Science.gov

Sample records for graph interpretation skills

  1. Measuring Primary Students' Graph Interpretation Skills via a Performance Assessment: A Case Study in Instrument Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Karen; Cranston, Kayla A.; Pryor, Marie; Kermish-Allen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This case study was conducted within the context of a place-based education project that was implemented with primary school students in the USA. The authors and participating teachers created a performance assessment of standards-aligned tasks to examine 6-10-year-old students' graph interpretation skills as part of an exploratory research…

  2. Challenges with Graph Interpretation: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Nirit

    2011-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on the development of scientific inquiry skills, the display and interpretation of data are becoming increasingly important. Graph interpretation competence is, in fact, essential to understanding today's world and to be scientifically literate. However, graph interpretation is a complex and challenging activity. Graph

  3. Graph Interpretation: A Translation Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dibble, Emily; Shaklee, Harriet

    To study how the organization of information affects the way that information is interpreted, a total of 404 undergraduates in two studies (151 and 253 students, respectively) solved statistical reasoning problems based on data presented in a variety of types of graphs and tables. When assessing relative probabilities, students were equally…

  4. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  5. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs Through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-12-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing software and inquiry-based instruction supported with traditional laboratory equipment in terms of improving fourth graders' ability to interpret motion and temperature graphs. Results of this study showed that there is a significant advantage in using real-time graphing technology to support fourth graders' ability to interpret graphs.

  6. Interpreting Motion Graphs through Metaphorical Projection of Embodied Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the cognitive processes that occur while students are exploring motion graphs. In a classroom experiment, we examine how high-school students (aged 17), with backgrounds in calculus and physics, interpret the graphs they create through drawing the path of the movement of their hand with a computer mouse. Based on recent, and…

  7. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  8. The "Join the Club" Interpretation of Some Graph Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Reiter, Harold

    to advances attained by the development of methods and models of graph theory. Computer scientists. Search- ing and sorting, finding shortest paths, constructing spanning trees with desirable properties call the root of the tree. We interpret V as the people living in a community. An edge between two

  9. Using professional interpreters in undergraduate medical consultation skills teaching

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Aarti; Swann, Jennifer; Smithson, William Henry

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work with interpreters is a core skill for UK medical graduates. At the University of Sheffield Medical School, this teaching was identified as a gap in the curriculum. Teaching was developed to use professional interpreters in role-play, based on evidence that professional interpreters improve health outcomes for patients with limited English proficiency. Other principles guiding the development of the teaching were an experiential learning format, integration to the core consultation skills curriculum, and sustainable delivery. The session was aligned with existing consultation skills teaching to retain the small-group experiential format and general practitioner (GP) tutor. Core curricular time was found through conversion of an existing consultation skills session. Language pairs of professional interpreters worked with each small group, with one playing patient and the other playing interpreter. These professional interpreters attended training in the scenarios so that they could learn to act as patient and family interpreter. GP tutors attended training sessions to help them facilitate the session. This enhanced the sustainability of the session by providing a cohort of tutors able to pass on their expertise to new staff through the existing shadowing process. Tutors felt that the involvement of professional interpreters improved student engagement. Student evaluation of the teaching suggests that the learning objectives were achieved. Faculty evaluation by GP tutors suggests that they perceived the teaching to be worthwhile and that the training they received had helped improve their own clinical practice in consulting through interpreters. We offer the following recommendations to others who may be interested in developing teaching on interpreted consultations within their core curriculum: 1) consider recruiting professional interpreters as a teaching resource; 2) align the teaching to existing consultation skills sessions to aid integration; and 3) invest in faculty development for successful and sustainable delivery. PMID:25473325

  10. Evaluating Interpreter's Skill by Measurement of Prosody Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Saori; Nakazono, Kaoru; Nishida, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Yasuo; Ichikawa, Akira

    Sign language is a visual language in which main articulators are hands, torso, head, and face. For simultaneous interpreters of Japanese sign language (JSL) and spoken Japanese, it is very important to recognize not only the hands movement but also prosody such like head, eye, posture and facial expression. This is because prosody has grammatical rules for representing the case and modification relations in JSL. The goal of this study is to introduce an examination called MPR (Measurement of Prosody Recognition) and to demonstrate that it can be an indicator for the other general skills of interpreters. For this purpose, we conducted two experiments: the first studies the relationship between the interpreter's experience and the performance score on MPR (Experiment-1), and the second investigates the specific skill that can be estimated by MPR (Experiment-2). The data in Experiment-1 came from four interpreters who had more than 1-year experience as interpreters, and more four interpreters who had less than 1-year experience. The mean accuracy of MPR in the more experienced group was higher than that in the less experienced group. The data in Experiment-2 came from three high MPR interpreters and three low MPR interpreters. Two hearing subjects and three deaf subjects evaluated their skill in terms of the speech or sign interpretation skill, the reliability of interpretation, the expeditiousness, and the subjective sense of accomplishment for the ordering pizza task. The two experiments indicated a possibility that MPR could be useful for estimating if the interpreter is sufficiently experienced to interpret from sign language to spoken Japanese, and if they can work on the interpretation expeditiously without making the deaf or the hearing clients anxious. Finally we end this paper with suggestions for conclusions and future work.

  11. Expert interpretation of bar and line graphs: the role of graphicacy in reducing the effect of graph format

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, David; Ali, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between informational and computational equivalence of representations, first articulated by Larkin and Simon (1987) has been a fundamental principle in the analysis of diagrammatic reasoning which has been supported empirically on numerous occasions. We present an experiment that investigates this principle in relation to the performance of expert graph users of 2 × 2 “interaction” bar and line graphs. The study sought to determine whether expert interpretation is affected by graph format in the same way that novice interpretations are. The findings revealed that, unlike novices—and contrary to the assumptions of several graph comprehension models—experts' performance was the same for both graph formats, with their interpretation of bar graphs being no worse than that for line graphs. We discuss the implications of the study for guidelines for presenting such data and for models of expert graph comprehension. PMID:26579052

  12. Interpretable whole-brain prediction analysis with GraphNet.

    PubMed

    Grosenick, Logan; Klingenberg, Brad; Katovich, Kiefer; Knutson, Brian; Taylor, Jonathan E

    2013-05-15

    Multivariate machine learning methods are increasingly used to analyze neuroimaging data, often replacing more traditional "mass univariate" techniques that fit data one voxel at a time. In the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature, this has led to broad application of "off-the-shelf" classification and regression methods. These generic approaches allow investigators to use ready-made algorithms to accurately decode perceptual, cognitive, or behavioral states from distributed patterns of neural activity. However, when applied to correlated whole-brain fMRI data these methods suffer from coefficient instability, are sensitive to outliers, and yield dense solutions that are hard to interpret without arbitrary thresholding. Here, we develop variants of the Graph-constrained Elastic-Net (GraphNet), a fast, whole-brain regression and classification method developed for spatially and temporally correlated data that automatically yields interpretable coefficient maps (Grosenick et al., 2009b). GraphNet methods yield sparse but structured solutions by combining structured graph constraints (based on knowledge about coefficient smoothness or connectivity) with a global sparsity-inducing prior that automatically selects important variables. Because GraphNet methods can efficiently fit regression or classification models to whole-brain, multiple time-point data sets and enhance classification accuracy relative to volume-of-interest (VOI) approaches, they eliminate the need for inherently biased VOI analyses and allow whole-brain fitting without the multiple comparison problems that plague mass univariate and roaming VOI ("searchlight") methods. As fMRI data are unlikely to be normally distributed, we (1) extend GraphNet to include robust loss functions that confer insensitivity to outliers, (2) equip them with "adaptive" penalties that asymptotically guarantee correct variable selection, and (3) develop a novel sparse structured Support Vector GraphNet classifier (SVGN). When applied to previously published data (Knutson et al., 2007), these efficient whole-brain methods significantly improved classification accuracy over previously reported VOI-based analyses on the same data (Grosenick et al., 2008; Knutson et al., 2007) while discovering task-related regions not documented in the original VOI approach. Critically, GraphNet estimates fit to the Knutson et al. (2007) data generalize well to out-of-sample data collected more than three years later on the same task but with different subjects and stimuli (Karmarkar et al., submitted for publication). By enabling robust and efficient selection of important voxels from whole-brain data taken over multiple time points (>100,000 "features"), these methods enable data-driven selection of brain areas that accurately predict single-trial behavior within and across individuals. PMID:23298747

  13. Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boote, Stacy K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were…

  14. Improving Graduate Students' Graphing Skills of Multiple Baseline Designs with Microsoft[R] Excel 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Ya-yu; Starling, A. Leyf Peirce

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a graphing task analysis using the Microsoft[R] Office Excel 2007 program on the single-subject multiple baseline graphing skills of three university graduate students. Using a multiple probe across participants design, the study demonstrated a functional relationship between the number of correct graphing

  15. Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Stacy K.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were collected and coded using a rubric of previously cited factors, categorized by Bertin's (Semiology of graphics: Diagrams, networks, maps. The University of Wisconsin Press, Ltd., Madison, 1983) theory of graph interpretation. Data analysis revealed responses varied by graph question level. Across levels, students interpreted graphs in one or more of the three ways: mathematical word problems (focusing on an algorithm), science data to be analyzed (incorporating science knowledge), or no strategy. Although consistently used across levels, the frequency and usefulness of approaches varied by question level.

  16. Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Actuarial Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

  17. Interpreting Unfamiliar Graphs: A Generative, Activity Theoretic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew Jin

    2004-01-01

    Research on graphing presents its results as if knowing and understanding were something stored in peoples' minds independent of the situation that they find themselves in. Thus, there are no models that situate interview responses to graphing tasks. How, then, we question, are the interview texts produced? How do respondents begin and end…

  18. Students' Interpretation of a Function Associated with a Real-Life Problem from Its Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahir, Nevin

    2010-01-01

    The properties of a function such as limit, continuity, derivative, growth, or concavity can be determined more easily from its graph than by doing any algebraic operation. For this reason, it is important for students of mathematics to interpret some of the properties of a function from its graph. In this study, we investigated the competence of…

  19. Interpretation of Radiological Images: Towards a Framework of Knowledge and Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Gijp, A.; van der Schaaf, M. F.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Huige, J. C. B. M.; Ravesloot, C. J.; van Schaik, J. P. J.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge and skills that are required for radiological image interpretation are not well documented, even though medical imaging is gaining importance. This study aims to develop a comprehensive framework of knowledge and skills, required for two-dimensional and multiplanar image interpretation in radiology. A mixed-method study approach was…

  20. Graph-based interpretation of the Molecular Interstellar Medium Segmentation

    E-print Network

    Colombo, Dario; Ginsburg, Adam; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Hughes, Annie

    2015-01-01

    We present a generalization of the Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) identification problem based on cluster analysis. The method we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation) considers the dendrogram of emission in the broader framework of graph theory and utilizes spectral clustering to find discrete regions with similar emission properties. For Galactic molecular cloud structures, we show that the characteristic volume and/or integrated CO luminosity are useful criteria to define the clustering, yielding emission structures that closely reproduce "by-eye" identification results. SCIMES performs best on well-resolved, high-resolution data, making it complementary to other available algorithms. Using 12CO(1-0) data for the Orion-Monoceros complex, we demonstrate that SCIMES provides robust results against changes of the dendrogram-construction parameters, noise realizations and degraded resolution. By comparing SCIMES with other cloud decomposition approaches, we show t...

  1. Effects of Graphing Conventions and Response Options on Interpretation of Small n Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of manipulation of two graphing conventions on judgements of time-series data by novice raters. These conventions involved the presence of phase change lines between baseline and intervention data and whether data points across phase changes were connected. The 1990 study of Matyas and Greenwood was also…

  2. Hands-on Materials for Teaching about Global Climate Change through Graph Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Hallagan, Jean E.; Shaffer, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Teachers need to address global climate change with students in their classrooms as evidence for consequences from these environmental changes mounts. One way to approach global climate change is through examination of authentic data. Mathematics and science may be integrated by interpreting graphs from the professional literature. This study…

  3. On the Relation of Abstract and Concrete in Scientists' Graph Interpretations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hwang, SungWon

    2006-01-01

    The notions of "abstract" and "concrete" are central to the conceptualization of mathematical knowing and learning. Much of the literature takes a dualist approach, leading to the privileging of the former term at the expense of the latter. In this article, we provide a concrete analysis of a scientist interpreting an unfamiliar graph to show how…

  4. Graph-based interpretation of the molecular interstellar medium segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Ginsburg, A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hughes, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalization of the giant molecular cloud identification problem based on cluster analysis. The method we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation) considers the dendrogram of emission in the broader framework of graph theory and utilizes spectral clustering to find discrete regions with similar emission properties. For Galactic molecular cloud structures, we show that the characteristic volume and/or integrated CO luminosity are useful criteria to define the clustering, yielding emission structures that closely reproduce `by-eye' identification results. SCIMES performs best on well-resolved, high-resolution data, making it complementary to other available algorithms. Using 12CO(1-0) data for the Orion-Monoceros complex, we demonstrate that SCIMES provides robust results against changes of the dendrogram-construction parameters, noise realizations and degraded resolution. By comparing SCIMES with other cloud decomposition approaches, we show that our method is able to identify all canonical clouds of the Orion-Monoceros region, avoiding the overdivision within high-resolution survey data that represents a common limitation of several decomposition algorithms. The Orion-Monoceros objects exhibit hierarchies and size-line width relationships typical to the turbulent gas in molecular clouds, although `the Scissors' region deviates from this common description. SCIMES represents a significant step forward in moving away from pixel-based cloud segmentation towards a more physical-oriented approach, where virtually all properties of the ISM can be used for the segmentation of discrete objects.

  5. Collaborative Robotic Instruction: A Graph Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitnik, Ruben; Recabarren, Matias; Nussbaum, Miguel; Soto, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Graphing is a key skill in the study of Physics. Drawing and interpreting graphs play a key role in the understanding of science, while the lack of these has proved to be a handicap and a limiting factor in the learning of scientific concepts. It has been observed that despite the amount of previous graph-working experience, students of all ages…

  6. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of How Professional Dance Teachers Implement Psychological Skills Training in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klockare, Ellinor; Gustafsson, Henrik; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how dance teachers work with psychological skills with their students in class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six female professional teachers in jazz, ballet and contemporary dance. The interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith 1996). Results…

  7. The Effect of a Graph-Oriented Computer-Assisted Project-Based Learning Environment on Argumentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, P. -S.; Van Dyke, M.; Chen, Y.; Smith, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore how seventh graders in a suburban school in the United States developed argumentation skills and science knowledge in a project-based learning environment that incorporated a graph-oriented, computer-assisted application. A total of 54 students (three classes) comprised this treatment…

  8. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  9. On the Interpretation of Whitney Numbers Through Arrangements of Hyperplanes, Zonotopes, Non-Radon Partitions, and Orientations of Graphs

    E-print Network

    Zaslavsky, Thomas

    On the Interpretation of Whitney Numbers Through Arrangements of Hyperplanes, Zonotopes, Non-Radon OF HYPERPLANES, ZONOTOPES, NON-RADON PARTITIONS, AND ORIENTATIONS OF GRAPHS BY CURTIS GREENE AND THOMAS of (x', x i ) with x' G XI. When L has a 0 element, the ordinary (simply indexed) Whltney numbers are w

  10. The Graphing Skills of Students in Mathematics and Science Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli

    Graphical representations play an important role in both science and mathematics education. Graphs can summarize very complex information or relationships very effectively. Although graphs are explicitly taught in mathematics classrooms as an end in themselves, many subject areas such as science or social studies utilize graphs to represent and…

  11. Interviewing patients using interpreters in an oncology setting: initial evaluation of a communication skills module | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The authors developed a communication skills training module for health professionals who work with professional translators in interviewing patients. The module combines didactic presentation of information and group role-play exercises in which trained medical interpreters help trainees communicate with bilingual patients. The module stresses communication strategies, including optimal seating arrangements that strengthen the clinician-patient relationship and de-emphasize interpreter-patient and interpreter-clinician interactions.

  12. When There Isn't a Right Answer: Interpretation and Reasoning, Key Skills for Twenty-First Century Geoscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Clare Elizabeth; Philo, Chris; Shipton, Zoe Kai

    2011-01-01

    A key challenge in university geoscience teaching is to give students the skills to cope with uncertainty. Professional geoscientists can rarely be certain of the "right answer" to problems posed by most geological datasets, and reasoning through this uncertainty, being intelligently flexible in interpreting data which are limited in resolution…

  13. Re-Examining the Power of Video Motion Analysis to Promote the Reading and Creating of Kinematic Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2010-01-01

    One essential skill that students who learn physics should possess is the ability to create and interpret kinematic graphs. However, it is well documented in the literature that students show lack of competence in these abilities. They have problems in connecting graphs and physics concepts, as well as graphs and the real world. The present paper…

  14. Categorization of First-Year University Students' Interpretations of Numerical Linear Distance-Time Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wemyss, Thomas; van Kampen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the various approaches taken by first-year university students (n[image omitted]550) when asked to determine the direction of motion, the constancy of speed, and a numerical value of the speed of an object at a point on a numerical linear distance-time graph. We investigated the prevalence of various well-known general…

  15. Interpreting Mathematics Scores on the New Jersey College Basic Skills Placement Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dass, Jane; Pine, Charles

    The New Jersey College Basic Skills Placement Test (NJCBSPT) is designed to measure certain basic language and mathematics skills of students entering New Jersey colleges. The primary purpose of the two mathematics sections is to determine whether students are prepared to begin certain college-level work without a handicap in computation or…

  16. Offline signature verification and skilled forgery detection using HMM and sum graph features with ANN and knowledge based classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Mohit; Choudhary, Vijay; Das, Rupam; Khan, Ilyas

    2010-02-01

    Signature verification is one of the most widely researched areas in document analysis and signature biometric. Various methodologies have been proposed in this area for accurate signature verification and forgery detection. In this paper we propose a unique two stage model of detecting skilled forgery in the signature by combining two feature types namely Sum graph and HMM model for signature generation and classify them with knowledge based classifier and probability neural network. We proposed a unique technique of using HMM as feature rather than a classifier as being widely proposed by most of the authors in signature recognition. Results show a higher false rejection than false acceptance rate. The system detects forgeries with an accuracy of 80% and can detect the signatures with 91% accuracy. The two stage model can be used in realistic signature biometric applications like the banking applications where there is a need to detect the authenticity of the signature before processing documents like checks.

  17. Skills

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Joshua K.

    2013-01-01

    The SKILLS curriculum is a web-based curriculum of (4k) targets for designing and managing applied behavior analysis-based treatment programs for children with autism and related disorders. PMID:25729511

  18. Levels of line graph question interpretation with intermediate elementary students of varying scientific and mathematical knowledge and ability: A think aloud study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Stacy Kathryn

    This study examined how intermediate elementary students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected their interpretation of line graphs and how their interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 6th-grade students engaged in think aloud interviews (Ericsson & Simon, 1993) while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science (TOGS) (McKenzie & Padilla, 1986). Hand gestures were video recorded. Student performance on the TOGS was assessed using an assessment rubric created from previously cited factors affecting students' graphing ability. Factors were categorized using Bertin's (1983) three graph question levels. The assessment rubric was validated by Padilla and a veteran mathematics and science teacher. Observational notes were also collected. Data were analyzed using Roth and Bowen's semiotic process of reading graphs (2001). Key findings from this analysis included differences in the use of heuristics, self-generated questions, science knowledge, and self-motivation. Students with higher prior achievement used a greater number and variety of heuristics and more often chose appropriate heuristics. They also monitored their understanding of the question and the adequacy of their strategy and answer by asking themselves questions. Most used their science knowledge spontaneously to check their understanding of the question and the adequacy of their answers. Students with lower and moderate prior achievement favored one heuristic even when it was not useful for answering the question and rarely asked their own questions. In some cases, if students with lower prior achievement had thought about their answers in the context of their science knowledge, they would have been able to recognize their errors. One student with lower prior achievement motivated herself when she thought the questions were too difficult. In addition, students answered the TOGS in one of three ways: as if they were mathematics word problems, science data to be analyzed, or they were confused and had to guess. A second set of findings corroborated how science background knowledge affected graph interpretation: correct science knowledge supported students' reasoning, but it was not necessary to answer any question correctly; correct science knowledge could not compensate for incomplete mathematics knowledge; and incorrect science knowledge often distracted students when they tried to use it while answering a question. Finally, using Roth and Bowen's (2001) two-stage semiotic model of reading graphs, representative vignettes showed emerging patterns from the study. This study added to our understanding of the role of science content knowledge during line graph interpretation, highlighted the importance of heuristics and mathematics procedural knowledge, and documented the importance of perception attentions, motivation, and students' self-generated questions. Recommendations were made for future research in line graph interpretation in mathematics and science education and for improving instruction in this area.

  19. Interpretive Structural Modeling of MLearning Curriculum Implementation Model of English Language Communication Skills for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim; Siraj, Saedah; Asra; Hussin, Zaharah

    2014-01-01

    In the field of distance education, learning mediated through mobile technology or mobile learning (mLearning) has rapidly building a repertoire of influence in distance education research. This paper aims to propose an mLearning curriculum implementation model for English Language and Communication skills course among undergraduates using…

  20. Acquisition of Visual Perceptual Skills from Worked Examples: Learning to Interpret Electrocardiograms (ECGs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berge, Kees; van Gog, Tamara; Mamede, Silvia; Schmidt, Henk G.; van Saase, Jan L. C. M.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that for acquiring problem-solving skills, instruction consisting of studying worked examples is more effective and efficient for novice learners than instruction consisting of problem-solving. This study investigated whether worked examples would also be a useful instructional format for the acquisition of visual perceptual…

  1. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  2. K-6 Social Studies Skills for the Human Behavior and Urban Studies Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Samuel L., Ed.

    This guide was developed to aid elementary students deal with life experiences through skill development. Major skills stressed are: locating, organizing, and evaluating information; acquiring information through listening, observing, and reading; communicating orally and in writing; interpreting pictures, charts, graphs, and tables; and working…

  3. Effect of Scientific Argumentation on the Development of Scientific Process Skills in the Context of Teaching Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gultepe, Nejla; Kilic, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the differences in integrated scientific process skills (designing experiments, forming data tables, drawing graphs, graph interpretation, determining the variables and hypothesizing, changing and controlling variables) of students (n = 17) who were taught with an approach based on scientific…

  4. Using Science Topics and Concepts to Teach Library Media Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voran, Judy; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes purpose, materials, and approach for several science-related lessons designed to teach library media skills to elementary school children: (1) Nonfiction Versus Fiction; (2) Desk Dictionaries and Specialized Dictionaries; (3) The Library as a Communication Storehouse; (4) Conducting a Survey; (5) Interpreting Graphs; and (6) Plastics,…

  5. Total Quality & Basic Skills. The TQ Castle--Using Basic Skills Development to Evade Alligators in the Moat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewe, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Key skills required in the total quality workplace are cross-functional teaming, interpreting charts/graphs, oral communication, brainstorming, understanding cause/effect, categorizing ideas, critical pathing, formulating suggestions, analyzing the needs of internal and external customers, and writing status reports. (SK)

  6. ``Cheers for Rates of Change'' -- An Introductory Lab Used to Relate Graphs to Physical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Doug; Whalen, Mary Battershell

    2012-11-01

    Students entering physics courses in high school have seen graphs for years in math and science classes, but often do not have a deep understanding of the physical meaning of the graphs. This introductory activity is designed to allow students to collect data for a real world or physical situation (the height versus volume of water held in everyday drinking glasses), and interpret the meaning of the graph and how it describes the physical situation. This activity is well suited for students who don't have much physics knowledge. It uses familiar objects to start developing the skills of making and interpreting graphs and then relating them to the physical situations they analyze. These skills are used heavily all year in our physics classes, which are based on the Modeling Instruction in Physics framework developed at Arizona State University.

  7. Expanding our understanding of students' use of graphs for learning physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverty, James T.

    It is generally agreed that the ability to visualize functional dependencies or physical relationships as graphs is an important step in modeling and learning. However, several studies in Physics Education Research (PER) have shown that many students in fact do not master this form of representation and even have misconceptions about the meaning of graphs that impede learning physics concepts. Working with graphs in classroom settings has been shown to improve student abilities with graphs, particularly when the students can interact with them. We introduce a novel problem type in an online homework system, which requires students to construct the graphs themselves in free form, and requires no hand-grading by instructors. A study of pre/post-test data using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K) over several semesters indicates that students learn significantly more from these graph construction problems than from the usual graph interpretation problems, and that graph interpretation alone may not have any significant effect. The interpretation of graphs, as well as the representation translation between textual, mathematical, and graphical representations of physics scenarios, are frequently listed among the higher order thinking skills we wish to convey in an undergraduate course. But to what degree do we succeed? Do students indeed employ higher order thinking skills when working through graphing exercises? We investigate students working through a variety of graph problems, and, using a think-aloud protocol, aim to reconstruct the cognitive processes that the students go through. We find that to a certain degree, these problems become commoditized and do not trigger the desired higher order thinking processes; simply translating ``textbook-like'' problems into the graphical realm will not achieve any additional educational goals. Whether the students have to interpret or construct a graph makes very little difference in the methods used by the students. We will also look at the results of using graph problems in an online learning environment. We will show evidence that construction problems lead to a higher degree of difficulty and degree of discrimination than other graph problems and discuss the influence the course has on these variables.

  8. Understanding graphs with two independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Jennifer L.

    Adults are not necessarily competent users of graphs with two independent variables, despite the frequency of this representational format. The three tasks in this thesis address the impact of interpretation statements and graph patterns. Interpretation statements were based on the statistical effects -- simple effects, main effects, and interactions. Graph patterns were systematically varied based on a novel classification scheme of graphs with two IVs. I suggest that the complexity of a graph's data pattern depends on the consistency of the simple effects' directions and magnitudes. In the first study, undergraduates constructed graphs based on statements about data patterns. Errors reflected a misunderstanding of how two IVs could be combined and represented graphically. When the experimental group had graph-relevant information added (variable labels spatially located on axes), the ability to represent the relationships among the IVs significantly increased. The ability to satisfy the constraints imposed by the statements was not affected. Adding labels specifically targeted skills relevant to graphical literacy. Transfer to a third trial was stronger for those of higher math abilities. The second study focused on the effect of an introductory statistics course. Overall, undergraduates performed well on statements describing the simple effects of the IVs. However, even though they improved from Time 1 to Time 2 for interaction statements, performance on statements about main effects and interactions still showed considerable room for improvement. In the third study, repeated trials of the 20 patterns proposed by the simple effects consistency model established that the proposed classification scheme addresses additional sources of variability in reasoning with graphs (i.e., sources not captured by traditional classification schemes). As the complexity level of the data pattern increased, performance (based on accuracy and RT) decreased, with parallel impacts on performance for each IV's complexity. This suggests that participants responded to conceptual differences among the levels, as the graph's perceptual characteristics vary based on the IV. Further development of a model organizing graph patterns will allow investigation of the interplay between the statement and graph pattern. In turn, this can lead to greater understanding of the graphical reasoning processes and improvements in graphical literacy.

  9. Learning to write without writing: Writing accurate descriptions of interactions after learning graph-printed description relations.

    PubMed

    Spear, Jack; Fields, Lanny

    2015-12-01

    Interpreting and describing complex information shown in graphs are essential skills to be mastered by students in many disciplines; both are skills that are difficult to learn. Thus, interventions that produce these outcomes are of great value. Previous research showed that conditional discrimination training that established stimulus control by some elements of graphs and their printed descriptions produced some improvement in the accuracy of students' written descriptions of graphs. In the present experiment, students wrote nearly perfect descriptions of the information conveyed in interaction-based graphs after the establishment of conditional relations between graphs and their printed descriptions. This outcome was achieved with the use of special conditional discrimination training procedures that required participants to attend to many of the key elements of the graphs and the phrases in the printed descriptions that corresponded to the elements in the graphs. Thus, students learned to write full descriptions of the information represented by complex graphs by an automated training procedure that did not involve the direct training of writing. PMID:26077442

  10. Advantages of Micro-Based Labs: Electronic Data Acquisition, Computerized Graphing, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuessy, Carol L.; Rowland, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) study (n=75) which uses multiple temperature gathering devices (mercury thermometer, digital thermometer, and computer probe) and graphing methods (hand graphs, delayed computer graphs, and real-time graphs). Reports that MBL real-time graphing provides significant increases in graphing skills. (MVL)

  11. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-05-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y =e-t/? would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to interpret the mean life (or time constant) ? using such a linear-log graph.

  12. Data collection and graph generation using touchscreen technology

    E-print Network

    Pope, John (John W.), Jr

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of the TouchGraph system, whose goal is to help students develop graphing skills by allowing them to record their own data and access the data of their classmates using ...

  13. A Graph Rewriting Framework for Statecharts Semantics ?

    E-print Network

    Peron, Adriano

    A Graph Rewriting Framework for Statecharts Semantics ? Andrea Maggiolo­Schettini 1 and Adriano that graph rewriting is a suitable environment to formalize semantics of specification languages with dynamic. Graph rewriting rules give the semantics of Statecharts in such interpretation. Standard Stat­ echarts

  14. Knowing a Lot for One's Age: Vocabulary Skill and Not Age Is Associated with Anticipatory Incremental Sentence Interpretation in Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borovsky, Arielle; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Fernald, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Adults can incrementally combine information from speech with astonishing speed to anticipate future words. Concurrently, a growing body of work suggests that vocabulary ability is crucially related to lexical processing skills in children. However, little is known about this relationship with predictive sentence processing in children or adults.…

  15. Using Sorting Networks for Skill Building and Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Robert; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2007-01-01

    Sorting networks, used in graph theory, have instructional value as a skill- building tool as well as an interesting exploration in discrete mathematics. Students can practice mathematics facts and develop reasoning and logic skills with this topic. (Contains 4 figures.)

  16. Quantum graphs as quantum relations

    E-print Network

    Nik Weaver

    2015-06-12

    The "noncommutative graphs" which arise in quantum error correction are a special case of the quantum relations introduced in [N. Weaver, Quantum relations, Mem. Amer. Math. Soc. 215 (2012), v-vi, 81-140]. We use this perspective to interpret the Knill-Laflamme error-correction conditions [E. Knill and R. Laflamme, Theory of quantum error-correcting codes, Phys. Rev. A 55 (1997), 900-911] in terms of graph-theoretic independence, to give an intrinsic characterization of Stahlke's quantum graph homomorphisms [D. Stahlke, Quantum source-channel coding and non-commutative graph theory, arXiv:1405.5254], and to realize the quantum confusability graph associated to a quantum channel [R. Duan, S. Severini, and A. Winter, Zero-error communication via quantum channels, noncommutative graphs, and a quantum Lovasz number, IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory 59 (2013), 1164-1174] as the pushforward of a diagonal relation.

  17. Helping Students Make Sense of Graphs: An Experimental Trial of SmartGraphs Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew; Kay, Rachel; Staudt, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Graphs are commonly used in science, mathematics, and social sciences to convey important concepts; yet students at all ages demonstrate difficulties interpreting graphs. This paper reports on an experimental study of free, Web-based software called SmartGraphs that is specifically designed to help students overcome their misconceptions regarding…

  18. Database Inference Conceptual Graphs Using Conceptual Graphs

    E-print Network

    Delugach, Harry S.

