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Sample records for graphite interface studies

  1. Polymer matrix and graphite fiber interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. F.; Zimmerman, R. S.; Odom, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hercules AS4 graphite fiber, unsized, or with EPON 828, PVA, or polysulfone sizing, was combined with three different polymer matrices. These included Hercules 3501-6 epoxy, Hercules 4001 bismaleimide, and Hexcel F155 rubber toughened epoxy. Unidirectional composites in all twelve combinations were fabricated and tested in transverse tension and axial compression. Quasi-isotropic laminates were tested in axial tension and compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, and tensile impact. All tests were conducted at both room temperature, dry and elevated temperature, and wet conditions. Single fiber pullout testing was also performed. Extensive scanning electron microphotographs of fracture surfaces are included, along with photographs of single fiber pullout failures. Analytical/experimental correlations are presented, based on the results of a finite element micromechanics analysis. Correlations between matrix type, fiber sizing, hygrothermal environment, and loading mode are presented. Results indicate that the various composite properties were only moderately influenced by the fiber sizings utilized.

  2. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Molecular Structure: Controlled Monolayer Formation on Graphite at the Liquid-solid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Kannappan, K.; Chin, V. Nora; Avila-Bront, L.; Jayaraman, S.; Turro, N. J.; Flynn, G. W.

    2006-03-01

    The self-assembly of heptadecanoic acid 1 and racemic 2-bromoheptadecanoic acid 2 mixtures on the basal plane of a graphite surface has been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy at the liquid-solid interface. The domain structure varies as a function of the ratio of coadsorbed molecules. At lower concentration of acid 2, heptadecanoic acid controls the surface structure by forming a template with fixed lamellar axis-molecular axis angle and domains with alternating R- and S-enantiomer molecular rows. Increasing the concentration of acid 2 leads to the segregation of chiral domains. The inter-correlation between heptadecanoic acid and 2-bromoheptadecanoic acid determines the 2D chiral configuration in the mixed monolayer. A model based on energetically favorable molecular conformations is proposed and will be discussed.

  3. Ordered ionic liquid structure observed at terraced graphite interfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Xing; Wu, Chengyi; Rajagopal, Karjini; Punpongjareorn, Napat; Yang, Ding-Shyue

    2016-02-01

    Reflection high-energy electron diffraction is presented as a contactless, surface-specific method to probe the ion organization and layering at the ionic liquid-solid interfaces. Three regimes can be identified for the structure of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM][Tf2N]) on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which is strongly dependent on the distances of ions from the surface. Direct observations showed that the ultrathin ionic liquid (IL) assembly can exhibit bulk-like phase-transition behaviours as a result of the structural matching between the IL and graphite layers and the confinement template effect due to the surface topography of graphite. The present study illustrates the opportunities for conducting further studies of the structures and ultrafast dynamics of IL-solid interfaces. PMID:26775813

  4. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  5. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  6. Mechanical and dielectric properties of SEBS modified by graphite inclusion and composite interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorescu, Ramona Marina; Ciuprina, Florin; Ghioca, Paul; Ghiurea, Marius; Iancu, Lorena; Spurcaciu, Bogdan; Panaitescu, Denis Mihaela

    2016-02-01

    Tough and flexible dielectrics were prepared using graphite (G), a natural and low-cost resource, as filler in polystyrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-polystyrene (SEBS) and maleinized SEBS (SEBS-MA) matrices. The disintegration of graphite in submicron particles was accomplished by the shear forces during the melt processing step and it was highlighted by atomic force microscopy. Simultaneous increase of tensile strain, strength and Young's modulus was noticed for SEBS/G and SEBS-MA/G composites compared to unfilled matrices, this remarkable feature being previously reported only for some nanocomposites. Moreover, an exponential variation of the dielectric permittivity with the volume fraction of G was obtained. Higher reinforcing efficiency and better dielectric properties were observed in SEBS-MA/G composites, compared to the corresponding SEBS/G composites, due to the stronger polymer-filler interface and better dispersion of graphite. This study brings new insights into nanolevel properties of SEBS composites and it opens new perspectives on high performance composites by using graphite instead of expensive graphene and efficient melt mixing process.

  7. Prediction and measurement of thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic solids and graphitic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Pamela M.; Smoyer, Justin L.; Duda, John Charles.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2010-06-01

    Due to the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of carbon allotropes, there have been many attempts to incorporate such structures into existing thermal abatement technologies. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic materials (i.e., graphite and graphene flakes or stacks) have garnered much interest due to the combination of both their thermal and mechanical properties. However, the introduction of these carbon-based nanostructures into thermal abatement technologies greatly increases the number of interfaces per unit length within the resulting composite systems. Consequently, thermal transport in these systems is governed as much by the interfaces between the constituent materials as it is by the materials themselves. This paper reports the behavior of phononic thermal transport across interfaces between isotropic thin films and graphite substrates. Elastic and inelastic diffusive transport models are formulated to aid in the prediction of conductance at a metal-graphite interface. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductance at Au-graphite interfaces is measured via transient thermoreflectance from 78 to 400 K. It is found that different substrate surface preparations prior to thin film deposition have a significant effect on the conductance of the interface between film and substrate.

