Sample records for graph interpretation skills

  1. The impact of video motion analysis on kinematics graph interpretation skills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Beichner

    1996-01-01

    Video motion analysis software was used by 368 introductory physics students in a variety of instructional settings. These high school and college students experienced graduated variations in their use of a video analysis software package. Post-instruction assessment of their ability to interpret kinematics graphs clearly establishes that all performed better than students taught via traditional instruction. The data indicate that

  2. Challenges with Graph Interpretation: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazer, Nirit

    2011-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on the development of scientific inquiry skills, the display and interpretation of data are becoming increasingly important. Graph interpretation competence is, in fact, essential to understanding today's world and to be scientifically literate. However, graph interpretation is a complex and challenging activity. Graph

  3. Graphs: Interpret Line Plots

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This website application provides practice interpreting line plots. The format of the website makes it available to use with individual students on one computer or with an entire class on an interactive white board. Each practice problem is submitted to determine if it is correct, when an incorrect answer is submitted the correct answer and an option for an explanation appears. Each problem set is also timed and the user is provided with a percent correct. This website does have a membership option for a fee which would enable the teacher to track the progress of multiple students over time.

  4. DRAWING BY EAR: INTERPRETING SONIFIED LINE GRAPHS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorna M. Brown; Stephen A. Brewster

    2003-01-01

    The research presented here describes a pilot study into the interpretation of sonified line graphs containing two data series. The experiment aimed to discover the level of accuracy with which sighted people were able to draw sketches of the graphs after listening to them. In addition, it aimed to identify any differences in performance when the graphs were presented using

  5. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  6. Drawing and Interpreting Data in a Bar Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Reid Brockett

    2012-08-02

    Drawing and interpreting data in a bar graph will explicitly teach strategies for students to collect and solve simple put together, take-apart and compare problems using information presented in a bar graph.

  7. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs Through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-12-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing software and inquiry-based instruction supported with traditional laboratory equipment in terms of improving fourth graders' ability to interpret motion and temperature graphs. Results of this study showed that there is a significant advantage in using real-time graphing technology to support fourth graders' ability to interpret graphs.

  8. SEMI-SUPERVISED LEARNING FOR GRAPH TO SIGNAL MAPPING: A GRAPH SIGNAL WIENER FILTER INTERPRETATION

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    borrowed from signal processing. We successfully use a graph-based semi-supervised learning approach to map this interpretation to improve our results. Index Terms-- Signal processing on graphs, Semisupervised learning, graph analytics transposes to a signal analysis problem that can benefit from a rich signal processing

  9. Adolescents' Graphing Skills: A Descriptive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, John; And Others

    Clinical interviews were conducted with 25 seventh- and eighth-grade students to determine: (1) the extent to which they could produce correct graphical representations of familiar situations; (2) to what extent they could infer relationships from graphs; (3) what are the most commonly held graphing misconceptions and how stable they are; and (4)…

  10. Interpreting a Graph and Constructing Its Derivative Graph: Stability and Change in Students' Conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubuz, Behiye

    2007-01-01

    This present study investigated engineering students' conceptions and misconceptions related to derivative, particularly interpreting the graph of a function and constructing its derivative graph. Participants were 147 first year engineering students from four universities enrolled in first year undergraduate calculus courses with or without the…

  11. Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

  12. Using professional interpreters in undergraduate medical consultation skills teaching.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Aarti; Swann, Jennifer; Smithson, William Henry

    2014-01-01

    The ability to work with interpreters is a core skill for UK medical graduates. At the University of Sheffield Medical School, this teaching was identified as a gap in the curriculum. Teaching was developed to use professional interpreters in role-play, based on evidence that professional interpreters improve health outcomes for patients with limited English proficiency. Other principles guiding the development of the teaching were an experiential learning format, integration to the core consultation skills curriculum, and sustainable delivery. The session was aligned with existing consultation skills teaching to retain the small-group experiential format and general practitioner (GP) tutor. Core curricular time was found through conversion of an existing consultation skills session. Language pairs of professional interpreters worked with each small group, with one playing patient and the other playing interpreter. These professional interpreters attended training in the scenarios so that they could learn to act as patient and family interpreter. GP tutors attended training sessions to help them facilitate the session. This enhanced the sustainability of the session by providing a cohort of tutors able to pass on their expertise to new staff through the existing shadowing process. Tutors felt that the involvement of professional interpreters improved student engagement. Student evaluation of the teaching suggests that the learning objectives were achieved. Faculty evaluation by GP tutors suggests that they perceived the teaching to be worthwhile and that the training they received had helped improve their own clinical practice in consulting through interpreters. We offer the following recommendations to others who may be interested in developing teaching on interpreted consultations within their core curriculum: 1) consider recruiting professional interpreters as a teaching resource; 2) align the teaching to existing consultation skills sessions to aid integration; and 3) invest in faculty development for successful and sustainable delivery. PMID:25473325

  13. Neural complexity: A graph theoretic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, L.; Buckley, C. L.; Bullock, S.

    2011-04-01

    One of the central challenges facing modern neuroscience is to explain the ability of the nervous system to coherently integrate information across distinct functional modules in the absence of a central executive. To this end, Tononi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA.PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.91.11.5033 91, 5033 (1994)] proposed a measure of neural complexity that purports to capture this property based on mutual information between complementary subsets of a system. Neural complexity, so defined, is one of a family of information theoretic metrics developed to measure the balance between the segregation and integration of a system’s dynamics. One key question arising for such measures involves understanding how they are influenced by network topology. Sporns [Cereb. Cortex53OPAV1047-321110.1093/cercor/10.2.127 10, 127 (2000)] employed numerical models in order to determine the dependence of neural complexity on the topological features of a network. However, a complete picture has yet to be established. While De Lucia [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.71.016114 71, 016114 (2005)] made the first attempts at an analytical account of this relationship, their work utilized a formulation of neural complexity that, we argue, did not reflect the intuitions of the original work. In this paper we start by describing weighted connection matrices formed by applying a random continuous weight distribution to binary adjacency matrices. This allows us to derive an approximation for neural complexity in terms of the moments of the weight distribution and elementary graph motifs. In particular, we explicitly establish a dependency of neural complexity on cyclic graph motifs.

  14. Sex Differences Related to Graphing Skills in Microcomputer-Based Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasell, Heather

    As part of an investigation of the effectiveness of a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) activity in developing students' graphing skills, this study was specifically designed to examine the differences between females and males in both performance on graphing tasks and on their attitudes to graphs and graph-based activities. Results based on a…

  15. Interpreting the Evidence on Life Cycle Skill Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flavio Cunha; James J. Heckman; Lance Lochner; Dimitriy V. Masterov

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents economic models of child development that capture the essence of recent findings from the empirical literature on skill formation. The goal of this essay is to provide a theoretical framework for interpreting the evidence from a vast empirical literature, for guiding the next generation of empirical studies, and for formulating policy. Central to our analysis is the

  16. Chapter 12 Interpreting the Evidence on Life Cycle Skill Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitriy V. Masterov

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents economic models of child development that capture the essence of recent findings from the empirical literature on skill formation. The goal of this essay is to provide a theoretical framework for interpreting the evidence from a vast empirical literature, for guiding the next generation of empirical studies, and for formulating policy. Central to our analysis is the

  17. Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boote, Stacy K.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were…

  18. Reading and Interpreting Tables and Graphs Involving Rates and Percentages

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Schield, Milo

    This survey, created by Milo Schield of Augsburg College, assesses statistical literacy. The survey focuses on the general use of informal statistics in everyday situations: reading and interpreting tables and graphs involving rates and percentages. The survey itself takes between thirty and forty minutes. The author does apologize for the length, but insists that it is due to how comprehensive the survey is. Sixty-nine questions in length, almost every topic concerning statistics is covered. The survey was funded by the W.M. Keck Statistical Literacy Project.

  19. Today's Forecast: Graphing Temperature Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sandra Kolb

    In this activity students use Internet skills to find local and Antarctic weather data. They record the data, assemble it in a logical order, graph it, and interpret the graphed information. Students will: prepare a graph using an x and y axis; show graphing increments; arrange data on a graph; interpret graphed data; demonstrate conversion of Fahrenheit to Celsius and Celsius to Fahrenheit; and differentiate between below and above zero degrees temperature.

  20. Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Stacy K.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were collected and coded using a rubric of previously cited factors, categorized by Bertin's (Semiology of graphics: Diagrams, networks, maps. The University of Wisconsin Press, Ltd., Madison, 1983) theory of graph interpretation. Data analysis revealed responses varied by graph question level. Across levels, students interpreted graphs in one or more of the three ways: mathematical word problems (focusing on an algorithm), science data to be analyzed (incorporating science knowledge), or no strategy. Although consistently used across levels, the frequency and usefulness of approaches varied by question level.

  1. Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Actuarial Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

  2. SEMI-SUPERVISED LEARNING FOR GRAPH TO SIGNAL MAPPING: A GRAPH SIGNAL WIENER FILTER INTERPRETATION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of graphs with tools borrowed from signal processing. We successfully use a graph-based semi that can benefit from a rich signal processing toolkit. In other scenarios, each node of a graph is itself], the wavelets on graphs [10] and more generally the emerging field of discrete signal processing on graphs [8

  3. The Relation between the Working Memory Skills of Sign Language Interpreters and the Quality of Their Interpretations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dijk, Rick; Christoffels, Ingrid; Postma, Albert; Hermans, Daan

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments we investigated the relationship between the working memory skills of sign language interpreters and the quality of their interpretations. In Experiment 1, we found that scores on 3-back tasks with signs and words were not related to the quality of interpreted narratives. In Experiment 2, we found that memory span scores for…

  4. Interpreting Unfamiliar Graphs: A Generative, Activity Theoretic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew Jin

    2004-01-01

    Research on graphing presents its results as if knowing and understanding were something stored in peoples' minds independent of the situation that they find themselves in. Thus, there are no models that situate interview responses to graphing tasks. How, then, we question, are the interview texts produced? How do respondents begin and end…

  5. Memory and Language Skills in Simultaneous Interpreters: The Role of Expertise and Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoffels, Ingrid K.; de Groot, Annette M. B.; Kroll, Judith F.

    2006-01-01

    Simultaneous interpreting is a complex skill in which language comprehension and production take place at the same time in two languages. In this study, we examined performance on basic language and working memory tasks that have been hypothesized to engage cognitive skills important for simultaneous interpreting. The participants were native…

  6. Interpretation of Radiological Images: Towards a Framework of Knowledge and Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Gijp, A.; van der Schaaf, M. F.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Huige, J. C. B. M.; Ravesloot, C. J.; van Schaik, J. P. J.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge and skills that are required for radiological image interpretation are not well documented, even though medical imaging is gaining importance. This study aims to develop a comprehensive framework of knowledge and skills, required for two-dimensional and multiplanar image interpretation in radiology. A mixed-method study approach was…

  7. Students' Interpretation of a Function Associated with a Real-Life Problem from Its Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahir, Nevin

    2010-01-01

    The properties of a function such as limit, continuity, derivative, growth, or concavity can be determined more easily from its graph than by doing any algebraic operation. For this reason, it is important for students of mathematics to interpret some of the properties of a function from its graph. In this study, we investigated the competence of…

  8. A Review of AP Calculus Graphing Calculator Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Review material on graphing calculator use from the College Board AP Calculus Course Description. The problems are mostly AB level. The page also contains a brief historical remark about Maria Gaetana Agnesi.

  9. Effects of Training in Dream Recall and Dream Interpretation Skills on Dream Recall, Attitudes, and Dream Interpretation Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aaron B. Rochlen; Daniela P. Ligiero; Clara E. Hill; Kristin J. Heaton

    1999-01-01

    Forty-two volunteer clients with below-average dream recall and attitudes toward dreams participated in training sessions focusing on either improving dream recall and attitudes toward dreams, building dream interpretation skills, or educating about counseling. After training, individual dream interpretation sessions were conducted. No significant differences were found among the 3 conditions in regard to dream recall, attitudes toward dreams, or client-

  10. So Many Graphs, So Little Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Jennifer J.; Benson, Christine C.

    2009-01-01

    Interpreting graphs found in various content areas is an important skill for students, especially in light of high-stakes testing. In addition, reading and understanding graphs is an important part of numeracy, or numeric literacy, a skill necessary for informed citizenry. This article explores the different categories of graphs, provides…

  11. Beyond Behavioral Skills to Human-Involved Processes: Relational Nursing Practice and Interpretive Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doane, Gweneth A. Hartrick

    2002-01-01

    Behaviorist teaching of communication skills can interfere with learning of humanistic nursing. Interpretive inquiry can help students experience the transformative power for relationships and develop confidence and trust in their capacity for relational nursing practice. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  12. Effects of Training in Dream Recall and Dream Interpretation Skills on Dream Recall, Attitudes, and Dream Interpretation Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochlen, Aaron B.; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Hill, Clara E.; Heaton, Kristin J.

    1999-01-01

    Volunteer clients (N=44) with below-average dream recall and attitudes toward dreams participated in training sessions focusing on either improving dream recall and attitudes toward dreams, building dream-interpretation skills, or educating about counseling. No significant differences were found within the three groups. Results suggest that…

  13. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  14. Line Graph Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Idorenyin Jamar

    2007-10-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's development of graph interpretation skills, the authors hope to make apparent some of the cognitive processes students may go through as they attempt to master this important inquiry skill and thus provide fellow teachers with insight as to how to more effectively develop these skills in their own students.

  15. Effects of Graphing Conventions and Response Options on Interpretation of Small n Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of manipulation of two graphing conventions on judgements of time-series data by novice raters. These conventions involved the presence of phase change lines between baseline and intervention data and whether data points across phase changes were connected. The 1990 study of Matyas and Greenwood was also…

  16. On the Relation of Abstract and Concrete in Scientists' Graph Interpretations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hwang, SungWon

    2006-01-01

    The notions of "abstract" and "concrete" are central to the conceptualization of mathematical knowing and learning. Much of the literature takes a dualist approach, leading to the privileging of the former term at the expense of the latter. In this article, we provide a concrete analysis of a scientist interpreting an unfamiliar graph to show how…

  17. Formal Aspects of Computing (1994) 3: 1000 Interpreting Message Flow Graphs

    E-print Network

    Leue, Stefan

    1994-01-01

    . In formal or semi-formal use in telecommunications systems: [CC91] (`temporal message flow diagrams'), [CCHK between processes, in the style of a Message Sequence Chart or Time Sequence Diagram. ProcessesFormal Aspects of Computing (1994) 3: 1­000 c 1994 BCS Interpreting Message Flow Graphs Peter B

  18. Hands-on Materials for Teaching about Global Climate Change through Graph Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Audrey C.; Hallagan, Jean E.; Shaffer, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Teachers need to address global climate change with students in their classrooms as evidence for consequences from these environmental changes mounts. One way to approach global climate change is through examination of authentic data. Mathematics and science may be integrated by interpreting graphs from the professional literature. This study…

  19. Using the Computer to Teach Methods and Interpretative Skills in the Humanities: Implementing a Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Bruce William

    The results of implementing computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in two religion courses and a logic course at California State College, Bakersfield, are examined along with student responses. The main purpose of the CAI project was to teach interpretive skills. The most positive results came in the logic course. The programs in the New Testament…

  20. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of How Professional Dance Teachers Implement Psychological Skills Training in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klockare, Ellinor; Gustafsson, Henrik; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how dance teachers work with psychological skills with their students in class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six female professional teachers in jazz, ballet and contemporary dance. The interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith 1996). Results…

  1. UNF graduates of the ASL/English Interpreting Program will demonstrate mastery of content knowledge and interpreting skills through proficiency on course embedded assessments, activities, and critical task assessments. It is expected that candidates apply

    E-print Network

    Asaithambi, Asai

    -monitoring skills to assess interpretation for accuracy and make repairs when necessary. Critical Thinking Skills · Apply critical thinking skills to ethical decision-making. · Apply critical thinking skills and interpreting skills through proficiency on course embedded assessments, activities, and critical task

  2. Collaborative Robotic Instruction: A Graph Teaching Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitnik, Ruben; Recabarren, Matias; Nussbaum, Miguel; Soto, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Graphing is a key skill in the study of Physics. Drawing and interpreting graphs play a key role in the understanding of science, while the lack of these has proved to be a handicap and a limiting factor in the learning of scientific concepts. It has been observed that despite the amount of previous graph-working experience, students of all ages…

  3. Computer as an Aid for Exploring Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Laurence T.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the important role of graphs in conveying scientific information and the use of computer software in amplifying the value of graphs as tools for scientific investigation. Topics discussed include: skills required for analyzing and interpreting graphs, software design, and teaching and learning strategies. (JRH)

  4. Measures of Fine Motor Skills in People with Tremor Disorders: Appraisal and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Kathleen E.; Héroux, Martin E.

    2013-01-01

    People with Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, or other movement disorders involving tremor have changes in fine motor skills that are among the hallmarks of these diseases. Numerous measurement tools have been created and other methods devised to measure such changes in fine motor skills. Measurement tools may focus on specific features – e.g., motor skills or dexterity, slowness in movement execution associated with parkinsonian bradykinesia, or magnitude of tremor. Less obviously, some tools may be better suited than others for specific goals such as detecting subtle dysfunction early in disease, revealing aspects of brain function affected by disease, or tracking changes expected from treatment or disease progression. The purpose of this review is to describe and appraise selected measurement tools of fine motor skills appropriate for people with tremor disorders. In this context, we consider the tools’ content – i.e., what movement features they focus on. In addition, we consider how measurement tools of fine motor skills relate to measures of a person’s disease state or a person’s function. These considerations affect how one should select and interpret the results of these tools in laboratory and clinical contexts. PMID:23717299

  5. Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Katie Workman

    2009-11-09

    Kids will collect and organize data into a graph then analyze the results. Students will have two weeks to complete this assignment with their group. Pick three types of candy. Survey 30 people to see which kind they like best. Play Graphing Games Create two bar graphs using Let's Graph! Use the same data to create a bar, line, area, pie and XY graph. Create a Graph. Save each graph then decide which graph works best for this particular data. Make sure ...

  6. Rated MPG for Confusion Using Gas Mileage to Learn Graphing and Data Analysis Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Claudia Bode

    2009-01-01

    This case study follows a family’s dilemma about how to save money on gasoline. Should they keep their SUV and trade in their Corolla for a hybrid sedan? Going from 28 (Corolla) to 48 (Hybrid) miles per gallon (MPG) should really save money on gas. That’s a change of 20 MPG! Or, should they keep their Corolla and trade in their SUV for a minivan? The SUV gets about 13 MPG while the Minivan gets 17 MPG. Students learn how to analyze fuel efficiency in terms of “gallons per miles” driven instead of miles per gallon, and gain graphing and data analysis skills. An extension activity also relates fuel efficiency to greenhouse gas emissions. The case was developed for use in a high school general science course. It could be adapted for use in introductory physics, chemistry, algebra, or environmental science courses at the high school or college level.

  7. The Effect of a Graph-Oriented Computer-Assisted Project-Based Learning Environment on Argumentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, P. -S.; Van Dyke, M.; Chen, Y.; Smith, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to explore how seventh graders in a suburban school in the United States developed argumentation skills and science knowledge in a project-based learning environment that incorporated a graph-oriented, computer-assisted application. A total of 54 students (three classes) comprised this treatment…

  8. Groovy Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Cate

    2008-04-14

    Geometry is everywhere! Use these links to learn about graphing and test your knowledge! Test your coordinate graphing skills and catch the Graph Mole We will be working with graphs in class. Make your own graph of information you compile with this link. Just for Fun! Have fun with some Tricky Tangrams. See how many shapes you ...

  9. Line Graph Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts Bannister, Vanessa R.; Jamar, Idorenyin; Mutegi, Jomo W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the learning progress of one fifth-grade student is examined with regard to the development of her graph interpretation skills as she participated in the Junior Science Institute (JSI), a two-week, science intensive summer camp in which participants engaged in microbiology research and application. By showcasing the student's…

  10. Data and Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Lerdahl

    2010-02-23

    Practice your graphing skills with these fun activities! Work on your bar graphs with Bar Graph Bugs Take a survey with Data Picking Use pictures to graph with Pictograph Answer graphing questions Use coordinate graphing with Billy Bug and Graph a mole. Use coordinate graphing to Planet Hop! ...

  11. Supplantation of Mental Operations on Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Markus; Girwidz, Raimund; Engel, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Research findings show the difficulties younger students have in working with graphs. Higher mental operations are necessary for a skilled interpretation of abstract representations. We suggest connecting a concrete representation of the modeled problem with the related graph. The idea is to illustrate essential mental operations externally. This…

  12. Graph/Chart Interpretation and Reading Comprehension as Critical Thinking Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malamitsa, Katerina; Kokkotas, Panagiotis; Kasoutas, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In contemporary academic literature and in many national curricula, there is a widespread acceptance that critical thinking should be an important dimension of Education. Teachers and researchers recognize the importance of developing students critical thinking, but there are still great difficulties in defining and assessing critical-thinking…

  13. Prospective middle school mathematics teachers’ reflective thinking skills: descriptions of their students’ thinking and interpretations of their teaching

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Jansen; Sandy M. Spitzer

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined prospective middle school mathematics teachers’ reflective thinking skills to understand how they\\u000a learned from their own teaching practice when engaging in a modified lesson study experience. Our goal was to identify variations\\u000a among prospective teachers’ descriptions of students’ thinking and frequency of their interpretations about how teaching affected\\u000a their students’ learning. Thirty-three participants responded to

  14. Categorization of first-year university students' interpretations of numerical linear distance-time graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemyss, Thomas; van Kampen, Paul

    2013-06-01

    We have investigated the various approaches taken by first-year university students (n?550) when asked to determine the direction of motion, the constancy of speed, and a numerical value of the speed of an object at a point on a numerical linear distance-time graph. We investigated the prevalence of various well-known general graphing difficulties, such as graph-as-picture errors and slope-height confusion. We established that two-thirds of our students could determine the direction of motion with respect to a reference point, just under 80% could determine that the speed is constant, and just under 20% of our students could correctly determine the value of the speed; in the latter case, about half of the students divided the two coordinates. Three stable categories of correctly explaining the constancy of speed emerged from the data. We found that the reason given for determining that the speed of the object was constant did not correlate with successfully determining a value for the speed. We have established that technical difficulties such as determining the slope of any linear graph did not explain the poor performance. By comparing the answers to similar questions on water level versus time graphs, we were able to establish that context dependence and incorrect prior learning are likely to play a role. Post-test data are used to confirm the validity of the categorization and support the conclusion that being able to determine the slope of a y,x graph and having a correct qualitative understanding of a distance-time graph is not sufficient to correctly determine a value for the speed.

  15. The Impact of Microcomputer-Based Science Labs on Children's Graphing Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokros, Janice R.

    Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL), the use of microcomputers for student-directed data acquisition and analysis, represents a promising new development in science laboratory instruction. This descriptive study determined the impact of MBLs on middle school students' understanding of graphs of distance and velocity. The study was based on the…

  16. Categorization of First-Year University Students' Interpretations of Numerical Linear Distance-Time Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wemyss, Thomas; van Kampen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the various approaches taken by first-year university students (n[image omitted]550) when asked to determine the direction of motion, the constancy of speed, and a numerical value of the speed of an object at a point on a numerical linear distance-time graph. We investigated the prevalence of various well-known general…

  17. Individual Differences and the Interpretation of Auditory Graphs: Cognitive Abilities and Demographics

    E-print Network

    designing auditory graphs. Raven's matrices, gender, handedness, and musical ability were most effective as the letter presented 2 letters before and `3' if the letter was not the same. Spatial Reasoning Task: Raven regression investigated utility of demographics, Raven's matrices, and n-back working memory task

  18. Re-Examining the Power of Video Motion Analysis to Promote the Reading and Creating of Kinematic Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2010-01-01

    One essential skill that students who learn physics should possess is the ability to create and interpret kinematic graphs. However, it is well documented in the literature that students show lack of competence in these abilities. They have problems in connecting graphs and physics concepts, as well as graphs and the real world. The present paper…

  19. Automatic skill acquisition in Reinforcement Learning using connection graph stability centrality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Ajdari Rad; Martin Hasler; Parham Moradi

    2010-01-01

    Reinforcement Learning (RL) is an approach for training agent's behavior through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment. An important problem of RL is that in large domains an enormous number of decisions are to be made. Hence, instead of learning using individual primitive actions, an agent could learn much faster if it could form high level behaviors known as skills.

  20. Interpretive Structural Modeling of MLearning Curriculum Implementation Model of English Language Communication Skills for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim; Siraj, Saedah; Asra; Hussin, Zaharah

    2014-01-01

    In the field of distance education, learning mediated through mobile technology or mobile learning (mLearning) has rapidly building a repertoire of influence in distance education research. This paper aims to propose an mLearning curriculum implementation model for English Language and Communication skills course among undergraduates using…

  1. Acquisition of Visual Perceptual Skills from Worked Examples: Learning to Interpret Electrocardiograms (ECGs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Berge, Kees; van Gog, Tamara; Mamede, Silvia; Schmidt, Henk G.; van Saase, Jan L. C. M.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that for acquiring problem-solving skills, instruction consisting of studying worked examples is more effective and efficient for novice learners than instruction consisting of problem-solving. This study investigated whether worked examples would also be a useful instructional format for the acquisition of visual perceptual…

  2. Interpretations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    Although nobody can question the practical efficiency of quantum mechanics, there remains the serious question of its interpretation. As Valerio Scarani puts it, "We do not feel at ease with the indistinguishability principle (that is, the superposition principle) and some of its consequences." Indeed, this principle which pervades the quantum world is in stark contradiction with our everyday experience. From the very beginning of quantum mechanics, a number of physicists--but not the majority of them!--have asked the question of its "interpretation". One may simply deny that there is a problem: according to proponents of the minimalist interpretation, quantum mechanics is self-sufficient and needs no interpretation. The point of view held by a majority of physicists, that of the Copenhagen interpretation, will be examined in Section 10.1. The crux of the problem lies in the status of the state vector introduced in the preceding chapter to describe a quantum system, which is no more than a symbolic representation for the Copenhagen school of thought. Conversely, one may try to attribute some "external reality" to this state vector, that is, a correspondence between the mathematical description and the physical reality. In this latter case, it is the measurement problem which is brought to the fore. In 1932, von Neumann was first to propose a global approach, in an attempt to build a purely quantum theory of measurement examined in Section 10.2. This theory still underlies modern approaches, among them those grounded on decoherence theory, or on the macroscopic character of the measuring apparatus: see Section 10.3. Finally, there are non-standard interpretations such as Everett's many worlds theory or the hidden variables theory of de Broglie and Bohm (Section 10.4). Note, however, that this variety of interpretations has no bearing whatsoever on the practical use of quantum mechanics. There is no controversy on the way we should use quantum mechanics!

