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Sample records for graphite furnace atomic

  1. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  2. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  3. Direct analysis of solids by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a second surface atomizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rettberg, T.M.; Holcombe, J.A.

    1986-06-01

    The direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric analysis of solids using the second surface atomizer has been investigated. The atomizer features a gas-cooled Ta insert within the graphite furnace onto which the analyte can be condensed, after which atomization is performed by raising the furnace to a higher temperature and shutting off the coolant gas. The analyses were conducted on standard reference material fly ash, river sediment, and citrus leaves, in addition to filter paper samples. All analyses were conducted without sample pretreatment or use of matrix modifiers. Quantitation was done by using simple aqueous standards. By use of peak heights, the recoveries varied from 81% to 127%, although several determinations were within the certified concentration range. The procedures typically gave low background absorbances and peak shapes that were relatively independent of the original sample matrix.

  4. Rapid analysis with transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhang; Carnrick, Glen; Slavin, Walter

    1993-09-01

    A new graphite furnace instrument using a transversely heated furnace tube with a longitudinal Zeeman correction system has been specifically designed to provide more nearly stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) conditions than previous furnace systems. Because there are no cold ends on this furnace tube on which to condense analyte and matrix materials, the vapor phase interferences are expected to be smaller. Also, the cooldown step can be avoided, thus saving time. This instrument permits the delivery of sample into a furnace already heated. The delivery rate of the autosampler can be slowed. These opportunities make it feasible for the sample to be dry on the platform by the time the delivery is complete. Several elements of environmental significance were chosen for test: As, Pb, Se, Tl, Cd, Cu, Cr and V. In almost all of these situations, the analyte was fully recovered without using a matrix modifier or a pyrolysis step. However, As and Pb in urine and As in sediment required a modifier and pyrolysis step for accurate results. A new fast furnace protocol was developed to accommodate use of a matrix modifier and this new protocol was successful for Pb and As in these matrices. All the procedures required less than 1 min total cycle times and produced results in agreement with certified values. This is in contrast with conventional methods which require 2-3 min per firing. These results confirm that graphite furnace methods can be accomplished with a throughput greater than 60 determinations per hour, and eventually, it may be possible to increase this rate beyond 100 determinations per hour.

  5. Determination of mercury in soils and sediments by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-García, Ignacio; Sánchez-Merlos, Mateo; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    1997-12-01

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of mercury is presented, in which the samples are suspended in a solution containing hydrofluoric and nitric acids. Silver nitrate (4% m/v) and potassium permanganate (3%) are incorporated, in the order specified, and aliquots are directly introduced into the graphite furnace. A fast heating programme with no conventional pyrolysis step is used. The detection limit for mercury in a 125 mg ml -1 suspension is 0.1 μg g -1. Calibration is performed by using aqueous standards. The reliability of the procedure is proved by analysing certified reference materials.

  6. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  7. Analysis of lithium in deep basalt groundwaters using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Marcy, A.D.

    1986-05-01

    Lithium is under consideration for use as a reactive (sorptive) tracer in experiments designed to provide information regarding natural attenuation processes in a basalt-groundwater environment. In support of these activities, background lithium concentrations in samples obtained from a variety of test horizons have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Significant interference was observed in these determinations and was found to be due to the presence of silicate in the samples. It was found that these problems could be circumvented through the use of alkaline silicate or synthetic groundwater matrix modifiers. This matrix effect was examined in some detail. Results obtained using the graphite furnace were compared to results obtained using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

  8. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  9. Determination of total tin in silicate rocks by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elsheimer, H.N.; Fries, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of total tin in silicate rocks utilizing a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer with a stabilized-temperature platform furnace and Zeeman-effect background correction. The sample is decomposed by lithium metaborate fusion (3 + 1) in graphite crucibles with the melt being dissolved in 7.5% hydrochloric acid. Tin extractions (4 + 1 or 8 + 1) are executed on portions of the acid solutions using a 4% solution of tricotylphosphine oxide in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Ascorbic acid is added as a reducing agent prior to extraction. A solution of diammonium hydrogenphosphate and magnesium nitrate is used as a matrix modifier in the graphite furnace determination. The limit of detection is > 10 pg, equivalent to > 1 ??g l-1 of tin in the MIBK solution or 0.2-0.3 ??g g-61 in the rock. The concentration range is linear between 2.5 and 500 ??g l-1 tin in solution. The precision, measured as relative standard deviation, is < 20% at the 2.5 ??g l-1 level and < 7% at the 10-30 ??g l-1 level of tin. Excellent agreement with recommended literature values was found when the method was applied to the international silicate rock standards BCR-1, PCC-1, GSP-1, AGV-1, STM-1, JGb-1 and Mica-Fe. Application was made to the determination of tin in geological core samples with total tin concentrations of the order of 1 ??g g-1 or less.

  10. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  11. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved. PMID:16314066

  12. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  13. Development of mixed-waste analysis capability for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; TenKate, L.B.; Wroblewski, A.

    1995-03-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) are typically configured with ventilation to capture potentially toxic and corrosive gases emitted from the vaporization of sample aliquots. When radioactive elements are present, additional concerns (such as meeting safety guidelines and ALARA principles) must be addressed. This report describes a modification to a GFAAS that provides additional containment of vaporized sample aliquots. The modification was found to increase containment by a factor of 80, given expected operating conditions. The use of the modification allows more mixed-waste samples to be analyzed, permits higher levels of radioactive samples to be analyzed, or exposes the analyst to less airborne radioactivity. The containment apparatus was attached to a Perkin-Elmer Zeeman 5000 spectrophotometer for analysis of mixed-waste samples; however, it could also be used on other systems and in other applications where greater containment of vaporized material is desired.

  14. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  15. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, Alexandre; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa; Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira; Silva, Márcia Messias; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues

    2012-05-01

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 μg kg- 1 for arsenic and 0.2 μg kg- 1 for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a "cold finger" was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis.

  16. Determination of yttrium and rare-earth elements in rocks by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J G

    1981-01-01

    With use of synthetic solutions and several international standard reference materials a method has been developed for determining traces of Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu in rocks by electrothermal atomization in a pyrolytically-coated graphite furnace. Depending on the element, the sensitivity is of the order of 10(-9)-10(-12) g at 2500 degrees . To avoid matrix interferences the lanthanides are separated from the common elements by co-precipitation with calcium and iron as carriers. The data for Canadian reference rock SY-2 (syenite), U.S.G.S. reference rocks W-2 (diabase), DNC-1 (diabase) and BIR-1 (basalt), and South African reference rock NIM-18/69 (carbonatite) obtained by graphite-furnace atomization are compared with the values obtained by flame atomic-absorption. The results are in good agreement with literature values. PMID:18962852

  17. Determination of trace and minor elements in alloys by atomic-absorption spectroscopy using an induction-heated graphite-well furnace as atom source-II.

    PubMed

    Ashy, M A; Headridge, J B; Sowerbutts, A

    1974-06-01

    Results are presented for the atomic-absorption spectrophotometric determination of zinc in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloys, and aluminium, antimony and tin in steels, by means of solid samples dropped into an induction-heated graphite-well furnace to produce the atomic vapour. PMID:18961510

  18. Determination of gold in geological materials by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Kuryło, Michał; Otto, Magdalena; Mróz, Agnieszka

    2012-09-15

    A simple and cost effective preconcentration method on modified activated carbons is described for the determination of traces of gold (Au) in geological samples by carbon slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The basic parameters affecting the adsorption capacity of Au(III) ions on modified activated carbons were studied in detail and the effect of activated carbons modification has been determined by studying the initial runs of adsorption isotherms. The influence of chlorides and nitrates on adsorption ability of Au(III) ions onto the modified activated carbons for diluted aqueous solution was also studied in detail in respect to the determination of gold in solid materials after digestion steps in the analytical procedure, which usually involves the application of aqua regia. SEM-EDX and XPS studies confirmed that the surface reduction of Au(III) ions to Au(0) is the main gold adsorption mechanism on the activated carbon. Determination of gold after its preconcentration on the modified activated carbon was validated by applying certified reference materials. The experimental results are in good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of Au in real samples using aqueous standards. PMID:22967620

  19. Graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of palladium in soil.

    PubMed

    Patel, K S; Sharma, P C; Hoffmann, P

    2000-08-01

    A new and sensitive procedure for the graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometric (GF-AAS) determination of Pd in soil at nanogram level is described. The method is based on prior separation and enrichment of the metal as Pd(II)-SnCl3- -N-butylacetamide (BAA) complex into 1-pentanol (PN) by solvent extraction method. The value of the molar absorptivity of the complex in three solvents, i.e. ethyl acetate, 1-pentanol, chloroform, lie in the range of (0.70-2.75) x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) at lambda(max) 360-440 nm. The metal could be enriched into organic solvent, i.e. PN, up to 10-folds. The sensitivity (A = 0.0044) of the method in the term of the peak height was 0.5 ng Pd/mL of the aqueous solution at an enrichment factor (EF) of 5. Optimization of analytical variables during enrichment and GF-AAS determination of the metal are discussed. The method has been applied for the analysis of Pd to soil samples derived from roads and highways in Germany. PMID:11220609

  20. Stability of low concentration calibration standards for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D A; TenKate, L B

    1993-11-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) is used for determination of ultra-trace metals in environmentally important samples. In the generation of GFAAS calibration curves for many environmental applications, low concentration calibration standards must be prepared dally, as required by the Statement of Work (SOW) for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program (CLP). This results in significant time and work for the analyst and significant cost to the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) for chemicals and waste management. While EPA SW 846 is less prescriptive than the CLP SOW, ACL has been following the CLP guidelines because in-house criteria regarding the stability of GFAAS standards have not been established. A study was conducted to determine the stability of GFAAS standards for analytes commonly used in the ACL (single and mixed) as a function of time. Data were collected over nine months. The results show that GFAAS standards for Sb, Pb, Se, Ag, and TI are stable for a longer period of time than currently assumed by the CLP SOW. Reducing the frequency of preparing these standards will increase efficiency, decrease the handling of hazardous the quantity of hazardous waste generated, and decrease the quantity of hazardous substances to be ordered and stocked by the laboratory. These benefits will improve GFAAS analysis quality, reduce costs, enhance safety, and lower environmental concerns.

  1. Determination of chromium and molybdenum in medical foods by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Phifer, E C

    1995-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to determine chromium and molybdenum in 7 medical foods from 5 manufacturers. Linear standard curves were obtained for both elements for concentrations between 5 and 25 ng/mL. Detection limits were 0.24 ng/mL for Cr and 0.67 ng/mL for Mo. Characteristic masses were 3.1 and 14.7 pg for Cr and Mo, respectively. No difference was detected between wet and dry ashing methods, and dry ashing was used to complete the study. The method was validated by assaying various National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials. Analysis of these products for Cr and Mo were within certified values. One product was evaluated by this method for reproducibility (n = 5). Relative standard deviations were 6.8 and 4.8% for Cr and Mo, respectively. This product contained 0.31 +/= 0.02 micrograms Cr/g and 0.63 +/- 0.03 micrograms Mo/g. The remaining products contained 0.09-1.28 micrograms Cr/g and 0.07-2.3 micrograms Mo/g. Mean recovery values were 98 +/- 14% (n = 14) for Cr at spike levels of 0.20-1.89 micrograms/g and 102 +/- 24% (n = 10) for Mo at spike levels of 0.30-1.89 micrograms/g. PMID:8664588

  2. AN INTRALABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF HYDRIDE GENERATION AND GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINING ORGANIC AND INORGANIC ARSENIC IN COMPLEX WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed intralaboratory comparison of the determination of arsenic in complex wastewater samples by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption techniques has been conducted. Two hydride generation techniques were employed. One consisted of the use of sodium boro...

  3. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  4. A versatile microcomputer interface and peripheral devices: An application in deuterium lamp background correction graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökmen, A.; Yalcin, S.

    1992-01-01

    A versatile interface card for Apple IIe computer and various peripheral devices are designed to control instruments which generates transient signals like in graphite furnace atomic spectrometer. The interface card consists of a multiplexed analog-to-digital converter, a digital-to-analog converter, and a timer/counter chip. The timer/counter chip with 16 built-in registers can be programmed in many modes which provides a time base for real-time measurements. A stepper motor runs under the control of timer/counter chip independent of computer. A light chopper connected to the stepper motor is controlled easily by computer. A dual high-voltage switch can modulate dc light sources under computer control. This system is applied to D2-lamp background correction graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The D2 lamp is chopped by a mechanical chopper driven by a stepper motor and a hollow cathode lamp is modulated electronically. The data acquisition program is written in machine language and synchronization between light sources and computer is provided by chopper position signal through the interrupts. A sampling rate of 16 during a signal period at 50-Hz chopping frequency is found to be the optimum value. A large number of data collected during atomization period is compressed in machine code. This saved storage space and analysis time.

  5. Determination of trace amount of cobalt in feed grains and forages by solvent extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blanchflower, W J; Cannavan, A; Kennedy, D G

    1990-10-01

    A method is described for the determination of trace amounts of cobalt in feed grains and forages with a detection limit of 1 ng g-1. Samples are ashed in a muffle furnace and complexed with 2-nitroso-1-naphthol. Following solvent extraction, cobalt is determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The assay can be carried out in a normal analytical laboratory without the need for special "clean" rooms. Reagents have been selected to keep reagent blank values at low levels, and heptan-2-one is used as extracting solvent to avoid problems with evaporation. The assay has been used for diagnostic purposes and to formulate special low cobalt diets for sheep for experimental purposes. PMID:2270874

  6. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Surfactant/oil/water system for the determination of selenium in eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieggli, C. V. S.; Bohrer, D.; Noremberg, S.; do Nascimento, P. C.; de Carvalho, L. M.; Vieira, S. L.; Reis, R. N.

    2009-06-01

    An oil-in-water formulation has been optimized to determine trace levels of selenium in whole hen eggs by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. This method is simpler and requires fewer reagents when compared with other sample pre-treatment procedures. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (GF AAS) measurement was carried out using standard addition calibration and Pd as a modifier. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 5% and the limit of detection was 1 µg L - 1 . The validation of the method was performed against a standard reference material Whole Egg Powder (RM 8415), and the measured Se corresponded to 95.2% of the certified value. The method was used for the determination of the Se level in eggs from hens treated with Se dietary supplements. Inorganic and organic Se sources were added to hen feed. The Se content of eggs was higher when hens were fed with organic Se compared to the other treatments. The proposed method, including sample emulsification for subsequent Se determination by GF AAS has proved to be sensitive, reproducible, simple and economical.

  8. Determination of vanadium in soils and sediments by the slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using permanent modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Otto, Magdalena

    2013-09-15

    A new analytical procedure for vanadium (V) determination in soils and sediments by the slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (slurry sampling GFAAS) using the mixed permanent modifiers is described. Moreover, the comparison of action of the modifiers based on the iridium (Ir) and carbide-forming elements: tungsten (W) and niobium (Nb) deposited on the graphite tubes is studied, especially in terms of their analytical utility and determination sensitivity. The mechanism of their action was investigated using an X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). Finally, the mixture of 0.3 μg of Ir and 0.04 μg of Nb was used for the graphite tube permanent modification. The analytical procedure was optimized on the basis of the data from pyrolysis and atomization temperature curves studies. The results obtained for the four certified reference materials (marine sediments: PACS-1 and MESS-1, lake sediment: SL-1, soil: San Joaquin Soil SRM 2709), using the slurry sampling GFAAS and the standard calibration method, were in good agreement with the certified values. The detection and quantification limits and characteristic mass calculated for the proposed procedure were 0.04 µg/g, 0.16 µg/g and 11.9 pg, respectively. The precision (RSD% less than 8%) and the accuracy of vanadium determination in the soil and sediment samples were acceptable. PMID:23708618

  9. Determination of total tin in environmental biological and water samples by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Dogan, S; Haerdi, W

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of traces of tin using several analytical techniques (X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, polarographic techniques and atomic absorption) have been tested. Parameters such as simplicity, rapidity, sensitivity and interferences are compared in order to choose the most useful method for practical purpose. Finally, flameless atomic absorption was chosen for the determination of total tin concentration in different natural samples. Digestion of biological samples (plant, plankton, fish, etc.) was achieved by using Lumatom (a trade organic chemical). Thus, the digested sample is directly injected into the graphite furnace. This digestion technique is suitable and rapid with a minimum of error (contamination and losses). For tin analysis in water samples, a preconcentration of tin is carried out by coprecipitation with 1, 10-phenanthroline and tetraphenyl boron. The precipitate is separated and dissolved in alcohol or in Lumatom. The sensitivity of this method is 0.1 ng absolute tin. PMID:7451013

  10. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Determination of total tin in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of total tin in geological materials, with use of a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace. The sample is decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 10% hydrochloric acid. Tin is then extracted into trioctylphosphine oxide-methyl isobutyl ketone prior to atomization. Impregnation of the furnace with a sodium tungstate solution increases the sensitivity of the determination and improves the precision of the results. The limits of determination are 0.5-20 ppm of tin in the sample. Higher tin values can be determined by dilution of the extract. Replicate analyses of eighteen geological reference samples with diverse matrices gave relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 10.8% with an average of 4.6%. Average tin values for reference samples were in general agreement with, but more precise than, those reported by others. Apparent recoveries of tin added to various samples ranged from 95 to 111% with an average of 102%. ?? 1984.

  12. Evaluation of ammonia as diluent for serum sample preparation and determination of selenium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Caraballo, Edwin A.; Burguera, Marcela; Burguera, José L.

    2002-12-01

    A method for the determination of total selenium in serum samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was evaluated. The method involved direct introduction of 1:5 diluted serum samples (1% v/v NH 4OH+0.05% w/v Triton X-100 ®) into transversely heated graphite tubes, and the use of 10 μg Pd+3 μg Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifier. Optimization of the modifier mass and the atomization temperature was conducted by simultaneously varying such parameters and evaluating both the integrated absorbance and the peak height/peak area ratio. The latter allowed the selection of compromise conditions rendering good sensitivity and adequate analyte peak profiles. A characteristic mass of 49 pg and a detection limit (3s) of 6 μg 1 -1 Se, corresponding to 30 μg l -1 Se in the serum sample, were obtained. The analyte addition technique was used for calibration. The accuracy was assessed by the determination of total selenium in Seronorm™ Trace Elements Serum Batch 116 (Nycomed Pharma AS). The method was applied for the determination of total selenium in ten serum samples taken from individuals with no known physical affection. The selenium concentration ranged between 79 and 147 μg l -1, with a mean value of 114±22 μg l -1.

  13. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of trace metals in mineral coal.

    PubMed

    Silva, M M; Goreti, M; Vale, R; Caramão, E B

    1999-12-01

    A procedure for lead, cadmium and copper determination in coal samples based on slurry sampling using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer is proposed. The slurries were prepared by weighing the samples directly into autosampler cups (5-30 mg) and adding a 1.5 ml aliquot of a diluent mixture of 5% v/v HNO(3), 0.05% Triton X-100 and 10% ethanol. The slurry was homogenized by manual stirring before measurement. Slurry homogenization using ultrasonic agitation was also investigated for comparison. The effect of particle size and the use of different diluent compositions on the slurry preparation were investigated. The temperature programmes were optimized on the basis of pyrolysis and atomization curves. Absorbance characteristics with and without the addition of a palladium-magnesium modifier were compared. The use of 0.05% m/v Pd and 0.03% m/v Mg was found satisfactory for stabilizing Cd and Pb. The calibration was performed with aqueous standards. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling. Better recoveries of the analytes were obtained when the particle size was reduced to <37 mum. Several certified coal reference materials (BCR Nos. 40, 180, and 181) were analyzed, and good agreement was obtained between the results from the proposed slurry sampling method and the certificate values. PMID:18967798

  14. Ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in seawater by hollow fiber supported liquid membrane extraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jin-feng; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-fu; He, Bin; Hu, Xia-lin; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2007-05-01

    A new procedure, based on hollow fiber supported liquid membrane preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection, was developed for the determination of trace Cd in seawater samples. With 1-octanol that contained a mixture of dithizone (carrier) and oleic acid immobilized in the pores of the polypropylene hollow fiber as a liquid membrane, Cd was selectively extracted from water samples into 0.05 M HNO 3 that filled the lumen of the hollow fiber as a stripping solution. The main extraction related parameters were optimized, and the effects of salinity and some coexisting interferants were also evaluated. Under the optimum extraction conditions, an enrichment factor of 387 was obtained for a 100-mL sample solution. In combination with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, a very low detection limit (0.8 ng L - 1 ) and a relative standard deviation (2.5% at 50 ng L - 1 level) were achieved. Five seawater samples were analyzed by the proposed method without dilution, with detected Cd concentration in the range of 56.4-264.8 ng L - 1 and the relative spiked recoveries over 89%. For comparison, these samples were also analyzed by the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) method after a 10-fold dilution for matrix effect elimination. Statistical analysis with a one-way ANOVA shows no significant differences (at 0.05 level) between the results obtained by the proposed and ICP-MS methods. Additionally, analysis of certified reference materials (GBW (E) 080040) shows good agreement with the certified value. These results indicate that this present method is very sensitive and reliable, and can effectively eliminate complex matrix interferences in seawater samples.

  15. Determination of Pb in Biological Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Exercise in Common Interferences and Fundamental Practices in Trace Element Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spudich, Thomas M.; Herrmann, Jennifer K.; Fietkau, Ronald; Edwards, Grant A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to ascertain trace-level Pb in samples of bovine liver or muscle by applying graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS). The primary objective is to display the effects of physical and spectral intrusions in determining trace elements, and project the usual methods employed to minimize accuracy errors…

  16. Direct determination of particulate elements in edible oils and fats using an ultrasonic slurry sampler with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dalen, Gerard; de Galan, Leo

    1994-12-01

    Through the use of an ultrasonic slurry mixer, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) can be applied for the fully automated determination of particulate iron and nickel in edible oils and fats. The unsupervised ultrasonic slurry autosampler yields the same accuracy and somewhat better precision than the much more laborious manual GFAAS method.

  17. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively. PMID:26592606

  18. [Determination of aluminum in wheat flour food by microwave digestion-high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting; Zhao, Li-jiao; Zhong, Ru-gang

    2011-12-01

    The contents of aluminum (Al) in four kinds of wheat flour food (noodle, dumpling wrapper, twisted cruller and soda biscuit) were determined by high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) combined with microwave digestion. The samples were completely digested by the mixture of HNO3 and H2O2 in closed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vessels. The conditions for microwave digestion, pyrolysis temperature and atomization temperature were optimized. The optimum experimental conditions were determined as follows. The microwave digestion was performed with HNO3/H2O2 7:1 (volume ratio), microwave power 1000 W and 190 degrees C for 40 minutes. The optimum pyrolysis temperature was 1350 degrees C and the optimum atomization temperature was 2400 degrees C. Magnesium nitrate solution with the concentration of 1 g x L(-1) was used as the matrix modifier. The correlation coefficient for the standard curve was 0.9999, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was from 1.7% to 2.4%, and the recovery for the samples was from 98.16% to 102.67%. The assay method for the determination of Al in wheat flour food established in this study has referential importance for the constituent of the correlated food standards. PMID:22295801

  19. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS. PMID:25958863

  20. Determination of total selenium in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tasneem G; Kolachi, Nida F; Afridi, Hassan I; Brahman, Kapil Dev; Shah, Faheem

    2014-01-01

    The total selenium (Se) was determined in herbal and pharmaceutical supplements used for liver diseases. The total Se contents were determined in different pharmaceutical and herbal supplements by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the techniques was evaluated by using certified reference material and the standard addition method. The recoveries of total Se were 99.4 and 99.0% for HGAAS and GFAAS, respectively. The precision of the techniques expressed as RSD were 2.34 and 4.54% for HGAAS and GFAAS measurements, respectively. The LOD values for HGAAS and GFAAS were 0.025 and 0.052 pglg, respectively. The concentrations of Se in pharmaceutical and herbal supplements were found in the range of 19.2-53.8 and 25.0-42.5 pg/g, respectively, corresponding to 35-76% and 45-76% of the total recommended dose of Se for adults. PMID:25632445

  1. Determination of bismuth in environmental samples by slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using combined chemical modifiers.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Ryszard; Dobrzyńska, Joanna; Gawrońska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry technique was applied for the determination of Bi in environmental samples. The study focused on the effect of Zr, Ti, Nb and W carbides, as permanent modifiers, on the Bi signal. Because of its highest thermal and chemical stability and ability to substantially increase Bi signal, NbC was chosen as the most effective modifier. The temperature programme applied for Bi determination was optimized based on the pyrolysis and atomization curves obtained for slurries prepared from certified reference materials (CRMs) of the soil and sediments. To overcome interferences caused by sulfur compounds, Ba(NO₃)₂ was used as a chemical modifier. Calibration was performed using the aqueous standard solutions. The analysis of the CRMs confirmed the reliability of the proposed analytical method. The characteristic mass for Bi was determined to be 16 pg with the detection limit of 50 ng/g for the optimized procedure at the 5% (w/v) slurry concentration. PMID:25384374

  2. Effect of magnesium acetylacetonate on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kowalewska, Zofia; Welz, Bernhard; Castilho, Ivan N B; Carasek, Eduardo

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of magnesium acetylacetonate (MgA) on the signal of organic forms of vanadium in xylene solution by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MgA alone or mixed with palladium acetylacetonate (PdA) was considered as a chemical modifier. It has been found that MgA does not improve, but decreases significantly the integrated absorbance of V in the form of alkyl-aryl sulfonates, acetylacetonates, porphyrins and in lubricating oils, while its effect is negligible in the case of "dark products" from petroleum distillation, i.e., heavy oil fractions and residues. The decrease is also observed in the presence of Pd. The MgA (or MgA+PdA) effect on the integrated absorbance of V has been studied using the following variants: different ways of modifier application, various pyrolysis temperature, additional application of air ashing, preliminary pretreatment with iodine and methyltrioctylammonium chloride, application of various graphite furnace heating systems (longitudinal or transverse) and various optical and background correction systems (medium-resolution line source spectrometer with deuterium background correction or high-resolution continuum source spectrometer). The experiments indicate formation of more refractory compounds as a possible reason for the decrease of the integrated absorbance for some forms of V in the presence of MgA. The application of MgA as a chemical modifier in V determination is not recommended. Results of this work have general importance as, apart from the intentional use of MgA as a modifier, organic Mg compounds, present in petroleum products for other reason (e.g. as an additive), can influence the signal of V compounds and hence the accuracy in V determination. Generally, petroleum products with known amount of V are recommended as standards; however, lubricating oils can be inadequate for "dark products" from petroleum distillation. In the case of unknown samples it is

  3. Evaluation of four sample treatments for determination of platinum in automotive catalytic converters by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, Ana I.; Alvarado, José I.