  8. Effect of Co-60 gamma radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy blends and epoxy-graphite fiber interface

    SciTech Connect

    Netravali, A.N.; Manji, A. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of Co-60 gamma radiation of up to 100 Mrads on an IM6-G graphite fiber-epoxy interface was studied using the single-fiber-composite (SFC) technique. Flexible epoxy blends were formulated using DGEBA based and polyglycol diepoxide epoxies which were cured with aliphatic and aromatic curing agents. Bulk epoxy specimens and graphite fibers were tension tested to obtain their tensile properties. The fragment length distribution from SFC tests, single fiber strength data, and a Monte Carlo simulation of Poisson/Weibull model for fiber strength and flaws were used to obtain the effective interfacial shear strength values. The results indicate that while graphite fiber strength is not affected by radiation, the tensile properties of the epoxies used are adversely affected by the radiation. The interfacial shear strength, however, increases significantly with the radiation dose. 36 refs.

  9. Tunable resistance of a carbon nanotube-graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Paulson, S; Helser, A; Nardelli, M B; Taylor, R M; Falvo, M; Superfine, R; Washburn, S

    2000-12-01

    The transfer of electrons from one material to another is usually described in terms of energy conservation, with no attention being paid to momentum conservation. Here we present results on the junction resistance between a carbon nanotube and a graphite substrate and show that details of momentum conservation also can change the contact resistance. By changing the angular alignment of the atomic lattices, we found that contact resistance varied by more than an order of magnitude in a controlled and reproducible fashion, indicating that momentum conservation, in addition to energy conservation, can dictate the junction resistance in graphene systems such as carbon nanotube junctions and devices. PMID:11099407

  10. Chemical Erosion Studies of Lithiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Priya; Surla, Vijay; Burns, David; Ruzic, David

    2010-11-01

    Lithium evaporation treatments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown dramatic improvements in plasma performance increasing the viability of lithium as Plasma facing Component (PFC) material. In order to understand the complex system of lithiated ATJ graphite, chemical erosion measurements of plain and lithiated ATJ graphite are conducted in the newly built RF plasma facility. A differential pumping scheme is employed and a Residual Gas Analyzer is used for chemical erosion measurements. Target is mounted on a substrate heater (0-500C) and it is connected to a biasing circuitry to allow for temperature dependent studies and energy dependent measurements. To study the effect of lithium on chemical erosion, lithium is evaporated in-situ onto ATJ graphite. The dominant chemical erosion products are known to be CD4 and C2D2. The challenges in measuring C2D2, as it interferes with N2 and CO peaks, are presented. It was found that lithium treatments have suppressed the CD4 signal, and the effect of lithium on other peaks is presented. The effect of temperature on chemical erosion is also investigated and it was found that temperature increases the erosion of graphite.

  11. The formation and stability of the solid electrolyte interface on the graphite anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agubra, Victor A.; Fergus, Jeffrey W.

    2014-12-01

    The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer plays a critical role in the cycle life of Li-ion batteries. The potential difference across the SEI during charging results in the potential for Li+ intercalation at the graphite-SEI interface to be lower than the potential at the SEI-electrolyte interface, which can prevent electrolyte reduction and decomposition. The stability of the SEI layer at certain critical battery operating conditions remains a challenge in the performance of lithium ion batteries. Electrolyte additives and surface modification of the anode electrode have been shown to improve the formation of an effective SEI layer. However, there is still a need for improving the robustness of the SEI to withstand extreme battery operating conditions. In this paper, the formation and stability of the SEI layer for lithium ion batteries is reviewed. This review includes discussion of the formation, growth and stability of the SEI on graphite anode materials.

  12. TEM Study of Internal Crystals in Supernova Graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Bernatowicz, T.; Stadermann, F. J.; Messenger, S.; Amari, S.

    2003-03-01

    A coordinated TEM and isotopic study of ten supernova (SN) graphites from the Murchison meteorite has revealed many internal grains, mostly titanium carbides (TiCs) and TiC-kamacite composite grains, which were accreted during the graphite growth.

  13. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X-ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  14. Reaction layer formation at the graphite/copper-chromium alloy interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.; Michal, Gary M.

