 porphyry samples overlap, form a limited differentiation series at 69-72% SiO2, have arc geochemical signatures, and yield subparallel chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns with light REE enrichment, concave-upward heavy REE, and small negative Eu anomalies. Although their phenocrysts differ in size (owing to fragmentation of crystals in the tuff) and abundance, the similar mineralogy, composition (in spite of crystal concentration in the tuff), and indistinguishable ages of the tuff and porphyry indicate that the magmas were closely related. A rare magmatic enclave (54% SiO2, arc geochemical signature) in the porphyry may be similar to parental magma and provides evidence of mafic magma and thermal input. The porphyry is interpreted to have been exposed by erosion of thick intracaldera tuff from an asymmetric resurgent dome. The Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River cuts an arcuate valley into and around the caldera on the west and north, and may have cut down from an original caldera moat. Proximal outflow tuff, and thus the 69 Ma land surface, remains at the west margin of the caldera structure. The Middle Fork caldera lies within a region of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic plutons bounded by northeast-trending faults. To the northwest, Cretaceous plutonic rocks are widely exposed, indicating greater exhumation. The Middle Fork is a relatively well preserved caldera within a broad region of Alaska and adjacent Yukon that contains Late Cretaceous plutons and, in the less deeply exhumed blocks, silicic volcanic rocks.

  14. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  15. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  16. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  17. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  18. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  19. A Special Relationship: Germany and Minnesota, 1945-1985 = Brucken Ubes Grenzen: Minnesota and Bundesrepublik Deutschland, 1945-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasrud, Clarence A., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers describes the post-World War II relationship between Germany and Minnesota. The relationship with the Federal Republic of West Germany is emphasized but East Germany is not ignored. The papers include: "Current Issues in German-American Relations" (P. Hermes); "The Cult of Talent and Genius: A German Specialty"…

  20. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator & employer. 2009 by the Regents of the University of Minnesota.

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    of the University of Minnesota. Page 1 of 2 Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA): Certification for Birth/Care by the health care provider. Ensure that Sections I and II are completed before giving this form to the health care provider. Employer name including department/unit: Supervisor/Responsible administrator name

  1. View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of upstream face of Grand Coulee Dam, looking northeast. This image features a cloudless sky.) - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Dam & Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, Across Columbia River, Southeast of Town of Grand Coulee, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  2. Title: Grand River Conservation Authority Data Data Creator /

    E-print Network

    Title: Grand River Conservation Authority Data Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Grand River Conservation Authority Publisher: Grand River Conservation Authority Edition: 2006 Versions: N/A Publication the Grand River Conservation Authority Region. Vector data includes the following: floodplain, wetlands

  3. GRAND DITCH VIEW, FROM FARVIEW CURVE OVERLOOK, VIEWING WEST. DITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRAND DITCH VIEW, FROM FARVIEW CURVE OVERLOOK, VIEWING WEST. DITCH IS INDICATED BY HORIZONTAL LINE NEAR TOP OF CLOUD COVERED PEAKS - Grand Ditch, Baker Creek to LaPoudre Pass Creek, Grand Lake, Grand County, CO

  4. Introduction to grand unification theories

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, K.

    1980-01-01

    The Georgi-Glashow model is introduced based on the minimal gauge group SU(5) as a prototype grand unification theory of the electroweak and strong interactions. Simple estimation of sin/sup 2/ theta/sub W/ in the symmetry limit and the renormalization corrections at the energy scale of M/sub W/ are given along with other successes of the SU(5) model.

  5. Gauge-Higgs grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosotani, Yutaka; Yamatsu, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is proposed. Orbifold boundary conditions and one brane scalar field reduce SO(11) to the standard model symmetry, which is further broken to SU(3)_C × U(1)_EM by the Hosotani mechanism. In a minimal model, quarks and leptons are contained in a multiplet in 32 of SO(11) in each generation. Proton decay is naturally suppressed by a conserved fermion number.

  6. Grand unification and exotic fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feger, Robert P.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2015-08-01

    We exploit the recently developed software package LieART to show that SU (N ) grand unified theories with chiral fermions in mixed tensor irreducible representations can lead to standard model chiral fermions without additional light exotic chiral fermions; i.e., only standard model fermions are light in these models. Results are tabulated which may be of use to model builders in the future. An SU(6) toy model is given and model searches are discussed.

  7. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The Middle Fork is a relatively well preserved caldera within a broad region of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic plutons bounded by northeast-trending faults. In the relatively downdropped and less deeply exhumed crustal blocks, Cretaceous–Early Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks attest to long-term stability of the landscape. Within the Middle Fork caldera, the granite porphyry is interpreted to have been exposed by erosion of thick intracaldera tuff from an asymmetric resurgent dome. The Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River incised an arcuate valley into and around the caldera fill on the west and north and may have cut down from within an original caldera moat. The 70 Ma land surface is preserved beneath proximal outflow tuff at the west margin of the caldera structure and beneath welded outflow tuff 16–23 km east-southeast of the caldera in a paleovalley. Within ?50 km of the Middle Fork caldera are 14 examples of Late Cretaceous (?)–Tertiary felsic volcanic and hypabyssal intrusive rocks that range in area from <1 km2 to ?100 km2. Rhyolite dome clusters north and northwest of the caldera occupy tectonic basins associated with northeast-trending faults and are relatively little eroded. Lava of a latite complex, 12–19 km northeast of the caldera, apparently flowed into the paleovalley of the Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River. To the northwest of the Middle Fork caldera, in the Mount Harper crustal block, mid-Cretaceous plutonic rocks are widely exposed, indicating greater total exhumation. To the southeast of the Middle Fork block, the Mount Veta block has been uplifted sufficiently to expose a ca. 68–66 Ma equigranular granitic pluton. Farther to the southeast, in the Kechumstuk block, the flat-lying outflow tuff remnant in Gold Creek and a regionally extensive high terrace indicate that the landscape there has been little modified since 70 Ma other than entrenchment of tributaries in response to post–2.7 Ma lowering of base level of the Yukon River associated with advance of the Cordilleran ice sheet.

