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1

Improving Graphing Interpretation Skills and Understanding of Motion Using Microcomputer Based Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the relative effectiveness of the traditional lab method and the microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) for improving student understanding. Examines three areas of achievement: graphing interpretation skills, and interpreting motion graphs and understanding of motion. Results indicate that MBL laboratories are more effective than…

Svec, Michael

1999-01-01

2

The impact of video motion analysis on kinematics graph interpretation skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Video motion analysis software was used by introductory physics students in a variety of instructional settings. 368 high school and college students took part in a study where the effect of graduated variations in the use of a video analysis tool was examined. Post-instruction assessment of student ability to interpret kinematics graphs indicates that groups using the tool generally performed better than students taught via traditional instruction. The data further establishes that the greater the integration of video analysis into the kinematics curriculum, the larger the educational impact. An additional comparison showed that graph interpretation skills were significantly better when a few traditional labs were simply replaced with video analysis experiments. Hands-on involvement appeared to play a critical role. Limiting student experience with the video analysis technique to a single teacher-led demonstration resulted in no improvement in performance relative to traditional instruction. Offering more extensive demonstrations and carrying them out over an extended period of time proved somewhat effective. The greatest impact came from a combination of demonstrations with hands-on labs. The curricular modifications employed in the different classrooms and the methods used to evaluate them are discussed.

Beichner, Robert J.

1996-10-01

3

Kinematics Graph Interpretation Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The primary goal of the Kinematics Graphing Project is to investigate the ability of students to interpret kinematics graphs and to generate a set of suggestions for faculty teaching the subject. Evaluation instruments are used to uncover the common misconceptions of students.

Beichner, Robert J.

2003-10-10

4

Effect of Micro-Computer Based Laboratory on Graphing Interpretation Skills and Understanding of Motion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs of objects in motion are frequently used in introductory high school or college physics courses since they offer a valuable alternative to verbal and algebraic descriptions by offering students another way of manipulating the developing concepts. If graphs are to be a valuable tool for students, then the level of the students' graphing

Svec, Michael T.

5

Challenges with graph interpretation: a review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growing emphasis on the development of scientific inquiry skills, the display and interpretation of data are becoming increasingly important. Graph interpretation competence is, in fact, essential to understanding today’s world and to be scientifically literate. However, graph interpretation is a complex and challenging activity. Graph interpretation competence is affected by many factors, including aspects of graph characteristics, the

Nirit Glazer

2011-01-01

6

The effects of microcomputer-based laboratory exercises on the acquisition of line graph construction and interpretation skills by high school biology students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Effects of microcomputer-based laboratories and level of cognitive development on tenth-grade biology students' ability to construct and interpret line graphs was investigated. Fortysix students enrolled in general biology classes at a rural high school volunteered to participate in the study. These students were administered instruments to assess level of cognitive development and line-graphing ability. Ten students that scored between zero and three and ten students that scored between six and ten on the graphing assessment were chosen to participate in the study. The 20 students were then assigned to either experimental or conventional groups to achieve a matched design with relation to gender and line-graphing ability. Statistical analysis of the data indicated no effect due to instructional method on graph-interpretation abilities. An instructional effect was demonstrated for graph-construction tasks (p < 0.10) with the conventional group outperforming the microcomputer-based laboratory group. Effect sizes of -1.01 and 0.48 were found for graph-construction and -interpretation skills, respectively. Effects related to cognitive development were indicated with those students classified as high cognitive development outscoring those classified as low (p < 0.10) This was true for both graph-construction and graph-interpretation tasks. No two-way interactions were found.

Adams, D. Daryl; Shrum, John W.

7

Challenges with Graph Interpretation: A Review of the Literature  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the growing emphasis on the development of scientific inquiry skills, the display and interpretation of data are becoming increasingly important. Graph interpretation competence is, in fact, essential to understanding today's world and to be scientifically literate. However, graph interpretation is a complex and challenging activity. Graph

Glazer, Nirit

2011-01-01

8

Graphs: Interpret Line Plots  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website application provides practice interpreting line plots. The format of the website makes it available to use with individual students on one computer or with an entire class on an interactive white board. Each practice problem is submitted to determine if it is correct, when an incorrect answer is submitted the correct answer and an option for an explanation appears. Each problem set is also timed and the user is provided with a percent correct. This website does have a membership option for a fee which would enable the teacher to track the progress of multiple students over time.

2012-01-01

9

Graphing Skills among High School Physics Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the influence of two factors of the process of graphing on rural students' (n=93) ability to comprehend kinematics graphs on constant velocity events. Students exhibited difficulty in constructing and comprehending graphs of derived variables and were unaware of their own graphing skills deficiencies. (34 references) (MDH)

Brasell, Heather M.; Rowe, Mary Budd

1993-01-01

10

The Effects of Microcomputer-Based Laboratory Exercises on the Acquisition of Line Graph Construction and Interpretation Skills by High School Biology Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effects of microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) exercises and level of cognitive development on high school biology students' ability to construct and interpret line graphs were investigated. Forty-six students enrolled in general biology classes at a rural high school volunteered to participate in the study. These students were administered…

Adams, D. Daryl; Shrum, John W.

11

The Use of Graphing Technology to Promote Transfer of Learning: the Interpretation of Graphs in Physics.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined the relationship between mathematics background and performance on graph-related problems in physics before and after instruction on the graphical analysis of motion and several microcomputer-based laboratory experiences. Students identified as either having or not having a graphing technology enhanced precalculus mathematics background were further categorized into one of four groups according to mathematics placement at the university. The performances of these groups were compared to identity differences. Pre- and Post-test data were collected from 589 students and 312 students during Autumn Quarter 1990 and Winter Quarter 1991 respectively. Background information was collected from each student. Significant differences were found between students with the technology enhanced mathematics background and those without when considering the entire populations both quarters. The students with the technology background were favored Autumn quarter and students without the technology background were favored Winter quarter. However, the entire population included an underrepresentation of students at the highest and lowest placements; hence, these were eliminated from the analyses. No significant differences were found between the technology/no technology groups after the elimination of the underrepresented groups. All categories of students increased their mean scores from pretest to post-test; the average increase was 8.23 points Autumn Quarter and 11.41 points Winter Quarter. Males consistently outperformed females on both the pretest and the post-test Autumn 1990. All students found questions involving the concept of acceleration more difficult than questions involving velocity or distance. Questions requiring students to create graphs were more difficult than questions requiring students to interpret graphs. Further research involving a qualitative component is recommended to identify the specific skills students use when solving graph-related physics problems. In addition, it is recommended that a similar study be conducted to include a control group not participating in the microcomputer -based laboratory experiments.

Nichols, Jeri Ann

12

Supporting Fourth Graders' Ability to Interpret Graphs through Real-Time Graphing Technology: A Preliminary Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined to what extent inquiry-based instruction supported with real-time graphing technology improves fourth grader's ability to interpret graphs as representations of physical science concepts such as motion and temperature. This study also examined whether there is any difference between inquiry-based instruction supported with…

Deniz, Hasan; Dulger, Mehmet F.

2012-01-01

13

Interpreting a Graph and Constructing Its Derivative Graph: Stability and Change in Students' Conceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This present study investigated engineering students' conceptions and misconceptions related to derivative, particularly interpreting the graph of a function and constructing its derivative graph. Participants were 147 first year engineering students from four universities enrolled in first year undergraduate calculus courses with or without the…

Ubuz, Behiye

2007-01-01

14

The Impact of Microcomputer-Based Labs on Children's Ability to Interpret Graphs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports the results of an in-depth examination of middle school children's graphing skills and misconceptions. Also discusses a study in which students learned graphing skills through microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL). (ML)

Mokros, Janice R.; Tinker, Robert F.

1987-01-01

15

Sex Differences Related to Graphing Skills in Microcomputer-Based Labs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of an investigation of the effectiveness of a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) activity in developing students' graphing skills, this study was specifically designed to examine the differences between females and males in both performance on graphing tasks and on their attitudes to graphs and graph-based activities. Results based on a…

Brasell, Heather

16

Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were…

Boote, Stacy K.

2014-01-01

17

Reading and Interpreting Tables and Graphs Involving Rates and Percentages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This survey, created by Milo Schield of Augsburg College, assesses statistical literacy. The survey focuses on the general use of informal statistics in everyday situations: reading and interpreting tables and graphs involving rates and percentages. The survey itself takes between thirty and forty minutes. The author does apologize for the length, but insists that it is due to how comprehensive the survey is. Sixty-nine questions in length, almost every topic concerning statistics is covered. The survey was funded by the W.M. Keck Statistical Literacy Project.

Schield, Milo

2009-03-11

18

Individual Differences and the Interpretation of Auditory Graphs: Cognitive Abilities and Demographics  

E-print Network

designing auditory graphs. Raven's matrices, gender, handedness, and musical ability were most effective predictors of auditory graph interpretation. To be an effective predictor, working memory may need Collected data on gender, age, handedness, and musical background. Cognitive Abilities Measures Working

19

Today's Forecast: Graphing Temperature Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity students use Internet skills to find local and Antarctic weather data. They record the data, assemble it in a logical order, graph it, and interpret the graphed information. Students will: prepare a graph using an x and y axis; show graphing increments; arrange data on a graph; interpret graphed data; demonstrate conversion of Fahrenheit to Celsius and Celsius to Fahrenheit; and differentiate between below and above zero degrees temperature.

Kolb, Sandra

20

Assessing and Understanding Line Graph Interpretations Using a Scoring Rubric of Organized Cited Factors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examined how 12- and 13-year-old students' mathematics and science background knowledge affected line graph interpretations and how interpretations were affected by graph question levels. A purposive sample of 14 students engaged in think aloud interviews while completing an excerpted Test of Graphing in Science. Data were collected and coded using a rubric of previously cited factors, categorized by Bertin's (Semiology of graphics: Diagrams, networks, maps. The University of Wisconsin Press, Ltd., Madison, 1983) theory of graph interpretation. Data analysis revealed responses varied by graph question level. Across levels, students interpreted graphs in one or more of the three ways: mathematical word problems (focusing on an algorithm), science data to be analyzed (incorporating science knowledge), or no strategy. Although consistently used across levels, the frequency and usefulness of approaches varied by question level.

Boote, Stacy K.

2014-04-01

21

Cognitive Consequences of Microcomputer-Based Laboratories: Graphing Skills Development  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study in which eighth grade physical science students studied graphing with a microcomputer as their lab partner in a microcomputer based laboratory. Graph templates were used to solve problems based on previous learning. It was concluded that the Computer as Lab Partner curriculum was effective in teaching graphing concepts.

Linn, Marcia; Layman, John W.; Nachmias, Rafi

2006-09-14

22

Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

Actuarial Foundation, 2013

2013-01-01

23

Interpreting Unfamiliar Graphs: A Generative, Activity Theoretic Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on graphing presents its results as if knowing and understanding were something stored in peoples' minds independent of the situation that they find themselves in. Thus, there are no models that situate interview responses to graphing tasks. How, then, we question, are the interview texts produced? How do respondents begin and end…

Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew Jin

2004-01-01

24

Students' Interpretation of a Function Associated with a Real-Life Problem from Its Graph  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The properties of a function such as limit, continuity, derivative, growth, or concavity can be determined more easily from its graph than by doing any algebraic operation. For this reason, it is important for students of mathematics to interpret some of the properties of a function from its graph. In this study, we investigated the competence of…

Mahir, Nevin

2010-01-01

25

A strategy to teach students to draw and interpret velocity-time graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study investigates the effectiveness of an instructional strategy to teach students with little or no prior knowledge in kinematics how to draw and interpret velocity-time graphs representing the motion of objects. The researchers test how presenting velocity-time graphs at the same time that the student observes the motion of an object effects comprehension.

Clark, Laura; Goldberg, Fred

2006-05-23

26

SEMI-SUPERVISED LEARNING FOR GRAPH TO SIGNAL MAPPING: A GRAPH SIGNAL WIENER FILTER INTERPRETATION  

E-print Network

to signal mapping with the objective of analysing intricate structural properties of graphs with tools structure. In that case, the relevant information often lies in the weighted edges that measure the strength toolkit. In other scenarios, each node of a graph is itself the support of a measure (scalar or vector

Gonçalves, Paulo

27

A Review of AP Calculus Graphing Calculator Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Review material on graphing calculator use from the College Board AP Calculus Course Description. The problems are mostly AB level. The page also contains a brief historical remark about Maria Gaetana Agnesi.

28

High School Students Interpreting Tables and Graphs: Implications for Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concerns about students’ difficulties in statistical reasoning led to a study which explored form five (14- to 16-year-olds) students’ ideas in this area. The study focussed on descriptive statistics, graphical representations, and probability. This paper presents and discusses the ways in which students made sense of information in graphical representations (tables and bar graph) obtained from the individual interviews. The

SASHI VARTA SHARMA

2006-01-01

29

So Many Graphs, So Little Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interpreting graphs found in various content areas is an important skill for students, especially in light of high-stakes testing. In addition, reading and understanding graphs is an important part of numeracy, or numeric literacy, a skill necessary for informed citizenry. This article explores the different categories of graphs, provides…

Wall, Jennifer J.; Benson, Christine C.

2009-01-01

30

My Bar Graph Tells a Story  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

2010-01-01

31

Physics Students' Performance Using Computational Modelling Activities to Improve Kinematics Graphs Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate undergraduate students' performance while exposed to complementary computational modelling activities to improve physics learning, using the software "Modellus." Interpretation of kinematics graphs was the physics topic chosen for investigation. The theoretical framework adopted was based on Halloun's…

Araujo, Ives Solano; Veit, Eliane Angela; Moreira, Marco Antonio

2008-01-01

32

On the Relation of Abstract and Concrete in Scientists' Graph Interpretations: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The notions of "abstract" and "concrete" are central to the conceptualization of mathematical knowing and learning. Much of the literature takes a dualist approach, leading to the privileging of the former term at the expense of the latter. In this article, we provide a concrete analysis of a scientist interpreting an unfamiliar graph to show how…

Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hwang, SungWon

2006-01-01

33

Hands-on Materials for Teaching about Global Climate Change through Graph Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers need to address global climate change with students in their classrooms as evidence for consequences from these environmental changes mounts. One way to approach global climate change is through examination of authentic data. Mathematics and science may be integrated by interpreting graphs from the professional literature. This study…

Rule, Audrey C.; Hallagan, Jean E.; Shaffer, Barbara

2008-01-01

34

The Relation between the Working Memory Skills of Sign Language Interpreters and the Quality of Their Interpretations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two experiments we investigated the relationship between the working memory skills of sign language interpreters and the quality of their interpretations. In Experiment 1, we found that scores on 3-back tasks with signs and words were not related to the quality of interpreted narratives. In Experiment 2, we found that memory span scores for…

Van Dijk, Rick; Christoffels, Ingrid; Postma, Albert; Hermans, Daan

2012-01-01

35

Attributed programmed graph grammars and their application to schematic diagram interpretation.  

PubMed

Attributed programmed graph grammars are introduced in this paper and their application to the interpretation of schematic diagrams is proposed. In contrast with most of the approaches to syntactic pattern recognition, where the grammar controls a parser, the grammar in our system is used as a generative tool. Two classes of diagrams are studied, namely circuit diagrams and flowcharts. The task is in either case to extract a description from an input diagram. PMID:22499631

Bunke, H

1982-06-01

36

Interpretation of Radiological Images: Towards a Framework of Knowledge and Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The knowledge and skills that are required for radiological image interpretation are not well documented, even though medical imaging is gaining importance. This study aims to develop a comprehensive framework of knowledge and skills, required for two-dimensional and multiplanar image interpretation in radiology. A mixed-method study approach was…

van der Gijp, A.; van der Schaaf, M. F.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Huige, J. C. B. M.; Ravesloot, C. J.; van Schaik, J. P. J.; ten Cate, Th. J.

2014-01-01

37

Rated MPG for Confusion Using Gas Mileage to Learn Graphing and Data Analysis Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This case study follows a family’s dilemma about how to save money on gasoline. Should they keep their SUV and trade in their Corolla for a hybrid sedan? Going from 28 (Corolla) to 48 (Hybrid) miles per gallon (MPG) should really save money on gas. That’s a change of 20 MPG! Or, should they keep their Corolla and trade in their SUV for a minivan? The SUV gets about 13 MPG while the Minivan gets 17 MPG. Students learn how to analyze fuel efficiency in terms of “gallons per miles” driven instead of miles per gallon, and gain graphing and data analysis skills. An extension activity also relates fuel efficiency to greenhouse gas emissions. The case was developed for use in a high school general science course. It could be adapted for use in introductory physics, chemistry, algebra, or environmental science courses at the high school or college level.

Bode, Claudia; Gleue, Alan; Pearson, Carolyn

2009-01-01

38

An interpretative phenomenological analysis of how professional dance teachers implement psychological skills training in practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine how dance teachers work with psychological skills with their students in class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six female professional teachers in jazz, ballet and contemporary dance. The interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith 1996). Results revealed that all teachers used psychological skills training techniques such as goal setting

Ellinor Klockare; Henrik Gustafsson; Sanna M. Nordin-Bates

2011-01-01

39

An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of How Professional Dance Teachers Implement Psychological Skills Training in Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to examine how dance teachers work with psychological skills with their students in class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six female professional teachers in jazz, ballet and contemporary dance. The interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith 1996). Results…

Klockare, Ellinor; Gustafsson, Henrik; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M.

2011-01-01

40

Teacher-Designed Software for Interactive Linear Equations: Concepts, Interpretive Skills, Applications & Word-Problem Solving.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

No longer just a user of commercial software, the 21st century teacher is a designer of interactive software based on theories of learning. This software, a comprehensive study of straightline equations, enhances conceptual understanding, sketching, graphic interpretive and word problem solving skills as well as making connections to real-life and…

Lawrence, Virginia

41

UNF graduates of the ASL/English Interpreting Program will demonstrate mastery of content knowledge and interpreting skills through proficiency on course embedded assessments, activities, and critical task assessments. It is expected that candidates apply  

E-print Network

-monitoring skills to assess interpretation for accuracy and make repairs when necessary. Critical Thinking Skills · Apply critical thinking skills to ethical decision-making. · Apply critical thinking skills and interpreting skills through proficiency on course embedded assessments, activities, and critical task

Asaithambi, Asai

42

Graph Dance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners "dance" (move back and forth at varying speeds) by reading a graph. This is a kinesthetic way to help learners interpret and understand how motion is graphed. This resource includes instructions for three different graph "dances" and an optional extension activity.

Muller, Eric

2004-01-01

43

Graphing Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Bar Graphs and Pie Charts Students will practice graphing data on bar graphs and pie charts using quizzes and games. Students will also practice interpreting data given information. Watch this video to refresh your memory. Video Today

Johnston, Miss

2011-04-06

44

Categorization of first-year university students' interpretations of numerical linear distance-time graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have investigated the various approaches taken by first-year university students (n?550) when asked to determine the direction of motion, the constancy of speed, and a numerical value of the speed of an object at a point on a numerical linear distance-time graph. We investigated the prevalence of various well-known general graphing difficulties, such as graph-as-picture errors and slope-height confusion. We established that two-thirds of our students could determine the direction of motion with respect to a reference point, just under 80% could determine that the speed is constant, and just under 20% of our students could correctly determine the value of the speed; in the latter case, about half of the students divided the two coordinates. Three stable categories of correctly explaining the constancy of speed emerged from the data. We found that the reason given for determining that the speed of the object was constant did not correlate with successfully determining a value for the speed. We have established that technical difficulties such as determining the slope of any linear graph did not explain the poor performance. By comparing the answers to similar questions on water level versus time graphs, we were able to establish that context dependence and incorrect prior learning are likely to play a role. Post-test data are used to confirm the validity of the categorization and support the conclusion that being able to determine the slope of a y,x graph and having a correct qualitative understanding of a distance-time graph is not sufficient to correctly determine a value for the speed.

Wemyss, Thomas; van Kampen, Paul

2013-06-01

45

An Algebra of Graphs and Graph Rewriting  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we propose an axiomatization of partially abstract graphs, i.e., of suitable classes of monomorphisms in a category of graphs, which may be interpreted as graphs having both a concrete part and an abstract part (defined up to isomorphism). Morphisms between pa-graphs are pushout squares. We show that the basic notions of the algebraic theory of graph grammars

Andrea Corradini; Ugo Montanari

1991-01-01

46

Function plot response: A scalable system for teaching kinematics graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding and interpreting graphs are essential skills in all sciences. While students are mostly proficient in plotting given functions and reading values off graphs, they frequently lack the ability to construct and interpret graphs in a meaningful way. Students can use graphs as representations of value pairs, but often fail to interpret them as the representation of functions, and mostly fail to use them as representations of physical reality. Working with graphs in classroom settings has been shown to improve student abilities with graphs, particularly when the students can interact with them. We introduce a novel problem type in an online homework system, which requires students to construct the graphs themselves in free form, and requires no hand-grading by instructors. Initial experiences using the new problem type in an introductory physics course are reported.

Laverty, James; Kortemeyer, Gerd

2012-08-01

47

Categorization of First-Year University Students' Interpretations of Numerical Linear Distance-Time Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have investigated the various approaches taken by first-year university students (n[image omitted]550) when asked to determine the direction of motion, the constancy of speed, and a numerical value of the speed of an object at a point on a numerical linear distance-time graph. We investigated the prevalence of various well-known general…

Wemyss, Thomas; van Kampen, Paul

2013-01-01

48

Using Charts and Graphs to Teach Immigration History.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stresses developing students' interpretive skills, geography knowledge, and ability to read and understand statistics. Argues that computer accessibility makes possible innovative use of charts and graphs for secondary history teachers. Notes data may be printed out and used as teaching tools. Presents five teacher-produced graphs and provides…

Burson, George

1990-01-01

49

The Impact of Microcomputer-Based Science Labs on Children's Graphing Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL), the use of microcomputers for student-directed data acquisition and analysis, represents a promising new development in science laboratory instruction. This descriptive study determined the impact of MBLs on middle school students' understanding of graphs of distance and velocity. The study was based on the…

Mokros, Janice R.

50

Graphing Reality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphing is an essential skill that forms the foundation of any physical science.1 Understanding the relationships between measurements ultimately determines which modeling equations are successful in predicting observations.2 Over the years, science and math teachers have approached teaching this skill with a variety of techniques. For secondary school instruction, the job of graphing skills falls heavily on physics teachers. By virtue of the nature of the topics we cover, it is our mission to develop this skill to the fine art that it is.

Beeken, Paul

2014-11-01

51

Re-Examining the Power of Video Motion Analysis to Promote the Reading and Creating of Kinematic Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One essential skill that students who learn physics should possess is the ability to create and interpret kinematic graphs. However, it is well documented in the literature that students show lack of competence in these abilities. They have problems in connecting graphs and physics concepts, as well as graphs and the real world. The present paper…

Eshach, Haim

2010-01-01

52

Chemical Understanding and Graphing Skills in an Honors Case-Based Computerized Chemistry Laboratory Environment: The Value of Bidirectional Visual and Textual Representations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The case-based computerized laboratory (CCL) is a chemistry learning environment that integrates computerized experiments with emphasis on scientific inquiry and comprehension of case studies. The research objective was to investigate chemical understanding and graphing skills of high school honors students via bidirectional visual and textual…

Dori, Yehudit J.; Sasson, Irit

2008-01-01

53

How Do Students Learn to Apply their Mathematical Knowledge to Interpret Graphs in Physics?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a laboratory-based program in physics designed to help students build effective links between the mathematical equations used to solve problems in mechanics and the real world of moving objects. The program is based on a study conducted among senior college students, which illustrated out the value of laboratory work in science education for development of thinking skills and positive attitudes (Contains 14 references).

Woolnough, Jim

2006-09-14

54

Interviewing patients using interpreters in an oncology setting: initial evaluation of a communication skills module | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

The authors developed a communication skills training module for health professionals who work with professional translators in interviewing patients. The module combines didactic presentation of information and group role-play exercises in which trained medical interpreters help trainees communicate with bilingual patients. The module stresses communication strategies, including optimal seating arrangements that strengthen the clinician-patient relationship and de-emphasize interpreter-patient and interpreter-clinician interactions.

55

Location Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this interactive activity adapted from Annenberg Learner’s Teaching Math Grades 6–8, students interpret two line graphs to identify possible locations where the data might have been gathered.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2012-06-29

56

The Graphing Game Show  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan assesses student interpretation of graphs utilizing cooperative learning to further students understanding. Types of graphs used are horizontal and vertical bar graphs, picture graphs, and pictographs. In the lesson students play a game called the Graphing Game Show, in which they must work as a team to answer questions about specific graphs. The lesson includes four student resource worksheets and suggestions for extension and differentiation.

2011-01-01

57

Bar Graph Mania  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use these activities to build and interpret data on bar graphs. Catch all the bugs in the system and put them in the correct column of the bar graph. Answer the questions about the bugs in the graph. Catch bugs in six rooms. Bugs in the system Do these bar graphing activities. You don\\'t have to do the last question ...

Thurlow, Ms.

2005-10-26

58

Assessing Students' Abilities to Construct and Interpret Line Graphs: Disparities between Multiple-Choice and Free-Response Instruments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes studies designed to examine the instrumentation used to assess both graphing abilities and the impact of microcomputer-based laboratories (MBL) on students' graphing abilities. Results suggest that numerous disparities between the results of multiple-choice and free response instruments. The analysis also revealed that the impact of MBL…

Berg, Craig A.; Smith, Philip

1994-01-01

59

Effect of Training with the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System Lexicon on Mammographic Interpretation Skills in Developing Countries 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale and ObjectivesThe authors evaluated the effect of training in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon on the interpretive skills of radiologists evaluating screening mammograms in Ukraine.

Constance D Lehman; Louise Miller; Carolyn M Rutter; Vivien Tsu

2001-01-01

60

Influence of interactive videodisc instruction using simultaneous-time analysis on kinematics graphing skills of high school physics students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study presents an investigation of (n=31) physics students' analysis of videodisc-recorded images with treatments over an extended time. Researchers found no significant learning difference between using simultaneous-time and delayed-time analysis for student understanding of kinematics graphs.

Brungardt, John B.; Zollman, Dean A.

2006-05-23

61

Interpretations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although nobody can question the practical efficiency of quantum mechanics, there remains the serious question of its interpretation. As Valerio Scarani puts it, "We do not feel at ease with the indistinguishability principle (that is, the superposition principle) and some of its consequences." Indeed, this principle which pervades the quantum world is in stark contradiction with our everyday experience. From the very beginning of quantum mechanics, a number of physicists--but not the majority of them!--have asked the question of its "interpretation". One may simply deny that there is a problem: according to proponents of the minimalist interpretation, quantum mechanics is self-sufficient and needs no interpretation. The point of view held by a majority of physicists, that of the Copenhagen interpretation, will be examined in Section 10.1. The crux of the problem lies in the status of the state vector introduced in the preceding chapter to describe a quantum system, which is no more than a symbolic representation for the Copenhagen school of thought. Conversely, one may try to attribute some "external reality" to this state vector, that is, a correspondence between the mathematical description and the physical reality. In this latter case, it is the measurement problem which is brought to the fore. In 1932, von Neumann was first to propose a global approach, in an attempt to build a purely quantum theory of measurement examined in Section 10.2. This theory still underlies modern approaches, among them those grounded on decoherence theory, or on the macroscopic character of the measuring apparatus: see Section 10.3. Finally, there are non-standard interpretations such as Everett's many worlds theory or the hidden variables theory of de Broglie and Bohm (Section 10.4). Note, however, that this variety of interpretations has no bearing whatsoever on the practical use of quantum mechanics. There is no controversy on the way we should use quantum mechanics!

Bellac, Michel Le

2014-11-01

62

Interpretive Structural Modeling of MLearning Curriculum Implementation Model of English Language Communication Skills for Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the field of distance education, learning mediated through mobile technology or mobile learning (mLearning) has rapidly building a repertoire of influence in distance education research. This paper aims to propose an mLearning curriculum implementation model for English Language and Communication skills course among undergraduates using…

Abdullah, Muhammad Ridhuan Tony Lim; Siraj, Saedah; Asra; Hussin, Zaharah

2014-01-01

63

Field-by-field evaluation of intraoperative transoesophageal echocardiography interpretative skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

A quality assurance system is essential for the credibility and structured growth of anaesthesiology-based transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) programmes. We have developed software (Q\\/A Kappa), involving a 400-line source code, capable of directly reporting kappa correlation coefficient values, using external reviewer interpretations as the `gold standard', and thereby allowing systematic assessment of the validity of intraoperative echocardiographic interpretation. This paper presents

Michael Griffin; Bruce Edwards; Jon Judd; Robert Workman; Terence Rafferty

2000-01-01

64

Global Warming Graph Analysis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students interpret a variety of graphs from IPCC reports to learn the details of climate change. Pairs of students analyze data in graphs, and present their findings by addressing the following points: 1) Describe the axes and range of the graph; 2) Describe the general trend of the graph; and 3) What might your graph be telling us, and what can you infer from the data? This lesson appears to be relatively simple, but much of the peer-reviewed data in these reports are highly technical and require a great deal of analysis.

Larsen, Krista

65

K-6 Social Studies Skills for the Human Behavior and Urban Studies Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide was developed to aid elementary students deal with life experiences through skill development. Major skills stressed are: locating, organizing, and evaluating information; acquiring information through listening, observing, and reading; communicating orally and in writing; interpreting pictures, charts, graphs, and tables; and working…

Banks, Samuel L., Ed.

66

The effect of four instructional methods, gender, and time of testing on the achievement of sixth graders learning to interpret graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of four instructional methods (direct instruction, computer-aided instruction, video observation, and microcomputer-based lab activities), gender, and time of testing (pretest, immediate posttest for determining the immediate effect of instruction, and a delayed posttest two weeks later to determine the retained effect of the instruction) on the achievement of sixth graders who were learning to interpret graphs of displacement and velocity. The dependent variable of achievement was reflected in the scores earned by students on a testing instrument of established validity and reliability. The 107 students participating in the study were divided by gender and were then randomly assigned to the four treatment groups, each taught by a different teacher. Each group had approximately equal numbers of males and females. The students were pretested and then involved in two class periods of the instructional method which was unique to their group. Immediately following treatment they were posttested and two weeks later they were posttested again. The data in the form of test scores were analyzed with a two-way split-plot analysis of variance to determine if there was significant interaction among technique, gender, and time of testing. When significant interaction was indicated, the Tukey HSD test was used to determine specific mean differences. The results of the analysis indicated no gender effect. Only students in the direct instruction group and the microcomputer-based laboratory group had significantly higher posttest-1 scores than pretest scores. They also had significantly higher posttest-2 scores than pretest scores. This suggests that the learning was retained. The other groups experienced no significant differences among pretest, posttest-1, and posttest-2 scores. Recommendations are that direct instruction and microcomputer-based laboratory activities should be considered as effective stand-alone methods for teaching sixth grade students to interpret graphs of displacement and velocity. However, video and computer instruction may serve as supplemental activities.