    2006-09-01

    Conventional and microwave assisted digestion, both using aqua regia, alkaline fusion with lithium metaborate and aqueous slurries were evaluated as sample treatments for determination of Pt in automotive catalytic converters by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (GF-AAS). Determination of platinum by GF-AAS in samples of the catalytic converter's substrates, prepared by the four methods described, indicates that the highest platinum concentration i.e. maximum Pt extraction in the range of 748 ± 15-998 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , is obtained for samples dissolved by alkaline fusion, closely followed by analysis of aqueous plus Triton X-100 slurries 708 ± 14-958 ± 10 μg mL - 1 , while neither one of the acid digestion procedures achieved total dissolution of the samples. Slurry analysis is thus shown to be a viable alternative and is recommended, based on its speed and ease of implementation. Aqueous standards calibration curves and the standard addition methods were also compared. The results showed that no appreciable matrix effects are present, regardless of the sample preparation procedure used. Precision of the measurements, expressed as percentage relative standard deviation, ranged between 2.5 to 4.9%. Accuracy of the results was assessed by recovery tests which rendered values between 98.9 and 100.9%.

  4. Determination of cadmium and lead in beverages after leaching from pewter cups using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dessuy, Morgana B; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Borges, Aline R; Silva, Márcia M; Martelli, Patrícia B

    2011-07-15

    Two simple methods have been developed to determine cadmium and lead in different kinds of beverages and vinegar leached from pewter cups produced in Brazil. Leaching experiments have been carried out with different solutions: beer, sugar cane spirit, red and white wine, vinegar and a 3% acetic acid solution. The solutions were kept in cups with and without solder for 24h. Lead and cadmium have been determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction. The limits of detection were 0.05 and 1.4 μg L(-1), and the characteristic mass was 1.0 pg and 19 pg for Cd and Pb, respectively. With the developed methods it was possible to determine accurately cadmium and lead by direct analysis in these liquids and to evaluate the leaching of these metals from pewter cups. The results presented in this work show that pewter cups are not cadmium- and lead-free; this point goes against the manufacturers' declaration that their products are lead-free. PMID:21645758

  5. Determination of Beryllium in Soil and Sediment by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption with a Microwave-Acid Digestion Method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai-lan; Gan, Jie; Yu, Lei; Zhu, Ri-long; Tian, Yun; Luo, Yue-ping

    2015-11-01

    A method for determination of beryllium in soils and sediments by microwave-acid digestion/graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) is described. In this paper, the working conditions of the instrument are optimized, the drawing of calibration curve is expounded, the pretreatment process of soil and sediments (including microwave heating process and the selection of digestion system) is discussed, and the interference of coexisting elements is examined. The sample was pretreated by microwave digestion parameters using HNO₃/ HCl/HF mixed acid system. The method is fast and simple without matrix modifier, and has no interference by coexisting ions, and has high repeatability and reproducibility. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) is 0.004 9 mg · kg⁻¹ (sample quantity 0.200 0 g, sample volume 25 mL), and the limits of quantitation (LOQ) is 0.20 mg · kg⁻¹. This method is used to measure the standard samples and actual samples, whether in the laboratory, or between laboratories, has good accuracy and precision. PMID:26978948

  6. Analysis of lead in 55 brands of dietary calcium supplements by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Meehye; Kim, Changmin; Song, Insang

    2003-02-01

    The lead (Pb) contents of calcium (Ca) supplements available in Korea were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Zeeman background correction and peak area mode. All samples were microwave-digested in concentrated HNO(3). Ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and magnesium nitrate were used as matrix modifiers. Fifty-five brands of Ca supplements were classified into seven categories based on the major composite: bone, milk, oyster/clam shell, egg shell, algae, shark cartilage and chelated. The mean Pb contents of Ca supplements were 1.1 microg g(-1) (coefficient of variation 5.7%), ranging from n.d. (not detected) to 6.7 microg g(-1). Ca supplements made of bone have the highest Pb contents (2.3 microg g(-1)) with a wide range (0.1-6.7 microg g(-1)). The results were similar to those reported in other countries. The mean daily intakes of Pb from the supplement could be about 5 microg (mean Pb concentration 1.1 microg g(-1) x mean daily intake 4.5 g) taking 2% of provisional tolerable daily intake that the FAO/WHO Joint Food Additive and Contaminants Committee has set to evaluate its safety. However, measures to prevent potentials of Pb toxicity from overtaking some Ca supplements should be considered. PMID:12623663

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR THE CALIBRATION OF PERKIN ELMER (PE) MODEL 5100 ZL ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER: GRAPHITE FURNACE (NHX/SOP-171-005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes the calibration procedures and performance checks required to ensure the consistent performance of the Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 5100 zl atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace unit as a whole. Separate calibration procedures were not required ...

  8. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  9. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  10. Determination of Chlorine in Milk via Molecular Absorption of SrCl Using High-Resolution Continuum Source Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-07-20

    Total chlorine in milk was determined via the molecular absorption of diatomic strontium monochloride at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The effects of coating the graphite furnace, using different modifiers, amount of molecule-forming element, and different calibrants were investigated and optimized. Chlorine concentrations in milk samples were determined in a Zr-coated graphite furnace using 25 μg of Sr as the molecule-forming reagent and applying a pyrolysis temperature of 600 °C and a molecule-forming temperature of 2300 °C. Linearity was maintained up to 500 μg mL(-1) of Cl. The method was tested by analyzing a certified reference wastewater. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified value. The limit of detection of the method was 1.76 μg mL(-1). The chlorine concentrations in various cow milk samples taken from the market were found in the range of 588-1472 mg L(-1). PMID:27345208

  11. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  12. Solid sampling determination of lithium and sodium additives in microsamples of yttrium oxyorthosilicate by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczai, Nikoletta; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Bencs, László

    2016-03-01

    Solid sampling high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-HR-CS-GFAAS) methods were developed and studied for the fast and sensitive quantitation of Li and Na additives in microsamples of cerium-doped yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Y2SiO5:Ce) scintillator materials. The methods were optimized for solid samples by studying a set of GFAAS conditions (i.e., the sample mass, sensitivity of the analytical lines, and graphite furnace heating programs). Powdered samples in the mass range of 0.099-0.422 mg were dispensed onto graphite sample insertion boats, weighed and analyzed. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized by the use of single-element standard solutions of Li and Na (acidified with 0.144 mol/L HNO3) at the Li I 610.353 nm and Na I 285.3013 nm analytical lines. For calibration purposes, the method of standard addition with Li and Na solutions was applied. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibration graphs were not worse than 0.9678. The limit of detection for oxyorthosilicate samples was 20 μg/g and 80 μg/g for Li and Na, respectively. The alkaline content of the solid samples were found to be in the range of 0.89 and 8.4 mg/g, respectively. The accuracy of the results was verified by means of analyzing certified reference samples, using methods of standard (solution) addition calibration.

  13. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: ultra trace determination of cadmium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zeini Jahromi, Elham; Bidari, Araz; Assadi, Yaghoub; Milani Hosseini, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Mohammad Reza

    2007-03-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). In this extraction method, 500 microL methanol (disperser solvent) containing 34 microL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 0.00010 g ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (chelating agent) was rapidly injected by syringe into the water sample containing cadmium ions (interest analyte). Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the formation of fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride, which have been dispersed, in bulk aqueous sample. At this stage, cadmium reacts with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and therefore, hydrophobic complex forms which is extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride. After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), these droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25+/-1 microL). Then a 20 microL of sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was determined by GF AAS. Some effective parameters on extraction and complex formation, such as extraction and disperser solvent type and their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and concentration of the chelating agent have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor 125 was obtained from only 5.00 mL of water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 2-20 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 0.6 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for ten replicate measurements of 20 ng L(-1) of cadmium was 3.5%. The relative recoveries of cadmium in tap, sea and rivers water samples at spiking level of 5 and 10 ng L(-1) are 108, 95, 87 and 98%, respectively. The characteristics of the proposed method have been compared with cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line liquid-liquid extraction, single drop microextraction (SDME), on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and co-precipitation based on bibliographic data. Therefore, DLLME

  14. On the possibilities of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of multiple atomic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Rello, L.; Flórez, M.; Belarra, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper explores the potential of commercially available high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry instrumentation for the simultaneous or sequential monitoring of various atomic lines, in an attempt to highlight the analytical advantages that can be derived from this strategy. In particular, it is demonstrated how i) the monitoring of multiplets may allow for the simple expansion of the linear range, as shown for the measurement of Ni using the triplet located in the vicinity of 234.6 nm; ii) the use of a suitable internal standard may permit improving the precision and help in correcting for matrix-effects, as proved for the monitoring of Ni in different biological samples; iii) direct and multi-element analysis of solid samples may be feasible on some occasions, either by monitoring various atomic lines that are sufficiently close (truly simultaneous monitoring, as demonstrated in the determination of Co, Fe and Ni in NIST 1566a Oyster tissue) or, alternatively, by opting for a selective and sequential atomization of the elements of interest during every single replicate. Determination of Cd and Ni in BCR 679 White cabbage is attempted using both approaches, which permits confirming that both methods can offer very similar and satisfactory results. However, it is important to stress that the second approach provides more flexibility, since analysis is no longer limited to those elements that show very close atomic lines (closer than 0.3 nm in the ultraviolet region) with a sensitivity ratio similar to the concentration ratio of the analytes in the samples investigated.

  15. Development of an analytical method for the determination of arsenic in gasoline samples by hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Boschetti, Wiliam; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Welz, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present work was to optimize the conditions for the determination of arsenic in gasoline with hydride generation-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after acid digestion using a full two-level factorial design with center point. The arsine was generated in a batch system and collected in a graphite tube coated with 150 μg Ir as a permanent modifier. The sample volume, the pre-reduction conditions, the temperature program and modifier mass were kept fixed for all experiments. The estimated main effects were: reducing agent concentration (negative effect), acid concentration (negative effect) and trapping temperature (positive effect). It was observed that there were interactions between the variables. Moreover, the curvature was significant, indicating that the best conditions were at the center point. The optimized parameters for arsine generation were 2.7 mol L- 1 hydrochloric acid and 1.6% (w/v) sodium tetrahydroborate. The optimized conditions to collect arsine in the graphite furnace were a trapping temperature of 250 °C and a collection time of 30 s. The limit of detection was 6.4 ng L- 1 and the characteristic mass was 24 pg. Two different systems for acid digestion were used: a digester block with cold finger and a microwave oven. The concentration of arsenic found with the proposed method was compared with that obtained using a detergentless microemulsion and direct graphite furnace determination. The results showed that the factorial design is a simple tool that allowed establishing the appropriate conditions for sample preparation and also helped in evaluating the interaction between the factors investigated.

  16. Development of a simple method for the determination of lead in lipstick using alkaline solubilization and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Aline Rodrigues; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-02-15

    A simple method was developed for determining the total lead content in lipstick samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) after treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Multivariate optimization was used to establish the optimal conditions of sample preparation. The graphite furnace heating program was optimized through pyrolysis and atomization curves. An aliquot containing approximately 50mg of the sample was mixed with TMAH and heated in a water bath at 60°C for 60 min. Using Nb as the permanent modifier and Pd as the chemical modifier, the optimal temperatures were 900°C and 1800°C for pyrolysis and atomization, respectively. Under optimum conditions, the working range was from 1.73 to 50.0 μg L(-1), with detection and quantification limits of 0.20 and 0.34 μg g(-1), respectively. The precision was evaluated under conditions of repeatability and intermediate precision and showed standard deviations of 2.37%-4.61% and 4.93%-9.75%, respectively. The % recovery ranged from 96.2% to 109%, and no significant differences were found between the results obtained using the proposed method and the microwave decomposition method for real samples. Lead was detected in 21 tested lipstick samples; the lead content in these samples ranged from 0.27 to 4.54 μg g(-1). PMID:23598019

  17. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of chromium in water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for the determination of chromium in natural water samples. The detection limit for this analytical method is 0.4 microg/L with a working linear limit of 25.0 microg/L. The precision at the detection limit ranges from 20 to 57 percent relative standard deviation (RSD) with an improvement to 4.6 percent RSD for concentrations more than 3 microg/L. Accuracy of this method was determined for a variety of reference standards that was representative of the analytical range. The results were within the established standard deviations. Samples were spiked with known concentrations of chromium with recoveries ranging from 84 to 122 percent. In addition, a comparison of data between graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and direct-current plasma atomic emission spectrometry resulted in suitable agreement between the two methods, with an average deviation of +/- 2.0 microg/L throughout the analytical range.

  18. Determination of cobalt in biological samples by line-source and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using solid sampling or alkaline treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Anderson Schwingel; Vieira, Mariana Antunes; da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Borges, Daniel L. Gallindo; Welz, Bernhard; Heitmann, Uwe; Curtius, Adilson José

    2005-06-01

    Two procedures for the determination of Co in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) were compared: solid sampling (SS) and alkaline treatment with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using two different instruments for the investigation: a conventional line-source (LS) atomic absorption spectrometer and a prototype high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. For the direct introduction of the solid samples, certified reference materials (CRM) were ground to a particle size ≤50 μm. Alkaline treatment was carried out by placing about 250 mg of the sample in polypropylene flasks, adding 2 mL of 25% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide and de-ionized water. Due to its unique capacity of providing a 3-D spectral plot, a high-resolution continuum source (HR-CS) graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used as a tool to evaluate potential spectral interferences, including background absorption for both sample introduction procedures, revealing that a continuous background preceded the atomic signal for pyrolysis temperatures lower than 700 °C. Molecular absorption bands with pronounced rotational fine structure appeared for atomization temperatures >1800 °C probably as a consequence of the formation of PO. After optimization had been carried out using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry, the optimized conditions were adopted also for line-source atomic absorption spectrometry. Six biological certified reference materials were analyzed, with calibration against aqueous standards, resulting in agreement with the certified values (according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level) and in detection limits as low as 5 ng g -1.

  19. An improved impaction-graphite furnace system for the direct and near real-time determination of cadmium, chromium, lead and manganese in aerosols and cigarette smoke by simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Ill; Smith, Mark V.; Indurthy, Suneetha; Deval, Anupama; Sneddon, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The design, operating characteristics, and preliminary evaluation of an improved impaction-graphite furnace system, based on a theoretical study of particle size collected, are presented. After direct collection, the graphite furnace from the system is inserted in an atomic absorption spectrometer for analysis by simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry. This system has the potential for the direct and near real-time (few minutes) determination of metals in aerosols. The system has been preliminarily evaluated using aqueous solutions of chromium, and has then been applied to the determination of cadmium, chromium, lead, and manganese in cigarette smoke. Results show an increase ranging from almost five (lead) to sixteen (cadmium) over background levels.

  20. Investigation of spectral interferences in the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Aline R.; Becker, Emilene M.; François, Luciane L.; de Jesus, Alexandre; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard; Dessuy, Morgana B.; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2014-11-01

    In the present work, spectral interferences on the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples were investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry at the main analytical lines: 217.001 and 283.306 nm. For these investigations, samples were introduced into the furnace as slurry together with a mixture of Pd and Mg as chemical modifier. Spectral interferences were observed for some samples at both analytical lines. In order to verify whether a wet digestion procedure would avoid these interferences, a reference method for wet digestion of fertilizers was employed as an alternative sample preparation procedure. However, the same interferences were also observed in the digested samples. In order to identify and eliminate the fine-structured background using a least-squares background correction, reference spectra were generated using the combination of different species. The use of the latter technique allowed the elimination of spectral interferences for most of the investigated samples, making possible the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples free of interferences. The best results were found using a reference spectrum of NH4H2PO4 at 217.001 nm, and a mixture of H2SO4 + Ca and HNO3 + Ca at the 283.306 nm line. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using a certified reference material “Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer”. Similar results were obtained using line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction, indicating that the latter technique was also capable to correct the spectral interferences, at least in part.

  1. Fast and direct screening of copper in micro-volumes of distilled alcoholic beverages by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ajtony, Zsolt; Laczai, Nikoletta; Dravecz, Gabriella; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Marosi, Áron; Marlok, Bence; Streli, Christina; Bencs, László

    2016-12-15

    HR-CS-GFAAS methods were developed for the fast determination of Cu in domestic and commercially available Hungarian distilled alcoholic beverages (called pálinka), in order to decide if their Cu content exceeds the permissible limit, as legislated by the WHO. Some microliters of samples were directly dispensed into the atomizer. Graphite furnace heating programs, effects/amounts of the Pd modifier, alternative wavelengths (e.g., Cu I 249.2146nm), external calibration and internal standardization methods were studied. Applying a fast graphite furnace heating program without any chemical modifier, the Cu content of a sample could be quantitated within 1.5min. The detection limit of the method is 0.03mg/L. Calibration curves are linear up to 10-15mg/L Cu. Spike-recoveries ranged from 89% to 119% with an average of 100.9±8.5%. Internal calibration could be applied with the assistance of Cr, Fe, and/or Rh standards. The accuracy of the GFAAS results was verified by TXRF analyses. PMID:27451250

  2. Determination of selenium in infant formula and enteral formula by dry ash graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with deuterium background correction.

    PubMed

    Cook, K K

    1996-01-01

    A method was developed to determine selenium in infant formula using a graphite furnace equipped with deuterium background correction after dry ashing. The method circumvents the use of perchloric acid, 2,3-diaminonapthalene (DAN) and hydride generation without the use of Zeeman background correction. Twelve commercial infant and enteral formulas and corresponding spiked products (30-500 ng) were analyzed in triplicate for Se to evaluate this method. All test portions were digested on a hot plate after addition of magnesium nitrate-nitric acid. Following heating, digests were evaporated to dryness and placed in a 500 degrees C muffle furnace for 30 min to complete ashing. All Se was converted to Se+4 by dissolving the ash in HCl (5 + 1) and holding the solution for 20 min in a 60 degrees C water bath. Se+4 was subsequently reduced to Se(zero) with ascorbic acid and collected on a membrane filter. The membrane filters were digested in a small volume of nitric acid in a microwave oven. Following digestion, contents of the vessels were diluted and analyzed for Se by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Selenium standards in starch or in unfortified formula containing trace levels of Se were carried through the entire process. The recovery range for Se was 85-127%, and analyzed reference materials fell within their certified range for Se. This method is as sensitive (detection limit 0.44 ng Se/g) as methods reported in the literature and may be applicable to other foods. PMID:8823924

  3. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time. PMID:25770602

  4. Induction graphitizing furnace acceptance test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The induction furnace was designed to provide the controlled temperature and environment required for the post-cure, carbonization and graphitization processes for the fabrication of a fibrous graphite NERVA nozzle extension. The acceptance testing required six tests and a total operating time of 298 hrs. Low temperature mode operations, 120 to 850 C, were completed in one test run. High temperature mode operations, 120 to 2750 C, were completed during five tests.

  5. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern.

    PubMed

    Anal, Jasha Momo H

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  6. Trace and Essential Elements Analysis in Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf Samples by Graphite Furnace-Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Its Health Concern

    PubMed Central

    Anal, Jasha Momo H.

    2014-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf commonly known as lemon grass is used extensively as green tea and even as herbal tea ingredient across the world. Plants have the ability to uptake metals as nutrient from the soil and its environment which are so essential for their physiological and biochemical growth. Concentrations of these twelve trace elements, namely, Mg, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo, As, Cd, and Pb, are analysed by graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS) and are compared with the permissible limits of FAO/WHO, ICMR, and NIH, USA, which are found to be within permissible limits. Toxic metals like As, Cd, and Pb, analysed are within the tolerable daily diet limit and at low concentration. PMID:25525430

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR MAINTENANCE OF PERKIN ELMER (PE) MODEL ZL5100 PC ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER: GRAPHITE FURNACE (NHX/SOP-171-006)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes maintenance practices for the Perkin Elmer (PE) Model ZL5100 PC atomic absorption spectrometer with graphite furnace. It was required that the procedure be performed daily by the instrument operator during periods of analysis and recorded in the instrumen...

  8. Graphite filter atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2007-09-01

    Graphite filter atomizers (GFA) for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) show substantial advantages over commonly employed electrothermal vaporizers and atomizers, tube and platform furnaces, for direct determination of high and medium volatility elements in matrices associated with strong spectral and chemical interferences. Two factors provide lower limits of detection and shorter determination cycles with the GFA: the vaporization area in the GFA is separated from the absorption volume by a porous graphite partition; the sample is distributed over a large surface of a collector in the vaporization area. These factors convert the GFA into an efficient chemical reactor. The research concerning the GFA concept, technique and analytical methodology, carried out mainly in the author's laboratory in Russia and South Africa, is reviewed. Examples of analytical applications of the GFA in AAS for analysis of organic liquids and slurries, bio-samples and food products are given. Future prospects for the GFA are discussed in connection with analyses by fast multi-element AAS.

  9. The determination of total Se in urine and serum by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ir as permanent modifier and in situ oxidation for complete trimethylselenonium recovery.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Patricia; Gonçalves, Rodrigo Araújo; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto

    2005-12-01

    The present work evaluated the use of iridium (Ir) as permanent modifier for the determination of total selenium in urine and serum by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Concerning urine, the presence of trimethylselenonium (TMSe(+)) was especially considered. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1,000 and 2,100 degrees C, respectively, were used. For nondigested urine and serum samples, 0.2% v/v HNO(3) and Triton X-100 were used as diluents, respectively, and the same initial platform Ir treatment was effective for up to 1,100 atomization cycles. Good precision [less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD)] can be achieved with the proposed method. Low TMSe(+) recovery was observed for nondigested urine samples. Thus, if this species is to be considered in urine analysis, a previous external mineralization step was found to be necessary. Alternatively, an in situ oxidation treatment was developed. Detection limits of 8, 10, and 7 mug l(-1) were obtained after dilution, microwave-assisted digestion, and in situ oxidation procedures, respectively. The accuracy of the method was validated by the analysis of certified reference or commercial quality control materials and spiked samples. PMID:16267645

  10. Evaluation of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct determination of chromium in medicinal plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Rêgo, Jardes F.; Neto, José A. Gomes

    2012-12-01

    A method for Cr determination in medicinal plants using direct solid sampling graphite furnace high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. Modifiers were dispensable. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1500 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. Slopes of calibration curves (50-750 pg Cr, R2 > 0.999) using aqueous and solid standards coincides in 96%, indicated feasibility of aqueous calibration for solid sampling of medicinal plants. Accuracy was checked by analysis of four plant certified reference materials. Results were in agreement at 95% confidence level with certified and non-certified values. Ten samples of medicinal plants were analyzed and Cr contents were in the 1.3-17.7 μg g- 1 Cr range. The highest RSD (n = 5) was 15.4% for the sample Melissa officinalis containing 13.9 ± 2.1 μg g- 1 Cr. The limit of detection was 3.3 ng g- 1 Cr.