  8. Minnesota Linking Study: A Study of the Alignment of the NWEA RIT Scale with the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA) Testing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) completed a study to connect the scale of the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA) Testing Program used for Minnesota's mathematics and reading assessments with NWEA's RIT (Rasch Unit) scale. Information from the state assessments was used in a study to establish performance-level scores on…

  9. Thank you for making a gift to the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy. The University of Minnesota Foundation will acknowledge and direct your gift to the purpose

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Thank you for making a gift to the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy. The University of Minnesota Foundation will acknowledge and direct your gift to the purpose you designate. Gift Designation:____________________ ________________________________ Signature:________________________ Give Online You can make an immediate online gift at http

  10. Calibration of quartz tuning fork spring constants for non-contact atomic force microscopy: direct mechanical measurements and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Langewisch, Gernot; Schurig, Philipp; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quartz tuning forks are being increasingly employed as sensors in non-contact atomic force microscopy especially in the “qPlus” design. In this study a new and easily applicable setup has been used to determine the static spring constant at several positions along the prong of the tuning fork. The results show a significant deviation from values calculated with the beam formula. In order to understand this discrepancy the complete sensor set-up has been digitally rebuilt and analyzed by using finite element method simulations. These simulations provide a detailed view of the strain/stress distribution inside the tuning fork. The simulations show quantitative agreement with the beam formula if the beam origin is shifted to the position of zero stress onset inside the tuning fork base and torsional effects are also included. We further found significant discrepancies between experimental calibration values and predictions from the shifted beam formula, which are related to a large variance in tip misalignment during the tuning fork assembling process. PMID:24778977

  11. Gas Phase Photoacoustic Sensor at 8.41 mu m Using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2006-10-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 ?m between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz) and delivered a modest 5.3 mW at the tuning fork. This spectrometer was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultaneous absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10{sup -8} W cm-1 Hz{sup -1/2}. A corresponding theoretical analysis of the instrument sensitivity is presented and is capable of quantitatively reproducing the experimental NEAS, indicating that the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

  12. MRX protects fork integrity at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence causes checkpoint activation dependent on chromatin context

    PubMed Central

    Bentsen, Iben B.; Nielsen, Ida; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Helena B.; Gupta, Souvik Sen; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Andersen, Anni H.; Bjergbaek, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    To address how eukaryotic replication forks respond to fork stalling caused by strong non-covalent protein–DNA barriers, we engineered the controllable Fob-block system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system allows us to strongly induce and control replication fork barriers (RFB) at their natural location within the rDNA. We discover a pivotal role for the MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2) complex for fork integrity at RFBs, which differs from its acknowledged function in double-strand break processing. Consequently, in the absence of the MRX complex, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) accumulates at the rDNA. Based on this, we propose a model where the MRX complex specifically protects stalled forks at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence leads to processing resulting in ssDNA. To our surprise, this ssDNA does not trigger a checkpoint response. Intriguingly, however, placing RFBs ectopically on chromosome VI provokes a strong Rad53 checkpoint activation in the absence of Mre11. We demonstrate that proper checkpoint signalling within the rDNA is restored on deletion of SIR2. This suggests the surprising and novel concept that chromatin is an important player in checkpoint signalling. PMID:23376930

  13. Hydrology of the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah, before, during, and after underground coal mining

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slaughter, C.B.; Freethey, G.W.; Spangler, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    From 1988-92 the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Division of Oil, Gas, and Mining, studied the effects of underground coal mining and the resulting subsidence on the hydrologic system near the North Fork of the Right Fork of Miller Creek, Carbon County, Utah. The subsidence caused open fractures at land surface, debris slides, and rockfalls in the canyon above the mined area. Land surface subsided and moved several feet horizontally. The perennial stream and a tributary upstream from the mined area were diverted below the ground by surface fractures where the overburden thickness above the Wattis coal seam is 300 to 500 feet. The reach downstream was dry but flow resumed where the channel traversed the Star Point Sandstone, which forms the aquifer below the coal seams where ground-water discharge provides new base flow. Concentrations of dissolved constituents in the stream water sampled just downstream from the mined area increased from about 300 mg/L (milligrams per liter) to more than 1,500 mg/L, and the water changed from primarily a magnesium calcium bicarbonate to primarily a magnesium sulfate type. Monitored water levels in two wells completed in the perched aquifer(s) above the mine indicate that fractures from subsidence- related deformation drained the perched aquifer in the Blackhawk Formation. The deformation also could have contributed to the decrease in discharge of three springs above the mined area, but discharge from other springs in the area did not change ubstantially; thus, the relation between subsidence and spring discharge, if any, is not clear. No significant changes in the chemical character of water discharging from springs were detected, but the dissolved-solids concentration in water collected from a perched sandstone aquifer overlying the mined coal seams increased during mining activity.