    Database Inference ­ Conceptual Graphs Using Conceptual Graphs To Represent Database Inference on conceptual graphs. The database inference problem is briefly described. Previous approaches are summarized problems. The classification of inference target classes and the use of conceptual graphs for database

  19. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  20. Helping Students Make Sense of Graphs: An Experimental Trial of SmartGraphs Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Andrew; Kay, Rachel; Staudt, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Graphs are commonly used in science, mathematics, and social sciences to convey important concepts; yet students at all ages demonstrate difficulties interpreting graphs. This paper reports on an experimental study of free, Web-based software called SmartGraphs that is specifically designed to help students overcome their misconceptions regarding graphs. SmartGraphs allows students to interact with graphs and provides hints and scaffolding to help students, if they need help. SmartGraphs activities can be authored to be useful in teaching and learning a variety of topics that use graphs (such as slope, velocity, half-life, and global warming). A 2-year experimental study in physical science classrooms was conducted with dozens of teachers and thousands of students. In the first year, teachers were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Data show that students of teachers who use SmartGraphs as a supplement to normal instruction make greater gains understanding graphs than control students studying the same content using the same textbooks, but without SmartGraphs. Additionally, teachers believe that the SmartGraphs activities help students meet learning goals in the physical science course, and a great majority reported they would use the activities with students again. In the second year of the study, several specific variations of SmartGraphs were researched to help determine what makes SmartGraphs effective.

  1. String graphs and incomparability graphs

    E-print Network

    Fox, Jacob

    Given a collection C of curves in the plane, its string graph is defined as the graph with vertex set C, in which two curves in C are adjacent if and only if they intersect. Given a partially ordered set (P,<), its ...

  2. MIT Lincoln Laboratory Linear Algebraic Graph Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Kepner, Jeremy

    of Defense under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government. #12;MIT · Introduction · Power Law Graphs · Graph Benchmark · Results · Summary #12;MIT Lincoln Laboratory Slide-3

  3. Graph Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2005-12-27

    Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

  4. Fostering the Development of Quantitative Life Skills through Introductory Astronomy: Can it be Done?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follette, Katherine B.; McCarthy, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a student survey designed to test whether the all-important life skill of numeracy/quantitative literacy can be fostered and improved upon in college students through the vehicle of non-major introductory courses in Astronomy. Many instructors of introductory science courses for non-majors would state that a major goal of our classes is to teach our students to distinguish between science and pseudoscience, truth and fiction, in their everyday lives. It is difficult to believe that such a skill can truly be mastered without a fair amount of mathematical sophistication in the form of arithmetic, statistical and graph reading skills that many American college students unfortunately lack when they enter our classrooms. In teaching what is frequently their "terminal science course in life” can we instill in our students the numerical skills that they need to be savvy consumers, educated citizens and discerning interpreters of the ever-present polls, studies and surveys in which our society is awash? In what may well be their final opportunity to see applied mathematics in the classroom, can we impress upon them the importance of mathematical sophistication in interpreting the statistics that they are bombarded with by the media? Our study is in its second semester, and is designed to investigate to what extent it is possible to improve important quantitative skills in college students through a single semester introductory Astronomy course.

  5. Can Comparison of Contrastive Examples Facilitate Graph Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linsey A.; Gentner, Dedre

    2011-01-01

    The authors explore the role of comparison in improving graph fluency. The ability to use graphs fluently is crucial for STEM achievement, but graphs are challenging to interpret and produce because they often involve integration of multiple variables, continuous change in variables over time, and omission of certain details in order to highlight…

  6. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karin; Kuhlthau, Carol C.; Branch, Jennifer L.; Solowan, Diane Galloway; Case, Roland; Abilock, Debbie; Eisenberg, Michael B.; Koechlin, Carol; Zwaan, Sandi; Hughes, Sandra; Low, Ann; Litch, Margaret; Lowry, Cindy; Irvine, Linda; Stimson, Margaret; Schlarb, Irene; Wilson, Janet; Warriner, Emily; Parsons, Les; Luongo-Orlando, Katherine; Hamilton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Includes 19 articles that address issues related to library skills and Canadian school libraries. Topics include information literacy; inquiry learning; critical thinking and electronic research; collaborative inquiry; information skills and the Big 6 approach to problem solving; student use of online databases; library skills; Internet accuracy;…

  7. Skill Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdsworth, Tom

    2007-01-01

    With competition to attract quality students into career and technical education programs and many entrants to the workforce inadequately prepared with employability skills, some community colleges have found a way to answer industry's call--they are launching SkillsUSA chapters on campus. In this article, the author features SkillsUSA, a…

  8. Graph Theory

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Jesse D

    2011-01-01

    This a text about graph theory: There are seven formal sections. The first two sections are fairly redundant, but suffice to cover some of the general topics in graph theory. In the third section (Chapter 3), there is a serious treatment of the Zarankiewicz problem, specifically focusing on the standard bound for the Zarankiewicz number. The fourth and fifth sections focus on longstanding conjectures in graph theory and the sixth section is an application of conditional probability to stack (packing) questions. The seventh section treats the Four Color Theorem without directly solving or answering the Hadwiger conjecture. There is a closing section, which treats a very small subsection of the problems raised in the text.

  9. university-logo Graph Expansions

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    university-logo Graph Expansions Green's Relations Closing Remarks Semigroup Graph Expansions January 2009 Rebecca Noonan Heale Semigroup Graph Expansions: #12;university-logo Graph Expansions Green;university-logo Graph Expansions Green's Relations Closing Remarks History Definitions Graph Expansions

  10. Novice Interpretations of Visual Representations of Geosciences Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkemper, L. K.; Arthurs, L.

    2013-12-01

    Past cognition research of individual's perception and comprehension of bar and line graphs are substantive enough that they have resulted in the generation of graph design principles and graph comprehension theories; however, gaps remain in our understanding of how people process visual representations of data, especially of geologic and atmospheric data. This pilot project serves to build on others' prior research and begin filling the existing gaps. The primary objectives of this pilot project include: (i) design a novel data collection protocol based on a combination of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and eye-tracking tasks to investigate student data handling skills of simple to complex visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data, (ii) demonstrate that the protocol yields results that shed light on student data handling skills, and (iii) generate preliminary findings upon which tentative but perhaps helpful recommendations on how to more effectively present these data to the non-scientist community and teach essential data handling skills. An effective protocol for the combined use of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and computer-based eye-tracking tasks for investigating cognitive processes involved in perceiving, comprehending, and interpreting visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data is instrumental to future research in this area. The outcomes of this pilot study provide the foundation upon which future more in depth and scaled up investigations can build. Furthermore, findings of this pilot project are sufficient for making, at least, tentative recommendations that can help inform (i) the design of physical attributes of visual representations of data, especially more complex representations, that may aid in improving students' data handling skills and (ii) instructional approaches that have the potential to aid students in more effectively handling visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data that they might encounter in a course, television news, newspapers and magazines, and websites. Such recommendations would also be the potential subject of future investigations and have the potential to impact the design features when data is presented to the public and instructional strategies not only in geoscience courses but also other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses.

  11. Flexibility in data interpretation: effects of representational format

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, David W.; Goldstone, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Graphs and tables differentially support performance on specific tasks. For tasks requiring reading off single data points, tables are as good as or better than graphs, while for tasks involving relationships among data points, graphs often yield better performance. However, the degree to which graphs and tables support flexibility across a range of tasks is not well-understood. In two experiments, participants detected main and interaction effects in line graphs and tables of bivariate data. Graphs led to more efficient performance, but also lower flexibility, as indicated by a larger discrepancy in performance across tasks. In particular, detection of main effects of variables represented in the graph legend was facilitated relative to detection of main effects of variables represented in the x-axis. Graphs may be a preferable representational format when the desired task or analytical perspective is known in advance, but may also induce greater interpretive bias than tables, necessitating greater care in their use and design. PMID:24427145

  12. Skills core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Laura

    Constantly changing technology and increasing competition mean that private companies are aggressively seeking new employees with high levels of technological literacy, good judgment, and communication and team-building skills. Industry also needs workers educated in science, math, engineering, and technology. But which of these skills are most important? Researchers at Indian River Community College at Fort Pierce, Fla., will attempt to answer that question with an NSF grant of nearly $1 million.

  13. Gaining a Better Understanding of Estuarine Circulation and Improving Data Visualization Skills Through a Hands-on Contouring Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailloux, B. J.; Kenna, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The creation and accurate interpretation of graphs is becoming a lost art among students. The availability of numerous graphing software programs makes the act of graphing data easy but does not necessarily aide students in interpreting complex visual data. This is especially true for contour maps; which have become a critical skill in the earth sciences and everyday life. In multiple classes, we have incorporated a large-scale, hands-on, contouring exercise of temperature, salinity, and density data collected in the Hudson River Estuary. The exercise allows students to learn first-hand how to plot, analyze, and present three dimensional data. As part of a day-long sampling expedition aboard an 80' research vessel, students deploy a water profiling instrument (Seabird CTD). Data are collected along a transect between the Verrazano and George Washington Bridges. The data are then processed and binned at 0.5 meter intervals. The processed data is then used during a later laboratory period for the contouring exercise. In class, students work in groups of 2 to 4 people and are provided with the data, a set of contouring instructions, a piece of large (3' x 3') graph paper, a ruler, and a set of colored markers. We then let the groups work together to determine the details of the graphs. Important steps along the way are talking to the students about X and Y scales, interpolation, and choices of contour intervals and colors. Frustration and bottlenecks are common at the beginning when students are unsure how to even begin with the raw data. At some point during the exercise, students start to understand the contour concept and each group usually produces a finished contour map in an hour or so. Interestingly, the groups take pride in the coloring portion of the contouring as it indicates successful interpretation of the data. The exercise concludes with each group presenting and discussing their contour plot. In almost every case, the hands-on graphing has improved the "students" visualization skills. Contouring has been incorporated into the River Summer (www.riversumer.org, http://www.riversumer.org/) program and our Environmental Measurements laboratory course. This has resulted in the exercise being utilized with undergraduates, high-school teachers, graduate students, and college faculty. We are in the process of making this curricular module available online to educators.

  14. TIGRE: Combinator graph reduction on the RTX 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, Philip, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient evaluation technique is examined for lazy functional programs based on combinator graph reduction. Graph reduction is widely believed to be slow and inefficient, but an abstract machine called the Threaded Interpretive Graph Reduction Engine (TIGRE) achieves a substantial speedup over previous reduction techniques. The runtime system of TIGRE is a threaded system that permits self-modifying program execution with compiler-guaranteed safety. This paper describes an implementation of TIGRE in Forth for the Harris RTX 2000 stack processor.

  15. Structural Differentiation of Graphs Using Hosoya-Based Indices

    PubMed Central

    Dehmer, Matthias; Mowshowitz, Abbe; Shi, Yongtang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the Hosoya-Spectral indices and the Hosoya information content of a graph. The first measure combines structural information captured by partial Hosoya polynomials and graph spectra. The latter is a graph entropy measure which is based on blocks consisting of vertices with the same partial Hosoya polynomial. We evaluate the discrimination power of these quantities by interpreting numerical results. PMID:25019933

  16. Graphs in Scientific Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, William S.

    Two surveys were carried out to help increase knowledge of current graph usage in science. A detailed analysis of all graphs in one volume of the journal "Science" revealed that 30 percent had errors. Graphs are used more in some disciplines than in others; a survey of 57 journals revealed natural science journals use far more graphs than…

  17. A Comparison of Video Modeling, Text-Based Instruction, and No Instruction for Creating Multiple Baseline Graphs in Microsoft Excel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyner, Bryan C.; Fienup, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphing is socially significant for behavior analysts; however, graphing can be difficult to learn. Video modeling (VM) may be a useful instructional method but lacks evidence for effective teaching of computer skills. A between-groups design compared the effects of VM, text-based instruction, and no instruction on graphing performance.…

  18. Helping Young Children Understand Graphs: A Demonstration Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Kent; Madden, Wendy

    1990-01-01

    Outlines a demonstration lesson showing third graders how to make and interpret graphs. Includes descriptions of purpose, vocabulary, and learning activities in which students graph numbers of students with dogs at home and analyze the contents of M&M candy packages by color. Argues process helps students understand large amounts of abstract…

  19. Walk Entropies in Graphs

    E-print Network

    Ernesto Estrada; Jose A. de la Pena; Naomichi Hatano

    2013-07-02

    Entropies based on walks on graphs and on their line-graphs are defined. They are based on the summation over diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the thermal Green's function of a graph also known as the communicability. The walk entropies are strongly related to the walk regularity of graphs and line-graphs. They are not biased by the graph size and have significantly better correlation with the inverse participation ratio of the eigenmodes of the adjacency matrix than other graph entropies. The temperature dependence of the walk entropies is also discussed. In particular, the walk entropy of graphs is shown to be non-monotonic for regular but non-walk-regular graphs in contrast to non-regular graphs.

  20. Register Allocation via Hierarchical Graph Coloring David Callahan Brian Koblenz

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Charles N.

    Register Allocation via Hierarchical Graph Coloring David Callahan Brian Koblenz Tera Computer and conclusions contained in this docu­ ment are those of Tera Computer Company and should not be interpreted

  1. Graph match program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, Mark T.

    1990-03-01

    A program is described for manipulating and comparing graphs of radar cross sections. The size and position of one graph relative to another can be changed and the two graphs combined to produce a new graph which represents an average of the two. The program can process data sets of varying numbers of data values. Graph Match was written using Apple Macintosh SE and II computers and Turbo Pascal as the programming language.

  2. Remote sensing: Principles and interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This book includes explanations of modern remote sensing systems and the skills needed to interpret imaging technology. Examples are provided of imaging systems such as Landsat Thematic Mapper, Seasat, Heat Capacity Mapping Mission, Space Shuttle Imaging Radar, Large Format Camera, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, Coastal Zone Scanner, and Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner.

  3. Library Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhullar, Pushpajit K., Ed.; Lawhorne, Anne R., Ed.

    This guide is designed to acquaint students of the University of Missouri-Columbia with the facilities and resources of the Ellis Library, and is intended for students enrolled in Library Science 105: Library Skills. The guide is organized into sections dealing with search strategies and types of library materials. It opens with an orientation to…

  4. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  5. Sharing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mealy, Virginia; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Three articles describe methods for teaching library skills. The first presents a song used to teach students the Dewey Decimal system; the second describes a reading program incorporating Halloween and foreign countries; and the third includes short poems designed to teach students to care for library books properly. (CLB)

  6. Strategic leadership: the essential skills.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, Paul J H; Krupp, Steve; Howland, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    The more uncertain your environment, the greater the opportunity--if you have the leadership skills to capitalize on it. Research at the Wharton school and at the authors' consulting firm, involving more than 20,000 executives to date, has identified six skills that, when mastered and used in concert, allow leaders to think strategically and navigate the unknown effectively. They are the abilities to anticipate, challenge, interpret, decide, align, and learn. This article describes the six skills in detail and includes a self-assessment that will enable you to identify the ones that most need your attention. The authors have found that strength in one skill cannot easily compensate for a deficit in another. An adaptive strategic leader has learned to apply all six at once. PMID:23390746

  7. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  8. The Web Graph Anthony Bonato

    E-print Network

    Bonato, Anthony

    The Web Graph Anthony Bonato Ryerson University Mathematics Graduate Seminar October 29, 2008 #12;Introducing the Web Graph - Anthony Bonato 2 Graph theory ­ the last century #12;Introducing the Web Graph - Anthony Bonato 3 Today... #12;Introducing the Web Graph - Anthony Bonato 4 · a graph G = (V(G),E(G)) = (V

  9. Graph Algorithms Robert Elsasser

    E-print Network

    Elsässer, Robert

    Graph Algorithms Robert Els¨asser 28 November 2011 Program of the day: · Matchings in graphs Robert any cut edge. Then, G has a 1-factor. Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11 with w(M) 2w(M ) in O(m log m) steps. Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11

  10. Graph Algorithms Robert Elsasser

    E-print Network

    Elsässer, Robert

    Graph Algorithms Robert Els¨asser 01 December 2011 Program of the day: · Interconnection networks Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11/12 0 #12;7. Interconnection networks · no bottlenecks · high fault tolerance Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11/12 1 #12

  11. Graph Algorithms Robert Elsasser

    E-print Network

    Elsässer, Robert

    Graph Algorithms Robert Els¨asser 08 December 2011 Program of the day: · Algorithms in interconnection net- works Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11/12 0 #12;Hypercube a Hamiltonian cycle. Robert Els¨asser Universit¨at Paderborn Graph Algorithms WS 11/12 1 #12;Broadcasting

  12. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  13. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  14. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph

  15. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Machining Skills Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document of skill standards for the machining skills cluster serves as a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. These 67 occupational skill standards describe what people should know and be able to do in an…

  16. Introduction Random Graphs Radom Geometric Graphs Chasing Cops on Random Graphs

    E-print Network

    Bonato, Anthony

    Introduction Random Graphs Radom Geometric Graphs Chasing Cops on Random Graphs Pawel Pralat Alon) SIAM DM, June 2012 Pawel Pralat Chasing Cops on Random Graphs #12;Introduction Random Graphs Radom Geometric Graphs Outline 1 Introduction and Definitions 2 Meyniel's Conjecture holds for random

  17. Using a Problem Solving-Cooperative Learning Approach to Improve Students' Skills for Interpreting [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectra of Unknown Compounds in an Organic Spectroscopy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angawi, Rihab F.

    2014-01-01

    To address third- and fourth-year chemistry students' difficulties with the challenge of interpreting [superscript 1]H NMR spectra, a problem solving-cooperative learning technique was incorporated in a Spectra of Organic Compounds course. Using this approach helped students deepen their understanding of the basics of [superscript 1]H NMR…

  18. Interpreting Metonymy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, Anne

    1994-01-01

    This paper examines some of the problems associated with interpreting metonymy, a figure of speech in which an attribute or commonly associated feature is used to name or designate something. After defining metonymy and outlining the principles of metonymy, the paper explains the differences between metonymy, synecdoche, and metaphor. It is…

  19. Performing Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothe, Elsa Lenz; Berard, Marie-France

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a/r/tographic methodology to interrogate interpretive acts in museums, multiple areas of inquiry are raised in this paper, including: which knowledge is assigned the greatest value when preparing a gallery talk; what lies outside of disciplinary knowledge; how invitations to participate invite and disinvite in the same gesture; and what…

  20. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

  1. Methods of visualizing graphs

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak C. (Richland, WA); Mackey, Patrick S. (Kennewick, WA); Perrine, Kenneth A. (Richland, WA); Foote, Harlan P. (Richland, WA); Thomas, James J. (Richland, WA)

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  2. Quantum statistics on graphs

    E-print Network

    JM Harrison; JP Keating; JM Robbins

    2011-01-07

    Quantum graphs are commonly used as models of complex quantum systems, for example molecules, networks of wires, and states of condensed matter. We consider quantum statistics for indistinguishable spinless particles on a graph, concentrating on the simplest case of abelian statistics for two particles. In spite of the fact that graphs are locally one-dimensional, anyon statistics emerge in a generalized form. A given graph may support a family of independent anyon phases associated with topologically inequivalent exchange processes. In addition, for sufficiently complex graphs, there appear new discrete-valued phases. Our analysis is simplified by considering combinatorial rather than metric graphs -- equivalently, a many-particle tight-binding model. The results demonstrate that graphs provide an arena in which to study new manifestations of quantum statistics. Possible applications include topological quantum computing, topological insulators, the fractional quantum Hall effect, superconductivity and molecular physics.

  3. Interpreting functions of one-dimensional kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canty, Reality S.

    The present work examined several factors related to interpreting graphical representations of motion concepts. Since the seminal work of Larkin and Simon (1987), cognitive research has investigated informational equivalence and computational efficiency by contrasting performance across different representations systems such as line versus bar graph (Ali & Peebles, 2012; Shah & Freedman, 2009; Zacks & Tversky, 1999), table versus graph (Speier, 2006; Vessey, 1991) or table versus map (Smelcer & Carmel, 1997). Physics education research has focused on difficulties related to interpreting motion concepts in graphs, accounting for them in terms of misconceptions. Kinematics, the branch of physics concerned with the motion of objects, makes an interesting study of informational equivalence and computational efficiency because its three primary representations -- position-time, velocity-time, and acceleration-time graphs -- can reflect the same information in the same representational system which provides a different type of contrast than has usually been used in this area of cognitive research. In the present work, four experiments were used to test several hypotheses concerned with whether information about the motion of objects can be directly read-off the graph or whether it needed additional processing beyond what was directly visible; Palmer (1987) referred to this as the derivational structure of representations. The main findings across the four experiments were that (a) graph type was not a reliable factor of graph interpretation difficulty, (b) derivational structure was useful for analyzing tasks but there was no evidence supporting it as a process account, (c) graph-based judgment is susceptible to visual features in the graph that trigger powerful spatial-conceptual correspondences particularly height (e.g., higher means more, lower means less), direction of slope (e.g., zero, positive, negative), and curvature (e.g., increasing rate of change, decreasing rate of change), (d) subjects primarily based their judgments on information from these features even when interpretation demanded more elaborate inferences with respect to the actual properties of motion depicted, and (e) domain knowledge was not enough to override the spatial-conceptual correspondences that biased judgment.

  4. Quantum Interpretations

    E-print Network

    A. R. P. Rau

    2006-06-03

    Difficulties and discomfort with the interpretation of quantum mechanics are due to differences in language between it and classical physics. Analogies to The Special Theory of Relativity, which also required changes in the basic worldview and language of non-relativistic classical mechanics, may help in absorbing the changes called for by quantum physics. There is no need to invoke extravagances such as the many worlds interpretation or specify a central role for consciousness or neural microstructures. The simple, but basic, acceptance that what is meant by the state of a physical system is different in quantum physics from what it is in classical physics goes a long way in explaining its seeming peculiarities.

  5. Basic Skills for Reflective Inquiry in the Social Studies. Bridges to the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodabaugh, Mary Jane; And Others

    The document consists of five social studies units for developing basic inquiry skills at the secondary level. Students read and analyze data through the construction of a table and a graph in Unit I, "Reading Graphs and Charts." Topics include a model of consumer demand, census information, and national budgeting. In Unit II, "Community Change,"…

  6. Interpretive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the recognition of quality in interpretation and knowledge generation within the qualitative research field, I propose a framework by which to evaluate the quality of knowledge generated within generalist, interpretive clinical practice. I describe three priorities for research in developing this model further, which will strengthen and preserve core elements of the discipline of general practice, and thus promote and support the health needs of the public. PMID:21805819

  7. Recognition of Probe Ptolemaic Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Maw-Shang; Hung, Ling-Ju

    Let G denote a graph class. An undirected graph G is called a probe G graph if one can make G a graph in G by adding edges between vertices in some independent set of G. By definition graph class G is a subclass of probe G graphs. Ptolemaic graphs are chordal and induced gem free. They form a subclass of both chordal graphs and distance-hereditary graphs. Many problems NP-hard on chordal graphs can be solved in polynomial time on ptolemaic graphs. We proposed an O(nm)-time algorithm to recognize probe ptolemaic graphs where n and m are the numbers of vertices and edges of the input graph respectively.

  8. Weighted Competition Graphs YOSHIO SANO

    E-print Network

    Weighted Competition Graphs YOSHIO SANO Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto a generalization of competition graphs, called weighted competi- tion graphs. The weighted competition graph) is the competition graph of D, and the weight w(e) of an edge e = xy E is the number of the common preys of x and y

  9. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    SciTech Connect

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Ayd?n; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implement a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.

  10. Graphs, matrices, and the GraphBLAS: Seven good reasons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kepner, Jeremy; Bader, David; Buluç, Ayd?n; Gilbert, John; Mattson, Timothy; Meyerhenke, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of graphs has become increasingly important to a wide range of applications. Graph analysis presents a number of unique challenges in the areas of (1) software complexity, (2) data complexity, (3) security, (4) mathematical complexity, (5) theoretical analysis, (6) serial performance, and (7) parallel performance. Implementing graph algorithms using matrix-based approaches provides a number of promising solutions to these challenges. The GraphBLAS standard (istcbigdata.org/GraphBlas) is being developed to bring the potential of matrix based graph algorithms to the broadest possible audience. The GraphBLAS mathematically defines a core set of matrix-based graph operations that can be used to implementmore »a wide class of graph algorithms in a wide range of programming environments. This paper provides an introduction to the GraphBLAS and describes how the GraphBLAS can be used to address many of the challenges associated with analysis of graphs.« less

  11. The Graph Traversal Pattern

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-01-01

    A graph is a structure composed of a set of vertices (i.e.nodes, dots) connected to one another by a set of edges (i.e.links, lines). The concept of a graph has been around since the late 19$^\\text{th}$ century, however, only in recent decades has there been a strong resurgence in both theoretical and applied graph research in mathematics, physics, and computer science. In applied computing, since the late 1960s, the interlinked table structure of the relational database has been the predominant information storage and retrieval model. With the growth of graph/network-based data and the need to efficiently process such data, new data management systems have been developed. In contrast to the index-intensive, set-theoretic operations of relational databases, graph databases make use of index-free, local traversals. This article discusses the graph traversal pattern and its use in computing.

  12. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  13. Vacuum Energy in Quantum Graphs 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Justin

    2007-07-14

    We calculate the vacuum energy in quantum graphs. Vacuum energy arose in quantum physics but has an independent mathematical interest as a functional carrying information about the eigenvalue spectrum of a system. A quantum graph is a metric graph...

  14. Practical skills of the future innovator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurov, Vitaliy

    2015-03-01

    Physics graduates face and often are disoriented by the complex and turbulent world of startups, incubators, emergent technologies, big data, social network engineering, and so on. In order to build the curricula that foster the skills necessary to navigate this world, we will look at the experiences at the Wolfram Science Summer School that gathers annually international students for already more than a decade. We will look at the examples of projects and see the development of such skills as innovative thinking, data mining, machine learning, cloud technologies, device connectivity and the Internet of things, network analytics, geo-information systems, formalized computable knowledge, and the adjacent applied research skills from graph theory to image processing and beyond. This should give solid ideas to educators who will build standard curricula adapted for innovation and entrepreneurship education.

  15. A First-Year Course That Teaches Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarneski, Debra

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall semester of 2009, I taught a first-year course that focused on skills required to successfully complete undergraduate research. This paper will discuss the Simpson College first-year course requirements, my course goals, the graph theory topics covered, student feedback, and instructor reflection.

  16. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  17. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  18. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  19. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  20. Making "Photo" Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doto, Julianne; Golbeck, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students…

  1. Using Specialized Graph Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of logarithm and reciprocal graphs in the college physics classroom. Provides examples, such as electrical conductivity, reliability function in the Weibull model, and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for latent heat of vaporation. Shows graphs with weighting of points. (YP)

  2. Graphing Electric Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Marvin L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the powerful graphing ability of computer algebra systems (CAS) to create three-dimensional graphs or surface graphics of electric potentials. Provides equations along with examples of the printouts. Lists the programs Mathematica, Maple, Derive, Theorist, MathCad, and MATLAB as promising CAS systems. (MVL)

  3. Reinhard Diestel Graph Theory

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jun-Ming

    the development of the discipline for some time to come. Yet much has happened in those 20 years, in graph theory methods of surface topology to bear on long-standing algorithmic graph problems. Clearly, then, the time, I believe that an #12;viii Preface introductory text should be lean and concentrate on the essential

  4. Spectral distances on graphs

    E-print Network

    Jiao Gu; Bobo Hua; Shiping Liu

    2015-03-31

    By assigning a probability measure via the spectrum of the normalized Laplacian to each graph and using L^p Wasserstein distances between probability measures, we define the corresponding spectral distances d_p on the set of all graphs. This approach can even be extended to measuring the distances between infinite graphs. We prove that the diameter of the set of graphs, as a pseudo-metric space equipped with d_1, is one. We further study the behavior of d_1 when the size of graphs tends to infinity by interlacing inequalities aiming at exploring large real networks. A monotonic relation between d_1 and the evolutionary distance of biological networks is observed in simulations.

  5. LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP,

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Group, Graphic Design Portions of this Guide were adapted from WOSHTEP's Taking Action for SafetyLEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION

  6. The Effect of Graphing Calculators on College Students' Ability To Solve Procedural and Conceptual Problems in Developmental Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Mark A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the Casio 9850 and the TI-85 graphing calculators on college students' procedural skills and conceptual understanding in two different developmental mathematics courses. The courses used in this study were Elementary Algebra and Intermediate Algebra. Both the non-graphing calculator group…

  7. Using graph approach for managing connectivity in integrative landscape modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabotin, Michael; Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Libres, Aline; Lagacherie, Philippe; Crevoisier, David; Moussa, Roger

    2013-04-01

    In cultivated landscapes, a lot of landscape elements such as field boundaries, ditches or banks strongly impact water flows, mass and energy fluxes. At the watershed scale, these impacts are strongly conditionned by the connectivity of these landscape elements. An accurate representation of these elements and of their complex spatial arrangements is therefore of great importance for modelling and predicting these impacts.We developped in the framework of the OpenFLUID platform (Software Environment for Modelling Fluxes in Landscapes) a digital landscape representation that takes into account the spatial variabilities and connectivities of diverse landscape elements through the application of the graph theory concepts. The proposed landscape representation consider spatial units connected together to represent the flux exchanges or any other information exchanges. Each spatial unit of the landscape is represented as a node of a graph and relations between units as graph connections. The connections are of two types - parent-child connection and up/downstream connection - which allows OpenFLUID to handle hierarchical graphs. Connections can also carry informations and graph evolution during simulation is possible (connections or elements modifications). This graph approach allows a better genericity on landscape representation, a management of complex connections and facilitate development of new landscape representation algorithms. Graph management is fully operational in OpenFLUID for developers or modelers ; and several graph tools are available such as graph traversal algorithms or graph displays. Graph representation can be managed i) manually by the user (for example in simple catchments) through XML-based files in easily editable and readable format or ii) by using methods of the OpenFLUID-landr library which is an OpenFLUID library relying on common open-source spatial libraries (ogr vector, geos topologic vector and gdal raster libraries). OpenFLUID-landr library has been developed in order i) to be used with no GIS expert skills needed (common gis formats can be read and simplified spatial management is provided), ii) to easily develop adapted rules of landscape discretization and graph creation to follow spatialized model requirements and iii) to allow model developers to manage dynamic and complex spatial topology. Graph management in OpenFLUID are shown with i) examples of hydrological modelizations on complex farmed landscapes and ii) the new implementation of Geo-MHYDAS tool based on the OpenFLUID-landr library, which allows to discretize a landscape and create graph structure for the MHYDAS model requirements.