  11. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the direct determination of arsenic in fish oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Éderson R; de Almeida, Tarcísio S; Borges, Daniel L G; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; Feldmann, Jörg; Campo Menoyo, Javier Del

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) has been applied for the development of a method for the determination of total As in fish oil samples using direct analysis. The method does not use any sample pretreatment, besides dilution with 1-propanole, in order to decrease the oil viscosity. The stability and sensitivity of As were evaluated using ruthenium and iridium as permanent chemical modifiers and palladium added in solution over the sample. The best results were obtained with ruthenium as the permanent modifier and palladium in solution added to samples and standard solutions. Under these conditions, aqueous standard solutions could be used for calibration for the fish oil samples diluted with 1-propanole. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1400 °C and 2300 °C, respectively, and the limit of detection and characteristic mass were 30 pg and 43 pg, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using microwave-assisted acid digestion of the samples with subsequent determination by HR-CS GF AAS and ICP-MS; the results were in agreement (95% confidence level) with those of the proposed method. PMID:26838392

  12. Determination of Lead in Water Samples Using a New Vortex-Assisted, Surfactant-Enhanced Emulsification Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Combined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Lu, Ying; Mmereki, Daniel; Pan, Weiliang; Tang, Xiaohui; Zhou, Guangming; Mao, Yufeng; Su, Xaioxuan

    2016-04-01

    A low toxic solvent-based vortex-assisted surfactant-enhanced emulsification liquid-liquid microextraction (LT-VSLLME) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for the extraction and determination of lead (Pb) in water samples. In the LT-VSLLME method, the extraction solvent was dispersed into the aqueous samples by the assistance of vortex agitator. Meanwhile, the addition of a surfactant, which acted as an emulsifier, could enhance the speed of the mass-transfer from aqueous samples to the extraction solvent. The influences of analytical parameters, including extraction solvent type and its volume, surfactant type and its volume, pH, concentration of chelating agent, salt effect and extraction time were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a good relative standard deviation of 3.69% at 10 ng L(-1) was obtained. The calibration graph showed a linear pattern in the ranges of 5-30 ngL(-1), with a limit of detection of 0.76 ng L(-1). The linearity was obtained by five points in the concentration range of 5-30 ngL(-1). The enrichment factor was 320. The procedure was applied to wastewater and river water, and the accuracy was assessed through the analysis of the recovery experiments. PMID:26614355

  13. Ultrasound-Assisted Emulsification Microextraction Based on Solidification Floating Organic Drop Trace Amounts of Manganese Prior to Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Determination

    PubMed Central

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn+2 at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50–10.0 ng mL−1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL−1 was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  14. One-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the selective determination of methylmercury in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Mo, Yajun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for the selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg) was developed by one-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (D-DLLME) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed method, Cu(II) reacted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which was used as the chelating agent instead of DDTC for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of MeHg. Because the stability of MeHg-DDTC is higher than that of Cu-DDTC, MeHg can displace Cu from the Cu-DDTC complex and be preconcentrated in a single DLLME procedure. MeHg could be extracted into the extraction solvent phase at pH 6 while Hg(II) remained in the sample solution. Potential interference from co-existing metal ions with lower DDTC complex stability was largely eliminated without the need of any masking reagent. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of this method was 13.6ngL(-1) (as Hg), and an enhancement factor of 81 was achieved with a sample volume of 5.0mL. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace MeHg in some environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26717807

  15. Determination of macro and trace elements in multivitamin dietary supplements by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with slurry sampling.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    In this research, three different commercially available multivitamin dietary supplements were analyzed by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) with slurry sampling. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se were determined and compared to the amounts stated by producers. The safety of multivitamin dietary supplements depends on various factors including the manufacturing process and the purity and origins of the raw ingredients. For this reason, this research determined concentrations of several toxic elements (As, Cd, and Pb). Microwave-assisted high pressure Teflon bomb digestion was used to determine total amounts of elements in samples. Samples were prepared as slurries at a concentration of 0.1% (m/v) for macro elements (Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Se) and at a concentration of % (m/v) for trace elements (As, Cd, and Pb) in acidic media (3M HNO3). The influence of acid concentration, Triton X-100 addition, sonication time, and sonication power on absorbance was investigated. The accuracy of this method was validated by analyses of NRCC LUTS-1 (Lobster hepatopancreas), NRCC DORM-1 (Dogfish Muscle), NRCC DOLT-2 (Dogfish Liver), NBS SRM 1570 (Spinach Leaves) and NBS SRM 1573 (Tomato Leaves) certified reference materials. The measured elements contents in these reference materials (except NRCC DOLT-2) were in satisfactory agreement with the certified values according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. PMID:24176741

  16. Ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric for selenium speciation in foods and beverages.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Pekiner, Ozlem Zeynep

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and environmentally friendly ultrasound assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (USA-IL-DLLME) was developed for the speciation of inorganic selenium in beverages and total selenium in food samples by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Some analytical parameters including pH, amount of complexing agent, extraction time, volume of ionic liquid, sample volume, etc. were optimized. Matrix effects were also investigated. Enhancement factor (EF) and limit of detection (LOD) for Se(IV) were found to be 150 and 12 ng L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found 4.2%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with analysis of LGC 6010 Hard drinking water and NIST SRM 1573a Tomato leaves standard reference materials. Optimized method was applied to ice tea, soda and mineral water for the speciation of Se(IV) and Se(VI) and some food samples including beer, cow's milk, red wine, mixed fruit juice, date, apple, orange, grapefruit, egg and honey for the determination of total selenium. PMID:26041239

  17. Lead and cadmium in human placentas and maternal and neonatal blood (in a heavily polluted area) measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Baranowska, I

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To measure the concentrations of the trace elements lead and cadmium in human placenta and in maternal and neonatal (cord) blood. To assess the influence of the strongly polluted environment on the content of metals in tissues and on the permeability of placenta to cadmium and lead. Various methods of mineralisation were tested before analysis. METHODS--Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the determination of lead and cadmium. The samples for analysis were prepared by mineralisation under pressure in a Teflon bomb (HNO3, 110 degrees C), by wet ashing under normal pressure (HNO3 + H2O2 for 12 hours), and by microwave digestion in concentrated nitric acid. RESULTS--In analysed samples the following mean concentrations of cadmium and lead were found: in venous blood Pb = 72.50 ng/ml, Cd = 4.90 ng/ml; in placenta Pb = 0.50 microgram/g, Cd = 0.11 microgram/g; in cord blood Pb = 38.31 ng/ml, Cd = 1.13 ng/ml. CONCLUSION--High concentrations of lead and cadmium were found in placentas and in maternal blood whereas in neonatal blood there was an increased concentration of lead and only traces of cadmium. It is concluded that the placenta is a better barrier for cadmium than for lead. Among the examined methods of mineralisation, microwave digestion was the best. PMID:7795737

  18. Solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration and determination of cobalt and nickel by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

    PubMed

    Bidabadi, Mahboubeh Shirani; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2009-07-15

    Solidified floating organic drop microextraction (SFODME), combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was proposed for simultaneous separation/enrichment and determination of trace amounts of nickel and cobalt in surface waters and sea water. 1-(2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as chelating agent. The main parameters affecting the performance of SFODME, such as pH, concentration of PAN, extraction time, stirring rate, extraction temperature, sample volume and nature of the solvent were optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, a good relative standard deviation for six determination of 20 ng l(-1) of Co(II) and Ni(II) were 4.6 and 3.6%, respectively. An enrichment factor of 502 and 497 and detection limits of 0.4 and 0.3 ng l(-1) for cobalt and nickel were obtained, respectively. The procedure was applied to tap water, well water, river water and sea water, and accuracy was assessed through the analysis of certified reference water or recovery experiments. PMID:19117672

  19. Separation and preconcentration of trace level of lead in one drop of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Patel, Devesh Kumar

    2010-04-15

    Drop-to-drop solvent microextraction (DDSME) assisted with ultrasonication is applied for the determination of lead in one drop (30 microL) of blood sample by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). The optimum extraction efficiency of lead was observed for 10 min extraction time at pH 5.0 with 2 microL of organic solvent that containing 0.5 M of Cyanex-302. The optimized methodology exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.3-30.0 ng mL(-1) lead with relative standard deviations (RSD) from 2.5 to 4.4%. The method is found to be simple and rapid for the analysis of lead in micro amount of blood sample with the limit of detection (LOD) of 0.08 ng mL(-1). The application of the proposed method has been successfully tested for the determination of lead in blood samples. The results showed that under the optimized experimental conditions, the method showed good sensitivity and recovery %, as well as advantages such as linearity, simplicity, low cost and high feasibility. PMID:20004520

  20. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop trace amounts of manganese prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Mohadesi, Alireza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an ultrasound-assisted emulsification microextraction based on solidification floating organic drop method is described for preconcentration of trace amounts of Mn (II). 2-(5-Bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5 diethylaminophenol was added to a solution of Mn(+2) at ph = 10.0. After this, 1-undecanol was added to the solution as an extraction solvent, and solution was stirred. Several factors influencing the microextraction efficiency, such as pH, the amount of chelating agent, nature and volume of extraction solvent, the volume of sample solution, stirring rate, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Then sample vial was cooled by inserting into an ice bath, and the solidified was transferred into a suitable vial for immediate melting. Finally the sample was injected into a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Under the optimum condition the linear dynamic range was 0.50-10.0 ng mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9926, and the detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1) was obtained. The enrichment factor was 160. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of manganese in sea, rain, tap, and river water samples. PMID:22645504

  1. Ultrasound-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drops microextraction of ultra trace amount of Te (IV) prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Fathirad, Fariba; Afzali, Daryoush; Mostafavi, Ali; Ghanbarian, Maryam

    2012-01-15

    In the present study, a new, simple and efficient method for the preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of Te (IV) is developed using ultrasound-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drops microextraction (USAE-SFODME) before graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination. In this method, tellurium is extracted into the fine droplets of 1-undecanol after chelate formation with the water soluble ligand, ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). Several factors such as pH, chelating agent amount, type and volume of the extracting solvent, sonication and centrifuging time that influence the extraction and complex formation are optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.01-0.24ngmL(-1) of tellurium in the original solution, with limit of detection of 0.003ngmL(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven replicated determinations of tellurium ion at 0.08ngmL(-1) concentration level is calculated as 3.4%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of Te (IV) in a standard soil and several water samples. PMID:22265571

  2. Determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in human semen by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave sample dissolution.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, J; Moreno, R; Cristiano, A R

    1991-09-01

    Human semen samples were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, using L'vov platforms and the method of standard additions, to determine their Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn content. The samples were analyzed directly and after conventional and microwave wet acid dissolution. Matrix modification, using magnesium and palladium nitrates and ammonium biphosphate solutions, was evaluated for the analysis of the microwave-digested samples. The best results were obtained for Cr, Cu and Zn using Pd(NO3)2, and a mixture of Mg(NO3)2 and Pd(NO3)2 solutions. The direct analysis of water-diluted semen produced inaccurate results with unacceptably high standard deviations. The results obtained for the microwave-dissolved samples showed relative standard deviation values within the range 0.63-8.4%. The analysis of spiked semen solutions showed recoveries of the added analytes ranging from 96 to 104%. The accuracy of the measurements was checked against the NIST 1,577a, bovine liver, standard reference material. Sample dissolution time was drastically reduced from 3-4 hours, using the conventional method, to approximately 8 minutes using the microwave-assisted wet acid digestion procedure. PMID:1821719

  3. The study of applicability of dithiocarbamate-coated fullerene C 60 for preconcentration of palladium for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leśniewska, Barbara A.; Godlewska, Iwona; Godlewska—Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2005-03-01

    The present method comprises an off-line enrichment of Pd on the fullerene, C 60, coated with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC), followed by the elution of formed Pd-chelate with ethanol and the subsequent determination of Pd from the eluate by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. By using fullerene loaded with 0.1% APDC, the analytical system is simplified as the sample can be directly preconcentrated on the column. The following parameters affecting the preconcentration of Pd on C 60 were optimized: amount of ligand used for the coating of fullerene, sample pH, kind of eluent, sample and eluent flow rates, volume and number of fractions of eluent used. The sorption efficiency for Pd on coated fullerene was 99.2±1.1%. The best elution efficiency for Pd from the column was obtained with 0.6 ml of ethanol at a flow rate of 0.2 ml min -1. The limit of detection was 0.044 ng ml -1. The effect of sample pretreatment procedure on the preconcentration of Pd by evaluated method is discussed. The content of Pd in road dust (179.2±17.4 ng g -1) determined by proposed method was in agreement with the results obtained with a reference method. The low recovery of analyte (64%) was obtained for geological material CRM SARM-7 (platinum ore) due to the much higher concentration of interfering elements.

  4. Novel ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica for selective magnetic solid phase extraction of trace Cd followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingshan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Determination of trace Cd in environmental, biological and food samples is of great significance to toxicological research and environmental pollution monitoring. While the direct determination of Cd in real-world samples is difficult due to its low concentration and the complex matrix. Herein, a novel Cd(II)-ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica (Cd(II)-II-MMS) was prepared and was employed as a selective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) material for extraction of trace Cd in real-world samples followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the proposed method was 6.1 ng L- 1 for Cd with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.0% (c = 50 ng L- 1, n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 50-fold. To validate the proposed method, Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water, ZK018-1 lyophilized human urine and NIES10-b rice flour were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method exhibited a robust anti-interference ability due to the good selectivity of Cd(II)-II-MMS toward Cd(II). It was successfully employed for the determination of trace Cd(II) in environmental water, human urine and rice samples with recoveries of 89.3-116%, demonstrating that the proposed method has good application potential in real world samples with complex matrix.

  5. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Ni and Pb in diesel and gasoline samples stabilized as microemulsion using conventional and permanent modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Mariela N. Matos; Campos, Reinaldo C.

    2005-06-01

    A procedure for the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Ni and Pb in diesel and gasoline samples was developed. Sample stabilization was necessary because of evident analyte losses that occurred immediately after sampling. Excellent long-term sample stabilization was observed by mixing different organic solvents with propan-1-ol and 50% vol/vol HNO 3 at a 3.3:6.5:1 volume ratio. For Pb, efficient thermal stabilization was obtained using aqueous Pd-Mg modifier as well as for Ir as permanent modifier. The drying temperature and ramp rate influenced the sensitivity obtained for Ni, and had to be carefully optimized. Taking this into account, the same sensitivity was attained in all investigated organic media stabilized as microemulsion. Thus, calibration with microemulsions prepared with a single organic solvent was possible, using aqueous or organic stock solutions. Commercial gasoline and diesel samples were directly analyzed after stabilization as microemulsion and by comparative UOP procedures. n-Hexane microemulsions were used for calibration, and good agreement was obtained between the results using the proposed and comparative procedures. Typical coefficients of variation ( n = 6) ranged from 1% to 4%, and from 1% to 3% for Ni and Pb, respectively. Detection limits ( k = 3) in the original gasoline or diesel samples, derived from 10 blank measurements, were 4.5 and 3.6 μg l - 1 for Ni and Pb, respectively, comfortably below the values found in the analyzed samples.

  6. Automatic microemulsion preparation for metals determination in fuel samples using a flow-batch analyzer and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Antônio S; Sousa, Rafael A; Harding, David P; Cadore, Solange; Almeida, Luciano F; Araújo, Mário César U

    2012-05-21

    The principal thermodynamic advantages of using microemulsions over standard emulsions for flow metal analysis are the greatly increased analyte stability and emulsive homogeneity that improve both the ease of sample preparation, and the analytical result. In this study a piston propelled flow-batch analyzer (PFBA) for the determination of Cu, Cr and Pb in gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was explored. Investigative phase modeling for low dilution was conducted both for gasoline and naphtha microemulsions. Rheological considerations were also explored including a mathematical flow derivation to fine tune the system's operational parameters, and the GF AAS coupling. Both manual and automated procedures for microemulsion preparation were compared. The results of the paired t test at a 95% confidence level showed no significant differences between them. Further recovery test results confirmed a negligible matrix effect of the sample on the analyte absorption signals and an efficient stabilization of the samples (with metals) submitted to microemulsion treatment. The accuracy of the developed procedure was attested by good recovery percentages in the ranges of 100.0±3.5% for Pb in the naphtha samples, and 100.2±3.4% and 100.7±4.6% for Cu and Cr, respectively in gasoline samples. PMID:22541820

  7. Ultrasound-assisted ion-pair dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of trace amounts of lead in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Daryoush; Mohadesi, Ali Reza; Falahnejad, Masoumeh; Bahadori, Behnoosh

    2013-01-01

    A new ion-pair dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method is described for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of lead in different water samples. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used for determination of lead. The ion association complex between lead and iodide ions that forms is PbI4(-2)-tetradecyl-dimethylbenzylammonium, which is extracted into fine droplets of chlorobenzene. In order to reach the optimized experimental conditions, the influence of different parameters, such as concentration of KI, nature and volume of extraction solvents, pH effect, extraction time, and the period and speed of sonication and centrifugation, were optimized. The LOD was 0.08 ng/mL and the linear dynamic range was 0.20-8.0 ng/mL in initial solution with a correlation coefficient of 0.9985. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor was 555.5. The proposed method was successfully applied for separation and determination of lead in sea, rain, river, and drinking water samples. PMID:23513972

  8. Solid phase chelating extraction and separation of inorganic antimony species in pharmaceutical and water samples for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zih-Perényi, Katalin; Jankovics, Péter; Sugár, Éva; Lásztity, Alexandra

    2008-03-01

    A separation procedure for antimony(III) and antimony(V) was developed with the use of chelating celluloses. Sb(III) was separately pre-concentrated on imino diacetic acid-ethyl cellulose in the acidic pH range, in which the uptake of Sb(V) was negligible in the μg L - 1 concentration range. On the other hand, both Sb species Sb(V) and Sb(III) were pre-concentrated on a chloride form of 2,2'-diaminodiethylamine-cellulose. These solid phase extraction procedures were combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SPE-GFAAS) for Sb detection. Pharmaceutical compounds of organic and inorganic types (ten compounds), as well as mineral water samples (twelve types) were analyzed. Detection limits of 0.18 µg L - 1 Sb(III) and 0.25 µg L - 1 Sb(V) were found in aqueous sample solutions and water samples, respectively, considering a 25-fold pre-concentration. The total Sb, mostly in the form of Sb(V), could be determined in phosphate-containing pharmaceuticals, while in phosphoric acid, Sb(III) was the dominant form. In all other types of samples the Sb content was below the detection threshold, and therefore, the potential suitability of the SPE-GFAAS method for the determination of Sb(III) species was proven by recovery tests of spiked samples. This method ensures the required detection power with regard to the allowable Sb limits established by international organizations.

  9. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  10. Investigation of chemical modifiers for the determination of lead in fertilizers and limestone using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction and slurry sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Aline R.; Becker, Emilene M.; Dessuy, Morgana B.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    In this work, chemical modifiers in solution (Pd/Mg, NH4H2PO4 and NH4NO3/Pd) were compared with permanent modifiers (Ir and Ru) for the determination of lead in fertilizer and limestone samples using slurry sampling and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman-effect background correction. The analytical line at 283.3 nm was used due to some spectral interference observed at 217.0 nm. The NH4H2PO4 was abandoned due to severe spectral interference even at the 283.3-nm line. For Pd/Mg and NH4NO3/Pd the optimum pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 900 °C and 1900 °C, respectively. For Ru and Ir, the integrated absorbance signal was stable up to pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C and 900 °C, respectively, and up to atomization temperature of 1700 °C. The limit of detection (LOD) was 17 ng g- 1 using Pd/Mg and 29 ng g- 1 using NH4NO3/Pd. Among the permanent modifiers investigated, the LOD was 22 ng g- 1 Pb for Ir and 10 ng g- 1 Pb for Ru. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using the certified reference material NIST SRM 695. Although Ru provided lower LOD, which can be attributed to a lower blank signal, only the modifiers in solution showed concordant values of Pb concentration for the NIST SRM 695 and the most of analyzed samples. Moreover, the Pd/Mg modifier provided the highest sensitivity and for this reason it is more suitable for the determination of Pb in fertilizers samples in slurry; besides this it presented a better signal-to-noise ratio than NH4NO3/Pd.

  11. Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry—a fast and reliable screening procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic in fish and seafood.

    PubMed

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; Llorente-Mirandes, Toni; Damin, Isabel C F; López-Sánchez, José F; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Welz, Bernhard; Silva, Márcia M

    2015-03-01

    Direct solid sample analysis with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GF AAS) was investigated initially with the intention of developing a method for the determination of total As in fish and other seafood. A mixture of 0.1% Pd+0.06% Mg+0.06% Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier, added in solution over the solid samples, making possible the use of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures of 1200 °C and 2400 °C, respectively. The sample mass had to be limited to 0.25 mg, as the integrated absorbance did not increase further with increasing sample mass. Nevertheless, the recovery of As from several certified reference materials was of the order of 50% lower than the certified value. Strong molecular absorption due to the phosphorus monoxide molecule (PO) was observed with high-resolution continuum source AAS (HR CS AAS), which, however, did not cause any spectral interference. A microwave-assisted digestion with HNO3/H2O2 was also investigated to solve the problem; however, the results obtained for several certified reference materials were statistically not different from those found with direct SS-GF AAS. Accurate values were obtained using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to analyze the digested samples, which suggested that organic As compounds are responsible for the low recoveries. HPLC-ICP-MS was used to determine the arsenobetaine (AB) concentration. Accurate results that were not different from the certified values were obtained when the AB concentration was added to the As concentration found by SS-GF AAS for most certified reference materials (CRM) and samples, suggesting that SS-GF AAS could be used as a fast screening procedure for inorganic As determination in fish and seafood. PMID:25618661

  12. Influence of citric acid as chemical modifier for lead determination in dietary calcium supplement samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezar Paz de Mattos, Julio; Medeiros Nunes, Adriane; Figueiredo Martins, Ayrton; Luiz Dressler, Valderi; Marlon de Moraes Flores, Érico

    2005-06-01

    Citric acid was used as a chemical modifier for Pb determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in dietary supplement samples (calcium carbonate, dolomite and oyster shell samples) and its efficiency was compared to the use of palladium. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were established without use of chemical modifier, with the addition of 20, 100 and 200 μg of citric acid, and with 3 μg of palladium. The citric acid modifier made possible the interference-free Pb determination in the presence of high concentrations of Ca and Mg nitrates. Acid sample digestion involving closed vessels (microwave-assisted and conventional heating) and acid attack using polypropylene vessels at room temperature were compared. All digestion procedures presented similar results for calcium carbonate and dolomite samples. However, for oyster shell samples accurate results were obtained only with the use of closed vessel systems. Analyte addition and matrix-matched standards were used for calibration. The characteristic mass for Pb using citric acid and palladium were 16 and 25 pg, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was always less than 5% when citric acid was used. The relative and absolute limits of detection were 0.02 μg g - 1 and 8 pg with citric acid and 0.1 μg g - 1 and 44 pg with the Pd modifier, respectively ( n = 10, 3σ). The recovery of Pb in spiked calcium supplement samples (10 μg l - 1 ) was between 98% and 105%. With the use of 100 μg of citric acid as chemical modifier, problems such as high background absorption and high RSD values were minimized in comparison to the addition of 3 μg of palladium.

  13. Determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers employing direct solid sampling analysis and high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira Souza, Sidnei; François, Luciane Luiza; Borges, Aline Rocha; Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    The present study proposes the determination of copper and mercury in phosphate fertilizers by direct solid sampling analysis (SS) employing high resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). For Cu determination, two analytical lines were used: 327.3960 nm and 249.2146 nm. Hg determination was carried out on the line 253.6521 nm and 100 μg KMnO4 was used as chemical modifier. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for Cu determination was 1300 °C. Atomization temperatures for Cu and Hg were 2400 and 1100 °C, respectively. External calibration with aqueous standard solutions was adopted for both elements. The limits of quantification (LoQs) and characteristic mass (m0) obtained for Cu determination were 0.4 μg g- 1 and 1.12 ng, respectively, on line 249.2146 nm, and 64 μg g- 1 and 25 pg on 327.3960 nm. For mercury, LoQ and m0 were 4.8 ng g- 1 and 39 pg, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed methods was confirmed by the analysis of standard reference material (SRM) of Trace Elements in Multi-Nutrient Fertilizer (SRM NIST 695). The precision expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), was better than 8.2% for Hg and 7.7% for the Cu (n = 5), considered satisfactory for microanalysis in solid sample. Four fertilizer samples acquired in commercial establishments in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, were analyzed. The optimized analytical methods were simple, fast, accurate, precise and free of spectral interferences for the determination of Cu and Hg in phosphate fertilizer samples by SS-HR-CS GF AAS, avoiding the dissolution of the sample, the use of harmful reagents and the generation of residues.

  14. Direct sample introduction of wines in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of arsenic, cadmium, copper and lead content.

    PubMed

    Ajtony, Zsolt; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Suskó, Emoke Klaudia; Mezei, Pál; György, Krisztina; Bencs, László

    2008-07-30

    A multi-element graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) method was elaborated for the simultaneous determination of As, Cd, Cu, and Pb in wine samples of various sugar contents using the transversally heated graphite atomizer (THGA) with end-capped tubes and integrated graphite platforms (IGPs). For comparative GFAAS analyses, direct injection (i.e., dispensing the sample onto the IGP) and digestion-based (i.e., adding oxidizing agents, such as HNO(3) and/or H(2)O(2) to the sample solutions) methods were optimized with the application of chemical modifiers. The mixture of 5 microg Pd (applied as nitrate) plus 3 microg Mg(NO(3))(2) chemical modifier was proven to be optimal for the present set of analytes and matrix, it allowing the optimal 600 degrees C pyrolysis and 2200 degrees C atomization temperatures, respectively. The IGP of the THGA was pre-heated at 70 degrees C to prevent the sputtering and/or foaming of sample solutions with a high organic content, dispensed together with the modifier solution, which method also improved the reproducibility of the determinations. With the digestion-based method, the recovery ranged between 87 and 122%, while with the direct injection method it was between 96 and 102% for Cd, Cu, and Pb, whereas a lower, compromise recovery of 45-85% was realized for As. The detection limits (LODs) were found to be 5.0, 0.03, 1.2, and 0.8 microg l(-1) for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. The characteristic mass (m(0)) data were 24 pg As, 1.3 pg Cd, 13 pg Cu, and 35 pg Pb. The upper limits of the linear calibration range were 100, 2, 100, and 200 microg l(-1) for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. The precisions were not worse than 4.8, 3.1, 3.7, and 2.3% for As, Cd, Cu, and Pb, respectively. For arsenic, a higher amount of the modifier (e.g., 20 microg Pd plus 12 microg Mg(NO(3))(2)) could be recommended to overcome the interference from the presence of sulphate and phosphate in wines. Although this method increased the

  15. Noble metals as permanent chemical modifiers for the determination of mercury in environmental reference materials using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and calibration against aqueous standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Alessandra Furtado; Welz, Bernhard; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2002-12-01

    Iridium, palladium, rhodium and ruthenium, thermally deposited on the platform, were investigated as permanent modifiers for the determination of mercury in ash, sludge, marine and river sediment reference materials, ground to a particle size of 50 μm, using solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A total mass of 250 μg of each modifier was applied using 25 injections of 20 μl of modifier solution (500 mg l -1), and executing a temperature program for modifier conditioning after each injection. The performance of palladium was found to be most consistent, taking the characteristic mass as the major criterion, resulting in an excellent correlation between the measured integrated absorbance values and the certified mercury contents. Mercury was found to be lost in part from aqueous solutions during the drying stage in the presence of all the investigated permanent modifiers, as well as in the presence of the palladium and magnesium nitrates modifier added in solution. A loss-free determination of mercury in aqueous solutions could be reached only after the addition of potassium permanganate, which finally made possible the use of aqueous standards for the direct analysis of solid samples. A characteristic mass of 55-60 pg Hg was obtained for the solid samples, using Pd as a permanent modifier, and also in aqueous solutions after the addition of permanganate. The results obtained for mercury in ash, sludge and sediment reference materials, using direct solid sapling and calibration against aqueous standards, as well as the detection limit of 0.2 mg kg -1 were satisfactory for a routine procedure.