Young, Jerry Wayne

67

The Impact of "Skills for Life" on Adult Basic Skills in England: How Should We Interpret Trends in Participation and Achievement?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The English "Skills for Life" strategy symbolises the prominent place that adult basic skills have claimed in education and training policy in England since the beginning of this century. The strategy aims to improve the skills of a large number of learners over a ten year period (2001-2010). This paper explores what we can learn about the impact…

Bathmaker, Ann-Marie

2007-01-01

68

Graphs in Economics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint presentation features an explanation of different types of graphs. Students will learn how to make and interpret a time-series graph, a cross-section graph, and a scatter diagram. Illustrations and text are used to define and calculate the slope of a line and distinguish between linear and nonlinear relationships and between relationships that have a maximum and a minimum.

Vellangany, Isaac; University, Rutgers

69

Graphing Stratospheric Ozone  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will seek to understand trends that are shown by graphical analysis of ozone measurements over time. Students will investigate ozone chemistry and issues around the preservation of the Earthâs ozone layer, and learn how to read false color images of ozone concentration. They will then interpret trends from graphs of data and construct a correctly labeled graph. This lesson uses NASA images of Antarctic ozone to motivate the graphing lesson and then presents more sophisticated examples of graphing using images from the Neumayer Antarctic Station. A printable student questionnaire and teacher answer key is provided.

70

Growing and Graphing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students visit second- and fourth-grade classes to measure the heights of older students using large building blocks as a non-standard unit of measure. They also measure adults in the school community. Results are displayed in age-appropriate bar graphs (paper cut-outs of miniature building blocks glued on paper to form bar graphs) enabling a comparison of the heights of different age groups. The activities that comprise this activity help students develop the concepts and vocabulary to describe, in a non-ambiguous way, how heights change as children age. This introduction to graphing provides an important foundation for creating and interpreting graphs in future years.

Engineering K-Phd Program

71

Graphs and Tracks Impresses as a Kinematics Teaching Tool  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The ability to construct and interpret graphs associated with simple motions of objects is unquestionably a desirable outcome of physics education. The computer program Graphs and Tracks was designed to help students build such skills. The genesis of Graphs and Tracks dates from the early 1980s, when the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington began conducting research on student understanding of the kinematic concepts of 1D velocity and acceleration. A physical system similar to the one simulated in Graphs and Tracks, consisting of a ball rolling on a slotted track, has been used by the Physics Education Group and has been integrated into curricular material. Graphs and Tracks was updated in the late 1980s to reflect insight drawn from research concerning student understanding of graphing concepts used in kinematics. The system simulated in Graphs and Tracks is a ball sliding without friction along a segmented track in which each segment can have a unique slope. Transitions from one segment of the track to another are artificially smooth. As users are informed, the vertical dimension of the track is exaggerated onscreen so that slopes appear up to nine times greater than they actually are. Thus, the appearance of the ball's motion onscreen is highly two-dimensional. The package is divided into two programs: Graphs and Tracks I: From Graphs to Motion and Graphs and Tracks II: From Motion to Graphs. Both sections include online tutorial instruction on how to operate the program. These tutorials thoroughly cover all of the basic functions used in the program.

Wilkinson, L. K.; Risley, John; Gastineau, J.; Engelhardt, P. V.; Schultz, S. F.

2006-10-11

72

Expanding our understanding of students' use of graphs for learning physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally agreed that the ability to visualize functional dependencies or physical relationships as graphs is an important step in modeling and learning. However, several studies in Physics Education Research (PER) have shown that many students in fact do not master this form of representation and even have misconceptions about the meaning of graphs that impede learning physics concepts. Working with graphs in classroom settings has been shown to improve student abilities with graphs, particularly when the students can interact with them. We introduce a novel problem type in an online homework system, which requires students to construct the graphs themselves in free form, and requires no hand-grading by instructors. A study of pre/post-test data using the Test of Understanding Graphs in Kinematics (TUG-K) over several semesters indicates that students learn significantly more from these graph construction problems than from the usual graph interpretation problems, and that graph interpretation alone may not have any significant effect. The interpretation of graphs, as well as the representation translation between textual, mathematical, and graphical representations of physics scenarios, are frequently listed among the higher order thinking skills we wish to convey in an undergraduate course. But to what degree do we succeed? Do students indeed employ higher order thinking skills when working through graphing exercises? We investigate students working through a variety of graph problems, and, using a think-aloud protocol, aim to reconstruct the cognitive processes that the students go through. We find that to a certain degree, these problems become commoditized and do not trigger the desired higher order thinking processes; simply translating ``textbook-like'' problems into the graphical realm will not achieve any additional educational goals. Whether the students have to interpret or construct a graph makes very little difference in the methods used by the students. We will also look at the results of using graph problems in an online learning environment. We will show evidence that construction problems lead to a higher degree of difficulty and degree of discrimination than other graph problems and discuss the influence the course has on these variables.

Laverty, James T.

73

Gender and Holland Type as Moderators of the Validity and Interpretive Utility of the Skills Confidence Inventory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of results of the Skills Confidence Inventory completed by 1147 employed adults and 706 college students revealed minimal gender differences in self-efficacy within 21 occupations and 6 Holland job families. (SK)

Betz, Nancy E.; Borgen, Fred H.; Kaplan, Allison; Harmon, Lenore W.

1998-01-01

74

Advantages of Micro-Based Labs: Electronic Data Acquisition, Computerized Graphing, or Both?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) study (n=75) which uses multiple temperature gathering devices (mercury thermometer, digital thermometer, and computer probe) and graphing methods (hand graphs, delayed computer graphs, and real-time graphs). Reports that MBL real-time graphing provides significant increases in graphing skills. (MVL)

Stuessy, Carol L.; Rowland, Paul M.

1989-01-01

75

Motion graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a novel method for creating realistic, controllable motion. Given a corpus of motion capture data, we automatically construct a directed graph called a motion graph that encapsulates connections among the database. The motion graph consists both of pieces of original motion and automatically generated transitions. Motion can be generated simply by building walks on the

Lucas Kovar; Michael Gleicher; Frederic H. Pighin

2002-01-01

76

Gender and Holland Type as Moderators of the Validity and Interpretive Utility of the Skills Confidence Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a large national sample of employed adults, this study found minimal gender differences in self-efficacy for the Holland themes among women and men within 21 occupations, and within six Holland job families. For both women and men, evidence for the validity of the Skills Confidence Inventory, the measure of self-efficacy, indicated considerable predictive utility of the six General Confidence

Nancy E. Betz; Fred H. Borgen; Allison Kaplan; Lenore W. Harmon

1998-01-01

77

Torus Grid Graph Kneser Graph  

E-print Network

,3) Torus Grid Graph {1,4} {3,4} {1,2} {2,5} {2,4} {2,3} {1,5} {4,5} {1,3} {3,5} Kneser Graph Considered the cheapest edge, {8, 9}. with weight 76 New Features of the GraphTheory Package Animations for Prim's and Kruskal's Algorithms Below we show some key frames from the commands: > G:=AntiPrismGraph(5,2): > G

78

Data collection and graph generation using touchscreen technology  

E-print Network

This thesis describes the design and implementation of the TouchGraph system, whose goal is to help students develop graphing skills by allowing them to record their own data and access the data of their classmates using ...

Pope, John (John W.), Jr

2010-01-01

79

Music skills and the expressive interpretation of music in children with Williams-Beuren syndrome: pitch, rhythm, melodic imagery, phrasing, and musical affect.  

PubMed

This paper studied music in 14 children and adolescents with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS), a multi-system neurodevelopmental disorder, and 14 age-matched controls. Five aspects of music were tested. There were two tests of core music domains, pitch discrimination and rhythm discrimination. There were two tests of musical expressiveness, melodic imagery and phrasing. There was one test of musical interpretation, the ability to identify the emotional resonance of a musical excerpt. Music scores were analyzed by means of logistic regressions that modeled outcome (higher or lower music scores) as a function of group membership (WBS or Control) and cognitive age. Compared to age peers, children with WBS had similar levels of musical expressiveness, but were less able to discriminate pitch and rhythm, or to attach a semantic interpretation to emotion in music. Music skill did not vary with cognitive age. Musical strength in individuals with WBS involves not so much formal analytic skill in pitch and rhythm discrimination as a strong engagement with music as a means of expression, play, and, perhaps, improvisation. PMID:11815880

Hopyan, T; Dennis, M; Weksberg, R; Cytrynbaum, C

2001-03-01

80

Lesson 19: Graphs of Functions Reading  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lesson begins with graphs of the Dow Jones Industrial Average and water levels of Lake Huron where points on the graph are interpreted. Intervals of increase and maxima are introduced before the graph of F(x) = sqrt (x+4) is completed by first generating a table of data. This is followed by the vertical line test and using graphs to solve equations and inequalities.

2011-01-01

81

Probably Graphing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Student will conduct a coin tossing experiment for 30 trials. Their results will be graphed, showing a line graph that progresses toward the theoretical probability. Students will observe that as the number of trials increases they begin to see a graphical representation of the Law of Large Numbers. Instructions, handouts, and a lesson extension are all included here.

Heitschmidt, Corey

2000-01-01

82

All About Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will practice creating and understanding bar graphs. Learn about making and reading graphs. BrainPOP! Bar Graph Video Bugs have gotten into the library! Help the Cybersquad get rid of them and graph which bugs showed up. Bugs in the System Graph colors and shapes! Bar Graph Sorter Practice using tally charts. IXL Tally Charts Practice using bar graphs. IXL Bar Graphs ...

Hoffmann, Mrs.

2011-06-09

83

Helping Students Make Sense of Graphs: An Experimental Trial of SmartGraphs Software  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs are commonly used in science, mathematics, and social sciences to convey important concepts; yet students at all ages demonstrate difficulties interpreting graphs. This paper reports on an experimental study of free, Web-based software called SmartGraphs that is specifically designed to help students overcome their misconceptions regarding…

Zucker, Andrew; Kay, Rachel; Staudt, Carolyn

2014-01-01

84

Graph Theory  

SciTech Connect

Graph theory is a branch of discrete combinatorial mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The theory was pioneered by the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century, commenced its formal development during the second half of the 19th century, and has witnessed substantial growth during the last seventy years, with applications in areas as diverse as engineering, computer science, physics, sociology, chemistry and biology. Graph theory has also had a strong impact in computational linguistics by providing the foundations for the theory of features structures that has emerged as one of the most widely used frameworks for the representation of grammar formalisms.

Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

2005-12-27

85

Random graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We will review some of the major results in random graphs and some of the more challenging open problems. We will cover algorithmic and structural questions. We will touch on newer models, including those related to the WWW.

Alan M. Frieze

2006-01-01

86

Bar Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students use preset data or input their own data to be represented by a bar graph. This activity allows students to explore bar graphs and how changing scales will alter how their data is represented. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

2010-01-01

87

Circle Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students use preset data or input their own data that will be represented in a circle graph. This activity allows students to explore making circle graphs and calculating the percent of a circle that each data entry occupies. This activity includes supplemental materials, including background information about the topics covered, a description of how to use the application, and exploration questions for use with the java applet.

2010-01-01

88

Graphing Paleoclimate  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will gain a basic understanding of climate, earth's energy budget, greenhouse gases, factors that affect the climate, paleoclimate, and how proxies are used. The students will then graph paleoclimates. All of the graphing data needed for this activity are contained within this unit. While presenting their findings, students will look for any connections to global climate and some of the variables suggested within the unit. There are corresponding assignments along with a scoring guide also available.

2012-01-01

89

Active Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners track their movements with jumping and leaping graphs. In part A, learners jump as high as they can and press their inked fingers or hands against a large true-to-life chart with vertical distance marked along the vertical edge. Learners compare the results. In part B, learners jump as far as they can and use masking tape to mark their spot on a true-to-life bar graph. Again, learners compare the results.

Museum, Chicago C.

2011-01-01

90

Great Graphing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You are going to put on your math-cap and think about points and graphs in order to solve problems. First you will help help Billy Bug s Grub get into his belly. Then you will find the Mean, Median, Mode of building heights. Finally you will find out: What s the point? ...

Craighill, Miss

2007-11-12

91

Puzzles & Graphs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The material in this booklet is concerned with a discussion and examination of geometric puzzles and the ideas which result from their study. The general idea of graphs is introduced as a tool which can be used to solve geometric puzzles. The fact that working with puzzles can lead to unexpected mathematical discoveries is stressed. Such topics as…

Fujii, John N.

92

Sinusoidal Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by Nathan Kahl for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purpose of this module is to study properties of the graphs of the basic trigonometric functions, sine and cosine. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Kahl, Nathan

2010-05-07

93

Graph Theory in Drama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use graph theory to create social graphs for their own social networks and apply what learn to create a graph representing the social dynamics found in a dramatic text. Students then derive meaning based on what they know about the text from the graphs they created. Students learn graph theory vocabulary, as well as engineering applications of graph theory.

IMPART RET Program, College of Information Science & Technology,

94

A random graph model for massive graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a random graph model which is a special case of sparse random graphs with given degree sequences. This model involves only a small number of parameters, called logsize and log-log growth rate. These parameters capture some universal characteristics of massive graphs. Furthermore, from these parameters, various properties of the graph can be derived. For example, for certain ranges

William Aiello; Fan R. K. Chung; Linyuan Lu

2000-01-01

95

Graph Mole  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Flash activity provides an interactive application for plotting points on a Cartesian coordinate plane. If players already know how to graph Cartesian coordinates, they click on the "Play Game" button to start the easy version of the game. The goal is to bonk the mole before he gets all the vegetables by choosing the correct ordered pair of his location in the field. There are also a medium version and a hard version of the game.

Dun, Sulan

2011-08-30

96

Visualization of Social Networks with Node Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson introduces the concept of node graphs for the purpose of visualizing social networks. The lesson is presented with an introductory physical activity where students create a living graph. Students, building on their existing knowledge regarding common graph types, learn how node graphs can be used to visualize data from social networks. Students will participate in a simulated contagious infection event and will accurately record data about the transmission of the disease. These data will be used to construct a single computer file to be used to create a single node graph for describing the network. Students will then be responsible for understanding how to interpret the resulting network graph in the context of the activity.

Santone, Adam

2012-02-13

97

Convex Graph Invariants  

E-print Network

The structural properties of graphs are usually characterized in terms of invariants, which are functions of graphs that do not depend on the labeling of the nodes. In this paper we study convex graph invariants, which are ...

Chandrasekaran, Venkat

98

On cliques in graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clique is a maximal complete subgraph of a graph. The maximum number of cliques possible in a graph withn nodes is determined. Also, bounds are obtained for the number of different sizes of cliques possible in such a graph.

J. W. Moon; L. Moser

1965-01-01

99

Motion, Technology, Gestures in Interpreting Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is part of a long-term research on the construction of mathematical meanings through the interaction with various technologies. The research involved a set of teaching experiments based on body motion with sensors and calculators at different school levels, from kindergarten to secondary school. Here I refer to the one developed in a…

Robutti, Ornella

2006-01-01

100

Exchanging Graphs with GXL  

Microsoft Academic Search

GXL (Graph eXchange Language) is designed to be a standard dataexchange format for graph-based tools. GXL is defined as an XML sublanguage,which offers support for exchanging instance graphs together with their appropriateschema information in a uniform format. Formally, GXL is based on typed,attributed, directed, ordered graphs which are extended by concepts to representhypergraphs and hierarchical graphs. Using this general graph

Andreas Winter

2001-01-01

101

Charts and Graphs in the Workplace. P.R.I.D.E. People Retraining for Industry Excellence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This workplace skills course on charts and graphs in the workplace is intended to teach students to read and make tables and graphs, make projections from charts/graphs, see trends and draw conclusions from charts/graphs and calculate totals, averages, and percentages. Introductory material includes objectives, topics, methods, and materials. The…

Lewandowski, Carol

102

Concurrent Graph and Term Graph Rewriting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graph Rewriting Systems are a powerful formalism for the specification of parallel and distributed systems, and the corresponding theory is rich of results concerning parallelism and concurrency. I will review the main results of the theory of concurrency for the algebraic approach to graph rewriting, emphasizing the relationship with the theory of Petri nets. In fact, graph rewriting systems can

Andrea Corradini

1996-01-01

103

School District Guidelines: How to Interpret and Use the Student Roster and Individual Student Report: New Jersey Minimum Basic Skills Testing Program 1979-80.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A minimum standards amendment to the New Jersey Public School Act of 1975 requires the testing of public school students to determine proficiency in the minimum basic skills of reading and mathematics, under the auspices of the New Jersey State Department of Education's Educational Assessment Program. To meet the mandates of this amendment, the…

New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of Operations, Research, and Evaluation.

104

Knowing a Lot for One's Age: Vocabulary Skill and Not Age Is Associated with Anticipatory Incremental Sentence Interpretation in Children and Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adults can incrementally combine information from speech with astonishing speed to anticipate future words. Concurrently, a growing body of work suggests that vocabulary ability is crucially related to lexical processing skills in children. However, little is known about this relationship with predictive sentence processing in children or adults.…

Borovsky, Arielle; Elman, Jeffrey L.; Fernald, Anne

2012-01-01

105

Improving Media Message Interpretation Processing Skills to Promote Healthy Decision Making About Substance Use: The Effects of the Middle School Media Ready Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Media Ready Program was designed as a middle school, media literacy education, preventive intervention program to improve adolescents' media literacy skills and reduce their intention to use alcohol or tobacco products. In a short-term efficacy trial, schools in North Carolina were randomly assigned to conditions (Media Ready: n = 214; control: n = 198). Boys in the Media Ready group reported significantly less

Janis B. Kupersmidt; Tracy M. Scull; Jessica W. Benson

2012-01-01

106

Graphing Polar Curves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

Lawes, Jonathan F.

2013-01-01

107

Motion Graphs Virtual Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Motion Graphs virtual lab helps physics students learn the essential features of position vs. time and velocity vs. time graphs. Students are provided sample graphs, and they try to move the on-screen caterpillar in order to make the caterpillar's motion match the sample graph. A printable activity guide is included.

2014-04-03

108

Fuzzy morphisms between graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A generic definition of fuzzy morphism between graphs (GFM) is introduced that includes classical graph related problem definitions as sub-cases (such as graph and subgraph isomorphism). The GFM uses a pair of fuzzy relations, one on the vertices and one on the edges. Each relation is a mapping between the elements of two graphs. These two fuzzy relations are linked

Aymeric Perchant; Isabelle Bloch

2002-01-01

109

Cellular Graph Acceptors, 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an earlier report, sequential and parallel acceptors were defined whose languages are sets of d-graphs, i.e., labelled graphs of bounded degree whose arcs at each node are numbered. This report defines graph acceptance by cellular d-graph automata, and...

A. Wu

1977-01-01

110

Create a Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will learn how to create area, bar, pie, and line graphs. They are provided with information about what each type of graph shows and what it can be used for. Students are given an example of each type of graph, but they can create graphs using their own data in the interactive tool.

Statistics, National C.

2000-01-01

111

Variables and Graphs: What's Our Story?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn how to quickly and efficiently interpret graphs, which are used for everyday purposes as well as engineering analysis. Through a practice handout completed as a class and a worksheet completed in small groups, students gain familiarity in talking about and interpreting graphs. They use common graph terminology such as independent variable, dependent variable, linear data, linear relationship and rate of change. The equation for calculating slope is explained. The focus is on students becoming able to clearly describe linear relationships by using the language of slope and the rate of change between variables. At lesson end, students discuss the relationship between variables as presented by the visual representation of a graph. Then they independently complete a homework handout.

VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering,

112

Science Sampler: Node graph visualizations for eighth-grade mathematics students using a virus transmission simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Because eighth-grade curriculum standards focus in part on systems analysis and graphing, a lesson was created to enhance students' analytical skills with the introduction of a type of graph, the node graph, which can be used to represent the interconnectedness of system components. This lesson is rooted in understanding real-world concepts regarding the transmission of infectious agents throughout a population.

Santone, Adam L.; Mccutcheon, Jennifer A.

2008-07-01

113

Validation of the Descriptive Tests of Mathematics Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A variety of techniques was used to assess the validity of the Descriptive Tests of Mathematics Skills (DTMS) for making placement decisions. The DTMS is a group of four tests (Arthmetic Skills, Elementary Algebra Skills, Intermediate Algebra Skills, and Functions & Graphs) that was designed to help colleges place each admitted student in the…

Bridgeman, Brent

114

Higher hairy graph homology.  

E-print Network

We study the hairy graph homology of a cyclic operad; in particular we show how to assemble corresponding hairy graph cohomology classes to form cocycles for ordinary graph homology, as defined by Kontsevich. We identify the part of hairy graph homology coming from graphs with cyclic fundamental group as the dihedral homology of a related associative algebra with involution. For the operads Comm, Assoc and Lie we compute this algebra explicitly, enabling us to apply known results on dihedral homology to the computation of hairy graph homology. In addition we determine the image in hairy graph homology of the trace map defined in [CKV], as a symplectic representation. For the operad Lie assembling hairy graph cohomology classes yields all known non-trivial rational homology of Out(F_n). The hairy graph homology of Lie is also useful for constructing elements of the cokernel of the Johnson homomomorphism of a once-punctured surface.

Jim Conant; Martin Kassabov; Karen Vogtmann

115

Intrinsic graph structure estimation using graph laplacian.  

PubMed

A graph is a mathematical representation of a set of variables where some pairs of the variables are connected by edges. Common examples of graphs are railroads, the Internet, and neural networks. It is both theoretically and practically important to estimate the intensity of direct connections between variables. In this study, a problem of estimating the intrinsic graph structure from observed data is considered. The observed data in this study are a matrix with elements representing dependency between nodes in the graph. The dependency represents more than direct connections because it includes influences of various paths. For example, each element of the observed matrix represents a co-occurrence of events at two nodes or a correlation of variables corresponding to two nodes. In this setting, spurious correlations make the estimation of direct connection difficult. To alleviate this difficulty, a digraph Laplacian is used for characterizing a graph. A generative model of this observed matrix is proposed, and a parameter estimation algorithm for the model is also introduced. The notable advantage of the proposed method is its ability to deal with directed graphs, while conventional graph structure estimation methods such as covariance selections are applicable only to undirected graphs. The algorithm is experimentally shown to be able to identify the intrinsic graph structure. PMID:24708372

Noda, Atsushi; Hino, Hideitsu; Tatsuno, Masami; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

2014-07-01

116

TIGRE: Combinator graph reduction on the RTX 2000  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An efficient evaluation technique is examined for lazy functional programs based on combinator graph reduction. Graph reduction is widely believed to be slow and inefficient, but an abstract machine called the Threaded Interpretive Graph Reduction Engine (TIGRE) achieves a substantial speedup over previous reduction techniques. The runtime system of TIGRE is a threaded system that permits self-modifying program execution with compiler-guaranteed safety. This paper describes an implementation of TIGRE in Forth for the Harris RTX 2000 stack processor.

Koopman, Philip, Jr.

1990-01-01

117

Wikipedia: Graph Theory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Drawing on the knowledge of the people, Wikipedia presents this site on graph theory. Here, the history, problems, and applications of graph theory are explained, and there are links to other print and online resources for more information.

1969-12-31

118

Exponential Graphing Using Technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is teacher/student directed for discovering and translating exponential functions using a graphing app. The lesson focuses on the translations from a parent graph and how changing the coefficient, base and exponent values relate to the transformation.

Gaynr, Cheryl

2012-07-27

119

Metaheuristics for graph bisection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares several metaheuristics on the balanced graph bisection problem and identies their relative perfor- mance on structured test graphs. For this purpose, a Simple implementation of a graph Bisection Iterated Local Search algorithm (SBILS) is introduced. Its results are compared to the well-known Genetic Bisection Algorithm, to the state-of- the-art graph partitioning programs Metis and Scotch, and to

Charles-edmond Bichot

2009-01-01

120

Complex Networks and Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about complex networks and how to represent them using graphs. They also learn that graph theory is a useful mathematical tool for studying complex networks in diverse applications of science and engineering, such as neural networks in the brain, biochemical reaction networks in cells, communication networks, such as the internet, and social networks. Topics covered include set theory, defining a graph, as well as defining the degree of a node and the degree distribution of a graph.

Complex Systems Science Laboratory

121

Graph Pebbling Anna Blasiak  

E-print Network

Graph Pebbling Anna Blasiak Senior Thesis in Mathematics Middlebury College May 2008 #12;ii #12;c Copyright by Anna Blasiak , 2008. All Rights Reserved #12;iv #12;v Abstract A graph is a mathematical object that contains a set of vertices and edges, where an edge connects any two vertices. In the plane, a graph can

Keinan, Alon

122

Graph-Plotting Routine  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Plotter routine for IBM PC (AKPLOT) designed for engineers and scientists who use graphs as integral parts of their documentation. Allows user to generate graph and edit its appearance on cathode-ray tube. Graph may undergo many interactive alterations before finally dumped from screen to be plotted by printer. Written in BASIC.

Kantak, Anil V.

1987-01-01

123

Reflections on "The Graph"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article responds to arguments by Skidmore and Thompson (this issue of "Educational Researcher") that a graph published more than 10 years ago was erroneously reproduced and "gratuitously damaged" perceptions of the quality of education research. After describing the purpose of the original graph, the author counters assertions that the graph

Petrosino, Anthony

2012-01-01

124

Supermanifolds from Feynman graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We generalize the computation of Feynman integrals of log divergent graphs in terms of the Kirchhoff polynomial to the case of graphs with both fermionic and bosonic edges, to which we assign a set of ordinary and Grassmann variables. This procedure gives a computation of the Feynman integrals in terms of a period on a supermanifold, for graphs admitting a

Matilde Marcolli; Abhijnan Rej

2008-01-01

125

Building Brilliant Bar Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this series of three lesson plans, students create bar graphs, double bar graphs, and determine appropriate intervals for scale. Each lesson incorporates teacher modeling, student practice (students have an opportunity to label and create the scale for their own graphs), assessment (including rubrics), and reteaching or extension options.

Bower, Briana; Miller, Mary

2005-01-01

126

Graph Theory Book  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the Graduate Texts in Mathematics series comes this textbook on graph theory by Reinhard Diestel from the University of Hamburg. Topics covered include flows, planar graphs, infinite graphs, and Hamilton cycles. Visitors can read the full text (by clicking on "electronic edition") or summaries of each section, as well as reviews from different scholarly journals.

Diestel, Reinhard

1969-12-31

127

Colouring planar graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is no known polynomial time 4-colouring algorithm for planar graphs, except the algorithms that can be derived from\\u000a the proofs of Appel et al. and Robertson et al. An alternative way to colour planar graphs is to investigate the problem of finding nowhere-zero k-flows in graphs.

Paulette Lieby

128

Frugal Colouring of Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A k-frugal colouring of a graph G is a proper colouring of the vertices of G such that no colour appears more than k times in the neighbourhood of a vertex. This type of colouring was introduced by Hind, Molloy and Reed in 1997. In this paper, we study the frugal chromatic number of planar graphs, planar graphs with large

Omid Amini; Louis Esperet; Jan Van Den Heuvel

2007-01-01

129

Data Analysis: Bar Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Bridges In Mathematics Supplement, two activities are presented in which primary students are introduced to bar graphs. In each activity students graph catagorical data that reflects their own opinions. Once the graphs are complete, students analyze the data as a class and make conclusions based on the data.

2009-01-01

130

Graphs and Functions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson is designed to introduce students to plotting points and graphing functions in the Cartesian coordinate system. The lesson provides links to discussions and activities that transition from functions as rules to the graphs of those functions. Finally, the lesson provides links to follow-up lessons designed for use in succession to an introduction to graphing.

Shodor

2012-03-29

131

Graphing with "LogoWriter."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book discusses four kinds of graphs that are taught in mathematics at the middle school level: pictographs, bar graphs, line graphs, and circle graphs. The chapters on each of these types of graphs contain information such as starting, scaling, drawing, labeling, and finishing the graphs using "LogoWriter." The final chapter of the book…

Yoder, Sharon K.

132

An Efficient Algorithm for Graph Isomorphism  

Microsoft Academic Search

A procedure for determining whether two graphs are isomorphic is described. During the procedure, from any given graph two graphs, the representative graph and the reordered graph, are derived. The representative graph is a homomorphic image of the original graph; the reordered graph is constructed from the representative graph to be isomorphic to the given graph. Unique labels are assigned

Derek G. Corneil; C. C. Gotlieb

1970-01-01

133

Methods of visualizing graphs  

DOEpatents

Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

Wong, Pak C. (Richland, WA); Mackey, Patrick S. (Kennewick, WA); Perrine, Kenneth A. (Richland, WA); Foote, Harlan P. (Richland, WA); Thomas, James J. (Richland, WA)

2008-12-23

134

Supermanifolds from Feynman graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We generalize the computation of Feynman integrals of log divergent graphs in terms of the Kirchhoff polynomial to the case of graphs with both fermionic and bosonic edges, to which we assign a set of ordinary and Grassmann variables. This procedure gives a computation of the Feynman integrals in terms of a period on a supermanifold, for graphs admitting a basis of the first homology satisfying a condition generalizing the log divergence in this context. The analog in this setting of the graph hypersurfaces is a graph supermanifold given by the divisor of zeros and poles of the Berezinian of a matrix associated with the graph, inside a superprojective space. We introduce a Grothendieck group for supermanifolds and identify the subgroup generated by the graph supermanifolds. This can be seen as a general procedure for constructing interesting classes of supermanifolds with associated periods.