  3. Levels of line graph question interpretation with intermediate elementary students of varying scientific and mathematical knowledge and ability: A think aloud study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Stacy Kathryn

    This study examined how intermediate elementary students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected their interpretation of line graphs and how their interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 6th-grade students engaged in think aloud interviews (Ericsson & Simon, 1993) while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science (TOGS) (McKenzie & Padilla, 1986). Hand gestures were video recorded. Student performance on the TOGS was assessed using an assessment rubric created from previously cited factors affecting students' graphing ability. Factors were categorized using Bertin's (1983) three graph question levels. The assessment rubric was validated by Padilla and a veteran mathematics and science teacher. Observational notes were also collected. Data were analyzed using Roth and Bowen's semiotic process of reading graphs (2001). Key findings from this analysis included differences in the use of heuristics, self-generated questions, science knowledge, and self-motivation. Students with higher prior achievement used a greater number and variety of heuristics and more often chose appropriate heuristics. They also monitored their understanding of the question and the adequacy of their strategy and answer by asking themselves questions. Most used their science knowledge spontaneously to check their understanding of the question and the adequacy of their answers. Students with lower and moderate prior achievement favored one heuristic even when it was not useful for answering the question and rarely asked their own questions. In some cases, if students with lower prior achievement had thought about their answers in the context of their science knowledge, they would have been able to recognize their errors. One student with lower prior achievement motivated herself when she thought the questions were too difficult. In addition, students answered the TOGS in one of three ways: as if they were mathematics word problems, science data to be analyzed, or they were confused and had to guess. A second set of findings corroborated how science background knowledge affected graph interpretation: correct science knowledge supported students' reasoning, but it was not necessary to answer any question correctly; correct science knowledge could not compensate for incomplete mathematics knowledge; and incorrect science knowledge often distracted students when they tried to use it while answering a question. Finally, using Roth and Bowen's (2001) two-stage semiotic model of reading graphs, representative vignettes showed emerging patterns from the study. This study added to our understanding of the role of science content knowledge during line graph interpretation, highlighted the importance of heuristics and mathematics procedural knowledge, and documented the importance of perception attentions, motivation, and students' self-generated questions. Recommendations were made for future research in line graph interpretation in mathematics and science education and for improving instruction in this area.

  4. Graph Dance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Eric Muller

    2004-01-01

    In this activity, learners "dance" (move back and forth at varying speeds) by reading a graph. This is a kinesthetic way to help learners interpret and understand how motion is graphed. This resource includes instructions for three different graph "dances" and an optional extension activity.

  5. Graphing Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

  6. Reading Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-20

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to graphing functions and interpreting graphs of real life situations such as distance and velocity. The lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to graphing and gathering information from graphs as well as suggested ways to work them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one.

  7. Graphing Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeken, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science. Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations. Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary…

  8. Total Quality & Basic Skills. The TQ Castle--Using Basic Skills Development to Evade Alligators in the Moat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewe, Glenda

    1994-01-01

    Key skills required in the total quality workplace are cross-functional teaming, interpreting charts/graphs, oral communication, brainstorming, understanding cause/effect, categorizing ideas, critical pathing, formulating suggestions, analyzing the needs of internal and external customers, and writing status reports. (SK)

  9. Bar Graph Mania

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Thurlow

    2005-10-26

    Use these activities to build and interpret data on bar graphs. Catch all the bugs in the system and put them in the correct column of the bar graph. Answer the questions about the bugs in the graph. Catch bugs in six rooms. Bugs in the system Do these bar graphing activities. You don\\'t have to do the last question ...

  10. U-interpreter

    SciTech Connect

    Arvind; Gostelow, K.P.

    1982-02-01

    The author argues that by giving a unique name to every activity generated during a computation, the u-interpreter can provide greater concurrency in the interpretation of data flow graphs. 19 references.

  11. Acquisition of cognitive skill

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. Anderson

    1982-01-01

    A framework for skill acquisition is proposed that includes two major stages in the development of a cognitive skill: a declarative stage in which facts about the skill domain are interpreted and a procedural stage in which the domain knowl- edge is directly embodied in procedures for performing the skill. This general framework has been instantiated in the ACT system

  12. Axiomatising Tree-interpretable Structures Achim Blumensath

    E-print Network

    Blumensath, Achim

    by synchronous multihead automata. ­ Rational graphs [18], [21] are graphs with an edge relation recognised by asynchronous multihead automata. ­ Recursive graphs [16] are graphs with recursive edge relation. These classes of tree-interpretable structures which generalises the notion of a prefix-recognisable graph to arbitrary

  13. Global Warming Graph Analysis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Krista Larsen

    Students interpret a variety of graphs from IPCC reports to learn the details of climate change. Pairs of students analyze data in graphs, and present their findings by addressing the following points: 1) Describe the axes and range of the graph; 2) Describe the general trend of the graph; and 3) What might your graph be telling us, and what can you infer from the data? This lesson appears to be relatively simple, but much of the peer-reviewed data in these reports are highly technical and require a great deal of analysis.

  14. Task Analyses of Critical Evaluations of Quantitative Arguments: First Steps in Critical Interpretation of Graphically Presented Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Curtis C.; And Others

    The ability to think critically in the presence of arguments with essential quantitative elements, most often graphical elements, will become an essential skill for educated citizens in the future. This paper takes one specific graphical display, a narrow series of observational and interpretational tasks related to a graph, and using a small set…

  15. Graphs in Economics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Isaac Vellangany

    This PowerPoint presentation features an explanation of different types of graphs. Students will learn how to make and interpret a time-series graph, a cross-section graph, and a scatter diagram. Illustrations and text are used to define and calculate the slope of a line and distinguish between linear and nonlinear relationships and between relationships that have a maximum and a minimum.

  16. Theory and Practice in the Teaching of Interpreting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarup, Hanne

    1993-01-01

    Identifies component features which are important for the skill of interpreting. Discusses differences between interpreting and translation and between consecutive and simultaneous interpreting. Provides methods for teaching component skills of interpreting to students. (HB)

  17. Graph Indexing: Tree + Delta >= Graph

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peixiang Zhao; Jeffrey Xu Yu; Philip S. Yu

    2007-01-01

    Recent scientific and technological advances have witnessed an abundance of structural patterns modeled as graphs. As a result, it is of special interest to process graph contain- ment queries effectively on large graph databases. Given a graph database G, and a query graph q, the graph contain- ment query is to retrieve all graphs in G which contain q as

  18. Mass Spectrometry: Using a Game Format to Develop Logic Skills While Applying Fundamental Chemistry Knowledge to Determine Possible Chemical Formula Represented in Graphic Output From A Mass Spetrometer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Fenno, Ubah Medical Academy, Hopkins, MN, based on an activity presented by Olaf Runquist, Professor, Hamline University.

    This activity is a series of game-like lessons that assist the student in developing the logic skills needed to read mass spectrometer output and formulate the identity of an unknown molecule. As students endeavor to identify the unknown they must apply fundamental chemistry knowledge including formula mass, isotopes, periodic table, relative abundance, interpreting graphs, organic chemistry, ionization, bonding rules, and structural formulas.

  19. Growing and Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Engineering K-PhD Program,

    Students visit second- and fourth-grade classes to measure the heights of older students using large building blocks as a non-standard unit of measure. They also measure adults in the school community. Results are displayed in age-appropriate bar graphs (paper cut-outs of miniature building blocks glued on paper to form bar graphs) enabling a comparison of the heights of different age groups. The activities that comprise this activity help students develop the concepts and vocabulary to describe, in a non-ambiguous way, how heights change as children age. This introduction to graphing provides an important foundation for creating and interpreting graphs in future years.

  20. Advantages of Micro-Based Labs: Electronic Data Acquisition, Computerized Graphing, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuessy, Carol L.; Rowland, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) study (n=75) which uses multiple temperature gathering devices (mercury thermometer, digital thermometer, and computer probe) and graphing methods (hand graphs, delayed computer graphs, and real-time graphs). Reports that MBL real-time graphing provides significant increases in graphing skills. (MVL)

  1. Considerations When Working with Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwa-Froelich, Deborah A.; Westby, Carol E.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the current training and certification procedures in place for linguistic interpreters, the continuum of interpreter roles, and how interpreters' perspectives may influence the interpretive interaction. The specific skills needed for interpreting in either health care or educational settings are identified. A table compares…

  2. Conceptual graphs for semantics and knowledge processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fargues, J.; Landau, M.C.; Dugourd, A.; Catach, L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the representational and algorithmic power of the conceptual graph model for natural language semantics and knowledge processing. Also described is a Prolog-like resolution method for conceptual graphs, which allows to perform deduction on very large semantic domains. The interpreter developed is similar to a Prolog interpreter in which the terms are any conceptual graphs and in which the unification algorithm is replaced by a specialized algorithm for conceptual graphs.

  3. Living Skills as a Core Curriculum Component.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufty, David

    Schools should help students develop daily living skills in addition to basic cognitive skills such as reading, writing, and figuring. Living skills are interpreted to include those skills which help students cope with rapid social change. Skills need to be taught on health and nutrition, safety and first aid, interpersonal relationships, family…

  4. Using Physiology to Explore Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Bruce J. Dudek (St. Labre High School)

    1998-12-01

    Making graphs can be a challenging process for some students to understand. Using graphs and student collected data, the class will learn how to construct and interpret graphs. They will develop simple experiments; designate x and y axis, scale, label and plot points on a graph; determine blood pressure and extrapolate heart rate using pulse, sphygmomanometer, and stethoscope; collect, organize, display, and analyze experimental data; and discover factors affecting heart rate and pressure. Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to designate x and y axis, scale, label and plot points on a graph.

  5. Knowing a Lot for One's Age: Vocabulary Skill and Not Age Is Associated with Anticipatory Incremental Sentence Interpretation in Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borovsky, Arielle; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Fernald, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Adults can incrementally combine information from speech with astonishing speed to anticipate future words. Concurrently, a growing body of work suggests that vocabulary ability is crucially related to lexical processing skills in children. However, little is known about this relationship with predictive sentence processing in children or adults.…

  6. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-05-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y =e-t/? would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to interpret the mean life (or time constant) ? using such a linear-log graph.

  7. Data collection and graph generation using touchscreen technology

    E-print Network

    Pope, John (John W.), Jr

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and implementation of the TouchGraph system, whose goal is to help students develop graphing skills by allowing them to record their own data and access the data of their classmates using ...

  8. Resolving Interpretive Ambiguity in Text: Children's Generation of Multiple Interpretations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casteel, Mark A.

    1997-01-01

    Studied text interpretation in four experiments with second and fourth graders, manipulating several story variables. Found that both groups were skilled at providing two text interpretations, although second graders were more likely than fourth graders to use extra-story information in their second interpretations. Subjects' first interpretations

  9. Novel graph distance matrix.

    PubMed

    Randi?, Milan; Pisanski, Tomaz; Novic, Marjana; Plavsi?, Dejan

    2010-07-15

    We have introduced novel distance matrix for graphs, which is based on interpretation of columns of the adjacency matrix of a graph as a set of points in n-dimensional space, n being the number of vertices in the graph. Numerical values for the distances are based on the Euclidean distance between n points in n-dimensional space. In this way, we have combined the traditional representation of graphs (drawn as 2D object of no fixed geometry) with their representation in n-dimensional space, defined by a set of n-points that lead to a representation of definite geometry. The novel distance matrix, referred to as natural distance matrix, shows some structural properties and offers novel graph invariants as molecular descriptors for structure-property-activity studies. One of the novel graph descriptors is the modified connectivity index in which the bond contribution for (m, n) bond-type is given by 1/ radical(m + n), where m and n are the valence of the end vertices of the bond. The novel distance matrix (ND) can be reduced to sparse distance-adjacency matrix (DA), which can be viewed as specially weighted adjacency matrix of a graph. The quotient of the leading eigenvalues of novel distance-adjacency matrix and novel distance matrix, as illustrated on a collection of graphs of chemical interest, show parallelism with a simple measure of graph density, based on the quotient of the number of edges in a graph and the maximal possible number of edges for graphs of the same size. PMID:20301095

  10. Using Sorting Networks for Skill Building and Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andre, Robert; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2007-01-01

    Sorting networks, used in graph theory, have instructional value as a skill- building tool as well as an interesting exploration in discrete mathematics. Students can practice mathematics facts and develop reasoning and logic skills with this topic. (Contains 4 figures.)

  11. The Effect of Calculator-Based Ranger Activities on Students' Graphing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh Nam

    2002-01-01

    Addresses three issues of Calculator-based Ranger (CBR) activities on graphing abilities: (a) the effect of CBR activities on graphing abilities; (b) the extent to which prior knowledge about graphing skills affects graphing ability; and (c) the influence of instructional styles on students' graphing abilities. Indicates that CBR activities are…

  12. Graph Theory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Graph theory is widely used in computer science, engineering and of course, mathematics. Wikipedia offers this definition and overview of Graph Theory (1). This next website from Mega-Math (2) reviews some of the Vocabulary of Graphs and highlights some applications for graph theory, such as the design of computer systems and games. Some additional applications for Graph Theory are discussed in this more technical book called Graph Theory with Applications (3). This website from Georgia Tech (4) discusses a proof that allows a user to create a map of the U.S. using just four colors. For a more involved explanation of Graph Theory, see this Graph Theory book by Reinhard Diestel (5). On this next website (6), Christopher P. Mawata of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga offers a collection of Graph Theory Lessons for educators. The final website provides a short biography of a key figure in Graph Theory who recently passed away, Frank Harary (7).

  13. Bar Graphs!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Pocock

    2006-10-26

    Mrs. Kohlar has been working with you on bar graphs. Here are a couple of games for you to play to help you practice using them. Catch all the Bugs in the system and put them in the correct column of the bar graph. Answer the questions about the bugs in the graph. You can play the game twice if you wish. Do these bar graph activities and have some bar graph fun! Don\\'t worry about the last question, just answer ...

  14. Choose the Right Graph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moersch, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of accurate graphic presentation and describes graphs available on "LabQuest" computer software. Highlights include graphing conventions; prerequisites for computer graphing; bar graphs; pie graphs; stacked bar graphs; line graphs; x/y graphs; scatter graphs; box plots; stem and leaf graphs; best fit graphs; and normal…

  15. Map Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Ali

    2010-02-23

    Map Skill Activities Map Skills Follow the directions below and write your answers on the worksheet provided. 1. Continents Quiz: Continents Quiz 2. Latitude/Longitude Reviews latitude and longitude quiz latitude/longitude map game lat/long multiple choice quiz 3. Map Scale Map Scale Activity 4.Map Skills map skills game map skills quiz ...

  16. Sparse Projections over Graph

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deng Cai; Xiaofei He; Jiawei Han

    2008-01-01

    Recent study has shown that canonical algorithms such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discrimi- nant Analysis (LDA) can be obtained from graph based di- mensionality reduction framework. However, these algo- rithms yield projective maps which are linear combination of all the original features. The results are difficult to be interpreted psychologically and physiologically. This paper presents a novel

  17. Insight into earthquake sequencing: analysis and interpretation of time-series constructed from the directed graph of the Markov chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavers, M. S.; Vasudevan, K.

    2015-02-01

    Directed graph representation of a Markov chain model to study global earthquake sequencing leads to a time-series of state-to-state transition probabilities that includes the spatio-temporally linked recurrent events in the record-breaking sense. A state refers to a configuration comprised of zones with either the occurrence or non-occurrence of an earthquake in each zone in a pre-determined time interval. Since the time-series is derived from non-linear and non-stationary earthquake sequencing, we use known analysis methods to glean new information. We apply decomposition procedures such as ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to study the state-to-state fluctuations in each of the intrinsic mode functions. We subject the intrinsic mode functions, the orthogonal basis set derived from the time-series using the EEMD, to a detailed analysis to draw information-content of the time-series. Also, we investigate the influence of random-noise on the data-driven state-to-state transition probabilities. We consider a second aspect of earthquake sequencing that is closely tied to its time-correlative behavior. Here, we extend the Fano factor and Allan factor analysis to the time-series of state-to state transition frequencies of a Markov chain. Our results support not only the usefulness the intrinsic mode functions in understanding the time-series but also the presence of power-law behaviour exemplified by the Fano factor and the Allan factor.

  18. MY NASA DATA: Reading Bar Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity engages students in reading a bar graph using authentic NASA data. Students will identify major parts of bar graphs and make a generalization based their interpretation of the graphed data. The lesson provides detailed procedures, related links and sample graphs, follow-up questions, extensions, and teacher notes. Designed for student use, MY NASA DATA LAS samples micro datasets from large scientific data archives, and provides structured investigations engaging students in exploration of real data to answer real world questions.

  19. Insight into earthquake sequencing: Analysis and interpretation of time-series constructed from the directed graph of the Markov chain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, K.; Cavers, M.

    2013-12-01

    Directed graph representation of a Markov chain model to study global earthquake sequencing leads to a time-series of state-to-state transition probabilities. A state refers to a configuration comprised of zones with either the occurrence or non-occurrence of an earthquake in each zone in a pre-determined time interval. We generalize the Markov chain of earthquake sequences by including the recurrent events in space and time for each event in the record-breaking sense. The record-breaking recurrent events provide the basis for redefining the weights for the state-to-state transition probabilities. For the non-linear and non-stationary time-series generated, we apply decomposition procedures such as ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) to study the state-to-state fluctuations in each of the intrinsic mode functions. We subject the intrinsic mode functions, the orthogonal basis set derived from the time-series using the EEMD, to a detailed analysis to draw information-content of the time-series. Also, we investigate the influence of random-noise on the data-driven state-to-state transition probabilities. We consider a second aspect of earthquake sequencing that is closely tied to its time-correlative behavior. Here, we extend the Fano factor and Allan factor analysis to the time-series of state-to state transition frequencies of a Markov chain that includes the spatio-temporally linked recurrent events in the record-breaking sense. Our results derived from a global seismic catalogue support not only the usefulness of the intrinsic mode functions in examining the time-series but also the presence of power-law behaviour exemplified by the Fano factor and the Allan factor.

  20. Planar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, G. M.; Montaldi, E.

    1984-03-01

    We sum in closed form the planar graphs in a zero-dimensional theory and generalize a previously known solution. An appropriate expansion of this solution is useful to sum planar graphs in any dimensional space-time.

  1. Lesson Summary Students graph and analyze raw data for

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    gasses in our atmosphere Prior Knowledge & Skills · Graphing skills · Knowledge of the greenhouse effect. What is the greenhouse effect? How does it work? 8. Where are the two largest holes locatedLesson Summary Students graph and analyze raw data for concentrations of four different greenhouse

  2. Ohio Guidelines for Educational Interpreters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Special Education.

    This document presents Ohio's state guidelines to assist school districts in providing appropriate educational interpreting services for students who have hearing impairments. A section on the primary role of the educational interpreter considers: necessary knowledge and skills, modes of communication, interpreting environments, testing…

  3. Bar Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shodor

    2012-04-02

    This lesson is designed to give students experience creating and reading bar graphs. The lesson provides links to a practice data set and the bar graph activity so that students can practice making bar graphs and check their work using the activity. Finally, the lesson provides a suggested follow-up to this lesson.

  4. Distributed Graphs and Graph Transformation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriele Taentzer

    1999-01-01

    The new approach of distributed graphs and graph transformation developed in this article allows us to use structured graph transformation on two abstraction levels: the network and the local level. The network level contains the description of topological structures of a system. The local level covers the description of states and their transitions in local systems. Local state transitions may

  5. Permutation Graphs and Transitive Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shimon Even; Amir Pnueli; Abraham Lempel

    1972-01-01

    A graph G with vertex set N = {1, 2, .-. , n} is called a permutation graph there exists a permutation P on N such that for i,j E N, (i - j)(P-'(i) - P-'(j)) < 0 if ar only if i and j are joined by an edge in G. A structural relationship is established between permutation graphs

  6. A Feynman graph selection tool in GRACE system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fukuko Yuasa; Toshiaki Kaneko; Tadashi Ishikawa

    2001-01-01

    We present a Feynman graph selection tool grcsel, which is an interpreter written in C language. In the framework of GRACE, it enables us to get a subset of Feynman graphs according to given conditions. .

  7. Teaching Quantitative Skills in the Geosciences

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This section of the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) website provides resources, information and discussion to support undergraduate students and faculty in the difficult task of mastering quantitative skills. From simple arithmetic or graphing to sophisticated use of equations and models, quantitative skills are an integral aspect of teaching geoscience at the undergraduate level.

  8. The Nature of Employability Skills: Empirical Evidence from Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Johnny; Ng, Michael Chi Man; Loke, Fiona; Ramos, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns the changing nature of employability skills, moving from the original life skills or basic skills concepts to the increasingly work-oriented interpretation. The early concept of employability skills linked employability skills to job readiness and holding down employment. However, the work-oriented focus is increasingly linking…

  9. Supplementing the Graphing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piston, Calvin

    1992-01-01

    Proposes three types of supplementary problems to develop students' skill in interpretation of graphically represented data. Eleven examples are presented and solved for the following types of problems: comparison of one quantity to another, comparison of two quantities that each depend on a common parameter, and reasonable data prediction. (MDH)

  10. The Graph Choice Chart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Hannah; Nelson, Sarah J.; Weatherbee, Ryan; Zoellick, Bill; Schauffler, Molly

    2014-01-01

    Data literacy is complex. When students investigate the natural world, they must be able to gather data, organize it in tables and spreadsheets, analyze it in context, and describe and interpret it--usually as evidence to support a scientific argument. These skills are echoed in the science and engineering practices of the "Next Generation…

  11. Interpretations of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Lyn; Miller, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The National Literacy Strategy (NLS) was introduced into schools in England in 1998 with the aim of raising the literacy attainments of primary-aged children. The Framework for Teaching the Literacy Hour, a key component of the NLS, proposes an interpretation of literacy that emphasises reading, writing and spelling skills. An investigation of the…

  12. Presentation skills.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Nurses with such skills can share knowledge and expertise, and communicate clearly, in a range of workplace scenarios. PMID:25746884

  13. Impossible Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-05-24

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to graphs that are not possible, either because they don't pass the vertical line test or simply because of the context of the graph, i.e. discontinuous graph of displacement vs. time. This lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to impossible graphs as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one.

  14. Fostering the Development of Quantitative Life Skills through Introductory Astronomy: Can it be Done?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follette, Katherine B.; McCarthy, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a student survey designed to test whether the all-important life skill of numeracy/quantitative literacy can be fostered and improved upon in college students through the vehicle of non-major introductory courses in Astronomy. Many instructors of introductory science courses for non-majors would state that a major goal of our classes is to teach our students to distinguish between science and pseudoscience, truth and fiction, in their everyday lives. It is difficult to believe that such a skill can truly be mastered without a fair amount of mathematical sophistication in the form of arithmetic, statistical and graph reading skills that many American college students unfortunately lack when they enter our classrooms. In teaching what is frequently their "terminal science course in life” can we instill in our students the numerical skills that they need to be savvy consumers, educated citizens and discerning interpreters of the ever-present polls, studies and surveys in which our society is awash? In what may well be their final opportunity to see applied mathematics in the classroom, can we impress upon them the importance of mathematical sophistication in interpreting the statistics that they are bombarded with by the media? Our study is in its second semester, and is designed to investigate to what extent it is possible to improve important quantitative skills in college students through a single semester introductory Astronomy course.

  15. Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luparelli, Augustus N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These four articles focus on developing basic reading, science, and job search skills: "Reading Program for Vocational Classes" by Augustus Luparelli; "Why Teach Employability Skills?" by Larry Siefferman; "Improving Vocabulary and Reading Skills" by Edythe Conway; and "Science in Everyday Life" by Virginia Eleazer and George Carney. (SK)

  16. Quantum networks modelled by graphs

    E-print Network

    Pavel Exner; Olaf Post

    2007-12-10

    Quantum networks are often modelled using Schroedinger operators on metric graphs. To give meaning to such models one has to know how to interpret the boundary conditions which match the wave functions at the graph vertices. In this article we give a survey, technically not too heavy, of several recent results which serve this purpose. Specifically, we consider approximations by means of ``fat graphs'' -- in other words, suitable families of shrinking manifolds -- and discuss convergence of the spectra and resonances in such a setting.

  17. All About Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Hoffmann

    2011-06-09

    Students will practice creating and understanding bar graphs. Learn about making and reading graphs. BrainPOP! Bar Graph Video Bugs have gotten into the library! Help the Cybersquad get rid of them and graph which bugs showed up. Bugs in the System Graph colors and shapes! Bar Graph Sorter Practice using tally charts. IXL Tally Charts Practice using bar graphs. IXL Bar Graphs ...

  18. Graph automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Symeon Bozapalidis; Antonios Kalampakas

    2008-01-01

    Magmoids satisfying the 15 fundamental equations of graphs, namely graphoids, are introduced. Automata on directed hypergraphs are defined by virtue of a relational graphoid. The closure properties of the so-obtained class are investigated, and a comparison is being made with the class of syntactically recognizable graph languages.

  19. Graphing Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connery, Keely Flynn

    2007-01-01

    Graphing predictions is especially important in classes where relationships between variables need to be explored and derived. In this article, the author describes how his students sketch the graphs of their predictions before they begin their investigations on two laboratory activities: Distance Versus Time Cart Race Lab and Resistance; and…

  20. Map graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhi-Zhong Chen; Michelangelo Grigni; Christos H. Papadimitriou

    2002-01-01

    We consider a modified notion of planarity, in which two nations of a map are considered adjacent when they share any point of their boundaries (not necessarily an edge, as planarity requires). Such adjacencies define a map graph. We give an NP characterization for such graphs, derive some consequences regarding sparsity and coloring, and survey some algorithmic results.

  1. Token Graphs

    E-print Network

    Fabila-Monroy, Ruy; Huemer, Clemens; Hurtado, Ferran; Urrutia, Jorge; Wood, David R

    2009-01-01

    For a graph $G$ and integer $k\\geq1$, we define the token graph $F_k(G)$ to be the graph with vertex set all $k$-subsets of $V(G)$, where two vertices are adjacent in $F_k(G)$ whenever their symmetric difference is a pair of adjacent vertices in $G$. Thus vertices of $F_k(G)$ correspond to configurations of $k$ indistinguishable tokens placed at distinct vertices of $G$, where two configurations are adjacent whenever one configuration can be reached from the other by moving one token along an edge from its current position to an unoccupied vertex. This paper introduces token graphs and studies some of their properties including: connectivity, diameter, cliques, chromatic number, Hamiltonian paths, and Cartesian products of token graphs.

  2. Helping Students Make Sense of Graphs: An Experimental Trial of SmartGraphs Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Andrew; Kay, Rachel; Staudt, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Graphs are commonly used in science, mathematics, and social sciences to convey important concepts; yet students at all ages demonstrate difficulties interpreting graphs. This paper reports on an experimental study of free, Web-based software called SmartGraphs that is specifically designed to help students overcome their misconceptions regarding graphs. SmartGraphs allows students to interact with graphs and provides hints and scaffolding to help students, if they need help. SmartGraphs activities can be authored to be useful in teaching and learning a variety of topics that use graphs (such as slope, velocity, half-life, and global warming). A 2-year experimental study in physical science classrooms was conducted with dozens of teachers and thousands of students. In the first year, teachers were randomly assigned to experimental or control conditions. Data show that students of teachers who use SmartGraphs as a supplement to normal instruction make greater gains understanding graphs than control students studying the same content using the same textbooks, but without SmartGraphs. Additionally, teachers believe that the SmartGraphs activities help students meet learning goals in the physical science course, and a great majority reported they would use the activities with students again. In the second year of the study, several specific variations of SmartGraphs were researched to help determine what makes SmartGraphs effective.