  8. Postural consistency in skilled archers.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Atha, J

    1990-01-01

    The consistency of an archer's postural set at the moment of loose (arrow release) is commonly perceived to be an important determinant of success. The coach seeks, among other things, to provide the archer with information about postural consistency, details of which he acquires by eye or occasionally by video-recordings. The gains that might be achieved from more precise information are examined here. Nine skilled archers, classified into either skilled or elite groups according to their officially computed handicap, were continuously monitored and measured with a three-dimensional co-ordinate analyser (Charnwood Dynamics Coda-3 Scanner) while shooting two ends (series) of three arrows each. Considerable variability was observed in the precision with which the positions of head, elbow and bow at the moment of loose were replicated by archers of similar levels of skill. These results are interpreted to suggest that precise postural consistency may not be the primary feature distinguishing between the performance of archers at the higher skill levels. PMID:2084269

  9. Interpretive Management: What General Managers Can Learn from Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Richard K.; Piore, Michael J.; Malek, Kamal M.

    1998-01-01

    An analytical management approach reflects a traditional perspective and an interpretive approach involves a perspective suited to rapidly changing, unpredictable markets. Both approaches are valid, but each serves different purposes and calls for different strategies and skills. (JOW)

  10. On geometrical interpretation of the p-adic Maslov index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenov, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    A set of selfdual lattices ? in a two-dimensional p-adic symplectic space MediaObjects/220_2005_BF02099983_f2.jpg is provided by an integer valued metric d. A realization of the metric space (?, d) as a graph ? is suggested and this graph has been linked to the Bruhat-Tits tree. An action of symplectic group MediaObjects/220_2005_BF02099983_f3.jpg on a set of cycles of length three of the graph ? is considered and a geometrical interpretation of the p-adic Maslov index is given in terms of this action.

  11. House of Graphs: a database of interesting graphs

    E-print Network

    Brinkmann, Gunnar; Goedgebeur, Jan; Melot, Hadrien

    2012-01-01

    In this note we present House of Graphs (http://hog.grinvin.org) which is a new database of graphs. The key principle is to have a searchable database and offer -- next to complete lists of some graph classes -- also a list of special graphs that already turned out to be interesting and relevant in the study of graph theoretic problems or as counterexamples to conjectures. This list can be extended by users of the database.

  12. A Semantic Graph Query Language

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I L

    2006-10-16

    Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

  13. Introduction Balanced Group Labeled Graphs

    E-print Network

    Diwan, Ajit A

    Introduction Results Summary Balanced Group Labeled Graphs M. Joglekar N. Shah A.A. Diwan.A.Diwan Balanced Group Labeled Graphs #12;Introduction Results Summary Outline 1 Introduction Group Labeled Graphs Balanced Labellings Characterization 2 Results Counting Number of Balanced labellings Proof Markable Graphs

  14. Momentum operators on graphs

    E-print Network

    Exner, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    We discuss ways in which momentum operators can be introduced on an oriented metric graph. A necessary condition appears to the balanced property, or a matching between the numbers of incoming and outgoing edges; we show that a graph without an orientation, locally finite and at most countably infinite, can made balanced oriented \\emph{iff} the degree of each vertex is even. On such graphs we construct families of momentum operators; we analyze their spectra and associated unitary groups. We also show that the unique continuation principle does not hold here.

  15. Speculation and Historical Interpretation for Fifth and Sixth Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Elizabeth; Gregory, Leslie A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit for fifth- and sixth-grade students that helps develop critical thinking skills. Explains that students read the book, "Leonardo da Vinci" (Diane Stanley), to develop their historical interpretation skills and demonstrate that there is not just one right answer in history. (CMK)

  16. Field Geology Reasoning Skills in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    When geology students are confronted with their first rock exposure, they are often bewildered by the volume of information available and the need to filter out the irrelevant and unnecessary while recording the remainder in a format that lends itself to later analysis. In spite of the problems, the first experience of fieldwork provides many students with the inspiration to devote themselves to this branch of science. The critical factor appears to be the realisation that many of the vaguely interesting topics that have previously been studied in isolation all contribute to an understanding of the rocks in front of the observer. Even with only basic facts and limited understanding, the willing student rapidly gains a deeper appreciation of the ways in which the disparate fields of geoscience are inter-related. However, the initial enthusiasm this generates can be lost if the student is unable to record the information systematically and analyse it logically. The current project seeks to develop in students the intellectual skills necessary to analyse an exposure. In many ways finding the answers to any exposure's history is easy; the difficult part is formulating the right questions. By creating a series of 'Outcrop Exercises', I am seeking to imbue students with an appreciation of the way a structured series of questions can lead to understanding. If they go into the field knowing the sort of questions that they will have to ask themselves, they are more likely to understand the nature and purpose of the data they will have to collect. The earliest exercises were designed to enhance a stratigraphy course, and were intended for use by students who already had field experience. Rather than providing them with accepted facies models for the geological past, the data and questions with which they were provided allowed them to generate their own environmental interpretations. The success of these suggested that they had wider applicability: they could be used to develop essential reasoning skills before going into the field; they could form the basis of follow-up work after a field day, or could be used as a substitute for field work if severe weather prevented an excursion. Each Outcrop Exercise consists of an A3 data sheet, a question sheet, specimen cards and, if appropriate, topographic and geologic maps. The most important dimension of each exercise is the nature and structure of the questions, which begin by requiring the student to make simple observations and lead to a comprehensive interpretation of the exposure. The materials are intended to be used in a variety of ways: for example, if the resources are available it is preferable to replace the specimen cards with real specimens; if time is short, data processing can be omitted by supplying students with prepared graphs. With future developments, it will be possible to link exercises together to generate a geological history for a whole area from primary data. These exercises must not be seen as a substitute for real fieldwork, but it is hoped that they will enhance students' appreciation of the data that they must collect in the field.

  17. GRAPHS WITH EULERIAN UNIT SPHERES OLIVER KNILL

    E-print Network

    Knill, Oliver

    . Geometric graphs, Graph coloring, Eulerian graphs, discrete Hopf-Rinov, Platonic solids, Billiards in graphs. We define Platonic spheres graph theoretically as d-spheres for which all unit spheres S(x) are graph isomorphic Platonic (d-1)-spheres. Gauss- Bonnet allows a straightforward classification within graph theory

  18. Identifying student difficulties with basic scientific reasoning skills: An example from control of variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    Current national and local standards for the science learning of K-12 students emphasize both basic concepts (such as density) and fundamental reasoning skills (such as proportional reasoning, the interpretation of graphs, and the use of control of variables). At Western Washington University (WWU) and the University of Washington (UW), an effort is underway to examine the ability of university students to apply these same concepts and skills. Populations include students in liberal arts physics courses, introductory calculus-based physics courses, and special courses for the preparation of teachers. One focus of the research has been on the idea of control of variables. This topic is studied by students at all levels, from the primary grades, in which the notion of a ``fair test,'' is sometimes used, to university courses. This talk will discuss research tasks in which students are expected to infer from experimental data whether a particular variable influences (i.e., affects) or by itself determines (i.e., predicts) a given result. Student responses will be presented to identify specific difficulties.

  19. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜e?t with ? proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  20. Efficiently Controllable Graphs

    E-print Network

    Can Gokler; Seth Lloyd; Peter Shor; Kevin Thompson

    2015-10-29

    We investigate graphs that can be disconnected into small components by removing a vanishingly small fraction of their vertices. We show that when a quantum network is described by such a graph, the network is efficiently controllable, in the sense that universal quantum computation can be performed using a control sequence polynomial in the size of the network while controlling a vanishingly small fraction of subsystems. We show that networks corresponding to finite-dimensional lattices are efficently controllable, and explore generalizations to percolation clusters and random graphs. We show that the classical computational complexity of estimating the ground state of Hamiltonians described by controllable graphs is polynomial in the number of subsystems/qubits.

  1. Graph homomorphisms between trees

    E-print Network

    Csikvari, Peter

    In this paper we study several problems concerning the number of homomorphisms of trees. We begin with an algorithm for the number of homomorphisms from a tree to any graph. By using this algorithm and some transformations ...

  2. Historical Trends Graph

    Cancer.gov

    Use this graph to explore the relationship over time of levels and trends in cancer rates for geographic areas and for demographic subgroups. Potential health disparities can be explored to identify opportunities or to evaluate the success of prior interventions.

  3. Unit Rectangle Visibility Graphs

    E-print Network

    Dean, Alice; Hamilton, Sarah; Pangborn, Greta

    2007-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, rectangle visibility graphs have generated considerable interest, in part due to their applicability to VLSI chip design. Here we study unit rectangle visibility graphs, with fixed dimension restrictions more closely modeling the constrained dimensions of gates and other circuit components in computer chip applications. A graph $G$ is a unit rectangle visibility graph (URVG) if its vertices can be represented by closed unit squares in the plane with sides parallel to the axes and pairwise disjoint interiors, in such a way that two vertices are adjacent if and only if there is a non-degenerate horizontal or vertical band of visibility joining the two rectangles. Our results include necessary and sufficient conditions for $K_n$, $K_{m,n}$, and trees to be URVGs, as well as a number of general edge bounds.

  4. Classical dynamics on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Barra, F.; Gaspard, P.

    2001-06-01

    We consider the classical evolution of a particle on a graph by using a time-continuous Frobenius-Perron operator that generalizes previous propositions. In this way, the relaxation rates as well as the chaotic properties can be defined for the time-continuous classical dynamics on graphs. These properties are given as the zeros of some periodic-orbit zeta functions. We consider in detail the case of infinite periodic graphs where the particle undergoes a diffusion process. The infinite spatial extension is taken into account by Fourier transforms that decompose the observables and probability densities into sectors corresponding to different values of the wave number. The hydrodynamic modes of diffusion are studied by an eigenvalue problem of a Frobenius-Perron operator corresponding to a given sector. The diffusion coefficient is obtained from the hydrodynamic modes of diffusion and has the Green-Kubo form. Moreover, we study finite but large open graphs that converge to the infinite periodic graph when their size goes to infinity. The lifetime of the particle on the open graph is shown to correspond to the lifetime of a system that undergoes a diffusion process before it escapes.

  5. Classical dynamics on graphs

    E-print Network

    F. Barra; P. Gaspard

    2000-11-24

    We consider the classical evolution of a particle on a graph by using a time-continuous Frobenius-Perron operator which generalizes previous propositions. In this way, the relaxation rates as well as the chaotic properties can be defined for the time-continuous classical dynamics on graphs. These properties are given as the zeros of some periodic-orbit zeta functions. We consider in detail the case of infinite periodic graphs where the particle undergoes a diffusion process. The infinite spatial extension is taken into account by Fourier transforms which decompose the observables and probability densities into sectors corresponding to different values of the wave number. The hydrodynamic modes of diffusion are studied by an eigenvalue problem of a Frobenius-Perron operator corresponding to a given sector. The diffusion coefficient is obtained from the hydrodynamic modes of diffusion and has the Green-Kubo form. Moreover, we study finite but large open graphs which converge to the infinite periodic graph when their size goes to infinity. The lifetime of the particle on the open graph is shown to correspond to the lifetime of a system which undergoes a diffusion process before it escapes.

  6. SimGraph: A Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Kenney, Patrick S.

    1997-01-01

    Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data, making a qualitative analysis of the data difficult while it remains in a numerical representation. Therefore, a method of merging related data together and presenting it to the user in a more comprehensible format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is an object-oriented data visualization software package that presents simulation data in animated graphical displays for easy interpretation. Data produced from a flight simulation is presented by SimGraph in several different formats, including: 3-Dimensional Views, Cockpit Control Views, Heads-Up Displays, Strip Charts, and Status Indicators. SimGraph can accommodate the addition of new graphical displays to allow the software to be customized to each user s particular environment. A new display can be developed and added to SimGraph without having to design a new application, allowing the graphics programmer to focus on the development of the graphical display. The SimGraph framework can be reused for a wide variety of visualization tasks. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper describes the capabilities and operations of SimGraph.

  7. Global Skill Shortages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Malcolm S.; Zaidi, Mahmood A.

    This book discusses the causes and impact of global skill shortages, focusing on data from skill shortages measured in the period 1995-1998 in 19 developed and emerging economies. Chapter one contains a brief introduction. Chapter two is a review of theoretical literature on skill shortages, including static and dynamic shortages, efficiency wage…

  8. Teaching Organizational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakunas, Boris; Holley, William

    2004-01-01

    Kerr and Zigmond (1986) found that 67 percent of all high school teachers surveyed viewed organizational skills as crucial for student success in school. How can teachers get their students to agree? One way is to teach organizational skills just as they would teach writing or computation skills. Explain and demonstrate what students are to do,…

  9. Assessing Employability Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Russell L.

    This report describes how available measures/tests of employability skills were identified and analyzed to determine their suitability for evaluating the employability skills of students enrolled in Iowa vocational programs. Conclusions of this research are as follows: suitable measures are available for assessing the employability skills of…

  10. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  11. Visualizing Graphs in Three Dimensions Colin Ware* and Peter Mitchell#

    E-print Network

    Ware, Colin

    in 3D but required users to rotate various levels of the tree to find the node they were seeking. Other for some time that larger graphs can be interpreted if laid out in 3D and displayed with stereo and/or motion depth cues to support spatial perception. However, prior studies were carried out using displays

  12. Feynman motives of banana graphs

    E-print Network

    Paolo Aluffi; Matilde Marcolli

    2008-07-16

    We consider the infinite family of Feynman graphs known as the "banana graphs" and compute explicitly the classes of the corresponding graph hypersurfaces in the Grothendieck ring of varieties as well as their Chern-Schwartz-MacPherson classes, using the classical Cremona transformation and the dual graph, and a blowup formula for characteristic classes. We outline the interesting similarities between these operations and we give formulae for cones obtained by simple operations on graphs. We formulate a positivity conjecture for characteristic classes of graph hypersurfaces and discuss briefly the effect of passing to noncommutative spacetime.

  13. Feynman motives of banana graphs

    E-print Network

    Aluffi, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    We consider the infinite family of Feynman graphs known as the ``banana graphs'' and compute explicitly the classes of the corresponding graph hypersurfaces in the Grothendieck ring of varieties as well as their Chern--Schwartz--MacPherson classes, using the classical Cremona transformation and the dual graph, and a blowup formula for characteristic classes. We outline the interesting similarities between these operations and we give formulae for cones obtained by simple operations on graphs. We formulate a positivity conjecture for characteristic classes of graph hypersurfaces and discuss briefly the effect of passing to noncommutative spacetime.

  14. Evidentiary Competence: Sixth Graders' Understanding for Gathering and Interpreting Evidence in Scientific Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Heisawn; Songer, Nancy B.; Lee, Soo-Young

    2007-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on the development of scientific inquiry skills, there is a strong need for more research on students' ability to collect and interpret evidence. This paper calls attention to the notion of evidentiary competence that refers to the concepts and reasoning skills involved in the collection, organization, and interpretation

  15. Omni Graph Mining: Graph mining using RDBMS Jin Kyu Kim

    E-print Network

    and LinkedIn, internet search companies such Google and Yahoo, and mobile service companies have accumulated a framework for their daily graph data analysis job. Each company might have different size of graph data of these our daily behaviors are represented by graph. Social networking service companies such as Facebook

  16. Extending graph homomorphism and simulation for real life graph matching 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yinghui

    2011-06-30

    Among the vital problems in a variety of emerging applications is the graph matching problem, which is to determine whether two graphs are similar, and if so, find all the valid matches in one graph for the other, based on specified metrics...

  17. Casimir Effect for Quantum Graphs

    E-print Network

    Matrasulov, D U; Khabibullaev, P K; Saidov, A A

    2007-01-01

    The Casimir effects for one-dimensional fractal networks, so-called quantum graphs is studied. Based on the Green function approach for quantum graphs zero-point energy for some simplest topologies is written explicitly.

  18. Casimir Effect for Quantum Graphs

    E-print Network

    D. U. Matrasulov; J. R. Yusupov; P. K. Khabibullaev; A. A. Saidov

    2007-07-25

    The Casimir effects for one-dimensional fractal networks, so-called quantum graphs is studied. Based on the Green function approach for quantum graphs zero-point energy for some simplest topologies is written explicitly.

  19. Graph dynamics : learning and representation

    E-print Network

    Ribeiro, Andre Figueiredo

    2006-01-01

    Graphs are often used in artificial intelligence as means for symbolic knowledge representation. A graph is nothing more than a collection of symbols connected to each other in some fashion. For example, in computer vision ...

  20. Open Graphs and Computational Reasoning 

    E-print Network

    Dixon, Lucas; Ross, Duncan; Aleks, Kissinger

    2010-01-01

    We present a form of algebraic reasoning for computational objects which are expressed as graphs. Edges describe the flow of data between primitive operations which are represented by vertices. These graphs have an interface ...

  1. Visibility graph motifs

    E-print Network

    Jacopo Iacovacci; Lucas Lacasa

    2015-12-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of visibility graph motifs, smaller substructures that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated to general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable to distinguish among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  2. Subdominant pseudoultrametric on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dovgoshei, A A; Petrov, E A

    2013-08-31

    Let (G,w) be a weighted graph. We find necessary and sufficient conditions under which the weight w:E(G)?R{sup +} can be extended to a pseudoultrametric on V(G), and establish a criterion for the uniqueness of such an extension. We demonstrate that (G,w) is a complete k-partite graph, for k?2, if and only if for any weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric, among all such extensions one can find the least pseudoultrametric consistent with w. We give a structural characterization of graphs for which the subdominant pseudoultrametric is an ultrametric for any strictly positive weight that can be extended to a pseudoultrametric. Bibliography: 14 titles.

  3. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  4. Better dual-task processing in simultaneous interpreters

    PubMed Central

    Strobach, Tilo; Becker, Maxi; Schubert, Torsten; Kühn, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous interpreting (SI) is a highly complex activity and requires the performance and coordination of multiple, simultaneous tasks: analysis and understanding of the discourse in a first language, reformulating linguistic material, storing of intermediate processing steps, and language production in a second language among others. It is, however, an open issue whether persons with experience in SI possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks and whether they are able to transfer these skills to lab-based dual-task situations. Within the present study, we set out to explore whether interpreting experience is associated with related higher-order executive functioning in the context of dual-task situations of the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) type. In this PRP situation, we found faster reactions times in participants with experience in simultaneous interpretation in contrast to control participants without such experience. Thus, simultaneous interpreters possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks in lab-based dual-task situations. PMID:26528232

  5. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  6. Sketching for Developing Critical Thinking Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Wang, P.; Sim, T. B.; Goh, E.; Ng, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Sketching is a valuable field technique to support a person's observation, recording, interpretation and communication of important features in both natural and human-made landscapes. The Singapore geography syllabus employs an inquiry approach and encourages sketching as a fundamental geographical skill. Sketching allows the learner to connect with the world through a personal and kinesthetic experience. The Earth Observatory of Singapore collaborates with the Singapore Geography Teachers' Association, Urban Sketchers, and National Institute of Education professional development to give teachers both basic sketching skills and the opportunity to develop those skills in a scaffolded environment. In Singapore, geography and geology skills overlap in content area of coastal processes, climate change, and plate tectonics with its associated natural hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunami. Both disciplines are interested in how people live on the Earth. Likewise, basic skills such as observing, classifying, measuring, and communicating cut across disciplines of social and natural sciences in order to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information about the world. Hence, sketching, commonly considered an art skill, is used to further scientific thinking. This somewhat unique collaboration to develop sketching in teachers is based on the long tradition of sketches in geological field work, the newly popular urban sketching community, and professional development by a professional organization and the Singapore National Institute of Education. Workshops provide technique as well as opportunities for sketching with experts in different areas relevant to the geography curriculum.

  7. Mining and Indexing Graph Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Dayu

    2013-01-01

    Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and index those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…

  8. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs. PMID:25616091

  9. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  10. Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

  11. Editing graphs for maximum effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.W.; Rhiner, R.W.

    1991-01-08

    The paper contains over eighty rules for editing graphs, arranged under nine major headings in a logical sequence for editing all the graphs in a manuscript. It is excerpted from a monograph used at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to train beginning technical editors in editing graphs; a corresponding Hypercard stack is also used in this training. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  12. AALBORG UNIVERSITY Triangulation of Graphs --

    E-print Network

    AALBORG UNIVERSITY Triangulation of Graphs -- Algorithms Giving Small Total State Space by Uffe 790 aub dk e #12; Triangulation of Graphs -- Algorithms Giving Small Total State Space Uffe Kjaerulff small total state space for triangulated belief graphs (networks) is considered. It is an NP

  13. Interpretation reduces ecological impacts of visitors to world heritage site.

    PubMed

    Littlefair, Carolyn; Buckley, Ralf

    2008-07-01

    Minimal-impact interpretation is widely used to reduce the ecological impacts of visitors to protected areas. We tested whether verbal appeals and/or role-model demonstrations of minimal-impact behavior by a trained guide reduced noise, litter, and trampling impacts on hiking trails in a subtropical rainforest. Interpretation did reduce impacts significantly. Different interpretive techniques were more effective for different impacts. The experimental groups were mature, well-educated professionals; interpretation may differ in effectiveness for different visitors. Interpretation by skilled guides can indeed reduce visitor impacts in protected areas, especially if role modeling is combined with verbal appeals. PMID:18828278

  14. Graph - Based High Resolution Satellite Image Segmentation for Object Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravali, K.; Kumar, M. V. Ravi; Venugopala Rao, K.

    2014-11-01

    Object based image processing and analysis is challenging research in very high resolution satellite utilisation. Commonly ei ther pixel based classification or visual interpretation is used to recognize and delineate land cover categories. The pixel based classification techniques use rich spectral content of satellite images and fail to utilise spatial relations. To overcome th is drawback, traditional time consuming visual interpretation methods are being used operational ly for preparation of thematic maps. This paper addresses computational vision principles to object level image segmentation. In this study, computer vision algorithms are developed to define the boundary between two object regions and segmentation by representing image as graph. Image is represented as a graph G (V, E), where nodes belong to pixels and, edges (E) connect nodes belonging to neighbouring pixels. The transformed Mahalanobis distance has been used to define a weight function for partition of graph into components such that each component represents the region of land category. This implies that edges between two vertices in the same component have relatively low weights and edges between vertices in different components should have higher weights. The derived segments are categorised to different land cover using supervised classification. The paper presents the experimental results on real world multi-spectral remote sensing images of different landscapes such as Urban, agriculture and mixed land cover. Graph construction done in C program and list the run time for both graph construction and segmentation calculation on dual core Intel i7 system with 16 GB RAM, running 64bit window 7.

  15. Discrete Morse functions for graph configuration spaces

    E-print Network

    Adam Sawicki

    2012-09-02

    We present an alternative application of discrete Morse theory for two-particle graph configuration spaces. In contrast to previous constructions, which are based on discrete Morse vector fields, our approach is through Morse functions, which have a nice physical interpretation as two-body potentials constructed from one-body potentials. We also give a brief introduction to discrete Morse theory. Our motivation comes from the problem of quantum statistics for particles on networks, for which generalized versions of anyon statistics can appear.

  16. Path integral distance for data interpretation

    E-print Network

    Volchenkov, D

    2015-01-01

    The process of data interpretation is always based on the implicit introduction of equivalence relations on the set of walks over the database. Every equivalence relation on the set of walks specifies a Markov chain describing the transitions of a discrete time random walk. In order to geometrize and interpret the data, we propose the new distance between data units defined as a "Feynman path integral", in which all possible paths between any two nodes in a graph model of the data are taken into account, although some paths are more preferable than others. Such a path integral distance approach to the analysis of databases has proven its efficiency and success, especially on multivariate strongly correlated data where other methods fail to detect structural components (urban planning, historical language phylogenies, music, street fashion traits analysis, etc. ). We believe that it would become an invaluable tool for the intelligent complexity reduction and big data interpretation.

  17. Empirical data for the semantic interpretation of prepositional phrases in medical documents.

    PubMed Central

    Romacker, M.; Hahn, U.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the results from an empirical study deal-ing with the semantic interpretation of prepositional phrases in medical free texts. We use a small number of semantic interpretation schemata only, which operate on well-defined configurations in dependency graphs. We provide a quantitative analysis of the performance of the semantic interpreter in terms of recall/precision data, and consider, in qualitative terms, the impact semantic interpretation patterns have on the construction of the underlying medical ontology. PMID:11825251

  18. Why skill matters

    PubMed Central

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yasuda, Masaharu; Kim, Hyoung F.

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing rewards per unit time is ideal for success and survival for humans and animals. This goal can be approached by speeding up behavior aiming at rewards, and this is done most efficiently by acquiring skills. Importantly, reward-directed skills consist of two components: finding a good object (object skill) and acting on the object (action skill), which occur sequentially. Recent studies suggest that object skill is based on high capacity memory on object-value association. When a learned object appears, the corresponding memory is quickly expressed as a value-based gaze bias, leading to the automatic acquisition or avoidance of the object. Object skill thus plays a crucial role in increasing rewards per unit time. PMID:23911579

  19. Simultaneous interpretation selectively influences working memory and attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Morales, Julia; Padilla, Francisca; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Bajo, M Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has shown that becoming an expert in a certain domain may lead to a transfer of the acquired skills to other domains requiring similar abilities. Thus, the cognitive skills acquired by professional interpreters after intensive training may also transfer to other domains. Simultaneous interpreters are known to develop high working memory capacity (e.g., Christoffels, de Groot, & Kroll, 2006; Signorelli, Haarmann, & Obler, 2012). However, little is known about transfer of other processes such us updating and some aspects of attention also involved in interpretation. In Experiment 1, we found that interpreters outperformed a control group in updating skills, as measured through a dual version of the n-back task (Jaeggi et al., 2007). In Experiment 2, use of the ANTI-V allowed us to reveal that interpreting differentially modulates the interactions between attentional networks. Thus, we found no group differences in conflict resolution, but the interaction between the alertness and orienting networks differed between interpreters and non-interpreters. Taken together, these results suggest that experience in simultaneous interpreting transfers to other domains, but this transfer seems specific to the cognitive processes more closely involved in the interpreting tasks. PMID:25577491

  20. What is a complex graph?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongkwang; Wilhelm, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Many papers published in recent years show that real-world graphs G(n,m) ( n nodes, m edges) are more or less “complex” in the sense that different topological features deviate from random graphs. Here we narrow the definition of graph complexity and argue that a complex graph contains many different subgraphs. We present different measures that quantify this complexity, for instance C1e, the relative number of non-isomorphic one-edge-deleted subgraphs (i.e. DECK size). However, because these different subgraph measures are computationally demanding, we also study simpler complexity measures focussing on slightly different aspects of graph complexity. We consider heuristically defined “product measures”, the products of two quantities which are zero in the extreme cases of a path and clique, and “entropy measures” quantifying the diversity of different topological features. The previously defined network/graph complexity measures Medium Articulation and Offdiagonal complexity ( OdC) belong to these two classes. We study OdC measures in some detail and compare it with our new measures. For all measures, the most complex graph G has a medium number of edges, between the edge numbers of the minimum and the maximum connected graph n-1graph complexity measures are characterized with the help of different example graphs. For all measures the corresponding time complexity is given. Finally, we discuss the complexity of 33 real-world graphs of different biological, social and economic systems with the six computationally most simple measures (including OdC). The complexities of the real graphs are compared with average complexities of two different random graph versions: complete random graphs (just fixed n,m) and rewired graphs with fixed node degrees.

  1. Uncovering Everyday Coping Skills

    E-print Network

    -altering drugs · Sleep · Exercise From: Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder, Marsha Linehan, 1993 #12;Mindfulness #12;Mindfulness

  2. Introduction to Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    In this autoinstructional packet, the student is given an experimental situation which introduces him to the process of graphing. The lesson is presented for secondary school students in chemistry. Algebra I and a Del Mod System program (indicated as SE 018 020) are suggested prerequisites for the use of this program. Behavioral objectives are…

  3. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  4. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluha?, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  5. Applied photo interpretation for airbrush cartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inge, J. L.; Bridges, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    New techniques of cartographic portrayal have been developed for the compilation of maps of lunar and planetary surfaces. Conventional photo interpretation methods utilizing size, shape, shadow, tone, pattern, and texture are applied to computer processed satellite television images. The variety of the image data allows the illustrator to interpret image details by inter-comparison and intra-comparison of photographs. Comparative judgements are affected by illumination, resolution, variations in surface coloration, and transmission or processing artifacts. The validity of the interpretation process is tested by making a representational drawing by an airbrush portrayal technique. Production controls insure the consistency of a map series. Photo interpretive cartographic portrayal skills are used to prepare two kinds of map series and are adaptable to map products of different kinds and purposes.

  6. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Kope?, Grzegorz; Mago?, Wojciech; Ho?da, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. MATERIAL AND METHODS Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th-6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st-3rd) were used as controls. RESULTS We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th-5th than those in years 1st-3rd (66% vs. 56%; p<0.0001). Competency in ECG interpretation was higher in students who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; p<0.0001) but no difference was found between students who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (p<0.0001), being in clinical years (OR: 2.45 [1.35-4.46] and self-learning (OR: 2.44 [1.46-4.08]) determined competency in ECG interpretation. CONCLUSIONS Polish medical students in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools. PMID:26541993

  7. Competency in ECG Interpretation Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Kope?, Grzegorz; Mago?, Wojciech; Ho?da, Mateusz; Podolec, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrocardiogram (ECG) is commonly used in diagnosis of heart diseases, including many life-threatening disorders. We aimed to assess skills in ECG interpretation among Polish medical students and to analyze the determinants of these skills. Material/Methods Undergraduates from all Polish medical schools were asked to complete a web-based survey containing 18 ECG strips. Questions concerned primary ECG parameters (rate, rhythm, and axis), emergencies, and common ECG abnormalities. Analysis was restricted to students in their clinical years (4th–6th), and students in their preclinical years (1st–3rd) were used as controls. Results We enrolled 536 medical students (females: n=299; 55.8%), aged 19 to 31 (23±1.6) years from all Polish medical schools. Most (72%) were in their clinical years. The overall rate of good response was better in students in years 4th–5th than those in years 1st–3rd (66% vs. 56%; p<0.0001). Competency in ECG interpretation was higher in students who reported ECG self-learning (69% vs. 62%; p<0.0001) but no difference was found between students who attended or did not attend regular ECG classes (66% vs. 66%; p=0.99). On multivariable analysis (p<0.0001), being in clinical years (OR: 2.45 [1.35–4.46] and self-learning (OR: 2.44 [1.46–4.08]) determined competency in ECG interpretation. Conclusions Polish medical students in their clinical years have a good level of competency in interpreting the primary ECG parameters, but their ability to recognize ECG signs of emergencies and common heart abnormalities is low. ECG interpretation skills are determined by self-education but not by attendance at regular ECG classes. Our results indicate qualitative and quantitative deficiencies in teaching ECG interpretation at medical schools. PMID:26541993

  8. Feynman Graphs, Rooted Trees, and Ringel-Hall Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnizer, Kobi; Szczesny, Matt

    2009-07-01

    We construct symmetric monoidal categories {mathcal{LRF}, mathcal{LFG}} of rooted forests and Feynman graphs. These categories closely resemble finitary abelian categories, and in particular, the notion of Ringel-Hall algebra applies. The Ringel-Hall Hopf algebras of {mathcal{LRF}, mathcal{LFG}}, {{H}_mathcal{LRF}, {H}_mathcal{LFG}} are dual to the corresponding Connes-Kreimer Hopf algebras on rooted trees and Feynman diagrams. We thus obtain an interpretation of the Connes-Kreimer Lie algebras on rooted trees and Feynman graphs as Ringel-Hall Lie algebras.