Marcolli, Matilde; Rej, Abhijnan

2008-08-01

135

Supermanifolds from Feynman graphs  

E-print Network

We generalize the computation of Feynman integrals of log divergent graphs in terms of the Kirchhoff polynomial to the case of graphs with both fermionic and bosonic edges, to which we assign a set of ordinary and Grassmann variables. This procedure gives a computation of the Feynman integrals in terms of a period on a supermanifold, for graphs admitting a basis of the first homology satisfying a condition generalizing the log divergence in this context. The analog in this setting of the graph hypersurfaces is a graph supermanifold given by the divisor of zeros and poles of the Berezinian of a matrix associated to the graph, inside a superprojective space. We introduce a Grothendieck group for supermanifolds and we identify the subgroup generated by the graph supermanifolds. This can be seen as a general procedure to construct interesting classes of supermanifolds with associated periods.

Marcolli, Matilde

2008-01-01

136

Supermanifolds from Feynman graphs  

E-print Network

We generalize the computation of Feynman integrals of log divergent graphs in terms of the Kirchhoff polynomial to the case of graphs with both fermionic and bosonic edges, to which we assign a set of ordinary and Grassmann variables. This procedure gives a computation of the Feynman integrals in terms of a period on a supermanifold, for graphs admitting a basis of the first homology satisfying a condition generalizing the log divergence in this context. The analog in this setting of the graph hypersurfaces is a graph supermanifold given by the divisor of zeros and poles of the Berezinian of a matrix associated to the graph, inside a superprojective space. We introduce a Grothendieck group for supermanifolds and we identify the subgroup generated by the graph supermanifolds. This can be seen as a general procedure to construct interesting classes of supermanifolds with associated periods.

Matilde Marcolli; Abhijnan Rej

2008-06-10

137

Quantum statistics on graphs  

E-print Network

Quantum graphs are commonly used as models of complex quantum systems, for example molecules, networks of wires, and states of condensed matter. We consider quantum statistics for indistinguishable spinless particles on a graph, concentrating on the simplest case of abelian statistics for two particles. In spite of the fact that graphs are locally one-dimensional, anyon statistics emerge in a generalized form. A given graph may support a family of independent anyon phases associated with topologically inequivalent exchange processes. In addition, for sufficiently complex graphs, there appear new discrete-valued phases. Our analysis is simplified by considering combinatorial rather than metric graphs -- equivalently, a many-particle tight-binding model. The results demonstrate that graphs provide an arena in which to study new manifestations of quantum statistics. Possible applications include topological quantum computing, topological insulators, the fractional quantum Hall effect, superconductivity and molecular physics.

JM Harrison; JP Keating; JM Robbins

2011-01-07

138

Graph Matching Motion Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Graph Matching Motion Model shows the graph of position as a function of time, and the motion diagram, for a particular object that experiences one-dimensional motion with constant acceleration. Using the sliders, try to match the motion of the red object to that of the blue object - this should also get the two position versus time graphs to match. Then, predict what the velocity and acceleration graphs look like, by sliding the end points of the red lines up or down to give correct straight-line graphs. The Graph Matching Motion model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_vector_graph_matching.jar file will run the program if Java is installed.

Duffy, Andrew

2010-05-02

139

Map Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Map Skill Activities Map Skills Follow the directions below and write your answers on the worksheet provided. 1. Continents Quiz: Continents Quiz 2. Latitude/Longitude Reviews latitude and longitude quiz latitude/longitude map game lat/long multiple choice quiz 3. Map Scale Map Scale Activity 4.Map Skills map skills game map skills quiz ...

Ali, Mrs.

2010-02-23

140

Functions and Models: Graphing Calculators and Computers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Describe some situations where naive interpretation of Maple's output may be misleading;Show an appropriate viewing rectangle for the graph of a given function;Plot a function using Maple;Compare local and global properties of a given function;Find the solutions of a given equation using Maple.

Freeze, Michael

2003-01-22

141

Knowing a lot for one's age: Vocabulary skill and not age is associated with anticipatory incremental sentence interpretation in children and adults  

PubMed Central

Adults can incrementally combine information from speech with astonishing speed in order to anticipate future words. Concurrently, a growing body of work suggests that vocabulary ability is crucially related to lexical processing skills in young children. However, relatively little is known about this relationship with predictive sentence processing in children or adults. We explore this question by comparing the degree to which an upcoming sentential Theme is anticipated by a combination of information from a preceding Agent and Action. 48 children, aged of 3 to 10, and 48 college-aged adults’ eye-movements were recorded as they looked at a four-alternative forced-choice display while they heard a sentence in which the object referred to one of the pictures (e.g. The pirate hides the treasure) in the presence of an Agent-related, Action-related and Unrelated distractor image. Pictures were rotated across stimuli so that, across all versions of the study, each picture appeared in all conditions, yielding a completely balanced within-subjects design. Adults and children very quickly made use of combinatory information as soon as it became available at the action to generate anticipatory looks to the target object. Speed of anticipatory fixations did not vary with age. However, when controlling for age, individuals with higher vocabularies were faster to look to the target than those with lower vocabulary scores. Together, these results support and extend current views of incremental processing in which adults and children make use of linguistic information to continuously update their mental representation of ongoing language. PMID:22632758

Borovsky, Arielle; Elman, Jeffrey; Fernald, Anne

2012-01-01

142

An algorithm for automatic reduction of complex signal flow graphs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computer algorithm is developed that provides efficient means to compute transmittances directly from a signal flow graph or a block diagram. Signal flow graphs are cast as directed graphs described by adjacency matrices. Nonsearch computation, designed for compilers without symbolic capability, is used to identify all arcs that are members of simple cycles for use with Mason's gain formula. The routine does not require the visual acumen of an interpreter to reduce the topology of the graph, and it is particularly useful for analyzing control systems described for computer analyses by means of interactive graphics.

Young, K. R.; Hoberock, L. L.; Thompson, J. G.

1976-01-01

143

Designing Better Graphs by Including Distributional Information and Integrating Words, Numbers, and Images  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Statistical graphs are commonly used in scientific publications. Unfortunately, graphs in psychology journals rarely portray distributional information beyond central tendency, and few graphs portray inferential statistics. Moreover, those that do portray inferential information generally do not portray it in a way that is useful for interpreting

Lane, David M.; Sandor, Aniko

2009-01-01

144

Beyond Slopes and Points: Teaching Students How Graphs Describe the Relationships between Scientific Pheomena  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs represent complex information. They show relationships and help students see patterns and compare data. Students often do not appreciate the illuminating power of graphs, interpreting them literally rather than as symbolic representations (Leinhardt, Zaslavsky, and Stein 1990). Students often read graphs point by point instead of seeing…

Harris, David; Gomez Zwiep, Susan

2013-01-01

145

Turning Spreadsheets into Graphs: An Information Technology Lesson in Whole Brain Thinking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We have concluded that teaching undergraduate students to use spreadsheet software to analyze, interpret, and communicate spreadsheet data through a graph is an information technology exercise in whole brain thinking. In investigating why our students have difficulty constructing proper graphs, we have discovered that graphing requires two…

Patterson, Thomas F.; Leonard, Jonathan G.

2005-01-01

146

Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs  

E-print Network

Spectral characterizations of sun graphs and broken sun graphs Romain Boulet 10 Dec 2009 Abstract- cyclic graphs. An odd (resp. even) sun is a graph obtained by appending a pendant vertex to each vertex of an odd (resp. even) cycle. A broken sun is a graph obtained by deleting pendant vertices of a sun

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

147

Graphing Your Social Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students analyze their social networks using graph theory. They gather data on their own social relationships, either from Facebook interactions or the interactions they have throughout the course of a day, recording it in Microsoft Excel and using Cytoscape (a free, downloadable application) to generate social network graphs that visually illustrate the key persons (nodes) and connections between them (edges). The nodes in the Cytoscape graphs are color-coded and sized according to the importance of the node (in this activity, nodes are people in students' social networks). After the analysis, the graphs are further examined to see what can be learned from the visual representation. Students gain practice with graph theory vocabulary, including node, edge, betweeness centrality and degree on interaction, and learn about a range of engineering applications of graph theory.

IMPART RET Program, College of Information Science & Technology,

148

Topologies on directed graphs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Given a directed graph, a natural topology is defined and relationships between standard topological properties and graph theoretical concepts are studied. In particular, the properties of connectivity and separatedness are investigated. A metric is introduced which is shown to be related to separatedness. The topological notions of continuity and homeomorphism. A class of maps is studied which preserve both graph and topological properties. Applications involving strong maps and contractions are also presented.

Lieberman, R. N.

1972-01-01

149

Graph 4.3  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Graph is "an open source application used to draw mathematical graphs in a coordinate system." Anyone who wants to draw graphs of functions will find this program useful. The program makes it very easy to visualize a function and paste it into another program. It is also possible to do some mathematical calculations on the functions. Visitors will find all sorts of helpful information about the software, its uses, history, and features following the links on the left side of the page.

Johansen, Ivan

2009-06-16

150

Fostering the Development of Quantitative Life Skills through Introductory Astronomy: Can it be Done?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present preliminary results from a student survey designed to test whether the all-important life skill of numeracy/quantitative literacy can be fostered and improved upon in college students through the vehicle of non-major introductory courses in Astronomy. Many instructors of introductory science courses for non-majors would state that a major goal of our classes is to teach our students to distinguish between science and pseudoscience, truth and fiction, in their everyday lives. It is difficult to believe that such a skill can truly be mastered without a fair amount of mathematical sophistication in the form of arithmetic, statistical and graph reading skills that many American college students unfortunately lack when they enter our classrooms. In teaching what is frequently their "terminal science course in life” can we instill in our students the numerical skills that they need to be savvy consumers, educated citizens and discerning interpreters of the ever-present polls, studies and surveys in which our society is awash? In what may well be their final opportunity to see applied mathematics in the classroom, can we impress upon them the importance of mathematical sophistication in interpreting the statistics that they are bombarded with by the media? Our study is in its second semester, and is designed to investigate to what extent it is possible to improve important quantitative skills in college students through a single semester introductory Astronomy course.

Follette, Katherine B.; McCarthy, D. W.

2012-01-01

151

Graph Generator Survey  

SciTech Connect

The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

Lothian, Josh [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Sarah S [ORNL] [ORNL; Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baker, Matthew B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schrock, Jonathan [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-12-01

152

Graphing Linear Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We graph equations to find where the line lies on the graph and thus are able to use this information to see or predict where it will cross at any given point. If you were absent or need a review you can watch the tutorial videos in our Holt on line text or you can read through this site. graphing equations tutorial If you need a review of the quadrants and points of the coordinate plane then work through these activities. Review of coordinate points and graphing. Please work through the activities ...

Arnold, Mrs.

2011-03-21

153

Beginning Algebra Tutorial: Reading Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tutorial from West Texas A&M University's Virtual Math Lab introduces bar graphs, line graphs, double line graphs and Venn diagrams to beginning algebra students. The unit explains each type of graph and includes examples. Students will use provided sample graphs to answer a series of questions about each example.

Seward, Kim

154

"What Does This Graph Mean?" Formative Assessment With Science Inquiry to Improve Data Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the use of formative assessment to improve three specific data analysis skills within the context of a high school chemistry class: graph interpretation, pattern recognition, and making conclusions based on data. Students need to be able to collect data, analyze that data, and produce accurate scientific explanations (NRC, 2011) if they want to be ready for college and careers after high school. This mixed methods study, performed in a high school chemistry classroom, investigated the impact of the formative assessment process on data analysis skills that require higher order thinking. We hypothesized that the use of evaluative feedback within the formative assessment process would improve specific data analysis skills. The evaluative feedback was given to the one group and withheld from the other for the first part of the study. The treatment group had statistically better data analysis skills after evaluative feedback over the control. While these results are promising, they must be considered preliminary due to a number of limitations involved in this study.

Leech, Andrea Dawn

155

FACTOR GRAPHS AND GRAPH ENSEMBLES {ch:Graphs}  

E-print Network

for expressing graphically the structure of de- pendencies among random variables: undirected (or directed graph language, because of its simplicity and flexibility. As argumented in the previous Chapters, we of error correcting codes, or in the study of disordered materials, or, finally, when studying random

Montanari, Annamaria

156

Graph concatenation for quantum codes  

E-print Network

Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the ...

Beigi, Salman

157

Rainbow Graphs and Switching Classes  

E-print Network

A rainbow graph is a graph that admits a vertex-coloring such that every color appears exactly once in the neighborhood of each vertex. We investigate some properties of rainbow graphs. In particular, we show that there ...

Oh, Suho

158

Vacuum Energy in Quantum Graphs  

E-print Network

We calculate the vacuum energy in quantum graphs. Vacuum energy arose in quantum physics but has an independent mathematical interest as a functional carrying information about the eigenvalue spectrum of a system. A quantum graph is a metric graph...

Wilson, Justin

2007-07-14

159

Graphing Current Drug Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Graphing Current Drug Data gives (1) some current views on the drug issue, (2) a history of drug use, (3) specific data on alcohol, caffeine, cocaine, marijuana and nicotine, and (4) data on high school drug trends from 1975-1985. The unit could supply graphing data for any math class 7-12, and could also be used in a social studies class.

2007-04-18

160

Walking Out Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Walking Out Graphs Lesson described here, students experience several types of representations used to describe motion, including words, sentences, equations, graphs, data tables, and actions. The most important theme of this lesson is that students have to understand the consistency among these representations and form the habit of…

Shen, Ji

2009-01-01

161

Remarks on Graph Complexity  

Microsoft Academic Search

We revisit the notion of graph complexity introduced by Pudlák, Rödl, and Savický [PRS]. Using their framework, we show that sufficiently strong superlinear monotone lower bounds for the very special class of 2-slice functions would imply superpolynomial lower bounds for some other functions. Given an n-vertex graph G, the corresponding 2-slice function f G on n variables evaluates to zero

Satyanarayana V. Lokam

162

Graphing with Colors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 5 minute video shows Heather Zemanek's 3rd grade class learning about bar graphs. The video shows short excerpts of the lesson and commentary by the teacher. Along with the video are downloadable attachments: the lesson plan and transcipt as Word Documents and two graph examples in PDF form.

2012-01-01

163

Graphing the Globe  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity about the relation between day length and temperature. In one team, learners will create and analyze a graph of hours of sunlight versus month of the year for a number of latitudes. In another team, learners will graph temperature versus month for the same latitudes. The teams then compare data and draw conclusions from their analyses.

164

Graph Theory Tutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site includes: Introduction to Graph Theory, Euler Circuits and Paths, Coloring Problems, and Adjacency Matrices (under construction). Each section consists of an interactive tutorial discussing the basic concepts of graph theory. This site is useful for high school and college students.

Caldwell, Chris

2003-10-10

165

Lesson 12: Graphing Parabolas  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The lesson begins with an exploration of the family of graphs of y = ax^2, with an emphasis on tracking the changes in the y-values for differing values of the parameter a. The vertical shifts of y = ax^2 + c follow, leading into the graphs of y = ax^2 + bx and the derivation of the formula for the vertex.

2011-01-01

166

Exploring Graphs: WYSIWYG.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Graphs from media sources and questions developed from them can be used in the middle school mathematics classroom. Graphs depict storage temperature on a milk carton; air pressure measurements on a package of shock absorbers; sleep-wake patterns of an infant; a dog's breathing patterns; and the angle, velocity, and radius of a leaning bicyclist…

Johnson, Millie

1997-01-01

167

Real World Graph Connectivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present the topic of graph connectivity along with a famous theorem of Menger in the real-world setting of the national computer network infrastructure of "National LambdaRail". We include a set of exercises where students reinforce their understanding of graph connectivity by analysing the "National LambdaRail" network. Finally, we give…

Lind, Joy; Narayan, Darren

2009-01-01

168

Spectral distances on graphs  

E-print Network

By assigning a probability measure via the spectrum of the normalized Laplacian to each graph and using L^p Wasserstein distances between probability measures, we define the corresponding spectral distances d_p on the set of all graphs. This approach can even be extended to measuring the distances between infinite graphs. We prove that the diameter of the set of graphs, as a pseudo-metric space equipped with d_1, is one. We further study the behavior of d_1 when the size of graphs tends to infinity by interlacing inequalities aiming at exploring large real networks. A monotonic relation between d_1 and the evolutionary distance of biological networks is observed in simulations.

Jiao Gu; Bobo Hua; Shiping Liu

2014-02-25

169

Developing Map Skills Using Computers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-assisted instruction can be valuable in the teaching and learning of skills associated with the reading and interpretation of maps. The purpose of this manual is to provide teachers with a resource guide for the development of students' map skills and understanding of world geography through the use of a computer. Several suggested…

New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Computer Information Services.

170

Partial cubes as subdivision graphs and as generalized Petersen graphs  

E-print Network

Partial cubes as subdivision graphs and as generalized Petersen graphs Sandi Klavzar Department email: alenka.lipovec@uni-mb.si Abstract Isometric subgraphs of hypercubes are known as partial cubes that for a connected graph G its subdivision graph is a partial cube if and only if every block of G is either a cycle

Klavzar, Sandi

171

Partial cubes as subdivision graphs and as generalized Petersen graphs  

E-print Network

Partial cubes as subdivision graphs and as generalized Petersen graphs Sandi KlavŸzar # Department email: alenka.lipovec@uni­mb.si Abstract Isometric subgraphs of hypercubes are known as partial cubes that for a connected graph G its subdivision graph is a partial cube if and only if every block of G is either a cycle

Klavzar, Sandi

172

Cliques in graphs  

E-print Network

Cliques in Graphs Siu Lun Allan Lo Christ’s College University of Cambridge A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 2010 Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work... at most n/2, so if k3(n, ?) = 0 then ? ? n/2. For n/2 ? ? ? 4n/5, I have evaluated kr(n, ?) and determined the struc- tures of the extremal graphs. For ? ? 4n/5, I give a conjecture on kr(n, ?), as well as the structures of these extremal graphs. Moreover...

Lo, Allan

2010-10-12

173

GraphState - a tool for graph identification and labelling  

E-print Network

We present python libraries for Feynman graphs manipulation. The key feature of these libraries is usage of generalization of graph representation offered by B. G. Nickel et al. In this approach graph is represented in some unique 'canonical' form that depends only on its combinatorial type. The uniqueness of graph representation gives an efficient way for isomorphism finding, searching for subgraphs and other graph manipulation tasks. Though offered libraries were originally designed for Feynman graphs, they might be useful for more general graph problems.

Batkovich, D; Kompaniets, M; Novikov, S

2014-01-01

174

The effect of real-time laboratory graphing on learning graphic representations of distance and velocity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses a study which assessed the effect of a brief kinematics unit on: (1) students' ability to translate between a physical event and the graphic representation of it, and; (2) the effect of real-time on graphing skills. Reports the success of the use of a microcomputer-based laboratory with graphing velocity and distance.

Brasell, Heather

2006-05-23

175

Novice Interpretations of Visual Representations of Geosciences Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Past cognition research of individual's perception and comprehension of bar and line graphs are substantive enough that they have resulted in the generation of graph design principles and graph comprehension theories; however, gaps remain in our understanding of how people process visual representations of data, especially of geologic and atmospheric data. This pilot project serves to build on others' prior research and begin filling the existing gaps. The primary objectives of this pilot project include: (i) design a novel data collection protocol based on a combination of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and eye-tracking tasks to investigate student data handling skills of simple to complex visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data, (ii) demonstrate that the protocol yields results that shed light on student data handling skills, and (iii) generate preliminary findings upon which tentative but perhaps helpful recommendations on how to more effectively present these data to the non-scientist community and teach essential data handling skills. An effective protocol for the combined use of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and computer-based eye-tracking tasks for investigating cognitive processes involved in perceiving, comprehending, and interpreting visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data is instrumental to future research in this area. The outcomes of this pilot study provide the foundation upon which future more in depth and scaled up investigations can build. Furthermore, findings of this pilot project are sufficient for making, at least, tentative recommendations that can help inform (i) the design of physical attributes of visual representations of data, especially more complex representations, that may aid in improving students' data handling skills and (ii) instructional approaches that have the potential to aid students in more effectively handling visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data that they might encounter in a course, television news, newspapers and magazines, and websites. Such recommendations would also be the potential subject of future investigations and have the potential to impact the design features when data is presented to the public and instructional strategies not only in geoscience courses but also other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses.

Burkemper, L. K.; Arthurs, L.

2013-12-01

176

Skill Set  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With competition to attract quality students into career and technical education programs and many entrants to the workforce inadequately prepared with employability skills, some community colleges have found a way to answer industry's call--they are launching SkillsUSA chapters on campus. In this article, the author features SkillsUSA, a…

Holdsworth, Tom

2007-01-01

177

Random Graph Processes Tamas Makai  

E-print Network

Random Graph Processes Tam´as Makai Thesis submitted to the University of London for the degree clearly stated. Signed: (Tam´as Makai) Date: #12;Summary This thesis deals with random graph processes. More precisely it deals with two random graph processes which create H-free graphs. The first

Sheldon, Nathan D.

178

Graph homomorphisms Peter J. Cameron  

E-print Network

Graph homomorphisms Peter J. Cameron Combinatorics Study Group Notes, September 2006 Abstract This is a brief introduction to graph homomorphisms, hopefully a prelude to a study of the paper [1]. 1 Homomorphisms A homomorphism from a graph G to a graph H is a map from V G to V H which takes edges to edges

Banaji,. Murad

179

Storytelling Graphs Paul C. Nichols  

E-print Network

Storytelling Graphs Paul C. Nichols Department of Computer Science University of California, San are computed to form the edges in what can be considered a "Storytelling Graph". This storytelling graph can is referred to in this report as a "Storytelling Graph". This project implements a web application to overcome

Wang, Deli

180

A Semantic Graph Query Language  

SciTech Connect

Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

Kaplan, I L

2006-10-16

181

Graph algorithms experimentation facility  

E-print Network

We provide a facility to experiment with graph algorithms. The facility is implemented as a client to XAGE, a software environment developed under the direction of Dr. James Abello. XAGE allows a user to visually animate algorithmic actions...

Sonom, Donald George

2012-06-07

182

Graph similarity and matching  

E-print Network

Measures of graph similarity have a broad array of applications, including comparing chemical structures, navigating complex networks like the World Wide Web, and more recently, analyzing different kinds of biological data. ...

Zager, Laura (Laura A.)

2005-01-01

183

Graph Theory with Applications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Written by J.A. Bondy and U.S.R. Murty of the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris, this online 270-page textbook presents graph theory and its applications. The topics covered here include connectivity, independent sets and cliques, and planar and directed graphs. Each chapter has a list of references for further information, and most have exercises. Visitors can find the solution to those exercises in the Appendices here.

Bondy, J. A. (John Adrian); Murty, U. S.

1969-12-31

184

The random graph revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

ly,this is a countable set with an asymmetric membership relation. Now forman undirected graph by symmetrising the relation; that is, x and y are adjacent(written x y) if either x 2 y or y 2 x.For the second graph, the vertices are the primes congruent to 1 mod 4. Letp q hold if p is a quadratic residue mod q.

Peter J. Cameron

2000-01-01

185

Graphing Trash Material (Illuminations)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson plan students gather data about the items that they would normally throw in the trash. Once students collect the data they create a bar graph to display the number and kinds of materials they discard and then use this data to create a plan to reduce garbage and help the environment. The lesson plan includes an activity sheet (PDF) for graphing data and extension activity suggestions.

2008-01-01

186

Create a Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This cost-free web page allows users to easily create and print graphs for use as visual communication tools. Choose from five graph types: bar, line, area, pie, and X/Y. Various patterns, colors, grids, and label choices are available to allow customization. A detailed tutorial explains which graphical representation is best for various types of applications and assists users in set-up. This resource is published by NCES, the National Center for Education Statistics.

2007-11-29

187

Statistics and Graphing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Statistics play a vital role in the scientific enterprise. This activity provides background information and tutorials on basic statistics (mean, median, standard deviation, etc.) used in science. Topics include descriptive statistics (measures of central tendency and dispersion) and presenting data (tables, figures, and graphs). Sample datasets from actual scientific experiments are used to illustrate points. Links to an online statisitical tool and an online graphing application are also provided.

Laposata, Matt

188

Guide to graphing data and taking action.  

PubMed

3 kinds of graphs are presented as instructional examples of how to display data collected on family planning (FP) programs. The first is a trend analysis of new acceptors and requires monthly summaries of new acceptors serviced by the clinic. The objective is to gauge declines or increases over time in new acceptors for each contraceptive method offered. The second graph requires a monthly summary of new acceptors by method mix. The third graph needs data on the reason for attending the particular FP clinic. IEC activities can be enhanced with this information. In the example for graph 1, new acceptors over an 18-month-period are plotted on one axis by monthly units, and the other axis by number of new acceptors. The connection of dots reflects the trend over time. There is a specific example with data from Yena clinic over a 12-month-period; the interpretations and possible actions are indicated. Instructions for presenting a pie chart are also given for new acceptors by method mix; the example is given for data from Yena Clinic and possible interpretations and actions are indicated. A visual presentation of the data worksheet needed for a pie chart is provided. Calculations must be made for the fraction of new acceptors out of total acceptors and the percent of total new acceptors for each method. An explanation is given for constructing a bar chart; again an example is given of a completed bar chart with data and the accompanying data sheet. A checklist identifies important guidelines for developing and using line graphs, bar charts, and pie charts. PMID:12318345

1992-01-01

189

Resistance distances in composite graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resistance distance between any two vertices of a connected graph is defined as the effective resistance between them in the electrical network constructed from the graph by replacing each edge with a (unit) resistor. Let G+H, G × H, G[H], G\\otimes H, G\\;\\boxtimes \\;H, G\\circ H and G\\{H\\} be the join, product, composition, direct product, strong product, corona and rooted product of two graphs G and H, respectively. In this paper, formulae for resistance distances of these composite graphs are given in terms of parameters of the parent graphs, and some properties are established. Explicit formulae are obtained for resistance distances of some classes of graphs, including rook graphs, diagonal mesh graphs and generalized double graphs.

Yang, Yujun; Klein, Douglas J.

2014-09-01

190

National Association for Interpretation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NAI promotes the advancement of the profession of interpretation, a communication process used in on-site informal education programs at parks, zoos, nature centers, historic sites, museums, and aquaria. This site announces national and regional NAI conferences, workshops on diverse topics, skill certification programs, networking opportunities and job listing service. Includes membership information and application; can order newsletters, professional journals and books. Membership, program and publication fees apply.

191

Gaining a Better Understanding of Estuarine Circulation and Improving Data Visualization Skills Through a Hands-on Contouring Exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The creation and accurate interpretation of graphs is becoming a lost art among students. The availability of numerous graphing software programs makes the act of graphing data easy but does not necessarily aide students in interpreting complex visual data. This is especially true for contour maps; which have become a critical skill in the earth sciences and everyday life. In multiple classes, we have incorporated a large-scale, hands-on, contouring exercise of temperature, salinity, and density data collected in the Hudson River Estuary. The exercise allows students to learn first-hand how to plot, analyze, and present three dimensional data. As part of a day-long sampling expedition aboard an 80' research vessel, students deploy a water profiling instrument (Seabird CTD). Data are collected along a transect between the Verrazano and George Washington Bridges. The data are then processed and binned at 0.5 meter intervals. The processed data is then used during a later laboratory period for the contouring exercise. In class, students work in groups of 2 to 4 people and are provided with the data, a set of contouring instructions, a piece of large (3' x 3') graph paper, a ruler, and a set of colored markers. We then let the groups work together to determine the details of the graphs. Important steps along the way are talking to the students about X and Y scales, interpolation, and choices of contour intervals and colors. Frustration and bottlenecks are common at the beginning when students are unsure how to even begin with the raw data. At some point during the exercise, students start to understand the contour concept and each group usually produces a finished contour map in an hour or so. Interestingly, the groups take pride in the coloring portion of the contouring as it indicates successful interpretation of the data. The exercise concludes with each group presenting and discussing their contour plot. In almost every case, the hands-on graphing has improved the "students" visualization skills. Contouring has been incorporated into the River Summer (www.riversumer.org, http://www.riversumer.org/) program and our Environmental Measurements laboratory course. This has resulted in the exercise being utilized with undergraduates, high-school teachers, graduate students, and college faculty. We are in the process of making this curricular module available online to educators.

Mailloux, B. J.; Kenna, T. C.

2008-12-01

192

Using graph approach for managing connectivity in integrative landscape modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In cultivated landscapes, a lot of landscape elements such as field boundaries, ditches or banks strongly impact water flows, mass and energy fluxes. At the watershed scale, these impacts are strongly conditionned by the connectivity of these landscape elements. An accurate representation of these elements and of their complex spatial arrangements is therefore of great importance for modelling and predicting these impacts.We developped in the framework of the OpenFLUID platform (Software Environment for Modelling Fluxes in Landscapes) a digital landscape representation that takes into account the spatial variabilities and connectivities of diverse landscape elements through the application of the graph theory concepts. The proposed landscape representation consider spatial units connected together to represent the flux exchanges or any other information exchanges. Each spatial unit of the landscape is represented as a node of a graph and relations between units as graph connections. The connections are of two types - parent-child connection and up/downstream connection - which allows OpenFLUID to handle hierarchical graphs. Connections can also carry informations and graph evolution during simulation is possible (connections or elements modifications). This graph approach allows a better genericity on landscape representation, a management of complex connections and facilitate development of new landscape representation algorithms. Graph management is fully operational in OpenFLUID for developers or modelers ; and several graph tools are available such as graph traversal algorithms or graph displays. Graph representation can be managed i) manually by the user (for example in simple catchments) through XML-based files in easily editable and readable format or ii) by using methods of the OpenFLUID-landr library which is an OpenFLUID library relying on common open-source spatial libraries (ogr vector, geos topologic vector and gdal raster libraries). OpenFLUID-landr library has been developed in order i) to be used with no GIS expert skills needed (common gis formats can be read and simplified spatial management is provided), ii) to easily develop adapted rules of landscape discretization and graph creation to follow spatialized model requirements and iii) to allow model developers to manage dynamic and complex spatial topology. Graph management in OpenFLUID are shown with i) examples of hydrological modelizations on complex farmed landscapes and ii) the new implementation of Geo-MHYDAS tool based on the OpenFLUID-landr library, which allows to discretize a landscape and create graph structure for the MHYDAS model requirements.

Rabotin, Michael; Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Libres, Aline; Lagacherie, Philippe; Crevoisier, David; Moussa, Roger

2013-04-01

193

Shop Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Shop Skills is a lesson plan which provides instruction in the safety procedures and work processes for hand and machine tools used in a metal machine shop. Specific skills include sawing, drilling, boring, grinding, lathing, and milling. After completing this module, students should be able to demonstrate proficiency in these skills through a variety of shop projects and in a final exercise that uses a combination of these skills. Note: This module is part of a modularized manufacturing technology curriculum created by the PSCME, found at www.pscme.org/educators.html.