  14. Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

    2009-07-01

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

  15. Mercury and other Mining-Related Contaminants in Ospreys along the Upper Clark Fork River, MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, H.; Domenech, R.; Greene, E.; Staats, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) are widely recognized as bio-indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems. Until the time of fledging, nestlings feed exclusively on fish caught within a few kilometers of the nest. Therefore, tissues of these young birds may reflect the level of contamination of local fish and more generally, the contamination status of the aquatic ecosystem they inhabit. Nests can often be accessed with a boom truck and obtaining small blood samples from the flightless chicks is fairly noninvasive. Ospreys are nesting along the Upper Clark Fork River, Montana, which is heavily contaminated with wastes left from a century of copper and precious metals mining. We have been monitoring the levels of priority pollutants (arsenic, cadmium, lead, copper, zinc, mercury and selenium) in Osprey chicks along a 250 km section of the river for four years. Objectives are to establish current contaminant status, pinpoint pollution hotspots, and assess the success of restoration efforts. Our results suggest that of highest concern may be the bioaccumulation of mercury with blood levels of up to 0.7 mg/L in the growing chicks. These concentrations are expected to increase many fold upon fledging as feather growth stops, which acts as the major sink for mercury. Interestingly, we found mercury levels increased in downstream direction, in contrast to concentrations of other pollutants. Reasons may be the different origin of mercury versus other contaminants and the distribution of wetlands where mercury can be transformed into highly bioavailable methylmercury. Blood levels of selenium are also elevated throughout the Upper Clark Fork River drainage. We discuss the implications for restoration and remediation of the Clark Fork River.

  16. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  17. Fork stamping of pristine carbon nanotubes onto ferromagnetic contacts for spin-valve devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramich, Jörg; Baumgartner, Andreas; Muoth, Matthias; Hierold, Christofer; Schönenberger, Christian

    2015-11-01

    We present a fabrication scheme called 'fork stamping' optimized for the dry transfer of individual pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto ferromagnetic contact electrodes fabricated by standard lithography. We demonstrate the detailed recipes for a residue-free device fabrication and in-situ current annealing on suspended CNT spin-valve devices with ferromagnetic Permalloy (Py) contacts and report preliminary transport characterization and magnetoresistance experiments at cryogenic temperatures. This scheme can directly be used to implement more complex device structures, including multiple gates or superconducting contacts.

  18. An identification of the East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain, Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    The work in this report was conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District, during the period November 1991 through July 1992. The purpose of this study is to identify the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain. This information is required as part of the remedial action plans for removal or containment of contamination within the EFPC floodplain. EFPC and a portion of its floodplain have been contaminated as a result of operations and accidental releases at the Department of Energy`s Y-12 Plant. Mercury is the major contaminant found in EFPC and its floodplain.

  19. Oxbow Conservation Area; Middle Fork John Day River, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Shaun; Smith, Brent; Cochran, Brian

    2003-04-01

    In early 2001, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, through their John Day Basin Office, concluded the acquisition of the Middle Fork Oxbow Ranch. Under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Tribes are required to provided BPA an 'annual written report generally describing the real property interests in the Project, HEP analyses undertaken or in progress, and management activities undertaken or in progress'. This report is to be provided to the BPA by 30 April of each year. This is the first annual report filed for the Oxbow Ranch property.

  20. Note: Wide band amplifier for quartz tuning fork sensors with digitally controlled stray capacitance compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ping; Hao, Lifeng; Ding, Ning; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Rongguo

    2015-11-01

    We presented a preamplifier design for quartz tuning fork (QTF) sensors in which the stray capacitance is digitally compensated. In this design, the manually controlled variable capacitor is replaced by a pair of varicap diodes, whose capacitance could be accurately tuned by a bias voltage. A tuning circuit including a single side low power operational amplifier, a digital-to-analog converter, and a microprocessor is also described, and the tuning process can be conveniently carried out on a personal computer. For the design, the noise level was investigated experimentally.

  1. Note: Wide band amplifier for quartz tuning fork sensors with digitally controlled stray capacitance compensation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ping; Hao, Lifeng; Ding, Ning; Jiao, Weicheng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Rongguo

    2015-11-01

    We presented a preamplifier design for quartz tuning fork (QTF) sensors in which the stray capacitance is digitally compensated. In this design, the manually controlled variable capacitor is replaced by a pair of varicap diodes, whose capacitance could be accurately tuned by a bias voltage. A tuning circuit including a single side low power operational amplifier, a digital-to-analog converter, and a microprocessor is also described, and the tuning process can be conveniently carried out on a personal computer. For the design, the noise level was investigated experimentally. PMID:26628186

  2. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Spajer, M. Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D.; Jalocha, A.

    2013-11-11

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  3. Photo-thermal quartz tuning fork excitation for dynamic mode atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Bontempi, Alexia; Teyssieux, Damien; Thiery, Laurent; Hermelin, Damien; Vairac, Pascal; Friedt, Jean-Michel

    2014-10-13

    A photo-thermal excitation of a Quartz Tuning Fork (QTF) for topographic studies is introduced. The non-invasive photo-thermal excitation presents practical advantages compared to QTF mechanical and electrical excitations, including the absence of the anti-resonance and its associated phase rotation. Comparison between our theoretical model and experiments validate that the optical transduction mechanism is a photo-thermal rather than photo-thermoacoustic phenomenon. Topographic maps in the context of near-field microscopy distance control have been achieved to demonstrate the performance of the system.