  9. Eigenvalue bracketing for discrete and metric graphs

    E-print Network

    Post, Olaf

    2008-01-01

    We develop eigenvalue estimates for the Laplacians on discrete and metric graphs using different types of boundary conditions at the vertices of the metric graph. Via an explicit correspondence of the equilateral metric and discrete graph spectrum (also in the ``exceptional'' values of the metric graph corresponding to the Dirichlet spectrum) we carry over these estimates from the metric graph Laplacian to the discrete case. We apply the results to covering graphs and present examples where the covering graph Laplacians have spectral gaps.

  10. Automatic Skill Acquisition in Reinforcement Learning Agents Using Connection Bridge Centrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Parham; Shiri, Mohammad Ebrahim; Entezari, Negin

    Incorporating skills in reinforcement learning methods results in accelerate agents learning performance. The key problem of automatic skill discovery is to find subgoal states and create skills to reach them. Among the proposed algorithms, those based on graph centrality measures have achieved precise results. In this paper we propose a new graph centrality measure for identifying subgoal states that is crucial to develop useful skills. The main advantage of the proposed centrality measure is that this measure considers both local and global information of the agent states to score them that result in identifying real subgoal states. We will show through simulations for three benchmark tasks, namely, "four-room grid world", "taxi driver grid world" and "soccer simulation grid world" that a procedure based on the proposed centrality measure performs better than the procedure based on the other centrality measures.

  11. The relationship between graphing calculator use and the development of classroom norms in an exemplay teacher's college algebra course 

    E-print Network

    Gerren, Sally Sue

    2008-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to advance knowledge about the relationship between graphing calculator use and classroom norm development. An interpretive case study design incorporating qualitative and quantitative research methods was used...

  12. Improving Library Research Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Catherine W.

    This report describes a program to advance library research skills in two sixth grade science classes. The problem was assessed through a survey, questionnaire, and worksheet, and by direct observation. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that students displayed a lack of research skills related to library research. Some of the causes were…

  13. Critical Skills Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As the U.S. economy begins to show signs of improvement, executives say they need a workforce fully equipped with skills beyond just the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic (the three Rs). Skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation (the four Cs) will become even more…

  14. Teaching Basic Caregiver Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, Susan, Ed.; Harrah, Doris, Ed.

    This instructor's guide provides materials for a nursing skills course designed to teach basic home nursing skills to families who plan to care for a chronically ill or elderly family member at home. It may be taught by a registered nurse with knowledge of all areas or by a team, with each instructor concentrating on his/her area of expertise.…

  15. Teaching Organizational Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakunas, Boris; Holley, William

    2001-01-01

    Advocates teaching students organizational skills that lead to school success. Outlines seven such skills and how to teach them, including such things as bringing necessary supplies to class, organizing handouts and loose-leaf papers, taking and organizing notes, developing and following study plans, and planning and carrying out large projects.…

  16. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  17. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  18. Early Communicative Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKay, Gilbert F.; Dunn, William R.

    Intended for parents and teachers, the manual offers guidelines for developing communication skills in severely and profoundly mentally handicapped children. An introduction helps the reader determine a suitable starting point and provides a description of early communication skills; Part II describes the five stages in communication development.…

  19. Self Assessment Skills Identification

    E-print Network

    is lowest) how much you enjoy using each skill. Then do the same for what you feel your ability level here. Enjoyment (1-4) Skills Ability (1-4) Identify important questions Read for information Synthesize situations Develop new approaches to a situation Speak/Write/Read other languages Create art/music

  20. Testing Skills in Vertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Mildred Sears; Tosto, Pat

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a project that gives students examples of basic skills that many vertebrate species develop as they grow and function in their ecosystem. These activities involve information gathering about surroundings, learning how to use objects, and tracking and searching skills. Different vertebrate species may acquire…

  1. Building Web Literacy Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Jonathon; Isbell, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    Describes web literacy instruction developed and implemented in response to students' needs as part of an English-as-a-Foreign-Language academic skills preparation curriculum. The goals of the instruction are to introduce critical reading strategies and develop computer literacy skills. (Author/VWL)

  2. Soft Skills, Hard Science

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    , and Persons with Disabilities) 6 6 #12;how to help? What factors cause students with disabilities to be less with disabilities, 680 employers who have hired in STEM areas Students rated themselves on various skills, EmployersSoft Skills, Hard Science: A Program to Improve Job Placement of STEM Graduates with Disabilities

  3. Thinking Skills & Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    A review of research and the views of researchers prominent in the field of thinking skill development discusses the role of thinking skills in the ability to formulate problems, resolve issues, determine the most effective decisions, and create effective solutions to problems. The views of Edward deBono, Robert Ennis, Reuven Feuerstein, Matthew…

  4. When Thinking Skills Trump Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivey, Gay; Fisher, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    A popular response among high school teachers and leaders facing students reading far below grade level, the authors claim, is to adopt back-to-basics packaged programs that focus on discrete skills with little attention to critical reading and writing. The authors express concern that reliance on such programs keeps older struggling readers from…

  5. Finite Prime Distance Graphs and 2-Odd Graphs Joshua D. Laison, Colin Starr, and Andrea Walker

    E-print Network

    Laison, Josh

    that trees, cycles, and bipartite graphs are prime distance graphs, and that Dutch windmill graphs and paper, Vinogradov's Theorem, and Ramar´e's Theorem, respectively; and we show that Dutch windmill graphs and paper

  6. Lung segmentation with graph cuts: Graph size versus performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazokifard, Banafsheh; Sowmya, Arcot

    2013-10-01

    The effect of graph size on segmentation performance and speed is investigated, where segmentation is based on the graph cuts algorithm. The study is performed on lung extraction in 50 complete multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) datasets, and a fully automatic procedure. The experiments were performed on different graph sizes for both 2-D (4 and 8 neighbours) and 3-D (6 and 26 neighbours) graphs. Five slices from each segmented dataset were compared to the reference delineation provided by a radiologist. Our evaluations highlight the fact that when medical image segmentation is performed using graph cuts, increasing graph and neighbourhood connection size does not necessarily improve the segmentation performance, but also increase the running time dramatically.

  7. Wages and Skills Utilization: Effect of Broad Skills and Generic Skills on Wages in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Catherine R.; Ng, Michael Chi Man; Sung, Johnny; Loke, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Many people go for training to upgrade their skills which is hoped to pave the way for better pay. But what are the kinds of skills that really affect wages? Employers have emphasized the value of generic skills such as interpersonal and communication skills, teamwork and problem solving. Does possession of these skills translate to at least the…

  8. Graph duality as an instrument of Gauge-String correspondence

    E-print Network

    Diaz, Pablo; Veliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    We explore an identity between two graphs and unravel its physical meaning in the context of the gauge-gravity correspondence. From the mathematical point of view, the identity equates probabilities associated with $\\mathbb{GT}$, the branching graph of the unitary groups, with probabilities associated with $\\mathbb{Y}$, the branching graph of the symmetric groups. The identity is physically meaningful. One side is identified with transition probabilities between states in an RG flow from $U(M)$ to $U(N)$ gauge theories. The other side of the identity corresponds to transition probabilities of multigraviton states in certain domain wall like backgrounds. To realise this interpretation we consider a family of bubbling geometries represented by concentric rings using the LLM prescription. In these backgrounds, the transition probabilities of multigraviton states from one ring to another are given by appropriate three-point functions. We show that, in a natural limit, these computations exactly match the probabil...

  9. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Training Visual Analysis of AB Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Katie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Visual analysis is the primary method of evaluating data in single-subject research. Few studies have evaluated interventions to teach visual analysis skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate systematic instruction, delivered using computer-based intervention or a recorded lecture, on identifying changes in slope and level in AB graphs.…

  10. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  11. Algorithms: Graphs Amotz Bar-Noy

    E-print Network

    Bar-Noy, Amotz

    , Databases, Electronic Circuits, . . . An alternative definition: A graph is a collection of subsets of sizeAlgorithms: Graphs Amotz Bar-Noy CUNY Spring 2012 Amotz Bar-Noy (CUNY) Graphs Spring 2012 1 / 95 #12;Graphs Definition: A graph is a collection of edges and vertices. Each edge connects two vertices

  12. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  13. Community detection in graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Santo

    2010-02-01

    The modern science of networks has brought significant advances to our understanding of complex systems. One of the most relevant features of graphs representing real systems is community structure, or clustering, i.e. the organization of vertices in clusters, with many edges joining vertices of the same cluster and comparatively few edges joining vertices of different clusters. Such clusters, or communities, can be considered as fairly independent compartments of a graph, playing a similar role like, e.g., the tissues or the organs in the human body. Detecting communities is of great importance in sociology, biology and computer science, disciplines where systems are often represented as graphs. This problem is very hard and not yet satisfactorily solved, despite the huge effort of a large interdisciplinary community of scientists working on it over the past few years. We will attempt a thorough exposition of the topic, from the definition of the main elements of the problem, to the presentation of most methods developed, with a special focus on techniques designed by statistical physicists, from the discussion of crucial issues like the significance of clustering and how methods should be tested and compared against each other, to the description of applications to real networks.

  14. Disfluencies in Consecutive Interpreting among Undergraduates in the Language Lab Environment1

    E-print Network

    interpreting (CI) is "a process in which adequate information is orally presented and transferred into another cost and moderate requirement on technical support. It is applied in interpreter-on-site business to the increasing social demand for CI interpreters and English users of certain CI skills, a number of universities

  15. Graphing the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2014-01-01

    Renee Clary and James Wandersee implemented the Stratigraphy and Data Interpretation Project described in this article when they recognized that some students were having difficulties constructing appropriate graphics and interpreting their constructed graphics for an earlier mathematics-science project in their classrooms. They also previously…

  16. Data Acquisition Interpretation

    E-print Network

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    University of British Columbia Geophysical Inversion Facility Applied Geophysics, 2010 Justin Granek DCIPData Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Virgin River DCIP Report Justin Granek1 1 Report #12;Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Outline 1 Data Acquisition Location

  17. GraphGrep: A Fast and Universal Method for Querying Graphs Rosalba Giugno

    E-print Network

    Shasha, Dennis

    , finding all the occurrences of a sub- graph in a database of graphs. The interface to Graph- Grep to represent the graphs in an abstract form and to filter the database. GraphGrep has been tested on databases in a database of graphs. The increasing size of application databases requires efficient structure searching

  18. CPM: A Graph Pattern Matching Kernel with Diffusion for Accurate Graph Classification

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    patterns from a graph database. We then map subgraphs to graphs in the graph database and use a process we databases search algorithms [17, 32, 40, 42], graph classification aims to construct accurate predictiveCPM: A Graph Pattern Matching Kernel with Diffusion for Accurate Graph Classification Aaron Smalter

  19. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-20

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters. PMID:25690236

  20. Basic visual observation skills training course. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    This is the third report in a series prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in Observation Skills. The first report (Phase 1) was essentially exploratory. It defined Observation Skills` broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. The second report (Phase 2) provided a more specific basis for the actual design and delivery of Observation Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The present report (Phase 3) documents the design of a Basic Visual Observation Skills course and delivery of the course to safeguards inspectors at IAEA Headquarters Vienna in February and May of 1995. The purpose of the course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The course is basic in the sense that it provides training in skills which are generally applicable to inspections of all types of facilities and activities subject to safeguards. The course is designed for 16 hours of classroom delivery, ideally in four 4-hour sessions over a period of four days. The first 12 hours provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention and attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following the training in each of the five skill areas is an Integrating Exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection.

  1. Cactus Graphs for Genome Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paten, Benedict; Diekhans, Mark; Earl, Dent; St. John, John; Ma, Jian; Suh, Bernard; Haussler, David

    We introduce a data structure, analysis and visualization scheme called a cactus graph for comparing sets of related genomes. Cactus graphs capture some of the advantages of de Bruijn and breakpoint graphs in one unified framework. They naturally decompose the common substructures in a set of related genomes into a hierarchy of chains that can be visualized as multiple alignments and nets that can be visualized in circular genome plots.

  2. Kernel Functions for Graph Classification

    E-print Network

    Smalter, Aaron Matthew

    2008-01-01

    chemical structure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Graph representations of chemicals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.3 A Database of three labeled graphs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3.1 Example graphs and frequent subgraphs... function that maps a chemical space to a property space in the form of P = ^k(D) (3.1) where D is a chemical structure, P is a property, and the function ^k is an estimated mapping from a chemical space to a property space. Difierent QSPR methodologies can...

  3. Bondage number of grid graphs

    E-print Network

    Dettlaff, Magda; Yero, Ismael G

    2012-01-01

    The bondage number $b(G)$ of a nonempty graph $G$ is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from $G$ results in a graph with domination number greater than the domination number of $G$. Here we study the bondage number of some grid-like graphs. In this sense, we obtain some bounds or exact values of the bondage number of some Cartesian product, strong product or direct product of two paths.

  4. Strategies for Learning: Teaching Thinking Skills across the Curriculum through Science. Analyzing Information and Data. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauker, Robert A.; Roy, Kenneth Russell

    Science process skills such as observing, classifying, inferring, interpreting, predicting, and hypothesizing can all be classified as a sub category of thinking skills. This book is part of the series "Strategies for Learning" that focuses on the step-by-step development and application of thinking skills as a vehicle for learning science. The…

  5. Quantum graphs with spin Hamiltonians

    E-print Network

    J. M. Harrison

    2008-01-30

    The article surveys quantization schemes for metric graphs with spin. Typically quantum graphs are defined with the Laplace or Schrodinger operator which describe particles whose intrinsic angular momentum (spin) is zero. However, in many applications, for example modeling an electron (which has spin-1/2) on a network of thin wires, it is necessary to consider operators which allow spin-orbit interaction. The article presents a review of quantization schemes for graphs with three such Hamiltonian operators, the Dirac, Pauli and Rashba Hamiltonians. Comparing results for the trace formula, spectral statistics and spin-orbit localization on quantum graphs with spin Hamiltonians.

  6. Ostomy Home Skills Program

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Advanced Skills Course for Rural Surgeons Support the Work of the Nora Institute Featured Articles Nora Institute ... Committee on Trauma News NAPBC News Philanthropy at Work RAS-ACS News YFA E-News Primers and ...

  7. Changes in Communication Skills

    MedlinePLUS

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Changes in Communication Skills Communication is hard for people with Alzheimer’s disease because they have trouble remembering things. They may struggle to find words ...

  8. Develop Choral Reading Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, James A.

    1984-01-01

    The responsibility for helping students attain competence in music-reading skills must fall on choral directors and choral music teachers from middle schools on up. Teachers must teach rhythmic and tonal vocabularies and pitch accuracies. Methods are described. (RM)

  9. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  10. Assessing statistical significance in causal graphs

    E-print Network

    Chindelevitch, Leonid

    Background: Causal graphs are an increasingly popular tool for the analysis of biological datasets. In particular, signed causal graphs--directed graphs whose edges additionally have a sign denoting upregulation or ...

  11. Performance Introspection of Graph Databases Peter Macko

    E-print Network

    Performance Introspection of Graph Databases Peter Macko Harvard University pmacko, provenance databases, etc. makes graph storage and processing of paramount impor- tance. We present a performance introspection framework for graph databases, PIG, which provides both a toolset and methodology

  12. Graph duality as an instrument of Gauge-String correspondence

    E-print Network

    Pablo Diaz; Hai Lin; Alvaro Veliz-Osorio

    2015-05-18

    We explore an identity between two graphs and unravel its physical meaning in the context of the gauge-gravity correspondence. From the mathematical point of view, the identity equates probabilities associated with $\\mathbb{GT}$, the branching graph of the unitary groups, with probabilities associated with $\\mathbb{Y}$, the branching graph of the symmetric groups. The identity is physically meaningful. One side is identified with transition probabilities between states in an RG flow from $U(M)$ to $U(N)$ gauge theories. The other side of the identity corresponds to transition probabilities of multigraviton states in certain domain wall like backgrounds. To realise this interpretation we consider a family of bubbling geometries represented by concentric rings using the LLM prescription. In these backgrounds, the transition probabilities of multigraviton states from one ring to another are given by appropriate three-point functions. We show that, in a natural limit, these computations exactly match the probabilities in the graph $\\mathbb{Y}$. Besides, the probabilities in the graph $\\mathbb{GT}$ are seen to correspond to the eigenvalues of the embedding chain charges which have been recently studied.

  13. Contribution of Oral Language Skills, Linguistic Skills, and Transcription Skills to Chinese Written Composition among Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Pui-sze; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the contribution of oral language skills, linguistic skills, and transcription skills to Chinese written composition among Grade 4 students in Hong Kong. Measures assessing verbal working memory, oral language skills, linguistic skills (i.e., syntactic skills and discourse skills), transcription skills (i.e.,…

  14. The measurement of quantum entanglement and enumeration of graph coverings

    E-print Network

    Hero, Michael W; Williams, Lauren Kelly

    2009-01-01

    We provide formulas for polynomial invariants on a tensor product of defining representations of unitary groups, U(n_1) x ... x U(n_r), when viewed as a real vector space. This situation has a physical interpretation, as it is the quantum analog of an r-particle classical system in which the i-th particle has n_i classical states. We provide a graphical interpretation of the dimension of the degree 2m polynomial invariants. Specifically, we exhibit a bijection between isomorphism classes of m-fold coverings of connected simple graphs and a conjectural basis for the space of degree 2m polynomial invariants. The graph coverings are related to branched coverings of surfaces.

  15. Interpreting Abstract Interpretations in Membership Equational Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Rosu, Grigore

    2001-01-01

    We present a logical framework in which abstract interpretations can be naturally specified and then verified. Our approach is based on membership equational logic which extends equational logics by membership axioms, asserting that a term has a certain sort. We represent an abstract interpretation as a membership equational logic specification, usually as an overloaded order-sorted signature with membership axioms. It turns out that, for any term, its least sort over this specification corresponds to its most concrete abstract value. Maude implements membership equational logic and provides mechanisms to calculate the least sort of a term efficiently. We first show how Maude can be used to get prototyping of abstract interpretations "for free." Building on the meta-logic facilities of Maude, we further develop a tool that automatically checks and abstract interpretation against a set of user-defined properties. This can be used to select an appropriate abstract interpretation, to characterize the specified loss of information during abstraction, and to compare different abstractions with each other.

  16. On the relation between a graph code and a graph state

    E-print Network

    Yongsoo Hwang; Jun Heo

    2015-11-18

    A graph state and a graph code respectively are defined based on a mathematical simple graph. In this work, we examine a relation between a graph state and a graph code both obtained from the same graph, and show that a graph state is a superposition of logical qubits of the related graph code. By using the relation, we first discuss that a local complementation which has been used for a graph state can be useful for searching locally equivalent stabilizer codes, and second provide a method to find a stabilizer group of a graph code.

  17. Integrating skills, content, and the process of science in introductory geoscience courses using a group research project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannula, K. A.

    2008-12-01

    Introductory geoscience courses serve many purposes. A good introductory course needs to teach students how scientists think, correct mistaken ideas about the age of the Earth or climate change, provide the background to allow students to judge energy and environmental policies, prepare students for future geoscience classes, and convince students to explore geoscience further. Teaching these courses effectively is a great challenge. My department's solution has been to use an extended group project in lab to advance many of these goals simultaneously. All sections of our Earth Systems Science courses (100 to 150 students per semester) participate in a project monitoring the Florida River, a small tributary of the Colorado River system which is locally used for drinking water and irrigation, which traverses units from Precambrian granite to Paleocene sediments, and which goes through land used for wilderness, mining, rapid ex-urban development, ranching, and natural gas production. Each lab section is responsible for measuring discharge, sediment load, and water chemistry on one or two reaches of the river. The lab groups compare data with other sites along the river and from past semesters in order to draw broader conclusions than possible from their own limited experience. In order to put the sampling and data interpretation into context, we have incorporated many of our other assignments into the project. The topographic maps lab uses the Florida River maps and sample sites, a field trip introducing rocks and minerals shows students the variety of bedrock across which the river flows, and a series of graphing exercises introduce students to previously collected data while giving them practice plotting and interpreting data. The exercises and labs are designed to build on one another, using skills and information from previous weeks to understand new aspects of the local geology. Not every place has the diverse geology of southwestern Colorado. However, this general approach - combining many skill-building exercises with a long-term research project - may be possible at other institutions.

  18. Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimer, Dirk; Sars, Matthias; Suijlekom, Walter D. van

    2013-09-15

    We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

  19. Chromatic scheduling of dynamic data-graph computations

    E-print Network

    Kaler, Tim (Tim F. S.)

    2013-01-01

    Data-graph computations are a parallel-programming model popularized by programming systems such as Pregel, GraphLab, PowerGraph, and GraphChi. A fundamental issue in parallelizing data-graph computations is the avoidance ...

  20. Contact Graph Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic. The information carried by CGR contact plan messages is useful not only for dynamic route computation, but also for the implementation of rate control, congestion forecasting, transmission episode initiation and termination, timeout interval computation, and retransmission timer suspension and resumption.

  1. Interpreters: a double-edged sword in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Maltby, H J

    1999-07-01

    The provision of health services for all Australians is based on equality of access to health care services, regardless of cultural origin or linguistic skill, and on the responsibility of the health system to respond appropriately. Lack of fluency in the English language and lack of bilingual or multilingual nurses are major sources of miscommunication, even with the use of interpreters and translated health information. Many immigrant women find the use of interpreters unacceptable. Nurses are concerned with legal issues. These two viewpoints make the use of interpreters a double-edged sword in practice. The findings of recent research and the literature in relation to language skills and the use of interpreters and translations in the Australian context are explored. Potential resolutions for transcultural nursing practice are provided. PMID:10693412

  2. 57 Word Attack Skill Games.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mara, Patricia; Sorenson, Juanita

    These 57 game cards were developed to help teachers build their resource files for word-attack skills. Cards are keyed to skills suggested by the Wisconsin Design for Reading Skill Development and are color-coded according to their appropriateness for children in kindergarten through grade three. The front of each card gives the name of the skill,…

  3. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  4. Teaching Soft Skills Employers Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Maureen; Kisling, Eric; Hackworth, Robbie G.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies the soft skills community colleges teach in an office technology course and determines whether the skills taught are congruent with the soft skills employers require in today's entry-level office work. A qualitative content analysis of a community college office technology soft skills course was performed using 23 soft…

  5. Building Skills to Build Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Communities are at the heart of the government's vision for the Big Society. And it's the author's strongly held view that skills should be at the heart of each and every one of those communities. If one grows the skills of an individual then the community will flourish. There is a job to be done in building skills to build communities--skilled

  6. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  7. Skills Verdict: Must Do Better

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spilsbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    "Ambition 2020: World Class Skills and Jobs" is the UK Commission for Employment and Skills' annual assessment, to the four UK nations, of their progress towards becoming "world class" in productivity, employment and skills by 2020. "Ambition 2020" provides a robust independent account of economic and skills developments. This report is the…

  8. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms. PMID:25526839

  9. Graphs as Statements of Belief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, David

    2002-01-01

    Identifies points where beliefs are important when making decisions about how graphs are drawn. Describes a simple case of the reaction between 'bicarb soda' and orange or lemon juice and discusses how drawing a graph becomes a statement of belief. (KHR)

  10. A PVS Graph Theory Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Sjogren, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper documents the NASA Langley PVS graph theory library. The library provides fundamental definitions for graphs, subgraphs, walks, paths, subgraphs generated by walks, trees, cycles, degree, separating sets, and four notions of connectedness. Theorems provided include Ramsey's and Menger's and the equivalence of all four notions of connectedness.

  11. Leaky Quantum Graphs: A Review

    E-print Network

    Pavel Exner

    2008-01-07

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of a recent work concerning ``leaky'' quantum graphs described by Hamiltonians given formally by the expression $-\\Delta -\\alpha \\delta (x-\\Gamma)$ with a singular attractive interaction supported by a graph-like set in $\\mathbb{R}^\

  12. CANCER MORTALITY MAPS AND GRAPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cancer Mortality Maps & Graph Web Site provides interactive maps, graphs (which are accessible to the blind and visually-impaired), text, tables and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of cancer death rates for the time period 1950-1994 for more than 40 cancer...

  13. Multivariate Data & Tables and Graphs

    E-print Network

    Stasko, John T.

    1 Multivariate Data & Tables and Graphs CS 4460 ­ Intro. to Information Visualization Sep. 4, 2014 John Stasko Fall 2014 CS 4460 2 Agenda · Data and its characteristics · Tables and graphs · Design something of interest to us Fall 2014 CS 4460 3 Fall 2014 CS 4460 4 Data Sets · Data comes in many different

  14. GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY A Dissertation Outline Presented by CJ CAREY Submitted Rights Reserved #12;GRAPH CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY A Dissertation Outline Presented by CJ CONSTRUCTION FOR MANIFOLD DISCOVERY MAY 2015 CJ CAREY B.Sc., WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN ST. LOUIS M

  15. Soft skills and dental education.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. PMID:23574183

  16. Digital video, learning styles, and student understanding of kinematics graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Teresa Lee

    1997-12-01

    Student ability to analyze and interpret motion graphs following laboratory instruction that utilized interactive digital video as well as traditional instructional techniques was investigated. Research presented suggested that digital video tools serve to motivate students and may be an effective mechanism to enhance student understanding of motion concepts. Two laboratory exercises involving motion concepts were developed for this study. Students were divided into two instructional groups. The treatment group used digital video techniques and the control group used traditional techniques to perform the laboratory exercises. Student understanding of motion concepts were assessed, in part, using the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Other assessment measures included student responses to a set of written graphical analysis questions and two post-lab activities. Possible relationships between individual learning style preferences and student understanding of motion concepts were also addressed. Learning style preferences were assessed using the Productivity Environmental Preference Survey prior to the instructional treatments. Students were asked to comment in writing about their learning styles before and after they were given the learning style assessment. Student comments revealed that the results they received from Productivity Environmental Preference Survey accurately reflected their learning styles. Results presented in this study showed that no significant relationship exists between students' learning style preferences and their ability to interpret motion graphs as measured by scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. In addition, the results showed no significant difference between instructional treatment and mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics. Analysis of writing activities revealed that students in the treatment group responded more effectively than students in the control group to graphical interpretation questions that closely paralleled the motions they had observed during the laboratory. However, students in both instructional groups displayed similar levels of difficulty when confronted with motions that deviated from what they had observed in the laboratory. After controlling for differences in student ability levels using SAT scores and course grades, a significant difference in mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs-Kinematics was observed between males and females. Males and females as a separate population had similar mean SAT scores and course grades. A suggestion was made that the observed difference between males and females based on mean scores on the Test of Understanding Graphs- Kinematics could be due to a gender bias inherent in the instrument. A recommendation was made that future studies could address this observed gender difference.

  17. Semi-Markov Graph Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Raberto, Marco; Rapallo, Fabio; Scalas, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we outline a model of graph (or network) dynamics based on two ingredients. The first ingredient is a Markov chain on the space of possible graphs. The second ingredient is a semi-Markov counting process of renewal type. The model consists in subordinating the Markov chain to the semi-Markov counting process. In simple words, this means that the chain transitions occur at random time instants called epochs. The model is quite rich and its possible connections with algebraic geometry are briefly discussed. Moreover, for the sake of simplicity, we focus on the space of undirected graphs with a fixed number of nodes. However, in an example, we present an interbank market model where it is meaningful to use directed graphs or even weighted graphs. PMID:21887245

  18. Graph Partitioning and Sequencing Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-09-19

    Graph partitioning is a fundemental problem in many scientific contexts. CHACO2.0 is a software package designed to partition and sequence graphs. CHACO2.0 allows for recursive application of several methods for finding small edge separators in weighted graphs. These methods include inertial, spectral, Kernighan Lin and multilevel methods in addition to several simpler strategies. Each of these approaches can be used to partition the graph into two, four, or eight pieces at each level of recursion.more »In addition, the Kernighan Lin method can be used to improve partitions generated by any of the other algorithms. CHACO2.0 can also be used to address various graph sequencing problems, with applications to scientific computing, database design, gene sequencing and other problems.« less

  19. A Study on Edge-Set Graphs of Certain Graphs

    E-print Network

    Johan Kok; N. K. Sudev; K. P. Chithra

    2015-07-08

    Let $G(V, E)$ be a simple connected graph, with $|E| = \\epsilon.$ In this paper, we define an edge-set graph $\\mathcal G_G$ constructed from the graph $G$ such that any vertex $v_{s,i}$ of $\\mathcal G_G$ corresponds to the $i$-th $s$-element subset of $E(G)$ and any two vertices $v_{s,i}, v_{k,m}$ of $\\mathcal G_G$ are adjacent if and only if there is at least one edge in the edge-subset corresponding to $v_{s,i}$ which is adjacent to at least one edge in the edge-subset corresponding to $v_{k,m}$ where $s,k$ are positive integers. It can be noted that the edge-set graph $\\mathcal G_G$ of a graph $G$ id dependent on both the structure of $G$ as well as the number of edges $\\epsilon.$ We also discuss the characteristics and properties of the edge-set graphs corresponding to certain standard graphs.

  20. Application of machine learning and expert systems to Statistical Process Control (SPC) chart interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shewhart, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts are one of several tools used in quality control. Other tools include flow charts, histograms, cause and effect diagrams, check sheets, Pareto diagrams, graphs, and scatter diagrams. A control chart is simply a graph which indicates process variation over time. The purpose of drawing a control chart is to detect any changes in the process signalled by abnormal points or patterns on the graph. The Artificial Intelligence Support Center (AISC) of the Acquisition Logistics Division has developed a hybrid machine learning expert system prototype which automates the process of constructing and interpreting control charts.