  3. Graphs and Statistics: A Resource Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of General Education Curriculum Development.

    Graphical representation of statistical data is the focus of this resource handbook. Only graphs which present numerical information are discussed. Activities involving the making, interpreting, and use of various types of graphs and tables are included. Sections are also included which discuss statistical terms, normal distribution and…

  4. Shop Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shop Skills is a lesson plan which provides instruction in the safety procedures and work processes for hand and machine tools used in a metal machine shop. Specific skills include sawing, drilling, boring, grinding, lathing, and milling. After completing this module, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in these skills through a variety of shop projects and in a final exercise that uses a combination of these skills. Note: This module is part of a modularized manufacturing technology curriculum created by the PSCME, found at www.pscme.org/educators.html.

  5. STAR: Steiner-Tree Approximation in Relationship Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gjergji Kasneci; Maya Ramanath; Mauro Sozio; Fabian M. Suchanek; Gerhard Weikum

    2009-01-01

    Large graphs and networks are abundant in modern information systems: entity-relationship graphs over relational data or Web-extracted entities, biological networks, social online communities, knowledge bases, and many more. Often such data comes with expressive node and edge labels that allow an interpretation as a semantic graph, and edge weights that reflect the strengths of semantic relations between entities. Finding close

  6. Can Comparison of Contrastive Examples Facilitate Graph Understanding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Linsey A.; Gentner, Dedre

    2011-01-01

    The authors explore the role of comparison in improving graph fluency. The ability to use graphs fluently is crucial for STEM achievement, but graphs are challenging to interpret and produce because they often involve integration of multiple variables, continuous change in variables over time, and omission of certain details in order to highlight…

  7. Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering

    E-print Network

    Mayfield, John

    the number of partitions of a set of size $n$ into $k$ non-empty blocks. A graph theoretic interpretation of this quantity --- the number of partitions of the empty graph of order $n$ into $k$ non-empty independent setsStirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering problem Galvin earned his PhD in mathematics

  8. Graphing Points

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Izzy

    2012-02-07

    Let's learn how to use the lines on graphs (the x & y axis) to plot information. Choose any of the activities below to test your knowledge of identifying the coordinates correctly. Meteoroid Coordinates Soccer Coordinates Donut Coordinates Graphing Points Save the Zogs!-Using Linear Equations Using your coordinate plane knowledge and linear equations help to rescue the Zogs! Can you find the axis for these problems too? What have you noticed about linear equations? What do the lines in linear equations look ...

  9. Circle Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use preset data or input their own data that will be represented in a circle graph. This activity allows students to explore making circle graphs and calculating the percent of a circle that each data entry occupies. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

  10. Bar Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use preset data or input their own data to be represented by a bar graph. This activity allows students to explore bar graphs and how changing scales will alter how their data is represented. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

  11. Graphing Paleoclimate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Students will gain a basic understanding of climate, earth's energy budget, greenhouse gases, factors that affect the climate, paleoclimate, and how proxies are used. The students will then graph paleoclimates. All of the graphing data needed for this activity are contained within this unit. While presenting their findings, students will look for any connections to global climate and some of the variables suggested within the unit. There are corresponding assignments along with a scoring guide also available.

  12. National Association for Interpretation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NAI promotes the advancement of the profession of interpretation, a communication process used in on-site informal education programs at parks, zoos, nature centers, historic sites, museums, and aquaria. This site announces national and regional NAI conferences, workshops on diverse topics, skill certification programs, networking opportunities and job listing service. Includes membership information and application; can order newsletters, professional journals and books. Membership, program and publication fees apply.

  13. Visualization of Social Networks with Node Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Adam Santone

    2012-02-13

    This lesson introduces the concept of node graphs for the purpose of visualizing social networks. The lesson is presented with an introductory physical activity where students create a living graph. Students, building on their existing knowledge regarding common graph types, learn how node graphs can be used to visualize data from social networks. Students will participate in a simulated contagious infection event and will accurately record data about the transmission of the disease. These data will be used to construct a single computer file to be used to create a single node graph for describing the network. Students will then be responsible for understanding how to interpret the resulting network graph in the context of the activity.

  14. Graph Field Automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua Herman; Keith David Pedersen

    2008-01-01

    The Graph Automata have been the paradigm in the expression of utilizing Graphs as a language. Matrix Graph grammars \\\\cite{Pedro} are an algebratization of graph rewriting systems. Here we present the dual of this formalizm which some extensions which we term Graph Field Automata The advantage to this approach is a framework for expressing machines that can use Matrix Graph

  15. Graph Theory in Drama

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students use graph theory to create social graphs for their own social networks and apply what learn to create a graph representing the social dynamics found in a dramatic text. Students then derive meaning based on what they know about the text from the graphs they created. Students learn graph theory vocabulary, as well as engineering applications of graph theory.

  16. Novice Interpretations of Visual Representations of Geosciences Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkemper, L. K.; Arthurs, L.

    2013-12-01

    Past cognition research of individual's perception and comprehension of bar and line graphs are substantive enough that they have resulted in the generation of graph design principles and graph comprehension theories; however, gaps remain in our understanding of how people process visual representations of data, especially of geologic and atmospheric data. This pilot project serves to build on others' prior research and begin filling the existing gaps. The primary objectives of this pilot project include: (i) design a novel data collection protocol based on a combination of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and eye-tracking tasks to investigate student data handling skills of simple to complex visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data, (ii) demonstrate that the protocol yields results that shed light on student data handling skills, and (iii) generate preliminary findings upon which tentative but perhaps helpful recommendations on how to more effectively present these data to the non-scientist community and teach essential data handling skills. An effective protocol for the combined use of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and computer-based eye-tracking tasks for investigating cognitive processes involved in perceiving, comprehending, and interpreting visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data is instrumental to future research in this area. The outcomes of this pilot study provide the foundation upon which future more in depth and scaled up investigations can build. Furthermore, findings of this pilot project are sufficient for making, at least, tentative recommendations that can help inform (i) the design of physical attributes of visual representations of data, especially more complex representations, that may aid in improving students' data handling skills and (ii) instructional approaches that have the potential to aid students in more effectively handling visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data that they might encounter in a course, television news, newspapers and magazines, and websites. Such recommendations would also be the potential subject of future investigations and have the potential to impact the design features when data is presented to the public and instructional strategies not only in geoscience courses but also other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses.

  17. Court Interpreter Training in the Language Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromberg, Wayne H.; Head, Gerald L.

    1984-01-01

    Results of demographic studies and statistics from state and federal courts indicate a growing need for Spanish-English court interpreters with special training in consecutive and simultaneous court interpretation. The five strongest skills which need to be taught in a court interpreter training program are identified and suggestions are given on…

  18. Graphing Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Martin Farley

    Student graphing of high and low tide from locations showing the three tide types (diurnal, semi-diurnal, and mixed) and the Bay of Fundy (tidal amplitude increased by resonance). Students recognize that not all tides are the same and that location is an important control on tides.

  19. Backyard Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COSI

    2009-01-01

    In this math activity, learners will create a scale diagram of their backyard or other outdoor area on graph paper. This activity encourages learners to use models and pictures to relate concepts of ratio, proportion and percentage, as well as to make estimates and comparisons using common units of measurement.

  20. Graph Decomposition of Slim Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yair Caro; Raphael Yuster

    1999-01-01

    A Graph G=(V,E) is called k-slim if for every subgraph S=(VS,ES) of G with s=|VS|Sk there exists K²VS, |K|=k, such that the vertices of VS\\\\K can be partitioned into two subsets, A and B, such that |A|h~s and |B|h~s and no edge of ES connects a vertex from A and a vertex from B. k-slim graphs contain, in particular, the

  1. State of the Atmosphere: Interpreting Weather Observations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    LaFrance, Kim

    2010-08-23

    The purpose of this lesson is to let students analyze atmospheric radiosonde data from a balloon launched at NASA Langley Research Center by teachers attending a workshop. Other resources are included to assist in interpreting the observations. Students are asked to explain in paragraph format their interpretation of the atmospheric conditions depicted by the data and the graph produced using the data.

  2. 1. Iturria-Medina et al (2007). Neuroimage `Characterizing brain anatomical connections using diffusion weighted MRI and graph theory'. 2. Rubinov, M et al (2010). Complex network measures of brain connectivity: uses and interpretations.

    E-print Network

    Priebe, Carey E.

    1. Iturria-Medina et al (2007). Neuroimage `Characterizing brain anatomical connections using diffusion weighted MRI and graph theory'. 2. Rubinov, M et al (2010). Complex network measures of brain, and function using networkx. 4. Gray, William R., et al (2012). "Magnetic resonance connectome automated

  3. A random graph model for massive graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Aiello; Fan R. K. Chung; Linyuan Lu

    2000-01-01

    We propose a random graph model which is a special case of sparse random graphs with given degree sequences. This model involves only a small number of parameters, called logsize and log-log growth rate. These parameters capture some universal characteristics of massive graphs. Furthermore, from these parameters, various properties of the graph can be derived. For example, for certain ranges

  4. Traceability of line graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liming Xiong; Minmin Zong

    2009-01-01

    Brualdi and Shanny [R.A. Brualdi, R.F. Shanny, Hamiltonian line graphs, J. Graph Theory 5 (1981) 307–314], Clark [L. Clark, On hamitonian line graphs, J. Graph Theory 8 (1984) 303–307] and Veldman [H.J. Veldman, On dominating and spanning circuits in graphs, Discrete Math. 124 (1994) 229–239] gave minimum degree conditions of a line graph guaranteeing the line graph to be hamiltonian.

  5. Cellular Graph Automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Y. Wu; Azriel Rosenfeld

    1978-01-01

    Labelled graphs of bounded degree, with numbers assigned to the arcs at each node, are called d-graphs. A class of generalized automata, called cellular d-graph automata, in which the intercell connections define a d-graph, is introduced. It can be shown that a cellular d-graph automaton can measure various properties of its underlying graph; can detect graph or subgraph isomorphism; and

  6. Assessing Students' Metacognitive Skills

    PubMed Central

    Alman, Martha; Gardner, Stephanie; Born, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop a diagnostic test for assessing cognitive skills related to metacognition in a physiology course. Methods Cognitive skills believed to be related to metacognition (visualizing lecture information and interpreting diagrams) were identified in a first-professional year (P1) physiology course and test items were constructed for each. Analyses included overall reliability, item discrimination, and variance comparisons of 4 groups to assess the effect of prior physiology coursework and diagnostic test score level on the first examination in physiology. Results Overall reliability was 0.83 (N = 78). Eighty percent of the test items discriminated positively. The average diagnostic test scores of students with or without a prior physiology course did not differ significantly. Students who scored above the class mean on the diagnostic test and who had taken a prior physiology course also had the highest average scores on the physiology examination. Conclusion The diagnostic test provided a measure of a limited number of skills related to metacognition, and preliminary data suggest that such skills are especially important in retaining information. PMID:17429514

  7. Automatic Skill Acquisition in Reinforcement Learning Agents Using Connection Bridge Centrality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parham Moradi; Mohammad Ebrahim Shiri; Negin Entezari

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Incorporating skills in reinforcement learning methods results in accelerate agents learning performance. The key problem\\u000a of automatic skill discovery is to find subgoal states and create skills to reach them. Among the proposed algorithms, those\\u000a based on graph centrality measures have achieved precise results. In this paper we propose a new graph centrality measure\\u000a for identifying subgoal states that is

  8. Graph Mole

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sulan Dun

    2011-08-30

    This Flash activity provides an interactive application for plotting points on a Cartesian coordinate plane. If players already know how to graph Cartesian coordinates, they click on the "Play Game" button to start the easy version of the game. The goal is to bonk the mole before he gets all the vegetables by choosing the correct ordered pair of his location in the field. There are also a medium version and a hard version of the game.

  9. Practicing Language Arts Skills Using Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Suzanne A.

    This paper attempts to show a one-to-one relationship between the various activities involved in dramatic interpretation and specific language arts skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The skills listed in this model reflect both the cognitive and the affective domains and include concentration, perception, factual recall,…

  10. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  11. Study Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Mary M.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study strategies used to assist mildly handicapped students become more actively engaged and successful in gaining and responding to information in content area classes are described. They include using advance organizers, summarizing/paraphrasing what is read, enhancing listening skills, and improving the organization, appearance, and accuracy of…

  12. Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Thomas S.

    2006-01-01

    While this may not be a "complete list" of what leadership skills one needs to effectively lead in any/every situation, it should provide a great overview of many of the things s/he needs to do, at least initially.

  13. Employability Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module from the Florida Advanced Technological Education (FL-ATE) Center will help students understand and develop their own set of personal employability skills, such as communication and teamwork. The activity aims to help students understand the importance of communication and teamwork in a business setting. The lesson should require one class period to complete.

  14. Graph database systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Graves; E. R. Bergeman; C. B. Lawrence

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated using graphs as the foundation for database systems by developing a graph-based DBMS. We have demonstrated that: 1. Graph-based representations are useful for representing genome data. 2. A graph data model tailored to the requirements of genome data can be used as the basis of a database management system. 3. A graph database management system is a

  15. Matching RDF Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy J. Carroll

    2002-01-01

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) describes graphs ofstatements about resources. This paper explores the equality of twoRDF graphs in light of the graph isomorphism literature. Weconsider anonymous resources as unlabelled vertices in a graph,and show that the standard graph isomorphism algorithms,developed in the 1970's, can be used effectively for comparing RDFgraphs.

  16. From graphs to signals and back: Identification of graph structures using spectral analysis

    E-print Network

    Hamon, Ronan; Flandrin, Patrick; Robardet, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Many systems comprising entities in interactions can be represented as graphs, whose structure gives significant insights about how these systems work. Network theory has undergone further developments, in particular in relation to detection of communities in graphs, to catch this structure. Recently, an approach has been proposed to transform a graph into a collection of signals: Using a multidimensional scaling technique on a distance matrix representing relations between vertices of the graph, points in a Euclidean space are obtained and interpreted as signals, indexed by the vertices. In this article, we propose several extensions to this approach, developing a framework to study graph structures using signal processing tools. We first extend the current methodology, enabling us to highlight connections between properties of signals and graph structures, such as communities, regularity or randomness, as well as combinations of those. A robust inverse transformation method is next described, taking into ac...

  17. Variables and Graphs: What's Our Story?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

    Students learn how to quickly and efficiently interpret graphs, which are used for everyday purposes as well as engineering analysis. Through a practice handout completed as a class and a worksheet completed in small groups, students gain familiarity in talking about and interpreting graphs. They use common graph terminology such as independent variable, dependent variable, linear data, linear relationship and rate of change. The equation for calculating slope is explained. The focus is on students becoming able to clearly describe linear relationships by using the language of slope and the rate of change between variables. At lesson end, students discuss the relationship between variables as presented by the visual representation of a graph. Then they independently complete a homework handout.

  18. Abstract Interpreters for Free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Might, Matthew

    In small-step abstract interpretations, the concrete and abstract semantics bear an uncanny resemblance. In this work, we present an analysis-design methodology that both explains and exploits that resemblance. Specifically, we present a two-step method to convert a small-step concrete semantics into a family of sound, computable abstract interpretations. The first step re-factors the concrete state-space to eliminate recursive structure; this refactoring of the state-space simultaneously determines a store-passing-style transformation on the underlying concrete semantics. The second step uses inference rules to generate an abstract state-space and a Galois connection simultaneously. The Galois connection allows the calculation of the "optimal" abstract interpretation. The two-step process is unambiguous, but nondeterministic: at each step, analysis designers face choices. Some of these choices ultimately influence properties such as flow-, field- and context-sensitivity. Thus, under the method, we can give the emergence of these properties a graph-theoretic characterization. To illustrate the method, we systematically abstract the continuation-passing style lambda calculus to arrive at two distinct families of analyses. The first is the well-known k-CFA family of analyses. The second consists of novel "environment-centric" abstract interpretations, none of which appear in the literature on static analysis of higher-order programs.

  19. Cutwidth of Split Graphs, Threshold Graphs, and Proper Interval Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pinar Heggernes; Daniel Lokshtanov; Rodica Mihai; Charis Papadopoulos

    2008-01-01

    We give a linear-time algorithm to compute the cutwidth of threshold graphs, thereby resolving the computational complexity\\u000a of cutwidth on this graph class. Although our algorithm is simple and intuitive, its correctness proof relies on a series\\u000a of non-trivial structural results, and turns out to be surprisingly complex. Threshold graphs are a well-studied subclass\\u000a of interval graphs and of split

  20. Strategic leadership: the essential skills.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, Paul J H; Krupp, Steve; Howland, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    The more uncertain your environment, the greater the opportunity--if you have the leadership skills to capitalize on it. Research at the Wharton school and at the authors' consulting firm, involving more than 20,000 executives to date, has identified six skills that, when mastered and used in concert, allow leaders to think strategically and navigate the unknown effectively. They are the abilities to anticipate, challenge, interpret, decide, align, and learn. This article describes the six skills in detail and includes a self-assessment that will enable you to identify the ones that most need your attention. The authors have found that strength in one skill cannot easily compensate for a deficit in another. An adaptive strategic leader has learned to apply all six at once. PMID:23390746

  1. Box graphs and singular fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Hirotaka; Lawrie, Craig; Morrison, David R.; Schafer-Nameki, Sakura

    2014-05-01

    We determine the higher codimension fibers of elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau fourfolds with section by studying the three-dimensional = 2 supersymmetric gauge theory with matter which describes the low energy effective theory of M-theory compactified on the associated Weierstrass model, a singular model of the fourfold. Each phase of the Coulomb branch of this theory corresponds to a particular resolution of the Weierstrass model, and we show that these have a concise description in terms of decorated box graphs based on the representation graph of the matter multiplets, or alternatively by a class of convex paths on said graph. Transitions between phases have a simple interpretation as "flopping" of the path, and in the geometry correspond to actual flop transitions. This description of the phases enables us to enumerate and determine the entire network between them, with various matter representations for all reductive Lie groups. Furthermore, we observe that each network of phases carries the structure of a (quasi-)minuscule representation of a specific Lie algebra. Interpreted from a geometric point of view, this analysis determines the generators of the cone of effective curves as well as the network of flop transitions between crepant resolutions of singular elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds. From the box graphs we determine all fiber types in codimensions two and three, and we find new, non-Kodaira, fiber types for E 6, E7 and E 8.

  2. Approximate Graph Matching and Computing Median Graph for Graph Clustering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adel Hlaoui; Shengrui Wang

    We propose in this paper a new algorithm for computing the median of a set of graphs. The median graph is a useful tool for the clustering problem. The concept of median allows the extension of conventional algorithms such as the k-means to graph clustering, helping to bridge the gap between statistical and structural approaches to pattern recognition. An experimental

  3. On cliques in graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Moon; L. Moser

    1965-01-01

    A clique is a maximal complete subgraph of a graph. The maximum number of cliques possible in a graph withn nodes is determined. Also, bounds are obtained for the number of different sizes of cliques possible in such a graph.

  4. Signal processing on graphs: Transforms and tomograms

    E-print Network

    Mendes, R Vilela; Araújo, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Using projections on the (generalized) eigenvectors associated to matrices that characterize the topological structure, several authors have constructed generalizations of the Fourier transform on graphs. By exploring mappings of the spectrum of these matrices we show how to construct more general transforms, in particular wavelet-like transforms on graphs. For time-series, tomograms, a generalization of the Radon transforms to arbitrary pairs of non-commuting operators, are positive bilinear transforms with a rigorous probabilistic interpretation which provide a full characterization of the signals and are robust in the presence of noise. Here the notion of tomogram transform is also extended to signals on arbitrary graphs

  5. NFI Interpretation Interpreting NFI Timber

    E-print Network

    on the standing forest and, in so doing, has mitigated the problems involved in predicting these ratesNFI Interpretation Interpreting NFI Timber Volume Forecasts Issued by: National Forest Inventory advances have been made in methodology, with improved field survey techniques, greater understanding

  6. Graphing is Groovy!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss May

    2012-03-09

    These games show what a bar graph is and how to develop one. Learn how to create your own graph here! Make sure to click "Okay" on the game to start it. This game will show you how to develop a bar graph using data. This game is showing how the bugs make up the bar graph. They are the data being entered into the graph. Create a graph using bugs! Use this game to ...

  7. Create A Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    This Flash applet allows students to create a variety of graphs: line graph, pie chart, bar graph, area graph and x-y plot. Each type provides a variety of layout and design options. Users enter data and labels and choose data parameters. Completed graphs may be printed, saved, and/or emailed. The accompanying tutorial provides general information about graphs and explains how to use the applet.

  8. Application of Graph Embedding to solve Graph Matching Problems Application of Graph Embedding to solve Graph Matching Problems

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an approximate median graph using real databases containing large graphs. Mots-clés : Graph Matching, GraphApplication of Graph Embedding to solve Graph Matching Problems Application of Graph Embedding to solve Graph Matching Problems Ernest Valveny1 ­ Miquel Ferrer1 Centre de Visió per Computador, Dep

  9. Adjusting protein graphs based on graph entropy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Measuring protein structural similarity attempts to establish a relationship of equivalence between polymer structures based on their conformations. In several recent studies, researchers have explored protein-graph remodeling, instead of looking a minimum superimposition for pairwise proteins. When graphs are used to represent structured objects, the problem of measuring object similarity become one of computing the similarity between graphs. Graph theory provides an alternative perspective as well as efficiency. Once a protein graph has been created, its structural stability must be verified. Therefore, a criterion is needed to determine if a protein graph can be used for structural comparison. In this paper, we propose a measurement for protein graph remodeling based on graph entropy. We extend the concept of graph entropy to determine whether a graph is suitable for representing a protein. The experimental results suggest that when applied, graph entropy helps a conformational on protein graph modeling. Furthermore, it indirectly contributes to protein structural comparison if a protein graph is solid. PMID:25474347

  10. Interpretive Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHaan, Frank, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an interpretative experiment involving the application of symmetry and temperature-dependent proton and fluorine nmr spectroscopy to the solution of structural and kinetic problems in coordination chemistry. (MLH)

  11. Engineering interpretation

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Charles R.

    and Robotics Handout 2: Image Structure Roberto Cipolla and Andrew Gee October 1999 Image Structure 1 Image to interpret images using a small amount of edge and corner data. The Archer, Henry Moore. 8­bit greyscale

  12. Graph Classification Based on Optimizing Graph Spectra

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nguyen Duy Vinh; Akihiro Inokuchi; Takashi Washio

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Kernel methods such as the SVM are becoming increasingly popular due to their high performance in graph classification. In\\u000a this paper, we propose a novel graph kernel, called SPEC, based on graph spectra and the Interlace Theorem, as well as an\\u000a algorithm, called OPTSPEC, to optimize the SPEC kernel used in an SVM for graph classification. The fundamental performance\\u000a of

  13. Graph Classification Based on Optimizing Graph Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinh, Nguyen Duy; Inokuchi, Akihiro; Washio, Takashi

    Kernel methods such as the SVM are becoming increasingly popular due to their high performance in graph classification. In this paper, we propose a novel graph kernel, called SPEC, based on graph spectra and the Interlace Theorem, as well as an algorithm, called OPTSPEC, to optimize the SPEC kernel used in an SVM for graph classification. The fundamental performance of the method is evaluated using artificial datasets, and its practicality confirmed through experiments using a real-world dataset.

  14. Counseling Alcoholic Clients: Basic Communication Skills. Participant Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This training program handbook focuses on the presentation and practice of eight basic communication skills: attending, paraphrasing, reflection of feeling, summarizing, probing, counselor self-disclosure, interpreting, and confrontation. The skills are presented in 10 sessions, one for each of the eight skills and two integrating sessions. The…

  15. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Machining Skills Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document of skill standards for the machining skills cluster serves as a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. These 67 occupational skill standards describe what people should know and be able to do in an…

  16. Cohomology of Feynman graphs and perturbative quantum field theory

    E-print Network

    Lucian M. Ionescu

    2005-06-08

    An analog of Kreimer's coproduct from renormalization of Feynman integrals in quantum field theory, endows an analog of Kontsevich's graph complex with a dg-coalgebra structure. The graph complex is generated by orientation classes of labeled directed graphs. A graded commutative product is also defined, compatible with the coproduct. Moreover, a dg-Hopf algebra is identified. Graph cohomology is defined applying the cobar construction to the dg-coalgebra structure. As an application, L-infinity morphisms represented as series over Feynman graphs correspond to graph cocycles. Notably the total differential of the cobar construction corresponds to the L-infinity morphism condition. The main example considered is Kontsevich's formality morphism. The relation with perturbative quantum field theory is considered by interpreting L-infinity morphisms as partition functions, and the coefficients of the graph expansions as Feynman integrals.

  17. Fuzzy morphisms between graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aymeric Perchant; Isabelle Bloch

    2002-01-01

    A generic definition of fuzzy morphism between graphs (GFM) is introduced that includes classical graph related problem definitions as sub-cases (such as graph and subgraph isomorphism). The GFM uses a pair of fuzzy relations, one on the vertices and one on the edges. Each relation is a mapping between the elements of two graphs. These two fuzzy relations are linked

  18. Motion Graphs Virtual Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-04-03

    The Motion Graphs virtual lab helps physics students learn the essential features of position vs. time and velocity vs. time graphs. Students are provided sample graphs, and they try to move the on-screen caterpillar in order to make the caterpillar's motion match the sample graph. A printable activity guide is included.

  19. Create a Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Center for Education Statistics

    2000-01-01

    Students will learn how to create area, bar, pie, and line graphs. They are provided with information about what each type of graph shows and what it can be used for. Students are given an example of each type of graph, but they can create graphs using their own data in the interactive tool.

  20. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  1. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

  2. Turning Spreadsheets into Graphs: An Information Technology Lesson in Whole Brain Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Thomas F.; Leonard, Jonathan G.

    2005-01-01

    We have concluded that teaching undergraduate students to use spreadsheet software to analyze, interpret, and communicate spreadsheet data through a graph is an information technology exercise in whole brain thinking. In investigating why our students have difficulty constructing proper graphs, we have discovered that graphing requires two…

  3. Designing Better Graphs by Including Distributional Information and Integrating Words, Numbers, and Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, David M.; Sandor, Aniko

    2009-01-01

    Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting

  4. Beyond Slopes and Points: Teaching Students How Graphs Describe the Relationships between Scientific Pheomena

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David; Gomez Zwiep, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Graphs represent complex information. They show relationships and help students see patterns and compare data. Students often do not appreciate the illuminating power of graphs, interpreting them literally rather than as symbolic representations (Leinhardt, Zaslavsky, and Stein 1990). Students often read graphs point by point instead of seeing…

  5. Quantum Interpretations

    E-print Network

    A. R. P. Rau

    2006-06-03

    Difficulties and discomfort with the interpretation of quantum mechanics are due to differences in language between it and classical physics. Analogies to The Special Theory of Relativity, which also required changes in the basic worldview and language of non-relativistic classical mechanics, may help in absorbing the changes called for by quantum physics. There is no need to invoke extravagances such as the many worlds interpretation or specify a central role for consciousness or neural microstructures. The simple, but basic, acceptance that what is meant by the state of a physical system is different in quantum physics from what it is in classical physics goes a long way in explaining its seeming peculiarities.