  16. Magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-mei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Yan-hong; Lian, Hong-zhen; Hu, Xin

    2013-11-15

    A new approach of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using zincon-immobilized silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Zincon-Si-MNPs) as the MSPE absorbent. Cr(III) was quantitatively reserved on the absorbent at pH 9.1 while total Cr was reserved at pH 6.5. The absorbed Cr species were eluted by using 2 mol/L HCl and detected by GFAAS. The concentration of Cr(VI) could be calculated by subtracting Cr(III) from total Cr. All the parameters affecting the separation and extraction efficiency of Cr species such as pH, extraction time, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume and influence of co-existing ions were systematically examined and the optimized conditions were established accordingly. The detection limit (LOD) of the method was 0.016 and 0.011 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100 and 150. The precisions of this method (Relative standard deviation, RSD, n=7) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) at 0.1 ng mL(-1) were 6.0% and 6.2%, respectively. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified reference material of environmental water was analyzed, and the result of Cr speciation was in good agreement with the certified value. This MSPE-GFAAS method has been successfully applied for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in lake and tap waters with the recoveries of 88-109% for the spiked samples. Moreover, the MSPE separation mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) based on their adsorption-desorption on Zincon-Si-MNPs has been explained through various spectroscopic characterization. PMID:24148416

  17. Sensitive magnetic nanoparticle-based immunoassay of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase using protein cage templated lead phosphate for signal amplification with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Yang, Enjian; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new magnetic nanoparticles sandwich-like immunoassay using protein cage nanoparticles (PCN) for signal amplification together with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for quantification of organophosphorylated acetylcholinesterase adduct (OP-AChE), the biomarker of exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and nerve agents. OP-AChE adducts were firstly captured by titanium dioxide coated magnetic nanoparticles (TiO2-MNPs) from the sample matrixes through metal chelation with phospho-moieties, and then selectively recognized by anti-AChE antibody labeled on PCN which was packed with lead phosphate in its cavity (PCN-anti-AChE). The sandwich-like immunoreaction was performed among TiO2-MNPs, OP-AChE and PCN-anti-AChE to form TiO2-MNPs/OP-AChE/PCN-anti-AChE immunocomplex. The complex could be easily isolated from the sample solution with the help of magnet, and the released lead ions from PCN were detected by GFAAS for the quantification of OP-AChE. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved because PCN increased the amount of metal ions in the cavity of each apoferritin. The proposed immunoassay yielded a linear response over a broad OP-AChE concentrations from 0.01 nM to 2 nM, with a detection limit of 2 pM, which has enough sensitivity for monitoring of low-dose exposure to OPs. This new method showed an acceptable stability and reproducibility and was validated with OP-AChE spiked human plasma. PMID:26953358

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of low-level silver by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damrau, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Increased awareness of the quality of water in the United States has led to the development of a method for determining low levels (0.2-5.0 microg/L) of silver in water samples. Use of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry provides a sensitive, precise, and accurate method for determining low-level silver in samples of low ionic-strength water, precipitation water, and natural water. The minimum detection limit determined for low-level silver is 0.2 microg/L. Precision data were collected on natural-water samples and SRWS (Standard Reference Water Samples). The overall percent relative standard deviation for natural-water samples with silver concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L was less than 40 percent throughout the analytical range. For the SRWS with concentrations more than 0.2 microg/L, the overall percent relative standard deviation was less than 25 percent throughout the analytical range. The accuracy of the results was determined by spiking 6 natural-water samples with different known concentrations of the silver standard. The recoveries ranged from 61 to 119 percent at the 0.5-microg/L spike level. At the 1.25-microg/L spike level, the recoveries ranged from 92 to 106 percent. For the high spike level at 3.0 microg/L, the recoveries ranged from 65 to 113 percent. The measured concentrations of silver obtained from known samples were within the Branch of Quality Assurance accepted limits of 1 1/2 standard deviations on the basis of the SRWS program for Inter-Laboratory studies.

  19. A dried urine spot test to simultaneously monitor Mo and Ti levels using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rello, L.; Lapeña, A. C.; Aramendía, M.; Belarra, M. A.; Resano, M.

    2013-03-01

    Home-based collection protocols for clinical specimens are actively pursued as a means of improving life quality of patients that require frequent controls, such as patients with metallic prosthesis, for whom monitoring the evolution of Mo and Ti in biological fluids may play a decisive role to detect prosthesis mal-functioning. The collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers provides a simple way to implement these protocols. This work explores the potential of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the simultaneous and direct determination of Mo and Ti in urine, after its deposition onto clinical filter paper, giving rise to a dried urine spot. The approach used for depositing the sample was found crucial to develop a quantitative method, since the filter paper acts as a chromatographic support and produces a differential distribution of the target analytes. Furthermore, the high spreading of urine onto a filter paper results in a small amount of urine per surface unit, and thus, ultimately, in lack of sensitivity. In order to circumvent these problems, the use of an alternative approach based on the use of pre-cut 17 × 19 mm filter paper pieces onto which larger amounts of sample (500 μL) can be retained by single deposition was proposed and evaluated. In this way, an approximately 12-fold increase in sensitivity and a more homogeneous distribution of the target analytes were obtained, permitting the development of a quantification strategy based on the use of matrix-matched urine samples of known analyte concentrations, which were subjected to the same procedure as the samples. Accuracy of this method, which provides LODs of 1.5 μg L- 1 for Mo and 6.5 μg L- 1 for Ti, was demonstrated after analysis of urine reference materials. Overall, the performance of the method developed is promising, being likely suitable for determination of other analytes in dried urine spots.

  20. A sensitive magnetic nanoparticle-based immunoassay of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase using protein cage templated lead phosphate for signal amplification with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Yang, Enjian; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-04-01

    We developed a new magnetic nanoparticle sandwich-like immunoassay using protein cage nanoparticles (PCN) for signal amplification together with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for the quantification of an organophosphorylated acetylcholinesterase adduct (OP-AChE), the biomarker of exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and nerve agents. OP-AChE adducts were firstly captured by titanium dioxide coated magnetic nanoparticles (TiO2-MNPs) from the sample matrixes through metal chelation with phospho-moieties, and then selectively recognized by anti-AChE antibody labeled on PCN which was packed with lead phosphate in its cavity (PCN-anti-AChE). The sandwich-like immunoreaction was performed among TiO2-MNPs, OP-AChE and PCN-anti-AChE to form a TiO2-MNP/OP-AChE/PCN-anti-AChE immunocomplex. The complex could be easily isolated from the sample solution with the help of magnet, and the released lead ions from PCN were detected by GFAAS for the quantification of OP-AChE. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved because PCN increased the amount of metal ions in the cavity of each apoferritin. The proposed immunoassay yielded a linear response over a broad range of OP-AChE concentrations from 0.01 nM to 2 nM, with a detection limit of 2 pM, which has enough sensitivity for monitoring of low-dose exposure to OPs. This new method showed an acceptable stability and reproducibility and was validated with OP-AChE spiked human plasma. PMID:26953358

  1. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  2. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: a preliminary examination of results from an international collaborative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    1995-06-01

    An international collaborative study was initiated to evaluate the current state-of-the-art for solid sampling. Samples were sent to 28 laboratories and data were received from 18 collaborators, 16 of which reported slurry results. A preliminary check of performance using NIST SRM 1643c acidified water, showed that at least 13 laboratories were able to provide accurate results within ±10% of the mean certified Pb and Cr concentrations. The focus of this work was slurry analytical data reported by collaborators. Average performance by collaborators for the determination of Pb in NIST SRM 2704 Buffalo River Sediment was 103% recovery based on the mean certified reference value and was 84% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for NRCC PACS-1, a marine estuarine sediment, which was identified to collaborators as an unknown sediment. Average performance by collaborators for Cr in SRM 2704 was 96% based on the mean certified reference value and was 78% recovery based on the mean certified reference value for PACS-1. The use of secondary wavelengths and the importance of analysis of a representative subsample are highlighted. Possible problems leading to inaccurate results being reported by collaborators are discussed including the use of mini-flows, matrix modifiers, low atomization temperatures, short atomization times, and expulsion losses.

  3. Extension of working range in Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry by nonlinear calibration with prior correction for stray light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonardo, Robert F.; Yuzefovsky, Alexander I.; Zhou, Jack X.; McCaffrey, John T.; Michel, Robert G.

    1996-09-01

    The nonlinear working range of a Perkin-Elmer 4100Zl atomic absorption spectrometer was improved in three steps. Firstly, each absorbance datum within the transient profile was corrected for the presence of stray light by an algorithm originally developed by L'vov and co-workers (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 47 (1992) 889-895 and 1187-1202), but with the incorporation of the Newton method of successive approximations (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 49 (1994) 1643-1656. Secondly, a dip correction procedure was performed on temporal signal profiles that exhibited a dip due to rollover. In the final step, an analytically useful working curve was generated by the nonlinear calibration routine of Barnett (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 39 (1984) 829). Goodness of fit between the resultant calibration curve and the data was measured by the method suggested by Miller-Ihli et al. (Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 39 (1984) 1603) that is based on the sum of squares of the percentage deviation (SSPD) and the root mean square (RMS) percentage deviation. For lead, silver, copper, thallium, and cadmium, the analytical nonlinear working range was increased by as much as one and a half orders of magnitude, without any significant effect on the RMS. For chromium and manganese, no significant improvement in the nonlinear working range was observed, while the RMS improved by 50%. In the case of nickel, neither the working range nor the RMS was improved.

  4. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of methylmercury in human hair and sludge samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongmei; Hu, Bin; Chen, Beibei; Zu, Wanqing

    2008-07-01

    Two methods, based on hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid (three phase) microextraction (HF-LLLME) and hollow fiber liquid phase (two phase) microextraction (HF-LPME), have been developed and critically compared for the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). In HF-LPME, methylmercury was extracted into the organic phase (toluene) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained as a free species in the sample solution. In HF-LLLME, methylmercury was first extracted into the organic phase (toluene) and then into the acceptor phase (4% thiourea in 1 mol L - 1 HCl) prior to its determination by GFAAS, while inorganic mercury remained in the sample solution. The total mercury was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the levels of inorganic mercury in both HF-LLLME and HF-LPME were obtained by subtracting methylmercury from total mercury. The factors affecting the microextraction of methylmercury, including organic solvent, extraction time, stirring rate and ionic strength, were investigated and the optimal extraction conditions were established for both HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME. With a consumption of 3.0 mL of the sample solution, the enrichment factors were 204 and 55 for HF-LLLPME and HF-LPME, respectively. The limits of detection (LODs) for methylmercury were 0.1 μg L - 1 and 0.4 μg L - 1 (as Hg) with precisions (RSDs (%), c = 5 μg L - 1 (as Hg), n = 5) of 13% and 11% for HF-LLLPME-GFAAS and HF-LPME-GFAAS, respectively. For ICP-MS determination of total mercury, a limit of detection of 39 ng L - 1 was obtained. Finally, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was applied to the determination of methylmercury content in human hair and sludge, and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 99-113%. In order to validate the method, HF-LLLME-GFAAS was also applied to the analysis of a certified reference material of NRCC DORM-2 dogfish

  5. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation. PMID:27130088

  6. Graphene oxide-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of inorganic selenium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanan; Chen, Beibei; Wu, Shaowei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a method of graphene oxide (GO)-TiO2 composite solid phase extraction followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the speciation of inorganic selenium in environmental waters. The adsorption behavior of inorganic Se(IV) and Se(VI) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite was investigated. It was found that Se(IV) was quantitatively retained on the GO-TiO2 composites within a wide pH range of 0.5-10, while Se(VI) was quantitatively adsorbed on GO-TiO2(1:1) composite at pH 0.5-2, and no obvious adsorption of Se(VI) within the pH range of 4-10 was found. By selecting pH 6.0, Se(IV) could be easily determined. After reduction of Se(VI), total Se was determined by the proposed method, and Se(VI) was calculated as the difference between the total Se and Se(IV). The factors affecting the separation/preconcentration of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the isothermal adsorption of Se(IV) on the GO-TiO2(1:1) composite fitted Langmuir model; a linear range over 0.1-12ngmL(-1) was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) and precision of the method for Se(IV) was 0.04ngmL(-1) and 9.4% (cSe(IV)=0.5ngmL(-1), n=7), respectively. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a standard water sample (GSBZ50031-94) was analyzed, and the determined value was in a good agreement to the certified value. The established method was applied to inorganic Se speciation in environmental water samples and the recovery of 87.4-102% was obtained for the spiked samples. PMID:27154702

  7. Determination of thallium in cadmium and lead by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry with sample vaporization from a platform.

    PubMed

    Fazakas, J; Marinescu, D M

    1983-11-01

    When the sample is vaporized from the wall of a graphite furnace it is not possible to determine thallium in cadmium and lead by AAS without matrix matching of the standards. In the case of a lead matrix and vaporization from the wall, the thallium signal is barely distinguishable from the base-line. When the sample is vaporized from a platform, and the peak area is used for measurement, pure aqueous standards may be used for instrument calibration. The peak heights and areas of the thallium signals are considerably enhanced by vaporization from a platform (peak height 1.7-fold and peak area 2.6-fold in pure aqueous solutions as compared to vaporization from the wall). The enhancement factors are larger in presence of the cadmium or lead matrix since here the reduced interference also makes a contribution. PMID:18963481

  8. Electrochemical generation of volatile form of cadmium and its in situ trapping in a graphite furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eliška; Rychlovský, Petr; Resslerová, Tina; Hraníček, Jakub; Červený, Václav

    2016-03-01

    This publication describes the combination of flow-through electrochemical generation (EcVG) of cadmium volatile form with its in situ trapping in a graphite furnace atomizer. Three cathode materials (Pt, Pb, and Ti) and four potentially suitable electrolytes (HCl, H2SO4, HCOOH and NaCl) were tested. Automated sampling equipment for the graphite furnace atomizer with an untreated fused silica capillary was used for the introduction of the cadmium volatile form into the iridium-treated graphite furnace. The limit of detection (LOD) of the electrochemical Cd volatile form generation with in situ collection was 1.0 ng ml- 1 (concentration LOD) or 1.5 ng (absolute LOD). The efficiency of the method was estimated and discussed. The effect of selected concomitant ions was evaluated and the accuracy of the proposed method was established by determination of the Cd content in the NIST SRM 1643e certified reference material.

  9. Low-temperature transformations of sodium sulfate and sodium selenite in the presence of pre-reduced palladium modifier in graphite furnaces for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynsky, Anatoly B.; Stakheev, Alexandr Yu.; Telegina, Natalia S.; Senin, Valery G.; Kustov, Leonid M.; Wennrich, Rainer

    2001-08-01

    The low-temperature interaction (up to 550°C) of a pre-reduced palladium modifier with sodium sulfate and sodium selenite on the pyrolytic graphite platform was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron microprobe analysis. The equipment applied allowed the introduction of samples heated in an argon flow into the analytical chamber of the XPS spectrometer without contact with the air. Electron microprobe analysis showed that palladium and sulfur preferably occupy different areas on the platform surface. On the contrary, selenium from sodium selenite tends to occupy areas of the graphite surface covered with palladium. The most probable reason for this is the chemisorption of selenium (IV) on the palladium surface at the drying stage. No changes in the XPS spectra of metallic Pd and S 6+ were observed when Na 2SO 4 and Pd were heated together on the graphite platform in the range 100-550°C. The reduction of sodium selenite on the graphite surface already starts during drying. Pre-reduced palladium intensifies this process. The rate of the reduction is proportional to the amount of palladium, and in the presence of palladium at an atomic ratio of Pd/Se=7.5, the transformation of Se 4+ into Se 0 completes at 250°C.

  10. Plumbrook Hypersonic Tunnel Facility Graphite Furnace Degradation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    A recent rebuild revealed extensive degradation to the large graphite induction furnace in the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF). This damage to the graphite blocks and insulating felt is examined and modeled with thermochemical equilibrium codes. The primary reactions appear to be with water vapor and the nitrogen purge gas. Based on these conclusions, several changes are recommended. An inert purge gas (e.g. argon or helium) and controlling and monitoring water vapor to about 10 ppm should decrease the damage substantially.

  11. Study on solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of nickel, silver, cobalt, copper, cadmium and lead with MCI GEL CHP 20Y as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guangyu; Fen, Weibo; Lei, Chun; Xiao, Weilie; Sun, Handong

    2009-02-15

    A solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for the determination of nickel, silver, cobalt, copper, cadmium and lead with MCI GEL CHP 20Y as sorbent was studied. Trace amounts of chromium, nickel, silver, cobalt, copper, cadmium and lead were reacted with 2-(2-quinolinil-azo)-4-methyl-1,3-dihydroxidobenzene (QAMDHB) followed by adsorption onto MCI GEL CHP 20Y solid phase extraction column, and 1.0molL(-1) HNO(3) was used as eluent. The metal ions in 300mL solution can be concentrated to 1.0mL, representing an enrichment factor of 300 was achieved. The recoveries of analytes at pH 8.0 with 1.0g of resin were greater than 95% without interference from alkaline, earth alkaline and some metal ions. When detected with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, the detection limits in the original samples were 1.4ngL(-1) for Cr(III), 1.0ngL(-1) for Ni(II), 0.85ngL(-1) for Ag(I), 1.2ngL(-1) for Co(II), 1.0ngL(-1) for Cu(II), 1.2ngL(-1) for Cd(II) and 1.3ngL(-1) for Pb(II). The validation of the procedure was performed by the analysis of the certified standard reference materials, and the presented procedure was applied to the determination of analytes in biological, water and soil samples with good results (recoveries range from 89 to 104%, and R.S.D.% lower than 3.2%. The results agreed with the standard value or reference method). PMID:18562094

  12. A micromethod for the determination of blood lead with matrix modification by graphite furnace atomic absorption utilizing a L`VOV platform

    SciTech Connect

    Sheier, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of low concentrations of lead on pre- and post-natal growth and development is a growing concern. Several hundred thousand children, most of them living in older houses, are at risk of ingesting lead-based paint as well as lead bearing soil and house dust contaminated by the deterioration of lead-based paint. The authors have developed a micromethod utilizing 40 microliters of whole blood for the determination of lead in whole blood. Platform furnace technology coupled with the use of a matrix modifier has enabled the determination of lead in whole blood using aqueous standards for creating the calibration curve. The matrix modifier is prepared with 0.2% Triton X-100, 0.5% Ammonium Phosphate Dibasic, and 0.2% Nitric Acid. The standards are prepared in 1% Nitric Acid and diluted 1:10 with matrix modifier. The aqueous standards are compared to the NIST Standard Reference Material 955a and the values are adjusted accordingly. The controls and patient samples are prepared by diluting 40 microliters of whole blood with 360 microliters of matrix modifier. The sample is dried in two steps (120{degrees} and 250{degrees} C), charred at 615{degrees} C, and atomized at 1700{degrees} C. The 283.3 nm lead line is used because the background absorbance is lower and the calibration curve more linear. Blood controls are obtained from BioRad and show the following CV`s: Level 1 (7.8 ug/dl) 12.4; Level 2 (23.1 ug/dl) 5.3; and Level 3 (54.6 ug/dl) 4.2. The sensitivity of the method is 1 ug/dl. The recovery of whole blood spiked with 10 ug/dl of lead standard is 101%. The quality control data and recovery studies indicate that this method is very good for the determination of lead in whole blood.

  13. Fast emulsion-based method for simultaneous determination of Co, Cu, Pb and Se in crude oil, gasoline and diesel by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Luz, Maciel S; Nascimento, Angerson N; Oliveira, Pedro V

    2013-10-15

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Co, Cu, Pb and Se in crude oil, gasoline and diesel samples using emulsion-based sampling and GF AAS is proposed. 400mg of sample was weighted in volumetric flask following the sequential addition of 125 µL of hexane and 7.5 mL of Triton X-100(®) (20% mv(-1)). Subsequently, the mixture was stirred in ultrasonic bath, during 30 min, before dilution to 25 mL with deionized water. Aliquots of 20 μL of reference solution or sample emulsion were co-injected into the graphite tube with 10 μL of 2 g L(-1) Pd(NO3)2. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1300°C and 2250°C, respectively. The limits of detection (n=10, 3σ) and characteristic masses were 0.02 μg g(-1) (0.32 μg L(-1)) and 18 pg for Co, 0.03 μg g(-1) (0.48 μg L(-1)) and 15 pg for Cu, 0.04 μg g(-1) (0.64 μg L(-1)) and 48 pg for Pb, and 0.11 μg g(-1) (1.76 μg L(-1)) and 47 pg for Se. The reliabilities of the proposed method for Co and Se were checked by SRM(®) 1634c Residual Oil analysis. The found values are in accordance to the SRM at 95% confidence level (Student's t-test). Each sample was spiked with 0.18 μg g(-1) of Co, Cu, Pb and Se and the recoveries varied from 92% to 116% for Co, 83% to 117% for Cu, 72% to 117% for Pb, and 82% to 122% for Se. PMID:24054610

  14. Solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of trace amounts of silicon in polyamide. Comparison of the performance of platinum and palladium as chemical modifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; Aramendía, M.; Volynsky, A. B.; Belarra, M. A.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of silicon in a polyamide sample at the 10 μg g -1 level has been investigated. The performance of Pt and Pd as chemical modifiers for the reproducible atomization of this element has been compared, both for aqueous solutions and for solid samples. According to the results obtained, it can be concluded that Pt is an interesting alternative to Pd, since it is capable of providing a similar performance with the use of lower modifier amounts (1 μg of Pt vs. 20 μg of Pd for direct analysis of the sample). The method proposed shows important benefits for the determination of such a complicated element: the use of aqueous standards for calibration, low sample consumption (a few milligrams), high sample throughput (20 min per sample), low limit of detection (0.1 μg g -1) and reduced risk of analyte losses and, especially, of contamination, while precision is fit for the purpose (approx. 6% R.S.D.).

  15. Chemometric evaluation of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry) and Pb (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry) concentrations in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children.

    PubMed

    Batista, Érica Ferreira; Augusto, Amanda dos Santos; Pereira-Filho, Edenir Rodrigues

    2016-04-01

    A method was developed for determining the concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Pb in lipstick samples intended to be used by adults and children using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) after treatment with dilute HNO3 and hot block. The combination of fractional factorial design and Desirability function was used to evaluate the ICP OES operational parameters and the regression models using Central Composite and Doehlert designs were calculated to stablish the best working condition for all analytes. Seventeen lipstick samples manufactured in different countries with different colors and brands were analyzed. Some samples contained high concentrations of toxic elements, such as Cr and Pb, which are carcinogenic and cause allergic and eczematous dermatitis. The maximum concentration detected was higher than the permissible safe limits for human use, and the samples containing these high metal concentrations were intended for use by children. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a chemometrics tool for exploratory analysis to observe the similarities between samples relative to the metal concentrations (a correlation between Cd and Pb was observed). PMID:26838401

  16. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles for the on-line determination of gold, palladium, and platinum in mine samples based on flow injection micro-column preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanjuan; Liu, Shuxia; Tian, Miaomiao; Li, Wanjun; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Weihong; Jia, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    A simple and highly selective procedure for on-line determination of trace levels of Au, Pd, and Pt in mine samples has been developed using flow injection-column adsorption preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FI-column-GFAAS). The precious metals were adsorbed on the as-synthesized magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5-ether packed into a micro-column and then eluted with 2% thiourea + 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl solution prior to the determination by GFAAS. The properties of the magnetic adsorbents were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various experimental parameters affecting the preconcentration of Au, Pd, and Pt were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the detection limits of the developed technique were 0.16 ng mL(-1) for Au, 0.28 ng mL(-1) for Pd, and 1.01 ng mL(-1) for Pt, with enrichment factors of 24.3, 13.9, and 17.8, respectively. Precisions, evaluated as repeatability of results, were 1.1%, 3.9%, and 4.4% respectively for Au, Pd, and Pt. The developed method was validated by the analysis of Au, Pd, and Pt in certified reference materials and mine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24274293

  17. Cobalt internal standard for Ni to assist the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry employing direct solid sample analysis.