  1. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Hagberg, Aric; Hengartner, Nick; Percus, Allon G

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  2. Higher Order Thinking Skills in Vocational Education. ERIC Digest No. 127.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    The skills most often mentioned in definitions of critical thinking are the ability to think creatively, make decisions, solve problems, visualize, reason, analyze, interpret, and know how to learn. Vocational education should be involved in developing thinking skills for the following reasons: occupations are becoming more reliant on cognitive…

  3. Smiles, Nods, and Pauses: Activities to Enrich Children's Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennings, Dorothy Grant

    In exploring nonverbal language, this book suggests activities in which children can express and interpret meanings with more than words, provides a starting point for teachers in helping children develop nonverbal communication skills, and recommends that teachers build language arts programs which emphasize more than just words. Contents consist…

  4. Smooth Interpretation Swarat Chaudhuri

    E-print Network

    Chauduri, Swarat

    Smooth Interpretation Swarat Chaudhuri Pennsylvania State University swarat@cse.psu.edu Armando Solar-Lezama MIT asolar@csail.mit.edu Abstract We present smooth interpretation, a method for systematic approx- imation of programs by smooth mathematical functions. Programs from many application domains make

  5. OF CONFERENCE INTERPRETING

    E-print Network

    . The demand for qualified conference interpreters is at an all-time high, and is only expected to grow conference facilities, fully equipped for simultaneous interpreting. As well, numerous internship an exciting career ­ at home or abroad ­ within unlimited areas of interest. facebook.com/Glendon.School

  6. Database Graph Views : A Practical Model to Manage Persistent Graphs 1

    E-print Network

    1 Database Graph Views : A Practical Model to Manage Persistent Graphs 1 Alejandro Gutiérrez oriented or file systems. A database graph view provides a functional definition of a graph which allows. The graph view operators form a library which can be integrated in database systems or applications managing

  7. Some Remarks on Definability of Process Graphs

    E-print Network

    Luttik, Bas

    them in the context of the well- known process algebras BPA and BPP. For a process graph G, the density going from s to infinity" exist in G. For BPA-graphs we discuss some tentative findings about-definability results, stating that certain process graphs are not BPA-graphs, and stronger, not even BPA

  8. On Hashing Graphs Ashish Kundu1

    E-print Network

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    of graph-structured data models are on the rise ­ in graph databases, representation of biological and location data as well as financial databases [7, 15]. Often it is required to check if a given graph has. Authenticating the graph-structured data is often required as a security property in databases [14, 13

  9. An Efficient Graph Indexing Method Xiaoli Wang #

    E-print Network

    Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

    search has become a basic operation in graph databases. To manage graph data based on similarity database D = {g1, g2, . . . , g|D|} and a query graph q, find all gi D that are similar to q within a GED scalability in databases with a large number of graphs. Facing these difficulties, it is natural to consider

  10. GAIA: Graph Classification Using Evolutionary Computation

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    space for graph classification in large graph databases. Several scalable approaches have been proposed large databases. We propose an efficient method GAIA for mining discriminative subgraphs for graphGAIA: Graph Classification Using Evolutionary Computation Ning Jin University of North Carolina

  11. Impromptu Speaking and Interpretation Studies: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to look at forensics-based competition events and determine what, if any, impact they could have on the language learning and public speaking skills of interpreters in training. This paper details the nature of the impromptu and extemporaneous speaking events in forensics competitions and introduces a…

  12. Guidelines for Graphing Data with Microsoft[R] Office 2007[TM], Office 2010[TM], and Office for Mac[TM] 2008 and 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Erin E.; Reichow, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of single-case data requires systematic visual analysis across and within conditions. Graphs are a vital component for analyzing and communicating single-case design data and a necessary tool for applied researchers and practitioners. Several articles have been published with task analyses for graphing data with the new versions…

  13. Graph hierarchies for phylogeography

    PubMed Central

    Cybis, Gabriela B.; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian phylogeographic methods simultaneously integrate geographical and evolutionary modelling, and have demonstrated value in assessing spatial spread patterns of measurably evolving organisms. We improve on existing phylogeographic methods by combining information from multiple phylogeographic datasets in a hierarchical setting. Consider N exchangeable datasets or strata consisting of viral sequences and locations, each evolving along its own phylogenetic tree and according to a conditionally independent geographical process. At the hierarchical level, a random graph summarizes the overall dispersion process by informing which migration rates between sampling locations are likely to be relevant in the strata. This approach provides an efficient and improved framework for analysing inherently hierarchical datasets. We first examine the evolutionary history of multiple serotypes of dengue virus in the Americas to showcase our method. Additionally, we explore an application to intrahost HIV evolution across multiple patients. PMID:23382428

  14. Multigraph: Reusable Interactive Data Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    There are surprisingly few good software tools available for presenting time series data on the internet. The most common practice is to use a desktop program such as Excel or Matlab to save a graph as an image which can be included in a web page like any other image. This disconnects the graph from the data in a way that makes updating a graph with new data a cumbersome manual process, and it limits the user to one particular view of the data. The Multigraph project defines an XML format for describing interactive data graphs, and software tools for creating and rendering those graphs in web pages and other internet connected applications. Viewing a Multigraph graph is extremely simple and intuitive, and requires no instructions; the user can pan and zoom by clicking and dragging, in a familiar "Google Maps" kind of way. Creating a new graph for inclusion in a web page involves writing a simple XML configuration file. Multigraph can read data in a variety of formats, and can display data from a web service, allowing users to "surf" through large data sets, downloading only those the parts of the data that are needed for display. The Multigraph XML format, or "MUGL" for short, provides a concise description of the visual properties of a graph, such as axes, plot styles, data sources, labels, etc, as well as interactivity properties such as how and whether the user can pan or zoom along each axis. Multigraph reads a file in this format, draws the described graph, and allows the user to interact with it. Multigraph software currently includes a Flash application for embedding graphs in web pages, a Flex component for embedding graphs in larger Flex/Flash applications, and a plugin for creating graphs in the WordPress content management system. Plans for the future include a Java version for desktop viewing and editing, a command line version for batch and server side rendering, and possibly Android and iPhone versions. Multigraph is currently in use on several web sites including the US Drought Portal (www.drought.gov), the NOAA Climate Services Portal (www.climate.gov), the Climate Reference Network (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/crn), NCDC's State of the Climate Report (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc), and the US Forest Service's Forest Change Assessment Viewer (ews.forestthreats.org/NPDE/NPDE.html). More information about Multigraph is available from the web site www.multigraph.org. Interactive Multigraph Display of Real Time Weather Data

  15. Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Amy Roth

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

  16. Computing with Graphs and Graph Rewriting Dorothea Blostein Andy Schrr

    E-print Network

    Pentus, Mati

    represent chips or gates or resis­ tors, and graph edges are electrical connections. In a flow chart, nodes represent pieces of code, and edges represent control flow. In an organizational chart, nodes represent

  17. A Study on Set-Graphs

    E-print Network

    Johan Kok; K. P. Chithra; N. K. Sudev; C. Susanth

    2015-04-09

    A \\textit{primitive hole} of a graph $G$ is a cycle of length $3$ in $G$. The number of primitive holes in a given graph $G$ is called the primitive hole number of that graph $G$. The primitive degree of a vertex $v$ of a given graph $G$ is the number of primitive holes incident on the vertex $v$. In this paper, we introduce the notion of set-graphs and study the properties and characteristics of set-graphs. We also check the primitive hole number and primitive degree of set-graphs. Interesting introductory results on the nature of order of set-graphs, degree of the vertices corresponding to subsets of equal cardinality, the number of largest complete subgraphs in a set-graph etc. are discussed in this study. A recursive formula to determine the primitive hole number of a set-graph is also derived in this paper.

  18. READING SKILL AND LANGUAGE SKILL Virginia A. Mann+

    E-print Network

    a visual language skill that systematically maps onto extant spoken language skills. Some children perform disability could arise at any level from general cognition to visual perception. Yet since reading

  19. Skilled Veterans Corps

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2011-08-31

    once and for all. A group of elders has volunteered to clean up the reactors damaged by the tsunami and earthquake. Calling itself the Skilled Veteran Corps, the group consists of engineers and other specialists over 60 who are able?and willing--to do a...

  20. Construction Cluster Skills Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL. Built Environment Partnership.

    Twelve construction cluster skill standards and associated benchmarks were developed as part of a federally funded school-to-work initiative that included the following parties: the Chicago Public Schools; City Colleges of Chicago; and business, labor, and community organizations. The standards, which include core academic, generic workplace…

  1. Teaching Presentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.; Thompson, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Effective teaching of presentation skills focuses on the most important element of the presentation--the message itself. Some instructors place the heaviest emphasis on the messenger (the presenter) and focus their presentation feedback on all the presenter is doing wrong--saying "um," gesturing awkwardly, and so forth. When students receive this…

  2. Bicycle Skills Test Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Highway Safety Research Center.

    This manual provides the guidelines and components necessary for the planning and implementation of a basic bicycle skills test program. It is intended for use by enforcement personnel, city and town government officials, education and school groups, civic groups, or other interested persons. An introduction covers use of the manual and the…

  3. Teaching for Skill Mastery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepko, Stevie; Doan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on establishing a mastery climate where all students find success and start on the road to physical literacy. Using a five-step approach, physical educators will be offered guidance for developing practice tasks that lead to skill mastery. These steps include creating a mastery environment, designing deliberate practice tasks,…

  4. Sizing Up Social Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostlund, Karen L.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how students' social skills can be assessed in the context of cooperative learning. Suggests that the following classroom protocols be assessed: (1) listen; (2) be responsible to others; (3) respect others; and (4) stay on task. Provides an assessment scale for these behaviors. (PR)

  5. Essential Skills for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    No matter what standards they follow, principals must be skilled team builders, instructional leaders, and visionary risk-takers. There are five emerging roles: historian, cheerleader, lightning rod, landscaper (environmental scanner), and anthropologist. To succeed, principals must be empowered by districts, become authentic leaders, and make…

  6. State Skill Standards: Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Frederick; Reed, Loretta; Jensen, Capra; Robison, Gary; Taylor, Susan; Pavesich, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide skill standards for all content areas in career and technical education. The standards in this document are for photography programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program.…

  7. Skill in Expert Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helton, William S.

    2007-01-01

    The motor control of novice participants is often cognitively demanding and susceptible to interference by other tasks. As people develop expertise, their motor control becomes less susceptible to interference from other tasks. Researchers propose a transition in human motor skill from active control to automaticity. This progression may also be…

  8. Teaching Thinking Skills: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narode, Ronald; And Others

    This document addresses some of the factors involved in teaching critical thinking skills in the science classroom. It contains sections that deal with: (1) pair problem solving--creating a Socratic learning environment (emphasizes the role of the teacher); (2) writing to learn science (the thought-process protocol); (3) integrating science…

  9. Maintaining Foreign Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Tarey

    Human beings have as great a capacity for losing or forgetting a language as they do for learning one. Many have lost language skills due to a lack of a linguistically appropriate environment in which to use a particular language. Millions of individuals who have studied a second language in high school or college for several years have lost the…

  10. Measuring Skills and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludeman, Kate

    1991-01-01

    Customized skills assessments can perform a number of functions: help training departments demonstrate their effectiveness; provide a foundation for career development programs; reinforce company values; add feedback from the bottom up for performance evaluation; provide a concentrated focus for customer service improvement; and serve as a…

  11. State Skill Standards: Metalworking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for metalworking programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any…

  12. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  13. Fary's Theorem for 1-Planar Graphs Peter Eades1

    E-print Network

    Hong,Seokhee

    Figure 1(a)). The other is a 1-plane graph consisting of two paths of length two, called the gucci graph (see Figure 1(b)). Fig. 1. (a) The bulgari graph; (b) the gucci graph; (c) the bad K4 graph. We also-planar drawing if and only if G contains neither the bulgari graph nor the gucci graph. Furthermore

  14. Balanced Cayley graphs and balanced planar Joy Morris 1

    E-print Network

    Morris, Joy

    Balanced Cayley graphs and balanced planar graphs Joy Morris 1 , Pablo Spiga 2 and Kerri Webb, Alberta, Canada Abstract A balanced graph is a bipartite graph with no induced circuit of length 2 (mod 4). These graphs arise in linear programming. We focus on graph-algebraic properties of balanced graphs to prove

  15. Khovanov homology of graph-links

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, Igor M

    2012-08-31

    Graph-links arise as the intersection graphs of turning chord diagrams of links. Speaking informally, graph-links provide a combinatorial description of links up to mutations. Many link invariants can be reformulated in the language of graph-links. Khovanov homology, a well-known and useful knot invariant, is defined for graph-links in this paper (in the case of the ground field of characteristic two). Bibliography: 14 titles.

  16. PageRank in undirected random graphs

    E-print Network

    Kadavankandy, Arun; Prokhorenkova, Luidmilla Ostroumova; Raigorodskii, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    PageRank has numerous applications in information retrieval, reputation systems, machine learning, and graph partitioning.In this paper, we study PageRank in undirected random graphs with expansion property. The Chung-Lu random graph represents an example of such graphs. We show that in the limit, as the size of the graph goes to infinity, PageRank can be represented by a mixture of the restart distribution and the vertex degree distribution.

  17. Theory Interpretations in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Shankar, Natarajan; Butler, Ricky W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this task was to provide a mechanism for theory interpretations in a prototype verification system (PVS) so that it is possible to demonstrate the consistency of a theory by exhibiting an interpretation that validates the axioms. The mechanization makes it possible to show that one collection of theories is correctly interpreted by another collection of theories under a user-specified interpretation for the uninterpreted types and constants. A theory instance is generated and imported, while the axiom instances are generated as proof obligations to ensure that the interpretation is valid. Interpretations can be used to show that an implementation is a correct refinement of a specification, that an axiomatically defined specification is consistent, or that a axiomatically defined specification captures its intended models. In addition, the theory parameter mechanism has been extended with a notion of theory as parameter so that a theory instance can be given as an actual parameter to an imported theory. Theory interpretations can thus be used to refine an abstract specification or to demonstrate the consistency of an axiomatic theory. In this report we describe the mechanism in detail. This extension is a part of PVS version 3.0, which will be publicly released in mid-2001.

  18. Interpreting Arterial Blood Gases Successfully.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Brenda G; Zimmanck, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis is a crucial skill for perioperative nurses, in particular the RN circulator. This article provides the physiological basis for assessing ABGs perioperatively and presents a systematic approach to blood gas analysis using the Romanski method. Blood gas sample data allow the reader to practice ABG interpretation. In addition, four case studies are presented that give the reader the opportunity to analyze ABGs within the context of surgical patient scenarios. The ability to accurately assess ABGs allows the perioperative nurse to assist surgical team members in restoring a patient's acid-base balance. PMID:26411819

  19. Skilled or Skillful: What's the Difference for Readers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Carol; Dickinson, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the difference between "drilling for skills" and "becoming skillful readers" and shows how teachers can help students become skillful readers, writers, discussants, and thinkers through literature discussions. Discusses establishing a context for literature study, and initiating and maintaining literature study groups. (SR)

  20. Towards Robot Skill Learning: From Simple Skills to Table Tennis

    E-print Network

    Towards Robot Skill Learning: From Simple Skills to Table Tennis Jan Peters, Jens Kober, Katharina Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, 72076 Tübingen, Germany Abstract. Learning robots that can acquire new motor skills and re- fine existing ones have been a long-standing vision of both robotics

  1. Introduction: 569: Sampling Graphs (2013)

    E-print Network

    Lu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Jianguo Lu Introduction: Sampling Size estimation Bias correction Uniform Sampling Average Degree Weibo Sampling 569: Sampling Graphs (2013) Jianguo Lu University of Windsor November 18, 2013 #12;Jianguo Lu Introduction: Sampling Size estimation Bias correction Uniform Sampling Average Degree Weibo

  2. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    SciTech Connect

    Vander Wiel, Scott A; Storlie, Curtis B; Sandine, Gary; Hagberg, Aric A; Fisk, Michael

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  3. Densities in graphs and matroids 

    E-print Network

    Kannan, Lavanya

    2009-05-15

    the members of the Milner o?ce for their friendly help on my o?ce needs. Ms. Robin Campbell helped me in many of my questions with Latex. My sincere thanks to Dr. Frank and Dr. Jord?an of EGRES, E?otv?os Lor?and University, Budapest, Hungary. They served as my... in the study of random graphs was ?rst identi?ed by Erd?os and R?enyi [21], where they calculated the probability that a random graph G(n,p) contains a given balanced graph G. 10 Theorem I.3 (Erd?os and R?enyi [21]). If G is a balanced graph, then lim n?? Prob...

  4. Algorithms for Comparing Pedigree Graphs

    E-print Network

    Kirkpatrick, Bonnie; Finucane, Hilary; Jiang, Haitao; Zhu, Binhai; Karp, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    Pedigree graphs, which represent family relationships, are often constructed by collecting data from genealogical records to determine which pairs of people are parent and child. This process is expensive, and small mistakes in data collection--for example, one missing parent-child relationship--can cause large differences in the pedigree graphs created. In this paper, we introduce a simple pedigree definition based on a different type of data which is potentially easier to collect. This alternative characterization of a pedigree that describes a pedigree as a list of the descendants of each individual, rather than a list of parent-child relationships. We then introduce an algorithm that generates the pedigree graph from this list of descendants. We also consider the problem of comparing two pedigree graphs, which could be useful to evaluate the differences between pedigrees constructed via different methods. Specifically, this could be useful to evaluate pedigree reconstruction methods. We define the edit di...

  5. Algebraic decay in hierarchical graphs

    E-print Network

    Felipe Barra; Thomas Gilbert

    2002-04-23

    We study the algebraic decay of the survival probability in open hierarchical graphs. We present a model of a persistent random walk on a hierarchical graph and study the spectral properties of the Frobenius-Perron operator. Using a perturbative scheme, we derive the exponent of the classical algebraic decay in terms of two parameters of the model. One parameter defines the geometrical relation between the length scales on the graph, and the other relates to the probabilities for the random walker to go from one level of the hierarchy to another. The scattering resonances of the corresponding hierarchical quantum graphs are also studied. The width distribution shows the scaling behavior $P(\\Gamma) \\sim 1/\\Gamma$.

  6. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may need to be transferred to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility. ... Common medical problems that often lead to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility care include: Joint replacement surgery, ...

  7. Plants, Animals and Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Countrystart is a class in which students work with plants and animals, providing numerous opportunities to integrate basic skills teaching. The practical subject area becomes the vehicle to develop other skills needed by students. (JOW)

  8. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE. PMID:24831083

  9. Phylogenetic Toric Varieties on Graphs 

    E-print Network

    Buczynska, Weronika J.

    2010-10-12

    , namely Section 2, was reprinted with permission from ?Isotropic models of evolution with symmetries?, by Weronika Buczyn?ska, Maria Donten, and Jaros law A. Wi?sniewski, 2009. Interactions of classical and numerical algebraic geometry, Contemp. Math...., vol. 496, pp. 111?131. Copyright by Amer. Math. Soc. 18 the number of connected components of a sufficiently small neighborhood of v with v removed. A trivalent graph with no cycles is a trivalent tree. When discussing more then one graph instead...

  10. Locality of connective constants, II. Cayley graphs

    E-print Network

    Geoffrey R. Grimmett; Zhongyang Li

    2015-07-27

    The connective constant $\\mu(G)$ of an infinite transitive graph $G$ is the exponential growth rate of the number of self-avoiding walks from a given origin. In earlier work of Grimmett and Li, a locality theorem was proved for connective constants, namely, that the connective constants of two graphs are close in value whenever the graphs agree on a large ball around the origin. A condition of the theorem was that the graphs support so-called 'graph height functions'. When the graphs are Cayley graphs of infinite, finitely generated groups, there is a special type of graph height function termed here a 'group height function'. A necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of a group height function is presented, and may be applied in the context of the bridge constant, and of the locality of connective constants for Cayley graphs. Locality may thereby be established for a variety of infinite groups including those with strictly positive deficiency. It is proved that a large class of transitive graphs (and hence Cayley graphs) support graph height functions that are in addition harmonic on the graph. This extends an earlier constructive proof of Grimmett and Li, but subject to an additional condition of unimodularity which is benign in the context of Cayley graphs. It implies the existence of graph height functions for finitely generated solvable groups. The case of non-unimodular graphs may be handled similarly, but the resulting graph height functions need not be harmonic. Group height functions, as well as the graph height functions of the previous paragraph, are non-constant harmonic functions with linear growth and an additional property of having periodic differences. The existence of such functions on Cayley graphs is a topic of interest beyond their applications in the theory of self-avoiding walks.

  11. Zeta functions of quantum graphs

    E-print Network

    J. M. Harrison; K. Kirsten

    2010-12-03

    In this article we construct zeta functions of quantum graphs using a contour integral technique based on the argument principle. We start by considering the special case of the star graph with Neumann matching conditions at the center of the star. We then extend the technique to allow any matching conditions at the center for which the Laplace operator is self-adjoint and finally obtain an expression for the zeta function of any graph with general vertex matching conditions. In the process it is convenient to work with new forms for the secular equation of a quantum graph that extend the well known secular equation of the Neumann star graph. In the second half of the article we apply the zeta function to obtain new results for the spectral determinant, vacuum energy and heat kernel coefficients of quantum graphs. These have all been topics of current research in their own right and in each case this unified approach significantly expands results in the literature.

  12. Interpretation of Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Schwaneberg, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Bernoulli's equation with regards to: horizontal flow of incompressible fluids, change of height of incompressible fluids, gases, liquids and gases, and viscous fluids. Provides an interpretation, properties, terminology, and applications of Bernoulli's equation. (MVL)

  13. Interpretation of Biosphere Reserves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriman, Tim

    1994-01-01

    Introduces the Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB) to monitor the 193 biogeographical provinces of the Earth and the creation of biosphere reserves. Highlights the need for interpreters to become familiar or involved with MAB program activities. (LZ)

  14. Interpreting Weather Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. Sean; Ford, Brent A.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a brief introduction of our atmosphere, a guide to reading and interpreting weather maps, and a set of activities to facilitate teachers in helping to enhance student understanding of the Earth's atmosphere. (ZWH)

  15. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). PRE-SPC 11: SPC & Graphs. Instructor Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    This instructor guide, which was developed for use in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contains the materials required to present a learning module that is designed to prepare trainees for the program's statistical process control module by improving their basic math skills in working with line graphs and teaching…

  16. Uncertainty in structural interpretation: Lessons to be learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Clare E.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainty in the interpretation of geological data is an inherent element of geology. Datasets from different sources: remotely sensed seismic imagery, field data and borehole data, are often combined and interpreted to create a geological model of the sub-surface. The data have limited resolution and spatial distribution that results in uncertainty in the interpretation of the data and in the subsequent geological model(s) created. Methods to determine the extent of interpretational uncertainty of a dataset, how to capture and express that uncertainty, and consideration of uncertainties in terms of risk have been investigated. Here I review the work that has taken place and discuss best practice in accounting for uncertainties in structural interpretation workflows. Barriers to best practice are reflected on, including the use of software packages for interpretation. Experimental evidence suggests that minimising interpretation error through the use of geological reasoning and rules can help decrease interpretation uncertainty; through identification of inadmissible interpretations and in highlighting areas of uncertainty. Understanding expert thought processes and reasoning, including the use of visuospatial skills, during interpretation may aid in the identification of uncertainties, and in the education of new geoscientists.

  17. Employability Skills. At a Glance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wibrow, Bridget

    2011-01-01

    In a competitive workforce it is not just having the right qualification or technical skills that will land an individual a job; it could very well be their interpersonal skills. How someone communicates is often the first impression an employer has of a possible worker. Yet, it is precisely communication skills that employers feel applicants are…

  18. Perceptions Concerning Occupational Survival Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Robert E.

    This volume presents the reports of a series of interrelated studies which were part of a study that developed curriculum materials for teaching occupational survival skills. The first of six sections, Need for Teaching Occupational Survival Skills and Attitudes, discusses the importance of survival skills and describes twelve general topics which…

  19. Developing Managerial Skills in Palestine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madhoun, Mohammed; Analoui, Farhad

    2002-01-01

    This paper assesses the contribution of management training and development programmes (MTPs) to the development of managerial skills in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Different sets of variables were used to explore the managers' skills development by dividing the managerial skills into three main categories: self, people, and task-related…

  20. Student Math Skills Reference Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Odell; And Others

    This mathematics support guide is intended for use by vocational students and instructors as a review of essential mathematics concepts and for problem-solving exercises in the vocations. It is designed to accompany the "Mathematical Skills Inventory," which tests mathematics skills, attitudes, and background. A section entitled Arithmetic Skills

  1. Stochastic Reinforcement Benefits Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Eran; Averbeck, Bruno B.; Richmond, Barry J.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2014-01-01

    Learning complex skills is driven by reinforcement, which facilitates both online within-session gains and retention of the acquired skills. Yet, in ecologically relevant situations, skills are often acquired when mapping between actions and rewarding outcomes is unknown to the learning agent, resulting in reinforcement schedules of a stochastic…

  2. Developing Thinking Skills with Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, John B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study in which Logo programming was used to teach problem-solving skills to fourth to eighth grade students is described. The results, and their implications for further use of the computer to teach higher order thinking skills, are discussed. The possible use of Prolog programming to teach reasoning skills is described. (JL)

  3. Computational Skills for Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    This interview with Distinguished Science Award recipient Louis J. Gross highlights essential computational skills for modern biology, including: (1) teaching concepts listed in the Math & Bio 2010 report; (2) illustrating to students that jobs today require quantitative skills; and (3) resources and materials that focus on computational skills.

  4. CAREER SKILLS WORKSHEET Your skills are critical in shaping what you will enjoy as a career. The closer your skills

    E-print Network

    CAREER SKILLS WORKSHEET Your skills are critical in shaping what you will enjoy as a career experience. Review the following list off 46 career-relevant skills, feel free to add skills that you possess

  5. Interpreter-mediated dentistry.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Susan; Drew, Paul; Zayts, Olga; McGrath, Colman; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Wong, H M; Au, T K F

    2015-05-01

    The global movements of healthcare professionals and patient populations have increased the complexities of medical interactions at the point of service. This study examines interpreter mediated talk in cross-cultural general dentistry in Hong Kong where assisting para-professionals, in this case bilingual or multilingual Dental Surgery Assistants (DSAs), perform the dual capabilities of clinical assistant and interpreter. An initial language use survey was conducted with Polyclinic DSAs (n = 41) using a logbook approach to provide self-report data on language use in clinics. Frequencies of mean scores using a 10-point visual analogue scale (VAS) indicated that the majority of DSAs spoke mainly Cantonese in clinics and interpreted for postgraduates and professors. Conversation Analysis (CA) examined recipient design across a corpus (n = 23) of video-recorded review consultations between non-Cantonese speaking expatriate dentists and their Cantonese L1 patients. Three patterns of mediated interpreting indicated were: dentist designated expansions; dentist initiated interpretations; and assistant initiated interpretations to both the dentist and patient. The third, rather than being perceived as negative, was found to be framed either in response to patient difficulties or within the specific task routines of general dentistry. The findings illustrate trends in dentistry towards personalized care and patient empowerment as a reaction to product delivery approaches to patient management. Implications are indicated for both treatment adherence and the education of dental professionals. PMID:25828074

  6. Measuring Education and Skill

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in measuring education and skill that need to be taken into account in any new initiative to monitor social mobility. Over the past half-century, patterns of educational participation and attainment have become more heterogeneous, a trend that has been accompanied by increases in assessment and testing practices, and the availability of electronic data sources and other administrative records, including official school transcripts that are generally held indefinitely. This article describes the most promising approaches to measuring education and discusses some of the possible challenges for using the information to study social mobility. Measures of educational concepts fall along at least one of several dimensions: credentials earned, qualities of the schools attended, the amount and nature of curricular exposure, and the development and acquisition of skills. Selected data sources, with an emphasis on school transcripts and administrative records, and their possible uses are described. PMID:25983334

  7. Discrete Signal Processing on Graphs: Sampling Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Siheng; Varma, Rohan; Sandryhaila, Aliaksei; Kovacevic, Jelena

    2015-12-01

    We propose a sampling theory for signals that are supported on either directed or undirected graphs. The theory follows the same paradigm as classical sampling theory. We show that perfect recovery is possible for graph signals bandlimited under the graph Fourier transform. The sampled signal coefficients form a new graph signal, whose corresponding graph structure preserves the first-order difference of the original graph signal. For general graphs, an optimal sampling operator based on experimentally designed sampling is proposed to guarantee perfect recovery and robustness to noise; for graphs whose graph Fourier transforms are frames with maximal robustness to erasures as well as for Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi graphs, random sampling leads to perfect recovery with high probability. We further establish the connection to the sampling theory of finite discrete-time signal processing and previous work on signal recovery on graphs. To handle full-band graph signals, we propose a graph filter bank based on sampling theory on graphs. Finally, we apply the proposed sampling theory to semi-supervised classification on online blogs and digit images, where we achieve similar or better performance with fewer labeled samples compared to previous work.

  8. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    PubMed Central

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first year of residency training or later. Conclusions Gathering data from residency program directors provides support for developing new assessment tools in high-stakes licensing examinations. PMID:22833698

  9. Evolutionary games on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, György; Fáth, Gábor

    2007-07-01

    Game theory is one of the key paradigms behind many scientific disciplines from biology to behavioral sciences to economics. In its evolutionary form and especially when the interacting agents are linked in a specific social network the underlying solution concepts and methods are very similar to those applied in non-equilibrium statistical physics. This review gives a tutorial-type overview of the field for physicists. The first four sections introduce the necessary background in classical and evolutionary game theory from the basic definitions to the most important results. The fifth section surveys the topological complications implied by non-mean-field-type social network structures in general. The next three sections discuss in detail the dynamic behavior of three prominent classes of models: the Prisoner's Dilemma, the Rock-Scissors-Paper game, and Competing Associations. The major theme of the review is in what sense and how the graph structure of interactions can modify and enrich the picture of long term behavioral patterns emerging in evolutionary games.

  10. Business Students' Perceptions of Necessary Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lajuan; Riley, Monica; Fisher, Diane J.

    2003-01-01

    Business education students (n=100) rated 14 job skills identified by the Secretary's Commission on Necessary Skills. The top characteristic identified was interpersonal skills followed by critical thinking. Other skills included teamwork, problem solving, computer literacy, and multitasking. (JOW)

  11. A New SAS program for behavioral analysis of electrical penetration graph data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring feeding behaviors of insects whose piercing-sucking mouthparts are inserted into plant tissue is done by making the insect part of an electronic circuit, using electropenetrography (EPG). Fluctuating voltage signals in the circuit are graphed, and resulting waveforms are interpreted as sp...

  12. Correspondence Analysis and Association Models Constrained by a Conditional Independence Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Falguerolles, Antoine; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The manner in which the conditional independence graph of a multiway contingency table affects the fitting and interpretation of the Goodman association model and of correspondence analysis is considered. Estimation of row and column scores is presented through a framework that includes both models. (SLD)

  13. Individualized Math Problems in Graphs and Tables. Oregon Vo-Tech Mathematics Problem Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosler, Norma, Ed.

    This is one of eighteen sets of individualized mathematics problems developed by the Oregon Vo-Tech Math Project. Each of these problem packages is organized around a mathematical topic and contains problems related to diverse vocations. Solutions are provided for all problems. Problems involving the construction and interpretation of graphs and…

  14. High Performance Descriptive Semantic Analysis of Semantic Graph Databases

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Adolf, Robert D.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Feo, John T.; Haglin, David J.; Mackey, Greg E.; Mizell, David W.

    2011-06-02

    As semantic graph database technology grows to address components ranging from extant large triple stores to SPARQL endpoints over SQL-structured relational databases, it will become increasingly important to be able to understand their inherent semantic structure, whether codified in explicit ontologies or not. Our group is researching novel methods for what we call descriptive semantic analysis of RDF triplestores, to serve purposes of analysis, interpretation, visualization, and optimization. But data size and computational complexity makes it increasingly necessary to bring high performance computational resources to bear on this task. Our research group built a novel high performance hybrid system comprising computational capability for semantic graph database processing utilizing the large multi-threaded architecture of the Cray XMT platform, conventional servers, and large data stores. In this paper we describe that architecture and our methods, and present the results of our analyses of basic properties, connected components, namespace interaction, and typed paths such for the Billion Triple Challenge 2010 dataset.