  4. Hydrogeologic framework of the North Fork and surrounding areas, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schubert, Christopher E.; Bova, Richard G.; Misut, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    Ground water on the North Fork of Long Island is the sole source of drinking water, but the supply is vulnerable to saltwater intrusion and upconing in response to heavy pumping. Information on the area?s hydrogeologic framework is needed to analyze the effects of pumping and drought on ground-water levels and the position of the freshwater-saltwater interface. This will enable water-resource managers and water-supply purveyors to evaluate a wide range of water-supply scenarios to safely meet water-use demands. The extent and thickness of hydrogeologic units and position of the freshwater-saltwater interface were interpreted from previous work and from exploratory drilling during this study. The fresh ground-water reservoir on the North Fork consists of four principal freshwater flow systems (referred to as Long Island mainland, Cutchogue, Greenport, and Orient) within a sequence of unconsolidated Pleistocene and Late Cretaceous deposits. A thick glacial-lake-clay unit appears to truncate underlying deposits in three buried valleys beneath the northern shore of the North Fork. Similar glacial-lake deposits beneath eastern and east-central Long Island Sound previously were inferred to be younger than the surficial glacial deposits exposed along the northern shore of Long Island. Close similarities in thickness and upper-surface altitude between the glacial-lake-clay unit on the North Fork and the glacial-lake deposits in Long Island Sound indicate, however, that the two are correlated at least along the North Fork shore. The Matawan Group and Magothy Formation, undifferentiated, is the uppermost Cretaceous unit on the North Fork and constitutes the Magothy aquifer. The upper surface of this unit contains a series of prominent erosional features that can be traced beneath Long Island Sound and the North Fork. Northwest-trending buried ridges extend several miles offshore from areas southeast of Rocky Point and Horton Point. A promontory in the irregular, north-facing cuesta slope extends offshore from an area southwest of Mattituck Creek and James Creek. Buried valleys that trend generally southeastward beneath Long Island Sound extend onshore northeast of Hashamomuck Pond and east of Goldsmith Inlet. An undifferentiated Pleistocene confining layer, the lower confining unit, consists of apparently contiguous units of glacial-lake, marine, and nonmarine clay. This unit is more than 200 feet thick in buried valleys filled with glacial-lake clay along the northern shore, but elsewhere on the North Fork, it is generally less than 50 feet thick and presumably represents an erosional remnant of marine clay. Its upper surface is generally 75 feet or more below sea level where it overlies buried valleys, and is generally 100 feet or less below sea level in areas where marine clay has been identified. A younger unit of glacial-lake deposits, the upper confining unit, is a local confining layer and underlies a sequence of late Pleistocene moraine and outwash deposits. This unit is thickest (more than 45 feet thick) beneath two lowland areas--near Mattituck Creek and James Creek, and near Hashamomuck Pond--but pinches out close to the northern and southern shores and is locally absent in inland areas of the North Fork. Its upper-surface altitude generally rises to near sea level toward the southern shore. Freshwater in the Orient flow system is limited to the upper glacial aquifer above the top of the lower confining unit. The upper confining unit substantially impedes the downward flow of freshwater in inland parts of the Greenport flow system. Deep freshwater within the lower confining unit in the east-central part of the Cutchogue flow system probably is residual from an interval of lower sea level. The upper confining unit is absent or only a few feet thick in the west-central part of the Cutchogue flow system and does not substantially impede the downward flow of freshwater, but the lower confining unit probably im

  5. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

  6. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

  7. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

  8. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

  9. 33 CFR 334.855 - Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox Military Reservation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S. Army Garrison, Fort Knox...AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.855 Salt River, Rolling Fork River, Otter Creek; U.S....

  10. RecO Acts with RecF and RecR to Protect and Maintain Replication Forks Blocked by UV-induced DNA Damage in Escherichia coli*

    E-print Network

    Courcelle, Justin

    . Irradiation with near-UV (254 nm) light induces DNA lesions that block replication (1, 2). In wildRecO Acts with RecF and RecR to Protect and Maintain Replication Forks Blocked by UV-induced DNA replication forks arrested by UV- induced DNA damage. In the absence of RecF, replica- tion fails to recover

  11. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Silvia Emma; Ajazi, Arta; Carotenuto, Walter; Foiani, Marco; Giannattasio, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1. PMID:26411679

  12. A High-Q In-Plane SOI Tuning Fork Gyroscope Ajit Sharma, Faisal M. Zaman, Babak V. Amini and Farrokh Ayazi

    E-print Network

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    A High-Q In-Plane SOI Tuning Fork Gyroscope Ajit Sharma, Faisal M. Zaman, Babak V. Amini,000) with effective mode decoupling. The gyroscope was fabricated on 40µm thick Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) using. Keywords Tuning Fork, Gyroscope, High-Q, Silicon-on-Insulator INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION Vibratory

  13. Technology Solutions Case Study: Cold Climate Foundation Wall Hygrothermal Research Facility, Cloquet, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This case study describes the University of Minnesota’s Cloquet Residential Research Facility (CRRF) in northern Minnesota, which features more than 2,500 ft2 of below-grade space for building systems foundation hygrothermal research. Here, the NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team researches ways to improve the energy efficiency of the building envelope, including wall assemblies, basements, roofs, insulation, and air leakage.