2010-07-22

194

Graph Concatenation for Quantum Codes  

E-print Network

Graphs are closely related to quantum error-correcting codes: every stabilizer code is locally equivalent to a graph code, and every codeword stabilized code can be described by a graph and a classical code. For the construction of good quantum codes of relatively large block length, concatenated quantum codes and their generalizations play an important role. We develop a systematic method for constructing concatenated quantum codes based on "graph concatenation", where graphs representing the inner and outer codes are concatenated via a simple graph operation called "generalized local complementation." Our method applies to both binary and non-binary concatenated quantum codes as well as their generalizations.

Salman Beigi; Isaac Chuang; Markus Grassl; Peter Shor; Bei Zeng

2009-10-21

195

Graph Theory Tutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Chris Caldwell of the University of Tennessee at Martin provides the Graph Theory Tutorials Website. Sections included at the site are Introduction to Graph Theory, Euler Circuits and Paths, Coloring Problems, and Adjacency Matrices (under construction). Each section consists of an interactive tutorial discussing the basic concepts of graph theory. Registration (press the REGISTER button at the bottom of first page of each tutorial) is required for each tutorial. The user must either pass a quiz in the tutorial section or write a comment before continuing to the next page. Links to related resources are also provided at the site. This site is useful for high school students and is definitely worth a visit.

196

Graph Theory Tutorials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Chris Caldwell of the University of Tennessee at Martin provides the Graph Theory Tutorials Website. Sections included at the site are Introduction to Graph Theory, Euler Circuits and Paths, Coloring Problems, and Adjacency Matrices (under construction). Each section consists of an interactive tutorial discussing the basic concepts of graph theory. Registration (press the REGISTER button at the bottom of first page of each tutorial) is required for each tutorial. The user must either pass a quiz in the tutorial section or write a comment before continuing to the next page. Links to related resources are also provided at the site. This site is useful for high school students and is definitely worth a visit.

Caldwell, Chris K.

2007-03-09

197

Study Skills Mastery among Middle and High School Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A representative sample of study skills necessary for using maps, graphs and tables, and references was selected, and criterion-referenced tests assessing those skills were administered to sixth, ninth, and twelfth graders. Because the tests were criterion-referenced, no time limits were set and all students had ample opportunity to complete each…

Kamm, Karlyn; And Others

198

Graphing Stratospheric Ozone  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is part of the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) project, funded by NASA, which is a national consortium of scientists, museums, and educators working together to bring the latest science to students, teachers, and the general public. This lesson uses NASA images of Antarctic ozone (from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, or TOMS) to motivate a how-to graphing lesson followed by more sophisticated examples of graphing using images from the Neumayer Antarctic Station. Links are provided for investigating current knowledge of the ozone layer, and the impact of human activity on this vital part of the Earth system.

Fetter, Neil

199

Graphing Calculator Mini Course  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The "Graphing Calculator Mini Course" project provided a mathematically-intensive technologically-based summer enrichment workshop for teachers of American Indian students on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Eleven such teachers participated in the six-day workshop in summer of 1996 and three Sunday workshops in the academic year. The project aimed to improve science and mathematics education on the reservation by showing teachers effective ways to use high-end graphing calculators as teaching and learning tools in science and mathematics courses at all levels. In particular, the workshop concentrated on applying TI-82's user-friendly features to understand the various mathematical and scientific concepts.

Karnawat, Sunil R.

1996-01-01

200

Project on Teaching Charts and Graphs to ABE Students. Part I: Teacher's Guide [and] Part II: Transparency Assembly Package.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teacher's guide and collection of transparency masters are designed for use in teaching adult basic education (ABE) students how to read and interpret graphs and charts. Covered in the individual lessons of the instructional unit are the reading and interpretation of charts as well as picture, line, bar, and circle graphs. Each unit contains a…

Renton Vocational Inst., WA.

201

Rainbow Coloring of Graphs Rainbow Coloring of Graphs  

E-print Network

Rainbow Coloring of Graphs Rainbow Coloring of Graphs L. Sunil Chandran Computer Science and Automation Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore Email: sunil@csa.iisc.ernet.in #12;Rainbow Coloring of Graphs What is Rainbow Coloring? Consider an edge coloring, not necessarily proper. #12;Rainbow Coloring

Narasayya, Vivek

202

Interpreting recent carbon dioxide data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using web-accessed climate data, students will examine the latitudinal distribution of CO2 and explain how (and why) that has changed over (recent) time. They will then work in groups of two or three to download, graph, and interpret carbon dioxide concentration data from one individual location (different groups will be assigned a different site). Each student will complete a series of questions to ensure their understanding of the concepts outlined above.

Gordon, Elizabeth

203

Court Interpreter Training in the Language Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of demographic studies and statistics from state and federal courts indicate a growing need for Spanish-English court interpreters with special training in consecutive and simultaneous court interpretation. The five strongest skills which need to be taught in a court interpreter training program are identified and suggestions are given on…

Stromberg, Wayne H.; Head, Gerald L.

1984-01-01

204

Turning spreadsheets into graphs: An information technology lesson in whole brain thinking  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have Concluded that teaching undergraduate students to use spreadsheet software to analyze, interpret, and communicate\\u000a spreadsheet data through a graph is an information technology exercise in whole brain thinking. In investigating why our students\\u000a have difficulty constructing proper graphs, we have discovered that graphing requires two different types of thinking: analytical,\\u000a logical thinking for working with data and choosing

Thomas F. Patterson; Jonathan G. Leonard

2005-01-01

205

Topic in Depth - Graph Theory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Graph theory is widely used in computer science, engineering and of course, mathematics. Here, visitors will find links to information about the applications and components of graph theory, as well as its pioneers.

2010-09-13

206

Graph for locked rotor current  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Graph determines effect of stalled motor on a distribution system and eliminates hand calculation of amperage in emergencies. Graph is useful to any manufacturer, contractor, or maintenance department involved in electrical technology.

Peck, R. R.

1972-01-01

207

Spectral Techniques in Graph Algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existence of ecient algorithms to compute the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of graphs supplies a useful tool for the design of various graph algorithms. In this survey we describe several algorithms based on spectral techniques focusing on their

Noga Alon; Beverly Sackler

1998-01-01

208

Quantitative Literacy: Working with Log Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The need for working with and understanding different types of graphs is a common occurrence in everyday life. Examples include anything having to do investments, being an educated juror in a case that involves evidence presented graphically, and understanding many aspect of our current political discourse. Within a science class graphs play a crucial role in presenting and interpreting data. In astronomy, where the range of graphed values is many orders of magnitude, log-axes must be used and understood. Experience shows that students do not understand how to read and interpret log-axes or how they differ from linear. Alters (1996), in a study of college students in an algebra-based physics class, found little understanding of log plotting. The purpose of this poster is to show the method and progression I have developed for use in my “ASTRO 101” class, with the goal being to help students better understand the H-R diagram, mass-luminosity relationship, and digital spectra.

Shawl, S.

2013-04-01

209

Algorithms for string and graph layout  

E-print Network

Many graph optimization problems can be viewed as graph layout problems. A layout of a graph is a geometric arrangement of the vertices subject to given constraints. For example, the vertices of a graph can be arranged on ...

Newman, Alantha.

2004-01-01

210

Self-testing graph states  

E-print Network

We give a construction for a self-test for any connected graph state. In other words, for each connected graph state we give a set of non-local correlations that can only be achieved (quantumly) by that particular graph state and certain local measurements. The number of correlations considered is small, being linear in the number of vertices in the graph. We also prove robustness for the test.

Matthew McKague

2010-10-11

211

Quantum walks on quotient graphs  

SciTech Connect

A discrete-time quantum walk on a graph {gamma} is the repeated application of a unitary evolution operator to a Hilbert space corresponding to the graph. If this unitary evolution operator has an associated group of symmetries, then for certain initial states the walk will be confined to a subspace of the original Hilbert space. Symmetries of the original graph, given by its automorphism group, can be inherited by the evolution operator. We show that a quantum walk confined to the subspace corresponding to this symmetry group can be seen as a different quantum walk on a smaller quotient graph. We give an explicit construction of the quotient graph for any subgroup H of the automorphism group and illustrate it with examples. The automorphisms of the quotient graph which are inherited from the original graph are the original automorphism group modulo the subgroup H used to construct it. The quotient graph is constructed by removing the symmetries of the subgroup H from the original graph. We then analyze the behavior of hitting times on quotient graphs. Hitting time is the average time it takes a walk to reach a given final vertex from a given initial vertex. It has been shown in earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 74, 042334 (2006)] that the hitting time for certain initial states of a quantum walks can be infinite, in contrast to classical random walks. We give a condition which determines whether the quotient graph has infinite hitting times given that they exist in the original graph. We apply this condition for the examples discussed and determine which quotient graphs have infinite hitting times. All known examples of quantum walks with hitting times which are short compared to classical random walks correspond to systems with quotient graphs much smaller than the original graph; we conjecture that the existence of a small quotient graph with finite hitting times is necessary for a walk to exhibit a quantum speedup.

Krovi, Hari; Brun, Todd A. [Communication Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

2007-06-15

212

Lesson 3: Graphs and Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson begins with linear equations and inequalities in 1 variable and then moves on to linear equations in 2 variables. Graphs of linear equations in 2 variables are introduced as "a picture of all its solutions." Exercises targeting the links between equations, solutions, points, and graphs follows, with the final activities focusing on use of a graphing calculator to graph equations and find coordinates. There aren't any application problems in this lesson.

2011-01-01

213

Bondage number of planar graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bondage number b(G) of a nonempty graph G is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from G results in a graph with a domination number greater than the domination number of G. In this paper, we prove that b(G)?min{8,?(G)+2} for a planar graph G and b(G)?3 for a graph G with forbidden minor K4.

Liying Kang; Jinjiang Yuan

2000-01-01

214

Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

2007-08-07

215

Graphing Fall Leaves  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this biology lab extension, student will have already collected leaves from the playground and surrounding school areas and sorted them into categories according to leaf properties. Students will use the leave classifications/ sorts to graph the properties of the leaves.

Depeel, Bonnie

216

Investigating Motion - Graphing Speed  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This introduction to motion activity has students exploring speed and acceleration using a wheeled office chair and rope to pull a student a given distance and record the time. The results are graphed and different outcomes are predicted when variables are changed.

217

Coloring geographical threshold graphs  

SciTech Connect

We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Muller, Tobias [EINDHOVEN UNIV. OF TECH

2008-01-01

218

Graph-theoretical exorcism  

SciTech Connect

Given a graph G and an ordering phi of the vertices, V(G), we define a parsimonious proper coloring (PPC) of V(G) under phi to be a proper coloring of V(G) in the order phi, where a new color is introduced only when a vertex cannot be properly colored in its order with any of the colors already used.

Simmons, G.J.

1985-01-01

219

New Conic Graph Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two new types of graph paper are described; focus-focus conic paper and focus-directrix paper. Both types make it easier to draw families of conics. Suggestions for further work are given as is a method for establishing a connection with other ways of looking at the conic sections. (LS)

Rose, Kenneth

1974-01-01

220

Physics on Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is an extended version of the talk given at the Nato Advanced Research Workshop: New Challenges in Complex System Physics, May 20-24, 2013 in Samarkand (Uzbekistan). We report on results on three topics in joint work with V. Kostrykin (Mainz, Germany) and J. Potthoff (Mannheim, Germany): Propagation of waves on graphs,

Schrader, Robert

221

Restrained bondage in graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Let G = (V,E) be a graph. A set S V is a restrained dominating set if every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex in S and to a vertex in V S. The restrained domination number of G, denoted by r(G), is the smallest cardinality of a restrained dominating set of G. We define the restrained

Johannes H. Hattingh; Andrew R. Plummer

2008-01-01

222

Liar's domination in graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assume that each vertex of a graph G is the possible location for an “intruder” such as a thief, or a saboteur, a fire in a facility or some possible processor fault in a computer network. A device at a vertex v is assumed to be able to detect the intruder at any vertex in its closed neighborhood N[v]and to

Miranda L. Roden; Peter J. Slater

2009-01-01

223

Kevin Bacon and Graph Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The interconnected world of actors and movies is a familiar, rich example for graph theory. This paper gives the history of the "Kevin Bacon Game" and makes extensive use of a Web site to analyze the underlying graph. The main content is the classroom development of the weighted average to determine the best choice of "center" for the graph. The…

Hopkins, Brian

2004-01-01

224

Editing graphs for maximum effect  

SciTech Connect

The paper contains over eighty rules for editing graphs, arranged under nine major headings in a logical sequence for editing all the graphs in a manuscript. It is excerpted from a monograph used at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to train beginning technical editors in editing graphs; a corresponding Hypercard stack is also used in this training. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Murphy, P.W.; Rhiner, R.W.

1991-01-08

225

Dependence graphs and compiler optimizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dependence graphs can be used as a vehicle for formulating and implementing compiler optimizations. This paper defines such graphs and discusses two kinds of transformations. The first are simple rewriting transformations that remove dependence arcs. The second are abstraction transformations that deal more globally with a dependence graph. These transformations have been implemented and applied to several different types of

David J. Kuck; Robert H. Kuhn; David A. Padua; Bruce Leasure; Michael Wolfe

1981-01-01

226

A Note on Hamiltonian Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 1952, several well-known graph theorists have proven numerous results regarding Hamiltonian graphs. In fact, many elementary graph theory textbooks contain the theorems of Ore, Bondy and Chvatal, Chvatal and Erdos, Posa, and Dirac, to name a few. In this note, the authors state and prove some propositions of their own concerning Hamiltonian…

Skurnick, Ronald; Davi, Charles; Skurnick, Mia

2005-01-01

227

Tools for Large Graph Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Graphs show up in a surprisingly diverse set of disciplines, ranging from computer networks to sociology, biology, ecology and many more. How do such “normal” graphs look like? How can we spot abnormal subgraphs within them? Which nodes\\/edges are “suspicious?” How does a virus spread over a graph? Answering these questions is vital for outlier detection (such as terrorist

Deepayan Chakrabarti

228

It is Graph-Tastic!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use your knowledge of coordinates to play these graphing games! Have fun playing Driving Down the Grid. You must drive your car to the given coordinate. Make sure you do not crash into anything! Play Graph Mole for even more graphing fun! A farmer is trying to plant vegetables, until some pesky moles try to eat them. Choose with coordinate that the mole ...

Justin, Ms.

2011-10-21

229

Succinct Representation of Separable Graphs  

E-print Network

Guy E. Blelloch Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University #12;Overview · Preliminaries S S G1 G2 Separator S: · A family of graphs G is defined as separable if: #12;Separable Graphs Definition A B A B S G S S G1 G2 Separator S: · A family of graphs G is defined as separable if

Lonardi, Stefano

230

Densities in graphs and matroids  

E-print Network

Certain graphs can be described by the distribution of the edges in its subgraphs. For example, a cycle C is a graph that satisfies |E(H)| |V (H)| trivial subgraphs of C. Similarly, a tree T is a graph that satisfies...

Kannan, Lavanya

2009-05-15

231

Mississippi State Physics Labs: Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This inquiry-based lab for introductory physics courses explores the purpose of graphs. Students measure simple circular objects and blocks, graph the data, and look for relationships in the graphs. The lab was designed to help students discover the advantage of using graphical representations to understand numerical relationships. This material is part of a larger collection of introductory physics labs.

Ferguson, Joe; Denson, Jack

2008-09-08

232

SimGraph: A Flight Simulation Data Visualization Workstation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Today's modern flight simulation research produces vast amounts of time sensitive data, making a qualitative analysis of the data difficult while it remains in a numerical representation. Therefore, a method of merging related data together and presenting it to the user in a more comprehensible format is necessary. Simulation Graphics (SimGraph) is an object-oriented data visualization software package that presents simulation data in animated graphical displays for easy interpretation. Data produced from a flight simulation is presented by SimGraph in several different formats, including: 3-Dimensional Views, Cockpit Control Views, Heads-Up Displays, Strip Charts, and Status Indicators. SimGraph can accommodate the addition of new graphical displays to allow the software to be customized to each user s particular environment. A new display can be developed and added to SimGraph without having to design a new application, allowing the graphics programmer to focus on the development of the graphical display. The SimGraph framework can be reused for a wide variety of visualization tasks. Although it was created for the flight simulation facilities at NASA Langley Research Center, SimGraph can be reconfigured to almost any data visualization environment. This paper describes the capabilities and operations of SimGraph.

Kaplan, Joseph A.; Kenney, Patrick S.

1997-01-01

233

Towards Graph Containment Search and Indexing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given a set of model graphs D and a query graph q, con- tainment search aims to find all model graphs g ? D such that q contains g (q ? g). Due to the wide adoption of graph models, fast containment search of graph data finds many applications in various domains. In comparison to tra- ditional graph search that

Chen Chen; Xifeng Yan; Philip S. Yu; Jiawei Han; Dong-qing Zhang; Xiaohui Gu

2007-01-01

234

The Effects of Data and Graph Type on Concepts and Visualizations of Variability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing and interpreting variability in data lies at the heart of statistical reasoning. Since graphical displays should facilitate communication about data, statistical literacy should include an understanding of how variability in data can be gleaned from a graph. This paper identifies several types of graphs that students typically…

Cooper, Linda L.; Shore, Felice S.

2010-01-01

235

A comparison of auditory and visual graphs for use in physics and mathematics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to interpret graphical information is a prime concern in physics as graphs are widely used to give quick summaries of data sets, for pattern recognition, and for analysis of information. While visual graphs have been developed so that their content can be readily and concisely discerned, there is great difficulty when someone is unable, because of their environment

Steven Carl Sahyun

1999-01-01

236

Student difficulties in connecting graphs and physics: Examples from kinematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Some common errors exhibited by students in interpreting graphs in physics are illustrated by examples from kinematics. These are taken from the results of a descriptive study extending over a period of several years and involving several hundred university students who were enrolled in a laboratory-based preparatory physics course. Subsequent testing indicated that the graphing errors made by this group of students are not idiosyncratic, but are found in different populations and across different levels of sophistication. This paper examines two categories of difficulty identified in the investigation: difficulty in connecting graphs to physical concepts and difficulty in connecting graphs to the real world. Specific difficulties in each category are discussed in terms of student performance on written problems and laboratory experiments. A few of the instructional strategies that have been designed to address some of these difficulties are described.

Mcdermott, Lillian C.; Rosenquist, Mark; Van Zee, Emily

2005-10-27

237

Modified risk graph method using fuzzy rule-based approach.  

PubMed

The risk graph is one of the most popular methods used to determine the safety integrity level for safety instrumented functions. However, conventional risk graph as described in the IEC 61508 standard is subjective and suffers from an interpretation problem of risk parameters. Thus, it can lead to inconsistent outcomes that may result in conservative SILs. To overcome this difficulty, a modified risk graph using fuzzy rule-based system is proposed. This novel version of risk graph uses fuzzy scales to assess risk parameters and calibration may be made by varying risk parameter values. Furthermore, the outcomes which are numerical values of risk reduction factor (the inverse of the probability of failure on demand) can be compared directly with those given by quantitative and semi-quantitative methods such as fault tree analysis (FTA), quantitative risk assessment (QRA) and layers of protection analysis (LOPA). PMID:18835093

Nait-Said, R; Zidani, F; Ouzraoui, N

2009-05-30

238

Quantum chaos on discrete graphs  

E-print Network

Adapting a method developed for the study of quantum chaos on {\\it quantum (metric)} graphs \\cite {KS}, spectral $\\zeta$ functions and trace formulae for {\\it discrete} Laplacians on graphs are derived. This is achieved by expressing the spectral secular equation in terms of the periodic orbits of the graph, and obtaining functions which belongs to the class of $\\zeta$ functions proposed originally by Ihara \\cite {Ihara}, and expanded by subsequent authors \\cite {Stark,Sunada}. Finally, a model of "classical dynamics" on the discrete graph is proposed. It is analogous to the corresponding classical dynamics derived for quantum graphs \\cite {KS}.

Uzy Smilansky

2007-04-26

239

Exploring Data Display and Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This learning unit from Math Interactives demonstrates data display and graphs. A video is included which explains the role graphs have in the retail world. The interactive portion of the learning unit has students compare line graphs, bar graphs and circle graphs. They will compare two different data displays and determine if they represent the same data. This lesson will help students understand that the same data may be demonstrated in vastly different ways, and the importance of how data is displayed. A print version of the activity is available for download in Microsoft Word and PDF file formats.

2012-08-06

240

Spectral fluctuations of quantum graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We prove the Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture in its most general form for completely connected simple graphs with incommensurate bond lengths. We show that for graphs that are classically mixing (i.e., graphs for which the spectrum of the classical Perron-Frobenius operator possesses a finite gap), the generating functions for all (P,Q) correlation functions for both closed and open graphs coincide (in the limit of infinite graph size) with the corresponding expressions of random-matrix theory, both for orthogonal and for unitary symmetry.

Pluha?, Z.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

2014-10-01

241

Range charts and no-space graphs  

USGS Publications Warehouse

No-space graphs present one solution to the familiar problem: given data on the occurrence of fossil taxa in separate, well-sampled sections, determine a range chart; that is, a reasonable working hypothesis of the total range in the area in question of each taxon studied. The solution presented here treats only the relative sequence of biostratigraphic events (first and last occurrences of taxa) and does not attempt to determine an amount of spacing between events. Relative to a hypothesized sequence, observed events in any section may be in-place or out-of-place. Out-of-place events may indicate (1) the event in question reflects a taxon that did not fill its entire range (unfilled-range event), or (2) the event in question indicates a need for the revision of the hypothesized sequence. A graph of relative position only (no-space graph) can be used to facilitate the recognition of in-place and out-of-place events by presenting a visual comparison of the observations from each section with the hypothesized sequence. The geometry of the graph as constructed here is such that in-place events will lie along a line series and out-of-place events will lie above or below it. First-occurrence events below the line series and last-occurrence events above the line series indicate unfilled ranges. First-occurrence events above the line series and last-occurrence events below the line series indicate a need for the revision of the hypothesis. Knowing this, the stratigrapher considers alternative positionings of the line series as alternative range hypotheses and seeks the line series that best fits his geologic and paleontologic judgment. No-space graphs are used to revise an initial hypothesis until a final hypothesis is reached. In this final hypothesis every event is found in-place in at least one section, and all events in all sections may be interpreted to represent in-place events or unfilled-range events. No event may indicate a need for further range revision. The application of the no-space graph method requires the assumption of lack of reworking and the assumption that taxa that are present in a single horizon indicate taxa whose ranges overlap. When applied to hypothetical and actual data, the no-space graph technique produces geologically reasonable range charts that compare favorably with results produced by other methods. ?? 1978.

Edwards, L.E.

1978-01-01

242

Complexity of Graph State Preparation  

E-print Network

The graph state formalism is a useful abstraction of entanglement. It is used in some multipartite purification schemes and it adequately represents universal resources for measurement-only quantum computation. We focus in this paper on the complexity of graph state preparation. We consider the number of ancillary qubits, the size of the primitive operators, and the duration of preparation. For each lexicographic order over these parameters we give upper and lower bounds for the complexity of graph state preparation. The first part motivates our work and introduces basic notions and notations for the study of graph states. Then we study some graph properties of graph states, characterizing their minimal degree by local unitary transformations, we propose an algorithm to reduce the degree of a graph state, and show the relationship with Sutner sigma-game. These properties are used in the last part, where algorithms and lower bounds for each lexicographic order over the considered parameters are presented.

Mehdi Mhalla; Simon Perdrix

2004-12-09

243

Concord Consortium: SmartGraphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the portal to SmartGraphs, a project developed to promote learner understanding of graph functions through use of interactive digital graphing tools. The project goals are threefold: 1) Development of free digital graphing activities which are scaffolded to allow learner inputs, 2) Classroom testing of the graphing tools to document their effectiveness, and 3) Dissemination of free authoring tools for teachers to allow creation and sharing of new activities as open education resources. Each activity includes the interactive activity, lesson plan, and assessment with answer key. Users must register to access full functionality of all the tools available with SmartGraphs, which include graph sketching, acquiring and sharing real-time data, creating databases for classroom record-keeping and assessment, and access to authoring tools. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology. The Concord Consortium develops deeply digital learning innovations for science, mathematics, and engineering.

2012-04-25

244

From Graph States to Two-Graph States  

E-print Network

The name graph state is used to describe a certain class of pure quantum state which models a physical structure on which one can perform measurement-based quantum computing, and which has a natural graphical description. We present the two-graph state, this being a generalisation of the graph state and a two-graph representation of a stabilizer state. Mathematically, the two-graph state can be viewed as a simultaneous generalisation of a binary linear code and quadratic Boolean function. It describes precisely the coefficients of the pure quantum state vector resulting from the action of a member of the local Clifford group on a graph state, and comprises a graph which encodes the magnitude properties of the state, and a graph encoding its phase properties. This description facilitates a computationally efficient spectral analysis of the graph state with respect to operations from the local Clifford group on the state, as all operations can be realised graphically. By focusing on the so-called local transform group, which is a size 3 cyclic subgroup of the local Clifford group over one qubit, and over $n$ qubits is of size $3^n$, we can efficiently compute spectral properties of the graph state.

Constanza Riera; Stephane Jacob; Matthew G. Parker

2008-01-30

245

Graph Theoretical Model of a Sensorimotor Connectome in Zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Mapping the detailed connectivity patterns (connectomes) of neural circuits is a central goal of neuroscience. The best quantitative approach to analyzing connectome data is still unclear but graph theory has been used with success. We present a graph theoretical model of the posterior lateral line sensorimotor pathway in zebrafish. The model includes 2,616 neurons and 167,114 synaptic connections. Model neurons represent known cell types in zebrafish larvae, and connections were set stochastically following rules based on biological literature. Thus, our model is a uniquely detailed computational representation of a vertebrate connectome. The connectome has low overall connection density, with 2.45% of all possible connections, a value within the physiological range. We used graph theoretical tools to compare the zebrafish connectome graph to small-world, random and structured random graphs of the same size. For each type of graph, 100 randomly generated instantiations were considered. Degree distribution (the number of connections per neuron) varied more in the zebrafish graph than in same size graphs with less biological detail. There was high local clustering and a short average path length between nodes, implying a small-world structure similar to other neural connectomes and complex networks. The graph was found not to be scale-free, in agreement with some other neural connectomes. An experimental lesion was performed that targeted three model brain neurons, including the Mauthner neuron, known to control fast escape turns. The lesion decreased the number of short paths between sensory and motor neurons analogous to the behavioral effects of the same lesion in zebrafish. This model is expandable and can be used to organize and interpret a growing database of information on the zebrafish connectome. PMID:22624008

Stobb, Michael; Peterson, Joshua M.; Mazzag, Borbala; Gahtan, Ethan

2012-01-01

246

Balanced Allocation on Graphs  

E-print Network

It is well known that if n balls are inserted into n bins, with high probability, the bin with maximum load contains (1 + o(1))log n / loglog n balls. Azar, Broder, Karlin, and Upfal [1] showed that instead of choosing one bin, if d ? 2 bins are chosen at random and the ball inserted into the least loaded of the d bins, the maximum load reduces drastically to log log n / log d+O(1). In this paper, we study the two choice balls and bins process when balls are not allowed to choose any two random bins, but only bins that are connected by an edge in an underlying graph. We show that for n balls and n bins, if the graph is almost regular with degree n ?, where ? is not too small, the previous bounds on the maximum load continue to hold. Precisely, the maximum load is

Krishnaram Kenthapadi; Rina Panigrahy

2006-01-01

247

Graph Algorithms Vertex Coloring  

E-print Network

) >> K(G) Theorem: For any k 3, there exists a triangle-free graph Gk (K(Gk) = 2) for which (Gk) = k. A construction: G3 and G4 are the examples above. Construct Gk+1 from Gk. Let V = {v1, . . . , vn} be the vertices of Gk. The vertices of Gk+1 include V , a new vertex w, and a new set of vertices U = {u1

Bar-Noy, Amotz

248

An Unusual Exponential Graph  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is an addition to the series of papers on the exponential function begun by Albert Bartlett. In particular, we ask how the graph of the exponential function y = e[superscript -t/t] would appear if y were plotted versus ln t rather than the normal practice of plotting ln y versus t. In answering this question, we find a new way to…

Syed, M. Qasim; Lovatt, Ian

2014-01-01

249

Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph cohomology  

E-print Network

We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial -we call it cycle homology- and by graph homology.

Dirk Kreimer; Matthias Sars; Walter D. van Suijlekom

2012-08-31

250

Generative Graph Grammar of Neo-Vai?e?ika Formal Ontology (NVFO)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NLP applications for Sanskrit so far work within computational paradigm of string grammars. However, to compute 'meanings', as in traditional ?? bdabodha prakriy?-s, there is a need to develop suitable graph grammars. Ontological structures are fundamentally graphs. We work within the formal framework of Neo-Vai?e?ika Formal Ontology (NVFO) to propose a generative graph grammar. The proposed formal grammar only produces well-formed graphs that can be readily interpreted in accordance with Vai?e? ika Ontology. We show that graphs not permitted by Vai?e? ika ontology are not generated by the proposed grammar. Further, we write Interpreter of these graphical structures. This creates computational environment which can be deployed for writing computational applications of Vai?e? ika ontology. We illustrate how this environment can be used to create applications like computing ?? bdabodha of sentences.

Tavva, Rajesh; Singh, Navjyoti

251

Statistical mechanics on isoradial graphs  

E-print Network

Isoradial graphs are a natural generalization of regular graphs which give, for many models of statistical mechanics, the right framework for studying models at criticality. In this survey paper, we first explain how isoradial graphs naturally arise in two approaches used by physicists: transfer matrices and conformal field theory. This leads us to the fact that isoradial graphs provide a natural setting for discrete complex analysis, to which we dedicate one section. Then, we give an overview of explicit results obtained for different models of statistical mechanics defined on such graphs: the critical dimer model when the underlying graph is bipartite, the 2-dimensional critical Ising model, random walk and spanning trees and the q-state Potts model.

Cédric Boutillier; Béatrice De Tilière

2010-12-14

252

TGFF: task graphs for free  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a user-controllable, general-purpose,pseudorandom task graph generator called TaskGraphs For Free (TGFF). TGFF creates probleminstances for use in allocation and scheduling research.It has the ability to generate independenttasks as well as task sets which are composed of partiallyordered task graphs. A complete description ofa scheduling problem instance is created, includingattributes for processors, communication resources,tasks, and inter-task communication. The user...