  15. The BA in Translation and Interpretation at California State, Long Beach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainof, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Describes a translation and interpretation program at the University of California, Long Beach. The program affords students in both English and Spanish an opportunity to develop and perfect their linguistic skills and cultural knowledge to pursue a career in the field of translation and interpretation. The program covers technical vocabulary,…

  16. n-particle quantum statistics on graphs

    E-print Network

    Jonathan M. Harrison; Jonathan P. Keating; Jonathan M. Robbins; Adam Sawicki

    2013-04-21

    We develop a full characterization of abelian quantum statistics on graphs. We explain how the number of anyon phases is related to connectivity. For 2-connected graphs the independence of quantum statistics with respect to the number of particles is proven. For non-planar 3-connected graphs we identify bosons and fermions as the only possible statistics, whereas for planar 3-connected graphs we show that one anyon phase exists. Our approach also yields an alternative proof of the structure theorem for the first homology group of n-particle graph configuration spaces. Finally, we determine the topological gauge potentials for 2-connected graphs.

  17. Assessment of Interpersonal Communication Skills Among Sari Health Centers’ Staff

    PubMed Central

    Siamian, Hasan; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nia, Roobabe Darvish; Nezhad, Fereshteh Reza; Akbari, Hadise; Balaghafari, Azita; Vahdei, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim: Ability to communicate correctly has been one of the life's basic social skills and its significance in human life is to some extent that some of the experts attribute the human growth foundation owners of the leading personal injuries and progress to human relationship. Purpose of this study was to evaluate the interpersonal communication skills among the health care centers staff. Methods: This study was a descriptive–cross sectional study was done among 85 staff in 12 metropolitan and 9 urban health centers in 2013. According to Kerejsi and Morgan's table, 70 employees were determined as samples. Seventy questionnaires were distributed at the mentioned centers and 60 measurable health questionnaires were examined. Demographic data and measure of communication skills: is a 36-items consisting of seven domains: (general Communication, speaking, listening, interpretation and clarification, asking, feedback, and reward and punishment), obtained data were analyzed by inferential statistical tests (Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and correlation coefficient). Results: Most respondents 38 (63.3%) were women, 57 (95%) married and 17 (28.1 %) age means of 43-47 years. In the study status of the communication skills status of employees employed in health centres, Sari, “Punish and encourage skills” with mean and total standard deviation of 4.11±37.0 assigned the highest score and “feedback” skill with mean and total standard deviation of 3.68±045 assigned the less score. Conclusion: Findings showed that public relation skill, listening, reward and punishment in good scope and other skills were in the average scope. No need for training skills of empowerment of staff and their mental health. These results could be used for developing similar instruments in other health workers. PMID:25568632

  18. Exploration of Constantly Connected Dynamic Graphs Based on Cactuses

    E-print Network

    Ilcinkas, David

    Exploration of Constantly Connected Dynamic Graphs Based on Cactuses David Ilcinkas, Ralf Klasing consider the same problem and we suppose that the underlying graph is a cactus graph (a connected graph

  19. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part II. Isomer Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of graph theory to aid in the depiction of organic molecular structures. Gives a historical perspective of graph theory and explains graph theory terminology with organic examples. Lists applications of graph theory to current research projects. (ML)

  20. 0-1 graph partitioning and image segmentation

    E-print Network

    Goh, Chun Fan

    2008-01-01

    Graph partitioning is the grouping of all the nodes in a graph into two or more partitions based on certain criteria. Graph cut techniques are used to partition a graph. The Minimum Cut method gives imbalanced partitions. ...

  1. Interpretation of panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Perschbacher, Susanne

    2012-03-01

    Panoramic radiography has become a commonly used imaging modality in dental practice and can be a valuable diagnostic tool in the dentist's armamentarium. However, the panoramic image is a complex projection of the jaws with multiple superimpositions and distortions which may be exacerbated by technical errors in image acquisition. Furthermore, the panoramic radiograph depicts numerous anatomic structures outside of the jaws which may create additional interpretation challenges. Successful interpretation of panoramic radiographs begins with an understanding of the normal anatomy of the head and neck and how it is depicted in this image type. This article will describe how osseous structures, soft tissues, air spaces and ghost shadows contribute to the final panoramic image. A systematic and repeated approach to examining panoramic radiographs, which is recommended to ensure that critical findings are not overlooked, is also outlined. Examples of challenging interpretations, including variations of anatomy, artefacts and disease, are presented to illustrate these concepts. PMID:22376096

  2. Connectivity Oracles for Planar Graphs

    E-print Network

    Borradaile, Glencora; Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We consider dynamic subgraph connectivity problems for planar graphs. In this model there is a fixed underlying planar graph, where each edge and vertex is either "off" (failed) or "on" (recovered). We wish to answer connectivity queries with respect to the "on" subgraph. The model has two natural variants, one in which there are $d$ edge/vertex failures that precede all connectivity queries, and one in which failures/recoveries and queries are intermixed. We present a $d$-failure connectivity oracle for planar graphs that processes any $d$ edge/vertex failures in $sort(d,n)$ time so that connectivity queries can be answered in $pred(d,n)$ time. (Here $sort$ and $pred$ are the time for integer sorting and integer predecessor search over a subset of $[n]$ of size $d$.) Our algorithm has two discrete parts. The first is an algorithm tailored to triconnected planar graphs. It makes use of Barnette's theorem, which states that every triconnected planar graph contains a degree-3 spanning tree. The second part is a...

  3. Interpreter-Mediated Neuropsychological Testing of Monolingual Spanish Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Rachel; Guzmán-Vélez, Edmarie; Cardona-Rodriguez, Javier; Rodriguez, Nayra; Quiñones, Gabriela; Juan, San; Izaguirre, Borja; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate empirically whether using an interpreter to conduct neuropsychological testing of monolingual Spanish speakers affects test scores. Participants included 40 neurologically normal Spanish-speakers with limited English proficiency, ages 18–65 years (M= 39.7, SD =13.9), who completed the Vocabulary, Similarities, Block Design, and Matrix Reasoning subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III in two counterbalanced conditions: with and without an interpreter. Results indicated that interpreter use significantly increased scores on Vocabulary and Similarities. However, scores on Block Design and Matrix Reasoning did not differ depending upon whether or not an interpreter was used. In addition, the findings suggested a trend toward higher variability in scores when an interpreter was used to administer Vocabulary and Similarities; this trend did not show up for Block Design or Matrix Reasoning. Together, the results indicate that interpreter use may significantly affect scores for some tests commonly used in neuropsychological practice, with this influence being greater for verbally mediated tests. Additional research is needed to identify the types of tests that may be most affected as well as the factors that contribute to the effects. In the meantime, neuropsychologists are encouraged to avoid interpreter use whenever practically possible, particularly for tests with high demands on interpreter abilities and skills, with tests that have not been appropriately adapted and translated into the patient’s target language, and with interpreters who are not trained professionals. PMID:22185676

  4. Reconceptualised life skills in secondary education in the African context: Lessons learnt from reforms in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2014-04-01

    Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an emphasis on developing specific technical vocational skills considered essential for employability or self-employment. Using Ghana as an example, this paper shows how secondary education curriculum reformers recommended shifts that embraced a new interpretation of life skills focused on 21st-century skills. This gradual move also reflected the difficulty that secondary education in general has had in networking with the world of work to provide work experience that would lead to the development of work-related skills and enhance employability. The author's main argument is that although the reconceptualisation of life skills in secondary education to reflect 21st-century skills is a welcome shift in the African context, this needs to be accompanied by reforms in teacher education. Classroom teaching and learning need to be adapted in a fundamental way in order to ensure that youth fully benefit from the inclusion of 21st-century life skills in secondary education curricula. Such reforms must include pedagogical practices which nurture communication, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking skills.

  5. The ADAMS interactive interpreter

    SciTech Connect

    Rietscha, E.R.

    1990-12-17

    The ADAMS (Advanced DAta Management System) project is exploring next generation database technology. Database management does not follow the usual programming paradigm. Instead, the database dictionary provides an additional name space environment that should be interactively created and tested before writing application code. This document describes the implementation and operation of the ADAMS Interpreter, an interactive interface to the ADAMS data dictionary and runtime system. The Interpreter executes individual statements of the ADAMS Interface Language, providing a fast, interactive mechanism to define and access persistent databases. 5 refs.

  6. Enhancing graphical literacy skills in the high school science classroom via authentic, intensive data collection and graphical representation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmeri, Anthony

    This research project was developed to provide extensive practice and exposure to data collection and data representation in a high school science classroom. The student population engaged in this study included 40 high school sophomores enrolled in two microbiology classes. Laboratory investigations and activities were deliberately designed to include quantitative data collection that necessitated organization and graphical representation. These activities were embedded into the curriculum and conducted in conjunction with the normal and expected course content, rather than as a separate entity. It was expected that routine practice with graph construction and interpretation would result in improved competency when graphing data and proficiency in analyzing graphs. To objectively test the effectiveness in achieving this goal, a pre-test and post-test that included graph construction, interpretation, interpolation, extrapolation, and analysis was administered. Based on the results of a paired T-Test, graphical literacy was significantly enhanced by extensive practice and exposure to data representation.

  7. Comparing Stars: On Approximating Graph Edit Distance Zhiping Zeng

    E-print Network

    Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

    Sub are introduced to perform different kinds of graph search on graph databases. Comprehensive experimental studies are becoming ubiq- uitous, and graph data models have been studied in the database community for semantic data applications of graph models, vast amounts of graph data have been collected and graph databases have attracted

  8. Towards Graph Containment Search and Indexing Xifeng Yan2

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xiaohui "Helen"

    or networked data accumulated in large databases, supporting scalable graph search be- comes an emerging database system research problem. Given a graph database and a graph query, one could formulate two basic search problems: (1) (traditional) graph search: Given a graph database D = {g1, . . . , gn} and a graph

  9. Tadpole Labelled Oriented Graph Groups and Cyclically Presented Groups

    E-print Network

    Howie, Jim

    Tadpole Labelled Oriented Graph Groups and Cyclically Presented Groups James Howiea , Gerald the underlying graph is a tadpole graph. We show that such a group is the natural HNN exten- sion of a cyclically of Labelled Ori- ented Graph (LOG) groups where the underlying graph is a tadpole graph. It will turn out

  10. Navigation Recommendations for Exploring Hierarchical Graphs

    E-print Network

    Tominski, Christian

    Navigation Recommendations for Exploring Hierarchical Graphs Stefan Gladisch, Heidrun Schumann, Christian Tominski Institute for Computer Science, University of Rostock, Germany Abstract. Navigation of interest (DOI) allows us to recommend horizontal navigation in terms of the graph layout and also vertical

  11. Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

  12. Standard Distributions: One Graph Fits All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Clifford H.

    2007-01-01

    Standard distributions are ubiquitous but not unique. With suitable scaling, the graph of a standard distribution serves as the graph for every distribution in the family. The standard exponential can easily be taught in elementary statistics courses.

  13. Decidability, Behavioural Equivalences and Infinite Transition Graphs 

    E-print Network

    Hüttel, Hans

    This thesis studies behavioural equivalences on labelled infinite transition graphs and the role that they can play in the context of modal logics and notions from language theory. A natural class of such infinite graphs ...

  14. Optimization in Geometric Graphs: Complexity and Approximation 

    E-print Network

    Kahruman-Anderoglu, Sera

    2011-02-22

    We consider several related problems arising in geometric graphs. In particular, we investigate the computational complexity and approximability properties of several optimization problems in unit ball graphs and develop algorithms to find exact...

  15. Summary: beyond fault trees to fault graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Prassinos, P.; Smith, C.F.

    1984-09-01

    Fault Graphs are the natural evolutionary step over a traditional fault-tree model. A Fault Graph is a failure-oriented directed graph with logic connectives that allows cycles. We intentionally construct the Fault Graph to trace the piping and instrumentation drawing (P and ID) of the system, but with logical AND and OR conditions added. Then we evaluate the Fault Graph with computer codes based on graph-theoretic methods. Fault Graph computer codes are based on graph concepts, such as path set (a set of nodes traveled on a path from one node to another) and reachability (the complete set of all possible paths between any two nodes). These codes are used to find the cut-sets (any minimal set of component failures that will fail the system) and to evaluate the system reliability.

  16. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes)more »which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.« less

  17. Graphes et Reseaux Biologiques, Concepts et Algorithmes Graphes et Reseaux Biologiques, Concepts et

    E-print Network

    Tichit, Laurent

    Graphes et R´eseaux Biologiques, Concepts et Algorithmes Graphes et R´eseaux Biologiques, Concepts et Algorithmes L. Tichit 18 novembre 2014 1/27 #12;Graphes et R´eseaux Biologiques, Concepts et Algorithmes Transparents Christine 1-2 2/27 #12;Graphes et R´eseaux Biologiques, Concepts et Algorithmes D

  18. Graphs-at-a-time: Query Language and Access Methods for Graph Databases

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Graphs-at-a-time: Query Language and Access Methods for Graph Databases Huahai He Department. We propose a query language for graph databases that supports arbitrary attributes on nodes, edges that are centered on graph data. Existing data models, query languages, and database systems do not offer adequate

  19. Graph Database Indexing Using Structured Graph Decomposition David W. Williams, 2

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    Graph Database Indexing Using Structured Graph Decomposition 1 David W. Williams, 2 Jun Huan, 1 Wei@ittc.ku.edu Abstract We introduce a novel method of indexing graph databases in order to facilitate subgraph is a directed acyclic graph which contains a node for each of the unique, induced subgraphs of the database

  20. GraphDB: Modeling and Querying Graphs in Databases Ralf Hartmut Gting

    E-print Network

    Güting, Ralf Hartmut

    GraphDB: Modeling and Querying Graphs in Databases Ralf Hartmut Güting Praktische Informatik IV as nodes, edges, and explicitly stored paths of a graph (which is the whole database instance of the database graph. A powerful rewrite operation is offered for the mani­ pulation of heterogeneous sequences

  1. GraphDB: A Data Model and Query Language for Graphs in Databases

    E-print Network

    Güting, Ralf Hartmut

    GraphDB: A Data Model and Query Language for Graphs in Databases Ralf Hartmut Güting Praktische as nodes, edges, and explicitly stored paths of a graph (which is the whole database instance of the database graph. A powerful rewrite operation is offered for the manipulation of hetereogeneous sequences

  2. Age, skill, and management.

    PubMed

    Singleton, W T

    1983-01-01

    Although laboratory-based studies would suggest that most human attributes decay with age, almost all organizations and communities appoint individuals aged about fifty-five years as their policy-makers and leaders. Some human attributes which may improve with age are described from a series of skills analyses of managers. The older manager is more acceptable because he or she is less personally competitive, more capable of taking a global view concentrating on essentials, more veridical, more tolerant, more directional, and more aware of his or her own assets, limitations, and biases. PMID:6671801

  3. Graph Analytics for Signature Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Lo, Chaomei

    2013-06-01

    Within large amounts of seemingly unstructured data it can be diffcult to find signatures of events. In our work we transform unstructured data into a graph representation. By doing this we expose underlying structure in the data and can take advantage of existing graph analytics capabilities, as well as develop new capabilities. Currently we focus on applications in cybersecurity and communication domains. Within cybersecurity we aim to find signatures for perpetrators using the pass-the-hash attack, and in communications we look for emails or phone calls going up or down a chain of command. In both of these areas, and in many others, the signature we look for is a path with certain temporal properties. In this paper we discuss our methodology for finding these temporal paths within large graphs.

  4. Quantum Snake Walk on Graphs

    E-print Network

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2010-01-01

    I introduce a new type of continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states which most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. No efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  5. Quantum Snake Walk on Graphs

    E-print Network

    Ansis Rosmanis

    2010-08-18

    I introduce a new type of continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states which most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. No efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  6. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-02-01

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  7. Graph modeling systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Neergaard, Mike

    2015-10-13

    An apparatus and a method for vulnerability and reliability modeling are provided. The method generally includes constructing a graph model of a physical network using a computer, the graph model including a plurality of terminating vertices to represent nodes in the physical network, a plurality of edges to represent transmission paths in the physical network, and a non-terminating vertex to represent a non-nodal vulnerability along a transmission path in the physical network. The method additionally includes evaluating the vulnerability and reliability of the physical network using the constructed graph model, wherein the vulnerability and reliability evaluation includes a determination of whether each terminating and non-terminating vertex represents a critical point of failure. The method can be utilized to evaluate wide variety of networks, including power grid infrastructures, communication network topologies, and fluid distribution systems.

  8. Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T.

    2009-07-01

    Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

  9. Quantum snake walk on graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmanis, Ansis

    2011-02-15

    I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

  10. Interpreting the Constitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, William J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses constitutional interpretations relating to capital punishment and protection of human dignity. Points out the document's effectiveness in creating a new society by adapting its principles to current problems and needs. Considers two views of the Constitution that lead to controversy over the legitimacy of judicial decisions. (PS)

  11. Children's Interpretation of Dissolving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longden, Ken; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Children of 2 different age groups (11-12, n=246; and 13-14, n=196) were asked to draw and write about dissolving in 2 different ways. Greater percentage of children at both ages gave accurate particle interpretation that accurate view of observable process. Consistency between two ways of looking at dissolving was not found to improve with age.…

  12. DNA Mixture Interpretation

    E-print Network

    interpretation #12;Father's Sperm Mother's Egg Child's Cell Father's Sperm Mother's Egg Father contributes: 22 Showing Possible Genotype Combinations (from Genetic Inheritance) A B A AA AB B AB BB p q p p2 pq q pq q2 pq + pq = 2pq Allele Frequencies Parental Alleles Child Genotypes father mother father mother

  13. Tokens: Facts and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmandt-Besserat, Denise

    1986-01-01

    Summarizes some of the major pieces of evidence concerning the archeological clay tokens, specifically the technique for their manufacture, their geographic distribution, chronology, and the context in which they are found. Discusses the interpretation of tokens as the first example of visible language, particularly as an antecedent of Sumerian…

  14. Interpreting & Biomechanics. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet-Northeast, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) refers to a collection of disorders associated with nerves, muscles, tendons, bones, and the neurovascular (nerves and related blood vessels) system. CTD symptoms may involve the neck, back, shoulders, arms, wrists, or hands. Interpreters with CTD may experience a variety of symptoms including: pain, joint…

  15. Social Maladjustment: An Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center, David B.

    The exclusionary term, "social maladjustment," the definition in Public Law 94-142 (the Education for All Handicapped Children Act) of serious emotional disturbance, has been an enigma for special education. This paper attempts to limit the interpretation of social maladjustment in order to counter effects of such decisions as "Honig vs. Doe" in…

  16. Big Learning with Graphs Joseph Gonzalez

    E-print Network

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Big Learning with Graphs Joseph Gonzalez jegonzal@cs.cmu.edu Yucheng Low Billion Flickr Photos The Age of Big Data 2 "... data a new class;3 Big Data Big Graphs #12;Social Media · Graphs encode rela6onships between

  17. BRICS'2001 Lecture 4 Graph Polynomials

    E-print Network

    Makowsky, Johann A. "Janos"

    BRICS'2001 Lecture 4 Graph Polynomials Coloured Tutte Polynomials Graph polynomials and Splitting, Israel janos@cs.technion.ac.il http://www.cs.technion.ac.il/¸janos 1 BRICS'2001 Lecture 4 Some References for Graphs of Bounded Tree Width, submitted to MFCS'00. 2 BRICS'2001 Lecture 4 Some References, II ffl T

  18. The competition numbers of complete tripartite graphs

    E-print Network

    The competition numbers of complete tripartite graphs SUH-RYUNG KIM Department of Mathematics For a graph G, it is known to be a hard problem to compute the competition number k(G) of the graph G in general. In this paper, we give an explicit formula for the competition numbers of complete tripartite

  19. Chromatic capacity and graph operations Jack Huizenga

    E-print Network

    Huizenga, Jack

    are concerned, Greene proves in [8, Theorem 2] that cap(G)2 ln cap(G) > (1 - o(1)) · (G)2 2n for any graph G's Conjecture states that there exists an unbounded function f: N N such that cap(G) f((G)) for every graph GChromatic capacity and graph operations Jack Huizenga Department of Mathematics, Harvard University

  20. A Parallel Graph Partitioner for STAPL 

    E-print Network

    Castet, Nicolas

    2013-04-26

    and model many types of relations is the graph. A mesh, which is a special type of graph, is often used to model a spatial domain in scientific applications. Graph and mesh partitioning has many applications such as VLSI circuit design, parallel task...

  1. A practical heuristic for finding graph minors

    E-print Network

    Jun Cai; William G. Macready; Aidan Roy

    2014-06-10

    We present a heuristic algorithm for finding a graph $H$ as a minor of a graph $G$ that is practical for sparse $G$ and $H$ with hundreds of vertices. We also explain the practical importance of finding graph minors in mapping quadratic pseudo-boolean optimization problems onto an adiabatic quantum annealer.

  2. Ramanujan graphs with small girth. Yair Glasner

    E-print Network

    Glasner, Yair

    Ramanujan graphs with small girth. Yair Glasner Institute of Mathematics, The Hebrew University Jerusalem 91904, Israel Abstract: We construct an infinite family of (q+1)-regular Ramanujan graphs Xn-mail: yairgl@math.huji.ac.il 1 #12;1 Introduction Ramanujan graphs were first introduced by Lubotzky Phillips

  3. NOT EVERY UNIFORM TREE COVERS RAMANUJAN GRAPHS

    E-print Network

    Smirnova-Nagnibeda, Tatiana

    NOT EVERY UNIFORM TREE COVERS RAMANUJAN GRAPHS Alexander Lubotzky and Tatiana Nagnibeda Abstract. The notion of Ramanujan graph has been extended to not necessarily regular graphs by Y. Greenberg. We construct infinite trees with infinitely many finite quotients, none of which is Ramanujan. We give

  4. Discriminative Feature Selection for Uncertain Graph Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangnan; Yu, Philip S.; Wang, Xue; Ragin, Ann B.

    2015-01-01

    Mining discriminative features for graph data has attracted much attention in recent years due to its important role in constructing graph classifiers, generating graph indices, etc. Most measurement of interestingness of discriminative subgraph features are defined on certain graphs, where the structure of graph objects are certain, and the binary edges within each graph represent the “presence” of linkages among the nodes. In many real-world applications, however, the linkage structure of the graphs is inherently uncertain. Therefore, existing measurements of interestingness based upon certain graphs are unable to capture the structural uncertainty in these applications effectively. In this paper, we study the problem of discriminative subgraph feature selection from uncertain graphs. This problem is challenging and different from conventional subgraph mining problems because both the structure of the graph objects and the discrimination score of each subgraph feature are uncertain. To address these challenges, we propose a novel discriminative subgraph feature selection method, Dug, which can find discriminative subgraph features in uncertain graphs based upon different statistical measures including expectation, median, mode and ?-probability. We first compute the probability distribution of the discrimination scores for each subgraph feature based on dynamic programming. Then a branch-and-bound algorithm is proposed to search for discriminative subgraphs efficiently. Extensive experiments on various neuroimaging applications (i.e., Alzheimers Disease, ADHD and HIV) have been performed to analyze the gain in performance by taking into account structural uncertainties in identifying discriminative subgraph features for graph classification. PMID:25949925

  5. Growing Fat Graphs A. Efrat, S. Kobourov,

    E-print Network

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    Growing Fat Graphs A. Efrat, S. Kobourov, M. Stepp and C. Wenk Dept. of Computer Science University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 1. INTRODUCTION We present an algorithm for growing fat graphs. Tradi­ tionally, or to convey some additional informa­ tion. We show how to grow fat graphs with edges of variable thickness

  6. Growing Fat Graphs A. Efrat, S. Kobourov,

    E-print Network

    Kobourov, Stephen G.

    Growing Fat Graphs A. Efrat, S. Kobourov, M. Stepp and C. Wenk Dept. of Computer Science University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 1. INTRODUCTION We present an algorithm for growing fat graphs. Tradi- tionally, or to convey some additional informa- tion. We show how to grow fat graphs with edges of variable thickness

  7. Evolving Graph Databases under Description Logic Constraints

    E-print Network

    Calvanese, Diego

    Evolving Graph Databases under Description Logic Constraints Diego Calvanese1,2 , Magdalena Ortiz2 Graph databases are gaining increasing importance due to the adoption of data formats like RDF of managing classical relational databases are also relevant for graph databases. For instance

  8. Some Applications of Graph Theory to Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, Lawrence J.

    1974-01-01

    The connection between graph theory and clustering is reviewed and extended. Major emphasis is on restating, in a graph-theoretic context, selected past work in clustering, and conversely, developing alternative strategies from several standard concepts used in graph theory per se. (Author/RC)

  9. Comparing Graph Similarity Measures for Graphical Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouili, Salim; Tabbone, Salvatore; Valveny, Ernest

    In this paper we evaluate four graph distance measures. The analysis is performed for document retrieval tasks. For this aim, different kind of documents are used including line drawings (symbols), ancient documents (ornamental letters), shapes and trademark-logos. The experimental results show that the performance of each graph distance measure depends on the kind of data and the graph representation technique.

  10. Minimum Spanning Trees weighted graph API

    E-print Network

    Wu, Xiaolin

    1 Minimum Spanning Trees weighted graph API cycles and cuts Kruskal's algorithm Prim's algorithm of the evolutionary spirit." - Gordon Gecko #12;9 weighted graph API cycles and cuts Kruskal's algorithm Prim's algorithm advanced topics #12;10 Weighted Graph API iterate through all edges (once in each direction

  11. Geometric Properties of Assur Graphs Brigitte Servatius

    E-print Network

    Shai, Offer

    Geometric Properties of Assur Graphs Brigitte Servatius Offer Shai Walter Whiteley January 9, 2008 frameworks - Assur graphs - which arise in the analy- sis of mechanical linkages. In this paper we further explore the geometric properties of Assur graphs, with a focus on singular realizations which have static

  12. Avoiding Differences Spanning Trees in Grid Graphs

    E-print Network

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Avoiding Differences Spanning Trees in Grid Graphs The Firefighter Problem Automated Proof and Discovery #12;Avoiding Differences Spanning Trees in Grid Graphs The Firefighter Problem Automated Proof and Discovery #12;Avoiding Differences Spanning Trees in Grid Graphs The Firefighter Problem Outline 1 Avoiding

  13. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  14. A heuristic algorithm for graph isomorphism 

    E-print Network

    Torres Navarro, Luz

    1999-01-01

    polynomial time algorithm O(n?), ISO-MT, that seems' to solve the graph isomorphism decision problem correctly for all classes of graphs. Our algorithm is extremely useful from the practical point of view since counter examples (pairs of graphs for which our...

  15. Student Learning Outcomes for Religious Studies Graduate Program SLO 1: Critical Skills for the Study of Religion: Theory, Method and

    E-print Network

    Aazhang, Behnaam

    : Critical Skills for the Study of Religion: Theory, Method and (Inter)Disciplinarity Develop and apply critical toolkit to the study of religion and religious, Social and Cultural Dimensions of Religion Understand and interpret religious

  16. Competency Assessment in Senior Emergency Medicine Residents for Core Ultrasound Skills

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jessica N.; Kendall, John; Smalley, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quality resident education in point-of-care ultrasound (POC US) is becoming increasingly important in emergency medicine (EM); however, the best methods to evaluate competency in graduating residents has not been established. We sought to design and implement a rigorous assessment of image acquisition and interpretation in POC US in a cohort of graduating residents at our institution. Methods We evaluated nine senior residents in both image acquisition and image interpretation for five core US skills (focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), aorta, echocardiogram (ECHO), pelvic, central line placement). Image acquisition, using an observed clinical skills exam (OSCE) directed assessment with a standardized patient model. Image interpretation was measured with a multiple-choice exam including normal and pathologic images. Results Residents performed well on image acquisition for core skills with an average score of 85.7% for core skills and 74% including advanced skills (ovaries, advanced ECHO, advanced aorta). Residents scored well but slightly lower on image interpretation with an average score of 76%. Conclusion Senior residents performed well on core POC US skills as evaluated with a rigorous assessment tool. This tool may be developed further for other EM programs to use for graduating resident evaluation. PMID:26594291

  17. Discrete Applied Mathematics 113 (2001) 143166 Diameter determination on restricted graph families

    E-print Network

    Dragan, Feodor F.

    2001-01-01

    ,14], ptolemaic graphs [14], strongly chordal graphs, dually chordal graphs [2], distance­hereditary graphs [11,13] and for graphs of benzenoid systems [4]. It is not yet clear for general graphs whether computing the diameter

  18. A framework of joint graph embedding and sparse regression for dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Xiaoshuang Shi; Zhenhua Guo; Zhihui Lai; Yujiu Yang; Zhifeng Bao; Zhang, David

    2015-04-01

    Over the past few decades, a large number of algorithms have been developed for dimensionality reduction. Despite the different motivations of these algorithms, they can be interpreted by a common framework known as graph embedding. In order to explore the significant features of data, some sparse regression algorithms have been proposed based on graph embedding. However, the problem is that these algorithms include two separate steps: (1) embedding learning and (2) sparse regression. Thus their performance is largely determined by the effectiveness of the constructed graph. In this paper, we present a framework by combining the objective functions of graph embedding and sparse regression so that embedding learning and sparse regression can be jointly implemented and optimized, instead of simply using the graph spectral for sparse regression. By the proposed framework, supervised, semisupervised, and unsupervised learning algorithms could be unified. Furthermore, we analyze two situations of the optimization problem for the proposed framework. By adopting an ?2,1-norm regularization for the proposed framework, it can perform feature selection and subspace learning simultaneously. Experiments on seven standard databases demonstrate that joint graph embedding and sparse regression method can significantly improve the recognition performance and consistently outperform the sparse regression method. PMID:25706635

  19. Peer Assessment of Soft Skills and Hard Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Aimao

    2012-01-01

    Both the information technology (IT) industry and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) demand soft-skill training in higher education and require IT graduates to demonstrate competence in interpersonal communication, teamwork, and conflict management. Group projects provide teamwork environment for soft-skill training, but…

  20. Generic ICT Skills Profiles: Future Skills for Tomorrow's World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Co-operation Europe Ltd. (ICEL), Brussels, Belgium.

    This document describes generic skills profiles relevant to key jobs in information and communications technology (ICT). The profiles cover the main job areas for which the ICT industry is experiencing skills shortages. These types of information are provided for 18 generic job profiles: job description (vision, role, lifestyle); examples of job…

  1. Skill and Skilled Memory. Final Report. Research Report 04206.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staszewski, James J.

    Two longitudinal studies of expert-level cognitive skills and their acquisition are reported. The first study focused on the skill of an otherwise normal subject who increased his digit-span to over 100 digits with 4.5 years of practice using the mnemonic system developed by W. G. Chase and K. A. Ericsson. The second study followed two college…

  2. Evaluation of Psychotherapeutic Interpretations

    PubMed Central

    POGGE, DAVID L.; DOUGHER, MICHAEL J.