  14. Addressing MMR Vaccine Resistance in Minnesota's Somali Community.

    PubMed

    Bahta, Lynn; Ashkir, Asli

    2015-10-01

    Over the past 10 years, Minnesota clinicians have noticed increased resistance to MMR vaccination among Somali Minnesotans. Misinformation about a discredited study asserting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism has permeated this community as parents have increasingly become concerned about the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder among their children. As a result, MMR vaccination rates among U.S.-born children of Somali descent are declining. This article reports findings from an investigation by the Minnesota Department of Health, which was undertaken to better understand vaccine hesitancy among Somali Minnesotans. Based on these and other findings, we propose a multi-pronged approach for increasing vaccination rates in this population. PMID:26596077

  15. Scour measurements at contracted highway crossings in Minnesota, 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Hitchcock, Harry A.

    1998-01-01

    During record flooding in the Minnesota River basin in April 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration, collected real-time scour measurements at contracted bridge openings and provided data collection assistance to the Minnesota Department of Transportation bridge inspectors. Weather and flood plain vegetation restricted data collection to what could be collected from the bridge deck at many sites. The data collected from the bridge deck provided only a marginal description of the reference surface for contraction scour and of the flow distribution in the stream and flood plains upstream from the bridge. However, the measurements reflect the contributions of both local and contraction scour, thus providing the streambed geometry resulting from the total scour.

  16. Methods for assessing the quality of runoff from Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The quality of runoff from large, undisturbed peatlands in Minnesota is chaaracterized and sampling results from a number of bogs (referred to as a multiple watershed approach) was used to assess the effects of peat mining on the quality of bog runoff. Runoff from 45 natural peatlands and one mined bog was sampled five times in 1979-80 and analyzed for 34 water quality characteristics. Peatland watersheds were classified as bog, transition, or fen, based upon both water quality and watershed characteristics. Alternative classification methods were based on frequency distributions, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, and principal component analysis results. A multiple watershed approach was used as a basis of drawing inferences regarding the quality of runoff from a representative sample of natural bogs and a mined bog. The multiple watershed technique applied provides an alternative to long-term paired watershed experiments in evaluating the effects of land use activities on the quality of runoff from peatlands in Minnesota.

  17. Grand Challenges of Enterprise Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D; Neal, R.E.; Marks, D.

    2001-04-01

    Enterprise Integration connects and combines people, processes, systems, and technologies to ensure that the right people and the right processes have the right information and the right resources at the right time. A consensus roadmap for Technologies for Enterprise Integration was created as part of an industry/government/academia partnership in the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Initiative (IMTI). Two of the grand challenges identified by the roadmapping effort will be addressed here--Customer Responsive Enterprises and Totally Connected Enterprises. Each of these challenges is briefly discussed as to the current state of industry and the future vision as developed in the roadmap.

  18. Grand unification: quo vadis domine

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, G.

    1985-01-01

    The present theoretical and experimental situation with grand unification is summarized. The issues of proton decay and the Weinberg angle are addressed, going through the predictions of both the standard SU(5) theory and its supersymmetric extension. The SO(10) theory, which provides a minimal one family model, is then studied. The gravitational characteristics of domain walls and strings are then discussed. It is argued that there is a need to go beyond SO(10) in order to incorporate a unified picture of families. This leads to the prediction of mirror fermions, whose physics is analyzed. 31 refs. (LEW)

  19. 75 FR 81555 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Minnesota; Sulfur Dioxide SIP...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... Dioxide SIP Revision for Marathon Petroleum St. Paul Park AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... revision request for Marathon Petroleum in St. Paul Park, Minnesota. This submittal updates the...

  20. Biological diversity of the Minnesota caddisflies (Insecta, Trichoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The caddisfly fauna of Minnesota contains at least 277 species within 21 families and 75 genera. These species are based on examination of 312,884 specimens from 2,166 collections of 937 Minnesota aquatic habitats from 1890 to 2007. Included in these totals is my own quantitative sampling of 4 representative habitat types: small streams, medium rivers, large rivers, and lakes, from each of the 58 major Minnesota watersheds from June through September during 1999–2001. All species are illustrated herein, and their known Minnesota abundances, distributions, adult flight periodicities, and habitat affinities presented. Four species: Lepidostoma griseum (Lepidostomatidae), Psilotreta indecisa (Odontoceridae), and Phryganea sayi and Ptilostomis angustipennis (Phryganeidae) are added to the known fauna. An additional 31 dubious species records are removed for various reasons. Of the 5 determined caddisfly regions of the state, species richness per watershed was highest in the Lake Superior and Northern Regions, intermediate in the Southeastern, and lowest in the Northwestern and Southern. Of the 48 individual collections that yielded >40 species, all but 1 were from the Northern Region. Many species, especially within the families Limnephilidae and Phryganeidae, have appeared to decrease in distribution and abundance during the past 75 years, particularly those once common within the Northwestern and Southern Regions. Many species now appear regionally extirpated, and a few have disappeared from the entire state. The loss of species in the Northwestern and Southern Regions, and probably elsewhere, is almost certainly related to the conversion of many habitats to large-scale agriculture during the mid-20th century. PMID:22615539

  1. Chapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft describes habitat-related limiting factors, threats, strategies and actions)

    E-print Network

    Chapter 4, Section 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG Spg/Sum Chinook Status and Recovery (Draft.2 Status and Recovery of South Fork Salmon River MPG in the Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon ESU Table of Contents 4.2 South Fork Salmon River MPG