    PubMed

    de Babos, Diego Victor; Bechlin, Marcos André; Barros, Ariane Isis; Ferreira, Edilene Cristina; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta; de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella

    2016-05-15

    A new method is proposed for the simultaneous determination of Mo and Ni in plant materials by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS), employing direct solid sample analysis (DSS) and internal standardization (IS). Cobalt was used as internal standard to minimize matrix effects during Ni determinations, enabling the use of aqueous standards for calibration. Correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were typically better than 0.9937. The performance of the method was checked by analysis of six plant certified reference materials, and the results for Mo and Ni were in agreement with the certified values (95% confidence level, t-test). Analysis was made of different types of plant materials used as renewable sources of energy, including sugarcane leaves, banana tree fiber, soybean straw, coffee pods, orange bagasse, peanut hulls, and sugarcane bagasse. The concentrations found for Mo and Ni ranged from 0.08 to 0.63 ng mg(-1) and from 0.41 to 6.92 ng mg(-1), respectively. Precision (RSD) varied from 2.1% to 11% for Mo and from 3.7% to 10% for Ni. Limits of quantification of 0.055 and 0.074 ng were obtained for Mo and Ni, respectively. PMID:26992542

  18. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of arsenic and selenium in water and sediment by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Sandra R.; Garbarino, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) is a sensitive, precise, and accurate technique that can be used to determine arsenic and selenium in samples of water and sediment. The GF-AAS method has been developed to replace the hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) methods because the method detection limits are similar, bias and variability are comparable, and interferences are minimal. Advantages of the GF-AAS method include shorter sample preparation time, increased sample throughput from simultaneous multielement analysis, reduced amount of chemical waste, reduced sample volume requirements, increased linear concentration range, and the use of a more accurate digestion procedure. The linear concentration range for arsenic and selenium is 1 to 50 micrograms per liter in solution; the current method detection limit for arsenic in solution is 0.9 microgram per liter; the method detection limit for selenium in solution is 1 microgram per liter. This report describes results that were obtained using stop-flow and low-flow conditions during atomization. The bias and variability of the simultaneous determination of arsenic and selenium by GF-AAS under both conditions are supported with results from standard reference materials--water and sediment, real water samples, and spike recovery measurements. Arsenic and selenium results for all Standard Reference Water Samples analyzed were within one standard deviation of the most probable values. Long-term spike recoveries at 6.25, 25.0, 37.5 micrograms per liter in reagent-, ground-, and surface-water samples for arsenic averaged 103 plus or minus 2 percent using low-flow conditions and 104 plus or minus 4 percent using stop-flow conditions. Corresponding recoveries for selenium were 98 plus or minus 13 percent using low-flow conditions and 87 plus or minus 24 percent using stop-flow conditions. Spike recoveries at 25 micrograms per liter in 120 water samples ranged from 97 to 99 percent

  19. Determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in used automobile catalysts and active pharmaceutical ingredients using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, Martín; Flórez, María del Rosario; Queralt, Ignasi; Marguí, Eva

    2015-03-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of Pd, Pt and Rh in two samples of very different nature. While analysis of active pharmaceutical ingredients is straightforward and it is feasible to minimize matrix effects, to the point that calibration can be carried out against aqueous standard solutions, the analysis of used automobile catalysts is more challenging requiring the addition of a chemical modifier (NH4F·HF) to help in releasing the analytes, a more vigorous temperature program and the use of a solid standard (CRM ERM®-EB504) for calibration. However, in both cases it was possible to obtain accurate results and precision values typically better than 10% RSD in a fast and simple way, while only two determinations are needed for the three analytes, since Pt and Rh can be simultaneously monitored in both types of samples. Overall, the methods proposed seem suited for the determination of these analytes in such types of samples, offering a greener and faster alternative that circumvents the traditional problems associated with sample digestion, requiring a small amount of sample only (0.05 mg per replicate for catalysts, and a few milligrams for the pharmaceuticals) and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations. The LODs achieved were 6.5 μg g- 1 (Pd), 8.3 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 9.3 μg g- 1 (Rh) for catalysts, which decreased to 0.08 μg g- 1 (Pd), 0.15 μg g- 1 (Pt) and 0.10 μg g- 1 (Rh) for pharmaceuticals.

  20. Study on the effects of nitrilotriproprionic acid and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulphonate on the fractionation of beryllium in human serum using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Chadi H; Fournier, Michel; Brousseau, Pauline; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2008-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to beryllium may cause Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD), a lung disorder initiated by an electrostatic interaction with the MHC class II human leukocyte antigen (HLA). Molecular studies have found a significant correlation between the electrostatic potential at the HLA-DP surface and disease susceptibility. CBD can therefore be treated by chelation therapy. In this work, we studied the effect of two complexing agents, nitrilotriproprionic acid (NTP) and 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulphonate (Tiron), on the fractionation of beryllium in human serum analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Results We found the average serum beryllium concentration of fourteen non-exposed individuals to be 0.53 (± 0.14) μg l-1, with 21 (± 3)% of the beryllium mass bound to the low molecular weight fraction (LMW), and 79 (± 3)% bound to the high molecular weight fraction (HMW). The addition of Tiron increased the beryllium mass in the HMW fraction, while NTP was not seen to have any influence on the fractionation of beryllium between the two fractions. NTP was, however, shown to complex 94.5% of the Be mass in the LMW fraction. The beryllium GFAAS detection limit, calculated as three times the standard deviation of 10 replicates of the lowest standard (0.05 μg L-1), was 6.0 (± 0.2) ng L-1. Conclusion The concentration of beryllium or its fractionation in human serum was not affected by sex or smoking habit. On average, three quarters of the beryllium in serum were found in the HMW fraction. Of the two ligands tested, only Tiron was effective in mobilising beryllium under physiological conditions, thus increasing the Be content in the HMW fraction. PMID:18479524

  1. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  2. A novel approach in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the use of an auxiliary solvent for adjustment of density UV-VIS spectrophotometric and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of gold based on ion pair formation.

    PubMed

    Kocúrová, Lívia; Balogh, Ioseph S; Skrlíková, Jana; Posta, József; Andruch, Vasil

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), based on the use of an auxiliary solvent for the adjustment of density. The procedure utilises a solvent system consisting of a dispersive solvent, an extraction solvent and an auxiliary solvent, which allows for the use of solvents having a density lower than that of water as an extraction solvent while preserving simple phase separation by centrifugation. The suggested approach could be an alternative to procedures described in the literature in recent months and which have been devoted to solving the same problem. The efficiency of the suggested approach is demonstrated through the determination of gold based on the formation of the ion pair [Au(CN)(2)](-) anion with Astra Phloxine (R) reagent and its extraction using the DLLME procedure with subsequent UV-VIS spectrophotometric and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection. The optimum conditions were found to be: pH 3; 0.8 mmol L(-1) K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)]; 0.12 mmol L(-1) R; dispersive solvent, methanol; extraction solvent, toluene; auxiliary solvent, tetrachloromethane. The calibration plots were linear in the ranges 0.39-4.7 mg L(-1) and 0.5-39.4 μg L(-1) for UV-VIS and GFAAS detection, respectively; thus enables the application of the developed method in two ranges differing from one from another by three orders of magnitude. The presented approach can be applied to the development of DLLME procedures for the determination of other compounds extractable by organic solvents with a density lower than that of water. PMID:20875602

  3. Evaluation of Bi as internal standard to minimize matrix effects on the direct determination of Pb in vinegar by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ru permanent modifier with co-injection of Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Silvana Ruella; Neto, José Anchieta Gomes

    2007-09-01

    Bismuth was evaluated as an internal standard for the direct determination of Pb in vinegar by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using Ru as a permanent modifier with co-injection of Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2. The correlation coefficient of the graph plotted from the normalized absorbance signals of Bi versus Pb was r = 0.989. Matrix effects were evaluated by analyzing the slope ratios between the analytical curve obtained from reference solutions prepared in 0.2% (v/v) HNO 3 and analytical curves obtained from Pb additions in red and white wine vinegar samples. The calculated ratios were around 1.04 and 1.02 for analytical curves established applying an internal standard and 1.3 and 1.5 for analytical curves without. Analytical curves in the 2.5-15 μg L - 1 Pb concentration interval were established using the ratio Pb absorbance to Bi absorbance versus analyte concentration, and typical linear correlations of r = 0.999 were obtained. The proposed method was applied for direct determination of Pb in 18 commercial vinegar samples and the Pb concentration varied from 2.6 to 31 μg L - 1 . Results were in agreement at a 95% confidence level (paired t-test) with those obtained for digested samples. Recoveries of Pb added to vinegars varied from 96 to 108% with and from 72 to 86% without an internal standard. Two water standard reference materials diluted in vinegar sample were also analyzed and results were in agreement with certified values at a 95% confidence level. The characteristic mass was 40 pg Pb and the useful lifetime of the tube was around 1600 firings. The limit of detection was 0.3 μg L - 1 and the relative standard deviation was ≤ 3.8% and ≤ 8.3% ( n = 12) for a sample containing 10 μg L - 1 Pb with and without internal standard, respectively.

  4. Separation and preconcentration of platinum-group metals from spent autocatalysts solutions using a hetero-polymeric S, N-containing sorbent and determination by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eskina, Vasilina V; Dalnova, Olga A; Filatova, Daria G; Baranovskaya, Vasilisa B; Karpov, Yuri A

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of Pt, Pd and Rh after separation and concentration by original in-house developed heterochain polymer S, N-containing sorbent. The methods of sample preparation of spent ceramic-based autocatalysts were considered, two of which were used: autoclave decomposition in mixture of acids HCl:HNO3 (3:1) and high-temperature melting with K2S2O7. Both methods anyway limit the direct determination of analytes by HR CS GFAAS. Using the first method it is an incomplete digestion of spent autocatalysts samples, since the precipitate is Si, and the rhodium metal dissolves with difficulty and partially passes into solution. In contrast to the first method, the second method allow to completely transfer analytes into solution, however, the background signal produced by the chemical composition of the flux, overlaps the analytical zone. It was found, that Pt, Pd and Rh contained in the spent ceramic automotive catalysts could be effectively separated and concentrated by heterochain polymer S, N-containing sorbent, which has high sorption capacity, selectivity and resistant to dilute acids. The chosen HR CS GFAAS analysis conditions enable us to determine Pt, Pd and Rh with good metrological characteristics. The concentrations of Pt, Pd and Rh in two samples of automobile exhaust catalysts were found in range of 0.00015-0.00050; 0.170-0.189; 0.0180-0.0210wt%, respectively. The relative standard deviation obtained by HR CS GFAAS was not more than 5%. Limits of detection by HR CS GFAAS achieved were 6.2·10(-6)wt% for Pt, 1.8·10(-6)wt% for Pd, and 3.4·10(-6)wt% for Rh. Limits of determination achieved by HR CS GFAAS were 1.1·10(-5)wt% for Pt, 6.9·10(-5)wt% for Pd, and 8.3·10(-5)wt% for Rh. To control the accuracy of PGM in sorption concentrates by HR CS GFAAS method, it was appropriate to conduct an inter-method comparative experiment. The

  5. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  6. Heating rates in furnace atomic absorption using the L'vov platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koirtyohann, S.R.; Giddings, R.C.; Taylor, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Heating rate profiles for the furnace tube wall, the furnace atmosphere, and a L'vov platform were established for a range of conditions in a cyclically heated graphite atomizer. The tube wall profile was made by direct observation with a recording optical pyrometer. The sodium line reversal method was used to establish the heating rate of the furnace atmosphere, and appearance temperatures for a series metals of differing volatility was used to establish platform profiles. The tube wall heating rate was nearly linear at 2240??C s- until the desired temperature was reached after which the temperature remained constant. The furnace atmosphere reached a given temperature 0.2-0.4 s later than the tube wall through most of the atomize cycle. The platform lagged the tube wall 0.5-0.8 s. Under typical operating conditions the furnace atmosphere was 100-200??C cooler than the tube wall and at nearly constant temperature when the analyte vaporized from the platform. The L'vov platform causes the cyclically heated commercial furnace to approximate the behavior of a constant temperature furnace during atomization. ?? 1984.

  7. Preatomization separation of chromium(III) from chromium(VI) in the graphite furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Arpadjan, S.; Krivan, V.

    1986-11-01

    By means of /sup 51/Cr as a radiotracer, the behavior of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in a graphite furnace was investigated. After the addition of a mixture of trifluoroacetylacetone, tetramethylammonium hydroxide, and 0.5 M sodium acetate (1:2:2) to a water or urine sample, Cr(III) can quantitatively be removed from a graphite tube combined with an L'vov platform or from a tungsten-impregnated graphite tube without an L'vov platform at 400/sup 0/C while Cr(VI) quantitatively remains in the furnace up to a temperature of 1200/sup 0/C.

  8. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  9. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  10. COMPUTER-ASSISTED FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of furnace atomic absorption instrumentation with a turnkey chromatography data system is described. A simple addition of relays to the furnace power supply allows for automatic start-up of A/D conversion and spectrophotometer zeroing at the proper time. Manipulations inv...

  11. Determination of mercury by furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, K.; Franz, T.; Wennrich, R.

    1994-12-01

    The determination of Hg using different variants of the Furnace Atomic Nonthermal Excitation Spectrometry (FANES) is described. In the direct analysis of micro volumes of solutions, the results could be improved by working with chemical modifiers for the stabilization of Hg during the thermal pretreatment. The best results were obtained using Ir and Pd as modifiers, with absolute detection limits of 4 and 12 pg, respectively. The determination of mercury in sample volumes up to 10 ml could be achieved by coupling a cold vapour generation system and an amalgam attachment to the FANES source. A detection limit of 22 ng/l was obtained with this technique. The best results were obtained by using the cold vapour generation technique and in situ enrichment of Hg onto the modified inner surface of the graphite tube of the FANES source. Using Ir for permanent impregnation of the tube a detection limit of 0.0009 μ;g/l was found. The influence of hydride forming elements on the determination of mercury by the technique of vapour generation and in situ enrichment was studied. A reduction of the concentration of NaBH 4 to 0.002% m/v made it possible to determine traces of mercury in presence of a high excess of hydride forming elements without any depression of the Hg emission intensity. The results were validated using standard reference materials.

  12. Graphitization of Coke and Its Interaction with Slag in the Hearth of a Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Yanxiang; Barati, Mansoor; Liu, Zhengjian; Zhong, Jianbo; Su, Buxin; Wei, Mengfang; Wang, Guangwei; Yang, Tianjun

    2016-04-01

    Coke reaction behavior in the blast furnace hearth has yet to be fully understood due to limited access to the high temperature zone. The graphitization of coke and its interaction with slag in the hearth of blast furnace were investigated with samples obtained from the center of the deadman of a blast furnace during its overhaul period. All hearth coke samples from fines to lumps were confirmed to be highly graphitized, and the graphitization of coke in the high temperature zone was convinced to start from the coke surface and lead to the formation of coke fines. It will be essential to perform further comprehensive investigations on graphite formation and its evolution in a coke as well as its multi-effect on blast furnace performance. The porous hearth cokes were found to be filled up with final slag. Further research is required about the capability of coke to fill final slag and the attack of final slag on the hearth bottom refractories since this might be a new degradation mechanism of refractories located in the hearth bottom.

  13. Effect of beryllium nitrate vaporization on surface temperature in the pyrocoated graphite furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katskov, D. A.; Mofolo, R.; Tittarelli, P.

    1999-12-01

    The vaporization of 20-50 μg beryllium from nitrate solution was observed in graphite furnace atomizers using pyrocoated and Ta-lined tubes. A charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer was employed to follow the evolution of absorption spectra (200-475 nm), the light scattering and emission. Molecular bands of NO and NO 2 were observed below 1000°C. Beryllium absorption at 234.9 nm was prominent in spectra above 2200°C and 1900°C, respectively, in Ta-lined and pyrocoated tubes. The evolution profile of Be atomic absorption and of some bands indicated a faster vapor release in the pyrocoated tube. Light scattering occurred only in the pyrocoated tube, increasing with the tube age. When purge gas mini flow was applied, the scattering was observed at 1900-2200°C simultaneously with Be atomic absorption and emission continuum at long wavelength. The emission continuum showed the wavelength distribution characteristic of black body radiation. The temperature increase, due to the vaporization of the sample, was estimated using Planck's equation. The maximum temperature increase reached 400°C, when the most intense Be atomic absorption, light scattering and emission was observed. According to the hypothesis proposed, the black body radiation was induced by the formation of Be carbide in the pyrographite layer. Low heat capacity across the pyrographite prevented the heat dissipation, and led to increase of surface temperature. This induced an increase of sample evaporation rate and the formation of a thermal gradient in the cross section of the tube. Both factors originated vapor supersaturation in the tube center, spatial condensation and, accordingly, light scattering. The results, together with those already obtained with Mg nitrate place limitations to the atomization theories based on the concept of isothermal equilibrium or on Arrhenius kinetic approach.

  14. Treatment of simulated INEL buried wastes using a graphite electrode DC arc furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Surma, J.E.; Lawrence, W.E.; Titus, C.H.; Wittle, J.K.; Hamilton, R.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Rhea, D.; Thomas, P.; Woskov, P.P.

    1994-08-01

    A program has been established under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development (OTD), to develop the graphite electrode DC arc technology for the application of treating buried heterogenous solid wastes. A three way {open_quotes}National Laboratory-University-Industry{close_quotes} partnership was formed to develop this technology in the most timely and cost effective manner. This program is presently testing a newly fabricated pilot-scale DC arc furnace with associated diagnostics at the Plasma Fusion Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Initial testing in a smaller engineering scale furnace has established the viability of this technology for the treatment of solid heterogeneous wastes. Two diagnostic tools were developed under this program which support the evaluation of the DC arc technology. The diagnostics provide for both spatially resolved temperature measurements within the furnace and real time monitoring of the furnace metal emissions.

  15. COMPARISON BETWEEN ZEEMAN AND CONTINUUM BACKGROUND CORRECTION FOR GRAPHITE FURNACE AAS ON ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comparison study was carried out to evaluate the two most commonly used background correction techniques in furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Zeeman effect and continuum source background correction. Synthetic sample matrices were prepared consisting of the most frequ...

  16. Formation mechanism of the graphite-rich protective layer in blast furnace hearths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ke-xin; Zhang, Jian-liang; Liu, Zheng-jian; Liu, Feng; Liang, Li-sheng

    2016-01-01

    A long campaign life of blast furnaces is heavily linked to the existence of a protective layer in their hearths. In this work, we conducted dissection studies and investigated damage in blast furnace hearths to estimate the formation mechanism of the protective layer. The results illustrate that a significant amount of graphite phase was trapped within the hearth protective layer. Furthermore, on the basis of the thermodynamic and kinetic calculations of the graphite precipitation process, a precipitation potential index related to the formation of the graphite-rich protective layer was proposed to characterize the formation ability of this layer. We determined that, under normal operating conditions, the precipitation of graphite phase from hot metal was thermodynamically possible. Among elements that exist in hot metal, C, Si, and P favor graphite precipitation, whereas Mn and Cr inhibit this process. Moreover, at the same hot-face temperature, an increase of carbon concentration in hot metal can shorten the precipitation time. Finally, the results suggest that measures such as reducing the hot-face temperature and increasing the degree of carbon saturation in hot metal are critically important to improve the precipitation potential index.

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  18. Evaluation of the graphite electrode DC arc furnace for the treatment of INEL buried wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Surma, J.E.; Freeman, C.J.; Powell, T.D.; Cohn, D.R.; Smatlak, D.L.; Thomas, P.; Woskov, P.P.; Hamilton, R.A.; Titus, C.H.; Wittle, J.K.

    1993-06-01

    The past practices of DOE and its predecessor agencies in burying radioactive and hazardous wastes have left DOE with the responsibility of remediating large volumes of buried wastes and contaminated soils. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), has chosen to evaluate treatment of buried wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Because of the characteristics of the buried wastes, the potential for using high-temperature thermal treatment technologies is being evaluated. The soil-waste mixture at INEL, when melted or vitrified, produces a glass/ceramic referred to as iron-enriched basalt (IEB). One potential problem with producing the IEB material is the high melting temperature of the waste and soil (1,400-1,600{degrees}C). One technology that has demonstrated capabilities to process high melting point materials is the plasma arc heated furnace. A three-party program was initiated and the program involved testing an engineering-scale DC arc furnace to gain preliminary operational and waste processibility information. It also included the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a second-generation, pilot-scale graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Widely ranging simulants of INEL buried waste were prepared and processed in the Mark I furnace. The tests included melting of soils with metals, sludges, combustibles, and simulated drums. Very promising results in terms of waste product quality, volume reduction, heating efficiency, and operational reliability and versatility were obtained. The results indicate that the graphite electrode DC arc technology would be very well suited for treating high melting point wastes such as those found at INEL. The graphite electrode DC arc furnace has been demonstrated to be very simple, yet effective, with excellent prospects for remote or semi-remote operation.

  19. DETERMINATION OF LEAD AND CADMIUM IN FISH AND CLAM TISSUE BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH A MOLYBDENUM AND LANTHANUM TREATED PYROLYTIC GRAPHITE ATOMIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A molybdenum and lanthanum treated pyrolytically coated graphite tube is employed for the furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium directly in nitric-perchloric acid tissue digests. Lanthanum tends to promote the formation of a smooth lead atomiza...

  20. DC graphite arc furnace, a simple system to reduce mixed waste volume

    SciTech Connect

    Wittle, J.K.; Hamilton, R.A.; Trescot, J.

    1995-12-31

    The volume of low-level radioactive waste can be reduced by the high temperature in a DC Graphite Arc Furnace. This volume reduction can take place with the additional benefit of having the solid residue being stabilized by the vitrified product produced in the process. A DC Graphite Arc Furnace is a simple system in which electricity is used to generate heat to vitrify the material and thermally decompose any organic matter in the waste stream. Examples of this type of waste are protective clothing, resins, and grit blast materials produced in the nuclear industry. The various Department of Energy (DOE) complexes produce similar low-level waste streams. Electro-Pyrolysis, Inc. and Svedala/Kennedy Van Saun are engineering and building small 50-kg batch and up to 3,000 kg/hr continuous feed DC furnaces for the remediation, pollution prevention, and decontamination and decommissioning segments of the treatment community. This process has been demonstrated under DOE sponsorship at several facilities and has been shown to produce stable waste forms from surrogate waste materials.

  1. Fe-Si droplets associated with graphite on blast furnace coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornostayev, Stanislav S.; Fabritius, Timo M. J.; Kerkkonen, Olavi; Härkki, Jouko J.

    2012-06-01

    Fe-Si droplets on the surface of blast furnace (BF) coke from 25 to 50 cm at the tuyere level are mostly composed of Fe3Si, which has various shapes (round, elongated, and irregular) and penetration degrees into the BF coke matrix. The shapes and penetration degrees may depend on the saturation of molten iron by silicon during interaction with the coke matrix. The droplets are covered by a tiny shell of carbon. Graphite observed inside the droplets can be divided into two categories: well-formed tabular crystals with relatively large size and flakes with structures similar as those in cast iron. The textures of the droplets reflect composition, interaction with the coke matrix, and cooling conditions.

  2. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  3. Electrochemical selenium hydride generation with in situ trapping in graphite tube atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šíma, Jan; Rychlovský, Petr

    2003-05-01

    A manifold coupling continuous electrolytic hydride generation of volatile hydrides with atomization in graphite tube atomizers after in situ collection was used for Se(IV) determination. Laboratory-made thin-layer flow-through cells with lead wire (cell I) and granular lead (cell II) as the cathode material were used as the electrolytic generators of volatile selenium hydride. The automatic sampling equipment of the graphite atomizer, with an untreated fused silica capillary, was used both for the introduction of volatile hydride into the atomizer and for pretreatment of the graphite furnace surface with a palladium modifier. The influence of the experimental parameters on the analytical signal was studied and optimum conditions for selenium determination were found. The optimum experimental parameters for hydride generation were: catholyte (1 mol l -1 HCl)/anolyte (2 mol l -1 H 2SO 4) flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1; applied generation current of 1.2 A (cell I) and 0.8 A (cell II); and carrier gas flow rate of 40 (cell I) and 70 ml min -1 (cell II). The hydride generated was collected in the graphite tube (pre-treated with 5 μg of Pd reduced at 800 °C) at a temperature of 400 °C for 30 s. The overall efficiency of H 2Se electrochemical generation, transport and collection was 71±7% for cell I and 80±5% for cell II. The results for electrochemical generation of H 2Se (cell II) (absolute limit of detection 50 pg, 3σ criterion) were compared with the original generation of H 2Se using NaBH 4 as a reduction agent (absolute limit of detection 30 pg) and with conventional liquid sampling. The repeatability at the 1.0 ng ml -1 level was better than 2.4% (relative standard deviation) for electrochemical hydride generation and better than 2.8% for chemical hydride generation.

  4. From the Cover: Revealing the hidden atom in graphite by low-temperature atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hembacher, Stefan; Giessibl, Franz J.; Mannhart, Jochen; Quate, Calvin F.

    2003-10-01

    Carbon, the backbone material of life on Earth, comes in three modifications: diamond, graphite, and fullerenes. Diamond develops tetrahedral sp3 bonds, forming a cubic crystal structure, whereas graphite and fullerenes are characterized by planar sp2 bonds. Polycrystalline graphite is the basis for many products of everyday life: pencils, lubricants, batteries, arc lamps, and brushes for electric motors. In crystalline form, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is used as a diffracting element in monochromators for x-ray and neutron scattering and as a calibration standard for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The graphite surface is easily prepared as a clean atomically flat surface by cleavage. This feature is attractive and is used in many laboratories as the surface of choice for "seeing atoms." Despite the proverbial ease of imaging graphite by STM with atomic resolution, every second atom in the hexagonal surface unit cell remains hidden, and STM images show only a single atom in the unit cell. Here we present measurements with a low-temperature atomic force microscope with pico-Newton force sensitivity that reveal the hidden surface atom.

  5. Revealing the hidden atom in graphite by low-temperature atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hembacher, Stefan; Giessibl, Franz J; Mannhart, Jochen; Quate, Calvin F

    2003-10-28

    Carbon, the backbone material of life on Earth, comes in three modifications: diamond, graphite, and fullerenes. Diamond develops tetrahedral sp3 bonds, forming a cubic crystal structure, whereas graphite and fullerenes are characterized by planar sp2 bonds. Polycrystalline graphite is the basis for many products of everyday life: pencils, lubricants, batteries, arc lamps, and brushes for electric motors. In crystalline form, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is used as a diffracting element in monochromators for x-ray and neutron scattering and as a calibration standard for scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The graphite surface is easily prepared as a clean atomically flat surface by cleavage. This feature is attractive and is used in many laboratories as the surface of choice for "seeing atoms." Despite the proverbial ease of imaging graphite by STM with atomic resolution, every second atom in the hexagonal surface unit cell remains hidden, and STM images show only a single atom in the unit cell. Here we present measurements with a low-temperature atomic force microscope with pico-Newton force sensitivity that reveal the hidden surface atom. PMID:14504395

  6. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTION OF METALS FROM SOIL, DUST, AIR FILTER, AND SURFACE AND DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR AA (GRAPHITE FURNACE OR FLAME) OR ICP-AES ANALYSIS (BCO-L-3.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the acid digestion of soil, house dust, air filter, and surface or dermal wipe samples for analysis using inductively coupled plasma atomic emissions spectrometry (ICP-AES) and/or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) or fl...