  6. Test-Taking Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabers, Darrell

    There are two types of skills needed to perform well on a standardized achievement test: (1) the cognitive ability or basic skill that the test is designed to measure, and (2) the ability to demonstrate that cognitive ability or basic skill within the test situation. Test-taking skills (sometimes referred to as test wiseness) are the skills needed…

  7. Learning across the Curriculum with Creative Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Linda Lee

    1989-01-01

    Describes an instructional technique called "creative graphing" in which students learn to reorder information visually, to interpret the graphic aids of their textbooks more easily, to highlight relationships that are not immediately apparent in the text, and to illuminate ideas for further exploration using charts, trees, stars, chains, and…

  8. Functions and Models: Graphing Calculators and Computers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Freeze

    Describe some situations where naive interpretation of Maple's output may be misleading;Show an appropriate viewing rectangle for the graph of a given function;Plot a function using Maple;Compare local and global properties of a given function;Find the solutions of a given equation using Maple.

  9. An algorithm for automatic reduction of complex signal flow graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. R.; Hoberock, L. L.; Thompson, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    A computer algorithm is developed that provides efficient means to compute transmittances directly from a signal flow graph or a block diagram. Signal flow graphs are cast as directed graphs described by adjacency matrices. Nonsearch computation, designed for compilers without symbolic capability, is used to identify all arcs that are members of simple cycles for use with Mason's gain formula. The routine does not require the visual acumen of an interpreter to reduce the topology of the graph, and it is particularly useful for analyzing control systems described for computer analyses by means of interactive graphics.

  10. Interpretive Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the recognition of quality in interpretation and knowledge generation within the qualitative research field, I propose a framework by which to evaluate the quality of knowledge generated within generalist, interpretive clinical practice. I describe three priorities for research in developing this model further, which will strengthen and preserve core elements of the discipline of general practice, and thus promote and support the health needs of the public. PMID:21805819

  11. Intrinsic graph structure estimation using graph laplacian.

    PubMed

    Noda, Atsushi; Hino, Hideitsu; Tatsuno, Masami; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2014-07-01

    A graph is a mathematical representation of a set of variables where some pairs of the variables are connected by edges. Common examples of graphs are railroads, the Internet, and neural networks. It is both theoretically and practically important to estimate the intensity of direct connections between variables. In this study, a problem of estimating the intrinsic graph structure from observed data is considered. The observed data in this study are a matrix with elements representing dependency between nodes in the graph. The dependency represents more than direct connections because it includes influences of various paths. For example, each element of the observed matrix represents a co-occurrence of events at two nodes or a correlation of variables corresponding to two nodes. In this setting, spurious correlations make the estimation of direct connection difficult. To alleviate this difficulty, a digraph Laplacian is used for characterizing a graph. A generative model of this observed matrix is proposed, and a parameter estimation algorithm for the model is also introduced. The notable advantage of the proposed method is its ability to deal with directed graphs, while conventional graph structure estimation methods such as covariance selections are applicable only to undirected graphs. The algorithm is experimentally shown to be able to identify the intrinsic graph structure. PMID:24708372

  12. Biotechnology Skills Standards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Here users will find an assortment of Bioscience/Agricultural Biotechnology Skills Standards. These should be useful for development of new programs as well as for comparisons with existing programs. The sections discussed are: Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Skill Standards, Combined Bioscience/Agricultural Biotechnology Skill Standards, Agricultural Biotechnology Skill Standards, Bioscience Industry Skill Standards, National Association of Scientific Materials Managers, ACAP Austin Competency Analysis Profile - Biotechnology, Making Skill Standards Work, and Window on the Workplace.

  13. Image Interpretation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From Foothill College and the Using a Web-Based GIS to Teach Problem-Based Science in High School and College project, this document introduces aerial photography and satellite imagery. Methods for identifying objects are highlighted such as the fact that man-made constructions tend to be straight while natural features are not. The same information as a presentation can be found here: www.foothill.edu/fac/klenkeit/nsf/curriculum/ImageInterpretation.pptxThis is a helpful resource for the introductory GIS classroom.

  14. Wikipedia: Graph Theory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Drawing on the knowledge of the people, Wikipedia presents this site on graph theory. Here, the history, problems, and applications of graph theory are explained, and there are links to other print and online resources for more information.

  15. Exponential Graphing Using Technology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cheryl Gaynr

    2012-07-27

    This lesson is teacher/student directed for discovering and translating exponential functions using a graphing app. The lesson focuses on the translations from a parent graph and how changing the coefficient, base and exponent values relate to the transformation.

  16. The Oriented Graph Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willwacher, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    The oriented graph complexes are complexes of directed graphs without directed cycles. They govern, for example, the quantization of Lie bialgebras and infinite dimensional deformation quantization. Similar to the ordinary graph complexes GC n introduced by Kontsevich they come in two essentially different versions, depending on the parity of n. It is shown that, surprisingly, the oriented graph complex is quasi-isomorphic to the ordinary commutative graph complex of opposite parity GC n-1, up to some known classes. This yields in particular a combinatorial description of the action of on Lie bialgebras, and shows that a cycle-free formality morphism in the sense of Shoikhet can be constructed rationally without reference to configuration space integrals. Curiously, the obstruction class in the oriented graph complex found by Shoikhet corresponds to the well known theta graph in the ordinary graph complex.

  17. Querying Graph-Structured Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiefeng Cheng; J. X. Yu

    2007-01-01

    Graphs have great expressive power to describe the complex relationships among data objects, and there are large graph datasets available such as Web data, semi-structured data and XML data. In this paper, we describe our work on querying graph-structured data, including graph labeling methods, reachability joins, and graph pattern matching. We show that we can base on the graph labeling

  18. Exploring Data Displays and Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-02

    This multimedia mathematics resource deals with graphing data. A video illustrates how math plays a role in the way merchandise is displayed in retail stores. An interactive component allows students to explore and compare line graphs, bar graphs, and circle graphs to determine if the graphs represent the same data. A print activity about data, display, and graphs is included.

  19. Querying Graph Databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sergio Flesca; Sergio Greco

    2000-01-01

    Graph data is an emerging model for representing a variety of database contexts ranging from object-oriented databases to\\u000a hypertext data. Also many of the recursive queries that arise in relational databases are, in practice, graph traversals.\\u000a In this paper we present a language for searching graph-like databases. The language permits us to express paths in a graph\\u000a by means of

  20. Querying Large Graph Databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiping Ke; James Cheng; Jeffrey Xu Yu

    2010-01-01

    \\u000a Graph exists ubiquitously in a wide spectrum of application domains, such as protein structures in biology, chemical compounds\\u000a in chemistry, food webs in ecology, social networks, Web graphs, P2P networks, and many more. With the increasing popularity\\u000a of graph databases, how to assess graph data effectively and efficiently becomes an important research problem. Considerable\\u000a research efforts have been devoted to

  1. Complex Networks and Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students learn about complex networks and how to represent them using graphs. They also learn that graph theory is a useful mathematical tool for studying complex networks in diverse applications of science and engineering, such as neural networks in the brain, biochemical reaction networks in cells, communication networks, such as the internet, and social networks. Topics covered include set theory, defining a graph, as well as defining the degree of a node and the degree distribution of a graph.

  2. String graphs and incomparability graphs Janos Pach

    E-print Network

    Fox, Jacob

    of genetic structures. In 1966, interested in electrical networks realizable by printed circuits, Sinden [41 string graphs. In 1976, reporting on Sinden's work, Graham [20] introduced string graphs be realized with at most 2cnk intersection points, for some constants c and k. Sinden's question remained

  3. Graph Grammars: An ITS Technology for Diagram Representations Niels Pinkwart1

    E-print Network

    Aleven, Vincent

    manipulations by which a student might create a diagram, they facilitate the definition of structurally complex and pedagogically interesting constellations of graph elements to which an ITS should respond with feedback messages these constellations in graphs. Introduction Argumentative thinking skills are critical for humans in many aspects

  4. The Impact of Climate Change on Prairie Potholes Activity 2: Graphing/Data Analysis

    E-print Network

    The Impact of Climate Change on Prairie Potholes Activity 2: Graphing/Data Analysis Region: Prairie. Prerequisite Knowledge: ! Content: o Weather patterns o Climate change ! Skills: o Graphing ! Discuss dependent about the effects of habitat destruction and climate change on the breeding success of waterfowl. 5. Ask

  5. CareerFact Sheet BS Sign Language interpretation

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    CareerFact Sheet BS Sign Language interpretation A degree in Sign Language Interpretation prepares in a wide variety of sectors. The study of Sign Language Interpretation develops skills critical to a large number of career fields. These qualities include: · Proficiency in American Sign Language (ASL) · Public

  6. Graph Theory Book

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Diestel, Reinhard

    From the Graduate Texts in Mathematics series comes this textbook on graph theory by Reinhard Diestel from the University of Hamburg. Topics covered include flows, planar graphs, infinite graphs, and Hamilton cycles. Visitors can read the full text (by clicking on "electronic edition") or summaries of each section, as well as reviews from different scholarly journals.

  7. Reflections on "The Graph"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph

  8. Graphs and Functions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to plotting points and graphing functions in the Cartesian coordinate system. The lesson provides links to discussions and activities that transition from functions as rules to the graphs of those functions. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession to an introduction to graphing.

  9. Building Brilliant Bar Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Briana Bower

    2005-01-01

    In this series of three lesson plans, students create bar graphs, double bar graphs, and determine appropriate intervals for scale. Each lesson incorporates teacher modeling, student practice (students have an opportunity to label and create the scale for their own graphs), assessment (including rubrics), and reteaching or extension options.

  10. Simulations of graph automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Codrin Nichitiu; Eric Remila

    1998-01-01

    We state a definition of the simulation of graph automata, which are machines built by putting copies of the same finite-state automaton at the vertices of a regular graph, reading the states of the neighbors. The graphs considered here are planar, with the elementary cycles of the same length, and form regular tilings of the hyperbolic plane. Thereafter, we present

  11. Graphing Important People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Toolbox" column features content adapted from ReadWriteThink.org lesson plans and provides practical tools for classroom teachers. This issue's column features a lesson plan adapted from "Graphing Plot and Character in a Novel" by Lisa Storm Fink and "Bio-graph: Graphing Life Events" by Susan Spangler. Students retell biographic events…

  12. Graphing Inequalities, Connecting Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, J. Matt

    2014-01-01

    Students often have difficulty with graphing inequalities (see Filloy, Rojano, and Rubio 2002; Drijvers 2002), and J. Matt Switzer's students were no exception. Although students can produce graphs for simple inequalities, they often struggle when the format of the inequality is unfamiliar. Even when producing a correct graph of an…

  13. Are Graphs Finally Surfacing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beineke, Lowell W.

    1989-01-01

    Explored are various aspects of drawing graphs on surfaces. The Euler's formula, Kuratowski's theorem and the drawing of graphs in the plane with as few crossings as possible are discussed. Some applications including embedding of graphs and coloring of maps are included. (YP)

  14. Signing RDF Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy J. Carroll

    2003-01-01

    Assuming Pgraph cannot be done in polynomial time. However, it is possible to define a large class of canonicalizable RDF graphs, such that digital signatures for graphs in this cla ss can be created and verified in O( nlog( n)). Without changing its meaning, an

  15. Graph Processing Istvn Albert

    E-print Network

    Albert, Réka

    Graph Processing István Albert Bioinformatics Consulting Center Huck Institute for Life Sciences #12;Part 1 Representations and Algorithms #12;Graph Processing · Compute some static value for the task #12;Graph Processing Problems · Traversal, shortest paths, longest paths · Simple and strong

  16. Graph Processing Istvn Albert

    E-print Network

    Albert, Réka

    Graph Processing István Albert Bioinformatics Consulting Center Huck Institute for Life Sciences #12;Part 1 Representations and Algorithms #12;Graph Processing · Compute some static value the data structure for the task #12;Graph Processing Problems · Traversal, shortest paths, longest paths

  17. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  18. Random graph coloring: statistical physics approach.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, J; Saad, D

    2002-11-01

    The problem of vertex coloring in random graphs is studied using methods of statistical physics and probability. Our analytical results are compared to those obtained by exact enumeration and Monte Carlo simulations. We critically discuss the merits and shortcomings of the various methods, and interpret the results obtained. We present an exact analytical expression for the two-coloring problem as well as general replica symmetric approximated solutions for the thermodynamics of the graph coloring problem with p colors and K-body edges. PMID:12513569

  19. Methods of visualizing graphs

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Pak C. (Richland, WA); Mackey, Patrick S. (Kennewick, WA); Perrine, Kenneth A. (Richland, WA); Foote, Harlan P. (Richland, WA); Thomas, James J. (Richland, WA)

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  20. Information graphs for binary predictors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G; McRoberts, N; Burnett, F J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Binary predictors are used in a wide range of crop protection decision-making applications. Such predictors provide a simple analytical apparatus for the formulation of evidence related to risk factors, for use in the process of Bayesian updating of probabilities of crop disease. For diagrammatic interpretation of diagnostic probabilities, the receiver operating characteristic is available. Here, we view binary predictors from the perspective of diagnostic information. After a brief introduction to the basic information theoretic concepts of entropy and expected mutual information, we use an example data set to provide diagrammatic interpretations of expected mutual information, relative entropy, information inaccuracy, information updating, and specific information. Our information graphs also illustrate correspondences between diagnostic information and diagnostic probabilities. PMID:24983842

  1. Causal graph dynamics

    E-print Network

    Pablo Arrighi; Gilles Dowek

    2012-05-08

    We extend the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these "causal graph dynamics" is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions, and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. KEYWORDS: Dynamical networks, Boolean networks, Generative networks automata, Cayley cellular automata, Graph Automata, Graph rewriting automata, Parallel graph transformations, Amalgamated graph transformations, Time-varying graphs, Regge calculus, Local, No-signalling.

  2. Hyperbolic Graph Generator

    E-print Network

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

  3. Algebraic thinking :A Basic Skill

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Terese Herrera

    This resource guide from the Middle School Portal 2 project, written specifically for teachers, provides links to exemplary resources including background information, lessons, career information, and related national science education standards. The resources highlighted here aim to reflect students growing mathematical capacity over the span of the middle school years. The activities and lessons, intended as supplementary materials, range from introduction to the fundamentals of algebra to work on linear functions. Uniformly, they take into consideration the preference of the middle school student for concrete models, visual representations, and interactive tasks. You will find resources on: Working with algebraic expressions, solving equations, understanding graphs, and moving from patterns to rules to functions. Some are games, others are online simulations that can complement a lesson, and yet others are full-blown lesson plans. We believe you will find tasks here that motivate your students to expand their basic skills in algebra.

  4. Developing Science Process Skills in Special Schools in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sally; Sadeck, Melanie; Hodges, Merle

    2002-01-01

    Teachers were taught "Translation Activities" (TA) to teach science process skills in three special education schools in South Africa. In TA, information and data are provided as text, diagrams, tables, or graphs, and cooperative learning takes place. Teachers indicated the use of TA enabled them to deliver Outcomes Based Education. (Contains…

  5. A First-Year Course That Teaches Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czarneski, Debra

    2013-01-01

    In the Fall semester of 2009, I taught a first-year course that focused on skills required to successfully complete undergraduate research. This paper will discuss the Simpson College first-year course requirements, my course goals, the graph theory topics covered, student feedback, and instructor reflection.

  6. Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs Romain Boulet 10 Dec 2009 Abstract- cyclic graphs. An odd (resp. even) sun is a graph obtained by appending a pendant vertex to each vertex of an odd (resp. even) cycle. A broken sun is a graph obtained by deleting pendant vertices of a sun

  7. Predictors of employer satisfaction: technical and non-technical skills.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Jared A; Wu, Tsui-Feng; Fales-Williams, Amanda J; Kirk, Ryan A; Preast, Vanessa A

    2012-01-01

    Employers of 2007-2009 graduates from Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine were asked to respond to a survey regarding their overall satisfaction with their new employees as well as their new employees' preparation in several technical and non-technical skill areas. Seventy-five responses contained complete data and were used in the analysis. Four technical skill areas (data collection, data interpretation, planning, and taking action) and five non-technical skill areas (interpersonal skills, ability to deal with legal issues, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving) were identified. All of the skill area subscales listed above had appropriate reliability (Cronbach's alpha>0.70) and were positively and significantly correlated with overall employer satisfaction. Results of two simultaneous regression analyses indicated that of the four technical skill areas, taking action is the most salient predictor of employer satisfaction. Of the five non-technical skill areas, interpersonal skills, business skills, making referrals, and problem solving were the most important skills in predicting employer satisfaction. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that all technical skills explained 25% of the variation in employer satisfaction; non-technical skills explained an additional 42% of the variation in employer satisfaction. PMID:22433741

  8. Physical principles for economies of skilled movements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. L. Nelson

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents some elementary principles regarding constraints on movements, which may be useful in modeling and interpreting motor control strategies for skilled movements. Movements which are optimum with respect to various objectives, or “costs”, are analyzed and compared. The specific costs considered are related to movement time, distance, peak velocity, energy, peak acceleration, and rate of change of acceleration

  9. Critical Thinking Skills Evidenced in Graduate Students Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Holly Reed; Giraud, Vivana; Stedman, Nicole L. P.; Adams, Brittany L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify Facione's six critical thinking skills using graduate students blogs as a reflection tool in the context of leadership using structured and unstructured blogs. The skills researched were (a) Interpretation, (b) Analysis, (c) Evaluation, (d) Inference, (e) Explanation, and (f) Self-Regulation (Facione,…

  10. Weighted Competition Graphs YOSHIO SANO

    E-print Network

    Weighted Competition Graphs YOSHIO SANO Research Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Kyoto a generalization of competition graphs, called weighted competi- tion graphs. The weighted competition graph) is the competition graph of D, and the weight w(e) of an edge e = xy E is the number of the common preys of x and y

  11. Normalized Graph Cuts Some Observations

    E-print Network

    Gallier, Jean

    Normalized Graph Cuts Some Observations Jean Gallier CIS Department University of Pennsylvania jean: Dog Logic Jean Gallier (Upenn) Normalized Graph Cuts January 25, 2014 2 / 64 #12;1. Graph Clustering: A weighted graph and its partition into two clusters. Jean Gallier (Upenn) Normalized Graph Cuts January 25

  12. Beginning Algebra Tutorial: Reading Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Seward, Kim

    This tutorial from West Texas A&M University's Virtual Math Lab introduces bar graphs, line graphs, double line graphs and Venn diagrams to beginning algebra students. The unit explains each type of graph and includes examples. Students will use provided sample graphs to answer a series of questions about each example.

  13. Survival Skills: A Basic Skills Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Don

    The guide describes an approach designed to promote the basic skills of hearing impaired students Basic or survival skills are identified which cover the student's daily functioning at home, school, and in the community. The guide is aimed at the 10-15 year old hearing impaired student, but techniques are expected to be applicable to both…

  14. The Graph Traversal Pattern

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-01-01

    A graph is a structure composed of a set of vertices (i.e.nodes, dots) connected to one another by a set of edges (i.e.links, lines). The concept of a graph has been around since the late 19$^\\text{th}$ century, however, only in recent decades has there been a strong resurgence in both theoretical and applied graph research in mathematics, physics, and computer science. In applied computing, since the late 1960s, the interlinked table structure of the relational database has been the predominant information storage and retrieval model. With the growth of graph/network-based data and the need to efficiently process such data, new data management systems have been developed. In contrast to the index-intensive, set-theoretic operations of relational databases, graph databases make use of index-free, local traversals. This article discusses the graph traversal pattern and its use in computing.

  15. Graphing A Line

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    hbinggeli

    2010-06-02

    The purpose of this project is to provide resources for practicing graphing a line in slope-intercept form. Work through each step and make sure you do the assessment at the end. [Utah State Algebra 1 Core Curriculum - Standard II, Objectives 1-3.] Step 1: Click on the link to practice graphing lines. Try at least 10 different equations. Do more if you want to. Graphing Lines Practice Step 2: More Practice Here are some other activity that will help you better understand how to graph a line. Try them out! Graphing from slope intercept form Bug Zap Lines Butterfly slope game Slope Basketball Slope Quiz Interactive Graphing Tutorial (Make up your own equation. Move the ...

  16. Causal graph dynamics

    E-print Network

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  17. Graphing Your Social Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students analyze their social networks using graph theory. They gather data on their own social relationships, either from Facebook interactions or the interactions they have throughout the course of a day, recording it in Microsoft Excel and using Cytoscape (a free, downloadable application) to generate social network graphs that visually illustrate the key persons (nodes) and connections between them (edges). The nodes in the Cytoscape graphs are color-coded and sized according to the importance of the node (in this activity, nodes are people in students' social networks). After the analysis, the graphs are further examined to see what can be learned from the visual representation. Students gain practice with graph theory vocabulary, including node, edge, betweeness centrality and degree on interaction, and learn about a range of engineering applications of graph theory.

  18. Extending graph homomorphism and simulation for real life graph matching 

    E-print Network

    Wu, Yinghui

    2011-06-30

    accuracy over complex graphs. Worse still, the graph structures in real life applications constantly bear modifications. In response to these challenges, this thesis presents a series of approaches for ef?ciently solving graph matching problems, over both...

  19. Speculation and Historical Interpretation for Fifth and Sixth Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Elizabeth; Gregory, Leslie A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit for fifth- and sixth-grade students that helps develop critical thinking skills. Explains that students read the book, "Leonardo da Vinci" (Diane Stanley), to develop their historical interpretation skills and demonstrate that there is not just one right answer in history. (CMK)

  20. Constrained Graph Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Béla Bollobás; Oliver Riordan

    2000-01-01

    LetQ be a monotone decreasing property of graphs G on n vertices. Erd} os, Suen and Winkler (5) introduced the following natural way of choosing a random maximal graph inQ: start with G the empty graph on n vertices. Add edges to G one at a time, each time choosing uniformly from all e 2 Gc such that G +e2Q.

  1. On the refined counting of graphs on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Ramgoolam, Sanjaye; Wen, Congkao

    2013-05-01

    Ribbon graphs embedded on a Riemann surface provide a useful way to describe the double-line Feynman diagrams of large N computations and a variety of other QFT correlator and scattering amplitude calculations, e.g. in MHV rules for scattering amplitudes, as well as in ordinary QED. Their counting is a special case of the counting of bi-partite embedded graphs. We review and extend relevant mathematical literature and present results on the counting of some infinite classes of bi-partite graphs. Permutation groups and representations as well as double cosets and quotients of graphs are useful mathematical tools. The counting results are refined according to data of physical relevance, such as the structure of the vertices, faces and genus of the embedded graph. These counting problems can be expressed in terms of observables in three-dimensional topological field theory with Sd gauge group which gives them a topological membrane interpretation.

  2. Field Geology Reasoning Skills in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    When geology students are confronted with their first rock exposure, they are often bewildered by the volume of information available and the need to filter out the irrelevant and unnecessary while recording the remainder in a format that lends itself to later analysis. In spite of the problems, the first experience of fieldwork provides many students with the inspiration to devote themselves to this branch of science. The critical factor appears to be the realisation that many of the vaguely interesting topics that have previously been studied in isolation all contribute to an understanding of the rocks in front of the observer. Even with only basic facts and limited understanding, the willing student rapidly gains a deeper appreciation of the ways in which the disparate fields of geoscience are inter-related. However, the initial enthusiasm this generates can be lost if the student is unable to record the information systematically and analyse it logically. The current project seeks to develop in students the intellectual skills necessary to analyse an exposure. In many ways finding the answers to any exposure's history is easy; the difficult part is formulating the right questions. By creating a series of 'Outcrop Exercises', I am seeking to imbue students with an appreciation of the way a structured series of questions can lead to understanding. If they go into the field knowing the sort of questions that they will have to ask themselves, they are more likely to understand the nature and purpose of the data they will have to collect. The earliest exercises were designed to enhance a stratigraphy course, and were intended for use by students who already had field experience. Rather than providing them with accepted facies models for the geological past, the data and questions with which they were provided allowed them to generate their own environmental interpretations. The success of these suggested that they had wider applicability: they could be used to develop essential reasoning skills before going into the field; they could form the basis of follow-up work after a field day, or could be used as a substitute for field work if severe weather prevented an excursion. Each Outcrop Exercise consists of an A3 data sheet, a question sheet, specimen cards and, if appropriate, topographic and geologic maps. The most important dimension of each exercise is the nature and structure of the questions, which begin by requiring the student to make simple observations and lead to a comprehensive interpretation of the exposure. The materials are intended to be used in a variety of ways: for example, if the resources are available it is preferable to replace the specimen cards with real specimens; if time is short, data processing can be omitted by supplying students with prepared graphs. With future developments, it will be possible to link exercises together to generate a geological history for a whole area from primary data. These exercises must not be seen as a substitute for real fieldwork, but it is hoped that they will enhance students' appreciation of the data that they must collect in the field.

  3. Graphing Linear Equations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Arnold

    2011-03-21

    We graph equations to find where the line lies on the graph and thus are able to use this information to see or predict where it will cross at any given point. If you were absent or need a review you can watch the tutorial videos in our Holt on line text or you can read through this site. graphing equations tutorial If you need a review of the quadrants and points of the coordinate plane then work through these activities. Review of coordinate points and graphing. Please work through the activities ...

  4. Coloring random graphs.

    PubMed

    Mulet, R; Pagnani, A; Weigt, M; Zecchina, R

    2002-12-23

    We study the graph coloring problem over random graphs of finite average connectivity c. Given a number q of available colors, we find that graphs with low connectivity admit almost always a proper coloring, whereas graphs with high connectivity are uncolorable. Depending on q, we find the precise value of the critical average connectivity c(q). Moreover, we show that below c(q) there exists a clustering phase c in [c(d),c(q)] in which ground states spontaneously divide into an exponential number of clusters and where the proliferation of metastable states is responsible for the onset of complexity in local search algorithms. PMID:12484862

  5. Graphing and Functions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Arnold

    2011-11-17

    Graphing points, lines, and writing equations from tables or graphs. Functions. Read carefully about plotting points at coolmath4kids. Coolmath Plotting Points Play the game twice or more if you aren't getting most of them right. A score of over 7000 would be good. Coordinate plane quadrants and ordered pairs. Read about Time/distance Time and distance graphs and then Time/speed. Time and speed graphs Read about and practice functions. Intro to functions Function crunchersDomain and range. Domain and Range Then vertical line test. Vertical Line Test ...

  6. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lothian, Josh [ORNL; Powers, Sarah S [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Baker, Matthew B [ORNL; Schrock, Jonathan [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  7. Graph concatenation for quantum codes

    E-print Network

    Beigi, Salman

    Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the ...

  8. Rainbow Graphs and Switching Classes

    E-print Network

    Oh, Suho

    A rainbow graph is a graph that admits a vertex-coloring such that every color appears exactly once in the neighborhood of each vertex. We investigate some properties of rainbow graphs. In particular, we show that there ...