  2. Analyzing indicators of stream health for Minnesota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, U.; Kocian, M.; Wilson, B.; Bolton, A.; Nieber, J.; Vondracek, B.; Perry, J.; Magner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research has emphasized the importance of using physical, chemical, and biological indicators of stream health for diagnosing impaired watersheds and their receiving water bodies. A multidisciplinary team at the University of Minnesota is carrying out research to develop a stream classification system for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessment. Funding for this research is provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. One objective of the research study involves investigating the relationships between indicators of stream health and localized stream characteristics. Measured data from Minnesota streams collected by various government and non-government agencies and research institutions have been obtained for the research study. Innovative Geographic Information Systems tools developed by the Environmental Science Research Institute and the University of Texas are being utilized to combine and organize the data. Simple linear relationships between index of biological integrity (IBI) and channel slope, two-year stream flow, and drainage area are presented for the Redwood River and the Snake River Basins. Results suggest that more rigorous techniques are needed to successfully capture trends in IBI scores. Additional analyses will be done using multiple regression, principal component analysis, and clustering techniques. Uncovering key independent variables and understanding how they fit together to influence stream health are critical in the development of a stream classification for TMDL assessment.

  3. Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Baloun, J.

    1997-07-01

    The Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) propose to build an alfalfa processing plant integrated with an advanced power plant system at the Granite Falls, Minnesota Industrial Park to provide 75 MW of base load electric power and a competitively priced source of value added alfalfa based products. This project will utilize air blown fluidized bed gasification technology to process alfalfa stems and another biomass to produce a hot, clean, low heating value gas that will be used in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the gas turbine will be used to generate steam to power a steam turbine and provide steam for the processing of the alfalfa leaf into a wide range of products including alfalfa leaf meal, a protein source for livestock. The plant will demonstrate high efficiency and environmentally compatible electric power production, as well as increased economic yield from farm operations in the region. The initial phase of the Minnesota Agripower Project (MAP) will be to perform alfalfa feedstock testing, prepare preliminary designs, and develop detailed plans with estimated costs for project implementation. The second phase of MAP will include detailed engineering, construction, and startup. Full commercial operation will start in 2001.

  4. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50?000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7?×?7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  5. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, John

    1990-01-01

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  6. Replication fork integrity and intra-S phase checkpoint suppress gene amplification

    PubMed Central

    Kondratova, Anna; Watanabe, Takaaki; Marotta, Michael; Cannon, Matthew; Segall, Anca M.; Serre, David; Tanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Gene amplification is a phenotype-causing form of chromosome instability and is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Cells with mutant p53 lose G1/S checkpoint and are permissive to gene amplification. In this study we show that mammalian cells become proficient for spontaneous gene amplification when the function of the DSB repair protein complex MRN (Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1) is impaired. Cells with impaired MRN complex experienced severe replication stress and gained substrates for gene amplification during replication, as evidenced by the increase of replication-associated single-stranded breaks that were converted to DSBs most likely through replication fork reversal. Impaired MRN complex directly compromised ATM/ATR-mediated checkpoints and allowed cells to progress through cell cycle in the presence of DSBs. Such compromised intra-S phase checkpoints promoted gene amplification independently from mutant p53. Finally, cells adapted to endogenous replication stress by globally suppressing genes for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Our results indicate that the MRN complex suppresses gene amplification by stabilizing replication forks and by securing DNA damage response to replication-associated DSBs. PMID:25672394

  7. An investigation of shallow ground-water quality near East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmichael, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    Alluvial soils of the flood plain of East Fork Poplar Creek in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, are contaminated with mercury and other metals, organic compounds, and radio-nuclides originating from the Y-12 Plant, a nuclear-processing facility located within the U.S. Department of Energy 's Oak Ridge Reservation. Observation wells were installed in the shallow aquifer of the flood plain, and water quality samples were collected to determine if contaminants are present in the shallow groundwater. Groundwater in the shallow aquifer occurs under water-table conditions. Recharge is primarily from precipitation and discharge is to East Fork Poplar Creek. Groundwater levels fluctuate seasonally in response to variations in recharge and evapotranspiration. During extremely dry periods, the water table drops below the base of the shallow aquifer in some flood-plain areas. Contaminants found in water samples from several of the wells in concentrations which equaled or exceeded drinking-water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are antimony, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, phenols, and strontium-90. Total and dissolved uranium concentrations exceeded the analytical detection limit in nearly 70% of the wells in the flood plain. The results of water quality determinations demonstrate that elevated concentrations of most trace metals (and possibly organic compounds and radionuclides) were caused by contaminated sediments in the samples. The presence of contaminated sediment in samples is suspected to be the result of borehole contamination during well installation. (USGS)

  8. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J.; Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-10-01

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Mussels: the forgotten fauna of regulated rivers: a case study of the Caney Fork River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layzer, James B.; Gordon, Mark E.; Anderson, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    During the past century freshwater mussel populations have declined precipitously throughout North America. Much of this loss has resulted from the construction of dams. In the Cumberland River system, 23% (22 species) of the historic mussel fauna is extinct or listed as endangered. Several additional species have either been extirpated from the Cumberland River or exist only in small, non-reproducing populations. Mussels of headwater streams have been severely affected by coal mining and poor land use practices. An intensive survey was conducted in the Caney Fork River, a major tributary to the Cumberland River, to determine the historic and extant mussel fauna. The results indicate that at least 37 species of mussels have been extirpated from the Caney Fork River, mainly as a result of the construction and operation of the Center Hill Dam. Among the species extirpated, two are now extinct, five are endangered and five are candidates for listing as threatened or endangered. Effects associated with this dam include the inundation of 102 km of riverine habitat, the discharge of hypolimnetic water (which limits mussel reproduction) and an alternating pattern of stream bed scouring and dewatering. The recognition of mussel life history requirements during preconstruction could have reduced many of these effects.