  7. Determination of phosphorus using high-resolution diphosphorus molecular absorption spectra produced in the graphite furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mao Dong; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Okruss, Michael; Geisler, Sebastian; Florek, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Molecular absorption of diphosphorus was produced in a graphite furnace and evaluated in view of its suitability for phosphorus determination. Measurements were performed with two different high-resolution continuum source absorption spectrometers. The first system is a newly in-house developed simultaneous broad-range spectrograph, which was mainly used for recording overview absorption spectra of P2 between 193 nm and 245 nm. The region covers the main part of the C 1Σu+ ← X 1Σg+ electronic transition and shows a complex structure with many vibrational bands, each consisting of a multitude of sharp rotational lines. With the help of molecular data available for P2, an assignment of the vibrational bands was possible and the rotational structure could be compared with simulated spectra. The second system is a commercial sequential continuum source spectrometer, which was used for the basic analytical measurements. The P2 rotational line at 204.205 nm was selected and systematically evaluated with regard to phosphorus determination. The conditions for P2 generation were optimized and it was found that the combination of a ZrC modified graphite tube and borate as a chemical modifier were essential for a good production of P2. Serious interferences were found in the case of nitrate and sulfuric acid, although the nitrate interference can be eliminated by a higher pyrolysis temperature. The reliability of the method was proved by analysis of certified samples. Using standard tubes, a characteristic mass of 10 ng and a limit of detection of 7 ng were found. The values could further be improved by a factor of ten using a miniaturized tube with an internal diameter of 2 mm. Compared to the conventional method based on the phosphorus absorption line at 213.618 nm, the advantages of using P2 are the gentle temperature conditions and the potential of performing a simultaneous multi-line evaluation to further improve the limit of detection.

  8. Conducting atomic force microscopy of alkane layers on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.L.; McEuen, P.L.

    1995-05-08

    We have used an atomic force microscope with a conducting tip to investigate the layering of hexadecane on graphite. Discrete jumps were observed in both the tip--sample conductance and separation as individual liquid layers are penetrated. These conductance measurements extend solvation studies to higher force scales than have been previously achieved, and can be used to determine when the tip makes contact with the substrate. The layering also enables the formation of stable tunneling junctions.

  9. Tributyl phosphate as a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin in carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Gong, B; Matsumoto, K

    1996-07-01

    Tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been found to be a sensitivity-enhancing solvent for organotin compounds in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry; (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2), (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2), (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl, and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn all give 1 order of magnitude higher sensitivities in TBP than in toluene or ethyl acetate. The sensitivities are enhanced further 1-2 orders of magnitude in TBP, when PdCl(2)(CH(3)CN)(2) is added as a matrix modifier in the organic solvent. Among the four organotin compounds, (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CCH(3))(2) and (C(4)H(9))(2)Sn(O(2)CC(11)H(23))(2) give better sensitivities than (C(4)H(9))(3)SnCl and (C(4)H(9))(4)Sn in the absence of palladium in any organic solvent, which suggests that the oxygen atom in the tin compound might form tin oxides that are resistant to volatilization loss during ashing. Scanning electron microscopic, electrothermal vaporization ICPMS, and powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the final products before atomization include phosphorus-containing compounds Sn(2)P(2)O(7), SnP(2)O(7), and Pd(9)P(2), besides tin-palladium alloys, PdSn, Pd(3)Sn, Pd(2)Sn, Pd(3)Sn(2), and PdSn(3). These phosphorus-containing compounds would more efficiently stabilize tin and suppress tin vaporization loss during ashing, to give higher sensitivity. PMID:21619315

  10. The spectral opacity of triatomic carbon measured in a graphite tube furnace over the 280 to 600 nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.; Wells, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The opacity of linear triatomic carbon (C3) was measured in a graphite tube furnace from 280 to 600 nm to supplement the earlier measurements of Brewer and Engelke. The spectral cross section was estimated from the opacities using temperature profiles determined pyrometrically and a revised heat of formation delta H = 198 kcal/mole). The cross section was found to be nonnegligible over the range 300 to 500 nm and the electronic oscillator strength based on the total cross section estimate was 0.02.

  11. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  12. Solid sampling determination of total fluorine in baby food samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2016-11-15

    This study describes the applicability of solid sampling technique for the determination of fluorine in various baby foods via molecular absorption of calcium monofluoride generated in a graphite furnace of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry. Fluorine was determined at CaF wavelength, 606.440nm in a graphite tube applying a pyrolysis temperature of 1000°C and a molecule forming temperature of 2200°C. The limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.20ng and 0.17ng of fluorine, respectively. The fluorine concentrations determined in standard reference sample (bush branches and leaves) were in good agreement with the certified values. By applying the optimized parameters, the concentration of fluorine in various baby foods were determined. The fluorine concentrations were ranged from

  13. Determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins by carbon furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, J M; Campbell, W C

    1976-01-01

    A carbon furnace atomic absorption procedure is described for the determination of cadmium in the livers and kidneys of puffins, fratercula arctica. Samples are dried and weighed and 2 to 100 mg are dissolved in sulphuric and nitric acids. These solutions are analysed directly in the carbon furnace against aqueous standards and provide accurate results in the range 0-1 to 100 micrograms/g dry weight. The method is simple and rapid and requires much less of the small total sample than would be required for flame atomic absorption. PMID:1030692

  14. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, Gerald W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  15. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  16. A metallic furnace atomizer in hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry: Determination of bismuth and selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Aline; Kim, Manuela Leticia; Tudino, Mabel Beatriz; Baccan, Nivaldo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-08-01

    A flow injection hydride generation system with a metal furnace atomizer (Inconel 600® alloy) was employed for Bi and Se determination. The presented methods have linear ranges up to 200 and 500 μg L - 1 for Bi and Se, respectively, with good linearities ( r2 = 0.9997 and 0.9974, respectively). The limits of quantification obtained according to IUPAC recommendations were 2.3 μg L - 1 for Bi and 6 μg L - 1 for Se, and the relative standard deviations ( N = 6) based on Bi and Se analytical responses from real samples were 2.7% and 10%, respectively. Accuracy evaluations were based on certified materials such as SRM 361, SRM 363, and SRM 364 (steel alloys) for Bi, Mess-3 (marine sediment), SRM 397 (human hair), and Bio-Rad2 — 69042 (urine) for Se. Good agreements between the results were obtained at the 95% confidence level, according to the t-test.

  17. Optimization of fluorine determination via the molecular absorption of gallium mono-fluoride in a graphite furnace using a high-resolution continuum source spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleisner, Heike; Welz, Bernhard; Einax, Jürgen W.

    2010-09-01

    The determination of fluorine using the molecular absorption of gallium mono-fluoride (GaF) at the 211.248 nm rotational line has been optimized using a commercially available high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer with a transversely heated graphite tube furnace. The electron excitation spectrum of GaF was generated by adding 500 μg Ga per injection into the graphite tube as molecule forming reagent. Best results were obtained by applying Zr as a permanent modifier and a mixed Pd/Zr modifier, thermally pretreated before each sample injection together with the Ga reagent at 1100 °C. The use of sodium acetate and Ru(III) nitrosyl nitrate as additional modifiers injected together with the sample further improved the performance. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C could be used, and the optimum molecule forming temperature was 1550 °C. Several drinking water samples, a mineral water sample, and two certified reference materials were analyzed using the standard calibration technique; the absence of potential matrix effects was verified by measuring different dilutions and spiking with known fluorine mass. The results were in good agreement with the certified values and those measured by ion selective electrode; the recovery rate for the spiking experiments was between 97% and 106%. The results show that there was no matrix influence for that kind of samples containing relatively high concentrations of Ca, Mg and chloride, which are known to cause interference in GaF molecule absorption. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass of the method were 5.2 and 7.4 pg F, respectively, and were both about a factor of two better than recently published values.

  18. Direct determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in beer by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascentes, Clésia C.; Kamogawa, Marcos Y.; Fernandes, Kelly G.; Arruda, Marco A. Z.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) was employed for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn determination in beer without any sample digestion. The system was optimized and calibration was based on the analyte addition technique. A sample volume of 300 μl was introduced into the hot Ni tube at a flow-rate of 0.4 ml min -1 using 0.14 mol l -1 nitric acid solution or air as carrier. Different Brazilian beers were directly analyzed after ultrasonic degasification. Results were compared with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The detection limits obtained for Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in aqueous solution were 2.2, 18, 1.6, and 0.9 μg l -1, respectively. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.7% to 7.3% ( n=8) for solutions containing the analytes in the 25-50 μg l -1 range. The concentration ranges obtained for analytes in beer samples were: Cu: 38.0-155 μg l -1; Mn: 110-348 μg l -1, Pb: 13.0-32.9 μg l -1, and Zn: 52.7-226 μg l -1. Results obtained by TS-FF-AAS and GFAAS were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. The proposed method is fast and simple, since sample digestion is not required and sensitivity can be improved without using expensive devices. The TS-FF-AAS presented suitable sensitivity for determination of Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn in the quality control of a brewery.

  19. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2015-12-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  20. Reduction of matrix interferences in furnace atomic absorption with the L'vov Platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, M.L.; Koirtyohann, S.R.; Hinderberger, E.J.; Taylor, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    Use of a modified L'vov Platform and ammonium phosphate as a matrix modifier greatly reduced matrix interferences in a commercial Massmann-type atomic absorption furnace. Platforms were readily fabricated from furnace tubes and, once positioned in the furnace, caused no inconvenience in operation. Two volatile elements (Pb, Cd), two of intermediate volatility (Co, Cr) and two which form stable oxides (Al, Sn) were tested in natural water and selected synthetic matrices. In every case for which there was a significant matrix effect during atomization from the tube wall, the platform and platform plus modifier gave improved performance. With lead, for example, an average ratio of 0.48 ?? 0.11 was found when the slope of the standard additions plot for six different natural water samples was compared to the slope of the standard working curve in dilute acid. The average slope ratio between the natural water matrices and the dilute acid matrix was 0.94 ?? 0.03 with the L'vov Platform and 0.96 ?? 0.03 with the platform and matrix modifier. In none of the cases studied did the use of the platform or platform plus modifier cause an interference problem where none existed while atomizing from the tube wall. An additional benefit of the platform was a factor of about two improvement in peak height precision. ?? 1981.

  1. Fluorine determination in coal using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Patrícia M.; Morés, Silvane; Pereira, Éderson R.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption of the calcium mono-fluoride (CaF) molecule has been employed in this study for the determination of fluorine in coal using direct solid sample analysis and high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS). The rotational line at 606.440 nm was used for measuring the molecular absorption in the gas phase. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Different chemical modifiers have been studied, such as Pd and Ir as permanent modifiers, and Pd and the mixed Pd/Mg modifier in solution. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass were 0.3 and 0.1 ng F, respectively. One certified reference material (CRM) of coal (NIST 1635) and four CRMs with a non-certified value for F (SARM 18, SARM 20, BCR 40, BCR 180) were used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the method, obtaining good agreement (104%) with the certified value and with the informed values (ranging from 90 to 103%).

  2. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  3. The Determination of Trace Metals in Saline Waters and Biological Tissues Using the Heated Graphite Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segar, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    A selective, volatalization technique utilizing the heated graphite atomizer atomic absorption technique has been developed for the analysis of iron in sea water. A similar technique may be used to determine vanadium, copper, nickel and cobalt in saline waters when their concentrations are higher than those normally encountered'in unpolluted sea waters. A preliminary solvent extraction using ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate and methyl iso-butyl ketone permits the determination of a number of elements including iron, copper, zinc, nickel, cobalt and lead in sea water. The heated graphite atomized technique has also been applied to the determination of a range of trace transition elements in marine plant and animal tissues.

  4. Real-space Wigner-Seitz Cells Imaging of Potassium on Graphite via Elastic Atomic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Feng; Koskinen, Pekka; Kulju, Sampo; Akola, Jaakko; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic manipulation in the scanning tunnelling microscopy, conventionally a tool to build nanostructures one atom at a time, is here employed to enable the atomic-scale imaging of a model low-dimensional system. Specifically, we use low-temperature STM to investigate an ultra thin film (4 atomic layers) of potassium created by epitaxial growth on a graphite substrate. The STM images display an unexpected honeycomb feature, which corresponds to a real-space visualization of the Wigner-Seitz cells of the close-packed surface K atoms. Density functional simulations indicate that this behaviour arises from the elastic, tip-induced vertical manipulation of potassium atoms during imaging, i.e. elastic atomic manipulation, and reflects the ultrasoft properties of the surface under strain. The method may be generally applicable to other soft e.g. molecular or biomolecular systems. PMID:25651973

  5. Determination of chlorine in coal via the SrCl molecule using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Rocha, Lucas M.; Cadorim, Heloisa R.; Silva, Vanessa D.; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the determination of chlorine in coal is described via molecular absorption of the strontium mono-chloride (SrCl) molecule at 635.862 nm using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) and direct solid sample analysis. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were optimized and the measurements are accomplished with a platform coated with zirconium as a permanent chemical modifier in order to increase the sensitivity of the gaseous SrCl molecule generated in the graphite furnace. The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 700 °C and 2100 °C, respectively. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and characteristic mass of the method were 0.85 and 0.24 ng, respectively. The accuracy of the method has been verified using four certified reference materials and one not certified reference material of coal, and the results were in good agreement with the certified or reference values.

  6. Determination of indium in geological materials by electrothermal-atomization atomic absorption spectrometry with a tungsten-impregnated graphite furance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The sample is fused with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 15% (v/v) hydrobromic acid. Iron(III) is reduced with ascorbic acid to avoid its coextraction with indium as the bromide into methyl isobutyl ketone. Impregnation of the graphite furnace with sodium tungstate, and the presence of lithium metaborate and ascorbic acid in the reaction medium improve the sensitivity and precision. The limits of determination are 0.025-16 mg kg-1 indium in the sample. For 22 geological reference samples containing more than 0.1 mg kg-1 indium, relative standard deviations ranged from 3.0 to 8.5% (average 5.7%). Recoveries of indium added to various samples ranged from 96.7 to 105.6% (average 100.2%). ?? 1984.

  7. Gigahertz Dielectric Polarization of Substitutional Single Niobium Atoms in Defective Graphitic Layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Qin, Gaowu; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    We synthesize two Nb/C composites with an order of magnitude difference in the density of single niobium atoms substituted into defective graphitic layers. The concentration and sites of single Nb atoms are identified using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory. Comparing the experimental complex permittivity spectra reveals that a representative dielectric resonance at ∼16  GHz originates from the intrinsic polarization of single Nb atom sites, which is confirmed by theoretical simulations. The single-atom dielectric resonance represents the physical limit of the electromagnetic response of condensed matter, and thus might open up a new avenue for designing electromagnetic wave absorption materials. Single-atom resonance also has important implications in understanding the correlation between the macroscopic dielectric behaviors and the atomic-scale structural origin. PMID:26551823

  8. BOOK REVIEW: The Magic Furnace: the search for the origins of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Molly

    2000-01-01

    Science is beautiful with hindsight. Cut out the dead ends, the dull interludes and the mad theories that stayed mad and you are left with the highlights. Each amazing discovery builds on the last in a straight, undiverted road towards understanding. Even the twists of fate fit neatly into the evolving story. It is never quite as simple as that but it is immensely appealing nonetheless. This book uses the clarity of hindsight to tell one of the most amazing scientific stories of all time: the birth of atoms in the furnaces of the big bang and the stars. It draws together two seemingly separate lines of enquiry, both of which began in Ancient Greece. The Ancient Greeks looked at the skies, as we do today, and wondered what makes the sun shine. In answer, the philosopher Anaxogorus proposed that the sun was a red-hot ball of iron. Similarly, the idea of atoms was first introduced by Democritus in answer to the question: Can matter be subdivided forever? Democritus' atoms and Anaxogorus' iron sun were both theories that no-one thought could ever be proved or contested. After all, atoms are too small to see and the sun is too hot to visit. But proof comes in many guises and the existence of atoms was established by other means long before they could be `seen' with electron microscopes. The same ingenuity had to be applied to understanding the sun from the cool comfort of the Earth. Marcus Chown tells the story of these tremendous feats in a simple and entertaining way. He introduces all the principal characters of the story, blending personal anecdotes with descriptions of their work. Somehow knowing that we owe the discovery of radioactivity to a cloudy day and that of spectral lines to a roof falling on Fraunhofer's head adds to the evolving drama. Each chapter begins with a carefully chosen quote showing how great minds, from physicists to poets, have pondered these ancient questions. However, the text itself is uncluttered and scientific definitions and

  9. Influence of reaction between silica crucible and graphite susceptor on impurities of multicrystalline silicon in a unidirectional solidification furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B.; Nakano, S.; Kakimoto, K.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of silica crucible reaction with graphite susceptor on carbon and oxygen impurities in multicrystalline silicon was studied by global numerical simulations. Results showed that the crucible reaction has a marked effect on carbon and oxygen impurities in the crystal. When the activity of carbon on the surface of the graphite susceptor increases, both oxygen and carbon impurities in the melt increase rapidly. Therefore, the production of high-purity multicrystalline silicon requires setting a free space between the silica crucible and the graphite susceptor or depositing a layer of SiC film on the surface of susceptor to prevent reaction between them.

  10. Matrix modifiers for feedstuff selenium analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.F.; Zeringue, L.K.

    1988-01-01

    Gallium, Co, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cu, and Zn, dissolved in methanol, were evaluated for efficacy as an alternate volume matrix modifier in Se analysis of forages and concentrates. Gallium, Co, Mn, and Zn were unsuitable as modifiers. Nickel, Cd, Cu, and modifier M (Ni + Cd + Cu) were used to test recovery of Se addition (.025, .050, .100, .200, and .500 ..mu..g) in meat and bone meal, pelleted grain dust, dry milk replacer, whole soybeans, and alfalfa hay. Recovery of Se with Cu, Cd, and M had large and variable SD of means within Se concentrations across feedstuffs and within feedstuff across Se concentrations. Mean percent recoveries of Se with the Ni modifier for the five concentrations over all feedstuffs were 106.4, 102.4, 100.2, 97.5, and 97.4, respectively. Repeated analyses of these same five feedstuffs, plus National Bureau of Standards citrus leaves and corn stalk (recommended Se = .016 ..mu..g/g), gave Se concentration (means ..mu..g/g) of .423, .104, .168, .196, .624, .027, and .015, respectively. Results obtained with Cd, Cu, and M had larger SD than did results obtained with Ni. Nickel nitrate in methanol as an alternate volume matrix modifier for Se provided reliable and sensititive Se analyses for a variety of feedstuffs.

  11. Adsorption and recombination of hydrogen atoms on a model graphite surface. [in interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption and recombination of atomic hydrogen on a model graphite grain have been examined in a series of calculations in which a modified, iterative, extended Hueckel program was used. The hydrogen atom is found to be chemisorbed at a site with a zero-point binding energy of 0.7 eV and at an equilibrium distance of 2.25 A above the site. Despite a barrier of about 0.4 eV between adjacent sites, calculations suggest that at temperatures as low as 10 K, an H atom will tunnel through to adjacent sites in less than one nanosecond. However, a potential barrier to the recombination of two hydrogen atoms has been found which displays high sensitivity to the mutual arrangement of the two hydrogen atoms with respect to the graphite surface. Results show that at very low temperatures, recombinations can occur only by tunneling. Consistent with experiment, the region in which H2 begins to form exhibits a repulsive potential with respect to possible chemisorption of the incipient H2 entity.

  12. H2 recombination on interstellar grains. [due to hydrogen atom chemisorption on graphite grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Silk, J.

    1976-01-01

    From a consideration of relevant theoretical and experimental data it is concluded that H atoms (but not H2 molecules) will be chemisorbed on interstellar graphite grains, with H2 formation proceeding efficiently for graphite grain temperatures less than 70 K. It is argued that graphite grains will act as the principal sites for H2 formation, with a formation rate of about 4 to the minus 17th cu cm per sec. Heating by H2 molecules formed by surface recombination is analyzed in the context of the available experimental data, and a heating rate is derived and compared with other suggested cloud heating mechanisms. It is concluded that H2 recombination will provide the largest heat source in diffuse clouds if the albedo of interstellar dust in the 912-1200 A region is high (about 0.9), whereas if the albedo in this wavelength region is lower (about 0.5), photoelectron ejection from grains will tend to predominate, and can explain observed cloud temperatures with a carbon depletion factor of approximately 2, a factor attributable to a normal interstellar abundance of graphite grains.

  13. Atomic friction at exposed and buried graphite step edges: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-08

    The surfaces of layered materials such as graphite exhibit step edges that affect friction. Step edges can be exposed, where the step occurs at the outmost layer, or buried, where the step is underneath another layer of material. Here, we study friction at exposed and buried step edges on graphite using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and complementary molecular dynamics simulations of the AFM tip apex. Exposed and buried steps exhibit distinct friction behavior, and the friction on either step is affected by the direction of sliding, i.e., moving up or down the step, and the bluntness of the tip. These trends are analyzing in terms of the trajectory of the AFM tip as it moves over the step, which is a convolution of the topography of the surface and the tip shape.

  14. Commensurate-incommensurate transition of monolayer krypton on graphite by helium-atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S.; Kara, A.; Larese, J. Z.; Leung, W. Y.; Frankl, And D.

    1987-04-01

    The commensurate-incommensurate transition of monolayer krypton films on a graphite single-crystal substrate is observed by helium-atom diffraction for transition temperatures in the range 50-60 K. The change in lattice spacing appears continuous, with an upper limit of 0.3% on a possible jump, with no detectable hysteresis. The slightly incommensurate phase is disordered but apparently well correlated. The spatial correlation length changes in a possibly discontinuous manner. A decrease of specular and diffracted intensities while the film is still commensurate is observed. This may be due to incoherent elastic scattering from isolated defects, or possibly to increased inelastic scattering.

  15. Electronic and spectroscopic properties of early 3d metal atoms on a graphite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotomahevitra, A.; Garreau, G.; Demangeat, C.; Parlebas, J. C.

    1995-07-01

    High-sensitivity magneto-optic Kerr effect experiments failed to detect manifestations of magnetism in epitaxial films of V on Ag(100) substrates. More recently V 3s XPS of freshly evaporated V clusters on graphite exhibited the appearance of a satellite structure which has then been interpreted by the effect of surface magnetic moments on V. It is the absence of unambiguous results on the electronic properties of early 3d supported metals that prompts us to examine the problem. Our purpose is twofold. In a first part, after a total energy calculation within a tight-binding method which yields the equilibrium position of a given adatom, we use the Hartree-Fock approximation to find out a possible magnetic solution of V (or Cr) upon graphite for a reasonable value of the exchange integral Jdd. In a second part the informations given by the density of states of the graphite surface as well as the additional states of the adsorbed atom are taken into account through a generalised impurity Anderson Hamiltonian which incorporates the various Coulomb and exchange interactions necessary to analyse the 3s XPS results.

  16. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  17. Local Force Interactions and Image Contrast Reversal on Graphite Observed with Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Goetzen, Jan; Altman, Eric; Schwarz, Udo

    Surface interactions of graphene-based nanostructures remain a topic of considerable interest in nanotechnology. Similarly, tip-dependent imaging contrasts have attracted attention as they allow conclusions to be made about the surface's chemical structure and local reactivity. In this talk, we present noncontact atomic force microscopy data recorded in the attractive regime on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite that reveals image contrast reversal for the first time. While larger tip-sample separations feature bright spots on atomic sites, the maximum of the tip-sample interaction flips to the hollow site positions upon further approach, which represents the contrast predominantly observed in previous studies during attractive-mode imaging. This cross over of the local chemical interaction is confirmed in force spectroscopy experiments. The results will be discussed in light of recent theoretical simulations that have predicted the occurrence of such contrast reversal for specific tip terminations.

  18. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm(-2) and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis. PMID:26861684

  19. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel-carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm-2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis.

  20. Atomically isolated nickel species anchored on graphitized carbon for efficient hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lili; Liu, Peng Fei; Yan, Xuecheng; Gu, Lin; Yang, Zhen Zhong; Yang, Hua Gui; Qiu, Shilun; Yao, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production through electrochemical process is at the heart of key renewable energy technologies including water splitting and hydrogen fuel cells. Despite tremendous efforts, exploring cheap, efficient and durable electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution still remains as a great challenge. Here we synthesize a nickel–carbon-based catalyst, from carbonization of metal-organic frameworks, to replace currently best-known platinum-based materials for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. This nickel-carbon-based catalyst can be activated to obtain isolated nickel atoms on the graphitic carbon support when applying electrochemical potential, exhibiting highly efficient hydrogen evolution performance with high exchange current density of 1.2 mA cm−2 and impressive durability. This work may enable new opportunities for designing and tuning properties of electrocatalysts at atomic scale for large-scale water electrolysis. PMID:26861684

  1. Determination of sulfur in coal using direct solid sampling and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the CS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Mior, Renata; Morés, Silvane; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2013-03-15

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of sulfur in coal using direct solid sample analysis in a graphite tube furnace and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS). The molecular absorbance of the carbon monosulfide molecule (CS), which is formed in the vaporization stage, has been measured using the rotational line at 258.033 nm. Several chemical modifiers were tested and Ru, applied as permanent modifier was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 500 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. Aqueous standard solutions prepared from l-cysteine were used for calibration, as the linear regression obtained for this standard was not significantly different from that for a certified coal reference material (CRM) according to a Student t-test. The results obtained for sulfur in three coal CRM and six additional samples also showed no significant difference for the two calibration techniques according to the same statistical test. The sulfur concentration in the coal samples was found between 3.5 mg g(-1) and 33.7 mg g(-1) with a typical repeatability around 10%. The limit of detection for the direct analysis of solid coal samples was better than 0.1 μg S. PMID:23598139

  2. Determination of sulfur in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry of the SnS molecule in a graphite furnace.