Robert P. Dick; David L. Rhodes; Wayne Wolf

1998-01-01

253

Bondage number of grid graphs  

E-print Network

The bondage number $b(G)$ of a nonempty graph $G$ is the cardinality of a smallest set of edges whose removal from $G$ results in a graph with domination number greater than the domination number of $G$. Here we study the bondage number of some grid-like graphs. In this sense, we obtain some bounds or exact values of the bondage number of some Cartesian product, strong product or direct product of two paths.

Dettlaff, Magda; Yero, Ismael G

2012-01-01

254

A cluster algorithm for graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cluster algorithm for graphs called the emph{Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL~algorithm) is introduced. The algorithm provides basically an interface to an algebraic process defined on stochastic matrices, called the MCL~process. The graphs may be both weighted (with nonnegative weight) and directed. Let~$G$~be such a graph. The MCL~algorithm simulates flow in $G$ by first identifying $G$ in a canonical way with

S. Van Dongen

2000-01-01

255

Graphing the West Corridor Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity introduces students to using graphical analysis of data to analyze flaws in a local regional transit system's design. Students will evaluate factors such as ride time, wait time, and percentage of capacity used in a train. This activity requires the use of the FasTracks Living Lab at: http://control.mines.edu/livinglabs/labs/fastracks/. After completing this activity, students should be able to: 1. Plot simple variables versus time on graph paper 2. Calculate percentages and graph them versus time on graph paper 3. Answer questions quantitatively using information obtained from a graph.

Mooney, Mike; Fehr, Stuart

2009-01-01

256

Quantum graphs with spin Hamiltonians  

E-print Network

The article surveys quantization schemes for metric graphs with spin. Typically quantum graphs are defined with the Laplace or Schrodinger operator which describe particles whose intrinsic angular momentum (spin) is zero. However, in many applications, for example modeling an electron (which has spin-1/2) on a network of thin wires, it is necessary to consider operators which allow spin-orbit interaction. The article presents a review of quantization schemes for graphs with three such Hamiltonian operators, the Dirac, Pauli and Rashba Hamiltonians. Comparing results for the trace formula, spectral statistics and spin-orbit localization on quantum graphs with spin Hamiltonians.

J. M. Harrison

2007-12-06

257

Basic Skills in Asian Studies: India.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for an Asian studies program at the secondary level and using learning activities centering on India, the guide develops four basic skills: reading, applying critical thinking, interpreting the geography, and understanding history. Five learning activities are provided for each basic skill and each unit is introduced with a description…

Hantula, James

258

Graph Summarization with Bounded Error Saket Navlakha  

E-print Network

Graph Summarization with Bounded Error Saket Navlakha Dept. of Computer Science University a highly compact two-part representation of a given graph G consisting of a graph summary and a set of corrections. The graph summary is an aggregate graph in which each node corresponds to a set of nodes in G

Gruner, Daniel S.

259

Spectral Graph Theory *D. J. Kelleher1  

E-print Network

theory #12;Encoding a graph as a matrix We want to start using matrices, so we take functions f : V R as matrices. D. J. Kelleher Spectral graph theory #12;Encoding a graph as a matrix The degree matrix D, where. D. J. Kelleher Spectral graph theory #12;Encoding a graph as a matrix The adjacency matrix A where

Blei, Ron

260

Connected-homogeneous graphs Robert Gray  

E-print Network

Connected-homogeneous graphs Robert Gray BIRS Workshop on Infinite Graphs October 2007 1 / 14 #12;Homogeneous graphs Definition A graph is called homogeneous if any isomorphism between finite induced subgraphs extends to an automorphism of the graph. Homogeneity is the strongest possible symmetry condition

St Andrews, University of

261

Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs

Lynch, Mark A. M.

2012-01-01

262

Skills Center.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

Canter, Patricia; And Others

263

Employability Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module from the Florida Advanced Technological Education (FL-ATE) Center will help students understand and develop their own set of personal employability skills, such as communication and teamwork. The activity aims to help students understand the importance of communication and teamwork in a business setting. The lesson should require one class period to complete.

2011-03-03

264

Contact Graph Routing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contact Graph Routing (CGR) is a dynamic routing system that computes routes through a time-varying topology of scheduled communication contacts in a network based on the DTN (Delay-Tolerant Networking) architecture. It is designed to enable dynamic selection of data transmission routes in a space network based on DTN. This dynamic responsiveness in route computation should be significantly more effective and less expensive than static routing, increasing total data return while at the same time reducing mission operations cost and risk. The basic strategy of CGR is to take advantage of the fact that, since flight mission communication operations are planned in detail, the communication routes between any pair of bundle agents in a population of nodes that have all been informed of one another's plans can be inferred from those plans rather than discovered via dialogue (which is impractical over long one-way-light-time space links). Messages that convey this planning information are used to construct contact graphs (time-varying models of network connectivity) from which CGR automatically computes efficient routes for bundles. Automatic route selection increases the flexibility and resilience of the space network, simplifying cross-support and reducing mission management costs. Note that there are no routing tables in Contact Graph Routing. The best route for a bundle destined for a given node may routinely be different from the best route for a different bundle destined for the same node, depending on bundle priority, bundle expiration time, and changes in the current lengths of transmission queues for neighboring nodes; routes must be computed individually for each bundle, from the Bundle Protocol agent's current network connectivity model for the bundle s destination node (the contact graph). Clearly this places a premium on optimizing the implementation of the route computation algorithm. The scalability of CGR to very large networks remains a research topic. The information carried by CGR contact plan messages is useful not only for dynamic route computation, but also for the implementation of rate control, congestion forecasting, transmission episode initiation and termination, timeout interval computation, and retransmission timer suspension and resumption.

Burleigh, Scott C.

2011-01-01

265

Fullerene Graphs and Some Relevant Graph Vesna Andovaa1  

E-print Network

Fullerene Graphs and Some Relevant Graph Invariants Vesna Andovaa1 , Frantisek Kardosb , Riste, Slovenia. E-mail: skrekovski@gmail.com (Received xx.xx, 2013) 1 Introduction Fullerenes are polyhedral is the famous buckminster- fullerene, C60, whose discovery in 1985 marked the birth of fullerene chemistry [40

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Statistical models for cores decomposition of an undirected random graph  

E-print Network

We develop a rigorous and interpretable statistical model for networks using their shell structure to construct minimal sufficient statistics. The model provides the formalism necessary for using k-cores in statistical considerations of random graphs, and in particular social networks. It cannot be specialized to any known degree-centric model and does not generalize Erd\\"os-R\\'enyi. We propose a sampling algorithm for constructing all graphs with a given shell structure, and an MCMC algorithm to simulate from the model. These algorithms will serve as a basis for parameter estimation and model fit tests.

Karwa, Vishesh; Petrovi?, Sonja; Stasi, Despina; Wilburne, Dane

2014-01-01

267

Multiple directed graph large-class multi-spectral processor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerical analysis techniques for the interpretation of high-resolution imaging-spectrometer data are described and demonstrated. The method proposed involves the use of (1) a hierarchical classifier with a tree structure generated automatically by a Fisher linear-discriminant-function algorithm and (2) a novel multiple-directed-graph scheme which reduces the local maxima and the number of perturbations required. Results for a 500-class test problem involving simulated imaging-spectrometer data are presented in tables and graphs; 100-percent-correct classification is achieved with an improvement factor of 5.

Casasent, David; Liu, Shiaw-Dong; Yoneyama, Hideyuki

1988-01-01

268

Quantization of gauge fields, graph polynomials and graph homology  

SciTech Connect

We review quantization of gauge fields using algebraic properties of 3-regular graphs. We derive the Feynman integrand at n loops for a non-abelian gauge theory quantized in a covariant gauge from scalar integrands for connected 3-regular graphs, obtained from the two Symanzik polynomials. The transition to the full gauge theory amplitude is obtained by the use of a third, new, graph polynomial, the corolla polynomial. This implies effectively a covariant quantization without ghosts, where all the relevant signs of the ghost sector are incorporated in a double complex furnished by the corolla polynomial–we call it cycle homology–and by graph homology. -- Highlights: •We derive gauge theory Feynman from scalar field theory with 3-valent vertices. •We clarify the role of graph homology and cycle homology. •We use parametric renormalization and the new corolla polynomial.

Kreimer, Dirk, E-mail: kreimer@physik.hu-berlin.de [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany)] [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Sars, Matthias [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany)] [Humboldt University, 10099 Berlin (Germany); Suijlekom, Walter D. van [Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Radboud University Nijmegen, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

2013-09-15

269

PhET Teacher Activities: Moving Man - Velocity vs. Time Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan was developed specifically for use with the PhET simulation "The Moving Man". It is intended to help beginning students differentiate velocity vs. time graphs from position vs. time graphs, and also to promote understanding of multiple frames of reference in analyzing an object's motion. Only basic graphing skills are required of the student. The lesson was created by a high school teacher under the sponsorship of the PhET project. SEE RELATED ITEMS for a link to "The Moving Man" simulation. which must be running to complete the activity.

Reeves, Steve

270

Interpreting Metonymy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines some of the problems associated with interpreting metonymy, a figure of speech in which an attribute or commonly associated feature is used to name or designate something. After defining metonymy and outlining the principles of metonymy, the paper explains the differences between metonymy, synecdoche, and metaphor. It is…

Pankhurst, Anne

1994-01-01

271

Performing Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilizing a/r/tographic methodology to interrogate interpretive acts in museums, multiple areas of inquiry are raised in this paper, including: which knowledge is assigned the greatest value when preparing a gallery talk; what lies outside of disciplinary knowledge; how invitations to participate invite and disinvite in the same gesture; and what…

Kothe, Elsa Lenz; Berard, Marie-France

2013-01-01

272

47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

2013-10-01

273

47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

2011-10-01

274

47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

2010-10-01

275

47 CFR 80.761 - Conversion graphs.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conversion graphs. 80.761 Section 80.761 Telecommunication...Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.761 Conversion graphs. The following graphs must be employed where conversion from one to...

2012-10-01

276

Graphing Slope-Intercept Equations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This step by step lesson from Math Ops demonstrates graphing slope-intercept equations. Students can read the text on each slide or follow along as it is read out loud. Four examples are given along with detailed instructions on how to graph this type of equation.

2011-01-01

277

Interprocedural slicing using dependence graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper made two main contributions: it defined system de- pendence graphs (SDGs), which extended program dependence graphs (PDGs) (31, 17) to incorporate collections of procedures (with procedure calls) rather than just monolithic programs. It then defined an interprocedural slicing algorithm that identifies the com- ponents of the SDG that might affect the values of the variables de- fined at

Susan Horwitz; Thomas W. Reps; David Binkley

1990-01-01

278

Extremal Graphs Without 4-Cycles  

E-print Network

We prove an upper bound for the number of edges a C4-free graph on q^2 + q vertices can contain for q even. This upper bound is achieved whenever there is an orthogonal polarity graph of a plane of even order q.

Firke, Frank A; Nash, Evan D; Williford, Jason

2012-01-01

279

Fingerprint identification using graph matching  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new algorithm for automated fingerprint encoding and matching is presented. The algorithm is intended to be insensitive to imperfections introduced during fingerprint registration, such as noise. distortion and displacement. A fingerprint is represented in the form of a graph whose nodes correspond to ridges in the print. Edges of the graph connect nodes that represent neighboring or intersecting ridges.

D. K. Isenor; Safwat G. Zaky

1986-01-01

280

Graphs and Zero-Divisors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The last ten years have seen an explosion of research in the zero-divisor graphs of commutative rings--by professional mathematicians "and" undergraduates. The objective is to find algebraic information within the geometry of these graphs. This topic is approachable by anyone with one or two semesters of abstract algebra. This article gives the…

Axtell, M.; Stickles, J.

2010-01-01

281

METRICALLY HOMOGENEOUS GRAPHS GREGORY CHERLIN  

E-print Network

METRICALLY HOMOGENEOUS GRAPHS GREGORY CHERLIN Abstract. We give a catalog of the known metrically homogeneous graphs, and with proofs of existence, mainly via Fraiss´e theory. We also give some classification is metrically homoge- neous if the associated extended metric space is homogeneous. In other words

Cherlin, Gregory

282

Partial Evaluation Using Dependence Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis describes the use of program dependence graphs, as opposed to control flow graphs, as the basis for the partial evaluation of imperative programs. Partial evaluation is a program specialization operation in which programs with multiple inputs are specialized to take into account known values for some of their inputs. Thus, the result of partially evaluating a program given

Manuvir Das

1998-01-01

283

Chameleon Graphing: The Coordinate Plane  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web unit introduces the coordinate plane with the help of Sam the Chameleon, who illustrates how to find points on a number line and graph points in the coordinate plane. A link to a Java applet for graphing with Sam is included.

Whitcher, Ursula

2000-01-01

284

Rectangular Aids for Polar Graphs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A technique for teaching the graphing of polar coordinate equations is presented. This approach involves the use of an auxiliary graph in rectangular coordinates and is thought to aid students in understanding of problem-solving situations such as in dealing with points of intersection and determination of limits of integration. (MP)

Essary, Alice W.

1982-01-01

285

Graph Theory and Statistical Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graph theoretical methods are used in studying statistical physics. The objective is to try to understand the graph theoretical phenomenon that appears in the critical region of the Ising model. The Ising model was introduced in 1920 by Wilhelm Lentz as a model for ferromagnetism, and later studied by Ernst Ising. Ising could only solve it in one di- mension;

Roland Häggkvist; Daniel Andrén; Per Håkan Lundow; Klas Markström

286

EIA publications manual: Statistical graphs  

SciTech Connect

Statistical graphs both illustrate a set of data and provide an analytical perspective. The distinction between these two functions is one of emphasis. Where the purpose of a graph is to dramatize or highlight a set of data, its primary function is illustration. Where the purpose of a graph is to explore, measure, calculate, and derive relationships, the primary function of the graph is analytical. In general practice, these two functions can be so interdependent as to be indistinguishable. The following guidelines are intended to aid in resolving problems common to the presentation of data in statistical graphs. The variety and complexity of data to be presented call for a flexible approach; therefore, the following examples are intended not as inflexible specifications but rather as guides to the design of graphs that are attractive and easily understood. All the types of graphs discussed here have appeared in EIA publications. A list of references that provides further examples is included. Also included is a glossary of statistical terms used in discussing the statistical properties of different types of graphs. 11 refs., 24 figs.

Not Available

1985-04-01

287

Great Graphing Grabs Students' Attention.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes projects in a fifth grade classroom that used data collection and graph making activities as part of a collaborative project between the teacher and the library media specialist. Discusses the use of Excel spreadsheets, comparing the effectiveness of different types of graphs, and project planning. (LRW)

Bernstein, Allison

1999-01-01

288

Solving and Graphing Inequalities Add/Subtract  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn to graph an inequality and to write an inequality from a graph. Please do from 5-10 problems from each link. Practice inequalities with the Inequalities Genie. If you get something wrong it will explain what you should have done. Inequality Genie In this activity you will practice inequalities where you will drag the arrow to graph the inequality. Graph inequalities activity Now practice writing the inequality from a graph. Write an inequality from graph Finally ...

Arnold, Mrs.

2011-09-20

289

Skill puzzles  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are short exercises that allow students practice with concepts in Structural Geology, Tectonics, or Geophysics. (Many of them were designed with Eric Horsman.) The basic idea is to give students opportunities for frequent practice with difficult concepts, many of which require spatial visualization skills. These activities nearly always fit on a half-sheet of paper, and include a visual and verbal component. Instructors may use them for formative assessment or as group activities in class.

Titus, Sarah

290

Cluster states, algorithms and graphs  

E-print Network

The present paper is concerned with the concept of the one-way quantum computer, beyond binary-systems, and its relation to the concept of stabilizer quantum codes. This relation is exploited to analyze a particular class of quantum algorithms, called graph algorithms, which correspond in the binary case to the Clifford group part of a network and which can efficiently be implemented on a one-way quantum computer. These algorithms can ``completely be solved" in the sense that the manipulation of quantum states in each step can be computed explicitly. Graph algorithms are precisely those which implement encoding schemes for graph codes. Starting from a given initial graph, which represents the underlying resource of multipartite entanglement, each step of the algorithm is related to a explicit transformation on the graph.

Dirk Schlingemann

2003-05-28

291

Fire Containment in Planar Graphs  

E-print Network

In a graph $G$, a fire starts at some vertex. At every time step, firefighters can protect up to $k$ vertices, and then the fire spreads to all unprotected neighbours. The $k$-surviving rate $\\rho_k(G)$ of $G$ is the expectation of the proportion of vertices that can be saved from the fire, if the starting vertex of the fire is chosen uniformly at random. For a given class of graphs $\\cG$ we are interested in the minimum value $k$ such that $\\rho_k(G)\\ge\\epsilon$ for some constant $\\epsilon>0$ and all $G\\in\\cG$ i.e., such that linearly many vertices are expected to be saved in every graph from $\\cG$). In this note, we prove that for planar graphs this minimum value is at most 4, and that it is precisely 2 for triangle-free planar graphs.

Esperet, Louis; Maffray, Frédéric; Sipma, Félix

2011-01-01

292

Using a Problem Solving-Cooperative Learning Approach to Improve Students' Skills for Interpreting [Superscript 1]H NMR Spectra of Unknown Compounds in an Organic Spectroscopy Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To address third- and fourth-year chemistry students' difficulties with the challenge of interpreting [superscript 1]H NMR spectra, a problem solving-cooperative learning technique was incorporated in a Spectra of Organic Compounds course. Using this approach helped students deepen their understanding of the basics of [superscript 1]H NMR…

Angawi, Rihab F.

2014-01-01

293

A Regularized Graph Layout Framework for Dynamic Network Visualization  

E-print Network

Many real-world networks, including social and information networks, are dynamic structures that evolve over time. Such dynamic networks are typically visualized using a sequence of static graph layouts. In addition to providing a visual representation of the network topology at each time step, the sequence should preserve the mental map between layouts of consecutive time steps to allow a human to interpret the temporal evolution of the network. In this paper, we propose a framework for dynamic network visualization using regularized graph layouts. Regularization encourages stability of the layouts over time, thus preserving the mental map. The proposed framework involves optimizing a modified cost function that augments the cost function of a static graph layout algorithm with a grouping penalty, which encourages nodes to stay close to other nodes belonging to the same group, and a temporal penalty, which encourages smooth movements of the nodes over time. We introduce two dynamic layout algorithms under th...

Xu, Kevin S; Hero, Alfred O

2012-01-01

294

Graph hierarchies for phylogeography.  

PubMed

Bayesian phylogeographic methods simultaneously integrate geographical and evolutionary modelling, and have demonstrated value in assessing spatial spread patterns of measurably evolving organisms. We improve on existing phylogeographic methods by combining information from multiple phylogeographic datasets in a hierarchical setting. Consider N exchangeable datasets or strata consisting of viral sequences and locations, each evolving along its own phylogenetic tree and according to a conditionally independent geographical process. At the hierarchical level, a random graph summarizes the overall dispersion process by informing which migration rates between sampling locations are likely to be relevant in the strata. This approach provides an efficient and improved framework for analysing inherently hierarchical datasets. We first examine the evolutionary history of multiple serotypes of dengue virus in the Americas to showcase our method. Additionally, we explore an application to intrahost HIV evolution across multiple patients. PMID:23382428

Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

2013-03-19

295

Teaching Media Skills: Selected Sources. Bibliographic Series No. 87.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This bibliography of materials that facilitate the teaching of library skills on the elementary and secondary levels is organized under 12 clusters of essential skills: orientation, citizenship, listening and interpreting skills, selection of media, parts of a book, publication terminology, nonbook terminology, introduction and location of…

Povsic, Frances F.

296

Interpretive Medicine  

PubMed Central

Patient-centredness is a core value of general practice; it is defined as the interpersonal processes that support the holistic care of individuals. To date, efforts to demonstrate their relationship to patient outcomes have been disappointing, whilst some studies suggest values may be more rhetoric than reality. Contextual issues influence the quality of patient-centred consultations, impacting on outcomes. The legitimate use of knowledge, or evidence, is a defining aspect of modern practice, and has implications for patient-centredness. Based on a critical review of the literature, on my own empirical research, and on reflections from my clinical practice, I critique current models of the use of knowledge in supporting individualised care. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), and its implementation within health policy as Scientific Bureaucratic Medicine (SBM), define best evidence in terms of an epistemological emphasis on scientific knowledge over clinical experience. It provides objective knowledge of disease, including quantitative estimates of the certainty of that knowledge. Whilst arguably appropriate for secondary care, involving episodic care of selected populations referred in for specialist diagnosis and treatment of disease, application to general practice can be questioned given the complex, dynamic and uncertain nature of much of the illness that is treated. I propose that general practice is better described by a model of Interpretive Medicine (IM): the critical, thoughtful, professional use of an appropriate range of knowledges in the dynamic, shared exploration and interpretation of individual illness experience, in order to support the creative capacity of individuals in maintaining their daily lives. Whilst the generation of interpreted knowledge is an essential part of daily general practice, the profession does not have an adequate framework by which this activity can be externally judged to have been done well. Drawing on theory related to the recognition of quality in interpretation and knowledge generation within the qualitative research field, I propose a framework by which to evaluate the quality of knowledge generated within generalist, interpretive clinical practice. I describe three priorities for research in developing this model further, which will strengthen and preserve core elements of the discipline of general practice, and thus promote and support the health needs of the public. PMID:21805819

Reeve, Joanne

2010-01-01

297

Learning Oral Presentation Skills  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Oral presentation skills are central to physician-physician communication; however, little is known about how these skills are learned. Rhetoric is a social science which studies communication in terms of context and explores the action of language on knowledge, attitudes, and values. It has not previously been applied to medical discourse. We used rhetorical principles to qualitatively study how students learn oral presentation skills and what professional values are communicated in this process. DESIGN Descriptive study. SETTING Inpatient general medicine service in a university-affiliated public hospital. PARTICIPANTS Twelve third-year medical students during their internal medicine clerkship and 14 teachers. MEASUREMENTS One-hundred sixty hours of ethnographic observation. including 73 oral presentations on rounds. Discoursed-based interviews of 8 students and 10 teachers. Data were qualitatively analyzed to uncover recurrent patterns of communication. MAIN RESULTS Students and teachers had different perceptions of the purpose of oral presentation, and this was reflected in performance. Students described and conducted the presentation as a rule-based, data-storage activity governed by “order” and “structure.” Teachers approached the presentation as a flexible means of “communication” and a method for “constructing” the details of a case into a diagnostic or therapeutic plan. Although most teachers viewed oral presentations rhetorically (sensitive to context), most feedback that students received was implicit and acontextual, with little guidance provided for determining relevant content. This led to dysfunctional generalizations by students, sometimes resulting in worse communication skills (e.g., comment “be brief” resulted in reading faster rather than editing) and unintended value acquisition (e.g., request for less social history interpreted as social history never relevant). CONCLUSIONS Students learn oral presentation by trial and error rather than through teaching of an explicit rhetorical model. This may delay development of effective communication skills and result in acquisition of unintended professional values. Teaching and learning of oral presentation skills may be improved by emphasizing that context determines content and by making explicit the tacit rules of presentation. PMID:11359549

Haber, Richard J; Lingard, Lorelei A

2001-01-01

298

Flying through Graphs: An Introduction to Graph Theory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity incorporating basic terminology, concepts, and solution methods of graph theory in the context of solving problems related to air travel. Discusses prerequisite knowledge and resources and includes a teacher's guide with a student worksheet. (KHR)

McDuffie, Amy Roth

2001-01-01

299

Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Machining Skills Cluster.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document of skill standards for the machining skills cluster serves as a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. These 67 occupational skill standards describe what people should know and be able to do in an…

Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

300

A LEGO Introduction to Graphing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students use a LEGO® ball shooter to demonstrate and analyze the motion of a projectile through use of a line graph. This activity involves using a method of data organization and trend observation with respect to dynamic experimentation with a complex machine. Also, the topic of line data graphing is covered. The main objective is to introduce students graphs in terms of observing and demonstrating their usefulness in scientific and engineering inquiries. During the activity, students point out trends in the data and the overall relationship that can be deduced from plotting data derived from test trials with the ball shooter.

AMPS GK-12 Program,

301

DNA Rearrangements through Spatial Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper is a short overview of a recent model of homologous DNA recombination events guided by RNA templates that have been observed in certain species of ciliates. This model uses spatial graphs to describe DNA rearrangements and show how gene recombination can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent rigid vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico

302

Quantum Fields on Star Graphs  

E-print Network

We construct canonical quantum fields which propagate on a star graph modeling a quantum wire. The construction uses a deformation of the algebra of canonical commutation relations, encoding the interaction in the vertex of the graph. We discuss in this framework the Casimir effect and derive the correction to the Stefan-Boltzmann law induced by the vertex interaction. We also generalize the algebraic setting for covering systems with integrable bulk interactions and solve the quantum non-linear Schroedinger model on a star graph.

Bellazzini, B

2006-01-01

303

Quantum Fields on Star Graphs  

E-print Network

We construct canonical quantum fields which propagate on a star graph modeling a quantum wire. The construction uses a deformation of the algebra of canonical commutation relations, encoding the interaction in the vertex of the graph. We discuss in this framework the Casimir effect and derive the correction to the Stefan-Boltzmann law induced by the vertex interaction. We also generalize the algebraic setting for covering systems with integrable bulk interactions and solve the quantum non-linear Schroedinger model on a star graph.

B. Bellazzini; M. Mintchev

2006-05-03

304

Quantum fields on star graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We construct canonical quantum fields which propagate on a star graph modelling a quantum wire. The construction uses a deformation of the algebra of canonical commutation relations, encoding the interaction in the vertex of the graph. We discuss in this framework the Casimir effect and derive the correction to the Stefan-Boltzmann law induced by the vertex interaction. We also generalize the algebraic setting in order to cover systems with integrable bulk interactions and solve the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger model on a star graph.

Bellazzini, B.; Mintchev, M.

2006-09-01

305

Multigraph: Reusable Interactive Data Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are surprisingly few good software tools available for presenting time series data on the internet. The most common practice is to use a desktop program such as Excel or Matlab to save a graph as an image which can be included in a web page like any other image. This disconnects the graph from the data in a way that makes updating a graph with new data a cumbersome manual process, and it limits the user to one particular view of the data. The Multigraph project defines an XML format for describing interactive data graphs, and software tools for creating and rendering those graphs in web pages and other internet connected applications. Viewing a Multigraph graph is extremely simple and intuitive, and requires no instructions; the user can pan and zoom by clicking and dragging, in a familiar "Google Maps" kind of way. Creating a new graph for inclusion in a web page involves writing a simple XML configuration file. Multigraph can read data in a variety of formats, and can display data from a web service, allowing users to "surf" through large data sets, downloading only those the parts of the data that are needed for display. The Multigraph XML format, or "MUGL" for short, provides a concise description of the visual properties of a graph, such as axes, plot styles, data sources, labels, etc, as well as interactivity properties such as how and whether the user can pan or zoom along each axis. Multigraph reads a file in this format, draws the described graph, and allows the user to interact with it. Multigraph software currently includes a Flash application for embedding graphs in web pages, a Flex component for embedding graphs in larger Flex/Flash applications, and a plugin for creating graphs in the WordPress content management system. Plans for the future include a Java version for desktop viewing and editing, a command line version for batch and server side rendering, and possibly Android and iPhone versions. Multigraph is currently in use on several web sites including the US Drought Portal (www.drought.gov), the NOAA Climate Services Portal (www.climate.gov), the Climate Reference Network (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/crn), NCDC's State of the Climate Report (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc), and the US Forest Service's Forest Change Assessment Viewer (ews.forestthreats.org/NPDE/NPDE.html). More information about Multigraph is available from the web site www.multigraph.org. Interactive Multigraph Display of Real Time Weather Data

Phillips, M. B.

2010-12-01

306

Elicited Speech from Graph Items on the Test of Spoken English[TM]. Research Reports. Report 74. RR-04-06  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research applied a cognitive model to identify item features that lead to irrelevant variance on the Test of Spoken English[TM] (TSE[R]). The TSE is an assessment of English oral proficiency and includes an item that elicits a description of a statistical graph. This item type sometimes appears to tap graph-reading skills--an irrelevant…

Katz, Irvin R.; Xi, Xiaoming; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Cheng, Peter C. H.

2004-01-01

307

Noshing on Numbers: Using and Interpreting Data in Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students must learn how to plot and analyze data as a fundamental science and math skill. Data must also be incorporated into activities in meaningful ways that allow students to build understanding of the concepts being shared. In this workshop, attendees participated in three graphing activities, which served as the basis for discussion of these numerical literacy issues in the science classroom.

Shupla, C. B.

2014-07-01

308

Graph Laplacians and Nodal Domains Turker Biyikoglu  

E-print Network

Graph Laplacians and Nodal Domains T�urker Biyikoglu Graph Laplacians and Nodal Domains � p.1 domains The number of nodal domains of trees hypercubes cographs Graph Laplacians and Nodal Domains � p.2 78 9 10 11 12 Graph Laplacians and Nodal Domains � p.3/20 #12;Nodal Domains x=(-1,4.5,3,-2

Wien, Universität

309

Connected-homogeneous graphs Robert Gray  

E-print Network

Connected-homogeneous graphs Robert Gray British Combinatorial Conference July 2007 1 / 13 #12;Homogeneous graphs Definition A graph is called homogeneous if any isomorphism between finite induced subgraphs extends to an automorphism of the graph. Homogeneity is the strongest possible symmetry condition

St Andrews, University of

310

A contraction theorem for abstract graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction. This paper is primarily concerned with the four colour conjecture. Graph is taken to mean an abstract graph which may have multiple edges. Graphs are denoted by Greek capital letters, if F is a graph then ~(F) denotes the set of its vertices. Vertices are denoted by 1.e. latin letters. An edge which joins the vertices x and y

G. A. Dirac

1961-01-01

311

A Penrose polynomial for embedded graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We extend the Penrose polynomial, originally defined only for plane graphs, to graphs embedded in arbitrary surfaces. Considering this Penrose polynomial of embedded graphs leads to new identities and relations for the Penrose polynomial which can not be realized within the class of plane graphs. In particular, by exploiting connections with the transition polynomial and the ribbon group action, we

Joanna A. Ellis-Monaghan; Iain Moffatt

2011-01-01

312

Improper Colourings of Unit Disk Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: Motivated by a satellite communications problem, we consider a generalised colouring problem on unit disk graphs. A colouring is k-improper if no vertex receives the same colour as k+1 of its neighbours. The k-improper chromatic number ´, for unit interval graphs. Key-words: improper colouring, defective colouring, unit disk graph, interval graph, triangular

Frédéric Havet; Ross J. Kang; Jean-sébastien Sereni

2005-01-01

313

Almost all graphs are rigid - Revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

A graph is called asymmetric if it has the identity mapping as its only automorphism. In [P. Erdõs, A. Rényi, Asymmetric Graphs, Acta Math. Acad. Sci. Hungar. 14 (1963) 295–315], P. Erdõs and A. Rényi have proven that almost all graphs are asymmetric. A graph is called rigid if it has the identity mapping as its only endomorphism, which is

Jens Kötters

2005-01-01

314

Recognizing bull-free perfect graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A bull is the graph obtained from a triangle by adding two pendant vertices adjacent to distinct vertices of the triangle. Chvátal and Sbihi showed that the strong perfect graph conjecture holds for Bull-free graphs. We give a polynomial time recognition algorithm for Bull-free perfect graphs.