  10. Evidence that replication fork components catalyze establishment of cohesion between sister chromatids

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Dena R.; Christman, Michael F.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation requires that replicated sister chromatids are held together until anaphase, when their “cohesion” is dissolved, and they are pulled to opposite spindle poles by microtubules. Establishment of new cohesion between sister chromatids in the next cell cycle is coincident with replication fork passage. Emerging evidence suggests that this temporal coupling is not just a coincident timing of independent events, but rather that the establishment of cohesion is likely to involve the active participation of replication-related activities. These include PCNA, a processivity clamp for some DNA polymerases, Trf4/Pol ? (formerly Trf4/Pol?), a novel and essential DNA polymerase, and a modified Replication Factor C clamp–loader complex. Here we describe recent advances in how cohesion establishment is linked to replication, highlight important unanswered questions in this new field, and describe a “polymerase switch” model for how cohesion establishment is coupled to replication fork progression. Building the bridges between newly synthesized sister chromatids appears to be a fundamental but previously unrecognized function of the eukaryotic replication machinery. PMID:11459963

  11. SeiSmological grand challengeS

    E-print Network

    Allen, Richard M.

    SeiSmological grand challengeS in UnderStanding earth'S dynamic SyStemS SeiSmological grand challengeS in UnderStanding earth'S dynamic SyStemS January 2009 Long-range Science PLan for SeiSmoLogy WorkShoP SePtember 18­19, 2008, Denver, co #12;PrePared by the SeiSmological grand challengeS Writing grou

  12. Rio Grande rift: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Kenneth H.; Scott Baldridge, W.; Callender, Jonathan F.

    1987-11-01

    The Rio Grande rift of the southwestern United States is one of the world's principal continental rift systems. It extends as a series of asymmetrical grabens from central Colorado, through New Mexico, to Presidio, Texas, and Chihuahua, Mexico—a distance of more than 1000 km. Although the Rio Grande rift is closely related in timing and structural style to the contiguous Basin and Range extensional province, the two can be distinguished by a variety of geological and geophysical signatures. Rifts (both oceanic and continental) can be defined as elongate depressions overlying places where the entire lithosphere has ruptured in extension. The lithosphere of the Rio Grande rift conforms to this definition, in that: (1) the crust is moderately thinned—Moho depths range from about 45 km under the flanks to about 33 km beneath the rift axis. (2) anomalously low P n velocities (7.6-7.8 km s -1) beneath the rift and a long wavelength gravity low suggest that the asthenosphere is in contact with the base of the crust. The P-velocity is abnormally low (6.4-6.5 km s -1) in the lower half of the crust beneath the rift, suggesting high crustal temperatures. However, associated seismic and volcanologic data indicate the sub-rift lower crust is not dominated by a massive composite mafic intrusion such as is sometimes inferred for the East African rifts. Seismic and magnetotelluric data suggest the presence of a thin (< 1 km) sill-like contemporary midcrustal magma body which may perhaps extend intermittently along much of the length of the rift. Seismic and structural studies indicate a dominant horizontal fabric in the upper and middle crust. The brittle-ductile transition is at depths -15 km except for the major volcanic fields, where it rises to 2-3 km. Structural development of the rift occurred mainly during two time intervals: the early phase beginning at -30 Ma. and lasting 10-12 m.y., and the late phase extending from -10 to 3 Ma. The early phase involved extensive low-angle normal faulting throughout the rift region which was subsequently offset by high-angle normal faulting during the later deformational event. Volcanism of the Rio Grande rift is minor compared to some other continental rifts. Most of the volcanism is basaltic and occurred less than about 5 m.y. ago. Compositions range from alkalic to tholeiitic, with no unique spatial or temporal pattern. Magmas were probably derived from a variety of depths, indicating an unintegrated heat source with only local melting. Basaltic andesites and related calc-alkaline rocks erupted in the southern rift between about 30 and 18 m.y. ago were not uniquely related to the rifting process. Rather, the thermal pulse which generated these magmas was part of the previous, subduction-related event. Our interpretation of existing data concerning the evolution of the Rio Grande rift does not fit either simple active or passive "end-member" models. In particular, there is no compelling evidence for a major thermal event in the mantle uniquely associated with rifting. Yet heat—inherited from the immediately-preceding deformational regime—was certainly a critical factor in, and was probably a necessary condition for, rifting.

  13. Ground-water aspects of the lower Henrys Fork region, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crosthwaite, E.G.; Mundorff, Maurice John; Walker, Eugene H.