    PubMed

    Cadorim, Heloisa R; Pereira, Éderson R; Carasek, Eduardo; Welz, Bernhard; de Andrade, Jailson B

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of sulfur, as the tin mono-sulfide (SnS) molecule, in crude oil using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF MAS) has been developed. The molecular absorbance of the SnS has been measured using the wavelength at 271.624 nm and the crude oil samples were prepared as micro-emulsions due to their high viscosity. Several chemical modifiers (Ir, Pd, Ru, Zr) were tested and palladium was chosen, because it exhibited the best performance. The heating program was optimized by comparing the pyrolysis and vaporization curves obtained for an aqueous sulfur standard and a micro-emulsion of a crude oil certified reference material (CRM). The optimum pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were found to be 600 and 2000°C, respectively. The limit of detection and the characteristic mass using micro-emulsion analysis of crude oil samples were 5.8 and 13.3 ng S. Accuracy and precision of the method has been evaluated using two crude oil CRM (NIST 2721 and NIST 2722), showing good agreement with the informed or certified values. PMID:26695253

  3. Investigation of chemical modifiers for sulfur determination in diesel fuel samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry using direct analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Charles S.; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Welz, Bernhard; Andrade, Jailson B.; Dessuy, Morgana B.

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry has been applied for sulfur determination in diesel fuel. The sharp rotational lines of the carbon monosulfide molecule (formed during the vaporization step) were used to measure the absorbance. The analytical line at 258.056 nm was monitored using the sum of three pixels. Different chemical modifiers were investigated and the mixture of palladium and magnesium was used as chemical modifier in combination with iridium as permanent modifier. L-Cysteine was chosen as sulfur standard and the calibration was done against aqueous standard solutions. The proposed method was applied for the analyses of four diesel samples: two S10 samples and two S500 samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of sulfur in diesel fuel (NIST 2724b). Accurate results, for samples and CRM, were achieved after a dilution with propan-1-ol. The following figures of merit were obtained: characteristic mass of 17 ± 3 ng, limit of detection and limit of quantification of 1.4 mg kg- 1 and 4.7 mg kg- 1, respectively.

  4. Direct determination of bromine in plastic materials by means of solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez, M. R.; Resano, M.

    2013-10-01

    This work investigates the potential of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry for the direct determination of bromine in polymers, which could be interesting in view of the current regulations restricting the use of organobrominated compounds. The method developed is based on the addition of Ca (300 μg) and Pd (30 μg) to favor the formation of CaBr, which is monitored at the main molecular “lines” (rotational spectra) found in the vicinity of 625.315 nm. It was found that accurate results could be obtained for all the samples investigated (polyethylene, polypropylene and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene certified reference materials) using any of the lines studied and constructing the calibration curve with aqueous standards. Furthermore, the combined use of the main four CaBr lines available in the spectral area simultaneously monitored permits to easily expand the linear range up to 2000 ng, provides a limit of detection of 1.8 ng (1.8 μg g- 1 for a mass of 1 mg) and further improves precision to values between 3-7% RSD. Overall, the method proposed seems suited for the fast and simple control of these types of samples (approximately 10 min for sample are required), circumventing the traditional problems associated with sample digestion (e.g., losses of volatile compounds), and providing sufficient sensitivity to easily comply with regulations.

  5. Method development for the determination of bromine in coal using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and direct solid sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Éderson R.; Castilho, Ivan N. B.; Welz, Bernhard; Gois, Jefferson S.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Carasek, Eduardo; de Andrade, Jailson B.

    2014-06-01

    This work reports a simple approach for Br determination in coal using direct solid sample analysis in a graphite tube furnace and high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry. The molecular absorbance of the calcium mono-bromide (CaBr) molecule has been measured using the rotational line at 625.315 nm. Different chemical modifiers (zirconium, ruthenium, palladium and a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrates) have been evaluated in order to increase the sensitivity of the CaBr absorption, and Zr showed the best overall performance. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 800 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. Accuracy and precision of the method have been evaluated using certified coal reference materials (BCR 181, BCR 182, NIST 1630a, and NIST 1632b) with good agreement (between 98 and 103%) with the informed values for Br. The detection limit was around 4 ng Br, which corresponds to about 1.5 μg g- 1 Br in coal, based on a sample mass of 3 mg. In addition, the results were in agreement with those obtained using electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, based on a Student t-test at a 95% confidence level. A mechanism for the formation of the CaBr molecule is proposed, which might be considered for other diatomic molecules as well.

  6. Comparative Study of Atomic Force Imaging of DNA on Graphite and Mica Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinov, Dmitry; Dwir, Benjamin; Kapon, Eli; Borovok, Natalia; Molotsky, Tatiana; Kotlyar, Alexander

    2006-09-01

    Various DNA-based structures (single-, double-, triple-stranded and quadruplex-DNA) were characterized using non-contact atomic-force microscopy on two substrates: modified highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and mica. Deposition on mica, a conventional substrate used in studies of bio-molecules, results in strong deformation of all above types of molecules while deposition on modified HOPG affects the morphology of DNA much less compared to mica. This is demonstrated by a larger measured height of the DNA molecules deposited on HOPG, as compared to mica, and an increased flexibility of the molecules, evidenced by a shorter molecular end-to-end distance on HOPG. The estimated heights of the triplex and the quadruplex DNA measured on HOPG are similar to the diameter of these molecules in liquid. We thus conclude that modified HOPG is a substrate more suitable than mica for AFM characterization of DNA morphology.

  7. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  8. Spectrometer system using a modular echelle spectrograph and a laser-driven continuum source for simultaneous multi-element determination by graphite furnace absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, Sebastian; Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Huang, Mao Dong; Esser, Norbert; Florek, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    A multi-element absorption spectrometer system has been developed based on a laser-driven xenon continuum source and a modular simultaneous echelle spectrograph (MOSES), which is characterized by a minimized number of optical components resulting in high optical throughput, high transmittance and high image quality. The main feature of the new optical design is the multifunction usage of a Littrow prism, which is attached on a rotation stage. It operates as an order-sorter for the echelle grating in a double-pass mode, as a fine positioning device moving the echelle spectrum on the detector, and as a forwarder to address different optical components, e.g., echelle gratings, in the setup. Using different prisms, which are mounted back to back on the rotation stage, a multitude of different spectroscopic modes like broad-range panorama observations, specific UV-VIS and NIR studies or high resolution zoom investigations of variable spectral channels can be realized. In the UV panorama mode applied in this work, MOSES has simultaneously detectable wavelength coverage from 193 nm to 390 nm with a spectral resolution λ/Δλ of 55,000 (3-pixel criterion). In the zoom mode the latter can be further increased by a factor of about two for a selectable section of the full wavelength range. The applicability and the analytical performance of the system were tested by simultaneous element determination in a graphite furnace, using eight different elements. Compared to an instrument operating in the optimized single line mode, the achieved analytical sensitivity using the panorama mode was typically a factor of two lower. Using the zoom mode for selected elements, comparable sensitivities were obtained. The results confirm the influence of the different spectral resolutions.

  9. Determination of chlorine in food samples via the AlCl molecule using high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry in a graphite furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechetia, Miriam; Tognon, André Luiz; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.

    2012-05-01

    Determination of chlorine using the molecular absorption of aluminum mono-chloride (AlCl) at the 261.418 nm wavelength was accomplished by high-resolution continuum source molecular absorption spectrometry using a transversely heated graphite tube furnace with an integrated platform. For the analysis, 10 μL of the sample followed by 10 μL of a solution containing Al-Ag-Sr modifier, (1 g L- 1 each), were directly injected onto the platform. A spectral interference due to the use of Al-Ag-Sr as mixed modifier was easily corrected by the least-squares algorithm present in the spectrometer software. The pyrolysis and vaporization temperatures were 500 °C and 2200 °C, respectively. To evaluate the feasibility of a simple procedure for the determination of chlorine in food samples present in our daily lives, two different digestion methods were applied, namely (A) an acid digestion method using HNO3 only at room temperature, and (B) a digestion method with Ag, HNO3 and H2O2, where chlorine is precipitated as a low-solubility salt (AgCl), which is then dissolved with ammonia solution. The experimental results obtained with method B were in good agreement with the certified values and demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate than method A. This is because the formation of silver chloride prevented analyte losses by volatilization. The limit of detection (LOD, 3σ/s) for Cl in methods A and B was 18 μg g- 1 and 9 μg g- 1, respectively, 1.7 and 3.3 times lower compared to published work using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and absolute LODs were 2.4 and 1.2 ng, respectively.

  10. Imaging surface nanobubbles at graphite-water interfaces with different atomic force microscopy modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2013-05-01

    We have imaged nanobubbles on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces in pure water with different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, including the frequency-modulation, the tapping, and the PeakForce techniques. We have compared the performance of these modes in obtaining the surface profiles of nanobubbles. The frequency-modulation mode yields a larger height value than the other two modes and can provide more accurate measurement of the surface profiles of nanobubbles. Imaging with PeakForce mode shows that a nanobubble appears smaller and shorter with increasing peak force and disappears above a certain peak force, but the size returns to the original value when the peak force is reduced. This indicates that imaging with high peak forces does not cause gas removal from the nanobubbles. Based on the presented findings and previous AFM observations, the existing models for nanobubbles are reviewed and discussed. The model of gas aggregate inside nanobubbles provides a better explanation for the puzzles of the high stability and the contact angle of surface nanobubbles.

  11. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 μg/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  12. Probing the electronic properties of atomically thin graphitic layers with optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Kin Fai

    Since its discovery, graphene (a mono-layer of graphitic layer) has attracted tremendous attention from the physics community. Being one-atom thick, Single Layer Graphene (SLG) is an ideal model for fundamental studies of 2-Dimensional (2D) systems. One of the most interesting aspects of SLG is the resemblance of its electronic structure to an important class of particles in high energy physics, the Dirac massless Fermions, i.e., massless Fermions with 4 flavors. Such an electronic structure leads to many peculiar phenomena in fundamental physics and many desirable properties for technological applications of this new material. Therefore, a basic understanding of the electronic properties of SLG is of the greatest importance in this field. In this thesis, the electronic structure of single- and few-layer graphene is investigated with optical spectroscopic techniques. In the first part, the optical absorption spectrum of SLG is measured. In the mid/near infrared range, the absorbance is a universal constant equal to pialpha = 2.29%, a being the fine structure constant, independent of photon energies, the particular sample characteristics and all parameters describing the band structure of SLG. This reflects a fundamental fact that the charge carriers in SLG indeed behave as 2D Dirac massless Fermions at low energies. Since each Fermionic species absorbs by pialpha/4, the 4 spin-nodal flavors of Fermions in SLG gives an absorbance of pialpha. On the other hand, strong modifications of optical absorption in the visible/UV range due to many body interactions are observed. Such effects give rise to a breakdown of the universal absorbance and experimental signatures of saddle point excitons. In the second part, the electronic structure of Bi-Layer Graphene (BLG) is studied in the presence of strong applied electric fields. In contrast to SLG, the low-energy electrons in BLG are described as chiral massive Fermions. The linearly dispersing bands in SLG are replaced by

  13. SINGLE-LABORATORY EVALUATION OF SW-846 METHODS 7090/7091 DETERMINATION OF BERYLLIUM BY FLAME AND FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of a single-laboratory study of the 'Determination of Beryllium by Flame and Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry', are described. The study examined the application of these two powerful beryllium detection methods to the analysis of selected liquid and solid ...

  14. Direct determination of lead in wine materials by atomic absorption spectrometry using an electrothermal atomizer with a graphite filter-insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharia, A. N.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Chebotarev, A. N.; Arabadgi, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The operational parameters of an atomizer with a graphite filter-insert and a Pd-Mg matrix modifier are optimized for direct electrothermal atomic absorption determination of lead in some wines and associated materials. A method is proposed for eliminating interferences from mineral and organic components, as well as from nonatomic absorption, and for increasing the detection sensitivity for the element by up to a factor of two. The lower limit for determining the amount of lead in wines is 0.0025 mg/dm3. The relative standard deviation ( S r) does not exceed 10%.

  15. Improvements in cobalt determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using an on-line derivatization strategy.

    PubMed

    Matos, Geraldo Domingues; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2008-07-15

    An on-line derivatization strategy was developed for improving cobalt sensitivity using thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) as the analytical technique. This strategy involves the generation of a volatile cobalt compound, providing better sample vaporization efficiency. The effect of sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as complexing agent on the integrated absorbance signal was evaluated. Parameters including the pH of complex formation, complex concentration and volume, sample volume, flame gas composition and tube atomization configuration were optimized. A wide linear range (from 23 microg L(-1) to 3 mg L(-1); r(2)=0.9786) was obtained, with the best one (r(2)=0.9992) attained from 23 to 400 microg L(-1) with a sample throughput of 30 h(-1). The improvement in the detection power was 17-fold when compared to FAAS, which provides 7 microg L(-1) as the limit of detection when considered TS-FF-AAS technique. A relative standard deviation (n=10) of 4% for a cobalt solution containing 50 microg L(-1) was attained, and the accuracy of the procedure was evaluated through certified reference materials (IAEA-SL-1, lake sediment; and ISS-MURST-A1, Antarctic marine sediment). Good agreement between the results at the 95% confidence level was observed. PMID:18585309

  16. On the performance of van der Waals corrected-density functional theory in describing the atomic hydrogen physisorption on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Domancich, Nicolás F.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2010-11-01

    The atomic hydrogen physisorption on graphite was studied using the hydrogen-coronene model system and the van der Waals corrected-density functional theory (DFT + vdW). The results show that H preferentially occupies the hollow site. The adsorption energy at this site is calculated as 38.1 meV, in very good agreement with the available experimental measurements on a single graphite layer (39.2 ± 0.5 meV) and with reported MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations (39.7 meV). The results suggest that, in DFT simulations, dispersion corrections should be considered in order to obtain accurate distances, adsorption energies and diffusion barriers in physisorption processes such as those occurring in the cold interstellar medium.

  17. Determination of trace elements in automotive fuels by filter furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Anna; Tittarelli, Paolo; Katskov, Dmitri A.

    2002-03-01

    The determination of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Ni was performed in gasoline and diesel fuel samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using the Transverse Heated Filter Atomizer (THFA). Thermal conditions were experimentally defined for the investigated elements. The elements were analyzed without addition of chemical modifiers, using organometallic standards for the calibration. Forty-microliter samples were injected into the THFA. Gasoline samples were analyzed directly, while diesel fuel samples were diluted 1:4 with n-heptane. The following characteristic masses were obtained: 0.8 pg Cd, 6.4 pg Cr, 12 pg Cu, 17 pg Pb and 27 pg Ni. The limits of determination for gasoline samples were 0.13 μg/kg Cd, 0.4 μg/kg Cr, 0.9 μg/kg Cu, 1.5 μg/kg Pb and 2.5 μg/kg Ni. The corresponding limit of determination for diesel fuel samples was approximately four times higher for all elements. The element recovery was performed using the addition of organometallic compounds to gasoline and diesel fuel samples and was between 85 and 105% for all elements investigated.

  18. Determination of carbide-forming metals, chromium and barium, by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using a tungsten coil platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Camero, Rosa; Alvarado, José

    2000-07-01

    The use of a tungsten coil as a platform has been evaluated for the determination of carbide-forming metals, Cr and Ba. The methodology developed has been used for Cr and Ba determinations in HPS CRM, Trace Metals in Drinking Water, and NIST SRM 1643b, Trace Elements in Water. Good agreement was found between the results obtained and the certified values for Cr in both reference materials and for Ba in the NIST SRM. Barium results were approximately 14% lower than the certified results for the HPS CRM. This inaccuracy was ascribed to the presence of considerable amounts of Ca in this particular material. Precision of the measurements, 3σ relative standard deviation as percentage, were 2.5 and 5.8 for Cr and Ba, respectively. Characteristic masses, in picograms, were 1.70 for Cr and 19.0 for Ba. These results compare favorably with the literature values for Cr but not for Ba.

  19. Biosorption of platinum and palladium for their separation/preconcentration prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2003-08-01

    Inexpensive baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and green algae Chlorella vulgaris, either free or immobilized on silica gel have been shown to selectively accumulate platinum and palladium from water samples in acidic medium (pH 1.6-1.8). Optimization of conditions of metals biosorption (sample pH, algae and yeast masses, adsorption time, temperature) was performed in batch mode. The procedure of matrix separation based on biosorption of platinum and palladium on algae C. vulgaris covalently immobilized on silica gel in flow mode was developed. The use of algae in flow procedure offers several advantages compared with its use in the batch mode. The procedure shows better reproducibility (<2%), improved efficiency of platinum retention on the column (93.3±1.6%), is less laborious and less time consuming. The best recovery of biosorbed metals from column (87.7±3.3% for platinum and 96.8±1.1 for palladium) was obtained with solution of 0.3 mol l -1 thiourea in 1 mol l -1 hydrochloric acid. The influence of thiourea on analytical signals of examined metals during GFAAS determination is discussed. The procedure has been applied for separation of noble metals from tap and waste water samples spiked with platinum and palladium.

  20. Atomically Thin Mesoporous Nanomesh of Graphitic C3N4 for High-Efficiency Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Wang, Bing; Gao, Jian; Cheng, Zhihua; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Zhipan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-02-23

    Delamination of layer materials into two-dimensional single-atom sheets has induced exceptional physical properties, including large surface area, ultrahigh intrinsic carrier mobility, pronounced changes in the energy band structure, and other properties. Here, atomically thin mesoporous nanomesh of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is fabricated by solvothermal exfoliation of mesoporous g-C3N4 bulk made from thermal polymerization of freeze-drying assembled Dicyandiamide nanostructure precursor. With the unique structural advantages for aligned energy levels, electron transfer, light harvesting, and the richly available reaction sites, the as-prepared monolayer of mesoporous g-C3N4 nanomesh exhibits a superior photocatalytic hydrogen evolution rate of 8510 μmol h(-1) g(-1) under λ > 420 nm and an apparent quantum efficiency of 5.1% at 420 nm, the highest of all the metal-free g-C3N4 nanosheets photocatalysts. PMID:26766237

  1. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF PHOSPHORUS IN GASOLINE BY FLAMELESS ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new method is presented for the determination of phosphorus in gasoline using flameless atomic absorption. Lanthanum nitrate solution is inserted in a graphite furnace prior to direct addition of gasoline. The organic matrix is charred prior to atomization of the phosphorus. Th...

  2. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.; Rhee, D. Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D. R.; Surma, J. E.; Titus, C. H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive (<1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments (≳500 °C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190-690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations.

  3. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  4. Untergrundstörungen durch organische Lösungsmittel in der Atomabsorptionsspektrometrie mit Graphitöfen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gücer, S.; Massmann, H.

    In atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnaces, marked background interferences may occur during the atomization step, when organic solvents are used. Aromatic molecules can sorb to the graphite, partly very firmly, so that they appear in the absorption volume only during the atomizing step, even after preceding interim heating to 800°C. The undissociated molecules show characteristic vibrational spectra in which bands with relative sharp edges can be observed. No rotational structure is recognizable. Reliable background measurements may prove problematic if not entirely impossible in some wavelength regions.

  5. First-principles study of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (Li, Na, and K) and alkylamines towards alkali ion battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ri, Gum-Chol; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Hong, Song-Nam; Jong, Un-Gi; Ri, Mun-Hyok

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the structural, energetic, and electronic properties of ternary graphite compounds cointercalated with alkali atoms (AM = Li, Na, and K) and normal alkylamine molecules (nCx; x = 1, 2, 3, 4), denoted as AM-nCx-GICs. From the optimization of the orthorhombic unit cells for the crystalline compounds, it was found that, with the increase in the atomic number of alkali atoms, the layer separations decrease in contrast to AM-GICs, while the bond lengths between alkali atoms and graphene layer, and nitrogen atom of alkylamine increase. The calculated formation energies and interlayer binding energies of AM-nC3-GICs indicate that the compounds is increasingly stabilized from Li to K, and the energy barriers for migration of alkali atoms suggest that alkali cation with larger ionic radius diffuses more smoothly in graphite, being similar to AM-GICs. Through the analysis of electronic properties, it was established that more extent of electronic charge is transferred from more electropositive alkali atom to the carbon ring of graphene layer, and the hybridization of valence electron orbitals between alkylamine molecules and graphene layer is occurred.

  6. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, K. K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept for enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbits is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  7. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; Mccollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-01-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  8. Leveling coatings for reducing the atomic oxygen defect density in protected graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Podojil, G.; McCollum, T.; Anzic, J.

    1992-11-01

    Pinholes or other defect sites in a protective oxide coating provide pathways for atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit to reach underlying material. One concept of enhancing the lifetime of materials in low Earth orbit is to apply a leveling coating to the material prior to applying any reflective and protective coatings. Using a surface tension leveling coating concept, a low viscosity epoxy was applied to the surface of several composite coupons. A protective layer of 1000 A of SiO2 was deposited on top of the leveling coating, and the coupons were exposed to an atomic oxygen environment in a plasma asher. Pinhole populations per unit area were estimated by counting the number of undercut sites observed by scanning electron microscopy. Defect density values of 180,000 defects/sq cm were reduced to about 1000 defects/sq cm as a result of the applied leveling coating. These improvements occur at a mass penalty of about 2.5 mg/sq cm.

  9. Morphological and spectroscopic investigation of the behavior of permanent iridium modifier deposited on pyrolytic graphite coated and zirconium treated platforms in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sabbatini, L.

    1997-12-01

    In order to better characterise a permanent modifier based on iridium deposited on zirconium or tungsten treated platforms of transversely heated graphite atomizer, and to gain additional information about its chemical behavior directed to an eventual further optimization, a series of experiments were carried out, both by surface techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry on the iridium release from unmodified and various other modified pyrolytic graphite platforms. Special attention was paid to the influence of the amount of iridium, zirconium carbide coating of the platform surface and the presence of citric acid on the iridium vaporization during pyrolysis and atomization. The processes of iridium losses during pyrolysis and atomization and peak maximum alignment depend on the amount of the iridium deposited on the pyrolytic graphite coated platforms in the presence of nitric acid. A fractional order of release which suggests an atom vaporization from the surface or edges of the iridium islands was estimated. In the presence of citric acid, mass independence and zero order of the atom release were found. The zirconium treatment of the platform results in change of the spatial distribution of iridium and hence its vaporization. Vaporization temperatures as high as 2100°C, and first order of the process of atom generation were obtained. While it was possible to study the iridium atomization from uncoated and zirconium coated surfaces, evidencing a different order for the release process, the same was not possible for the tungsten coated platforms due to an 'overstabilization' that brought the iridium atomization temperature out of the working range of the instrument used. The different chemical behavior of tungsten and zirconium was also confirmed by XPS investigations. With tungsten, evidence of both WC and WO bonding

  10. Probing the adsorption of weak acids on graphite using amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed M A; Huang, Jun; McPhedran, Kerry N; Zeng, Hongbo; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal

    2015-03-17

    Recent thermodynamics calculations and adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of a self-assembled layer (SAL) of ionized weak acids to carbon was attributed to the negatively charged hydrogen bonding (-CAHB), yet the direct visualization and characterization of this adsorption behavior have not been reported. Here, an amplitude modulation-frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-FM AFM) technique was applied to discriminate the adsorption of decanoic acids (DA) on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Thermodynamics calculations revealed that the adsorption of SAL was driven by the formation of -CAHB with negatively charged functional groups of HOPG. Multilayer adsorption could occur over the adsorbed ionized SAL, leading to the development of aggregates. AM-FM AFM imaging showed that the adsorption of the DA molecules forming aggregates occurred only for the HOPG-functionalized steps, while DA molecules were found to adsorb over the entire functionalized HOPG surface after water-plasma treatment, as evident from the frequency shifts identified in AFM images. PMID:25710305

  11. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION, AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER ZEEMAN/5000 SYSTEM ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER (BCO-L-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5000 atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000 AA), and the Perkin Elmer 5000 Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000Z GFAA)...

  12. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE PERKIN-ELMER ZEEMAN/5000 SYSTEM ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER (BCO-L-6.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to outline the start-up, calibration, operation, and maintenance procedures for the Perkin-Elmer 5000 atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000 AA), and the Perkin Elmer 5000 Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer (PE 5000Z GFAA)...

  13. Determination of nanogram amounts of bismuth in rocks by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kane, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Bismuth concentrations as low as 10 ng g-1 in 100-mg samples of geological materials can be determined by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. After HF-HClO4 decomposition of the sample, bismuth is extracted as the iodide into methyl isobutyl ketone and is then stripped with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid into the aqueous phase. Aliquots of this solution are pipetted into the graphite furnace and dried, charred, and atomized in an automated sequence. Atomic absorbance at the Bi 223.1-nm line provides a measure of the amount of bismuth present. Results are presented for 14 U.S. Geological Survey standard rocks. ?? 1979.

  14. Se atoms and Se6 molecules as guests in Se-carbons - prepared by reduction of a SeCl4-graphite precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, J.; Shioyama, H.

    2000-01-01

    A SeCl4 -graphite intercalation compound precursor was reduced by a solution of lithium diphenylide in tetrahydrofuran at room temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements gave two distinguishable stages. One stage represented a Se-atom intercalation the other represented an intercalation of Se6 molecules. The in-plane diffraction patterns were estimated by selected-area electron diffraction, the existence of two different guest species (atoms and molecules) could be proved. The Se6 -molecule phase shows an incommensurate lattice with regard to the host lattice, but they are in the same orientation. The lattice parameter of intercalated Se6 is a Se 6-guest = 1158+/-36 pm, c Se 6-guest = 483+/-38 pm, which fits with the lattice parameter of non-intercalated Se6 molecules. Se atom domains show a 2 × agraphite superlattice with respect to the host lattice, which is a commensurate superstructure. Raman scattering data showed the occurrence of an acceptor-type graphite intercalation compound. Three different types of spectra could be obtained, two kinds of spectra consists of doublets at 1588 cm-1 and 1608 cm-1 , with different intensity ratios. These two kinds of spectra are certainly attributed to Se-atom domains, with different stages. A third type of spectrum show bands at higher wavenumbers (1646 cm-1 and 1653 cm-1 ). These bands are probably correlated to Se6 -molecule domains. They represent maybe very early stages of nanoparticle formation.