  9. Graph grammars as an analytical tool in physics and biology.

    PubMed

    Gernert, D

    1997-01-01

    The usual mathematics which is commonly applied to physics will scarcely be helpful when structures or patterns are to be handled, which is relevant both in biology and in physics. Here graph grammars are proposed as an additional mathematical technique, which supports characteristic operations including the generation, transfer, recognition, interpretation and application of patterns; in any case parallel processes can be described by parallel graph grammars. Under these aspects the properties of graph grammars are discussed in detail, and it will be shown that a homomorphic reduction to other representations (based on a vector space or on cellular automata) is possible. PMID:9305548

  10. Global Skill Shortages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Malcolm S.; Zaidi, Mahmood A.

    This book discusses the causes and impact of global skill shortages, focusing on data from skill shortages measured in the period 1995-1998 in 19 developed and emerging economies. Chapter one contains a brief introduction. Chapter two is a review of theoretical literature on skill shortages, including static and dynamic shortages, efficiency wage…

  11. The Michigan Essential Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    This publication lists skill expectations in ten curriculum areas for grades 1-9. Although intended to be used by educators in Michigan, the skill list can be used or adapted by educators in other states. The ten curriculum areas are: communication skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening); health education; mathematics; music; physical…

  12. Entry Skills for BSNs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Mary K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Continuing Education for Consensus on Entry Skills project, designed to bring the expectations of nursing service and nursing education closer on entry-level competencies of new baccalaureate graduates. Discusses teaching and collaboration skills, planning and evaluation of patient care skills, interpersonal relations/communication…

  13. Enhancing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

  14. Teaching Organizational Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakunas, Boris; Holley, William

    2004-01-01

    Kerr and Zigmond (1986) found that 67 percent of all high school teachers surveyed viewed organizational skills as crucial for student success in school. How can teachers get their students to agree? One way is to teach organizational skills just as they would teach writing or computation skills. Explain and demonstrate what students are to do,…

  15. School Leadership Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weigel, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between what is currently understood about skills for school leadership and the need for a greater understanding of those skills. The importance of developing leadership skills to improve school performance and effectiveness is great. In the field of school leadership, most leaders…

  16. DI: An interactive debugging interpreter for applicative languages

    SciTech Connect

    Skedzielewski, S.K.; Yates, R.K.; Oldehoeft, R.R.

    1987-03-12

    The DI interpreter is both a debugger and interpreter of SISLAL programs. Its use as a program interpreter is only a small part of its role; it is designed to be a tool for studying compilation techniques for applicative languages. DI interprets dataflow graphs expressed in the IF1 and IF2 languages, and is heavily instrumented to report the activity of dynamic storage activity, reference counting, copying and updating of structured data values. It also aids the SISAL language evaluation by providing an interim execution vehicle for SISAL programs. DI provides determinate, sequential interpretation of graph nodes for sequential and parallel operations in a canonical order. As a debugging aid, DI allows tracing, breakpointing, and interactive display of program data values. DI handles creation of SISAL and IF1 error values for each data type and propagates them according to a well-defined algebra. We have begun to implement IF1 optimizers and have measured the improvements with DI.

  17. Graphing with Colors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This 5 minute video shows Heather Zemanek's 3rd grade class learning about bar graphs. The video shows short excerpts of the lesson and commentary by the teacher. Along with the video are downloadable attachments: the lesson plan and transcipt as Word Documents and two graph examples in PDF form.

  18. ACTIVITIES: Graphs and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1975-01-01

    Using a set of worksheets, students will discover and apply Euler's formula regarding connected planar graphs and play and analyze the game of Sprouts. One sheet leads to the discovery of Euler's formula; another concerns traversability of a graph; another gives an example and a game involving these ideas. (Author/KM)

  19. Projective Nonnegative Graph Embedding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaobai Liu; Shuicheng Yan; Hai Jin

    2010-01-01

    We present in this paper a general formulation for nonnegative data factorization, called projective nonnegative graph embedding (PNGE), which 1) explicitly decomposes the data into two nonnegative components favoring the characteristics encoded by the so-called intrinsic and penalty graphs , respectively, and 2) explicitly describes how to transform each new testing sample into its low-dimensional nonnegative representation. In the past,

  20. Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Millie

    1997-01-01

    Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

  1. Bar Graph Sorter

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-03-09

    In this activity, students make bar graphs by sorting shapes either by shape or by color. This activity allows students to explore how to sort data to make bar graphs. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

  2. Walking Out Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

  3. Assortativity of complementary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Winterbach, W.; van Mieghem, P.

    2011-09-01

    Newman's measure for (dis)assortativity, the linear degree correlation?D, is widely studied although analytic insight into the assortativity of an arbitrary network remains far from well understood. In this paper, we derive the general relation (2), (3) and Theorem 1 between the assortativity ?D(G) of a graph G and the assortativity?D(Gc) of its complement Gc. Both ?D(G) and ?D(Gc) are linearly related by the degree distribution in G. When the graph G(N,p) possesses a binomial degree distribution as in the Erd?s-Rényi random graphs Gp(N), its complementary graph Gpc(N) = G1-p(N) follows a binomial degree distribution as in the Erd?s-Rényi random graphs G1-p(N). We prove that the maximum and minimum assortativity of a class of graphs with a binomial distribution are asymptotically antisymmetric: ?max(N,p) = -?min(N,p) for N ? ?. The general relation (3) nicely leads to (a) the relation (10) and (16) between the assortativity range ?max(G)-?min(G) of a graph with a given degree distribution and the range ?max(Gc)-?min(Gc) of its complementary graph and (b) new bounds (6) and (15) of the assortativity. These results together with our numerical experiments in over 30 real-world complex networks illustrate that the assortativity range ?max-?min is generally large in sparse networks, which underlines the importance of assortativity as a network characterizer.

  4. Quantum walks on graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dorit Aharonov; Andris Ambainis; Julia Kempe; Umesh V. Vazirani

    2001-01-01

    We set the ground for a theory of quantum walks on graphs-the generalization of random walks on finite graphs to the quantum world. Such quantum walks do not converge to any stationary distribution, as they are unitary and reversible. However, by suitably relaxing the definition, we can obtain a measure of how fast the quantum walk spreads or how confined

  5. Multi Bar Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Shodor

    2012-04-02

    In this activity, students enter in data to be represented in a double bar graph. Multi bar graphs allow the student to compare multiple characteristics of different subjects like population for different continents over time. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

  6. Real World Graph Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

    2009-01-01

    We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

  7. Derandomized Graph Products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noga Alon; Uriel Feige; Avi Wigderson; David Zuckerman

    1995-01-01

    Berman and Schnitger [10] gave a randomized reduction from approximating MAXSNPproblems [24] within constant factors arbitrarily close to 1 to approximating cliquewithin a factor of nffl(for some ffl). This reduction was further studied by Blum [11],who gave it the name randomized graph products. We show that this reduction can bemade deterministic (derandomized), using random walks on expander graphs [1]. Themain

  8. Distance-Time Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation is an animated slide show which: -describes a distance-time graph -explains what the slope of a distance time graph represents -explains its usefulness in understanding an objects motion This resource also includes an interactive test and review of the material, and can be downloaded for offline use.

  9. Small Alliances in Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodolfo Carvajal; Martín Matamala; Ivan Rapaport; Nicolas Schabanel

    2007-01-01

    Let G = (V, E) be a graph. A nonempty subset SV is a (strong defensive) alliance of G if every node in S has at least as many neighbors in S than in V \\\\S. This work is motivated by the following ob- servation: when G is a locally structured graph its nodes typically belong to small alliances. Despite

  10. represented as directed graph.

    E-print Network

    Theune, Mariët

    . The TUNA Data Redundancy in the Graph-Based Algorithm The cost function has to be monotonically increasing GRAPH 4+B to the end-to-end TUNA- REG task at REG 2008, we used a template-based surface realiser. and Kow, E. (2008). The TUNA Challenge 2008: Overview and evaluation results. In Proceedings of INLG

  11. Graphing Current Drug Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Graphing Current Drug Data gives (1) some current views on the drug issue, (2) a history of drug use, (3) specific data on alcohol, caffeine, cocaine, marijuana and nicotine, and (4) data on high school drug trends from 1975-1985. The unit could supply graphing data for any math class 7-12, and could also be used in a social studies class.

  12. Graphing the Globe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an activity about the relation between day length and temperature. In one team, learners will create and analyze a graph of hours of sunlight versus month of the year for a number of latitudes. In another team, learners will graph temperature versus month for the same latitudes. The teams then compare data and draw conclusions from their analyses.

  13. Graph Transactions as Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paolo Baldan; Andrea Corradini; Luciana Foss; Fabio Gadducci

    2006-01-01

    Transactional graph transformation systems (t-gtss) have been recently proposed as a mild extension of the standard dpo approach to graph transformation, equipping it with a suitable notion of atomic execution for computations. A typing mechanism induces a distinction between stable and unstable items, and a transaction is defined as a shift-equivalence class of computations such that the starting and ending

  14. Validating Graph Drawing Aesthetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helen C. Purchase; Robert F. Cohen; Murray I. James

    1995-01-01

    Designers of graph drawing algorithms and systems claim to illuminate application data by producing layouts that optimize measurable aesthetic qualities. Examples of these aesthetics include symmetry (where possible, a symmetrical view of the graph should be displayed), minimize edge crossings (the number of edge crossings in the display should be minimized), and minimize bends (the total number of bends in

  15. Maximum modular graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trajanovski, S.; Wang, H.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2012-07-01

    Modularity has been explored as an important quantitative metric for community and cluster detection in networks. Finding the maximum modularity of a given graph has been proven to be NP-complete and therefore, several heuristic algorithms have been proposed. We investigate the problem of finding the maximum modularity of classes of graphs that have the same number of links and/or nodes and determine analytical upper bounds. Moreover, from the set of all connected graphs with a fixed number of links and/or number of nodes, we construct graphs that can attain maximum modularity, named maximum modular graphs. The maximum modularity is shown to depend on the residue obtained when the number of links is divided by the number of communities. Two applications in transportation networks and data-centers design that can benefit of maximum modular partitioning are proposed.

  16. Equitable random graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Martin, Travis

    2014-11-01

    Random graph models have played a dominant role in the theoretical study of networked systems. The Poisson random graph of Erd?s and Rényi, in particular, as well as the so-called configuration model, have served as the starting point for numerous calculations. In this paper we describe another large class of random graph models, which we call equitable random graphs and which are flexible enough to represent networks with diverse degree distributions and many nontrivial types of structure, including community structure, bipartite structure, degree correlations, stratification, and others, yet are exactly solvable for a wide range of properties in the limit of large graph size, including percolation properties, complete spectral density, and the behavior of homogeneous dynamical systems, such as coupled oscillators or epidemic models.

  17. Skill and Will: Test-Taking Motivation and Assessment Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eklof, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    An achievement test score can be viewed as a joint function of skill and will, of knowledge and motivation. However, when interpreting and using test scores, the "will" part is not always acknowledged and scores are mostly interpreted and used as pure measures of student knowledge. This paper argues that students' motivation to do their best on…

  18. Turning spreadsheets into graphs: An information technology lesson in whole brain thinking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F. Patterson; Jonathan G. Leonard

    2005-01-01

    We have Concluded that teaching undergraduate students to use spreadsheet software to analyze, interpret, and communicate\\u000a spreadsheet data through a graph is an information technology exercise in whole brain thinking. In investigating why our students\\u000a have difficulty constructing proper graphs, we have discovered that graphing requires two different types of thinking: analytical,\\u000a logical thinking for working with data and choosing

  19. Using graph approach for managing connectivity in integrative landscape modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabotin, Michael; Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Libres, Aline; Lagacherie, Philippe; Crevoisier, David; Moussa, Roger

    2013-04-01

    In cultivated landscapes, a lot of landscape elements such as field boundaries, ditches or banks strongly impact water flows, mass and energy fluxes. At the watershed scale, these impacts are strongly conditionned by the connectivity of these landscape elements. An accurate representation of these elements and of their complex spatial arrangements is therefore of great importance for modelling and predicting these impacts.We developped in the framework of the OpenFLUID platform (Software Environment for Modelling Fluxes in Landscapes) a digital landscape representation that takes into account the spatial variabilities and connectivities of diverse landscape elements through the application of the graph theory concepts. The proposed landscape representation consider spatial units connected together to represent the flux exchanges or any other information exchanges. Each spatial unit of the landscape is represented as a node of a graph and relations between units as graph connections. The connections are of two types - parent-child connection and up/downstream connection - which allows OpenFLUID to handle hierarchical graphs. Connections can also carry informations and graph evolution during simulation is possible (connections or elements modifications). This graph approach allows a better genericity on landscape representation, a management of complex connections and facilitate development of new landscape representation algorithms. Graph management is fully operational in OpenFLUID for developers or modelers ; and several graph tools are available such as graph traversal algorithms or graph displays. Graph representation can be managed i) manually by the user (for example in simple catchments) through XML-based files in easily editable and readable format or ii) by using methods of the OpenFLUID-landr library which is an OpenFLUID library relying on common open-source spatial libraries (ogr vector, geos topologic vector and gdal raster libraries). OpenFLUID-landr library has been developed in order i) to be used with no GIS expert skills needed (common gis formats can be read and simplified spatial management is provided), ii) to easily develop adapted rules of landscape discretization and graph creation to follow spatialized model requirements and iii) to allow model developers to manage dynamic and complex spatial topology. Graph management in OpenFLUID are shown with i) examples of hydrological modelizations on complex farmed landscapes and ii) the new implementation of Geo-MHYDAS tool based on the OpenFLUID-landr library, which allows to discretize a landscape and create graph structure for the MHYDAS model requirements.

  20. Finite graph automata for linear and boundary graph languages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franz-josef Brandenburg; Konstantin Skodinis

    2005-01-01

    Graph grammars can be regarded as a generalization of context-free grammars from strings to graphs. Over the past 30 years a rich theory of graph grammars and their languages has been developed. However, there are no graph automata. There is no duality between generative and recognizing devices, as it is known for the Chomsky hierarchy of formal languages.Here we introduce

  1. The Effect of Using Graphing Calculators in Complex Function Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the role of graphing calculators in multiple representations for knowledge transfer and the omission of oversimplification in complex function graphs. The main aim is to examine whether graphing calculators were used efficiently to see different cases and multiple perspectives among complex function graphs, or whether…

  2. CONTEXTUAL GRAPH GRAMMARS CHARACTERISING RATIONAL GRAPHS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rewriting systems generate non recursive infinite graphs. 1. Introduction In 1956, and then in 1959 Noam Chomsky wrote two articles which defined the Chomsky hierarchy. This hierarchy has had a tremendous impact is established with the Chomsky hierarchy. In this paper we propose an external characterisation of rational

  3. The Effects of Data and Graph Type on Concepts and Visualizations of Variability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Linda L.; Shore, Felice S.

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing and interpreting variability in data lies at the heart of statistical reasoning. Since graphical displays should facilitate communication about data, statistical literacy should include an understanding of how variability in data can be gleaned from a graph. This paper identifies several types of graphs that students typically…

  4. Comparison of Student Understanding of Line Graph Slope in Physics and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinic, Maja; Milin-Sipus, Zeljka; Katic, Helena; Susac, Ana; Ivanjek, Lana

    2012-01-01

    This study gives an insight into the differences between student understanding of line graph slope in the context of physics (kinematics) and mathematics. Two pairs of parallel physics and mathematics questions that involved estimation and interpretation of line graph slope were constructed and administered to 114 Croatian second year high school…

  5. House of Graphs: a database of interesting graphs

    E-print Network

    Brinkmann, Gunnar; Goedgebeur, Jan; Melot, Hadrien

    2012-01-01

    In this note we present House of Graphs (http://hog.grinvin.org) which is a new database of graphs. The key principle is to have a searchable database and offer -- next to complete lists of some graph classes -- also a list of special graphs that already turned out to be interesting and relevant in the study of graph theoretic problems or as counterexamples to conjectures. This list can be extended by users of the database.

  6. From graph states to two-graph states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Constanza Riera; Stephane Jacob; Matthew G. Parker

    2008-01-01

    The name 'graph state' is used to describe a certain class of pure quantum state which models a physical structure on which one can perform measurement-based quantum computing, and which has a natural graphical description. We present the two-graph state, this being a generalisation of the graph state and a two-graph representation of a stabilizer state. Mathematically, the two-graph state

  7. Subjectivistic Interpretations of Probability

    E-print Network

    Fitelson, Branden

    Subjectivistic Interpretations of Probability The most recent and one of the most- abilities concern actual degrees of belief. Although this interpretation of probability was presented de Finetti, the subjectivistic interpretation o/ probability had no great effects on English

  8. DiGraph: Users Guide

    E-print Network

    Ivan Porres

    This document describes DiGraph version 0.9. When DiGraph starts it shows its version number. If the number shown is different from the version of this document, then this document is out of date. This document is divided in three main chapters. Chapter 2 explains the graph model on which DiGraph

  9. Named graphs, provenance and trust

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeremy J. Carroll; Christian Bizer; Patrick J. Hayes; Patrick Stickler

    2005-01-01

    The Semantic Web consists of many RDF graphs nameable by URIs. This paper extends the syntax and semantics of RDF to cover such Named Graphs. This enables RDF statements that describe graphs, which is beneficial in many Semantic Web application areas. As a case study, we explore the application area of Semantic Web publishing: Named Graphs allow publishers to communicate

  10. BIASED GRAPHS. IV. GEOMETRICAL REALIZATIONS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THOMAS ZASLAVSKY

    2000-01-01

    A gain graph is a graph whose oriented edges are labelled invertibly from a group G, the gain group. A gain graph determines a biased graph and therefore has three natural matroids (as shown in Parts I-II): the bias matroid G has connected circuits; the complete lift matroid L0 and its restriction to the edge set, the lift matroid L,

  11. Mining Shock Graphs with Kernels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Rakotomamonjy; Abdelaziz Bensrhair

    2006-01-01

    Abstract A common,approach for classifying shock graphs is to use a dissimilarity measure,on graphs and a distance based classifier. In this paper, we propose the use of kernel functions for data mining problems on shock graphs. The first contribution of the paper is to extend the class of graph kernel by proposing kernels based on bag of paths. Then, we

  12. Sketching for Developing Critical Thinking Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Wang, P.; Sim, T. B.; Goh, E.; Ng, H. K.

    2013-12-01

    Sketching is a valuable field technique to support a person's observation, recording, interpretation and communication of important features in both natural and human-made landscapes. The Singapore geography syllabus employs an inquiry approach and encourages sketching as a fundamental geographical skill. Sketching allows the learner to connect with the world through a personal and kinesthetic experience. The Earth Observatory of Singapore collaborates with the Singapore Geography Teachers' Association, Urban Sketchers, and National Institute of Education professional development to give teachers both basic sketching skills and the opportunity to develop those skills in a scaffolded environment. In Singapore, geography and geology skills overlap in content area of coastal processes, climate change, and plate tectonics with its associated natural hazards such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and tsunami. Both disciplines are interested in how people live on the Earth. Likewise, basic skills such as observing, classifying, measuring, and communicating cut across disciplines of social and natural sciences in order to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information about the world. Hence, sketching, commonly considered an art skill, is used to further scientific thinking. This somewhat unique collaboration to develop sketching in teachers is based on the long tradition of sketches in geological field work, the newly popular urban sketching community, and professional development by a professional organization and the Singapore National Institute of Education. Workshops provide technique as well as opportunities for sketching with experts in different areas relevant to the geography curriculum.

  13. Graphs associated with semigroups

    E-print Network

    Baber, Stephen Asa

    1976-01-01

    are assumed to be known. Other terms relating to semigroup theory will be introduced as they are needed. The main source for all semigroup theory used in this paper is the book by Clifford and Preston l2I . The common terminology of graph theory needed... if apS and a s ps In this paper we consider more specialized systems of sets and investigate their corresponding graphs, We ask the question, "When is this corresponding graph connected?" In Chapter II we review some of the known results...

  14. Efficiently Controllable Graphs

    E-print Network

    Can Gokler; Kevin Thompson; Peter Shor; Seth Lloyd

    2015-03-18

    We show that universal quantum computation can be performed efficiently on quantum networks while the fraction of controlled subsystems vanishes as the network grows larger. We provide examples of quantum spin network families admitting polynomial quantum gate complexity with a vanishing fraction of controlled spins. We define a new family of graphs, the efficiently controllable family, which admits efficient computation with vanishing fraction of controls. We explore generalizations to percolation clusters, fractals and random graphs. We show that the classical computational complexity of estimating the ground state of Hamiltonians described by controllable graphs is polynomial in the number of subsystems/qubits.

  15. Introduction to Bar Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-05-24

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to bar graphs as a way to represent categorical data. Caution should be used not to use bar graph and histogram interchangeably when using this lesson. This lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to bar graphs as well as suggested ways to integrate them into the lesson. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with the current one. Note, reading level is not indicated because the lesson does not include student reading material.

  16. Why skill matters.

    PubMed

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Yamamoto, Shinya; Yasuda, Masaharu; Kim, Hyoung F

    2013-09-01

    Maximizing rewards per unit time is ideal for success and survival in humans and animals. This goal can be approached by speeding up behavior aiming at rewards and this is done most efficiently by acquiring skills. Importantly, reward-directed skills consist of two components: finding a good object (i.e., object skill) and acting on the object (i.e., action skill), which occur sequentially. Recent studies suggest that object skill is based on high-capacity memory for object-value associations. When a learned object is encountered the corresponding memory is quickly expressed as a value-based gaze bias, leading to the automatic acquisition or avoidance of the object. Object skill thus plays a crucial role in increasing rewards per unit time. PMID:23911579

  17. Neighborhood graphs and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angot, Francois; Clouard, Regis; Elmoataz, Abderrahim; Revenu, Marinette

    1996-08-01

    Many image processing and image segmentation problems, in two or three dimensions, can be addressed and solved by methods and tools developed within the graph theory. Two types of graphs are studied: neighborhood graphs (with the duals Voronoi diagram and Delaunay graph) and adjacency graphs. In this paper, we propose an image representation based on graphs: the graph object, together with methods for attributing and weighting the graph, and methods to merge nodes, is defined within an object-oriented library of image processing operators. In order to demonstrate the interest of the approach, several applications dealing with 2D images are briefly described and discussed: we show that this change of representation can greatly simplify the tuning of image processing plans and how to replace complex sequences of image operators by one single basic operation on graphs. As results are promising, our library of graph operators is being extended to 3D images.

  18. Vectorization of Structure to Index Graph Databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Srinath Srinivas; Sumit Acharya; Himanshu Agrawal; Rajat Khare

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of retrieval from graph databases. Graph databases store graph structures in- stead of tables. Typically, graph databases are appli- cable in domains that require storage and retrieval of structural information. One of the main issues in graph databases is retrieval of member graphs based on struc- ture matching. Structure matching of graphs is a known

  19. Graphing. USMES Beginning "How To" Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Sally; And Others

    In this set of eight booklets on graphing, primary grade students learn how to choose which graph to make and how to make a bar graph, bar graph histogram, conversion graph, line chart, line graph, scatter graph, and slope diagram. The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended,…

  20. Graphs without odd holes, parachutes or proper wheels: a generalization of Meyniel graphs and of line graphs of bipartite graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michele Conforti; Gérard Cornuéjols

    2003-01-01

    We prove that the strong perfect graph conjecture holds for graphs that do not contain parachutes or proper wheels. This is done by showing the following theorem:If a graphGcontains no odd hole, no parachute and no proper wheel, thenGis bipartite or the line graph of a bipartite graph orGcontains a star cutset or an extended strong 2-join orG?is disconnected.To prove

  1. Graphs and Ellipses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Stern

    This lesson provides an introduction (or refresher) of the concept of graphs in Cartesian coordinates, starting with graphs of a straight line and a simple parabola. It is part of a high school course on astronomy, Newtonian mechanics and spaceflight. The implicit relationship x2+y2 = R2 for a circle is given, and from that the Cartesian equation of an ellipse is developed. Students will learn or re-acquire the use of graphs in Cartesian coordinates, become acquainted with linear graphs, the parabola and the rectangular hyperbola and also learn to prepare tables of paired values for plotting a line. Students will also learn about the Cartesian equation of an ellipse, with a worked example and the historical definition of the ellipse.

  2. Graph algorithms experimentation facility

    E-print Network

    Sonom, Donald George

    1994-01-01

    We provide a facility to experiment with graph algorithms. The facility is implemented as a client to XAGE, a software environment developed under the direction of Dr. James Abello. XAGE allows a user to visually animate algorithmic actions...

  3. Position versus Time Graph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    An animation of a red car moving to the right, hitting a wall and then moving backward to the left is shown. Also shown is one of four possible graphs depicting the car's position as a function of time.

  4. Directed Graphs digraph search

    E-print Network

    Sedgewick, Robert

    1 Directed Graphs digraph search transitive closure topological sort strong components References (digraphs) Set of objects with oriented pairwise connections. Page ranks with histogram for a larger example;3 Digraph applications digraph vertex edge financial stock, currency transaction transportation street

  5. Graph homomorphisms between trees

    E-print Network

    Csikvari, Peter

    In this paper we study several problems concerning the number of homomorphisms of trees. We begin with an algorithm for the number of homomorphisms from a tree to any graph. By using this algorithm and some transformations ...

  6. Convex Graph Invariants

    E-print Network

    2010-12-02

    Dec 2, 2010 ... Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Cambridge, MA 02139 ... best understood using structural properties of graphs. ...... normal cone at x with respect to C, again following the usual conventions in convex analysis [35]: 19 ...

  7. Graph similarity and matching

    E-print Network

    Zager, Laura (Laura A.)

    2005-01-01

    Measures of graph similarity have a broad array of applications, including comparing chemical structures, navigating complex networks like the World Wide Web, and more recently, analyzing different kinds of biological data. ...

  8. Software for graph processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Nievergelt

    1970-01-01

    Special purpose programming languages or software packages to facilitate the programming of graph algorithms are being developed at several places. The reports described below have come to my attention. I would appreciate hearing of any other similar efforts.

  9. Querying graphs with data 

    E-print Network

    Vrgoc, Domagoj

    2014-06-27

    Graph data is becoming more and more pervasive. Indeed, services such as Social Networks or the Semantic Web can no longer rely on the traditional relational model, as its structure is somewhat too rigid for the applications ...

  10. Discriminative Frequent Pattern-Based Graph Classification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Cheng; Xifeng Yan; Jiawei Han

    \\u000a Frequent graph mining has been studied extensively with many scalable graph mining algorithms developed in the past. Graph\\u000a patterns are essential not only for exploratory graph mining but also for advanced graph analysis tasks such as graph indexing,\\u000a graph clustering, and graph classification. In this chapter, we examine the frequent pattern-based classification of graph\\u000a data. We will introduce different types

  11. Graph Theory with Applications

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bondy, J. A. (John Adrian)

    Written by J.A. Bondy and U.S.R. Murty of the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris, this online 270-page textbook presents graph theory and its applications. The topics covered here include connectivity, independent sets and cliques, and planar and directed graphs. Each chapter has a list of references for further information, and most have exercises. Visitors can find the solution to those exercises in the Appendices here.

  12. Statistics and Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Matt Laposata

    Statistics play a vital role in the scientific enterprise. This activity provides background information and tutorials on basic statistics (mean, median, standard deviation, etc.) used in science. Topics include descriptive statistics (measures of central tendency and dispersion) and presenting data (tables, figures, and graphs). Sample datasets from actual scientific experiments are used to illustrate points. Links to an online statisitical tool and an online graphing application are also provided.