    1970-01-01

    The lower Henrys Fork region in eastern Idaho includes the plains and low benches between Ashton and the junction of Henrys Fork and Snake River. The northwestern and western parts of the area are part of the Snake River basalt plain. The central part of the area is occupied by alluvial plains of the Snake, Teton, and Falls Rivers and of Henrys Fork. The alluvial deposits are underlain by basalt. The southeastern part of the area is a bench (Rexburg Bench), chiefly on silicic and basaltic volcanic rocks, which rises gradually to mountain peaks (Big Hole Mountains) southeast of the area. Irrigation wells open to the basalt under the Snake River Plain and the basalt and sands and gravels under the alluvial plains yield large amounts of water with small drawdowns. Irrigation wells in the silicic volcanic rocks and the interbedded ash, pyroclastics, and sedimentary deposits beneath the Rexburg Bench generally yield much less water. The regional water table slopes southwestward beneath the basalt and alluvial plains. It is recharged by precipitation that infiltrates into the ground in the headwaters of Henrys Fork and Falls, and Teton Rivers and by water that moves downward from an extensive perched water body caused by seepage from stream channels and surface-water irrigation. The perched water in part moves vertically down to the regional water table and in part laterally to the streams. Ground water beneath the Rexburg Bench moves generally northwestward to join the regional ground-water body beneath the alluvia,1 and basalt plain, but this area contributes very little recharge to the main aquifer body. Recharge to the regional water table is estimated to average 725,000 acre-feet annually. The regional water table is below the level of the streams in the area, and ground water in the main aquifer, therefore, is not tributary to the streams. Pumping from the regional ground-water reservoir for irrigation or other uses would have no effect on streamflow or surface-water rights within the study area. However, depletion of the underflow would eventually reduce the inflow to American Falls Reservoir, unless the depletion was offset by additional recharge. Total withdrawals of ground water for irrigation in 1962, principally in the Rexburg Bench, were estimated to be 25,000 acre-feet. About 10,000 acre-feet was withdrawn for domestic, municipal, and stock supplies. These withdrawals caused no significant decline in the water table. In the Ashton area, surface-water irrigation has caused water to be perched in basalt above the silicic volcanic rocks, and much of' this perched water contributes to streamflow. Some ground water can be pumped from the basalt for irrigation and other uses. If ground water were pumped for irrigation, the flow of Henrys Fork would be decreased by the amount of pumped water consumed by crops. Water pumped for nonconsumptive use would have little effect on streamflow. Ground-water prospects for irrigation in the Falls River area are not encouraging.

  14. 76 FR 41559 - Minnesota Commercial Railway Company-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Washington County, MN 1

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...Sub-No. 3X)] Minnesota Commercial Railway Company--Discontinuance of Service...Docket No. AB 6 (Sub-No. 474X), BNSF Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption...Minnesota Commercial Railway Company (MNNR) filed a verified...

  15. Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2006-12-31

    A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

  16. Swimming capability of the remopleuridid trilobite Hypodicranotus striatus: hydrodynamic functions of the exoskeleton and the long, forked hypostome.

    PubMed

    Shiino, Yuta; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Suzuki, Yutaro; Ono, Satoshi

    2012-05-01

    The sophisticated hydrodynamic performance achieved by the exoskeleton and the long, forked hypostome of the remopleuridid trilobite Hypodicranotus striatus was demonstrated using image-based modelling and computational fluid dynamics simulation techniques. To understand the function of the long, forked hypostome, we examined two types of exoskeletal models, one with and one without the hypostome. We simulated the flow structures around the exoskeletal models under several ambient flow velocities to evaluate the shapes of the streamlines, the values of the drag and lift forces and the relevant coefficients acting on the models. The simulation results showed that the long, forked hypostome prevents the formation of a ventral vortex; thus, it stabilises the flow structure under all of the ambient velocities tested. Moreover, the hypostome functions to create positive lift, with stable lift coefficients observed under a wide range of velocities, and to reduce the drag coefficient as velocity increases. These results imply that the hypostome can reduce viscous drag with a modest lift force, which is an essential requirement for actively swimming animals. We conclude that the long, forked hypostome evolved to provide an active and stable swimming system, and we therefore hypothesise that Hypodicranotus exoskeletal morphology resulted from the adaptation to be a high-performance swimmer. PMID:22261264

  17. Mode analysis for a quartz tuning fork coupled to acoustic resonances of fluid in a cylindrical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuoriniemi, J.; Rysti, J.; Salmela, A.; Manninen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Quartz tuning forks are precise electromechanical oscillators mass produced in different sizes around one millimeter for the purpose of providing the reference frequency for watches and such. Usually, they are designed to operate at 215 = 32768 Hz in vacuum at room temperature. When refrigerated to cryogenic conditions, they may show extremely high Q-values. Immersion of such an oscillator to fluid medium changes its response due to inertial forces and dissipation exerted by the medium. This makes it very useful in studies of pure and mixed helium fluids at low temperatures. When the wavelength of sound in the medium, determined by the frequency of oscillation and the speed of sound, corresponds to typical dimensions in the fluid volume, the oscillator may produce standing acoustic waves, observed as strong anomalies in the oscillator response. This can happen in helium fluids for both first and second sound under various conditions. We study the character of such modes by computational methods for typical fork geometries in a cylindrical volume. Reasonable correspondence with measurements in helium mixtures both below and above 1 K is obtained. This is the regime of vigorous second sound resonances, since the speed of this unusual mode compares nicely with the typical dimensions and frequency of the tuning forks. The nontrivial geometry of the fork in the cylinder makes the problem somewhat challenging for computations.

  18. 75 FR 7266 - Roaring Fork Valley Physicians I.P.A.; Analysis of the Agreement Containing Consent Order to Aid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Roaring Fork Valley Physicians I.P.A.; Analysis of the Agreement Containing Consent Order to Aid Public... practices or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes both the... period of thirty (30) days. The following Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes the terms of...

  19. Reactive Transport Modeling Of Remedial Scenarios To Predict Cadmium, Copper, And Zinc In North Fork of Clear Creek, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Fork of Clear Creek (NFCC), Colorado is an acid-mine-drainage-impacted stream typical of many mountain surface waters affected by historic metal mining in the western United States. The stream is devoid of fish primarily because of high metal concentrations in the wate...

  20. Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

    1985-01-01

    The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).