Bruce Reed; Najiba Sbihi

1995-01-01

315

Some Remarks on Definability of Process Graphs  

E-print Network

them in the context of the well- known process algebras BPA and BPP. For a process graph G, the density going from s to infinity" exist in G. For BPA-graphs we discuss some tentative findings about-definability results, stating that certain process graphs are not BPA-graphs, and stronger, not even BPA

Klop, Jan Willem

316

Graph Comparison Using Fine Structure Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce a novel technique for comparing graphs using the structure of their subgraphs, which we call a graph's fine structure. Our technique compares graphs using the earth mover's distance between the distributions of summarizing features of their constituent subgraphs. We demonstrate the use of this technique as an abstraction of graph edit-distance and show its use in hierarchical clustering

Owen Macindoe; Whitman Richards

2010-01-01

317

Standards for graph algorithm primitives  

E-print Network

It is our view that the state of the art in constructing a large collection of graph algorithms in terms of linear algebraic operations is mature enough to support the emergence of a standard set of primitive building ...

Mattson, Tim

318

Multibody graph transformations and analysis  

PubMed Central

This two-part paper uses graph transformation methods to develop methods for partitioning, aggregating, and constraint embedding for multibody systems. This first part focuses on tree-topology systems and reviews the key notion of spatial kernel operator (SKO) models for such systems. It develops systematic and rigorous techniques for partitioning SKO models in terms of the SKO models of the component subsystems based on the path-induced property of the component subgraphs. It shows that the sparsity structure of key matrix operators and the mass matrix for the multibody system can be described using partitioning transformations. Subsequently, the notions of node contractions and subgraph aggregation and their role in coarsening graphs are discussed. It is shown that the tree property of a graph is preserved after subgraph aggregation if and only if the subgraph satisfies an aggregation condition. These graph theory ideas are used to develop SKO models for the aggregated tree multibody systems. PMID:24288438

2013-01-01

319

Doing time : inducing temporal graphs  

E-print Network

We consider the problem of constructing a directed acyclic graph that encodes temporal relations found in a text. The unit of our analysis is a temporal segment, a fragment of text that maintains temporal coherence. The ...

Bramsen, Philip James

2006-01-01

320

Charts and Graphs for BCPT  

Cancer.gov

Charts and Graphs for BCPT National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) Cumulative Rates of Breast Cancers Tamoxifen Reduced Invasive Breast Cancer in All Age Groups Events Among BCPT Participants BCPT

321

Graph anomalies in cyber communications  

SciTech Connect

Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-11

322

Summing tree graphs at threshold  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solution of the classical field equation generates the sum of all tree graphs. We show that the classical equation reduces to an easily solved ordinary differential equation for certain multiparticle threshold amplitudes and compute these amplitudes.

Brown, Lowell S.

1992-11-01

323

Pacific Temperature Anomalies with Graph  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This animation shows the El Nino-La Nina Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly from January 1997 through July 1999. A graph inset shows the global average sea surface temperature fluctuation during this time period.

Shirah, Greg; Bridgman, Tom; Starr, Cindy; Busalacchi, Antonio; Schultz, Peter

2003-08-30

324

Graphs in R and Bioconductor  

E-print Network

distributions p(k) = proportion of nodes that have k edges Random graph: p(k) = Poisson distribution with some's probabilities Genetic interaction network: components = genes interactions = synthetic, epistatic probability: m n/2: one giant connected component: size ~ n. (next

Spang, Rainer

325

Tree decompositions and social graphs  

E-print Network

Recent work has established that large informatics graphs such as social and information networks have non-trivial tree-like structure when viewed at moderate size scales. Here, we present results from the first detailed empirical evaluation of the use of tree decomposition (TD) heuristics for structure identification and extraction in social graphs. Although TDs have historically been used in structural graph theory and scientific computing, we show that---even with existing TD heuristics developed for those very different areas---TD methods can identify interesting structure in a wide range of realistic informatics graphs. Among other things, we show that TD methods can identify structures that correlate strongly with the core-periphery structure of realistic networks, even when using simple greedy heuristics; we show that the peripheral bags of these TDs correlate well with low-conductance communities (when they exist) found using local spectral computations; and we show that several types of large-scale "...

Adcock, Aaron B; Mahoney, Michael W

2014-01-01

326

CP(Graph): Introducing a Graph Computation Domain in Constraint Programming  

E-print Network

CP(Graph): Introducing a Graph Computation Domain in Constraint Programming Gregoire Dooms, Yves of domains such as bioinformatics, combi- natorial graph problems arise. We propose a novel way to solve constraint programming by introducing CP(Graph), a new computation domain focused on graphs including a new

Deville, Yves

327

Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

1995-06-01

328

Managing large dynamic graphs efficiently  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing need to ingest, manage, and query large volumes of graph-structured data arising in applications like social networks, communication networks, biological networks, and so on. Graph databases that can explicitly reason about the graphical nature of the data, that can support flexible schemas and node-centric or edge-centric analysis and querying, are ideal for storing such data. However,

Jayanta Mondal; Amol Deshpande

2012-01-01

329

Finding One Variable Statistics With a Graphing Calculator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This quick YouTube video from high school statistics teacher Roger W. Davis explains how to find one variable statistics using the TI-84 graphing calculator. The demonstration goes through three steps: entering the data, finding one variable statistics using the STAT menu, and interpreting the results. The data created includes mean, sum, median and more. Flash player is required to view this video, and the running time for the clip is 3:12.

Davis, Roger W.

2009-02-12

330

A First-Year Course That Teaches Research Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the Fall semester of 2009, I taught a first-year course that focused on skills required to successfully complete undergraduate research. This paper will discuss the Simpson College first-year course requirements, my course goals, the graph theory topics covered, student feedback, and instructor reflection.

Czarneski, Debra

2013-01-01

331

Zeta functions of quantum graphs  

E-print Network

In this article we construct zeta functions of quantum graphs using a contour integral technique based on the argument principle. We start by considering the special case of the star graph with Neumann matching conditions at the center of the star. We then extend the technique to allow any matching conditions at the center for which the Laplace operator is self-adjoint and finally obtain an expression for the zeta function of any graph with general vertex matching conditions. In the process it is convenient to work with new forms for the secular equation of a quantum graph that extend the well known secular equation of the Neumann star graph. In the second half of the article we apply the zeta function to obtain new results for the spectral determinant, vacuum energy and heat kernel coefficients of quantum graphs. These have all been topics of current research in their own right and in each case this unified approach significantly expands results in the literature.

J. M. Harrison; K. Kirsten

2009-11-12

332

Chromatic polynomials of random graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chromatic polynomials and related graph invariants are central objects in both graph theory and statistical physics. Computational difficulties, however, have so far restricted studies of such polynomials to graphs that were either very small, very sparse or highly structured. Recent algorithmic advances (Timme et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 023001) now make it possible to compute chromatic polynomials for moderately sized graphs of arbitrary structure and number of edges. Here we present chromatic polynomials of ensembles of random graphs with up to 30 vertices, over the entire range of edge density. We specifically focus on the locations of the zeros of the polynomial in the complex plane. The results indicate that the chromatic zeros of random graphs have a very consistent layout. In particular, the crossing point, the point at which the chromatic zeros with non-zero imaginary part approach the real axis, scales linearly with the average degree over most of the density range. While the scaling laws obtained are purely empirical, if they continue to hold in general there are significant implications: the crossing points of chromatic zeros in the thermodynamic limit separate systems with zero ground state entropy from systems with positive ground state entropy, the latter an exception to the third law of thermodynamics.

Van Bussel, Frank; Ehrlich, Christoph; Fliegner, Denny; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Timme, Marc

2010-04-01

333

The Role of Microcomputer-Based Laboratories in Learning To Make Graphs of Distance and Velocity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two questions about the effects of microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) activities on graphing skills were addressed in this study: (1) the extent to which activities help students link their concrete experiences with motion with graphic representations of these experiences; and (2) the degree of importance of the real-time aspect of the MBL in…

Brasell, Heather

334

Interpretation Of Biomechanical Data To A Gymnastics Coach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several trials of many different gymnastics skills on various pieces of apparatus were filmed and the results were studied with the coach. The time to accomplish the entire skill as well as the time for each segment of the skill was important to the coach. He was also interested in angle of release or push-off and the path of the center of gravity. Lastly, graphs of velocities and accelerations of limb segments were revealing to the coach. Biomechanical analysis has helped him see why the performances were good; he is more interested in working with the investigator in all the events in gymnastics through the medium of cinematography.

Shierman, Gail

1982-02-01

335

A comparison of auditory and visual graphs for use in physics and mathematics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to interpret graphical information is a prime concern in physics as graphs are widely used to give quick summaries of data sets, for pattern recognition, and for analysis of information. While visual graphs have been developed so that their content can be readily and concisely discerned, there is great difficulty when someone is unable, because of their environment or due to physical handicaps, to view graphs. An alternative to the visual graph is the auditory graph. An auditory graph uses sound rather than pictures to transmit information. This study shows that useful auditory graphs of single valued x-y data were constructed by mapping the y axis to pitch, the x axis to time, and by including drum beats to mark first and second derivative information. Further audio enhancement was used to indicate negative data values. The study used a World Wide Web based test consisting of a series of math and physics questions. Each question was based on a graph and had multiple-choice answers. The test instrument was refined through a series of pilot tests. The main study compared the results of over 200 introductory physics students at Oregon State University, as well as other selected subjects. A computer program randomly assigned subjects to one of three groups. Each group was presented with the same test but had a different graph presentation method. The presentation methods were: only visual graphs, only auditory graphs, or both auditory and visual graphs. This study shows that students with very little training can use auditory graphs to answer analytical and identification type questions. Student performance for the group using only auditory graphs is 70% of the level attained by subjects using visually presented graphs. In addition, five blind subjects from remote locations participated in this test. Their performance level exceeded that of the first-year physics students. This work also displays the results from a pilot study of various auditory preference choices. Elements of this test may be useful for future auditory graph research and development.

Sahyun, Steven Carl

336

Sharing Teaching Ideas: Graphing Families of Curves Using Transformations of Reference Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides for a fast extremely accurate approach to graphing functions that is based on learning function reference graphs and then applying algebraic transformations to these reference graphs.

Kukla, David

2007-01-01

337

Subvoxel Accurate Graph Search Using Non-Euclidean Graph Space  

PubMed Central

Graph search is attractive for the quantitative analysis of volumetric medical images, and especially for layered tissues, because it allows globally optimal solutions in low-order polynomial time. However, because nodes of graphs typically encode evenly distributed voxels of the volume with arcs connecting orthogonally sampled voxels in Euclidean space, segmentation cannot achieve greater precision than a single unit, i.e. the distance between two adjoining nodes, and partial volume effects are ignored. We generalize the graph to non-Euclidean space by allowing non-equidistant spacing between nodes, so that subvoxel accurate segmentation is achievable. Because the number of nodes and edges in the graph remains the same, running time and memory use are similar, while all the advantages of graph search, including global optimality and computational efficiency, are retained. A deformation field calculated from the volume data adaptively changes regional node density so that node density varies with the inverse of the expected cost. We validated our approach using optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the retina and 3-D MR of the arterial wall, and achieved statistically significant increased accuracy. Our approach allows improved accuracy in volume data acquired with the same hardware, and also, preserved accuracy with lower resolution, more cost-effective, image acquisition equipment. The method is not limited to any specific imaging modality and readily extensible to higher dimensions. PMID:25314272

Abramoff, Michael D.; Wu, Xiaodong; Lee, Kyungmoo; Tang, Li

2014-01-01

338

Language Performance, Context and the Personality of the Interpreter.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interpreting is an example of context-bound performance in which the interpreter has a prescribed role in infinitely varied contexts. The use of interpreting to train language students in confident and competent language use in less demanding contexts contributes to the development of both interpersonal skills and the ability to switch language…

Henderson, John

339

DSM skills are marketing skills  

SciTech Connect

Skeptics may view DSM as a convenient cover for using ratepayer funds (in the form of rebates and other financial inducements) to keep customers on the grid, thus providing electric utilities with an unfair competitive advantage. Actually, the most powerful advantages may result from the marketing skills DSM fosters. Put simply, DSM teaches utilities to understand and meet customer needs more effectively. Managing customers use of electricity has taught utilities unprecedented amounts about specific end-use technologies, about customers fuel and equipment selection practices and preferences, and about what it costs to serve their customers. As DSM programs have become more market-driven, utilities have become better communicators and salesmen in order to win customer participation. The result: DSM departments play an increasingly central role in managing customer relationships overall and in developing and implementing competitive strategies.

Stone, C. (Easton Consultants, Inc., Stamford, CT (United States))

1993-10-01

340

Index theorems for quantum graphs  

E-print Network

In geometric analysis, an index theorem relates the difference of the numbers of solutions of two differential equations to the topological structure of the manifold or bundle concerned, sometimes using the heat kernels of two higher-order differential operators as an intermediary. In this paper, the case of quantum graphs is addressed. A quantum graph is a graph considered as a (singular) one-dimensional variety and equipped with a second-order differential Hamiltonian H (a "Laplacian") with suitable conditions at vertices. For the case of scale-invariant vertex conditions (i.e., conditions that do not mix the values of functions and of their derivatives), the constant term of the heat-kernel expansion is shown to be proportional to the trace of the internal scattering matrix of the graph. This observation is placed into the index-theory context by factoring the Laplacian into two first-order operators, H =A*A, and relating the constant term to the index of A. An independent consideration provides an index formula for any differential operator on a finite quantum graph in terms of the vertex conditions. It is found also that the algebraic multiplicity of 0 as a root of the secular determinant of H is the sum of the nullities of A and A*.

S. A. Fulling; P. Kuchment; J. H. Wilson

2007-08-26

341

n-Particle Quantum Statistics on Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a full characterization of abelian quantum statistics on graphs. We explain how the number of anyon phases is related to connectivity. For 2-connected graphs the independence of quantum statistics with respect to the number of particles is proven. For non-planar 3-connected graphs we identify bosons and fermions as the only possible statistics, whereas for planar 3-connected graphs we show that one anyon phase exists. Our approach also yields an alternative proof of the structure theorem for the first homology group of n-particle graph configuration spaces. Finally, we determine the topological gauge potentials for 2-connected graphs.

Harrison, J. M.; Keating, J. P.; Robbins, J. M.; Sawicki, A.

2014-09-01

342

n-particle quantum statistics on graphs  

E-print Network

We develop a full characterization of abelian quantum statistics on graphs. We explain how the number of anyon phases is related to connectivity. For 2-connected graphs the independence of quantum statistics with respect to the number of particles is proven. For non-planar 3-connected graphs we identify bosons and fermions as the only possible statistics, whereas for planar 3-connected graphs we show that one anyon phase exists. Our approach also yields an alternative proof of the structure theorem for the first homology group of n-particle graph configuration spaces. Finally, we determine the topological gauge potentials for 2-connected graphs.

Jonathan M. Harrison; Jonathan P. Keating; Jonathan M. Robbins; Adam Sawicki

2013-04-21

343

Optimal preparation of graph states  

SciTech Connect

We show how to prepare any graph state of up to 12 qubits with (a) the minimum number of controlled-Z gates and (b) the minimum preparation depth. We assume only one-qubit and controlled-Z gates. The method exploits the fact that any graph state belongs to an equivalence class under local Clifford operations. We extend up to 12 qubits the classification of graph states according to their entanglement properties, and identify each class using only a reduced set of invariants. For any state, we provide a circuit with both properties (a) and (b), if it does exist, or, if it does not, one circuit with property (a) and one with property (b), including the explicit one-qubit gates needed.

Cabello, Adan; Lopez-Tarrida, Antonio J. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain); Danielsen, Lars Eirik [Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, P.O. Box 7803, Bergen N-5020 (Norway); Portillo, Jose R. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada I, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41012 Sevilla (Spain)

2011-04-15

344

Quantum snake walk on graphs  

SciTech Connect

I introduce a continuous-time quantum walk on graphs called the quantum snake walk, the basis states of which are fixed-length paths (snakes) in the underlying graph. First, I analyze the quantum snake walk on the line, and I show that, even though most states stay localized throughout the evolution, there are specific states that most likely move on the line as wave packets with momentum inversely proportional to the length of the snake. Next, I discuss how an algorithm based on the quantum snake walk might potentially be able to solve an extended version of the glued trees problem, which asks to find a path connecting both roots of the glued trees graph. To the best of my knowledge, no efficient quantum algorithm solving this problem is known yet.

Rosmanis, Ansis [David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science and Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, West Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-02-15

345

Algebraic connectivity and graph robustness.  

SciTech Connect

Recent papers have used Fiedler's definition of algebraic connectivity to show that network robustness, as measured by node-connectivity and edge-connectivity, can be increased by increasing the algebraic connectivity of the network. By the definition of algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the graph Laplacian is a lower bound on the node-connectivity. In this paper we show that for circular random lattice graphs and mesh graphs algebraic connectivity is a conservative lower bound, and that increases in algebraic connectivity actually correspond to a decrease in node-connectivity. This means that the networks are actually less robust with respect to node-connectivity as the algebraic connectivity increases. However, an increase in algebraic connectivity seems to correlate well with a decrease in the characteristic path length of these networks - which would result in quicker communication through the network. Applications of these results are then discussed for perimeter security.

Feddema, John Todd; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Abdallah, Chaouki T. (University of New Mexico)

2009-07-01

346

Optimal preparation of graph states  

E-print Network

We show how to prepare any graph state of up to 12 qubits with: (a) the minimum number of controlled-Z gates, and (b) the minimum preparation depth. We assume only one-qubit and controlled-Z gates. The method exploits the fact that any graph state belongs to an equivalence class under local Clifford operations. We extend up to 12 qubits the classification of graph states according to their entanglement properties, and identify each class using only a reduced set of invariants. For any state, we provide a circuit with both properties (a) and (b), if it does exist, or, if it does not, one circuit with property (a) and one with property (b), including the explicit one-qubit gates needed.

Adan Cabello; Lars Eirik Danielsen; Antonio J. Lopez-Tarrida; Jose R. Portillo

2010-11-24

347

Graph Complexity and Slice Functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

  \\u000a \\u000a Abstract. A graph-theoretic approach to study the complexity of Boolean functions was initiated by Pudl?k, R?dl, and Savick? [PRS]\\u000a by defining models of computation on graphs. These models generalize well-known models of Boolean complexity such as circuits,\\u000a branching programs, and two-party communication complexity.\\u000a \\u000a A Boolean function f is called a 2-slice function if it evaluates to zero on inputs

V. Lokam

2008-01-01

348

Interacting particle systems on graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this dissertation, the dynamics of socially or biologically interacting populations are investigated. The individual members of the population are treated as particles that interact via links on a social or biological network represented as a graph. The effect of the structure of the graph on the properties of the interacting particle system is studied using statistical physics techniques. In the first chapter, the central concepts of graph theory and social and biological networks are presented. Next, interacting particle systems that are drawn from physics, mathematics and biology are discussed in the second chapter. In the third chapter, the random walk on a graph is studied. The mean time for a random walk to traverse between two arbitrary sites of a random graph is evaluated. Using an effective medium approximation it is found that the mean first-passage time between pairs of sites, as well as all moments of this first-passage time, are insensitive to the density of links in the graph. The inverse of the mean-first passage time varies non-monotonically with the density of links near the percolation transition of the random graph. Much of the behavior can be understood by simple heuristic arguments. Evolutionary dynamics, by which mutants overspread an otherwise uniform population on heterogeneous graphs, are studied in the fourth chapter. Such a process underlies' epidemic propagation, emergence of fads, social cooperation or invasion of an ecological niche by a new species. The first part of this chapter is devoted to neutral dynamics, in which the mutant genotype does not have a selective advantage over the resident genotype. The time to extinction of one of the two genotypes is derived. In the second part of this chapter, selective advantage or fitness is introduced such that the mutant genotype has a higher birth rate or a lower death rate. This selective advantage leads to a dynamical competition in which selection dominates for large populations, while for small populations the dynamics are similar to the neutral case. The likelihood for the fitter mutants to drive the resident genotype to extinction is calculated.

Sood, Vishal

349

Digitizer Auditory Graph: Making Graphs Accessible to the Visually  

E-print Network

with an optical input device (e.g., webcam, digital camera, cell phone camera) and then hear an auditory graph/owner(s). CHI 2010, April 10­15, 2010, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. ACM 978-1-60558-930-5/10/04. Stephen H. Choi 30332 USA heejoong@gatech.edu Bruce N. Walker Sonification Lab, Schools of Psychology and Interactive

350

Evolutionary Graph Clustering using Graph and Cluster Mixtures  

E-print Network

Many networks and accordingly their representation in graphs are subject to structural changes during the course of their existence [CKT06]. Examples for such evolutionary networks include friendship networks in online communities, co-authorship networks in the scientific domain and collocation networks in computational linguistics. Studying the

Jan Rausch

351

Comparison Graph of Sea Ice Minimum - 2010  

NASA Video Gallery

This animated graph tracks the retreat of sea ice, measured in millions of square kilometers, averaged from the start of the satellite record in 1979 through 2000 (white). Next, the graph follows t...

352

Standard Distributions: One Graph Fits All  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Standard distributions are ubiquitous but not unique. With suitable scaling, the graph of a standard distribution serves as the graph for every distribution in the family. The standard exponential can easily be taught in elementary statistics courses.

Wagner, Clifford H.

2007-01-01

353

JUNG - Java Universal Network/Graph Framework  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

JUNG ??? the Java Universal Network/Graph Framework--is a software library that provides a common and extensive language for the modeling, analysis, and visualization of data that can be represented as a graph or network.

Joshua O'Madadhain, Danyel Fisher, and Scott White.

354

Mathematical Minute: Rotating a Function Graph  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using calculus only, we find the angles you can rotate the graph of a differentiable function about the origin and still obtain a function graph. We then apply the solution to odd and even degree polynomials.

Bravo, Daniel; Fera, Joseph

2013-01-01

355

Graphing Stories: Fifteen seconds at a time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of one-minute videos depicts scenarios with measurements that can be graphed over a time scale of zero to 15 seconds. Eight different types of graphs are represented. A pdf file of grids is provided.

Meyer, Dan; Buzzmath

2013-01-01

356

Optimization in Geometric Graphs: Complexity and Approximation  

E-print Network

solution procedures for several problems using geometrical properties of these graphs. We outline a matching-based branch and bound solution procedure for the maximum k-clique problem in unit disk graphs and demonstrate its effectiveness through...

Kahruman-Anderoglu, Sera

2011-02-22

357

Efficient Subgraph Matching on Billion Node Graphs  

E-print Network

The ability to handle large scale graph data is crucial to an increasing number of applications. Much work has been dedicated to supporting basic graph operations such as subgraph matching, reachability, regular expression matching, etc. In many cases, graph indices are employed to speed up query processing. Typically, most indices require either super-linear indexing time or super-linear indexing space. Unfortunately, for very large graphs, super-linear approaches are almost always infeasible. In this paper, we study the problem of subgraph matching on billion-node graphs. We present a novel algorithm that supports efficient subgraph matching for graphs deployed on a distributed memory store. Instead of relying on super-linear indices, we use efficient graph exploration and massive parallel computing for query processing. Our experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of performing subgraph matching on web-scale graph data.

Sun, Zhao; Wang, Haixun; Shao, Bin; Li, Jianzhong

2012-01-01

358

Seabirds and Shorebirds Maps and Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of maps and graphs provides information on the locations of breeding colonies, distributions of biomass, seasonal species density, and deposition graphs for seabird and shorebird species of the central California coast.

359

Understanding Conic Sections Using Alternate Graph Paper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes two alternative coordinate systems and their use in graphing conic sections. This alternative graph paper helps students explore the idea of eccentricity using the definitions of the conic sections.

Brown, Elizabeth M.; Jones, Elizabeth

2006-01-01

360

A discrete curvature on a planar graph  

E-print Network

Given a planar graph derived from a spherical, euclidean or hyperbolic tessellation, one can define a discrete curvature by combinatorial properties, which after embedding the graph in a compact 2d-manifold, becomes the Gaussian curvature.

M. Lorente

2004-12-20

361

Steiner's Problem in Graphs and Its Implications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A graph theoretic version of Steiner's problem in plane geometry is described. An approach for solving the problem, related to Melzak's solution to Steiner's problem, is presented. The problems of finding shortest route and minimal spanning tree in graphs...

S. L. Hakimi

1970-01-01

362

0-1 graph partitioning and image segmentation  

E-print Network

Graph partitioning is the grouping of all the nodes in a graph into two or more partitions based on certain criteria. Graph cut techniques are used to partition a graph. The Minimum Cut method gives imbalanced partitions. ...

Goh, Chun Fan

2008-01-01

363

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #3 Instructions  

E-print Network

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #3 Fall 1999 Instructions #15; Answer each question completely not exist any Ã?-regular graphs on n vertices, where Ã? and n are both odd. 2. Construct a graph which is (a, Eulerian, and Hamiltonian 3. Let G be a connected graph with jV (G)j #21; 3 such that deg(u) + deg(v) #21

deYoung, Brad

364

Control by quantum dynamics on graphs  

SciTech Connect

We address the study of controllability of a closed quantum system whose dynamical Lie algebra is generated by adjacency matrices of graphs. We characterize a large family of graphs that renders a system controllable. The key property is a graph-theoretic feature consisting of a particularly disordered cycle structure. Disregarding efficiency of control functions, but choosing subfamilies of sparse graphs, the results translate into continuous-time quantum walks for universal computation.

Godsil, Chris; Severini, Simone [Department of Combinatorics and Optimization, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-05-15

365

BLINKS: ranked keyword searches on graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Query processing over graph-structured data is enjoying a growing number of applications. A top-k keyword search query on a graph finds the top k answers according to some ranking criteria, where each answer is a substructure of the graph containing all query keywords. Current techniques for supporting such queries on general graphs suffer from several drawbacks, e.g., poor worst-case performance,

Hao He; Haixun Wang; Jun Yang; Philip S. Yu

2007-01-01

366

Bull-free Berge graphs are perfect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abull is the (self-complementary) graph with verticesa, b, c, d, e and edgesab, ac, bc, bd, ce; a graphG is calledBerge if neitherG not its complement contains a chordless cycle whose length is odd and at least five. We prove that bull-free Berge graphs are perfect; a part of our argument relies on a new property of minimal imperfect graphs.

Vašek Chvátal; Najiba Sbihi

1987-01-01

367

Core competence (knowledge) (skill)  

E-print Network

Core competence 8 5~8 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PPS003 Ver. 1.1 2011/03/07 #12; 2 (knowledge) (skill) (attitude) Set of skill, knowledge or attitude which should be learned or acquired by each, 2000) (knowledge) (skill) (attitude) Set of skill, knowledge or attitude which should be learned

Wu, Yih-Min

368

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links).  

E-print Network

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links). An edge connects two vertices, or a vertex with itself ­ loop. AC, AC - multiple edges BB ­ loop The shape of the graph does not matter, only the way the nodes are connected to each other. Simple graph - does not have loops and self

Albert, Réka

369

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links).  

E-print Network

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links). An edge connects two vertices, or a vertex with itself ­ loop. AC, AC - multiple edges BB ­ loop The shape of the graph does not matter, only the way the nodes are connected to each other. Simple graph - does not have loops (self

Albert, Réka

370

LS(Graph & Tree): A Local Search Framework for Constraint Optimization on Graphs and Trees  

E-print Network

LS(Graph & Tree): A Local Search Framework for Constraint Optimization on Graphs and Trees Pham University Providence, RI 02912, USA pvh@cs.brown.edu ABSTRACT LS(Graph & Tree) is a local search framework which aims at simplifying the modeling of Constraint Satisfaction Opti- mization Problems on graphs

Deville, Yves

371

Time-Space Tradeos for Undirected Graph Traversal by Graph Automata  

E-print Network

Time-Space Tradeos for Undirected Graph Traversal by Graph Automata Paul Beame y Allan Borodin z-space tradeos for traversing undirected graphs, using a variety of structured models that are all variants of Cook and Racko's \\Jumping Automata for Graphs". Our strongest tradeo is a quadratic lower bound

Borenstein, Elhanan

372

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links).  

E-print Network

Graph concepts Graphs are made up by vertices (nodes) and edges (links). An edge connects two vertices, or a vertex with itself ­ loop. AC, AC - multiple edges BB ­ loop The shape of the graph does not matter, only the way the nodes are connected to each other. Simple graph - does not have loops

Albert, Réka

373

GraphDB: A Data Model and Query Language for Graphs in Databases  

E-print Network

graph operations like determining a shortest path or a subgraph and the model is extensible, etc. The GraphDB model is meant to be implemented; system architecture and a representation and queryGraphDB: A Data Model and Query Language for Graphs in Databases Ralf Hartmut Güting Praktische

Güting, Ralf Hartmut

374

Efficient Information-Theoretic Graph Pruning for Graph-Based SLAM with Laser Range Finders  

E-print Network

Efficient Information-Theoretic Graph Pruning for Graph-Based SLAM with Laser Range Finders Henrik Kretzschmar Cyrill Stachniss Giorgio Grisetti Abstract-- In graph-based SLAM, the pose graph encodes the poses has a substantial influence on the runtime and the memory requirements of a SLAM system, which hinders

Stachniss, Cyrill

375

Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

1995-06-01

376

Examining student ability to interpret and use potential energy diagrams for classical systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington is examining the extent to which students are able to use graphs of potential energy vs. position to infer kinematic and dynamic quantities for a system. The findings indicate that many students have difficulty in relating the graphs to real-world systems. Some problems seem to be graphical in nature (e.g., interpreting graphs of potential energy vs. position as graphs of position vs. time). Others involve relating the graphs to total, kinetic, and potential energies, especially when the potential energy is negative. The results have implications beyond the introductory level since graphs of potential energy are used in advanced courses on classical and quantum mechanics.