  13. Graphing Trash Material (Illuminations)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    In this lesson plan students gather data about the items that they would normally throw in the trash. Once students collect the data they create a bar graph to display the number and kinds of materials they discard and then use this data to create a plan to reduce garbage and help the environment. The lesson plan includes an activity sheet (PDF) for graphing data and extension activity suggestions.

  14. Histograms and Bar Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-18

    This lesson is designed to introduce students to histograms and bar graphs as graphical representations of data. The lesson also covers the distinction between histograms and bar graphs and the concepts of class intervals and scale. The lesson provides links to discussions and activities related to these topics as well as worksheets for further practice. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession with this one.

  15. Quantitative Literacy: Working with Log Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawl, S.

    2013-04-01

    The need for working with and understanding different types of graphs is a common occurrence in everyday life. Examples include anything having to do investments, being an educated juror in a case that involves evidence presented graphically, and understanding many aspect of our current political discourse. Within a science class graphs play a crucial role in presenting and interpreting data. In astronomy, where the range of graphed values is many orders of magnitude, log-axes must be used and understood. Experience shows that students do not understand how to read and interpret log-axes or how they differ from linear. Alters (1996), in a study of college students in an algebra-based physics class, found little understanding of log plotting. The purpose of this poster is to show the method and progression I have developed for use in my “ASTRO 101” class, with the goal being to help students better understand the H-R diagram, mass-luminosity relationship, and digital spectra.

  16. MY NASA DATA: Correlation of Variables by Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    Activities in this lesson promote a fundamental understanding of relationships between graphed data. Sample graphs allow students to become familiar with interpreting data and to recognize relationships between variables. Additional microsets of atmospheric data (gases, clouds, pressures, temperatures, precipitation) are included. Students will use that data to predict the appearance of a graph, plot the data points, study the data pattern and draw a conclusion. In addition, students will determine if a relationship exists between two variables; leading to an understanding that relationships between variables can be more complicated than simple linear ones. This lesson uses student- and citizen science-friendly microsets of authentic NASA Earth system science data from the MY NASA DATA project. It also includes sample graphs, related links, extensions, and an online glossary.

  17. SimGraph: A Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Joseph A.; Kenney, Patrick S.

    1997-01-01

    Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data, making a qualitative analysis of the data difficult while it remains in a numerical representation. Therefore, a method of merging related data together and presenting it to the user in a more comprehensible format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is an object-oriented data visualization software package that presents simulation data in animated graphical displays for easy interpretation. Data produced from a flight simulation is presented by SimGraph in several different formats, including: 3-Dimensional Views, Cockpit Control Views, Heads-Up Displays, Strip Charts, and Status Indicators. SimGraph can accommodate the addition of new graphical displays to allow the software to be customized to each user s particular environment. A new display can be developed and added to SimGraph without having to design a new application, allowing the graphics programmer to focus on the development of the graphical display. The SimGraph framework can be reused for a wide variety of visualization tasks. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper describes the capabilities and operations of SimGraph.

  18. Teaching Basic Caregiver Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, Susan, Ed.; Harrah, Doris, Ed.

    This instructor's guide provides materials for a nursing skills course designed to teach basic home nursing skills to families who plan to care for a chronically ill or elderly family member at home. It may be taught by a registered nurse with knowledge of all areas or by a team, with each instructor concentrating on his/her area of expertise.…

  19. Testing Skills in Vertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funk, Mildred Sears; Tosto, Pat

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a project that gives students examples of basic skills that many vertebrate species develop as they grow and function in their ecosystem. These activities involve information gathering about surroundings, learning how to use objects, and tracking and searching skills. Different vertebrate species may acquire…

  20. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  1. More Life Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearn, Joan

    Designed to supplement already existing life skills instructional materials, this manual consists of 30 lessons to help students develop general, transferrrable skills in four areas--attending behaviors, cognition, self-management, and critical thinking. The following topics are among those covered in the lessons: eye contact, body posture,…

  2. Medication and Skilled Work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. N. Nicholson

    1990-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the way in which drugs impair performance. This has arisen because some may impair day-to-day skills of those whose occupations demand vigilance and motor skill, and of those who are involved in decision making or where interpersonal relations are crucial. For many years the position was adopted, at least in certain occupations where impaired performance

  3. Critical Skills Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As the U.S. economy begins to show signs of improvement, executives say they need a workforce fully equipped with skills beyond just the basics of reading, writing, and arithmetic (the three Rs). Skills such as critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity and innovation (the four Cs) will become even more…

  4. Social Skills Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Charles W., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue for people working in the field of adult literacy focuses on the impact of learning disabilities (LD) on an adult's social skills. It explores various social, emotional, and daily living concerns which adults with learning disabilities may face. The following articles are included: (1) "Social Skills and Adults with Learning…

  5. Measuring Internet Skills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander van Deursen; J. A. G. M. van Dijk

    2010-01-01

    Research that considers Internet skills often lacks theoretical justifications and does not go beyond basic button knowledge. There is a strong need for a measurement framework that can guide future research. In this article, operational definitions for measuring Internet skills are proposed, applied in two large-scale performance tests, and tested for reliability and validity. The framework consists of four Internet

  6. Assessing Employee Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on assessing employee skills. "Bridging the Training Gap: Identifying Work Place Transferable Skills Needs in Manufacturing Organizations in East Central Minnesota" (K. Peter Kuchinke, James M. Brown, Howie Anderson, Joe Hobson) reports a study of a workplace education program in rural Minnesota…

  7. What Are Generic Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the methodology and stages of occupational generic skills studies focusing on four occupational surveys encompassing seventy-seven trade occupations. Also, covers specifications for developing an individualized job training curriculum and cites some available generic skills tools for teachers. (EM)

  8. Knowledge & Skills Foundations

    E-print Network

    Hood, Craig

    methods and contextual understanding, critical thinking and hands-on skills. Basic Knowledge In the fields Charitable Trusts the sciences employ critical thinking skills as they learn scientific concepts. Beyond mere with scientific experiments but does not replace the thinking processes required to estimate, question and solve

  9. Early Communicative Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKay, Gilbert F.; Dunn, William R.

    Intended for parents and teachers, the manual offers guidelines for developing communication skills in severely and profoundly mentally handicapped children. An introduction helps the reader determine a suitable starting point and provides a description of early communication skills; Part II describes the five stages in communication development.…

  10. CAREER ENHANCEMENT SKILLS TRAINING

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    SOLICITOR BARRISTER CAREER ENHANCEMENT CONVERSION SKILLS TRAINING EMPLOYABILITY DEVOLUTION JUSTICE of training I Wish to enhance their employability by acquiring an extra skill set that can be applied LAW a professional legal education Graduate Diploma in Law Swansea #12;WHAT IS THE GRADUATE DIPLOMA

  11. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  12. ASK-GraphView: A large scale graph visualization system.

    PubMed

    Abello, James; van Ham, Frank; Krishnan, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    We describe ASK-GraphView, a node-link-based graph visualization system that allows clustering and interactive navigation of large graphs, ranging in size up to 16 million edges. The system uses a scalable architecture and a series of increasingly sophisticated clustering algorithms to construct a hierarchy on an arbitrary, weighted undirected input graph. By lowering the interactivity requirements we can scale to substantially bigger graphs. The user is allowed to navigate this hierarchy in a top down manner by interactively expanding individual clusters. ASK-GraphView also provides facilities for filtering and coloring, annotation and cluster labeling. PMID:17080786

  13. New Graph Calculi for Planar Non-3-Colorable Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanatani, Yoichi; Horiyama, Takashi; Iwama, Kazuo; Tamaki, Suguru

    The Hajós calculus is a nondeterministic procedure which generates the class of non-3-colorable graphs. If all non-3-colorable graphs can be constructed in polynomial steps by the calculus, then NP=co-NP holds. Up to date, however, it remains open whether there exists a family of graphs that cannot be generated in polynomial steps. To attack this problem, we propose two graph calculi PHC and PHC* that generate non-3-colorable planar graphs, where intermediate graphs in the calculi are also restricted to be planar. Then we prove that PHC and PHC* are sound and complete. We also show that PHC* can polynomially simulate PHC.

  14. Not-so-Soft Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Much recent discussion about the skills needed to secure Britain's economic recovery has focused on skills for employability. However, too often, these fundamental skills are understood in narrow functional or vocational terms. So-called "soft skills", what Penelope Tobin, in her 2008 paper "Soft Skills: the hard facts", terms "traits and…

  15. Resistance distances in composite graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujun; Klein, Douglas J.

    2014-09-01

    The resistance distance between any two vertices of a connected graph is defined as the effective resistance between them in the electrical network constructed from the graph by replacing each edge with a (unit) resistor. Let G+H, G × H, G[H], G\\otimes H, G\\;\\boxtimes \\;H, G\\circ H and G\\{H\\} be the join, product, composition, direct product, strong product, corona and rooted product of two graphs G and H, respectively. In this paper, formulae for resistance distances of these composite graphs are given in terms of parameters of the parent graphs, and some properties are established. Explicit formulae are obtained for resistance distances of some classes of graphs, including rook graphs, diagonal mesh graphs and generalized double graphs.

  16. Towards Robot Skill Learning: From Simple Skills to Table Tennis

    E-print Network

    Jegelka, Stefanie

    Towards Robot Skill Learning: From Simple Skills to Table Tennis Jan Peters, Jens Kober, Katharina learning problems to a game of robot table tennis. 1 Introduction Despite the many impressive motor skills

  17. Heat kernel estimates on weighted graphs Bernd Metzger \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Stollmann, P.

    Heat kernel estimates on weighted graphs Bernd Metzger \\Lambda and Peter Stollmann Ludwig of his sixtieth birthday Abstract We prove upper and lower heat kernel bounds for the Laplacian estimates give rise to a very explicit probabilistic interpretation and can be formulated in terms

  18. Interpreting psychoanalytic interpretation: a fourfold perspective.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Victor L

    2011-12-01

    Following an overview of psychoanalytic interpretation in theory, practice, and historical context, as well as the question of whether interpretations have scientific validity, the author holds that hermeneutics, the philosophical and psychological study of interpretation, provides a rich understanding of recent developments in self psychology, inter-subjective and relational perspectives, attachment theory, and psycho-spiritual views on psychoanalytic process. He then offers four distinct hermeneutical vantage points regarding interpretation in the psychoanalytic context, including (1) Freud's adaptation of the Aristotelian view of interpretation as the uncovering of a set of predetermined meanings and structures; (2) the phenomenological view of interpretation as the laying bare of "the things themselves," that is, removing the coverings of objectification and concretization imposed by social norms and the conscious ego; (3) the dialogical existential view of interpretation as an ongoing relational process; and (4) the transformational understanding in which interpretation evokes a "presence" that transforms both patient and analyst. He concludes by contending that these perspectives are not mutually exclusive ways of conducting an analysis, but rather that all occur within the analyst's suspended attention, the caregiving and holding essential to good therapeutic outcomes, and the mutuality of the psychoanalytic dialogue. PMID:22221043

  19. Component Evolution in General Random Intersection Graphs

    E-print Network

    Bradonjic, Milan; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Percus, Allon G

    2010-01-01

    Random intersection graphs (RIGs) are an important random structure with applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, and wireless sensor networks. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. We analyze the component evolution in general RIGs, and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize existing methods for analysis of component evolution: we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts of the study of component evolution in Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi graphs. The major challenge comes from the underlying structure of RIGs, which involves its both the set of nodes and the set of attributes, as well as the set of different probabilities among the nodes and attributes.

  20. Component Evolution in General Random Intersection Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradonji?, Milan; Hagberg, Aric; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; Percus, Allon G.

    Random intersection graphs (RIGs) are an important random structure with algorithmic applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, and wireless sensor networks. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. We analyze the component evolution in general RIGs, giving conditions on the existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize existing methods for analysis of component evolution: we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts of the study of component evolution in Erd?s-Rényi graphs. The major challenge comes from the underlying structure of RIGs, which involves both a set of nodes and a set of attributes, with different probabilities associated with each attribute.

  1. Graph Constrained Discriminant Analysis: A New Method for the Integration of a Graph into a Classification Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Guillemot; Arthur Tenenhaus; Laurent Le Brusquet; Vincent Frouin; Arkady B. Khodursky

    2011-01-01

    Integrating gene regulatory networks (GRNs) into the classification process of DNA microarrays is an important issue in bioinformatics, both because this information has a true biological interest and because it helps in the interpretation of the final classifier. We present a method called graph-constrained discriminant analysis (gCDA), which aims to integrate the information contained in one or several GRNs into

  2. Generative Graph Grammar of Neo-Vai?e?ika Formal Ontology (NVFO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavva, Rajesh; Singh, Navjyoti

    NLP applications for Sanskrit so far work within computational paradigm of string grammars. However, to compute 'meanings', as in traditional ?? bdabodha prakriy?-s, there is a need to develop suitable graph grammars. Ontological structures are fundamentally graphs. We work within the formal framework of Neo-Vai?e?ika Formal Ontology (NVFO) to propose a generative graph grammar. The proposed formal grammar only produces well-formed graphs that can be readily interpreted in accordance with Vai?e? ika Ontology. We show that graphs not permitted by Vai?e? ika ontology are not generated by the proposed grammar. Further, we write Interpreter of these graphical structures. This creates computational environment which can be deployed for writing computational applications of Vai?e? ika ontology. We illustrate how this environment can be used to create applications like computing ?? bdabodha of sentences.

  3. Semantic Graph Compression with Hypergraphs Arber Borici

    E-print Network

    Thomo, Alex

    exploited by graph processing techniques. However, given a sufficiently large graph, many techniques two practical reasons. First, capturing such information provides context to eventual graph processingSemantic Graph Compression with Hypergraphs Arber Borici Department of Computer Science University

  4. Automatic Skill Acquisition in Reinforcement Learning Agents Using Connection Bridge Centrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Parham; Shiri, Mohammad Ebrahim; Entezari, Negin

    Incorporating skills in reinforcement learning methods results in accelerate agents learning performance. The key problem of automatic skill discovery is to find subgoal states and create skills to reach them. Among the proposed algorithms, those based on graph centrality measures have achieved precise results. In this paper we propose a new graph centrality measure for identifying subgoal states that is crucial to develop useful skills. The main advantage of the proposed centrality measure is that this measure considers both local and global information of the agent states to score them that result in identifying real subgoal states. We will show through simulations for three benchmark tasks, namely, "four-room grid world", "taxi driver grid world" and "soccer simulation grid world" that a procedure based on the proposed centrality measure performs better than the procedure based on the other centrality measures.

  5. Library Skills Unit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Bolle

    2008-10-20

    The Library Skills Unit teaches library resources and information to 9th grade classes, this is a list of resources that maybe helpful to the students. Take the survey after you have completed all 4 units of library skills. I would love your feedback on the unit so that I can change some things to make it more beneficial for you, the students! Library Skills Unit Survey Use these links to get to databases quickly: eLibrary Facts on File/Issues Controversies CQ Researcher ...

  6. Presentation skills for nurses.

    PubMed

    Foulkes, Mark

    2015-02-18

    This article emphasises the importance of effective presentation skills. Such skills allow nurses to share knowledge and expertise and to communicate clearly in a range of workplace scenarios. Nurses are increasingly being asked to present in formal and informal situations, such as conferences, poster presentations, job interviews, case reports and ward-based teaching. This article explores the principles underpinning the development of these skills, discusses the situations in which they could be applied and demonstrates how nurses might improve and develop as presenters. PMID:25690236

  7. The relationship between psychological skills usage and competitive anxiety responses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Fletcher; Sheldon Hanton

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate equivocal findings within the literature addressing the relationship between competitive anxiety responses and psychological skills. Intensity (i.e. level) and direction (i.e. interpretation of intensity as facilitative or debilitative) dimensions of competitive state anxiety and self-confidence were examined in performers with different levels of psychological skills usage.Design. Cross-sectional design assessing psychological constructs during competition. The independent variable was

  8. PhET Teacher Activities: Moving Man - Velocity vs. Time Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steve Reeves

    This lesson plan was developed specifically for use with the PhET simulation "The Moving Man". It is intended to help beginning students differentiate velocity vs. time graphs from position vs. time graphs, and also to promote understanding of multiple frames of reference in analyzing an object's motion. Only basic graphing skills are required of the student. The lesson was created by a high school teacher under the sponsorship of the PhET project. SEE RELATED ITEMS for a link to "The Moving Man" simulation. which must be running to complete the activity.

  9. Graph ensemble boosting for imbalanced noisy graph stream classification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shirui; Wu, Jia; Zhu, Xingquan; Zhang, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    Many applications involve stream data with structural dependency, graph representations, and continuously increasing volumes. For these applications, it is very common that their class distributions are imbalanced with minority (or positive) samples being only a small portion of the population, which imposes significant challenges for learning models to accurately identify minority samples. This problem is further complicated with the presence of noise, because they are similar to minority samples and any treatment for the class imbalance may falsely focus on the noise and result in deterioration of accuracy. In this paper, we propose a classification model to tackle imbalanced graph streams with noise. Our method, graph ensemble boosting, employs an ensemble-based framework to partition graph stream into chunks each containing a number of noisy graphs with imbalanced class distributions. For each individual chunk, we propose a boosting algorithm to combine discriminative subgraph pattern selection and model learning as a unified framework for graph classification. To tackle concept drifting in graph streams, an instance level weighting mechanism is used to dynamically adjust the instance weight, through which the boosting framework can emphasize on difficult graph samples. The classifiers built from different graph chunks form an ensemble for graph stream classification. Experiments on real-life imbalanced graph streams demonstrate clear benefits of our boosting design for handling imbalanced noisy graph stream. PMID:25167562

  10. On the Relation of Graph Grammars and Graph Automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Mylopoulos

    1972-01-01

    It is shown that a strong relationship exists between sets of graphs defined by graph (walking) automata with markers available and sets defined by graph grammars. Polynomial recognition algorithms are presented for certain classes of sets and it is argued that the existence of polynomial algorithms for other classes is doubtful. Other properties of the classes of sets defined by

  11. Rainbow Coloring of Graphs Rainbow Coloring of Graphs

    E-print Network

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Rainbow Coloring of Graphs Rainbow Coloring of Graphs L. Sunil Chandran Computer Science and Automation Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore Email: sunil@csa.iisc.ernet.in #12;Rainbow Coloring of Graphs What is Rainbow Coloring? Consider an edge coloring, not necessarily proper. #12;Rainbow Coloring

  12. Graph Theory Tutorials

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Caldwell, Chris Kelly

    Chris Caldwell of the University of Tennessee at Martin provides the Graph Theory Tutorials Website. Sections included at the site are Introduction to Graph Theory, Euler Circuits and Paths, Coloring Problems, and Adjacency Matrices (under construction). Each section consists of an interactive tutorial discussing the basic concepts of graph theory. Registration (press the REGISTER button at the bottom of first page of each tutorial) is required for each tutorial. The user must either pass a quiz in the tutorial section or write a comment before continuing to the next page. Links to related resources are also provided at the site. This site is useful for high school students and is definitely worth a visit.

  13. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Univ. of Minnesota)

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  14. Graphs - Office of Cancer Survivorship

    Cancer.gov

    This page provides several cancer survivorship-related graphs. For additional statistics, including customized graphs or tables, please go to NCI’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.

  15. Distance Versus Time Graphs 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    This inquiry activity should be used before students learn about velocity and distance versus time graphs. Students will discover how the slope of a distance versus time graph is related to the speed of the object.

  16. Graphing 1D Kinematic Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aaron Larson

    In this demonstration students are given a position, velocity or acceleration graph showing the motion of an object. They are asked to write a short description of the motion, and make predictions by completing the remaining two graphs.

  17. Science Sampler: Walking Out Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ji Shen

    2009-12-01

    In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that student

  18. Graph dynamics : learning and representation

    E-print Network

    Ribeiro, Andre Figueiredo

    2006-01-01

    Graphs are often used in artificial intelligence as means for symbolic knowledge representation. A graph is nothing more than a collection of symbols connected to each other in some fashion. For example, in computer vision ...

  19. Range charts and no-space graphs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, L.E.

    1978-01-01

    No-space graphs present one solution to the familiar problem: given data on the occurrence of fossil taxa in separate, well-sampled sections, determine a range chart; that is, a reasonable working hypothesis of the total range in the area in question of each taxon studied. The solution presented here treats only the relative sequence of biostratigraphic events (first and last occurrences of taxa) and does not attempt to determine an amount of spacing between events. Relative to a hypothesized sequence, observed events in any section may be in-place or out-of-place. Out-of-place events may indicate (1) the event in question reflects a taxon that did not fill its entire range (unfilled-range event), or (2) the event in question indicates a need for the revision of the hypothesized sequence. A graph of relative position only (no-space graph) can be used to facilitate the recognition of in-place and out-of-place events by presenting a visual comparison of the observations from each section with the hypothesized sequence. The geometry of the graph as constructed here is such that in-place events will lie along a line series and out-of-place events will lie above or below it. First-occurrence events below the line series and last-occurrence events above the line series indicate unfilled ranges. First-occurrence events above the line series and last-occurrence events below the line series indicate a need for the revision of the hypothesis. Knowing this, the stratigrapher considers alternative positionings of the line series as alternative range hypotheses and seeks the line series that best fits his geologic and paleontologic judgment. No-space graphs are used to revise an initial hypothesis until a final hypothesis is reached. In this final hypothesis every event is found in-place in at least one section, and all events in all sections may be interpreted to represent in-place events or unfilled-range events. No event may indicate a need for further range revision. The application of the no-space graph method requires the assumption of lack of reworking and the assumption that taxa that are present in a single horizon indicate taxa whose ranges overlap. When applied to hypothetical and actual data, the no-space graph technique produces geologically reasonable range charts that compare favorably with results produced by other methods. ?? 1978.

  20. Preliminaries of Graph Presenter: ZHU, Siyu

    E-print Network

    Papadias, Dimitris

    Preliminaries of Graph Databases Presenter: ZHU, Siyu #12;Definition A graph database is a database that uses graph structures with nodes, edges, and properties to represent and store data. A graph. the Graph Database A relational database's data model is a collection interlinked tables. A graph database

  1. Vectorization of Structure to Index Graph Databases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Srinath Srinivasa

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of retrieval from graphdatabases. Graph databases store graph structures insteadof tables. Typically, graph databases are applicablein domains that require storage and retrieval ofstructural information. One of the main issues in graphdatabases is retrieval of member graphs based on structurematching. Structure matching of graphs is a knownNP-complete problem. In graph databases, this is compoundedby the fact

  2. Empirical comparison of graph classification algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikhil S. Ketkar; Lawrence B. Holder; Diane J. Cook

    2009-01-01

    The graph classification problem is learning to classify separate, individual graphs in a graph database into two or more categories. A number of algorithms have been introduced for the graph classification problem. We present an empirical comparison of the major approaches for graph classification introduced in literature, namely, SubdueCL, frequent subgraph mining in conjunction with SVMs, walk-based graph kernel, frequent

  3. Graphing. USMES Intermediate "How To" Set.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Sally; And Others

    In this set of six booklets on graphing, intermediate grade students learn how to choose which kind of graph to make; make bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, and conversion graphs; and use graphs to compare two sets of data. The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended,…

  4. Lesson 3: Graphs and Equations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This lesson begins with linear equations and inequalities in 1 variable and then moves on to linear equations in 2 variables. Graphs of linear equations in 2 variables are introduced as "a picture of all its solutions." Exercises targeting the links between equations, solutions, points, and graphs follows, with the final activities focusing on use of a graphing calculator to graph equations and find coordinates. There aren't any application problems in this lesson.

  5. Biased graphs IV: Geometrical realizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Zaslavsky

    2003-01-01

    A gain graph is a graph whose oriented edges are labelled invertibly from a group G, the gain group. A gain graph determines a biased graph and therefore has three natural matroids (as shown in Parts I and II): the bias matroidG has connected circuits; the complete lift matroidL0 and its restriction to the edge set, the lift matroidL, have

  6. Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

    2007-08-07

    A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

  7. Geometry of graph varieties

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeremy L.

    2003-01-01

    TRANSACTIONS OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Volume 355, Number 10, Pages 4151{4169 S 0002-9947(03)03321-X Article electronically published on May 15, 2003 GEOMETRY OF GRAPH VARIETIES JEREMY L. MARTIN Abstract. A picture P of a graph G =(V...;E) consists of a point P(v)foreach vertex v2V and a line P(e)foreachedgee2E, all lying in the projective plane over a eld k and subject to containment conditions corresponding to incidence in G.Agraph variety is an algebraic set whose points parametrize...

  8. Making "Photo" Graphs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Julianne Doto

    2007-10-01

    Collecting data and analyzing the results of experiments is difficult for children. The authors found a surprising way to help their third graders make graphs and draw conclusions from their data: digital photographs. The pictures bridged the gap between an abstract graph and the plants it represented. With the support of the photos, students analyzed the results of their experiment and represented them graphically. In addition, children learned about plants according to state science standards while integrating the data analysis components of state math standards.

  9. DebateGraph

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    DebateGraph states, "to change the world you need to look at it in a different way." Many would agree; this platform gives multiple partners the ability to visualize and share different ideas. It's a neat concept and it's one that has been used by the United Kingdom's Foreign Office and CNN. A helpful "how-to" area can get users started and the application allows visitors to link ideas visually via a very easy-to-use interface. This version of debate graph is compatible with all operating systems.

  10. Forces and Graphing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    GK-12 Program, Center for Engineering and Computing Education, College of Engineering and Information Technology,

    Use this activity to explore forces acting on objects, practice graphing experimental data, and introduce the algebra concepts of slope and intercept of a line. A wooden 2 x 4 beam is set on top of two scales. Students learn how to conduct an experiment by applying loads at different locations along the beam, recording the exact position of the applied load and the reaction forces measured by the scales at each end of the beam. In addition, students analyze the experiment data with the use of a chart and a table, and model/graph linear equations to describe relationships between independent and dependent variables.

  11. Graphing Calculator Mini Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karnawat, Sunil R.

    1996-01-01

    The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

  12. Elicited Speech from Graph Items on the Test of Spoken English[TM]. Research Reports. Report 74. RR-04-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Irvin R.; Xi, Xiaoming; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Cheng, Peter C. H.

    2004-01-01

    This research applied a cognitive model to identify item features that lead to irrelevant variance on the Test of Spoken English[TM] (TSE[R]). The TSE is an assessment of English oral proficiency and includes an item that elicits a description of a statistical graph. This item type sometimes appears to tap graph-reading skills--an irrelevant…

  13. Crew Skills and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas; Burbank, Daniel C.; Eppler, Dean; Garrison, Robert; Harvey, Ralph; Hoffman, Paul; Schmitt, Harrison

    1998-01-01

    One of the major focus points for the workshop was the topic of crew skills and training necessary for the Mars surface mission. Discussions centered on the mix of scientific skills necessary to accomplish the proposed scientific goals, and the training environment that can bring the ground and flight teams to readiness. Subsequent discussion resulted in recommendations for specific steps to begin the process of training an experienced Mars exploration team.

  14. Skill in Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval Skill quantifies the ability of one retrieval from a sounder to be more accurate than the best forecast relative to another with the same of another sounder. This is summarized using a Retrieval Anomaly Skill Score (RASS) which is the cor (retrieved-background, truth-background) * sqrt(f), Where f is defined as the ratio of accepted to the possible retrievals. Charts show various features and comparisons of RASS to other methods of retrieval.