  15. A fast and accurate method for the determination of total and soluble fluorine in toothpaste using high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and its comparison with established techniques.

    PubMed

    Gleisner, Heike; Einax, Jürgen W; Morés, Silvane; Welz, Bernhard; Carasek, Eduardo

    2011-04-01

    A fast and reliable method has been developed for the determination of total and soluble fluorine in toothpaste, important quality control parameters in dentifrices. The method is based on the molecular absorption of gallium mono-fluoride, GaF, using a commercially available high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometer. Transversely heated platform tubes with zirconium as permanent chemical modifier were used throughout. Before each sample injection, a palladium and zirconium modifier solution and a gallium reagent were deposited onto the graphite platform and thermally pretreated to transform them into their active forms. The samples were only diluted and introduced directly into the graphite tube together with additional gallium reagent. Under these conditions the fluoride was stable up to a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C, and the optimum vaporization (molecule formation) temperature was 1550 °C. The GaF molecular absorption was measured at 211.248 nm, and the limits of detection and quantification were 5.2 pg and 17 pg, respectively, corresponding to a limit of quantification of about 30 μg g(-1) (ppm) F in the original toothpaste. The proposed method was used for the determination of total and soluble fluorine content in toothpaste samples from different manufactures. The samples contained different ionic fluoride species and sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) with covalently bonded fluorine. The results for total fluorine were compared with those obtained with a modified conventional headspace gas chromatographic procedure. Accuracy and precision of the two procedures were comparable, but the proposed procedure was much less labor-intensive, and about five times faster than the latter one. PMID:21215545

  16. Tube furnace

    DOEpatents

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  17. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-12-31

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  18. Tube furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.G.; Frohwein, E.J.; Taylor, R.W.; Bowen, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  19. Determination of cadmium and lead at low levels by using preconcentration at fullerene coupled to thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, M. G.; Pereira-Filho, E. R.; Berndt, H.; Arruda, M. A. Z.

    2004-04-01

    A new and sensitive method for Cd and Pb determinations, based on the coupling of thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and a preconcentrator system, was developed. The procedure comprised the chelating of Cd and Pb with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate with posterior adsorption of the chelates on a mixture (40 mg) of C 60 and C 70 at a flow rate of 2.0 ml min -1. These chelates were eluted from the adsorbent by passing a continuous flow of ethanol (80% v/v) at 0.9 ml min -1 to a nickel tube placed in an air/acetylene flame. After sample introduction into the tube by using a ceramic capillary (0.5 mm i.d.), the analytical signals were registered as peak height. Under these conditions, improvement factors in detectability of 675 and 200 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, when compared to conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Spiked samples (mineral and tap waters) and drinking water containing natural concentrations of Cd were employed for evaluating accuracy by comparing the results obtained from the proposed methodology with those using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. In addition, certified reference materials (rye grass, CRM 281 and pig kidney, CRM 186) were also adopted for the accuracy tests. Due to the good linearity ranges for Cd (0.5-5.0 μg l -1) and Pb (10-250 μg l -1), samples with different concentrations could be analyzed. Detection limits of 0.1 and 2.4 μg l -1 were obtained for Cd and Pb, respectively, and RSD values <4.5% were observed ( n=10). Finally, a sample throughput of 24 determinations per hour was possible.

  20. Selective determination of four arsenic species in rice and water samples by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-An; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Lin; Chi, Miao-Bin; Hu, Hui-Hui; Zhang, Wang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This work describes a novel non-chromatographic approach for the accurate and selective determining As species by modified graphite electrode-based electrolytic hydride generation (EHG) for sample introduction coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) detection. Two kinds of sulfydryl-containing modifiers, l-cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH), are used to modify cathode. The EHG performance of As has been changed greatly at the modified cathode, which has never been reported. Arsenite [As(III)] on the GSH modified graphite electrode (GSH/GE)-based EHG can be selectively and quantitatively converted to AsH3 at applied current of 0.4A. As(III) and arsenate [As(V)] on the Cys modified graphite electrode (Cys/GE) EHG can be selectively and efficiently converted to arsine at applied current of 0.6A, whereas monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) do not form any or only less volatile hydrides under this condition. By changing the analytical conditions, we also have achieved the analysis of total As (tAs) and DMA. Under the optimal condition, the detection limits (3s) of As(III), iAs and tAs in aqueous solutions are 0.25μgL(-1), 0.22μgL(-1) and 0.10μgL(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the method is verified through the analysis of standard reference materials (SRM 1568a). PMID:27474289

  1. Combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy investigations on polythiophene chains on graphite with a tuning fork sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Lubin, Christophe; Thoyer, François; Cousty, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Polythiophene molecules adsorbed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface were studied by combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a quartz tuning fork sensor operating in Qplus mode and equipped with a Pt/Ir tip. Upon completing a careful sub-angström oscillation amplitude calibration of the probe, experiments were conducted in an ultra high vacuum at room temperature. By selecting the tip/surface distance regulation parameter, one can select the type of simultaneous information obtained in an area. For distance regulation based on the mean tunneling current, dynamic STM images together with maps of tip/surface force gradient were obtained. FM-AFM images with maps of the tunneling current were also acquired when the distance regulation was based on the frequency shift. Comparison between these images reveals interesting features. For example the tip which operates in STM mode with ultra low current (<10 pA) generates different interaction forces above molecules or graphite. Changes in energy dissipation processes as small as tens of millielectronvolts per cycle were recorded when the tip oscillates above the polymer or on the graphite surface. Hence data demonstrates that a stiff piezoelectric tuning fork of several kilonewtons/meters working as an AFM/STM probe with sub-angström amplitude can characterize weakly adsorbed molecules.

  2. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, Nicholas F.; Green, Donald R.; Price, Larry S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  3. Furnace assembly

    DOEpatents

    Panayotou, N.F.; Green, D.R.; Price, L.S.

    A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

  4. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  5. An electrochemical flow-cell for permanent modification of graphite tube with palladium for mercury determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ruben G. M.; de Oliveira, Elisabeth; Pedrotti, Jairo J.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2002-04-01

    An electrochemical procedure for palladium deposition on the inner surface of pyrolytic graphite-coated tubes for permanent chemical modification and a cold vapor generation system for the pre-concentration and determination of mercury trace levels in rain, potable, and non-potable water and lake sediment by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. A tubular electrochemical flow-cell was assembled on the original geometry of the graphite tube, which operated as the working electrode. A stainless steel tube, positioned downstream from the working electrode, was used as the auxiliary electrode. The applied potential was measured against a micro Ag/AgCl (sat) reference electrode inserted in the auxiliary electrode. Palladium solution in acetate buffer (100 mmol l -1, pH=4.8), flowing at 0.5 ml min -1 for 60 min was used to perform the electrodeposition. A homemade cold vapor generation system composed of a peristaltic pump, an injector-commutator, a flow meter and a disposable polyethylene gas-liquid separator flask (approx. 4.0 ml volume) were used. Volumes of 1.0 ml of reagent (2.0% w/v NaBH 4 in 0.10 mol l -1 of NaOH) and 1.0 ml of reference or sample solution in 0.25 mol l -1 of HNO 3 were carried to the gas-liquid separator using the peristaltic pump. The mercury vapor was carried out to the modified graphite tube by argon flow (200 ml min -1), and pre-concentrated for 120 s. The characteristic mass for 1.0 ml of reference solution was 26 pg (R.S.D.=0.12%, n=5). The detection limit obtained was 93 pg ( n=20, 3δ). The reliability of the entire procedure was confirmed by addition and recovery tests and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

  6. RBS investigations of high-temperature reactions on graphite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloi, Corinne C.; David Robertson, J.; Majidi, Vahid

    1995-05-01

    While graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is one of the most powerful techniques for ultratrace analysis of Pb, it is often plagued by matrix interferences. These interferences are minimized by the addition of matrix modifiers which stabilize the analyte signal through unknown mechanisms. Using RBS, the high temperature reactions of nitrate salts of Pb were studied on pyrolytically coated graphite with and without matrix modifiers. The addition of an ammonium phosphate modifier was found to stabilize Pb through the formation of a metal oxy-phosphorus compound. Moreover, the depth profiles demonstrated that the pyrolytically coated graphite was not impervious as previously thought. Pre-treatment of the surface with O 2 is also known to cause a delay in the vaporization of Pb. While a surface effect had previously been postulated, the 3.04 MeV resonance 16O(α, α) 16O elastic scattering measurements show that it proceeds through the formation of surface bound lead-oxygen species as the number of oxygen atoms chemisorbed and the number of lead atoms, present on the surface prior to vaporization, are nearly equal.

  7. L-tyrosine immobilized on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: a new substrate for thallium separation and speciation using stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Pablo H; Gil, Raúl A; Smichowski, Patricia; Polla, Griselda; Martinez, Luis D

    2009-12-10

    An approach for the separation and determination of inorganic thallium species is described. A new sorbent, L-tyrosine-carbon nanotubes (L-tyr-CNTs), was used and applied to the analysis of tap water samples. At pH 5.0, L-tyr was selective only towards Tl(III), while total thallium was determined directly by stabilized temperature platform furnace-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (STPF-ETAAS). The Tl(III) specie, which was retained by L-tyrosine, was quantitatively eluted from the column with 10% of nitric acid. An on-line breakthrough curve was used to determine the column capacity, which resulted to be 9.00 micromol of Tl(III) g(-1) of L-tyr-CNTs with a molar ratio of 0.14 (moles of Tl bound to moles of L-tyr at pH 5). Transient peak areas revealed that Tl stripping from the column occurred instantaneously. Effects of sample flow rate, concentration and flow rate of the eluent, and interfering ions on the recovery of the analyte were systematically investigated. The detection limit for the determination of total thallium (3sigma) by STPF-ETAAS was 150 ng L(-1). The detection limit (3sigma) for Tl(III) employing the separation system was 3 ng L(-1), with an enrichment factor of 40. The precision of the method expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD) resulted to be 3.4%. The proposed method was applied to the speciation and determination of inorganic thallium in tap water samples. The found concentrations were in the range of 0.88-0.91 microg L(-1) of Tl(III), and 3.69-3.91 microg L(-1) of total thallium. PMID:19932812

  8. Application of Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Determination of Trace Amounts of Zinc in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mazloomifar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    A selective and simple method for separation and preconcentration of zinc ions was developed by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Parameters that have an effect on the microextraction efficiency such as volume of extraction and disperser solvent, extraction time, and adding salt were investigated. Under optimum conditions, a preconcentration factor of 250 was obtained. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 0.09 ng mL−1. The linearity of method was obtained in range of 0.2–50 ng mL−1 with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.9974. The relative standard deviation for 10 replicate determinations at 1.0 ng mL−1 of zinc was 2.53%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of zinc in water sample. PMID:23737791

  9. Characterization of arsenic (V) and arsenic (III) in water samples using ammonium molybdate and estimation by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sounderajan, Suvarna; Udas, A C; Venkataramani, B

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic (V) is known to form heteropolyacid with ammonium molybdate in acidic aqueous solutions, which can be quantitatively extracted into certain organic solvents. In the present work, 12-molybdoarsenic acid extracted in butan-1-ol is used for quantification of As (V). Total arsenic is estimated by converting arsenic (III) to arsenic (V) by digesting samples with concentrated nitric acid before extraction. Concentration of As (III) in the sample solutions could be calculated by the difference in total arsenic and arsenic (V). The characterization of arsenic was carried out by GFAAS using Pd as modifier. Optimization of the experimental conditions and instrumental parameters was investigated in detail. Recoveries of (90-110%) were obtained in the spiked samples. The detection limit was 0.2 microg l(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace amount of arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) in process water samples. PMID:17761387

  10. Investigation of the Transition from Local Anodic Oxidation to Electrical Breakdown During Nanoscale Atomic Force Microscopy Electric Lithography of Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ye; Lin, Jun

    2016-04-01

    As one of the tip-based top-down nanoscale machining methods, atomic force microscopy (AFM) electric lithography is capable of directly generating flexible nanostructures on conductive or semi-conductive sample surfaces. In this work, distinct fabrication mechanisms and mechanism transition from local anodic oxidation (LAO) to electrical breakdown (BD) in the AFM nanoscale electric lithography of the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite sample surface was studied. We provide direct evidence of the transition process mechanism through the detected current-voltage (I-V) curve. Characteristics of the fabrication results under the LAO, transition, and BD regions involving the oxide growth rate or material removal rate and AFM probe wear are analyzed in detail. These factors are of great significance for improving the machining controllability and expanding its potential applications. PMID:26847869

  11. Online time-differential perturbed angular correlation study with an 19O beam - Residence sites of oxygen atoms in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Ueno, H.; Watanabe, H.; Miyoshi, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Kameda, D.; Ito, T.; Shimada, K.; Kaihara, J.; Suda, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Ohkubo, Y.; Asahi, K.

    2008-01-01

    The online time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method was applied to a study of the physical states of a probe 19F, the β- decay product of 19O (t1/2 = 26.9 s), implanted in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The observed magnitude of the electric field gradient at the probe nucleus, ∣Vzz∣ = 2.91(17) × 1022 V m-2, suggests that the incident 19O atoms are stabilized at an interlayer position with point group C3v. Exhibiting observed TDPAC spectra having a clear sample-to-detector configuration dependence, we demonstrate the applicability of the present online method with a short-lived radioactive 19O beam.

  12. Atomic force microscopy on phase-control pulsed force mode in water: Imaging and force analysis on a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    We developed phase-control pulsed force mode (p-PFM) as the operation mode for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The p-PFM allowed us to observe soft or weakly adsorbed materials in a liquid environment using a conventional AFM apparatus, and allowed for force curve mapping (FCM) after offline data processing. We applied the p-PFM to a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin (RhOEP) layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is applicable to anode catalysts of fuel cells. The RhOEP/HOPG system was stably observed in water by this mode. In the p-PFM image, we found both large and small protrusions, which were not observed in the dynamic force mode, in air. The detailed force analysis suggested that these protrusions are nanobubbles located on the HOPG substrate exposed in holes or pits of the RhOEP layer.

  13. Single Atom (Pd/Pt) Supported on Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Efficient Photocatalyst for Visible-Light Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guoping; Jiao, Yan; Waclawik, Eric R; Du, Aijun

    2016-05-18

    Reducing carbon dioxide to hydrocarbon fuel with solar energy is significant for high-density solar energy storage and carbon balance. In this work, single atoms of palladium and platinum supported on graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4), i.e., Pd/g-C3N4 and Pt/g-C3N4, respectively, acting as photocatalysts for CO2 reduction were investigated by density functional theory calculations for the first time. During CO2 reduction, the individual metal atoms function as the active sites, while g-C3N4 provides the source of hydrogen (H*) from the hydrogen evolution reaction. The complete, as-designed photocatalysts exhibit excellent activity in CO2 reduction. HCOOH is the preferred product of CO2 reduction on the Pd/g-C3N4 catalyst with a rate-determining barrier of 0.66 eV, while the Pt/g-C3N4 catalyst prefers to reduce CO2 to CH4 with a rate-determining barrier of 1.16 eV. In addition, deposition of atom catalysts on g-C3N4 significantly enhances the visible-light absorption, rendering them ideal for visible-light reduction of CO2. Our findings open a new avenue of CO2 reduction for renewable energy supply. PMID:27116595

  14. Furnace afterburner

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J.F. II

    1987-01-13

    An afterburner is described for the exhaust effluvia of a furnace, which exhaust contains combustible material, the afterburner comprising: a. an elongated, generally cylindrical combustion chamber having an inlet for the exhaust at or adjacent one end thereof, and an outlet at or adjacent its other end, b. means operable to induce a draft through the combustion chamber from its inlet to its outlet, c. a series of air nozzles disposed to direct jets of air into the interior of the combustion chamber. Certain nozzles are arranged to direct air jets into the combustion chamber substantially tangentially thereto in a clockwise direction, and the remainder of the nozzles and arranged to direct air jets into the chamber substantially tangentially thereto in a counter-clockwise direction, whereby to induce turbulence within the chamber to intermix the air and the exhaust thoroughly, and d. means operable to deliver air to the air nozzles.

  15. Microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor for trace-metals in furnace exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Thomas, P.; Cohn, D.R.; Surma, J.E.; Titus, C.H.

    1996-10-01

    A microwave plasma continuous emissions monitor has been successfully demonstrated for sensitive ({lt}1 ppb), real time measurements of trace metals in furnace exhaust. The instrument uses a robust, up to 1.5 kW, 2.45 GHz microwave plasma sustained in a portion of the undiluted furnace exhaust flow for atomic emission spectroscopy. The waveguide device is constructed of refractory materials compatible with high-temperature environments ({approx_gt}500{degree}C) and is flange mountable into the inside of the furnace exhaust duct. Fused quartz fiber optics in close proximity to the plasma flame transmit the UV through visible emission (190{endash}690 nm) to three spectrometers for simultaneous monitoring of several metals. This instrument has been used for continuous monitoring for a 49 h period with 0.5 s time resolution on a dc graphite electrode arc furnace during a soil vitrification test. Results are presented for chromium, manganese, and iron emissions during soil loading operations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Radiation heat transfer within an optical fiber draw tower furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Issa, J.; Jaluria, Y.; Polymeropoulos, C.E.; Yin, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Study of the thermal transport and material flow processes associated with the drawing of optical fiber in a graphite draw furnace requires modeling of the heat transfer from the furnace wall. Previous work has shown that accurate knowledge of the furnace heater element axial temperature distribution is essential for proper modeling of the radiative transfer process. The present work is aimed at providing this information, as well as generating a set of data for the study of radiation exchange in the furnace cavity. The experimental procedure involved measuring the centerline temperature distribution in graphite and fused silica rods inserted into an optical fiber draw tower furnace. The temperature measurements were then used along with a model for radiative-convective heat transfer in the furnace in order to obtain the furnace temperature profile. This is an inverse problem since the centerline temperature in the rod is known whereas the furnace thermal conditions are not. The results obtained showed that the furnace temperature distribution was independent of rod material and size. The shape of the computed temperature distributions suggest that they can be well represented by a Gaussian function.

  17. Determination of Chromium(III), Chromium(VI), and Chromium(III) acetylacetonate in water by ion-exchange disk extraction/metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, Nao; Inui, Tetsuo; Kitano, Masaru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    A new method for the separate determination of Chromium(III) (Cr(III)), Chromium(VI) (Cr(VI)), and Cr(III) acetylacetonate (Cr(acac)3) in water was developed using a cation-exchange extraction disk (CED) and an anion-exchange extraction disk (AED) combined with metal furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (MFAAS). A 100-mL water sample was adjusted to pH 5.6 and passed through the CED placed on the AED. Cr(acac)3 and Cr(III) were adsorbed on the CED, and Cr(VI) was adsorbed on the AED. The adsorbed Cr(acac)3 was eluted with 50 mL of carbon tetrachloride, followed by the elution of Cr(III) with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. Cr(VI) was eluted with 50 mL of 3 mol L- 1 nitric acid. The chemical species of Cr eluted from the CED with carbon tetrachloride was identified as Cr(acac)3 using infrared spectroscopy. The eluate of Cr(acac)3 was diluted to 100 mL with carbon tetrachloride, and those of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were diluted to 100 mL with deionized water. All of the solutions were subsequently analyzed by MFAAS. The calibration curve for the Cr(acac)3 aqueous solutions exhibited good linearity in the range of 0.1 to 1 ng. The detection limit of Cr, which corresponded to three times the standard deviation (n = 10) of the blank values, was 20 pg. The recovery test for Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cr(acac)3 exhibited desirable results (96.0%-107%) when 5 μg of each species (50 μg L- 1) was added to 100 mL water samples (i.e., tap water, rainwater, and bottled drinking water). In a humic acid solution, Cr(acac)3 was quantitatively recovered (103%), but Cr(III) and Cr(VI) exhibited poor recoveries (i.e., 84.8% and 78.4%, respectively).

  18. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  19. Modified Claus furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.L.

    1986-03-11

    A Claus thermal conversion furnace is described comprising a primary furnace chamber, a burner in the primary furnace chamber, an oxidant containing gas supply inlet connected to the burner, a hydrogen sulfide containing gas supply conduit connected to the burner, an outlet extending from the furnace, a secondary reaction chamber in heat but not gas exchange relationship with the primary furnace chamber, the secondary reaction chamber extending through the length of the primary furnace chamber to a point in the outlet extending from the furnace, a hydrogen sulfide decomposing catalyst in the secondary reaction chamber, a hydrogen sulfide containing gas supply conduit connected to the secondary reaction chamber.

  20. Diagnostics for a waste processing plasma arc furnace (invited) (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woskov, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    Maintaining the quality of our environment has become an important goal of society. As part of this goal new technologies are being sought to clean up hazardous waste sites and to treat ongoing waste streams. A 1 MW pilot scale dc graphite electrode plasma arc furnace (Mark II) has been constructed at MIT under a joint program among Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), MIT, and Electro-Pyrolysis, Inc. (EPI)c) for the remediation of buried wastes in the DOE complex. A key part of this program is the development of new and improved diagnostics to study, monitor, and control the entire waste remediation process for the optimization of this technology and to safeguard the environment. Continuous, real time diagnostics are needed for a variety of the waste process parameters. These parameters include internal furnace temperatures, slag fill levels, trace metals content in the off-gas stream, off-gas molecular content, feed and slag characterization, and off-gas particulate size, density, and velocity distributions. Diagnostics are currently being tested at MIT for the first three parameters. An active millimeter-wave radiometer with a novel, rotatable graphite waveguide/mirror antenna system has been implemented on Mark II for the measurement of surface emission and emissivity which can be used to determine internal furnace temperatures and fill levels. A microwave torch plasma is being evaluated for use as a excitation source in the furnace off-gas stream for continuous atomic emission spectroscopy of trace metals. These diagnostics should find applicability not only to waste remediation, but also to other high temperature processes such as incinerators, power plants, and steel plants.

  1. Graphite-Fiber-Reinforced Glass-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    G/GI structural composite material made of graphite fibers embedded in borosilicate glass exhibit excellent strength, fracture toughness, and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures. It is made by passing graphite-fiber yarn through slurry containing suspension of fine glass particles in carrier liquid and winding on drum to produce prepegged uniaxial tape. After drying, tapes are cut into appropriate lengths and laid up in graphite die in desired stacking scheme. Stack is consolidated by hot pressing in furnace.

  2. Graphite Gamma Scan Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mark W. Drigert

    2014-04-01

    This report documents the measurement and data analysis of the radio isotopic content for a series of graphite specimens irradiated in the first Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment, AGC-1. This is the first of a series of six capsules planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphites. The AGC-1 capsule was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL at approximately 700 degrees C and to a peak dose of 7 dpa (displacements per atom). Details of the irradiation conditions and other characterization measurements performed on specimens in the AGC-1 capsule can be found in “AGC-1 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Report” ORNL/TM 2013/242. Two specimens from six different graphite types are analyzed here. Each specimen is 12.7 mm in diameter by 25.4 mm long. The isotope with the highest activity was 60Co. Graphite type NBG-18 had the highest content of 60Co with an activity of 142.89 µCi at a measurement distance of 47 cm.

  3. Blast furnace on-line simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxén, Henrik

    1990-10-01

    A mathematical model of the ironmaking blast furnace (BF) is presented. The model describes the steady-state operation of the furnace in one spatial dimension using real process data sampled at the steelworks. The measurement data are reconciled by an interface routine which yields boundary conditions obeying the conservation laws of atoms and energy. The simulation model, which provides a picture of the internal conditions of the BF, can be used to evaluate the current state of the process and to predict the effect of operating actions on the performance of the furnace.

  4. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  5. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  6. The effect of heating power on impurity formation and transport during the holding phase in a Bridgman furnace for directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Kjerstin; Lindholm, Dag; M`Hamdi, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the most common impurities in multi-crystalline silicon. The general mechanism for formation and transport of O and C in the solidification furnace is as follows: oxygen from the silica crucible comes into the melt and combines with a silicon atom and evaporates at the gas/melt interface in the form of silicon oxide (SiO). Argon inert gas, injected into the furnace chamber, carries the SiO to the hot graphite fixtures, where it reacts with carbon to form carbon monoxide (CO) and silicon carbide (SiC). CO is carried by the gas to the melt free surface, where it dissociates into carbon and oxygen. Finally, during solidification oxygen and carbon are incorporated into the crystal. A global furnace model accounting for heat transfer, melt flow, gas flow and impurity transport has been applied to investigate the oxygen and carbon formation and transport in a vertical Bridgman furnace during the holding phase when the furnace is at its hottest. A case study is performed to investigate the effect of the applied heating power on the carbon and oxygen concentrations in the melt prior to solidification.

  7. Heat treatment furnace

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Parrott, Jeffrey G; DeMint, Paul D; Finney, Kevin R; Blue, Charles T

    2014-10-21

    A furnace heats through both infrared radiation and convective air utilizing an infrared/purge gas design that enables improved temperature control to enable more uniform treatment of workpieces. The furnace utilizes lamps, the electrical end connections of which are located in an enclosure outside the furnace chamber, with the lamps extending into the furnace chamber through openings in the wall of the chamber. The enclosure is purged with gas, which gas flows from the enclosure into the furnace chamber via the openings in the wall of the chamber so that the gas flows above and around the lamps and is heated to form a convective mechanism in heating parts.

  8. EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW, BLAST FURNACE NO. 3 (JANE FURNACE) CENTER, NO. 3 CAST HOUSE TO THE LEFT, WEST ORE BRIDGE TO THE RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Blast Furnace No. 3, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  9. Applications Of Graphite Fluoride Fibers In Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheng; Long, Martin; Dever, Therese

    1993-01-01

    Report characterizes graphite fluoride fibers made from commercially available graphitized carbon fibers and discusses some potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers in outer space. Applications include heat-sinking printed-circuit boards, solar concentrators, and absorption of radar waves. Other applications based on exploitation of increased resistance to degradation by atomic oxygen, present in low orbits around Earth.

  10. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.