Stephanik, Brian M.; Shaffer, Peter S.

2012-05-15

377

Games on graphs Milos Stojakovic  

E-print Network

Games on graphs Milos Stojakovi�c Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Novi Sad, Serbia milos.stojakovic@dmi.uns.ac.rs http://www.inf.ethz.ch/personal/smilos/ Abstract. Positional Games is a branch of Combinatorics which focuses on a variety of two player games, ranging from well-known games

Stojakovic, Milos

378

Graphical fisheye views of graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fisheye lens is a very wide angle lens that shows places nearby in detail while also showing remote regions in successively less detail. This paper describes a system for viewing and browsing planar graphs using a software analog of a fisheye lens. We first show how to implement such a view using solely geometric transformations. We then describe a

Manojit Sarkar; Marc H. Brown

1992-01-01

379

Introduction to Testing Graph Properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The aim of this article is to introduce the reader to the study of testing graph properties, while focusing on the main models\\u000a and issues involved. No attempt is made to provide a comprehensive survey of this study, and specific results are often mentioned\\u000a merely as illustrations of general themes.

Oded Goldreich

2010-01-01

380

Encyclopedia of Sparse Graph Codes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluation of Gallager codes for low error tolerance, short block length andhigh rate applications.Sparse graph codes include Gallager codes, Tanner codes, MN codes Repeat--Accumulate codes (RA codes), and turbo codes, all of which have near--Shannonlimit performance.This paper (which is still in preparation) describes empirical properties of a wideselection of these codes, comparing in particular the codes\\

David J. C. Mackay

1999-01-01

381

An introduction to factor graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graphical models such as factor graphs allow a unified approach to a number of key topics in coding and signal processing such as the iterative decoding of turbo codes, LDPC codes and similar codes, joint decoding, equalization, parameter estimation, hidden-Markov models, Kalman filtering, and recursive least squares. Graphical models can represent complex real-world systems, and such representations help to derive

Hans-Andrea Loeliger; ETH Zurich

2004-01-01

382

Short paths in expander graphs  

SciTech Connect

Graph expansion has proved to be a powerful general tool for analyzing the behavior of routing algorithms and the interconnection networks on which they run. We develop new routing algorithms and structural results for bounded-degree expander graphs. Our results are unified by the fact that they are all based upon, and extend, a body of work asserting that expanders are rich in short, disjoint paths. In particular, our work has consequences for the disjoint paths problem, multicommodify flow, and graph minor containment. We show: (i) A greedy algorithm for approximating the maximum disjoint paths problem achieves a polylogarithmic approximation ratio in bounded-degree expanders. Although our algorithm is both deterministic and on-line, its performance guarantee is an improvement over previous bounds in expanders. (ii) For a multicommodily flow problem with arbitrary demands on a bounded-degree expander, there is a (1 + {epsilon})-optimal solution using only flow paths of polylogarithmic length. It follows that the multicommodity flow algorithm of Awerbuch and Leighton runs in nearly linear time per commodity in expanders. Our analysis is based on establishing the following: given edge weights on an expander G, one can increase some of the weights very slightly so the resulting shortest-path metric is smooth - the min-weight path between any pair of nodes uses a polylogarithmic number of edges. (iii) Every bounded-degree expander on n nodes contains every graph with O(n/log{sup O(1)} n) nodes and edges as a minor.

Kleinberg, J. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States); Rubinfeld, R. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1996-12-31

383

Fibonacci Identities, Matrices, and Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

General strategies used to help discover, prove, and generalize identities for Fibonacci numbers are described along with some properties about the determinants of square matrices. A matrix proof for identity (2) that has received immense attention from many branches of mathematics, like linear algebra, dynamical systems, graph theory and others…

Huang, Danrun

2005-01-01

384

Situating Graphs as Workplace Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We investigate the use and knowledge of graphs in the context of a large industrial factory. We are particularly interested in the question of "transparency", a question that has been extensively considered in the general literature on tool use and, more recently, by Michael Roth and his colleagues in the context of scientific work. Roth uses the…

Noss, Richard; Bakker, Arthur; Hoyles, Celia; Kent, Phillip

2007-01-01

385

Fixation Time for Evolutionary Graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evolutionary graph theory (EGT) is recently proposed by Lieberman et al. in 2005. EGT is successful for explaining biological evolution and some social phenomena. It is extremely important to consider the time of fixation for EGT in many practical problems, including evolutionary theory and the evolution of cooperation. This study characterizes the time to asymptotically reach fixation.

Nie, Pu-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Ai

386

October 31, 1997 SMOOTH GRAPHS  

E-print Network

Answering a question of R. Jamison, H. A. Kierstead and P. J. Nyik* *os proved in [3 such that T ~= T |`(X \\ X0). Thus the comparability graph of T is !-smooth and clearly non-trivia* *l. However, the question whether a

Soukup, Lajos

387

Graphing Parametric Curves Using Spreadsheets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traditionally, using only pencil and paper the graphing of parametric functions was a time-consuming task. Microsoft Excel is a convenient tool that can be used in the classroom to facilitate and enhance this procedure. A simple, but effective, spreadsheet is described.

Didenko, A.; Allison, D.; Miller, G.

2008-10-01

388

Cognition for Interpreting Scientific Concepts: A Study of Acceleration  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diagrams of trajectories of two-dimensional motions were shown to five students in introductory physics and five physics faculty. Analysis of how the two groups interpreted the diagrams enabled the investigators to identify the underlying knowledge and skills required.

Reif, Frederick; Allen, Sue

2006-06-23

389

Interpretive Management: What General Managers Can Learn from Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analytical management approach reflects a traditional perspective and an interpretive approach involves a perspective suited to rapidly changing, unpredictable markets. Both approaches are valid, but each serves different purposes and calls for different strategies and skills. (JOW)

Lester, Richard K.; Piore, Michael J.; Malek, Kamal M.

1998-01-01

390

Exploring Systems of Equations using Graphing Calculators  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan introduces the concept of graphing a system of linear equations. Students will use graphing technology to explore the meaning of the solution of a linear system including solutions that correspond to intersecting lines, parallel lines, and coinciding lines. Students will also do graph linear systems by hand.

2012-12-18

391

Some Applications of Graph Theory to Clustering  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The connection between graph theory and clustering is reviewed and extended. Major emphasis is on restating, in a graph-theoretic context, selected past work in clustering, and conversely, developing alternative strategies from several standard concepts used in graph theory per se. (Author/RC)

Hubert, Lawrence J.

1974-01-01

392

Mining Message Sequence Graphs Sandeep Kumar  

E-print Network

sequence graph (MSG) to represent the concurrent program behavior. An MSG represents a graph where the nodes of the graph are partial orders, represented as Message Se- quence Charts. Mining an MSG allows us to understand concurrent program behaviors since the nodes of the MSG depict important

Roychoudhury, Abhik

393

CGMA: A Novel Conceptual Graph Matching Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel Conceptual Graph Matching Algorithm (CGMA) is proposed along with a knowledge base organization scheme. It allows the user to select the Degree of Matching and Degree of Inheritance to increase the user's satisfaction. A conceptual graph is represented in a special linear form (called U-Form) for CGMA. U-Form eliminates the necessity of explicit arcs in the graph to

Gi-chul Yang; Young Bae Choi; Jonathan C. Oh

1992-01-01

394

Long cycles in fullerene graphs , Frantisek Kardosb  

E-print Network

Long cycles in fullerene graphs Rok Ermana , Frantisek Kardosb and Jozef Miskufb a Department.kardos,jozef.miskuf}@upjs.sk Abstract It is conjectured that every fullerene graph is hamiltonian. Jendrol' and Owens proved [J. Math. Chem. 18 (1995), pp. 83­90] that every fullerene graph on n vertices has a cycle of length at least 4n

Boyer, Edmond

395

Face Recognition by Elastic Bunch Graph Matching  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a system for recognizing human faces fromsingle images out of a large database containing one imageper person. Faces are represented by labeled graphs, basedon a Gabor wavelet transform. Image graphs of new facesare extracted by an elastic graph matching process andcan be compared by a simple similarity function. Thesystem differs from the preceding one [1] in three respects.Phase

Laurenz Wiskott; Jean-marc Fellous; Norbert Krüger; Christoph Von Der Malsburg

1997-01-01

396

Gröbner Basis Convex Polytopes and Planar Graph  

E-print Network

Using the Gr\\"obner basis of an ideal generated by a family of polynomials we prove that every planar graph is 4-colorable. Here we also use the fact that the complete graph of 5 vertices is not included in any planar graph.

Dang Vu Giang

2012-02-21

397

Graph Laplacians, Nodal Domains, and Hyperplane Arrangements  

E-print Network

Graph Laplacians, Nodal Domains, and Hyperplane Arrangements TË?urker B�y�koâ??glu +,# , Wim Hordijk. Eigenvectors of the Laplacian of a graph G have received increasing at­ tention in the recent past. Here we minimal and maximal numbers of nodal domains for a particular graph. The class of Boolean Hypercubes

Stadler, Peter F.

398

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #6 Instructions  

E-print Network

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #6 Fall 1999 Instructions #15; Answer each question completely that a graph G is a tree if and only if it is connected and for every edge e 2 E(G), G n feg is not connected. By way of de#12;nition, note that any edge e in a graph for which the deletion of e results

deYoung, Brad

399

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #2 Instructions  

E-print Network

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #2 Fall 1999 Instructions #15; Answer each question completely) Construct an example of three mutually non-isomorphic graphs (G 1 , G 2 , and H) such that G 1 #24; H and G; an equivalence relation? 3. The function ' from the de#12;nition of isomorphism between two graphs is called

deYoung, Brad

400

Graph Laplacians, Nodal Domains, and Hyperplane Arrangements  

E-print Network

Graph Laplacians, Nodal Domains, and Hyperplane Arrangements T¨urker Biyikoglu, , Wim Hordijk. Eigenvectors of the Laplacian of a graph G have received increasing at- tention in the recent past. Here we minimal and maximal numbers of nodal domains for a particular graph. The class of Boolean Hypercubes

Stadler, Peter F.

401

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #7 Instructions  

E-print Network

AMAT 3240 { Graph Theory Assignment #7 Fall 1999 Instructions #15; Answer each question completely a connected weighted graph G, iteratively remove from G a non-cut-edge of maximum weight until only cut;nd a minimum-weight spanning path in a connected weighted graph G on n vertices. We have the idea

deYoung, Brad

402

Bioinformatics Graph Mining for Virtual Screening  

E-print Network

56 Bioinformatics Graph Mining for Virtual Screening Hiroto Saigo1, Sebastian Nowozin, Koji Tsuda which are represented as attributed graphs where atoms and bonds correspond to nodes and edges on developing efficient and accurate algo- rithms for learning from graph data. Our main idea is to combine

403

A graph covering problem Peter Cameron  

E-print Network

A graph covering problem Peter Cameron In 1983, Allan Schwenk posed a problem in the American Mathematical Monthly asking whether the edge set of the complete graph on ten vertices can be decom- posed into three copies of the Petersen graph. He, and O. P. Lossers (the problem- solving group at Eindhoven

Banaji,. Murad

404

Some Existentially Closed Graphs Thomas Dinski \\Lambda  

E-print Network

Some Existentially Closed Graphs Thomas Dinski \\Lambda Abstract We give a characterization of the existentially closed models and pre­ generic models of the theory of planar graphs and graphs without K 3;3 ­ minor. We show that there are 2 @0 countable existentially closed models in these classes and that all

Bielefeld, University of

405

Triply Existentially Complete Triangle-free Graphs  

E-print Network

Triply Existentially Complete Triangle-free Graphs Chaim Even-Zohar Nati Linial June 13, 2013 Abstract A triangle-free graph G is called k-existentially complete if for every induced k-vertex subgraph another vertex of G to H. Cherlin [8, 9] asked whether k-existentially complete triangle-free graphs exist

Linial, Nathan "Nati"

406

METRICALLY HOMOGENEOUS GRAPHS: A CATALOG GREGORY CHERLIN  

E-print Network

METRICALLY HOMOGENEOUS GRAPHS: A CATALOG GREGORY CHERLIN Abstract. We give a conjectured classification of the metrically homogeneous graphs: with a few interesting exceptions, these should correspond Related Problems 5 Structure of the Article 6 1. Preliminaries 7 1.1. Metrically Homogeneous Graphs

Cherlin, Gregory

407

Comparing Graph Similarity Measures for Graphical Recognition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we evaluate four graph distance measures. The analysis is performed for document retrieval tasks. For this aim, different kind of documents are used including line drawings (symbols), ancient documents (ornamental letters), shapes and trademark-logos. The experimental results show that the performance of each graph distance measure depends on the kind of data and the graph representation technique.

Jouili, Salim; Tabbone, Salvatore; Valveny, Ernest

408

Game chromatic number of graphs Thomas Dinski  

E-print Network

a modified graph coloring problem posed as a two­person game, with one person (Alice) trying to color a graph #12; 2 Dinski and Zhu 1 Introduction Let G be a finite graph and let X be a set of colors. We consider the first move. A move consists of selecting a previously uncolored vertex x and assigning to it a color

Bielefeld, University of

409

Generalized matrix tree theorem for mixed graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we provide a combinatorial description of an arbitrary minor of the Laplacian matrix (L) of a mixed graph (a graph with some oriented and some unoriented edges). This is a generalized Matrix Tree Theorem. We also characterize the non-singular substructures of a mixed graph. The sign attached to a nonsingular substructure is described in terms of labeling

Ravindra B. Bapat; Jerrold W. Grossman; Devadatta M. Kulkarni

1999-01-01

410

Blockwise Supervised Inference on Large Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we consider supervised learn- ing on large-scale graphs, which is highly de- manding in terms of time and memory costs. We demonstrate that, if a graph has a bi- partite structure that contains a small set of nodes separating the remaining from each other, the inference can be equivalently done over an induced graph connecting only the

Kai Yu; Shipeng Yu; Volker Tresp

411

On Injective Colourings of Chordal Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that one can compute the injective chromatic num- ber of a chordal graph G at least as efficiently as one can compute the chromatic number of (G B)2, where B are the bridges of G. In particu- lar, it follows that for strongly chordal graphs and so-called power chordal graphs the injective chromatic number can be determined in

Pavol Hell; André Raspaud; Juraj Stacho

2008-01-01

412

Random Lifts of Graphs Nati Linial  

E-print Network

Random Lifts of Graphs Nati Linial 27th Brazilian Math Colloquium, July '09 Nati Linial Random Lifts of Graphs #12;Plan of this talk A brief introduction to the probabilistic method. A quick review of expander graphs and their spectrum. Lifts, random lifts and their properties. Spectra of random lifts. Nati

Linial, Nathan "Nati"

413

Two New Graphs Kernels in Chemoinformatics  

E-print Network

combining machine learning and graph theory techniques. Such kernels prove their effi- ciency on several of tools available within the statistical machine learning framework. However, the definition of a vector are machine learning and graph theory. From this point of view, graph kernels provide a nice framework

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing  

SciTech Connect

Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

1999-03-02

415

Teaching and Assessing Graphing Using Active Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a college biology instructor, I often see graphs in lab reports that do not meet my expectations. I also observe that many college students do not always adequately differentiate between good and poor (or misleading) graphs. The activity described in this paper is the result of my work with students to improve their graphing literacy. The…

McFarland, Jenny

2010-01-01

416

A heuristic algorithm for graph isomorphism  

E-print Network

polynomial time algorithm O(n?), ISO-MT, that seems' to solve the graph isomorphism decision problem correctly for all classes of graphs. Our algorithm is extremely useful from the practical point of view since counter examples (pairs of graphs for which our...

Torres Navarro, Luz

2012-06-07

417

LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP,  

E-print Network

TRAINING GUIDE LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, ACTION, SKILLS, PREVENTION, LEADERSHIP, DAIRY SAFETY WORKER OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH TRAINING AND EDUCATION PROGRAM

Leistikow, Bruce N.

418

A bonding model of entanglement for $N$-qubit graph states  

E-print Network

The class of entangled $N$-qubit states known as graph states, and the corresponding stabilizer groups of $N$-qubit Pauli observables, have found a wide range of applications in quantum information processing and the foundations of quantum mechanics. A review of the properties of graph states is given and core spaces of graph states are introduced and discussed. A bonding model of entanglement for generalized graph states is then presented, in which the presence or absence of a bond between two qubits unequivocally specifies whether or not they are entangled. A physical interpretation of these bonds is given, along with a characterization of how they can be created or destroyed by entangling unitary operations and how they can be destroyed by local Pauli measurements. It is shown that local unitary operations do not affect the bond structure of a graph state, and therefore that if two graph states have nonisomorphic bond structures, then local unitary operations and/or reordering of qubits cannot change one into the other. Color multigraphs are introduced to depict the bond structures of graph states and to make some of their properties more apparent.

Mordecai Waegell

2014-06-01

419

High Performance Descriptive Semantic Analysis of Semantic Graph Databases  

SciTech Connect

As semantic graph database technology grows to address components ranging from extant large triple stores to SPARQL endpoints over SQL-structured relational databases, it will become increasingly important to be able to understand their inherent semantic structure, whether codified in explicit ontologies or not. Our group is researching novel methods for what we call descriptive semantic analysis of RDF triplestores, to serve purposes of analysis, interpretation, visualization, and optimization. But data size and computational complexity makes it increasingly necessary to bring high performance computational resources to bear on this task. Our research group built a novel high performance hybrid system comprising computational capability for semantic graph database processing utilizing the large multi-threaded architecture of the Cray XMT platform, conventional servers, and large data stores. In this paper we describe that architecture and our methods, and present the results of our analyses of basic properties, connected components, namespace interaction, and typed paths such for the Billion Triple Challenge 2010 dataset.

Joslyn, Cliff A.; Adolf, Robert D.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Feo, John T.; Haglin, David J.; Mackey, Greg E.; Mizell, David W.

2011-06-02

420

Guidelines for Graphing Data with Microsoft[R] Office 2007[TM], Office 2010[TM], and Office for Mac[TM] 2008 and 2011  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The interpretation of single-case data requires systematic visual analysis across and within conditions. Graphs are a vital component for analyzing and communicating single-case design data and a necessary tool for applied researchers and practitioners. Several articles have been published with task analyses for graphing data with the new versions…

Barton, Erin E.; Reichow, Brian

2012-01-01

421

Skills, Management of Skills, and IT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information technology (IT) skill shortages appear at the market level occasionally—usually for emerging technologies, unanticipated challenges, and\\/or unresolved issues such as systems security. Even when a market- level skill shortage does not exist, a firm can still suffer from skill shortages for its critical information system (IS) project and\\/or IT operations unless the firm plans and manages its needs for

Makoto Nakayama; Norma Sutcliffe

422

Speculation and Historical Interpretation for Fifth and Sixth Graders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a unit for fifth- and sixth-grade students that helps develop critical thinking skills. Explains that students read the book, "Leonardo da Vinci" (Diane Stanley), to develop their historical interpretation skills and demonstrate that there is not just one right answer in history. (CMK)

Schneider, Elizabeth; Gregory, Leslie A.

2000-01-01

423

Twistor theory on a finite graph  

E-print Network

We show how the description of a shear-free ray congruence in Minkowski space as an evolving family of semi-conformal mappings can naturally be formulated on a finite graph. For this, we introduce the notion of holomorphic function on a graph. On a regular coloured graph of degree three, we recover the space-time picture. In the spirit of twistor theory, where a light ray is the more fundamental object from which space-time points should be derived, the line graph, whose points are the edges of the original graph, should be considered as the basic object. The Penrose twistor correspondence is discussed in this context.

Paul Baird; Mohammad Wehbe

2010-02-01

424

A classification of all 1-Salem graphs  

E-print Network

A cyclotomic graph is one that has all its eigenvalues in the interval $[-2,2]$, and a Salem graph is either (i) bipartite with all but two eigenvalues in $[-2,2]$, or (ii) non-bipartite with all but one eigenvalue in the interval $[-2,2]$. We define an $m$-Salem graph to be a connected Salem graph $G$ for which $m$ is minimal such that there exists an induced cyclotomic subgraph of $G$ that has $m$ fewer vertices than $G$. Every Salem graph contains a 1-Salem graph as an induced subgraph. The main result of this paper is a complete combinatorial description of all 1-Salem graphs: there are 25 infinite families and 383 sporadic examples, only 16 of which give trivial Salem graphs. We observe that all generalised line graphs that are Salem graphs contain at least one triangle, and hence produce a complete list of all 25 connected non-bipartite triangle-free Salem graphs.

Cooley, Jonathan; McKee, James

2011-01-01

425

Affinity learning with diffusion on tensor product graph.  

PubMed

In many applications, we are given a finite set of data points sampled from a data manifold and represented as a graph with edge weights determined by pairwise similarities of the samples. Often the pairwise similarities (which are also called affinities) are unreliable due to noise or due to intrinsic difficulties in estimating similarity values of the samples. As observed in several recent approaches, more reliable similarities can be obtained if the original similarities are diffused in the context of other data points, where the context of each point is a set of points most similar to it. Compared to the existing methods, our approach differs in two main aspects. First, instead of diffusing the similarity information on the original graph, we propose to utilize the tensor product graph (TPG) obtained by the tensor product of the original graph with itself. Since TPG takes into account higher order information, it is not a surprise that we obtain more reliable similarities. However, it comes at the price of higher order computational complexity and storage requirement. The key contribution of the proposed approach is that the information propagation on TPG can be computed with the same computational complexity and the same amount of storage as the propagation on the original graph. We prove that a graph diffusion process on TPG is equivalent to a novel iterative algorithm on the original graph, which is guaranteed to converge. After its convergence we obtain new edge weights that can be interpreted as new, learned affinities. We stress that the affinities are learned in an unsupervised setting. We illustrate the benefits of the proposed approach for data manifolds composed of shapes, images, and image patches on two very different tasks of image retrieval and image segmentation. With learned affinities, we achieve the bull's eye retrieval score of 99.99 percent on the MPEG-7 shape dataset, which is much higher than the state-of-the-art algorithms. When the data- points are image patches, the NCut with the learned affinities not only significantly outperforms the NCut with the original affinities, but it also outperforms state-of-the-art image segmentation methods. PMID:22392704

Yang, Xingwei; Prasad, Lakshman; Latecki, Longin Jan

2013-01-01

426

Using Graph Theory to Analyze Drama  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students analyze dramatic works using graph theory. They gather data, record it in Microsoft Excel and use Cytoscape (a free, downloadable application) to generate graphs that visually illustrate the key characters (nodes) and connections between them (edges). The nodes in the Cytoscape graphs are color-coded and sized according to the importance of the node (in this activity nodes represent characters in the work and their relative importance to the story). After the analysis, the graphs are further examined to see what the visual depiction of the story in the form of a graph tells readers about the inner workings of the dramatic work. Students gain practice with graph theory vocabulary, including node, edge, betweeness centrality and degree on interaction, and learn about a range of engineering applications of graph theory.

IMPART RET Program, College of Information Science & Technology,

427

On a programming language for graph algorithms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An algorithmic language, GRAAL, is presented for describing and implementing graph algorithms of the type primarily arising in applications. The language is based on a set algebraic model of graph theory which defines the graph structure in terms of morphisms between certain set algebraic structures over the node set and arc set. GRAAL is modular in the sense that the user specifies which of these mappings are available with any graph. This allows flexibility in the selection of the storage representation for different graph structures. In line with its set theoretic foundation, the language introduces sets as a basic data type and provides for the efficient execution of all set and graph operators. At present, GRAAL is defined as an extension of ALGOL 60 (revised) and its formal description is given as a supplement to the syntactic and semantic definition of ALGOL. Several typical graph algorithms are written in GRAAL to illustrate various features of the language and to show its applicability.

Rheinboldt, W. C.; Basili, V. R.; Mesztenyi, C. K.

1971-01-01

428

Quantum searches on highly symmetric graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study scattering quantum walks on highly symmetric graphs and use the walks to solve search problems on these graphs. The particle making the walk resides on the edges of the graph, and at each time step scatters at the vertices. All of the vertices have the same scattering properties except for a subset of special vertices. The object of the search is to find a special vertex. A quantum circuit implementation of these walks is presented in which the set of special vertices is specified by a quantum oracle. We consider the complete graph, a complete bipartite graph, and an M -partite graph. In all cases, the dimension of the Hilbert space in which the time evolution of the walk takes place is small (between three and six), so the walks can be completely analyzed analytically. Such dimensional reduction is due to the fact that these graphs have large automorphism groups. We find the usual quadratic quantum speedups in all cases considered.

Reitzner, Daniel; Hillery, Mark; Feldman, Edgar; Bužek, Vladimír

2009-01-01

429

The Anatomy of the Facebook Social Graph  

E-print Network

We study the structure of the social graph of active Facebook users, the largest social network ever analyzed. We compute numerous features of the graph including the number of users and friendships, the degree distribution, path lengths, clustering, and mixing patterns. Our results center around three main observations. First, we characterize the global structure of the graph, determining that the social network is nearly fully connected, with 99.91% of individuals belonging to a single large connected component, and we confirm the "six degrees of separation" phenomenon on a global scale. Second, by studying the average local clustering coefficient and degeneracy of graph neighborhoods, we show that while the Facebook graph as a whole is clearly sparse, the graph neighborhoods of users contain surprisingly dense structure. Third, we characterize the assortativity patterns present in the graph by studying the basic demographic and network properties of users. We observe clear degree assortativity and characte...

Ugander, Johan; Backstrom, Lars; Marlow, Cameron

2011-01-01

430

Physical principles for economies of skilled movements  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents some elementary principles regarding constraints on movements, which may be useful in modeling and interpreting motor control strategies for skilled movements. Movements which are optimum with respect to various objectives, or “costs”, are analyzed and compared. The specific costs considered are related to movement time, distance, peak velocity, energy, peak acceleration, and rate of change of acceleration

W. L. Nelson

1983-01-01

431

Ecologies of Outdoor Skill: An Education of Attention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participants' performances of outdoor skills and leadership are interpreted for environmental learning using Ingold's (2000) notion of an "education of attention": the fine-tuning of their perception. The actual tasks and activities of adventure travel have until recently gone largely unquestioned; but the relationship between skills and…

Mullins, Philip M.

2011-01-01

432

Developing Thinking Skills That Are Basic to Citizenship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on thinking skills which are basic to citizenship, the paper reviews definitions of citizenship from Plato to the present, discusses scholarly thinking about citizenship, lists general principles of skill development, and presents two brief sample lessons. Citizenship is interpreted as social interaction which is based upon global…

Northup, Terry; Barnes, Buckley

433

Flux networks in metabolic graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A metabolic model can be represented as a bipartite graph comprising linked reaction and metabolite nodes. Here it is shown how a network of conserved fluxes can be assigned to the edges of such a graph by combining the reaction fluxes with a conserved metabolite property such as molecular weight. A similar flux network can be constructed by combining the primal and dual solutions to the linear programming problem that typically arises in constraint-based modelling. Such constructions may help with the visualization of flux distributions in complex metabolic networks. The analysis also explains the strong correlation observed between metabolite shadow prices (the dual linear programming variables) and conserved metabolite properties. The methods were applied to recent metabolic models for Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Methanosarcina barkeri. Detailed results are reported for E. coli; similar results were found for other organisms.

Warren, P. B.; Duarte Queiros, S. M.; Jones, J. L.

2009-12-01

434

What is the difference between the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph?  

PubMed Central

The breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph are two key data structures in the studies of genome rearrangements and genome assembly. However, the classical breakpoint graphs are defined on two genomes (represented as sequences of synteny blocks), while the classical de Bruijn graphs are defined on a single genome (represented as DNA strings). Thus, the connection between these two graph models is not explicit. We generalize the notions of both the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph, and make it transparent that the breakpoint graph and the de Bruijn graph are mathematically equivalent. The explicit description of the connection between these important data structures provides a bridge between two previously separated bioinformatics communities studying genome rearrangements and genome assembly.

2014-01-01

435

Embodied Semiotic Activities and Their Role in the Construction of Mathematical Meaning of Motion Graphs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the relation between bodily actions, artifact-mediated activities, and semiotic processes that students experience while producing and interpreting graphs of two-dimensional motion in the plane. We designed a technology-based setting that enabled students to engage in embodied semiotic activities and experience two modes of…

Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

2008-01-01

436

Mining top-k and bottom-k correlative crime patterns through graph representations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crime activities are geospatial phenomena and as such are geospatially, thematically and temporally correlated. Thus, crime datasets must be interpreted and analyzed in conjunction with various factors that can contribute to the formulation of crime. Discovering these correlations allows a deeper insight into the complex nature of criminal behavior. We introduce a graph based dataset representation that allows us to

Peter Phillips; Ickjai Lee

2009-01-01

437

The Poor Cartographer: Graph Coloring  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners help a poor cartographer color in the countries on a map, making sure each country is colored a different color than any of its neighbors. Through this exercise, learners discover the "has-to-be" rule and the value of place-holders. This activity reveals the complexity of graph coloring algorithms in computer science. Variations, extensions, background information, and solutions are included in the PDF.

Bell, Tim; Witten, Ian; Fellows, Mike

1995-01-01

438

Vertex Partitions of Chordal Graphs  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITAT POLIT `ECNICA DE CATALUNYA BARCELONA, SPAIN E-mail: david.wood@upc.edu Received April 26, 2005 G be an (undirected, simple, finite) graph with vertex set V(G) and edge set E(G). Let (G) be the maximum degree of G. The neighborhood of a vertex v of G is denoted by N(v) = {w V(G) : vw E

Wood, David R.