  15. Graph - Based High Resolution Satellite Image Segmentation for Object Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravali, K.; Kumar, M. V. Ravi; Venugopala Rao, K.

    2014-11-01

    Object based image processing and analysis is challenging research in very high resolution satellite utilisation. Commonly ei ther pixel based classification or visual interpretation is used to recognize and delineate land cover categories. The pixel based classification techniques use rich spectral content of satellite images and fail to utilise spatial relations. To overcome th is drawback, traditional time consuming visual interpretation methods are being used operational ly for preparation of thematic maps. This paper addresses computational vision principles to object level image segmentation. In this study, computer vision algorithms are developed to define the boundary between two object regions and segmentation by representing image as graph. Image is represented as a graph G (V, E), where nodes belong to pixels and, edges (E) connect nodes belonging to neighbouring pixels. The transformed Mahalanobis distance has been used to define a weight function for partition of graph into components such that each component represents the region of land category. This implies that edges between two vertices in the same component have relatively low weights and edges between vertices in different components should have higher weights. The derived segments are categorised to different land cover using supervised classification. The paper presents the experimental results on real world multi-spectral remote sensing images of different landscapes such as Urban, agriculture and mixed land cover. Graph construction done in C program and list the run time for both graph construction and segmentation calculation on dual core Intel i7 system with 16 GB RAM, running 64bit window 7.

  16. Strategies for Learning: Teaching Thinking Skills across the Curriculum through Science. Generating and Testing Hypothesis. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauker, Robert A.; Roy, Kenneth Russell

    Science process skills such as observing, classifying, inferring, interpreting, predicting, and hypothesizing can all be classified as a sub category of thinking skills. This book is part of the series "Strategies for Learning" that focuses on the step-by-step development and application of thinking skills as a vehicle for learning science. The…

  17. Strategies for Learning: Teaching Thinking Skills across the Curriculum through Science. Analyzing Information and Data. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauker, Robert A.; Roy, Kenneth Russell

    Science process skills such as observing, classifying, inferring, interpreting, predicting, and hypothesizing can all be classified as a sub category of thinking skills. This book is part of the series "Strategies for Learning" that focuses on the step-by-step development and application of thinking skills as a vehicle for learning science. The…

  18. Interpreting. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darroch, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    An interpreter's role is to facilitate communication and convey all auditory and signed information so that both hearing and deaf individuals may fully interact. The common types of services provided by interpreters are: (1) American Sign Language (ASL) Interpretation--a visual-gestural language with its own linguistic features; (2) Sign Language…

  19. Translation and Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Nancy Schweda

    1995-01-01

    Examines recent trends in the fields of translation and interpretation, focusing on translation and interpretation theory and practice, language-specific challenges, computer-assisted translation, machine translation, subtitling, and translator and interpreter training. An annotated bibliography discusses seven important works in the field. (112…

  20. Survey of graph database models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renzo Angles; Claudio Gutiérrez

    2008-01-01

    Graph database models can be defined as those in which data structures for the schema and instances are modeled as graphs or generalizations of them, and data manipulation is expressed by graph-oriented operations and type constructors. These models took off in the eighties and early nineties alongside object- oriented models. Their influence gradually died out with the emergence of other

  1. It is Graph-Tastic!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Justin

    2011-10-21

    Use your knowledge of coordinates to play these graphing games! Have fun playing Driving Down the Grid. You must drive your car to the given coordinate. Make sure you do not crash into anything! Play Graph Mole for even more graphing fun! A farmer is trying to plant vegetables, until some pesky moles try to eat them. Choose with coordinate that the mole ...

  2. A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

    2005-01-01

    Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

  3. Densities in graphs and matroids

    E-print Network

    Kannan, Lavanya

    2009-05-15

    Certain graphs can be described by the distribution of the edges in its subgraphs. For example, a cycle C is a graph that satisfies |E(H)| |V (H)| trivial subgraphs of C. Similarly, a tree T is a graph that satisfies...

  4. Random Graph Processes Tamas Makai

    E-print Network

    Sheldon, Nathan D.

    ,4 where K- 3,4 is created from the complete bi- partite graph with 3 vertices in one partition and 4Random Graph Processes Tam´as Makai Thesis submitted to the University of London for the degree clearly stated. Signed: (Tam´as Makai) Date: #12;Summary This thesis deals with random graph processes

  5. Bisimulation Equivalences for Graph Grammars ?

    E-print Network

    Baldan, Paolo

    - ing the equivalence of #12;nite causal automata. 1 Introduction Graph grammars have been shownBisimulation Equivalences for Graph Grammars ? Paolo Baldan, Andrea Corradini, Ugo Montanari Dipartimento di Informatica Universit#18;a di Pisa Abstract. Along the years the concurrent behaviour of graph

  6. Neighborhood transformations on graph automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno Martin; Christophe Papazian

    2008-01-01

    We consider simulations of graph automata. We introduce two local trans- formations on the neighborhood: splitting and merging. We explain how to use such transformations, and their consequences on the topology of the simulated graph, the speed of the simulation and the memory size of simulating automata in some cases. As an ex- ample, we apply these transformations to graph

  7. The random planar graph process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefanie Gerke; Dirk Schlatter; Angelika Steger; Anusch Taraz

    2008-01-01

    We consider the following variant of the classical random graph process introduced by Erd?os and Renyi. Starting with an empty graph on n vertices, choose the next edge uniformly at random among all edges not yet considered, but only insert it if the graph remains planar. We show that for all \\

  8. Cognitive measurements of graph aesthetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin Ware; Helen C. Purchase; Linda Colpoys; Matthew Mcgill

    2002-01-01

    A large class of diagrams can be informally characterized as node-link diagrams. Typically nodes represent entities, and links represent relationships between them. The discipline of graph drawing is concerned with methods for drawing abstract versions of such diagrams. At the foundation of the disci- pline are a set of graph aesthetics (rules for graph layout) that, it is assumed, will

  9. Contribution of Oral Language Skills, Linguistic Skills, and Transcription Skills to Chinese Written Composition among Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Pui-sze; Ho, Connie Suk-han; Chan, David Wai-ock; Chung, Kevin Kien-hoa

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the contribution of oral language skills, linguistic skills, and transcription skills to Chinese written composition among Grade 4 students in Hong Kong. Measures assessing verbal working memory, oral language skills, linguistic skills (i.e., syntactic skills and discourse skills), transcription skills (i.e.,…

  10. Structural interpretation of seismic data and inherent uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Clare

    2013-04-01

    Geoscience is perhaps unique in its reliance on incomplete datasets and building knowledge from their interpretation. This interpretation basis for the science is fundamental at all levels; from creation of a geological map to interpretation of remotely sensed data. To teach and understand better the uncertainties in dealing with incomplete data we need to understand the strategies individual practitioners deploy that make them effective interpreters. The nature of interpretation is such that the interpreter needs to use their cognitive ability in the analysis of the data to propose a sensible solution in their final output that is both consistent not only with the original data but also with other knowledge and understanding. In a series of experiments Bond et al. (2007, 2008, 2011, 2012) investigated the strategies and pitfalls of expert and non-expert interpretation of seismic images. These studies focused on large numbers of participants to provide a statistically sound basis for analysis of the results. The outcome of these experiments showed that a wide variety of conceptual models were applied to single seismic datasets. Highlighting not only spatial variations in fault placements, but whether interpreters thought they existed at all, or had the same sense of movement. Further, statistical analysis suggests that the strategies an interpreter employs are more important than expert knowledge per se in developing successful interpretations. Experts are successful because of their application of these techniques. In a new set of experiments a small number of experts are focused on to determine how they use their cognitive and reasoning skills, in the interpretation of 2D seismic profiles. Live video and practitioner commentary were used to track the evolving interpretation and to gain insight on their decision processes. The outputs of the study allow us to create an educational resource of expert interpretation through online video footage and commentary with associated further interpretation and analysis of the techniques and strategies employed. This resource will be of use to undergraduate, post-graduate, industry and academic professionals seeking to improve their seismic interpretation skills, develop reasoning strategies for dealing with incomplete datasets, and for assessing the uncertainty in these interpretations. Bond, C.E. et al. (2012). 'What makes an expert effective at interpreting seismic images?' Geology, 40, 75-78. Bond, C. E. et al. (2011). 'When there isn't a right answer: interpretation and reasoning, key skills for 21st century geoscience'. International Journal of Science Education, 33, 629-652. Bond, C. E. et al. (2008). 'Structural models: Optimizing risk analysis by understanding conceptual uncertainty'. First Break, 26, 65-71. Bond, C. E. et al., (2007). 'What do you think this is?: "Conceptual uncertainty" In geoscience interpretation'. GSA Today, 17, 4-10.

  11. Graphs without Odd Holes, Parachutes or Proper Wheels: A Generalization of Meyniel Graphs

    E-print Network

    Cornuejols, Gerard P.

    Graphs without Odd Holes, Parachutes or Proper Wheels: A Generalization of Meyniel Graphs: If a graph G contains no odd hole, no parachute and no proper wheel, then G is bipartite or the line graph that contain a line graph of a bipartite subdivision of a 3-connected graph. Key words: perfect graph, odd hole

  12. Graphing in Physics: Processes and Sources of Error in Tertiary Entrance Examinations in Western Australia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia A. Forster

    2004-01-01

    Interpretation and construction of graphs are central to the study of physics and to performance in physics. In this paper, I explore the interpretation and construction processes called upon in questions with a graphical component, in Western Australian Physics Tertiary Entrance Examinations. In addition, I list errors made by students as reported by examiners and offer explanations for the errors.

  13. Assessing Dual-Role Staff-Interpreter Linguistic Competency in an Integrated Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Sabogal, Regina; Newman, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Background Interpreter services for medical care increase physician–patient communication and safety, yet a “formal certification” process to demonstrate interpreter competence does not exist. Testing and training is left to individual health care facilities nationwide. Bilingual staff are often used to interpret, without any assessment of their skills. Assessing interpreters’ linguistic competence and setting standards for testing is a priority. Objective To assess dual-role staff interpreter linguistic competence in an integrated health care system to determine skill qualification to work as medical interpreters. Design Dual-role staff interpreters voluntarily completed a linguistic competency assessment using a test developed by a language school to measure comprehension, completeness, and vocabulary through written and oral assessment in English and the second language. Pass levels were predetermined by school as not passing, basic (limited ability to read, write, and speak English and the second language) and medical interpreter level. Five staff-interpreter focus groups discussed experiences as interpreters and with language test. Results A total of 840 dual-role staff interpreters were tested for Spanish (75%), Chinese (12%), and Russian (5%) language competence. Most dual-role interpreters serve as administrative assistants (39%), medical assistants (27%), and clinical staff (17%). Two percent did not pass, 21% passed at basic level, 77% passed at medical interpreter level. Staff that passed at the basic level was prone to interpretation errors, including omissions and word confusion. Focus groups revealed acceptance of exam process and feelings of increased validation in interpreter role. Conclusions We found that about 1 in 5 dual-role staff interpreters at a large health care organization had insufficient bilingual skills to serve as interpreters in a medical encounter. Health care organizations that depend on dual-role staff interpreters should consider assessing staff English and second language skills. PMID:17957420

  14. Introduction to Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol, William

    In this autoinstructional packet, the student is given an experimental situation which introduces him to the process of graphing. The lesson is presented for secondary school students in chemistry. Algebra I and a Del Mod System program (indicated as SE 018 020) are suggested prerequisites for the use of this program. Behavioral objectives are…

  15. Minus domination in graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean E. Dunbar; Stephen T. Hedetniemi; Michael A. Henning; Alice A. Mcrae

    1999-01-01

    We introduce one of many classes of problems which can be defined in terms of 3-valued functions on the vertices of a graph G = (V,E) of the form |:V ? {?1,0,1}. Such a function is said to be a minus dominating function if the sum of its function values over any closed neighborhood is at least one. That is,

  16. Investigating Motion - Graphing Speed

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This introduction to motion activity has students exploring speed and acceleration using a wheeled office chair and rope to pull a student a given distance and record the time. The results are graphed and different outcomes are predicted when variables are changed.

  17. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  18. Activity Graphs and Processes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christie Bolton; Jim Davies

    2000-01-01

    The widespread adoption of graphical notations for software design has created a demand for formally-based methods to support and extend their use. A principal focus for this demand is the Unified Mod- eling Language (UML), and, within UML, the diagrammatic notations for describing dynamic properties. This paper shows how one such notation, that of Activity Graphs, can be given a

  19. Decidable Integration Graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yonit Kesten; Amir Pnueli; Joseph Sifakis; Sergio Yovine

    1999-01-01

    . Integration Graphs are a computational model developed inthe attempt to identify simple Hybrid Systems with decidable analysisproblems. We start with the class of constant slope hybrid systems(cshs), in which the right hand side of all differential equations is aninteger constant. We refer to continuous variables whose right hand sideconstants are always 1 as timers . All other continuous variables

  20. Teaching Soft Skills Employers Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Maureen; Kisling, Eric; Hackworth, Robbie G.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies the soft skills community colleges teach in an office technology course and determines whether the skills taught are congruent with the soft skills employers require in today's entry-level office work. A qualitative content analysis of a community college office technology soft skills course was performed using 23 soft…

  1. Basic Skills. NIACE Briefing Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Adult Continuing Education, Leicester (England).

    Skills For Life, since 2001 the United Kingdom's national adult basic skills strategy, aims to improve literacy, numeracy, or English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) skills among people over the age of 16. Basic skills programs may be full- or part-time and are delivered in colleges, community venues, neighborhood learning centers, adult…

  2. A CAI Study Skills Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    This paper describes a computer assisted instruction (CAI) study skills program and reports the results of a study conducted to determine its effectiveness. The program consists of ten CAI study skills modules, a CAI study skills notebook, and a CAI study skills test. The modules address (1) managing time, (2) improving memory, (3) taking lecture…

  3. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  4. Interpreting Abstract Interpretations in Membership Equational Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Bernd; Rosu, Grigore

    2001-01-01

    We present a logical framework in which abstract interpretations can be naturally specified and then verified. Our approach is based on membership equational logic which extends equational logics by membership axioms, asserting that a term has a certain sort. We represent an abstract interpretation as a membership equational logic specification, usually as an overloaded order-sorted signature with membership axioms. It turns out that, for any term, its least sort over this specification corresponds to its most concrete abstract value. Maude implements membership equational logic and provides mechanisms to calculate the least sort of a term efficiently. We first show how Maude can be used to get prototyping of abstract interpretations "for free." Building on the meta-logic facilities of Maude, we further develop a tool that automatically checks and abstract interpretation against a set of user-defined properties. This can be used to select an appropriate abstract interpretation, to characterize the specified loss of information during abstraction, and to compare different abstractions with each other.

  5. Decompositions of complete graphs and complete bipartite graphs into isomorphic supersubdivision graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Sethuraman; P. Selvaraju

    2003-01-01

    A graph H is called a supersubdivison of a graph G if H is obtained from G by replacing every edge uv of G by a complete bipartite graph K2,m (m may vary for each edge) by identifying u and v with the two vertices in K2,m that form one of the two partite sets. We denote the set of

  6. Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Pluha?, Z. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, 180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Weidenmüller, H. A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

  7. Random graphs with hidden color.

    PubMed

    Söderberg, Bo

    2003-07-01

    We propose and investigate a unifying class of sparse random graph models, based on a hidden coloring of edge-vertex incidences, extending an existing approach, random graphs with a given degree distribution, in a way that admits a nontrivial correlation structure in the resulting graphs. The approach unifies a number of existing random graph ensembles within a common general formalism, and allows for the analytic calculation of observable graph characteristics. In particular, generating function techniques are used to derive the size distribution of connected components (clusters) as well as the location of the percolation threshold where a giant component appears. PMID:12935185

  8. Soft skills and dental education.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, M A G; Abu Kasim, N H; Naimie, Z

    2013-05-01

    Soft skills and hard skills are essential in the practice of dentistry. While hard skills deal with technical proficiency, soft skills relate to a personal values and interpersonal skills that determine a person's ability to fit in a particular situation. These skills contribute to the success of organisations that deal face-to-face with clients. Effective soft skills benefit the dental practice. However, the teaching of soft skills remains a challenge to dental schools. This paper discusses the different soft skills, how they are taught and assessed and the issues that need to be addressed in their teaching and assessment. The use of the module by the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya for development of soft skills for institutions of higher learning introduced by the Ministry of Higher Education, Malaysia. PMID:23574183

  9. The relationship between graphing calculator use and the development of classroom norms in an exemplay teacher's college algebra course

    E-print Network

    Gerren, Sally Sue

    2008-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to advance knowledge about the relationship between graphing calculator use and classroom norm development. An interpretive case study design incorporating qualitative and quantitative research methods was used...

  10. Implementing Calibrated Peer Review to Enhance Technical Critiquing Skills in a Bioengineering Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Saterbak, Ann

    Developed at UCLA, Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is a web-based tool developed to help students improve their technical writing and critiquing skills. In 2006 and 2007 we used CPR in an upper-level tissue culture laboratory course in which students conduct viability, attachment, and proliferation assays using fibroblast cells. After completing their experiments, students use PowerPoint to construct a technical poster that illustrates their experimental methods, results, and conclusions. For the CPR component of the assignment, students first evaluate three sample posters supplied by the instructor to calibrate their critiquing skills. After this step, students conduct a blind review of three peers posters and then evaluate their own. During the calibration, peer critiquing and self evaluation stages, students respond to 15 statements about the quality of the posters. Eleven statements cover technical content, including succinct summary of objectives, clear experimental methods, quality of graphs, and key results interpreted in words. Three statements probe the posters visual appeal, including appropriate size and style of font. One final statement requires a holistic evaluation of the poster. Following CPR, students turn in a revised copy of their technical poster. In 2006, students had difficulty during the calibration phase. Following a major revision of the calibration phase in 2007, 79% of students passed all three calibration posters. Instructor, peer, and self evaluations were compared. There was a strong linear correlation between instructor evaluation and peer evaluation (r = 0.60, regression model ANOVA P0.2). These results suggest that students may be better able to technically evaluate others work, rather than their own. Students perceived the peer evaluation process as generally helpful, although they noted that their peers comments were less specific and occasionally inconsistent with their instructors feedback. Students reported on surveys that peer evaluation was effective in helping them to recognize many facets of technical poster design, such as errors and omissions, data presentation, and technical argument. 97% of the students claimed their technical critiquing skills improved as a result of this experience. We feel that using CPR to facilitate the peer evaluation process is an effective way to enhance undergraduate engineering students technical critiquing skills.

  11. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms. PMID:25526839

  12. Eigenvalue bracketing for discrete and metric graphs

    E-print Network

    Olaf Post; Fernando Lledo

    2008-04-07

    We develop eigenvalue estimates for the Laplacians on discrete and metric graphs using different types of boundary conditions at the vertices of the metric graph. Via an explicit correspondence of the equilateral metric and discrete graph spectrum (also in the ``exceptional'' values of the metric graph corresponding to the Dirichlet spectrum) we carry over these estimates from the metric graph Laplacian to the discrete case. We apply the results to covering graphs and present examples where the covering graph Laplacians have spectral gaps.

  13. Hyperspectral Data Classification Using Factor Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarau, A.; Müller, R.; Palubinskas, G.; Reinartz, P.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate classification of hyperspectral data is still a competitive task and new classification methods are developed to achieve desired tasks of hyperspectral data use. The objective of this paper is to develop a new method for hyperspectral data classification ensuring the classification model properties like transferability, generalization, probabilistic interpretation, etc. While factor graphs (undirected graphical models) are unfortunately not widely employed in remote sensing tasks, these models possess important properties such as representation of complex systems to model estimation/decision making tasks. In this paper we present a new method for hyperspectral data classification using factor graphs. Factor graph (a bipartite graph consisting of variables and factor vertices) allows factorization of a more complex function leading to definition of variables (employed to store input data), latent variables (allow to bridge abstract class to data), and factors (defining prior probabilities for spectral features and abstract classes; input data mapping to spectral features mixture and further bridging of the mixture to an abstract class). Latent variables play an important role by defining two-level mapping of the input spectral features to a class. Configuration (learning) on training data of the model allows calculating a parameter set for the model to bridge the input data to a class. The classification algorithm is as follows. Spectral bands are separately pre-processed (unsupervised clustering is used) to be defined on a finite domain (alphabet) leading to a representation of the data on multinomial distribution. The represented hyperspectral data is used as input evidence (evidence vector is selected pixelwise) in a configured factor graph and an inference is run resulting in the posterior probability. Variational inference (Mean field) allows to obtain plausible results with a low calculation time. Calculating the posterior probability for each class and comparison of the probabilities leads to classification. Since the factor graphs operate on input data represented on an alphabet (the represented data transferred into multinomial distribution) the number of training samples can be relatively low. Classification assessment on Salinas hyperspectral data benchmark allowed to obtain a competitive accuracy of classification. Employment of training data consisting of 20 randomly selected points for a class allowed to obtain the overall classification accuracy equal to 85.32% and Kappa equal to 0.8358. Representation of input data on a finite domain discards the curse of dimensionality problem allowing to use large hyperspectral data with a moderately high number of bands.

  14. Writing, tables, and graphs: experience with group discussions in microbiology practical work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. V. Wyatt

    1984-01-01

    the manipulation of tables and graphs, or the rewriting of work. Microbiology is particularly suitable for the teaching of these skills because there are simple experiments which demand a great variety of choices of technique. Two such experiments are described with details of the class discussions. Although the experiments formed part of a series, they were also designed to provide

  15. Prepraring to Interpret: AA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-10-03

    Students will learn about Alcoholics Anonymous and prepare to interpret for a deaf member at a traditional AA meeting. Interpreting for Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) requires that the interpreter have an understanding of the purpose of the meetings, prepares adequately for frozen text and informal register that will be used, and has respect for the organization and its members. It can be a difficult, but rewarding assignment. Preparing to ...

  16. Photo observation & interpretation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sarah Titus

    Each week in Structural Geology, I assign students the task of sketching, describing, and interpreting an image. The images are chosen to match the relevant course material for that week. There is a specific form for this assignment, which is designed in part to physically separate their observations from interpretations on the page. In class, we spend 10-20 minutes discussing their different observations/interpretations.

  17. Editor's Note: Literacy Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chris Ohana

    2008-11-01

    Our science and literacy issue is always one of the most popular issues of the year, and we're betting this jam-packed issue will be no exception. Why? There are many probable reasons. Many elementary teachers are more comfortable with teaching science literacy so they look for ways to use their strengths. No Child Left Behind legislation has put the spotlight on literacy in the elementary grades, sometimes pushing science (and social studies and PE and art) out of the busy day. Teaching science with literacy skills may be one way to convey important science skills while still teaching and reinforcing literacy.

  18. Exponential random graph models

    E-print Network

    Fronczak, Agata

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, exponential random graphs (ERGs) are among the most widely-studied network models. Different analytical and numerical techniques for ERG have been developed that resulted in the well-established theory with true predictive power. An excellent basic discussion of exponential random graphs addressed to social science students and researchers is given in [Anderson et al., 1999][Robins et al., 2007]. This essay is intentionally designed to be more theoretical in comparison with the well-known primers just mentioned. Given the interdisciplinary character of the new emerging science of complex networks, the essay aims to give a contribution upon which network scientists and practitioners, who represent different research areas, could build a common area of understanding.

  19. Graphing the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2014-01-01

    Renee Clary and James Wandersee implemented the Stratigraphy and Data Interpretation Project described in this article when they recognized that some students were having difficulties constructing appropriate graphics and interpreting their constructed graphics for an earlier mathematics-science project in their classrooms. They also previously…

  20. An Unusual Exponential Graph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

  1. Levinson's theorem for graphs

    E-print Network

    Childs, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    We prove an analog of Levinson's theorem for scattering on a weighted (m+1)-vertex graph with a semi-infinite path attached to one of its vertices. In particular, we show that the number of bound states in such a scattering problem is equal to m minus half the winding number of the phase of the reflection coefficient (where each so-called half-bound state is counted as half a bound state).

  2. Levinson's theorem for graphs

    E-print Network

    Andrew M. Childs; DJ Strouse

    2011-06-30

    We prove an analog of Levinson's theorem for scattering on a weighted (m+1)-vertex graph with a semi-infinite path attached to one of its vertices. In particular, we show that the number of bound states in such a scattering problem is equal to m minus half the winding number of the phase of the reflection coefficient (where each so-called half-bound state is counted as half a bound state).

  3. Levinson's theorem for graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andrew M.; Strouse, D. J.

    2011-08-01

    We prove an analog of Levinson's theorem for scattering on a weighted (m + 1)-vertex graph with a semi-infinite path attached to one of its vertices. In particular, we show that the number of bound states in such a scattering problem is equal to m minus half the winding number of the phase of the reflection coefficient (where each so-called half-bound state is counted as half a bound state).

  4. Main graphs: Quadratic equation

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Main graphs: Quadratic equation: Equation A2 +B+C = 0, has solutions given by the following 'abc equations: Equation dN dt = kN has the solution: N(t) = N0ekt; N0 is an (arbitrary) initial value of N. Characteristic time of change is = 1/k. Systems of linear differential equations: For system dx dt = ax+by dy dt

  5. Data report: Charts & graphs

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Historical financial data is provided for the uranium market in graph and tabular form. Market data includes restricted and unrestricted uranium price ranges, average contract prices for natural uranium, separative work stop/secondary price ranges, and US DOE separative work prices. Selected historical economic indicators are listed for the United States, European Community, and Japan. Market data for March 1995 is detailed for spot and near-term transactions, medium and long-term transactions, conversion transactions, and separative work transactions.

  6. Towards an Integrated Model for Developing Sustainable Assessment Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fastre, Greet M. J.; van der Klink, Marcel R.; Sluijsmans, Dominique; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the goals of current education is to ensure that graduates can act as independent lifelong learners. Graduates need to be able to assess their own learning and interpret assessment results. The central question in this article is how to acquire sustainable assessment skills, enabling students to assess their performance and learning…

  7. Towards an integrated model for developing sustainable assessment skills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greet M. J. Fastré; Marcel R. van der Klink; Dominique Sluijsmans; Jeroen J. G. van Merriënboer

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of current education is to ensure that graduates can act as independent lifelong learners. Graduates need to be able to assess their own learning and interpret assessment results. The central question in this article is how to acquire sustainable assessment skills, enabling students to assess their performance and learning throughout life, and preparing them to meet

  8. The Development and Implementation of an Instrument to Assess Students’ Data Analysis Skills in Molecular Biology †

    PubMed Central

    Rybarczyk, Brian J.; Walton, Kristen L.W.; Grillo, Wendy Heck

    2014-01-01

    Developing visual literacy skills is an important component of scientific literacy in undergraduate science education. Comprehension, analysis, and interpretation are parts of visual literacy that describe related data analysis skills important for learning in the biological sciences. The Molecular Biology Data Analysis Test (MBDAT) was developed to measure students’ data analysis skills connected with scientific reasoning when analyzing and interpreting scientific data generated from experimental research. The skills analyzed included basic skills, such as identification of patterns and trends in data and connecting a method that generated the data, and advanced skills, such as distinguishing positive and negative controls, synthesizing conclusions, determining if data supports a hypothesis, and predicting alternative or next-step experiments. Construct and content validity were established and calculated statistical parameters demonstrate that the MBDAT is valid and reliable for measuring students’ data analysis skills in molecular and cell biology contexts. The instrument also measures students’ perceived confidence in their data interpretation abilities. As scientific research continues to evolve in complexity, interpretation of scientific information in visual formats will continue to be an important component of scientific literacy. Thus science education will need to support and assess students’ development of these skills as part of students’ scientific training. PMID:25574292

  9. Graph Coarsening for Path Finding in Cybersecurity Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Emilie A.; Johnson, John R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2013-01-01

    n the pass-the-hash attack, hackers repeatedly steal password hashes and move through a computer network with the goal of reaching a computer with high level administrative privileges. In this paper we apply graph coarsening in network graphs for the purpose of detecting hackers using this attack or assessing the risk level of the network's current state. We repeatedly take graph minors, which preserve the existence of paths in the graph, and take powers of the adjacency matrix to count the paths. This allows us to detect the existence of paths as well as find paths that have high risk of being used by adversaries.