    1992-01-01

    If much psychotherapy literature goes unread and unused by therapists, one reason may be the apparent irrelevance of theory-derived hypotheses to actual practice. Methods that uncover tacit knowledge that practicing therapists already possess can provide the empirical basis for more relevant theories and the testing of more meaningful hypotheses. This study demonstrates application of the phenomenological method to the question of evaluating psychotherapy. To discover how experienced psychotherapists evaluate interpretations made in actual psychotherapy sessions, therapists were asked to evaluate such interpretations from videotapes; analysis of responses yielded a set of 10 dimensions of evaluation. Such methods offer both practical utility and a source of theoretical growth anchored in the real world of the practicing therapist. PMID:22700101

  3. Physical Interpretion of Antigravity

    E-print Network

    Bars, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Geodesic incompleteness is a problem in both general relativity and string theory. The Weyl invariant Standard Model coupled to General Relativity (SM+GR), and a similar treatment of string theory, are improved theories that are geodesically complete. A notable prediction of this approach is that there must be antigravity regions of spacetime connected to gravity regions through gravitational singularities such as those that occur in black holes and cosmological bang/crunch. Antigravity regions introduce apparent problems of ghosts that raise several questions of physical interpretation. It was shown that unitarity is not violated but there may be an instability associated with negative kinetic energies in the antigravity regions. In this paper we show that the apparent problems can be resolved with the interpretation of the theory from the perspective of observers strictly in the gravity region. Such observers cannot experience the negative kinetic energy in antigravity directly, but can only detect in and o...

  4. Semantic interpretation of nominalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, R.D.; Gomez, F.

    1996-12-31

    A computational approach to the semantic interpretation of nominalizations is described. Interpretation of normalizations involves three tasks: deciding whether the normalization is being used in a verbal or non-verbal sense; disambiguating the normalized verb when a verbal sense is used; and determining the fillers of the thematic roles of the verbal concept or predicate of the nominalization. A verbal sense can be recognized by the presence of modifiers that represent the arguments of the verbal concept. It is these same modifiers which provide the semantic clues to disambiguate the normalized verb. In the absence of explicit modifiers, heuristics are used to discriminate between verbal and non-verbal senses. A correspondence between verbs and their nominalizations is exploited so that only a small amount of additional knowledge is needed to handle the nominal form. These methods are tested in the domain of encyclopedic texts and the results are shown.

  5. Children of Somali Refugees in Australian Schools: Self-Descriptions of School-Related Skills and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Agnes E.; Lawrence, Jeanette A.; Karantzas, Kellie; Brooker, Abi; Lin, Ying Han; Champness, Vivienne; Albert, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    We examined self-descriptions of children of Somali refugee families in Australian primary schools, focusing on how children's school-related skills and needs relate to the interpretive frames of mainstream and ethnic cultures. Three groups of Grade 5 and 6 children (Somali, Disadvantaged, Advantaged) made choices among school-related skills, and…

  6. Games on graphs Milos Stojakovic

    E-print Network

    Stojakovic, Milos

    Games on graphs Milos Stojakovi´c Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Novi Sad, Serbia milos.stojakovic@dmi.uns.ac.rs http://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/smilos/ Abstract. Positional Games is a branch of Combinatorics which focuses on a variety of two player games, ranging from well-known games

  7. Ancestral Genres of Mathematical Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing from sources in gesture studies, cognitive science, the anthropology of religion and art/architecture history, this article explores cultural, bodily and cosmological resonances carried (unintentionally) by mathematical graphs on Cartesian coordinates. Concepts of asymmetric bodily spaces, grids, orthogonality, mapping and sacred spaces…

  8. Two-Player Graph Pebbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudente, Matthew James

    Given a graph G with pebbles on the vertices, we define a pebbling move as removing two pebbles from a vertex u, placing one pebble on a neighbor v, and discarding the other pebble, like a toll. The pebbling number pi( G) is the least number of pebbles needed so that every arrangement of pi(G) pebbles can place a pebble on any vertex through a sequence of pebbling moves. We introduce a new variation on graph pebbling called two-player pebbling. In this, players called the mover and the defender alternate moves, with the stipulation that the defender cannot reverse the previous move. The mover wins only if they can place a pebble on a specified vertex and the defender wins if the mover cannot. We define ?(G), analogously, as the minimum number of pebbles such that given every configuration of the ?( G) pebbles and every specified vertex r, the mover has a winning strategy. First, we will investigate upper bounds for ?( G) on various classes of graphs and find a certain structure for which the defender has a winning strategy, no matter how many pebbles are in a configuration. Then, we characterize winning configurations for both players on a special class of diameter 2 graphs. Finally, we show winning configurations for the mover on paths using a recursive argument.

  9. Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Danrun

    2005-01-01

    General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

  10. Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

  11. Humidity Graphs for All Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esmael, F.

    1982-01-01

    In a previous article in this journal (Vol. 17, p358, 1979), a wet-bulb depression table was recommended for two simple experiments to determine relative humidity. However, the use of a graph is suggested because it gives the relative humidity directly from the wet and dry bulb readings. (JN)

  12. Interpreting Deer Harvest Records. 

    E-print Network

    Guynn, Dwight E.

    1984-01-01

    Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter. Director College Station B-1486 People Helping People Interpreting Deer Harvest Records LIB ARY Dwight f. Guynn* JUN 11 1985 Deer harvest records are extremely important to proper deer herd man... of the jaw teeth. A publication de scribing this technique is available from the Texas Agricultural Extension Service (8-1453 The Age of a Deer). How to Arrange Oata and Calculations Arrangement of harvest data by ages is very important...

  13. Uniquely K_r-Saturated Graphs

    E-print Network

    Hartke, Stephen G

    2012-01-01

    A graph G is uniquely K_r-saturated if it contains no clique with r vertices and if for all edges e in the complement, G + e has a unique clique with r vertices. Previously, few examples of uniquely K_r-saturated graphs were known, and little was known about their properties. We search for these graphs by adapting orbital branching, a technique originally developed for symmetric integer linear programs. We find several new uniquely K_r-saturated graphs with 4 \\leq r \\leq 7, as well as two new infinite families based on Cayley graphs for Z_n with a small number of generators.

  14. Exploring Complex Graphs by Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadi?, Bosiljka

    2003-04-01

    We present an algorithm to grow a graph with scale-free structure of {\\it in-} and {\\it out-links} and variable wiring diagram in the class of the world-wide Web. We then explore the graph by intentional random walks using local next-near-neighbor search algorithm to navigate through the graph. The topological properties such as betweenness are determined by an ensemble of independent walkers and efficiency of the search is compared on three different graph topologies. In addition we simulate interacting random walks which are created by given rate and navigated in parallel, representing transport with queueing of information packets on the graph.

  15. Quantum scattering theory on graphs with tails

    E-print Network

    Martin Varbanov; Todd A. Brun

    2009-06-18

    We consider quantum walks on a finite graphs to which infinite tails are attached. We explore how the propagating and bound states depend on the structure of the finite graph. The S-matrix for such graphs is defined. Its unitarity is proved as well as some other of its properties such as its transformation under time reversal. A spectral decomposition of the identity for the Hamiltonian of the graph is derived using its eigenvectors. We derive formulas for the S-matrix of a graph under certain operation such as cutting a tail, attaching a tail or connecting two tails to form an edge.

  16. Interpreting uncertainty terms.

    PubMed

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Uncertainty terms (e.g., some, possible, good, etc.) are words that do not have a fixed referent and hence are relatively ambiguous. A model is proposed that specifies how, from the hearer's perspective, recognition of facework as a potential motive for the use of an uncertainty term results in a calibration of the intended meaning of that term. Four experiments are reported that examine the impact of face threat, and the variables that affect it (e.g., power), on the manner in which a variety of uncertainty terms (probability terms, quantifiers, frequency terms, etc.) are interpreted. Overall, the results demonstrate that increased face threat in a situation will result in a more negative interpretation of an utterance containing an uncertainty term. That the interpretation of so many different types of uncertainty terms is affected in the same way suggests the operation of a fundamental principle of language use, one with important implications for the communication of risk, subjective experience, and so on. PMID:25090127

  17. Radiology interpretation process modeling.

    PubMed

    Noumeir, Rita

    2006-04-01

    Information and communication technology in healthcare promises optimized patient care while ensuring efficiency and cost-effectiveness. However, the promised results are not yet achieved; the healthcare process requires analysis and radical redesign to achieve improvements in care quality and productivity. Healthcare process reengineering is thus necessary and involves modeling its workflow. Even though the healthcare process is very large and not very well modeled yet, its sub-processes can be modeled individually, providing fundamental pieces of the whole model. In this paper, we are interested in modeling the radiology interpretation process that results in generating a diagnostic radiology report. This radiology report is an important clinical element of the patient healthcare record and assists in healthcare decisions. We present the radiology interpretation process by identifying its boundaries and by positioning it on the large healthcare process map. Moreover, we discuss an information data model and identify roles, tasks and several information flows. Furthermore, we describe standard frameworks to enable radiology interpretation workflow implementations between heterogeneous systems. PMID:16165403

  18. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach ? = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = ?0.67; 95% CI ?0.78 to ?0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research.

  19. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, Aaron V

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  20. Fast Approximate Quadratic Programming for Graph Matching

    PubMed Central

    Vogelstein, Joshua T.; Conroy, John M.; Lyzinski, Vince; Podrazik, Louis J.; Kratzer, Steven G.; Harley, Eric T.; Fishkind, Donniell E.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob; Priebe, Carey E.

    2015-01-01

    Quadratic assignment problems arise in a wide variety of domains, spanning operations research, graph theory, computer vision, and neuroscience, to name a few. The graph matching problem is a special case of the quadratic assignment problem, and graph matching is increasingly important as graph-valued data is becoming more prominent. With the aim of efficiently and accurately matching the large graphs common in big data, we present our graph matching algorithm, the Fast Approximate Quadratic assignment algorithm. We empirically demonstrate that our algorithm is faster and achieves a lower objective value on over 80% of the QAPLIB benchmark library, compared with the previous state-of-the-art. Applying our algorithm to our motivating example, matching C. elegans connectomes (brain-graphs), we find that it efficiently achieves performance. PMID:25886624

  1. The Anatomy of the Facebook Social Graph

    E-print Network

    Ugander, Johan; Backstrom, Lars; Marlow, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    We study the structure of the social graph of active Facebook users, the largest social network ever analyzed. We compute numerous features of the graph including the number of users and friendships, the degree distribution, path lengths, clustering, and mixing patterns. Our results center around three main observations. First, we characterize the global structure of the graph, determining that the social network is nearly fully connected, with 99.91% of individuals belonging to a single large connected component, and we confirm the "six degrees of separation" phenomenon on a global scale. Second, by studying the average local clustering coefficient and degeneracy of graph neighborhoods, we show that while the Facebook graph as a whole is clearly sparse, the graph neighborhoods of users contain surprisingly dense structure. Third, we characterize the assortativity patterns present in the graph by studying the basic demographic and network properties of users. We observe clear degree assortativity and characte...

  2. On a programming language for graph algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinboldt, W. C.; Basili, V. R.; Mesztenyi, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    An algorithmic language, GRAAL, is presented for describing and implementing graph algorithms of the type primarily arising in applications. The language is based on a set algebraic model of graph theory which defines the graph structure in terms of morphisms between certain set algebraic structures over the node set and arc set. GRAAL is modular in the sense that the user specifies which of these mappings are available with any graph. This allows flexibility in the selection of the storage representation for different graph structures. In line with its set theoretic foundation, the language introduces sets as a basic data type and provides for the efficient execution of all set and graph operators. At present, GRAAL is defined as an extension of ALGOL 60 (revised) and its formal description is given as a supplement to the syntactic and semantic definition of ALGOL. Several typical graph algorithms are written in GRAAL to illustrate various features of the language and to show its applicability.

  3. Explicit spectral formulas for scaling quantum graphs.

    PubMed

    Dabaghian, Yu; Blümel, R

    2004-10-01

    We present an exact analytical solution of the spectral problem of quasi-one-dimensional scaling quantum graphs. Strongly stochastic in the classical limit, these systems are frequently employed as models of quantum chaos. We show that despite their classical stochasticity all scaling quantum graphs are explicitly solvable in the form E(n) =f (n) , where n is the sequence number of the energy level of the quantum graph and f is a known function, which depends only on the physical and geometrical properties of the quantum graph. Our method of solution motivates a new classification scheme for quantum graphs: we show that each quantum graph can be uniquely assigned an integer m reflecting its level of complexity. We show that a network of taut strings with piecewise constant mass density provides an experimentally realizable analogue system of scaling quantum graphs. PMID:15600494

  4. Meeting the Demand: Teaching "Soft" Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, William J.; Logan, Joyce; Smith, Sheila M.; Szul, Linda F.

    This document contains four papers (and an introduction by William Wilhelm) on teaching "soft" skills in business education programs. "The Skill Building Challenge: Preparing a Bridge for the Workforce Skills Gap" (Sheila M. Smith) examines the following topics: the workforce skills gap; the importance of academic and behavioral skills; and public…

  5. Rhythmic and Vocal Creativity Builds Music Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, James D.

    2004-01-01

    The development of music skills, particularly performance skills, is often considered separate from creativity until music skills can be used in a creative way. Though an accumulation of music skills is necessary for high levels of creativity, a student's creativity can in turn develop music skills, and the primary grades (K--2) are the ideal…

  6. What is the difference between the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph are two key data structures in the studies of genome rearrangements and genome assembly. However, the classical breakpoint graphs are defined on two genomes (represented as sequences of synteny blocks), while the classical de Bruijn graphs are defined on a single genome (represented as DNA strings). Thus, the connection between these two graph models is not explicit. We generalize the notions of both the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph, and make it transparent that the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph are mathematically equivalent. The explicit description of the connection between these important data structures provides a bridge between two previously separated bioinformatics communities studying genome rearrangements and genome assembly. PMID:25572416

  7. Basic Skills in Asian Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, James

    This publication contains field tested learning activities which will help secondary students develop basic skills while learning about Asian history, culture, and geography. The activities can be used or easily adapted by teachers in any Asian studies course. The publication is organized by the skills taught. These are: reading; applying…

  8. High Scores but Low Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Liqun; Neilson, William S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper college admissions are based on test scores and students can exert two types of effort: real learning and exam preparation. The former improves skills but the latter is more effective in raising test scores. In this setting the students with the lowest skills are no longer the ones with the lowest aptitude, but instead are the ones…

  9. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This booklet contains draft national health care skill standards that were proposed during the National Health Care Skill Standards Project on the basis of input from more than 1,000 representatives of key constituencies of the health care field. The project objectives and structure are summarized in the introduction. Part 1 examines the need for…

  10. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  11. The Humanities and Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue present a rationale and methods for using elements of the humanities to teach remedial reading and writing. The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "The Humanities and Basic Skills Project" (Nan Dougherty); (2) "The Humanities and Basic Skills" (Robert L. Horn); (3) "Beyond Fragmentation;…

  12. Classroom Activities in Thinking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Janice, Comp.

    Intended as a resource for teachers of grades four and up who are eager to improve their students' thinking skills while teaching their regular curriculum, this booklet contains activities that can be used to teach a new concept or to review a previously taught skill. Following an introduction, the topics of the chapters of the resource guide and…

  13. Assessing Pupils' Skills in Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammann, Marcus; Phan, Thi Thanh Hoi; Ehmer, Maike; Grimm, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    This study is concerned with different forms of assessment of pupils' skills in experimentation. The findings of three studies are reported. Study 1 investigates whether it is possible to develop reliable multiple-choice tests for the skills of forming hypotheses, designing experiments and analysing experimental data. Study 2 compares scores from…

  14. Putting Skill in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that a focus on human capability and its development can be used to rethink the high skills policy visions favoured over recent decades. The article briefly summarises the increasing concerns with government policy formulas which have adopted a narrow focus such that skill and its accreditation is regarded as the outcome rather…

  15. Evaluation of Word Attack Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follettie, Joseph F.

    A framework for more apt and sensitive evaluation of generalized word attack skill--the heart of oral reading skill--is presented. The paper envisions the design and development of oral reading instruction as bounded by a fully-specified evaluation scheme. (Author)

  16. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 33 skill sheets for agricultural mechanics was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Some sheets teach operational procedures while others are for simple projects. Each skill sheet covers a single topic and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step construction or operational…

  17. Canada's Crisis in Advanced Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The key to economic and social development lies in the knowledge and skill base of human capital. This report, presented to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance, calls for vigorous action on the part of the Government of Canada, in concert with the provinces and territories, to protect the Canadian economy from a skills shortage…

  18. Evidence for Multiple Rhythmic Skills.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms, or patterns in time, play a vital role in both speech and music. Proficiency in a number of rhythm skills has been linked to language ability, suggesting that certain rhythmic processes in music and language rely on overlapping resources. However, a lack of understanding about how rhythm skills relate to each other has impeded progress in understanding how language relies on rhythm processing. In particular, it is unknown whether all rhythm skills are linked together, forming a single broad rhythmic competence, or whether there are multiple dissociable rhythm skills. We hypothesized that beat tapping and rhythm memory/sequencing form two separate clusters of rhythm skills. This hypothesis was tested with a battery of two beat tapping and two rhythm memory tests. Here we show that tapping to a metronome and the ability to adjust to a changing tempo while tapping to a metronome are related skills. The ability to remember rhythms and to drum along to repeating rhythmic sequences are also related. However, we found no relationship between beat tapping skills and rhythm memory skills. Thus, beat tapping and rhythm memory are dissociable rhythmic aptitudes. This discovery may inform future research disambiguating how distinct rhythm competencies track with specific language functions. PMID:26376489

  19. 21st Century Skills Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21) has forged alliances with key national organizations representing the core academic subjects, including Social Studies, English, Math, Science, Geography, World Languages and the Arts. These collaborations have resulted in the development of 21st Century Skills Maps that illustrate the essential…

  20. Business Financial Occupations: Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Decatur, GA.

    This report organizes the information provided by 71 individuals in finance-related occupations in 11 states into skills inventories for persons in these jobs. The skills inventories contain the following sections: (1) occupation-specific knowledge (communication, mathematics, science); (2) workplace behaviors (work ethics, interpersonal…

  1. Evidence for Multiple Rhythmic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Tierney, Adam; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms, or patterns in time, play a vital role in both speech and music. Proficiency in a number of rhythm skills has been linked to language ability, suggesting that certain rhythmic processes in music and language rely on overlapping resources. However, a lack of understanding about how rhythm skills relate to each other has impeded progress in understanding how language relies on rhythm processing. In particular, it is unknown whether all rhythm skills are linked together, forming a single broad rhythmic competence, or whether there are multiple dissociable rhythm skills. We hypothesized that beat tapping and rhythm memory/sequencing form two separate clusters of rhythm skills. This hypothesis was tested with a battery of two beat tapping and two rhythm memory tests. Here we show that tapping to a metronome and the ability to adjust to a changing tempo while tapping to a metronome are related skills. The ability to remember rhythms and to drum along to repeating rhythmic sequences are also related. However, we found no relationship between beat tapping skills and rhythm memory skills. Thus, beat tapping and rhythm memory are dissociable rhythmic aptitudes. This discovery may inform future research disambiguating how distinct rhythm competencies track with specific language functions. PMID:26376489

  2. Quality and Generic (Professional) Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Harpe, Barbara; Radloff, Alex; Wyber, John

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the business school at Australia's Curtin University of Technology has identified a set of generic skills to be taught to all undergraduates and begun implementing a project to teach and assess the skills in the context of each discipline. Discusses the project's measures of effectiveness and lessons learned to date. (EV)

  3. Hard evidence on soft skills?

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, James J.; Kautz, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent evidence on what achievement tests measure; how achievement tests relate to other measures of “cognitive ability” like IQ and grades; the important skills that achievement tests miss or mismeasure, and how much these skills matter in life. Achievement tests miss, or perhaps more accurately, do not adequately capture, soft skills—personality traits, goals, motivations, and preferences that are valued in the labor market, in school, and in many other domains. The larger message of this paper is that soft skills predict success in life, that they causally produce that success, and that programs that enhance soft skills have an important place in an effective portfolio of public policies. PMID:23559694

  4. Developing a Research Skill Set

    PubMed Central

    You, Y. Nancy; Bednarski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The recent decades have witnessed a significant expansion in the diversity of career paths within academic surgery. Although the skills for providing exemplary surgical care and for maintaining a strong work ethic are the foundations of an academic surgeon, deliberate career planning and organized acquisition of research skills contribute to the success of an academic career. In this article, we identify a set of core academic skills and propose a framework for acquiring them. We also describe specific career paths within academic surgery and provide an overview of the opportunities for acquiring specific skill sets. The development of an academic career is challenging, and firm knowledge of the personal motivations will sustain and endure the time needed for acquiring the needed skills. PMID:25067917

  5. Improving Learners' Research Process Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, T. K.; Hunter, L.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Seagroves, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Professional Development Program (PDP) supports participants as they design inquiry activities that help learners improve their research process skills. These skills include the cognitive or reasoning skills that scientists and engineers use while doing research; for example, making a testable hypothesis, coordinating results from multiple experiments, or identifying and evaluating tradeoffs. Past work in the PDP indicated that additional support was needed to help participants design instructional activities that would teach these important skills. A new workshop was therefore developed for the 2009 PDP cycle, entitled "Improving Learners' Process Skills." In this workshop, participants worked in small groups to define specific science and engineering skills found in four past PDP activity designs. Participants distinguished between "simple tasks" and "authentic inquiry" activities that learners could perform as demonstration of the skill. Through this new workshop, participants were able to explicitly discuss ways in which individual process skills are unique or inter-related. In addition, by identifying a "simple task," participants were able to pinpoint areas in which their own designs could be improved to better focus on authentic inquiry tasks. In 2010, the workshop was slightly modified to help participants reconnect the research process skills with the activity content. In addition, the idea of using generic and context-specific scaffolds was also introduced. To make the participants feel like they were contributing to the PDP community, four activity designs actively being worked on in the 2010 cycle were used. Based on participant feedback, this "Improving Learners' Process Skills" workshop should be strongly considered for future returning participants.

  6. Lamplighter groups, de Bruijn graphs, spider-web graphs and their spectra

    E-print Network

    Rostislav Grigorchuk; Paul-Henry Leemann; Tatiana Nagnibeda

    2015-05-05

    We describe the infinite family of spider-web graphs $S_{k,M,N }$, $k \\geq 2$, $M \\geq 1$ and $N \\geq 0$, studied in physical literature as tensor products of well-known de Brujin graphs $B_{k,N}$ and cyclic graphs $C_M$ and show that these graphs are Schreier graphs of the lamplighter groups $L_k = Z/kZ \\wr Z$. This allows us to compute their spectra and to identify the infinite limit of $S_{k,M,N}$, as $N, M \\to\\infty$, with the Cayley graph of the lamplighter group $L_k$.

  7. Cognitive and attitudinal predictors related to graphing achievement among pre-service elementary teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyjka, Sebastian P.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which six cognitive and attitudinal variables predicted pre-service elementary teachers' performance on line graphing. Predictors included Illinois teacher education basic skills sub-component scores in reading comprehension and mathematics, logical thinking performance scores, as well as measures of attitudes toward science, mathematics and graphing. This study also determined the strength of the relationship between each prospective predictor variable and the line graphing performance variable, as well as the extent to which measures of attitude towards science, mathematics and graphing mediated relationships between scores on mathematics, reading, logical thinking and line graphing. Ninety-four pre-service elementary education teachers enrolled in two different elementary science methods courses during the spring 2009 semester at Southern Illinois University Carbondale participated in this study. Each subject completed five different instruments designed to assess science, mathematics and graphing attitudes as well as logical thinking and graphing ability. Sixty subjects provided copies of primary basic skills score reports that listed subset scores for both reading comprehension and mathematics. The remaining scores were supplied by a faculty member who had access to a database from which the scores were drawn. Seven subjects, whose scores could not be found, were eliminated from final data analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted in order to establish validity and reliability of the Questionnaire of Attitude Toward Line Graphs in Science (QALGS) instrument. CFA tested the statistical hypothesis that the five main factor structures within the Questionnaire of Attitude Toward Statistical Graphs (QASG) would be maintained in the revised QALGS. Stepwise Regression Analysis with backward elimination was conducted in order to generate a parsimonious and precise predictive model. This procedure allowed the researcher to explore the relationships among the affective and cognitive variables that were included in the regression analysis. The results for CFA indicated that the revised QALGS measure was sound in its psychometric properties when tested against the QASG. Reliability statistics indicated that the overall reliability for the 32 items in the QALGS was .90. The learning preferences construct had the lowest reliability (.67), while enjoyment (.89), confidence (.86) and usefulness (.77) constructs had moderate to high reliabilities. The first four measurement models fit the data well as indicated by the appropriate descriptive and statistical indices. However, the fifth measurement model did not fit the data well statistically, and only fit well with two descriptive indices. The results addressing the research question indicated that mathematical and logical thinking ability were significant predictors of line graph performance among the remaining group of variables. These predictors accounted for 41% of the total variability on the line graph performance variable. Partial correlation coefficients indicated that mathematics ability accounted for 20.5% of the variance on the line graphing performance variable when removing the effect of logical thinking. The logical thinking variable accounted for 4.7% of the variance on the line graphing performance variable when removing the effect of mathematics ability.

  8. Europe's Skill Challenge: Lagging Skill Demand Increases Risks of Skill Mismatch. Briefing Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The main findings of Cedefop's latest skill demand and supply forecast for the European Union (EU) for 2010-20, indicate that although further economic troubles will affect the projected number of job opportunities, the major trends, including a shift to more skill-intensive jobs and more jobs in services, will continue. Between 2008 and 2010…

  9. The Special Education Core Curriculum Manual: Competency Level -- Communication Skills, Mathematics, Life Skills, and Study Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Leonard; And Others

    The manual is intended to provide basic objectives and teaching strategies for teachers of handicapped children at the upper elementary and secondary level in the areas of communication, mathematics, life skills, and study skills. Each subject area is divided into sub-sections under which learning objectives and associated teaching activities are…

  10. An Alumni Assessment of MIS Related Job Skill Importance and Skill Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Jerod W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a job skill survey of Management Information Systems (MIS) alumni from a Northeastern U.S. university. The study assesses job skill importance and skill gaps associated with 104 technical and non-technical skill items. Survey items were grouped into 6 categories based on prior research. Skill importance and skill

  11. Sensorimotor Primitives for Programming Robotic Assembly Skills

    E-print Network

    integration, graphical programming environments to facilitate skill composition, and design integration programming environment provides an intuitive inter­ face for the designer/programmer to compose the skillSensorimotor Primitives for Programming Robotic Assembly Skills James Daniel Morrow Submitted

  12. 49 CFR 383.113 - Required skills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSE STANDARDS; REQUIREMENTS AND PENALTIES Required Knowledge and Skills § 383.113 Required skills. (a) Basic vehicle control skills. All applicants for a CDL...

  13. Computing Information Value from RDF Graph Properties

    SciTech Connect

    al-Saffar, Sinan; Heileman, Gregory

    2010-11-08

    Information value has been implicitly utilized and mostly non-subjectively computed in information retrieval (IR) systems. We explicitly define and compute the value of an information piece as a function of two parameters, the first is the potential semantic impact the target information can subjectively have on its recipient's world-knowledge, and the second parameter is trust in the information source. We model these two parameters as properties of RDF graphs. Two graphs are constructed, a target graph representing the semantics of the target body of information and a context graph representing the context of the consumer of that information. We compute information value subjectively as a function of both potential change to the context graph (impact) and the overlap between the two graphs (trust). Graph change is computed as a graph edit distance measuring the dissimilarity between the context graph before and after the learning of the target graph. A particular application of this subjective information valuation is in the construction of a personalized ranking component in Web search engines. Based on our method, we construct a Web re-ranking system that personalizes the information experience for the information-consumer.

  14. JavaGenes: Evolving Graphs with Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Atsatt, Sean; Lawton, John; Wipke, Todd

    2000-01-01

    Genetic algorithms usually use string or tree representations. We have developed a novel crossover operator for a directed and undirected graph representation, and used this operator to evolve molecules and circuits. Unlike strings or trees, a single point in the representation cannot divide every possible graph into two parts, because graphs may contain cycles. Thus, the crossover operator is non-trivial. A steady-state, tournament selection genetic algorithm code (JavaGenes) was written to implement and test the graph crossover operator. All runs were executed by cycle-scavagging on networked workstations using the Condor batch processing system. The JavaGenes code has evolved pharmaceutical drug molecules and simple digital circuits. Results to date suggest that JavaGenes can evolve moderate sized drug molecules and very small circuits in reasonable time. The algorithm has greater difficulty with somewhat larger circuits, suggesting that directed graphs (circuits) are more difficult to evolve than undirected graphs (molecules), although necessary differences in the crossover operator may also explain the results. In principle, JavaGenes should be able to evolve other graph-representable systems, such as transportation networks, metabolic pathways, and computer networks. However, large graphs evolve significantly slower than smaller graphs, presumably because the space-of-all-graphs explodes combinatorially with graph size. Since the representation strongly affects genetic algorithm performance, adding graphs to the evolutionary programmer's bag-of-tricks should be beneficial. Also, since graph evolution operates directly on the phenotype, the genotype-phenotype translation step, common in genetic algorithm work, is eliminated.

  15. Components in time-varying graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicosia, Vincenzo; Tang, John; Musolesi, Mirco; Russo, Giovanni; Mascolo, Cecilia; Latora, Vito

    2012-06-01

    Real complex systems are inherently time-varying. Thanks to new communication systems and novel technologies, today it is possible to produce and analyze social and biological networks with detailed information on the time of occurrence and duration of each link. However, standard graph metrics introduced so far in complex network theory are mainly suited for static graphs, i.e., graphs in which the links do not change over time, or graphs built from time-varying systems by aggregating all the links as if they were concurrent in time. In this paper, we extend the notion of connectedness, and the definitions of node and graph components, to the case of time-varying graphs, which are represented as time-ordered sequences of graphs defined over a fixed set of nodes. We show that the problem of finding strongly connected components in a time-varying graph can be mapped into the problem of discovering the maximal-cliques in an opportunely constructed static graph, which we name the affine graph. It is, therefore, an NP-complete problem. As a practical example, we have performed a temporal component analysis of time-varying graphs constructed from three data sets of human interactions. The results show that taking time into account in the definition of graph components allows to capture important features of real systems. In particular, we observe a large variability in the size of node temporal in- and out-components. This is due to intrinsic fluctuations in the activity patterns of individuals, which cannot be detected by static graph analysis.