439

Graphs, partitions and Fibonacci numbers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The Fibonacci number of a graph is the number of independent vertex subsets. In this paper, we investigate trees with large Fibonacci number. In particular, we show that all trees with n edges and Fibonacci number,> 2,\\/4 for constants A,B as n ! 1. This is proved by using a natural correspondence between partitions of integers and star-like trees.

Arnold Knopfmacher; Robert F. Tichy; Stephan Wagner; Volker Ziegler

2007-01-01

440

Fibonacci Identities and Graph Colorings  

E-print Network

We generalize both the Fibonacci and Lucas numbers to the context of graph colorings, and prove some identities involving these numbers. As a corollary we obtain new proofs of some known identities involving Fibonacci numbers such as \\[F_{r+s+t} = F_{r+1}F_{s+1}F_{t+1} + F_r F_s F_t - F_{r-1}F_{s-1}F_{t-1}.\\

Christopher J. Hillar; Troels Windfeldt

2008-05-07

441

Fire Containment in Planar Graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a graph $G$, a fire starts at some vertex. At every time step, firefighters can protect up to $k$ vertices, and then the fire spreads to all unprotected neighbours. The $k$-surviving rate $\\\\rho_k(G)$ of $G$ is the expectation of the proportion of vertices that can be saved from the fire, if the starting vertex of the fire is chosen

Louis Esperet; Jan van den Heuvel; Frédéric Maffray; Félix Sipma

2011-01-01

442

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERS Translation/Interpretation  

E-print Network

STRATEGIESEMPLOYERS GOVERNMENT Translation/Interpretation Language Analysis Linguistics Diplomacy for more job opportunities. INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE Translation/Interpretation Banking/Finance Sales Customer, Page 2) AREAS Translation/Interpretation Airline Services Management Booking and Reservations Travel

New Hampshire, University of

443

Evolution of cooperation on dynamical graphs.  

PubMed

There are two key characteristic of animal and human societies: (1) degree heterogeneity, meaning that not all individual have the same number of associates; and (2) the interaction topology is not static, i.e. either individuals interact with different set of individuals at different times of their life, or at least they have different associations than their parents. Earlier works have shown that population structure is one of the mechanisms promoting cooperation. However, most studies had assumed that the interaction network can be described by a regular graph (homogeneous degree distribution). Recently there are an increasing number of studies employing degree heterogeneous graphs to model interaction topology. But mostly the interaction topology was assumed to be static. Here we investigate the fixation probability of the cooperator strategy in the prisoner's dilemma, when interaction network is a random regular graph, a random graph or a scale-free graph and the interaction network is allowed to change. We show that the fixation probability of the cooperator strategy is lower when the interaction topology is described by a dynamical graph compared to a static graph. Even a limited network dynamics significantly decreases the fixation probability of cooperation, an effect that is mitigated stronger by degree heterogeneous networks topology than by a degree homogeneous one. We have also found that from the considered graph topologies the decrease of fixation probabilities due to graph dynamics is the lowest on scale-free graphs. PMID:19095039

Kun, Adám; Scheuring, István

2009-04-01

444

Manufacturing Engineering Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Manufacturing Engineering Skills provides an assessment of what the key manufacturing skills along with skill gaps are in the marketplace. Joe Loughrey is president and chief operating officer of Cummins Inc. and chairman of The Manufacturing Institute, the research and education arm of the National Association of Manufacturers. Additionally, Manufacturing Engineering Skills was shared by Mike Mohlar and by Roger Lang at an SME mfg executive roundtable in 2005 to provide clarity and encouragement about careers in manufacturing.

Loughrey, Joe

2009-08-03

445

Social Skills Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The term “social skills” encompasses an array of learned behaviors that share the common goal of maintaining or increasing\\u000a reinforcement within a social context. Deficits in social skills can occur at any developmental period and are not likely\\u000a to improve spontaneously because impaired social skills impede interactions with other people. In turn, unsatisfying or disruptive\\u000a interactions exacerbate social skill deficits

Ashley J. Smith; Judith A. Jordan; Mary Fran Flood; David J. Hansen

446

Evaluating Physical Assessment Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes methods used in the nursing curriculum at the University of Iowa College of Nursing to evaluate inclusion of physical assessment skills and to test students' use of cognitive, perceptual, and psychomotor assessment skills in nursing diagnosis. Includes an example of motor and perceptual skill objectives for examining thorax and lungs.…

And Others; Reese, Jean L.

1979-01-01

447

Enhancing Employee Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains four symposium papers on enhancing employee skills. "The Effect of Study Skills Training Intervention on United States Air Force Aeromedical Apprentices" (John C. Griffith) demonstrates how study skills intervention resulted in a significant increase in the end-of-course scores of a sample of 90 randomly selected Air Force…

1999

448

Life Skills Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, Bates, the Inmate Programs Manager of the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office in Tampa, Florida, describes her office's Life Skills Project, a comprehensive program that has significantly enhanced three existing programs by adding extensive life skills components. The added life skills modules reinforce the importance of…

Bates, Jan P.

2005-01-01

449

Knowledge & Skills Foundations  

E-print Network

#12;Knowledge & Skills Foundations In the social sciences, incoming students succeed when they are armed with specific knowledge and skills--but above all, when they are ready to embrace the learning process. Basic Knowledge & Skills Students who are ready for entry-level courses are familiar

Hood, Craig

450

Roman Bondage Numbers of Some Graphs  

E-print Network

A Roman dominating function on a graph $G=(V,E)$ is a function $f: V\\to \\{0,1,2\\}$ satisfying the condition that every vertex $u$ with $f(u)=0$ is adjacent to at least one vertex $v$ with $f(v)=2$. The weight of a Roman dominating function is the value $f(G)=\\sum_{u\\in V} f(u)$. The Roman domination number of $G$ is the minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on $G$. The Roman bondage number of a nonempty graph $G$ is the minimum number of edges whose removal results in a graph with the Roman domination number larger than that of $G$. This paper determines the exact value of the Roman bondage numbers of two classes of graphs, complete $t$-partite graphs and $(n-3)$-regular graphs with order $n$ for any $n\\ge 5$.

Hu, Fu-Tao

2011-01-01

451

API Requirements for Dynamic Graph Prediction  

SciTech Connect

Given a large-scale time-evolving multi-modal and multi-relational complex network (a.k.a., a large-scale dynamic semantic graph), we want to implement algorithms that discover patterns of activities on the graph and learn predictive models of those discovered patterns. This document outlines the application programming interface (API) requirements for fast prototyping of feature extraction, learning, and prediction algorithms on large dynamic semantic graphs. Since our algorithms must operate on large-scale dynamic semantic graphs, we have chosen to use the graph API developed in the CASC Complex Networks Project. This API is supported on the back end by a semantic graph database (developed by Scott Kohn and his team). The advantages of using this API are (i) we have full-control of its development and (ii) the current API meets almost all of the requirements outlined in this document.

Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

2006-10-13

452

Short Encodings of Planar Graphs and Maps  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discuss space-efficient encoding schemes for planar graphs and maps. Our resultsimprove on the constants of previous schemes and can be achieved with simple encodingalgorithms. They are near-optimal in number of bits per edge.1 IntroductionIn this paper we discuss space-efficient binary encoding schemes for several classes of unlabeledconnected planar graphs and maps. In encoding a graph we must encode the

Kenneth Keeler; Jeffery Westbrook

1995-01-01

453

Comparing Columns on a Bar Graph (Illuminations)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson plan students learn to create bar graphs using unifix cubes, translate this representation to graph paper, and then compare the data that has been collected and displayed. Students are encouraged to make up their own questions about the data (favorite juice) and to practice with multiple sets of data. Sample questions for students and extension ideas are included. The lesson contains links to a PDF of graph paper and the Bar Grapher tool which is cataloged separately in this database.

Burton, Grace M.

2012-01-01

454

Efficient hierarchical graph-based video segmentation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an efficient and scalable technique for spatiotemporal segmentation of long video sequences using a hierarchical graph-based algorithm. We begin by over-segmenting a volumetric video graph into space-time regions grouped by appearance. We then construct a “region graph” over the obtained segmentation and iteratively repeat this process over multiple levels to create a tree of spatio-temporal segmentations. This hierarchical

Matthias Grundmann; Vivek Kwatra; Mei Han; Irfan A. Essa

2010-01-01

455

Weight of quadratic forms and graph states  

E-print Network

We prove a connection between Schmidt-rank and weight of quadratic forms. This provides a new tool for the classification of graph states based on entanglement. Our main tool arises from a reformulation of previously known results concerning the weight of quadratic forms in terms of graph states properties. As a byproduct, we obtain a straightforward characterization of the weight of functions associated with pivot-minor of bipartite graphs.

Alessandro Cosentino; Simone Severini

2009-06-13

456

3-facial colouring of plane graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A plane graph is l-facially k-colourable if its vertices can be coloured with\\u000ak colours such that any two distinct vertices on a facial segment of length at\\u000amost l are coloured differently. We prove that every plane graph is 3-facially\\u000a11-colourable. As a consequence, we derive that every 2-connected plane graph\\u000awith maximum face-size at most 7 is cyclically

Frédéric Havet; Jean-Sébastien Sereni; Riste Skrekovski

2006-01-01

457

Random walks on highly symmetric graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider uniform random walks on finite graphs withn nodes. When the hitting times are symmetric, the expected covering time is at least 1\\/2n logn-O(n log logn) uniformly over all such graphs. We also obtain bounds for the covering times in terms of the eigenvalues of the transition matrix of the Markov chain. For distance-regular graphs, a general lower bound

Luc Devroye; Amine Sbihi

1990-01-01

458

Applying Graph Theory to Interaction Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graph theory provides a substantial resource for a diverse range of quantitative and qualitative usability measures that can\\u000a be used for evaluating recovery from error, informing design tradeoffs, probing topics for user training, and so on.\\u000a \\u000a Graph theory is a straight-forward, practical and flexible way to implement real interactive systems. Hence, graph theory complements other approaches to formal HCI, such

Harold Thimbleby; Jeremy Gow

459

A definition of graph homology and graph K-theory of algebras.  

E-print Network

We introduce and study elementary properties of graph homology of algebras. This new homology theory shares many features of cyclic and Hochschild homology. We also define a graph K-theory together with an analog of Chern character.

M. V. Movshev

460

Cellular Graph Acceptors, 5: Closure Properties of Cellular d-Graph Languages.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Cellular d-graph languages are shown to be closed under set theoretic operations, including finite union and intersection; and under geometric operations, including permutation of arc end numbering, concatenation, closure, and formation of line graphs. De...

A. Wu

1978-01-01

461

Benchmarking Prolog Interpreters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpreters have the advantage of creating a safe environment in addition to provide portability. In the context of Prolog, several interpreters were developed following the model of the WAM. But what to say about the performance of the known interpreters? This article points to the differences in performance among the known Prolog interpreters. For this, we used several metrics to

Alexandre Martins Locci; Anderson Faustino da Silva

2011-01-01

462

Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

1965-01-01

463

Generation of graph-state streams  

SciTech Connect

We propose a protocol to generate a stream of mobile qubits in a graph state through a single stationary parent qubit and discuss two types of its physical implementation, namely, the generation of photonic graph states through an atomlike qubit and the generation of flying atoms through a cavity-mode photonic qubit. The generated graph states fall into an important class that can hugely reduce the resource requirement of fault-tolerant linear optics quantum computation, which was previously known to be far from realistic. In regard to the flying atoms, we also propose a heralded generation scheme, which allows for high-fidelity graph states even under the photon loss.

Ballester, Daniel [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del Pais Vasco-Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Apdo. 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Cho, Jaeyoon; Kim, M. S. [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, London SW7 2PG (United Kingdom); Optics Section, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15

464

Generation of graph-state streams  

E-print Network

We propose a protocol to generate a stream of mobile qubits in a graph state through a single stationary parent qubit and discuss two types of its physical implementation, namely, the generation of photonic graph states through an atom-like qubit and those of flying atoms through a cavity-mode photonic qubit. The generated graph states fall into an important class that can hugely reduce the resource requirement of fault-tolerant linear optics quantum computation, which was previously known to be far from realistic. In regard to the flying atoms, we also propose a heralded generation scheme, which allows for high-fidelity graph states even under the photon loss.

Daniel Ballester; Jaeyoon Cho; M. S. Kim

2010-12-08

465

Trapping Lab - Linking Equations and Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity reinforcse the relationship between the solution to a system of equations and the intersection of their corresponding graph. Generally, students begin to solve systems by using graphing and then algebra. Once a student learns to solve the system by algebra, they often forget the connection to the graph. Hence in this lab, they will use algebra first and then graph their answers. The situation is one where the student is asked to determine where an animal trail intersects with an access road. Given linear equations which represent the placement of the access roads, assign each person/group one or more equations representing an 'animal trail'.

2011-01-01

466

Graph edit distance from spectral seriation.  

PubMed

This paper is concerned with computing graph edit distance. One of the criticisms that can be leveled at existing methods for computing graph edit distance is that they lack some of the formality and rigor of the computation of string edit distance. Hence, our aim is to convert graphs to string sequences so that string matching techniques can be used. To do this, we use a graph spectral seriation method to convert the adjacency matrix into a string or sequence order. We show how the serial ordering can be established using the leading eigenvector of the graph adjacency matrix. We pose the problem of graph-matching as a maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) alignment of the seriation sequences for pairs of graphs. This treatment leads to an expression in which the edit cost is the negative logarithm of the a posteriori sequence alignment probability. We compute the edit distance by finding the sequence of string edit operations which minimizes the cost of the path traversing the edit lattice. The edit costs are determined by the components of the leading eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix and by the edge densities of the graphs being matched. We demonstrate the utility of the edit distance on a number of graph clustering problems. PMID:15747792

Robles-Kelly, Antonio; Hancock, Edwin R

2005-03-01

467

Rainbow Colouring of Split and Threshold Graphs  

E-print Network

A rainbow colouring of a connected graph is a colouring of the edges of the graph, such that every pair of vertices is connected by at least one path in which no two edges are coloured the same. Such a colouring using minimum possible number of colours is called an optimal rainbow colouring, and the minimum number of colours required is called the rainbow connection number of the graph. In this article, we show the following: 1. The problem of deciding whether a graph can be rainbow coloured using 3 colours remains NP-complete even when restricted to the class of split graphs. However, any split graph can be rainbow coloured in linear time using at most one more colour than the optimum. 2. For every integer k larger than 2, the problem of deciding whether a graph can be rainbow coloured using k colours remains NP-complete even when restricted to the class of chordal graphs. 3. For every positive integer k, threshold graphs with rainbow connection number k can be characterised based on their degree sequence al...

Chandran, L Sunil

2012-01-01

468

The Geometry of Graphs and Some of its Algorithmic Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we explore some implications of viewing graphs as geometric objects. This approach offers a new perspective on a number of graph-theoretic and algorithmic problems. There are several ways to model graphs geometrically and our main concern here is with geometric representations that respect the metric of the (possibly weighted) graph. Given a graph G we map its

Nathan Linial; Eran London; Yuri Rabinovich

1995-01-01

469

What Energy Functions Can Be Minimized via Graph Cuts?  

E-print Network

What Energy Functions Can Be Minimized via Graph Cuts? Vladimir Kolmogorov, Member, IEEE, and Ramin Zabih, Member, IEEE Abstract--In the last few years, several new algorithms based on graph cuts have constructs a graph such that the minimum cut on the graph also minimizes the energy. Yet, because these graph

Field, David

470

ON RADIALLY EXTREMAL GRAPHS AND DIGRAPHS, A SURVEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper gives an overview of results for radially minimal, critical, maximal and stable graphs and digraphs. The paper gives an overview of results for radially minimal, critical, maximal and stable graphs and digraphs. First we will speak about graphs and then digraphs. We consider nonempty and finite graphs and digraphs here. Let G be a graph. Then we denote

Ferdinand Gliviak

2000-01-01

471

Discovering correlated spatio-temporal changes in evolving graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graphs provide powerful abstractions of relational data, and are widely used in fields such as network management, web page analysis and sociology. While many graph representations of data describe dynamic and time evolving relationships, most graph mining work treats graphs as static entities. Our focus in this paper is to discover regions of a graph that are evolving in a

Jeffrey Chan; James Bailey; Christopher Leckie

2008-01-01

472

Existential Graphs for Terminological Logics \\Lambda Renate A. Schmidt  

E-print Network

Existential Graphs for Terminological Logics \\Lambda Renate A. Schmidt Max­Planck­Institut f Networks and Terminological Systems 2 3 Existential Graphs 7 4 Existential Graphs for Terminological : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 5 Existential graphs and conceptual graphs 21 6 Conclusion 21 References 23 Abstract In this paper

Schmidt, Renate A.

473

A Static Analysis Technique for Graph Transformation Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we introduce a static analysis technique for graph transformation systems. We present an algorithm which, given a graph transformation system and a start graph, produces a nite struc- ture consisting of a hypergraph decorated with transitions (Petri graph) which can be seen as an approximation of the Winskel style unfolding of the graph transformation system. The fact

Paolo Baldan; Andrea Corradini; Barbara König

2001-01-01

474

A fast kernel-based multilevel algorithm for graph clustering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graph clustering (also called graph partitioning) --- clustering the nodes of a graph --- is an important problem in diverse data mining applications. Traditional approaches involve optimization of graph clustering objectives such as normalized cut or ratio association; spectral methods are widely used for these objectives, but they require eigenvector computation which can be slow. Recently, graph clustering with a

Inderjit S. Dhillon; Yuqiang Guan; Brian Kulis

2005-01-01

475

Managing attack graph complexity through visual hierarchical aggregation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a framework for managing network attack graph complexity through interactive visualization, which includes hierarchical aggregation of graph elements. Aggregation collapses non-overlapping subgraphs of the attack graph to single graph vertices, providing compression of attack graph complexity. Our aggregation is recursive (nested), according to a predefined aggregation hierarchy. This hierarchy establishes rules at each level of aggregation, with the

Steven Noel; Sushil Jajodia

2004-01-01

476

Generating Weakly Triangulated Graphs \\Lambda RYAN B. HAYWARD y  

E-print Network

Generating Weakly Triangulated Graphs \\Lambda RYAN B. HAYWARD y Abstract. We show that a graph v j to G j \\Gamma1 to create the graph G j , such that v j is not the middle vertex of any P 3 of G j . A graph is weakly triangulated , or weakly chordal , if neither the graph nor its com­ plement

Hayward, Ryan B.

477

HYPERBOLIC RELATIVELY HYPERBOLIC GRAPHS AND DISC URSULA HAMENSTADT  

E-print Network

to investigate the geometry of graphs of discs in a handlebody. A handlebody of genus g 1 is a compact threeHYPERBOLIC RELATIVELY HYPERBOLIC GRAPHS AND DISC GRAPHS URSULA HAMENST¨ADT Abstract. We show, we show that the disc graph and the electrified disc graph of a handlebody H of genus g 2

Hamenstädt, Ursula

478

What Energy Functions Can Be Minimized via Graph Cuts?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last few years, several new algorithms based on graph cuts have been developed to solve energy minimization problems in com- puter vision. Each of these techniques constructs a graph such that the minimum cut on the graph also minimizes the energy. Yet because these graph constructions are complex and highly specific to a particular en- ergy function, graph

Vladimir Kolmogorov; Ramin Zabih

2002-01-01

479

Spanish Language Skills A Level: 1 Credit Value: 10 Module Code: ACE1680  

E-print Network

and interpretation of written or heard materials. · Show the skills required in the effective use of learningSpanish Language Skills A Level: 1 Credit Value: 10 Module Code: ACE1680 Students discuss, etc. Skills such as translation, essay writing, oral presentations and group discussions

Stevenson, Mark

480

The alignment-distribution graph  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

1993-01-01

481

The alignment-distribution graph  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

1993-01-01

482

k-Subdomination in graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a positive integer k, a k-subdominating function of a graph G=(V,E) is a function f:V?{?1,1} such that ?u?NG[v]f(u)?1 for at least k vertices v of G. The k-subdomination number of G, denoted by ?ks(G), is the minimum of ?v?Vf(v) taken over all k-subdominating functions f of G. In this article, we prove a conjecture for k-subdomination on trees proposed

Gerard J. Chang; Sheng-chyang Liaw; Hong-gwa Yeh

2002-01-01

483

Data Analysis: Graphs (Grade 3)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Bridges in Mathematics Supplement is designed to scaffold students learning from pictographs, to bar graphs, and finally dot plots (line plots). In each of the initial three activities the class gathers data and then works with partners to display the data in one form and then individually to display it in another form. The students then work together to compare representations and analyze the data. Two individual worksheets follow that enable students to demonstrate their own understanding of these three forms of representation and their analysis. Activity and independent worksheets are included in pdf format.

2008-01-01

484

Aspects of Performance on Line Graph Description Tasks: Influenced by Graph Familiarity and Different Task Features  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Motivated by cognitive theories of graph comprehension, this study systematically manipulated characteristics of a line graph description task in a speaking test in ways to mitigate the influence of graph familiarity, a potential source of construct-irrelevant variance. It extends Xi (2005), which found that the differences in holistic scores on…

Xi, Xiaoming

2010-01-01

485

Time-Space Tradeoffs for Undirected Graph Traversal by Graph Automata  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate time-space tradeoffs for traversing undirected graphs, using a variety of structured models that are all variants of Cook and Rackoff's “Jumping Automata for Graphs.” Our strongest tradeoff is a quadratic lower bound on the product of time and space for graph traversal. For example, achieving linear time requires linear space, implying that depth-first search is optimal. Since our

Paul Beame; Allan Borodin; Prabhakar Raghavan; Walter L. Ruzzo; Martin Tompa

1996-01-01

486

Segmenting Planar Superpixel Adjacency Graphs w.r.t. Non-planar Superpixel Affinity Graphs  

E-print Network

the perspective of graph parti- tioning. Specifically, we consider minimum multicuts of superpixel affin- ity graphs in which all affinities between non-adjacent superpixels are negative. We propose a relaxation if the affinity graph is non-planar. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach in user-assisted image

Fowlkes, Charless

487

A graph-cut approach to image segmentation using an affinity graph based on 0-sparse  

E-print Network

A graph-cut approach to image segmentation using an affinity graph based on 0-sparse representation segmentation method by construct- ing an affinity graph using 0 sparse representation. Computing first over-zero representation coefficients, and the affinity of connected super- pixels is derived by the corresponding

Boyer, Edmond

488

On Products and Line Graphs of Signed Graphs, their Eigenvalues and Energy  

E-print Network

On Products and Line Graphs of Signed Graphs, their Eigenvalues and Energy K.A. Germina, Shahul and Laplacian matrices and their eigenvalues and energies of the general product (non-complete extended p- sum product and the eigenvalues and energy of the product in terms of those of the factor graphs

Zaslavsky, Thomas

489

Aggregation Skip Graph: An Extension of Skip Graph for Efficient Aggregation Query  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skip graph is a structured overlay network that allows range query. Skip graph is useful for a distributed database which stores values corresponding to keys. Considering to find some aggregated value like a maximum, a minimum, or an average of stored values within a range of keys, Skip graph requires more messages as the query covers wider range since all

Toshiyuki Abe; Tatsuya Ueda; Kota Abe; Hayato Ishibashi; Toshio Matsuura

490

Intro Algo ring Arbitrary graphs Conclusion PING PONG IN DANGEROUS GRAPHS  

E-print Network

Arbitrary graphs Conclusion Defs and model Related work Our results Problem Black hole in a network Node Arbitrary graphs Conclusion Defs and model Related work Our results Problem Black hole in a network Node Arbitrary graphs Conclusion Defs and model Related work Our results Problem Black hole in a network Node

Fondements et Applications, Université Paris 7

491

Ground photography for improvved image interpretation training  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Systematic sets of ground based color and color infrared photography were presented to students in remote sensing classes to enhance their ability to interpret satellite images. Features readily apparent on computer enhanced LANDSAT images were presented simultaneously with ground based photography in the format of slide triplicates. It was hypothesized that this instructional approach would improve the students' abilities to recognize, understand and interpret ground phenomena present on remotely sensed imagery. Tests conducted in undergraduate remote sensing classes substantially upheld this hypothesis. Student image interpretive abilities were tested before and after being exposed to the ground level photography. In general, image interpretive skills of the class improved by 25%. Also, the performance of students having different academic majors varied greatly for differing types of image subjects.

Lougeay, R.

1981-01-01

492

Graph rewriting with polarized cloning  

E-print Network

We tackle the problem of graph transformation with a particular focus on node cloning. We propose a graph rewriting framework where nodes can be cloned zero, one or more times. A node can be cloned together with all its incident edges, with only the outgoing edges, with only the incoming edges or without any of the incident edges. We thus subsume previous works such as the sesqui-pushout, the heterogeneous pushout and the adaptive star grammars approaches. A rule is defined as a span $\\spa{\\grpol{L}}{l}{\\grpol{K}}{r}{R}$ where the right-hand side $R$ is a multigraph, the left-hand side $\\grpol{L}$ and the interface $\\grpol{K}$ are polarized multigraphs. A polarized multigraph is a multigraph endowed with some cloning annotations on nodes and edges. We introduce the notion of polarized multigraphs and define a rewriting step as pushback followed by a pushout in the same way as in the sesqui-pushout approach.

Duval, Dominique; Prost, Frédéric

2009-01-01

493

Path integral on star graph  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we study path integral for a single spinless particle on a star graph with N edges, whose vertex is known to be described by U(N) family of boundary conditions. After carefully studying the free particle case, both at the critical and off-critical levels, we propose a new path integral formulation that correctly captures all the scale-invariant subfamily of boundary conditions realized at fixed points of boundary renormalization group flow. Our proposal is based on the folding trick, which maps a scalar-valued wave function on star graph to an N-component vector-valued wave function on half-line. All the parameters of scale-invariant subfamily of boundary conditions are encoded into the momentum independent weight factors, which appear to be associated with the two distinct path classes on half-line that form the cyclic group Z2. We show that, when bulk interactions are edge-independent, these weight factors are generally given by an N-dimensional unitary representation of Z2. Generalization to momentum dependent weight factors and applications to worldline formalism are briefly discussed.

Ohya, Satoshi

2012-06-01

494

Multithreaded Algorithms for Graph Coloring  

SciTech Connect

Graph algorithms are challenging to parallelize when high performance and scalability are primary goals. Low concurrency, poor data locality, irregular access pattern, and high data access to computation ratio are among the chief reasons for the challenge. The performance implication of these features is exasperated on distributed memory machines. More success is being achieved on shared-memory, multi-core architectures supporting multithreading. We consider a prototypical graph problem, coloring, and show how a greedy algorithm for solving it can be e*ectively parallelized on multithreaded architectures. We present in particular two di*erent parallel algorithms. The first relies on speculation and iteration, and is suitable for any shared-memory, multithreaded system. The second uses data ow principles and is targeted at the massively multithreaded Cray XMT system. We benchmark the algorithms on three di*erent platforms and demonstrate scalable runtime performance. In terms of quality of solution, both algorithms use nearly the same number of colors as the serial algorithm.

Catalyurek, Umit V.; Feo, John T.; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Pothen, Alex

2012-10-21

495

Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs  

SciTech Connect

Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

2010-08-02

496

Continuum percolation in the intrinsically secure communications graph  

E-print Network

The intrinsically secure communications graph (iS-graph) is a random graph which captures the connections that can be securely established over a large-scale network, in the presence of eavesdroppers. It is based on ...

Pinto, Pedro C.

497

Understanding Graph Sampling Algorithms for Social Network Analysis  

E-print Network

Understanding Graph Sampling Algorithms for Social Network Analysis Tianyi Wang1, Yang Chen2 graph, graph sampling provides an efficient, yet inexpensive solution for social network analysis for social network analysis including user behavior measurements [11], social interaction characterization [4

Zhou, Yuanyuan

498

The assessment of laboratory performance skills in grade 9 science via individuals and pairs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research study focused on the development and administration of a laboratory investigation task involving ninth grade students currently studying Earth Science. Students were required to Plan and Perform the investigation based on concepts of Chemical Weathering. Science inquiry skills associated with Planning, Data Collection, Graphing, and Reasoning were evaluated using an analytical scoring rubric. Students completed a Survey Instrument, which provided contextual information about their prior laboratory experiences, and preferences about working individually versus pairs while completing science experiments. The sample was composed of 446 students from five schools in Western New York. Students completed the laboratory investigation individually and in pairs. One hundred and fifty students completed the task individually, and 296 students assigned to 148 pairs completed the task. T-tests and ANOVA's were used to evaluate achievement differences between individuals and pairs; by gender and individual ability for the individual sub-sample; and by the gender and ability composition for the pairs' sub-sample respectively. Mean scores for the Likert type Survey instrument provided contextual data about students' prior laboratory experiences. Factor analysis generally supported the theoretical model used to design the investigation. The results indicated there were significant differences in achievement between individuals and pairs in Graphing and Reasoning skills. Females outperformed males on the Total task, Data Collection, Graphing and Reasoning categories of skills. High ability students outperformed medium and low ability students on the Total Task, Planning, Graphing and Reasoning categories of skills. The composition of pairs by ability indicated significant differences in achievement on the Total Task, Planning and Reasoning skills. There were significant differences in achievement by female/female versus male/male and male/female pairs on the Total Task, Data Collection, Graphing and Reasoning skills.

Chan, Alfred William

499

Peripheral MR neurography: approach to interpretation.  

PubMed

The magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) examination is rapidly becoming a part of the diagnostic algorithm of patients with peripheral neuropathy; however, because of the technical demands and the lack of required reading skills, the examination is relatively underutilized and is currently limited to a few tertiary care centers. The radiologists with interest in peripheral nerve imaging should be able to perform and interpret this examination to exploit its potential for widespread use. This article outlines the systematic, stepwise approach to its interpretation and a brief discussion of the imaging pitfalls. PMID:24210314

Chhabra, Avneesh

2014-02-01

500

Feynman graph generation and calculations in the Hopf algebra of Feynman graphs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two programs for the computation of perturbative expansions of quantum field theory amplitudes are provided. feyngen can be used to generate Feynman graphs for Yang-Mills, QED and ?k theories. Using dedicated graph theoretic tools feyngen can generate graphs of comparatively high loop orders. feyncop implements the Hopf algebra of those Feynman graphs which incorporates the renormalization procedure necessary to calculate finite results in perturbation theory of the underlying quantum field theory. feyngen is validated by comparison to explicit calculations of zero dimensional quantum field theories and feyncop is validated using a combinatorial identity on the Hopf algebra of graphs.

Borinsky, Michael

2014-12-01