  10. A Graph-Oriented Object Database Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Gyssens; Jan Paredaens; Jan Van Den Bussche; Dirk Van Gucht

    1994-01-01

    A graph-oriented object database model (GOOD) is introduced as a theoretical basis for database systems in which manipulation as well as conceptual representation of data is transparently graph-based. In the GOOD model, the scheme as well as the instance of an object database is represented by a graph, and the data manipulation is expressed by graph transformations. These graph transformations

  11. Algorithms: Graphs Amotz Bar-Noy

    E-print Network

    Bar-Noy, Amotz

    , Databases, Electronic Circuits, . . . An alternative definition: A graph is a collection of subsets of sizeAlgorithms: Graphs Amotz Bar-Noy CUNY Spring 2012 Amotz Bar-Noy (CUNY) Graphs Spring 2012 1 / 95 #12;Graphs Definition: A graph is a collection of edges and vertices. Each edge connects two vertices

  12. On the number of plane graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oswin Aichholzer; Thomas Hackl; Birgit Vogtenhuber; Clemens Huemer; Ferran Hurtado; Hannes Krasser

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the number of plane geometric, i.e., straight-line, graphs, a set S of n points in the plane admits. We show that the number of plane graphs and connected plane graphs as well as the number of cycle- free plane graphs is minimized when S is in convex position. Moreover, these results hold for all these graphs with an

  13. On the Cayley Graphs of Brandt Semigroups

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yifei Hao; Xing Gao; Yanfeng Luo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the Cayley graphs of Brandt semigroups are investigated. The basic structures and properties of this kind of Cayley graphs are given, and a necessary and sufficient condition is given for the components of Cayley graphs of Brandt semigroups to be strongly regular. As an application, the generalized Petersen graph and k-partite graph, which cannot be obtained from

  14. Systems for Big-Graphs Arijit Khan

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Phil

    partitioning the graph and processing the graph data in parallel across a cluster of servers. However- ing systems for processing of big-graphs, key features of distributed graph algorithms, as well processing also generates a unique workload [8] as follows: · Poor Locality. Graphs represent relationships

  15. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs

  16. A Linear-Time Graph Kernel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shohei Hido; Hisashi Kashima

    2009-01-01

    The design of a good kernel is fundamental for knowledge discovery from graph-structured data. Existing graph kernels exploit only limited information about the graph structures but are still computationally expensive. We propose a novel graph kernel based on the structural characteristics of graphs. The key is to represent node labels as binary arrays and characterize each node using logical operations

  17. Effects of therapists nonverbal communication on rated skill and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sherer, M; Rogers, R W

    1980-07-01

    A therapist's nonverbal behavior may communicate emotion and feelings toward a client. Thus, skilled utilization of appropriate nonverbal cues should facilitate many nonbehavioral therapies. A 2 X 2 X 2 factorial experiment investigated the therapy-facilitating effects of three theoretical dimensions of nonverbal communication: Immediacy, potency or status, and responsivity. A reenacted client-centered therapy session was videotaped. Verbal content was held constant, but all combinations of the three nonverbal dimensions were portrayed. A total of 118 male and female nonparticipant observers rated the therapist's interpersonal skills (empathy, warmth, and genuineness) and effectiveness. The results disclosed that the nonverbal cues of immediacy (close therapist-client distance and eye contact) significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. Thus, the study demonstrated that a therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuiness, and effectiveness. These findings were interpreted in terms of the therapist's nonverbal cues communicating liking and acceptance of the client. PMID:7410567

  18. Math Skills Review

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wendy Keeney-Kennicutt

    1997-11-03

    This math skills review was written for first year college chemistry students who have weak math backgrounds, but is useful for all science students in high school and college. Topics covered include algebraic manipulation, dimensional analysis, significant figures, manipulation of exponents, scientific notation, logarithms, the quadratic equation and standard deviation.

  19. The Skills Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The government, through several White and Green Papers, has promoted the 'Skills Revolution'. This requires central direction and coordination of a wide range of policies, practices and partnerships. But there are several difficulties: the impossibility of micromanaging the complex social and economic system; the dominance of the rather limited…

  20. Rapid Response Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley-Winders, Anna Faye

    2008-01-01

    Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College's (MGCCC) long-term commitment to providing workforce training in a post-Katrina environment became a catalyst for designing short-term flexible educational opportunities. Providing nationally recognized skills training for the recovery/rebuilding of communities challenged the college to develop innovative,…

  1. Metacognitive Skills: Practical Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewel, Rosel H.; Waddell, Julia G.

    1986-01-01

    Four strategies effective in helping learning disabled students develop specific skills necessary for effective reading comprehension are described: (1) self questioning, (2) lookback strategies, (3) use of a code, and (4) inference modeling. The procedures are designed to shift students from a passive to an active role in reading. (CL)

  2. Math Skills Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartel, R. W.; Adem, M.

    2004-01-01

    A math review exam, written and administered in conjunction with the Quantitative Assessment Program at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, is used at the beginning of the 1st food engineering course to evaluate math skills needed for successful completion of the course. Students who do not score well on the math exam are targeted for individual…

  3. Teaching Presentation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William H.; Thompson, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Effective teaching of presentation skills focuses on the most important element of the presentation--the message itself. Some instructors place the heaviest emphasis on the messenger (the presenter) and focus their presentation feedback on all the presenter is doing wrong--saying "um," gesturing awkwardly, and so forth. When students receive this…

  4. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  5. Academic Skills Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demery, Marie

    A module consisting of eight academic skills is presented to help students achieve success and graduate from Northwestern State University (Louisiana) and other institutions. The elective course is open to all students, and especially for entering freshmen who have a grade point average of 2.0 or who are enrolled in developmental education…

  6. Skills for Tomorrow's Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananda, Srijati M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Over the last decade, concern over the nation's global economic status and the role of public education in preparing workers has led to a push for standards reform. Two converging reform strategies have emerged: (1) to create a voluntary system of academic standards for K-12 students, and (2) to create a voluntary system of industry-skill

  7. Soft Skills, Hard Science

    E-print Network

    Wu, Mingshen

    2013 Women & Science Conference1 Wednesday, May 22, 13 #12;Why focus on soft skills? What comes to mind, 13 #12;People with disabilities in STEM What comes to mind when you think of people with disabilities, May 22, 13 #12;Range of Disabilities 8 with Learning Disability 4 with Physical Disability 3 with ADHD

  8. The Skills Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burks, Beatrice Karol; Reeves, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Despite a vocal commitment to fairness, the British Government has, according to these authors, wholeheartedly failed to live up to this pledge when it comes to skills and adult training. A report on adult learning released in December by Demos found a system rife with inequality and contradictions. As the jobs market becomes increasingly…

  9. Skilled Veterans Corps

    E-print Network

    Hacker, Randi

    2011-08-31

    once and for all. A group of elders has volunteered to clean up the reactors damaged by the tsunami and earthquake. Calling itself the Skilled Veteran Corps, the group consists of engineers and other specialists over 60 who are able?and willing--to do a...

  10. Group Work Skills Rubric

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This document provides a rubric for grading group work skills. With this, instructors can evaluate students in the areas of initiative, preparation, cooperation and time management.This rubric would be useful for grading groups at most educational levels. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  11. Life Skills Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sunny

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the San Francisco Sheriff's Department (SFSD) Life Skills for Prisoners Program. The program was designed to enhance and expand the Resolve to Stop the Violence Project, which had operated successfully for three years in the San Francisco County Jail as a restorative justice program. The mission of SFSD is to…

  12. Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex work environment in which problems transcend disciplinary boundaries. Collaborative research approaches are emphasized, as are cross-training and gaining nonacademic experiences [Moslemi et al., 2009].

  13. Soft Skills, Hard Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirabile, Richard; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a six-step need-based training system for managers. It includes (1) identifying job duties, (2) describing jobs using competency statements, (3) identifying relative skill importance, (4) identifying employee strengths and weaknesses, (5) evaluating employee proficiency, and (6) preparing individual career plans. (CH)

  14. State Skill Standards: Metalworking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for metalworking programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any…

  15. Essential Skills for Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Paul M.

    1999-01-01

    No matter what standards they follow, principals must be skilled team builders, instructional leaders, and visionary risk-takers. There are five emerging roles: historian, cheerleader, lightning rod, landscaper (environmental scanner), and anthropologist. To succeed, principals must be empowered by districts, become authentic leaders, and make…

  16. Developing Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Patti

    2008-01-01

    Principals often think of professional development in terms of activities--attending a workshop, networking with colleagues at a conference, reading a professional article or book, and so on. Although these are all good things in and of themselves, genuine professional growth does not occur until knowledge and skills are put into practice at the…

  17. Skill in Expert Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helton, William S.

    2007-01-01

    The motor control of novice participants is often cognitively demanding and susceptible to interference by other tasks. As people develop expertise, their motor control becomes less susceptible to interference from other tasks. Researchers propose a transition in human motor skill from active control to automaticity. This progression may also be…

  18. Measuring Skills and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludeman, Kate

    1991-01-01

    Customized skills assessments can perform a number of functions: help training departments demonstrate their effectiveness; provide a foundation for career development programs; reinforce company values; add feedback from the bottom up for performance evaluation; provide a concentrated focus for customer service improvement; and serve as a…

  19. Mediation: Skills and techniques

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence Boulle; Colatrella Jr. Michael T; Anthony P. Picchioni

    2008-01-01

    Mediation-Skills and Techniques is an essential and comprehensive addition to the professional library of all mediators. It provides a thorough course of study of the mediation process, from convening the mediation to formalizing the settlement agreement. The book adopts an interdisciplinary approach to mediation, integrating knowledge and expertise from law, psychology, and sociology. Practical examples and case studies are used

  20. Statistical mechanics on isoradial graphs

    E-print Network

    Cédric Boutillier; Béatrice De Tilière

    2010-12-14

    Isoradial graphs are a natural generalization of regular graphs which give, for many models of statistical mechanics, the right framework for studying models at criticality. In this survey paper, we first explain how isoradial graphs naturally arise in two approaches used by physicists: transfer matrices and conformal field theory. This leads us to the fact that isoradial graphs provide a natural setting for discrete complex analysis, to which we dedicate one section. Then, we give an overview of explicit results obtained for different models of statistical mechanics defined on such graphs: the critical dimer model when the underlying graph is bipartite, the 2-dimensional critical Ising model, random walk and spanning trees and the q-state Potts model.

  1. Characterizing distance-regularity of graphs by the spectrum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin R. Van Dam; Willem H. Haemers; Jacobus H. Koolen; Edward Spence

    2006-01-01

    We characterize the distance-regular Ivanov-Ivanov-Faradjev graph from the spectrum, and construct cospectral graphs of the Johnson graphs, Doubled Odd graphs, Grassmann graphs, Doubled Grassmann graphs, antipodal covers of complete bipartite graphs, and many of the Taylor graphs. We survey the known results on cospectral graphs of the Hamming graphs, and of all distance-regular graphs on at most 70 vertices.

  2. GraphGrep: A Fast and Universal Method for Querying Graphs Rosalba Giugno

    E-print Network

    Shasha, Dennis

    , finding all the occurrences of a sub- graph in a database of graphs. The interface to Graph- Grep to represent the graphs in an abstract form and to filter the database. GraphGrep has been tested on databases in a database of graphs. The increasing size of application databases requires efficient structure searching

  3. CPM: A Graph Pattern Matching Kernel with Diffusion for Accurate Graph Classification

    E-print Network

    Kansas, University of

    patterns from a graph database. We then map subgraphs to graphs in the graph database and use a process we databases search algorithms [17, 32, 40, 42], graph classification aims to construct accurate predictiveCPM: A Graph Pattern Matching Kernel with Diffusion for Accurate Graph Classification Aaron Smalter

  4. A One-Semester Introduction to Literary Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Ingeborg; Noordhoorn, Max

    1977-01-01

    A one-semester introductory course on literary interpretation at Albion College is described. The course covers fiction, drama, and poetry, and trains students in basic skills and verbal tools necessary for literary analysis. Readings, papers and instructional materials are discussed. The course is taught in German. (CHK)

  5. Interpreting Ambiguous Advertisements: The Effect of Frontal Lobe Damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samantha Pearce; Skye McDonald; Max Coltheart

    1998-01-01

    Despite intact primary language processes patients with frontal lobe deficits often have impaired communication skills including impaired capacity to understand conversational inference. This study examined the ability of three patients with demonstrated frontal lobe pathology to interpret lexically ambiguous advertisements. When compared to a nonbrain-damaged control group it was found that the frontal lobe patients were poorer at comprehending the

  6. Impromptu Speaking and Interpretation Studies: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to look at forensics-based competition events and determine what, if any, impact they could have on the language learning and public speaking skills of interpreters in training. This paper details the nature of the impromptu and extemporaneous speaking events in forensics competitions and introduces a…

  7. "Performance of solar power plants -Data collection, Analysis and Interpretation"

    E-print Network

    Pulfrey, David L.

    "Performance of solar power plants - Data collection, Analysis and Interpretation" Dr. S 500 MW was solar thermal and the rest solar PV. The Solar Mission requires sufficient skilled man Rajasthan was declared by the Government as a Centre of Excellence for solar thermal. It is also planning

  8. Administration and interpretation of the Trail Making Test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher R Bowie; Philip D Harvey

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of cognitive functions is an increasingly important goal for clinicians and researchers. Many neuropsychological test batteries are comprehensive and require specialized training to administer and interpret. The Trail Making Test is an accessible neuropsychological instrument that provides the examiner with information on a wide range of cognitive skills and can be completed in 5–10 min. Its background, psychometric properties,

  9. A cluster algorithm for graphs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Van Dongen

    2000-01-01

    A cluster algorithm for graphs called the emph{Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL~algorithm) is introduced. The algorithm provides basically an interface to an algebraic process defined on stochastic matrices, called the MCL~process. The graphs may be both weighted (with nonnegative weight) and directed. Let~$G$~be such a graph. The MCL~algorithm simulates flow in $G$ by first identifying $G$ in a canonical way with

  10. Hyperbolic Recognition by Graph Automata

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Papazian; Eric Rémila

    2002-01-01

    Graph automata were first introduced by P. Rosenstiehl [10], under the name of intelligent graphs, surely because a network of finite automata is able to know some properties about its own structure. Hence P. Rosenstiehl\\u000a created some algorithms that find Eulerian paths or Hamiltonian cycles in those graphs, with the condition that every vertex\\u000a has a fixed degree [11]. Those

  11. The Web as a graph

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ravi Kumar; Prabhakar Raghavan; Sridhar Rajagopalan; D. Sivakumar; Andrew Tompkins; Eli Upfal

    2000-01-01

    The pages and hyperlinks of the World-Wide Web may be viewed as nodes and edges in a directed graph. This graph has about a billion nodes today, several billion links, and appears to grow exponentially with time. There are many reasons—mathematical, sociological, and commercial—for studying the evolution of this graph. We first review a set of algorithms that operate on

  12. TGFF: task graphs for free

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Dick; David L. Rhodes; Wayne Wolf

    1998-01-01

    We present a user-controllable, general-purpose,pseudorandom task graph generator called TaskGraphs For Free (TGFF). TGFF creates probleminstances for use in allocation and scheduling research.It has the ability to generate independenttasks as well as task sets which are composed of partiallyordered task graphs. A complete description ofa scheduling problem instance is created, includingattributes for processors, communication resources,tasks, and inter-task communication. The user...

  13. Cactus Graphs for Genome Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paten, Benedict; Diekhans, Mark; Earl, Dent; St. John, John; Ma, Jian; Suh, Bernard; Haussler, David

    We introduce a data structure, analysis and visualization scheme called a cactus graph for comparing sets of related genomes. Cactus graphs capture some of the advantages of de Bruijn and breakpoint graphs in one unified framework. They naturally decompose the common substructures in a set of related genomes into a hierarchy of chains that can be visualized as multiple alignments and nets that can be visualized in circular genome plots.

  14. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Metal Stamping Skills Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  15. Critical Skills Master's Program The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP)

    E-print Network

    Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science in an appropriate technical staff position at Sandia with competitive pay. Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP

  16. Skilled or Skillful: What's the Difference for Readers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilles, Carol; Dickinson, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Outlines the difference between "drilling for skills" and "becoming skillful readers" and shows how teachers can help students become skillful readers, writers, discussants, and thinkers through literature discussions. Discusses establishing a context for literature study, and initiating and maintaining literature study groups. (SR)

  17. Graphing the West Corridor Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-04-11

    This activity introduces students to using graphical analysis of data to analyze flaws in a local regional transit system's design. Students will evaluate factors such as ride time, wait time, and percentage of capacity used in a train. This activity requires the use of the FasTracks Living Lab at: http://control.mines.edu/livinglabs/labs/fastracks/. After completing this activity, students should be able to: 1. Plot simple variables versus time on graph paper 2. Calculate percentages and graph them versus time on graph paper 3. Answer questions quantitatively using information obtained from a graph.

  18. Skill Building in the Block?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, Louise M.; Pappas, Artemus M.

    1976-01-01

    Teachers in a block or model office program, noting that all students have not acquired basic office skills elsewhere, describe drills they use to improve entry skills advertised for daily in want ads. (Editor/HD)

  19. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may need to be transferred to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility. ... Common medical problems that often lead to skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility care include: Joint replacement surgery, ...

  20. Plants, Animals and Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Countrystart is a class in which students work with plants and animals, providing numerous opportunities to integrate basic skills teaching. The practical subject area becomes the vehicle to develop other skills needed by students. (JOW)

  1. What skills should students of undergraduate biochemistry and molecular biology programs have upon graduation?

    PubMed

    White, Harold B; Benore, Marilee A; Sumter, Takita F; Caldwell, Benjamin D; Bell, Ellis

    2013-01-01

    Biochemistry and molecular biology (BMB) students should demonstrate proficiency in the foundational concepts of the discipline and possess the skills needed to practice as professionals. To ascertain the skills that should be required, groups of BMB educators met in several focused workshops to discuss the expectations with the ultimate goal of clearly articulating the skills required. The results of these discussions highlight the critical importance of experimental, mathematical, and interpersonal skills including collaboration, teamwork, safety, and ethics. The groups also found experimental design, data interpretation and analysiand the ability to communicate findings to diverse audience to be essential skills. To aid in the development of appropriate assessments these skills are grouped into three categories, 1) Process of Science, 2) Communication and Comprehension of Science, and 3) Community of Practice Aspects of Science. Finally, the groups worked to align these competencies with the best practices in both teaching and in skills assessment. PMID:24019246

  2. Graphing Local Temperatures as Continuous Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kerri Caudill

    2012-06-11

    In this lesson, students construct a graph using local daily temperatures to demonstrate the ability to graph continuous data. Students graph and analyze temperature trends over the time of one month.

  3. Performance Introspection of Graph Databases Peter Macko

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    Performance Introspection of Graph Databases Peter Macko Harvard University pmacko, provenance databases, etc. makes graph storage and processing of paramount impor- tance. We present a performance introspection framework for graph databases, PIG, which provides both a toolset and methodology

  4. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

  5. 47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

  6. Complexity Results Graph Reconstruction Edith Hemaspaandra

    E-print Network

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    number matching symbols, given a protein DNA sequences. computer networking, reconstruction problemComplexity Results Graph Reconstruction # Edith Hemaspaandra Department of Computer Science investigate relative complexity graph isomorphism problem (GI) and problems related reconstruction graph

  7. A Collection of Features for Semantic Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Eliassi-Rad, T; Fodor, I K; Gallagher, B

    2007-05-02

    Semantic graphs are commonly used to represent data from one or more data sources. Such graphs extend traditional graphs by imposing types on both nodes and links. This type information defines permissible links among specified nodes and can be represented as a graph commonly referred to as an ontology or schema graph. Figure 1 depicts an ontology graph for data from National Association of Securities Dealers. Each node type and link type may also have a list of attributes. To capture the increased complexity of semantic graphs, concepts derived for standard graphs have to be extended. This document explains briefly features commonly used to characterize graphs, and their extensions to semantic graphs. This document is divided into two sections. Section 2 contains the feature descriptions for static graphs. Section 3 extends the features for semantic graphs that vary over time.

  8. Assessing statistical significance in causal graphs

    E-print Network

    Chindelevitch, Leonid

    Background: Causal graphs are an increasingly popular tool for the analysis of biological datasets. In particular, signed causal graphs--directed graphs whose edges additionally have a sign denoting upregulation or ...

  9. Finding One Variable Statistics With a Graphing Calculator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Davis, Roger W.

    2009-02-12

    This quick YouTube video from high school statistics teacher Roger W. Davis explains how to find one variable statistics using the TI-84 graphing calculator. The demonstration goes through three steps: entering the data, finding one variable statistics using the STAT menu, and interpreting the results. The data created includes mean, sum, median and more. Flash player is required to view this video, and the running time for the clip is 3:12.

  10. Match The Position Graph (Match x(t) graph)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The representation depicts a toy monster truck in a java applet animation. The student is shown a position-time graph and is asked to control the motion of the truck with the mouse. The goal of the exercise is to match the position vs. time graph as shown in the animation.

  11. Puzzle Play Improves Math Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-02-16

    This brief press release from the National Science Foundation summarizes the results of a University of Chicago study linking puzzle play with math skills. The study found that puzzle play proved to be a significant predictor of spatial skills. The study also found gender differences in child/parent interactions and in acquired skills.

  12. Stochastic Reinforcement Benefits Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Eran; Averbeck, Bruno B.; Richmond, Barry J.; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2014-01-01

    Learning complex skills is driven by reinforcement, which facilitates both online within-session gains and retention of the acquired skills. Yet, in ecologically relevant situations, skills are often acquired when mapping between actions and rewarding outcomes is unknown to the learning agent, resulting in reinforcement schedules of a stochastic…

  13. Skill Upgrading, Incorporated. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skill Upgrading, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    As in two other projects in Cleveland and Newark, New Jersey, this project was set up in Baltimore to provide technical assistance in designing ways to meet in-plant skills needs by upgrading job skills on entry workers through High Intensity Training (HIT). Skill Upgrading, Inc. was established in Maryland to provide training and manpower…

  14. Professional Certificate in Management Skills

    E-print Network

    Carleton University

    case studies and personal work situations to hone communications skills Module 3a Finding and Keeping skills for managing projects, people, teams and performance. · Learn to how to effectively manage change to hone their management skills and develop a deeper understand of this area · Team leaders and employees

  15. Computational Skills for Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    This interview with Distinguished Science Award recipient Louis J. Gross highlights essential computational skills for modern biology, including: (1) teaching concepts listed in the Math & Bio 2010 report; (2) illustrating to students that jobs today require quantitative skills; and (3) resources and materials that focus on computational skills.

  16. Psychological skills training as a way to enhance an athlete's performance in high-intensity sports.

    PubMed

    Birrer, D; Morgan, G

    2010-10-01

    The importance of psychological skills training (PST) in the development of athletic performance is widely recognized. This paper is a comprehensive review of PST in elite sports, with a special focus on high-intensity sports (HIS). The reviewed literature showed a lack of convincing evidence and theoretical underpinning concerning traditional psychological skills to enhance performance in HIS. Therefore, a model with three conceptual levels (psychological demands, skills and techniques) is presented. The model facilitates the identification of the psychological demands of a specific sport, which in turn enables distinguishing which psychological skills are required. This allows an expert to choose psychological techniques to improve the athlete's psychological skill. Considerations based on our model and the limited HIS-related literature available revealed self-skills, personal development and life skills, arousal-regulation skills, volitional skills, motivational skills and recovery skills as the most important skills to address in order to enhance performance. Development of harmonious passion, in-practice integration of volitional strategies, use of associative attentional techniques, pain management techniques, use of the mindfulness-acceptance approach and the facilitative interpretation of cognitive and somatic sensations are regarded as suitable to meet the psychological demands of HIS. They are recommended for systematic application by athletes and coaches. PMID:20840565

  17. Solving and Graphing Inequalities Add/Subtract

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Arnold

    2011-09-20

    Learn to graph an inequality and to write an inequality from a graph. Please do from 5-10 problems from each link. Practice inequalities with the Inequalities Genie. If you get something wrong it will explain what you should have done. Inequality Genie In this activity you will practice inequalities where you will drag the arrow to graph the inequality. Graph inequalities activity Now practice writing the inequality from a graph. Write an inequality from graph Finally ...

  18. Graph Classification by Means of Lipschitz Embedding

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaspar Riesen; Horst Bunke

    2009-01-01

    In pattern recognition and related fields, graph-based representations offer a versatile alternative to the widely used feature vectors. Therefore, an emerging trend of representing objects by graphs can be observed. This trend is intensified by the development of novel approaches in graph-based machine learning, such as graph kernels or graph-embedding techniques. These procedures overcome a major drawback of graphs, which

  19. Application of machine learning and expert systems to Statistical Process Control (SPC) chart interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shewhart, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Statistical Process Control (SPC) charts are one of several tools used in quality control. Other tools include flow charts, histograms, cause and effect diagrams, check sheets, Pareto diagrams, graphs, and scatter diagrams. A control chart is simply a graph which indicates process variation over time. The purpose of drawing a control chart is to detect any changes in the process signalled by abnormal points or patterns on the graph. The Artificial Intelligence Support Center (AISC) of the Acquisition Logistics Division has developed a hybrid machine learning expert system prototype which automates the process of constructing and interpreting control charts.

  20. Forecasting forecast skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalnay, Eugenia; Dalcher, Amnon

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is possible to predict the skill of numerical weather forecasts - a quantity which is variable from day to day and region to region. This has been accomplished using as predictor the dispersion (measured by the average correlation) between members of an ensemble of forecasts started from five different analyses. The analyses had been previously derived for satellite-data-impact studies and included, in the Northern Hemisphere, moderate perturbations associated with the use of different observing systems. When the Northern Hemisphere was used as a verification region, the prediction of skill was rather poor. This is due to the fact that such a large area usually contains regions with excellent forecasts as well as regions with poor forecasts, and does not allow for discrimination between them. However, when regional verifications were used, the ensemble forecast dispersion provided a very good prediction of the quality of the individual forecasts.