  16. Graph Embedded Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Alexandros; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel extension of the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm for single-hidden layer feedforward neural network training that is able to incorporate subspace learning (SL) criteria on the optimization process followed for the calculation of the network's output weights. The proposed graph embedded ELM (GEELM) algorithm is able to naturally exploit both intrinsic and penalty SL criteria that have been (or will be) designed under the graph embedding framework. In addition, we extend the proposed GEELM algorithm in order to be able to exploit SL criteria in arbitrary (even infinite) dimensional ELM spaces. We evaluate the proposed approach on eight standard classification problems and nine publicly available datasets designed for three problems related to human behavior analysis, i.e., the recognition of human face, facial expression, and activity. Experimental results denote the effectiveness of the proposed approach, since it outperforms other ELM-based classification schemes in all the cases. PMID:25751883

  17. Driving skills after whiplash.

    PubMed

    Gimse, R; Bjørgen, I A; Straume, A

    1997-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that some persons with longlasting problems after whiplash have changed eye movements. These changes have been related to disturbance of the posture control system. The question raised in the present study is whether such disturbances can influence daily life functions connected with balance, position and external movements, such as car driving. A group of 23 persons with disturbed eye movements due to whiplash injury, was tested in a driving simulator, together with a closely matched control group. The results revealed significant differences between the two groups with respect to response times to the traffic signs presented, identification of type of sign, as well as steering precision while the subjects' attention was directed to the process of identifying the signs. Alternative explanations such as driving experience, pain, medication or malingering are at least partly controlled for, but cannot completely be ruled out. A distorted posture control system leading to disturbance of eye movements seems to be the most likely primary causative factor, but these disturbances are most certainly complexly determined. Reduced attention capacity is considered to be a mediating secondary factor. Registration of eye movements may be a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate driving skill after whiplash. PMID:9309948

  18. EVA Skills Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Parazynski and a colleague from Extravehicular Activity (EVA), Robotics, & Crew Systems Operations (DX) worked closely to build the EVA Skills Training Program, and for the first time, defined the gold standards of EVA performance, allowing crewmembers to increase their performance significantly. As part of the program, individuals had the opportunity to learn at their own rate, taking additional water time as required, to achieve that level of performance. This focus on training to one's strengths and weaknesses to bolster them enabled the Crew Office and DX to field a much larger group of spacewalkers for the daunting "wall of EVA" required for the building and maintenance of the ISS. Parazynski also stressed the need for designers to understand the capabilities and the limitations of a human in a spacesuit, as well as opportunities to improve future generations of space. He shared lessons learned (how the Crew Office engaged in these endeavors) and illustrated the need to work as a team to develop these complex systems.

  19. Local Spectral Density and Vacuum Energy near a Quantum Graph Vertex

    E-print Network

    Stephen A. Fulling

    2005-08-17

    The delta interaction at a vertex generalizes the Robin (generalized Neumann) boundary condition on an interval. Study of a single vertex with N infinite leads suffices to determine the localized effects of such a vertex on densities of states, etc. For all the standard initial-value problems, such as that for the wave equation, the pertinent integral kernel (Green function) on the graph can be easily constructed from the corresponding elementary Green function on the real line. From the results one obtains the spectral-projection kernel, local spectral density, and local energy density. The energy density, which refers to an interpretation of the graph as the domain of a quantized scalar field, is a coefficient in the asymptotic expansion of the Green function for an elliptic problem involving the graph Hamiltonian; that expansion contains spectral/geometrical information beyond that in the much-studied heat-kernel expansion.

  20. Matrix models and graph colouring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Giovanni M.; Molinari, Luca; Montaldi, Emilio

    1993-06-01

    We study an edge-colouring problem on random planar graphs which is one of the simplest vertex models that may be analyzed by standard methods of large N matrix models. The main features of the saddle point solution and its critical behaviour are described. At the critical value of the coupling gcr the eigen value density u(?)M is found to vanish at the border of the support as ?-a2/3.

  1. Efficient planning by graph rewriting

    SciTech Connect

    Ambite, J.L.; Knoblock, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Planning involves the generation of a network of actions that achieves a desired goal given an initial state of the world. There has been significant progress in the analysis of planning algorithms, particularly in partial-order and in hierarchical task network (HTN) planning. In this abstract we propose a more general framework in which planning is seen as a graph rewriting process. This approach subsumes previous work and offers new opportunities for efficient planning.

  2. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  3. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-01

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the ?(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the Fe?CH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions. PMID:24692252

  4. GRECS: Graph Encryption for Approximate Shortest Distance Queries

    E-print Network

    Kollios, George

    . Other applications include encrypted graph databases and controlled disclosure systems. We propose GRECS Mathematics]: Graph Theory--graph algorithms; H.2.7 [DATABASE MANAGEMENT]: Database Administration encryption 1 Introduction Graph databases that store, manage, and query large graphs have received increased

  5. Models of random graph hierarchies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, Robert; Suchecki, Krzysztof; Ho?yst, Janusz A.

    2015-10-01

    We introduce two models of inclusion hierarchies: random graph hierarchy (RGH) and limited random graph hierarchy (LRGH). In both models a set of nodes at a given hierarchy level is connected randomly, as in the Erd?s-Rényi random graph, with a fixed average degree equal to a system parameter c. Clusters of the resulting network are treated as nodes at the next hierarchy level and they are connected again at this level and so on, until the process cannot continue. In the RGH model we use all clusters, including those of size 1, when building the next hierarchy level, while in the LRGH model clusters of size 1 stop participating in further steps. We find that in both models the number of nodes at a given hierarchy level h decreases approximately exponentially with h. The height of the hierarchy H, i.e. the number of all hierarchy levels, increases logarithmically with the system size N, i.e. with the number of nodes at the first level. The height H decreases monotonically with the connectivity parameter c in the RGH model and it reaches a maximum for a certain c max in the LRGH model. The distribution of separate cluster sizes in the LRGH model is a power law with an exponent about - 1.25. The above results follow from approximate analytical calculations and have been confirmed by numerical simulations.

  6. Topological structure of dictionary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuk?, Henryk; Krzemi?ski, Mark

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the topological structure of the subgraphs of dictionary graphs constructed from WordNet and Moby thesaurus data. In the process of learning a foreign language, the learner knows only a subset of all words of the language, corresponding to a subgraph of a dictionary graph. When this subgraph grows with time, its topological properties change. We introduce the notion of the pseudocore and argue that the growth of the vocabulary roughly follows decreasing pseudocore numbers—that is, one first learns words with a high pseudocore number followed by smaller pseudocores. We also propose an alternative strategy for vocabulary growth, involving decreasing core numbers as opposed to pseudocore numbers. We find that as the core or pseudocore grows in size, the clustering coefficient first decreases, then reaches a minimum and starts increasing again. The minimum occurs when the vocabulary reaches a size between 103 and 104. A simple model exhibiting similar behavior is proposed. The model is based on a generalized geometric random graph. Possible implications for language learning are discussed.

  7. Sparse graphs are not flammable

    E-print Network

    Pra?at, Pawe?

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the following \\emph{$k$-many firefighter problem} on a finite graph $G=(V,E)$. Suppose that a fire breaks out at a given vertex $v \\in V$. In each subsequent time unit, a firefighter protects $k$ vertices which are not yet on fire, and then the fire spreads to all unprotected neighbours of the vertices on fire. The objective of the firefighter is to save as many vertices as possible. The surviving rate $\\rho(G)$ of $G$ is defined as the expected percentage of vertices that can be saved when a fire breaks out at a random vertex of $G$. Let $\\tau_k = k+2-\\frac {1}{k+2}$. We show that for any $\\eps >0$ and $k \\ge 2$, each graph $G$ on $n$ vertices with at most $(\\tau_k-\\eps)n$ edges is not flammable; that is, $\\rho(G) > \\frac {2\\eps}{5\\tau_k} > 0$. Moreover, a construction of a family of flammable random graphs is proposed to show that the constant $\\tau_k$ cannot be improved.

  8. New Course Builds Research Skills

    E-print Network

    2007-10-20

    stream_size 1474 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name KULibraries_NewsRelease_NewCourseBuildsResearchSkills_20071020.pdf.txt stream_source_info KULibraries_NewsRelease_NewCourseBuildsResearchSkills_20071020.pdf.txt Content...-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 12/5/13 KU Libraries: New Course Builds Research Skills www.lib.ku.edu/askalibrarian/libraryCourse.shtml 1/1 Contact Us KU Libraries Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (785) 864-8983 PROVIDING ACCESS...

  9. Improving Undergraduates' Critical Thinking Skills through Peer-learning Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Critical thinking skills are among the primary learning outcomes of undergraduate education, but they are rarely explicitly taught. Here I present a two-fold study aimed at analyzing undergraduate students' critical thinking and information literacy skills, and explicitly teaching these skills, in an introductory Planetary Science course. The purpose of the research was to examine the students' information-filtering skills and to develop a short series of peer-learning workshops that would enhance these skills in both the students' coursework and their everyday lives. The 4 workshops are designed to be easily adaptable to any college course, with little impact on the instructor's workload. They make use of material related to the course's content, enabling the instructor to complement a pre-existing syllabus while explicitly teaching students skills essential to their academic and non-academic lives. In order to gain an understanding of undergraduates' existing information-filtering skills, I examined the material that they consider to be appropriate sources for a college paper. I analyzed the Essay 1 bibliographies of a writing-based introductory Planetary Science course for non-majors. The 22 essays cited 135 (non-unique) references, only half of which were deemed suitable by their instructors. I divided the sources into several categories and classified them as recommended, recommended with caution, and unsuitable for this course. The unsuitable sources ranged from peer-reviewed journal articles, which these novice students were not equipped to properly interpret, to websites that cannot be relied upon for scientific information (e.g., factoidz.com, answersingenesis.org). The workshops aim to improve the students' information-filtering skills by sequentially teaching them to evaluate search engine results, identify claims made on websites and in news articles, evaluate the evidence presented, and identify specific correlation/causation fallacies in news articles and advertisements. Students work in groups of 3-4, discussing worksheet questions that lead them step-by-step through 1) verbalizing their preconceptions of the workshop theme, 2) dissecting instructional materials to discover the cognitive processes they already use, 3) applying skills step-by-step in real-world situations (search engine results, news articles, ads, etc.), and 4) using metacognitive strategies of questioning and reflecting. Student participants in the pilot study often verbalized metacognition, and retained concepts as evidenced by a post-test conducted 2 months after the first workshop. They additionally reported consciously using skills learned in the workshops over a year later.

  10. Toward the development of structured criteria for interpretation of functional analysis data.

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, L P; Fisher, W W; Thompson, R H; Owen-DeSchryver, J; Iwata, B A; Wacker, D P

    1997-01-01

    Using functional analysis results to prescribe treatments is the preferred method for developing behavioral interventions. Little is known, however, about the reliability and validity of visual inspection for the interpretation of functional analysis data. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a set of structured criteria for visual inspection of multielement functional analyses that, when applied correctly, would increase interrater agreement and agreement with interpretations reached by expert consensus. In Study 1, 3 predoctoral interns interpreted functional analysis graphs, and interrater agreement was low (M = .46). In Study 2, 64 functional analysis graphs were interpreted by a panel of experts, and then a set of structured criteria were developed that yielded interpretive results similar to those of the panel (exact agreement = .94). In Study 3, the 3 predoctoral interns from Study 1 were trained to use the structured criteria, and the mean interrater agreement coefficient increased to .81. The results suggest that (a) the interpretation of functional analysis data may be less reliable than is generally assumed, (b) decision-making rules used by experts in the interpretation of functional analysis data can be operationalized, and (c) individuals can be trained to apply these rules accurately to increase interrater agreement. Potential uses of the criteria are discussed. PMID:9210309

  11. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  12. Lexical Knowledge and Interpreter Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaaden, Hanne

    1999-01-01

    Examines the performance of six student interpreters attending a training course at the University of Oslo. Data are drawn from video recordings in which the students interpret dialogs in two test situations. Students use consecutive interpreting with short speaker intervals and perform in Norwegian/Bosnian, Croatian, Serbian. Compares students'…

  13. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in timemore »at most ?(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.« less

  14. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in time at most ?(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.

  15. Graphs in machine learning: an introduction

    E-print Network

    Latouche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are commonly used to characterise interactions between objects of interest. Because they are based on a straightforward formalism, they are used in many scientific fields from computer science to historical sciences. In this paper, we give an introduction to some methods relying on graphs for learning. This includes both unsupervised and supervised methods. Unsupervised learning algorithms usually aim at visualising graphs in latent spaces and/or clustering the nodes. Both focus on extracting knowledge from graph topologies. While most existing techniques are only applicable to static graphs, where edges do not evolve through time, recent developments have shown that they could be extended to deal with evolving networks. In a supervised context, one generally aims at inferring labels or numerical values attached to nodes using both the graph and, when they are available, node characteristics. Balancing the two sources of information can be challenging, especially as they can disagree locally or globall...

  16. Fast Generation of Sparse Random Kernel Graphs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in time at most 𝒪(n(logn)2). As a practical example we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity. PMID:26356296

  17. Roman Bondage Numbers of Some Graphs

    E-print Network

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    A Roman dominating function on a graph $G=(V,E)$ is a function $f: V\\to \\{0,1,2\\}$ satisfying the condition that every vertex $u$ with $f(u)=0$ is adjacent to at least one vertex $v$ with $f(v)=2$. The weight of a Roman dominating function is the value $f(G)=\\sum_{u\\in V} f(u)$. The Roman domination number of $G$ is the minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on $G$. The Roman bondage number of a nonempty graph $G$ is the minimum number of edges whose removal results in a graph with the Roman domination number larger than that of $G$. This paper determines the exact value of the Roman bondage numbers of two classes of graphs, complete $t$-partite graphs and $(n-3)$-regular graphs with order $n$ for any $n\\ge 5$.

  18. Area law for random graph states

    E-print Network

    Benoit Collins; Ion Nechita; Karol Zyczkowski

    2013-06-12

    Random pure states of multi-partite quantum systems, associated with arbitrary graphs, are investigated. Each vertex of the graph represents a generic interaction between subsystems, described by a random unitary matrix distributed according to the Haar measure, while each edge of the graph represents a bi-partite, maximally entangled state. For any splitting of the graph into two parts we consider the corresponding partition of the quantum system and compute the average entropy of entanglement. First, in the special case where the partition does not "cross" any vertex of the graph, we show that the area law is satisfied exactly. In the general case, we show that the entropy of entanglement obeys an area law on average, this time with a correction term that depends on the topologies of the graph and of the partition. The results obtained are applied to the problem of distribution of quantum entanglement in a quantum network with prescribed topology.

  19. API Requirements for Dynamic Graph Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

    2006-10-13

    Given a large-scale time-evolving multi-modal and multi-relational complex network (a.k.a., a large-scale dynamic semantic graph), we want to implement algorithms that discover patterns of activities on the graph and learn predictive models of those discovered patterns. This document outlines the application programming interface (API) requirements for fast prototyping of feature extraction, learning, and prediction algorithms on large dynamic semantic graphs. Since our algorithms must operate on large-scale dynamic semantic graphs, we have chosen to use the graph API developed in the CASC Complex Networks Project. This API is supported on the back end by a semantic graph database (developed by Scott Kohn and his team). The advantages of using this API are (i) we have full-control of its development and (ii) the current API meets almost all of the requirements outlined in this document.

  20. A Coordinated Approach to Curricular Review and Development in Undergraduate Geoscience Programs: Using a Matrix to Identify and Track Skills and Skill Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R.; Savina, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    One approach to curriculum review and development is to construct a matrix of the desired skills versus courses in the departmental curriculum. The matrix approach requires faculty to articulate their goals, identify specific skills, and assess where in the curriculum students will learn and practice these skills and where there are major skills gaps. Faculty members in the Geology Department at Carleton College developed a matrix of skills covered in geology courses with the following objectives: 1) Geology majors should begin their "senior integrative exercise" having practiced multiple times all of the formal steps in the research process (recognizing problems, writing proposals, carrying out a project, reporting a project in several ways); 2) Geology majors should learn and practice a variety of professional and life skills life (e.g. computer skills, field skills, lab skills, and interpretive skills).The matrix was used to identify where in the curriculum various research methods and skills were addressed and to map potential student experiences to the objectives. In Carleton's non-hierarchical curriculum, the matrix was used to verify that students have many opportunities to practice research and life skills regardless of the path they take to completion of the major. In William and Mary's more structured curriculum, the matrix was used to ensure that skills build upon each other from course to course. Faculty members in the Geology Department at the College of William and Mary first used this approach to focus on teaching quantitative skills across the geology curriculum, and later used it in terms of teaching research, communication, and information literacy skills. After articulating goals and skills, faculty members in both departments developed more specific skill lists within each category of skills, then described the current assignments and activities in each course relative to the specific components of the matrix and discussed whether to add assignment or activities. We have found that much conversation among faculty and change within courses happens simply as a result of compiling the matrix. One effect of the use of the matrix is that faculty in the department know fairly specifically what skills students are learning and practicing in their other geology courses. Moreover, some faculty members are better suited by background or inclination to teach certain sets of skills. This coordinated approach avoids unnecessary duplication and allows faculty to build on skills and topics developed in previous courses. The matrix can also be used as a planning tool to identify gaps in the curriculum. In our experience, the skills matrix is a powerful organizational and communication tool. The skills matrix is a representation of what the department believes actually happens in the curriculum. Thus, development of a skills matrix provides a basis for departmental discussions of student learning goals and objectives as well as for describing the existing curriculum. The matrix is also a graphic representation, to college administrators and outside evaluators, of the "intentionality" of an entire curriculum, going beyond single courses and their syllabi. It can be used effectively to engage administration in discussions of departmental planning and needs analysis.

  1. Computational Genomics Using Graph Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar

    2005-03-01

    With exciting new discoveries concerning RNA's regulatory cellular roles in gene expression, structural and functional problems associated with DNA's venerable cousin have come to the forefront. RNA folding, for example, is analogous to the well-known protein folding problem, and seeks to link RNA's primary sequence with secondary and tertiary structures. As a single-stranded polynucleotide, RNA's secondary structures are defined by a network of hydrogen bonds, which lead to a variety of stems, loops, junctions, bulges, and other motifs. Supersecondary pseudoknot structures can also occur and, together, lead to RNA's complex tertiary interactions stabilized by salt and solvent ions in the natural cellular milieu. Besides folding, challenges in RNA research include identifying locations and functions of RNA genes, discovering RNA's structural repertoire (folding motifs), designing novel RNAs, and developing new antiviral and antibiotic compounds composed of, or targeting, RNAs. In this talk, I will describe some of these new biological findings concerning RNA and present an approach using graph theory (network theory) to represent RNA secondary structures. Because the RNA motif space using graphs is vastly smaller than RNA's sequence space, many problems related to analyzing and discovering new RNAs can be simplified and studied systematically. Some preliminary applications to designing novel RNAs will also be described.Related ReadingH. H. Gan, S. Pasquali, and T. Schlick, ``A Survey of Existing RNAs using Graph Theory with Implications to RNA Analysis and Design,'' Nuc. Acids Res. 31: 2926--2943 (2003). J. Zorn, H. H. Gan, N. Shiffeldrim, and T. Schlick, ``Structural Motifs in Ribosomal RNAs: Implications for RNA Design and Genomics,'' Biopolymers 73: 340--347 (2004). H. H. Gan, D. Fera, J. Zorn, M. Tang, N. Shiffeldrim, U. Laserson, N. Kim, and T. Schlick,``RAG: RNA-As-Graphs Database -- Concepts, Analysis, and Features,'' Bioinformatics 20: 1285--1291 (2004). U. Laserson, H. H. Gan, and T. Schlick, ``Searching for 2D RNA Geometries in Bacterial Genomes,'' Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Computational Geometry, June 9--11, New York, pp. 373--377 (2004). (http://socg.poly.edu/home.htm). N. Kim, N. Shiffeldrim, H. H. Gan, and T. Schlick, ``Novel Candidates of RNA Topologies,'' J. Mol. Biol. 341: 1129--1144 (2004). Schlick, ``RAG: RNA-As-Graphs Web Resource,'' BMC Bioinformatics 5: 88--97 (2004) (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/5/88). S. Pasquali, H. H. Gan, and T. Schlick, ``Modular RNA Architecture Revealed by Computational Analysis of Existing Pseudoknots and Ribosomal RNAs,'' Nucl. Acids Res., Submitted (2004). T. Schlick, Molecular Modeling: An Interdisciplinary Guide, Springer-Verlag, New York, 2002.

  2. Imaging geometric graphs using internal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article presents two topologically-motivated algorithms for reconstructing a metric graph from solutions to a wave equation on it. Our algorithms rely on narrowband and visibility measurements, and are therefore of considerable value to urban sensing applications. This is an advancement over the wideband methods traditionally used to study metric graphs. Our methodology exposes and separates the impact of the graph topology and geometry and is driven by a complete cohomological characterization of the space of wave equation solutions.

  3. Strong products of critical graphs SANDI KLAVZAR

    E-print Network

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Strong products of ­critical graphs SANDI KLAVZAR Summary. Let G[H] be the lexicographic product and let G 2� H be the strong product of graphs G and H. It is proved that if G is a ­critical graph numbers of strong products. It is shown in particular that for k 2, (C5 2� C5 2� C2k+1) = 10 + 5 k

  4. Projective representations from quantum enhanced graph symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, R. M.; Khlebnikov, S.; Wehefritz—Kaufmann, B.

    2015-04-01

    We define re-gaugings and enhanced symmetries for graphs with group labels on their edges. These give rise to interesting projective representations of subgroups of the automorphism groups of the graphs. We furthermore embed this construction into several higher levels of generalization using category theory and show that they are natural in that language. These include projective representations of the re-gauging groupoid and a novel generalization to all symmetries of the graph.

  5. Counting Links and Knots in Complete Graphs

    E-print Network

    Abrams, Loren

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the minimal number of links and knots in complete partite graphs. We provide exact values or bounds on the minimal number of links for all complete partite graphs with all but 4 vertices in one partition, or with 9 vertices in total. In particular, we find that the minimal number of links for $K_{4,4,1}$ is 74. We also provide exact values or bounds on the minimal number of knots for all complete partite graphs with 8 vertices.

  6. Discussiones Mathematicae Graph Theory 34 (2014) 287307

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    FOR TRACEABILITY OF BLOCK-CHAINS Binlong Lia,b1, Hajo Broersmab and Shenggui Zhanga2 a Department of Applied at least n-1 in G. A block-chain is a graph whose block graph is a path, i.e., it is either a P1, P2, every traceable graph is a block-chain, but the reverse does not hold. In this paper we characterize all

  7. Transport and dynamics on open quantum graphs

    E-print Network

    Felipe Barra; Pierre Gaspard

    2001-07-13

    We study the classical limit of quantum mechanics on graphs by introducing a Wigner function for graphs. The classical dynamics is compared to the quantum dynamics obtained from the propagator. In particular we consider extended open graphs whose classical dynamics generate a diffusion process. The transport properties of the classical system are revealed in the scattering resonances and in the time evolution of the quantum system.

  8. A Case Study of Two Sign Language Interpreters Working in Post-Secondary Education in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Denise

    2013-01-01

    A case study of two qualified New Zealand Sign Language interpreters working in a post-secondary education setting in New Zealand was undertaken using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Educational sign language interpreting at the post-secondary level requires a different set of skills and is a reasonably new development in New Zealand.…

  9. Fundamental movement skills and physical activity among children living in low-income communities: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although previous studies have demonstrated that children with high levels of fundamental movement skill competency are more active throughout the day, little is known regarding children’s fundamental movement skill competency and their physical activity during key time periods of the school day (i.e., lunchtime, recess and after-school). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between fundamental movement skill competency and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) throughout the school day among children attending primary schools in low-income communities. Methods Eight primary schools from low-income communities and 460 children (8.5?±?0.6 years, 54% girls) were involved in the study. Children’s fundamental movement skill competency (TGMD-2; 6 locomotor and 6 object-control skills), objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT3X and GT3X?+?accelerometers), height, weight and demographics were assessed. Multilevel linear mixed models were used to assess the cross-sectional associations between fundamental movement skills and MVPA. Results After adjusting for age, sex, BMI and socio-economic status, locomotor skill competency was positively associated with total (P?=?0.002, r?=?0.15) and after-school (P?=?0.014, r?=?0.13) MVPA. Object-control skill competency was positively associated with total (P?skill competency appears to be a better predictor of children’s MVPA during school-based physical activity opportunities than locomotor skill competency. Improving fundamental movement skill competency, particularly object-control skills, may contribute to increased levels of children’s MVPA throughout the day. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry No: ACTRN12611001080910. PMID:24708604

  10. A study on the effect of varying sequence of lab performance skills on lab performance of high school physics students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bournia-Petrou, Ethel A.

    The main goal of this investigation was to study how student rank in class, student gender and skill sequence affect high school students' performance on the lab skills involved in a laboratory-based inquiry task in physics. The focus of the investigation was the effect of skill sequence as determined by the particular task. The skills considered were: Hypothesis, Procedure, Planning, Data, Graph, Calculations and Conclusion. Three physics lab tasks based on the simple pendulum concept were administered to 282 Regents physics high school students. The reliability of the designed tasks was high. Student performance was evaluated on individual student written responses and a scoring rubric. The tasks had high discrimination power and were of moderate difficulty (65%). It was found that, student performance was weak on Conclusion (42%), Hypothesis (48%), and Procedure (51%), where the numbers in parentheses represent the mean as a percentage of the maximum possible score. Student performance was strong on Calculations (91%), Data (82%), Graph (74%) and Plan (68%). Out of all seven skills, Procedure had the strongest correlation (.73) with the overall task performance. Correlation analysis revealed some strong relationships among the seven skills which were grouped in two distinct clusters: Hypothesis, Procedure and Plan belong to one, and Data, Graph, Calculations, and Conclusion belong to the other. This distinction may indicate different mental processes at play within each skill cluster. The effect of student rank was not statistically significant according to the MANOVA results due to the large variation of rank levels among the participating schools. The effect of gender was significant on the entire test because of performance differences on Calculations and Graph, where male students performed better than female students. Skill sequence had a significant effect on the skills of Procedure, Plan, Data and Conclusion. Students are rather weak in proposing a sensible, detailed procedure for the inquiry task which involves the "novel" concept. However they perform better on Procedure and Plan, if the "novel" task is not preceded by another, which explicitly offers step-by-step procedure instructions. It was concluded that the format of detailed, structured instructions often adopted by many commercial and school-developed lab books and conventional lab practices, fails to prepare students to propose a successful, detailed procedure when faced with a slightly "novel", lab-based inquiry task. Student performance on Data collection was higher in the tasks that involved the more familiar experimental arrangement than in the tasks using the slightly "novel" equipment. Student performance on Conclusion was better in tasks where they had to collect the Data themselves than in tasks, where all relevant Data information was given to them.

  11. A streamlined software environment for situated skills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Sophia T.; Slack, Marc G.; Miller, David P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper documents a powerful set of software tools used for developing situated skills. These situated skills form the reactive level of a three-tiered intelligent agent architecture. The architecture is designed to allow these skills to be manipulated by a task level engine which is monitoring the current situation and selecting skills necessary for the current task. The idea is to coordinate the dynamic activations and deactivations of these situated skills in order to configure the reactive layer for the task at hand. The heart of the skills environment is a data flow mechanism which pipelines the currently active skills for execution. A front end graphical interface serves as a debugging facility during skill development and testing. We are able to integrate skills developed in different languages into the skills environment. The power of the skills environment lies in the amount of time it saves for the programmer to develop code for the reactive layer of a robot.

  12. The Skills of Exemplary Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John E.

    1990-01-01

    NASSP's Assessment Center Project has identified 12 key skills for successful principals: problem analysis, judgment, organizational ability, decisiveness, leadership, sensitivity, stress tolerance, oral communication, written communication, wide-ranging interests, personal motivation, and educational values. Effective principals succeed by…

  13. Interpersonal Skills for Technical Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fridie, Pamela

    1986-01-01

    Describes a summer internship as a faculty technical writer with a business corporation, revising installation manuals based upon information from computer programers--an experience that highlighted technical writers' need for interpersonal skills. (HTH)

  14. Scallops, Whelks, and Process Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleare, Catherine C.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines activities for each of eight science process skills (observing, using space/time relationships, classifying, using numbers, measuring, communicating, predicting, and inferring). Directions for the activities (all of which use sea shells) are included. (DH)

  15. Rainbow Colouring of Split and Threshold Graphs

    E-print Network

    Chandran, L Sunil

    2012-01-01

    A rainbow colouring of a connected graph is a colouring of the edges of the graph, such that every pair of vertices is connected by at least one path in which no two edges are coloured the same. Such a colouring using minimum possible number of colours is called an optimal rainbow colouring, and the minimum number of colours required is called the rainbow connection number of the graph. In this article, we show the following: 1. The problem of deciding whether a graph can be rainbow coloured using 3 colours remains NP-complete even when restricted to the class of split graphs. However, any split graph can be rainbow coloured in linear time using at most one more colour than the optimum. 2. For every integer k larger than 2, the problem of deciding whether a graph can be rainbow coloured using k colours remains NP-complete even when restricted to the class of chordal graphs. 3. For every positive integer k, threshold graphs with rainbow connection number k can be characterised based on their degree sequence al...

  16. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  17. Generation of graph-state streams

    E-print Network

    Daniel Ballester; Jaeyoon Cho; M. S. Kim

    2010-12-08

    We propose a protocol to generate a stream of mobile qubits in a graph state through a single stationary parent qubit and discuss two types of its physical implementation, namely, the generation of photonic graph states through an atom-like qubit and those of flying atoms through a cavity-mode photonic qubit. The generated graph states fall into an important class that can hugely reduce the resource requirement of fault-tolerant linear optics quantum computation, which was previously known to be far from realistic. In regard to the flying atoms, we also propose a heralded generation scheme, which allows for high-fidelity graph states even under the photon loss.

  18. Nuclear reactor multiphysics via bond graph formalism

    E-print Network

    Sosnovsky, Eugeny

    2014-01-01

    This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling nuclear reactor multiphysics problems using bond graphs. Conventional multiphysics simulation paradigms normally use operator splitting, which treats the ...

  19. ASGS: an alternative splicing graph web service.

    PubMed

    Bollina, Durgaprasad; Lee, Bernett T K; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-07-01

    Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. The Alternative Splicing Graph Server (ASGS) is a web service facilitating the systematic study of alternatively spliced genes of higher eukaryotes by generating splicing graphs for the compact visual representation of transcript diversity from a single gene. Taking a set of transcripts in General Feature Format as input, ASGS identifies distinct reference and variable exons, generates a transcript splicing graph, an exon summary, splicing events classification and a single line graph to facilitate experimental analysis. This freely available web service can be accessed at http://asgs.biolinfo.org. PMID:16845045

  20. Join-Reachability Problems in Directed Graphs

    E-print Network

    Georgiadis, Loukas; Palios, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    For a given collection G of directed graphs we define the join-reachability graph of G, denoted by J(G), as the directed graph that, for any pair of vertices a and b, contains a path from a to b if and only if such a path exists in all graphs of G. Our goal is to compute an efficient representation of J(G). In particular, we consider two versions of this problem. In the explicit version we wish to construct the smallest join-reachability graph for G. In the implicit version we wish to build an efficient data structure (in terms of space and query time) such that we can report fast the set of vertices that reach a query vertex in all graphs of G. This problem is related to the well-studied reachability problem and is motivated by emerging applications of graph-structured databases and graph algorithms. We consider the construction of join-reachability structures for two graphs and develop techniques that can be applied to both the explicit and the implicit problem. First we present optimal and near-optimal str...