    1992-01-01

    Sessile drop tests were used to obtain information about copper chromium alloys that suitably wet graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper-chromium alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures were conducted using scanning electron micrography, energy dispersive spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy, and x ray diffraction analyses. These analyses indicate that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for one hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 percent chromium form continuous reaction layers of approximately 10 micron thickness. The reaction layers adhere to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 degrees or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is chromium carbide. The kinetics of reaction layer formation were modelled in terms of bulk diffusion mechanisms. Reaction layer thickness is controlled initially by the diffusion of Cr out of Cu alloy and later by the diffusion of C through chromium carbide.

  15. Development of graphite/copper composites utilizing engineered interfaces. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincent, Sandra M.

    1991-01-01

    In situ measurements of graphite/copper alloy contact angles were made using the sessile drop method. The interfacial energy values obtained from these measurements were then applied to a model for the fiber matrix interfacial debonding phenomenon found in graphite/copper composites. The formation obtained from the sessile drop tests led to the development of a copper alloy that suitably wets graphite. Characterization of graphite/copper alloy interfaces subjected to elevated temperatures was conducted using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy, and X Ray Diffraction analyses. These analyses indicated that during sessile drop tests conducted at 1130 C for 1 hour, copper alloys containing greater than 0.98 at pct chromium form continuous reaction layers of approx. 10 microns in thickness. The reaction layers are adherent to the graphite surface. The copper wets the reaction layer to form a contact angle of 60 deg or less. X ray diffraction results indicate that the reaction layer is Cr3C2.

  16. Anisotropic Thermal and Electrical Properties of Thin Thermal Interface Layers of Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Bekyarova, Elena B.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are crucial components of high density electronics and the high thermal conductivity of graphite makes this material an attractive candidate for such applications. We report an investigation of the in-plane and through-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of thin thermal interface layers of graphite nanoplatelet (GNP) based composites. The in-plane electrical conductivity exceeds its through-plane counterpart by three orders of magnitude, whereas the ratio of the thermal conductivities is about 5. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the anisotropy in the transport properties is due to the in-plane alignment of the GNPs which occurs during the formation of the thermal interface layer. Because the alignment in the thermal interface layer suppresses the through-plane component of the thermal conductivity, the anisotropy strongly degrades the performance of GNP-based composites in the geometry required for typical thermal management applications and must be taken into account in the development of GNP-based TIMs.

  17. Efficient simulations of the aqueous bio-interface of graphitic nanostructures with a polarisable model.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Zak E; Tomásio, Susana M; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2014-05-21

    To fully harness the enormous potential offered by interfaces between graphitic nanostructures and biomolecules, detailed connections between adsorbed conformations and adsorption behaviour are needed. To elucidate these links, a key approach, in partnership with experimental techniques, is molecular simulation. For this, a force-field (FF) that can appropriately capture the relevant physics and chemistry of these complex bio-interfaces, while allowing extensive conformational sampling, and also supporting inter-operability with known biological FFs, is a pivotal requirement. Here, we present and apply such a force-field, GRAPPA, designed to work with the CHARMM FF. GRAPPA is an efficiently implemented polarisable force-field, informed by extensive plane-wave DFT calculations using the revPBE-vdW-DF functional. GRAPPA adequately recovers the spatial and orientational structuring of the aqueous interface of graphene and carbon nanotubes, compared with more sophisticated approaches. We apply GRAPPA to determine the free energy of adsorption for a range of amino acids, identifying Trp, Tyr and Arg to have the strongest binding affinity and Asp to be a weak binder. The GRAPPA FF can be readily incorporated into mainstream simulation packages, and will enable large-scale polarisable biointerfacial simulations at graphitic interfaces, that will aid the development of biomolecule-mediated, solution-based graphene processing and self-assembly strategies. PMID:24722915

  18. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photon-stimulated Oxidation of Buried Ice: Graphite Grain Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Grieves, G. A.; Orlando, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synthesis of CO and CO2 on ice-coated graphite and isotopic labeled 13C graphite has been examined for temperatures between 40 and 120 K. The results show that CO and CO2 can be formed at the buried ice:graphite interface with Lyα photon irradiation via the reaction of radicals (O and OH) produced by direct photodissociation and the dissociative electron attachment of the interfacial water molecules. The synthesized CO and CO2 molecules can desorb in hot photon-dominated regions and are lost to space when ice coated carbonaceous dust grains cycle within the protoplanetary disks. Thus, the nonthermal formation of CO and CO2 at the buried ice:grain interface by VUV photons may help regulate the carbon inventory during the early stage of planet formation. This may contribute to the carbon deficits in our solar system and suggests that a universal carbon deficit gradient may be expected within astrophysical bodies surrounding center stars.

  19. Floatability study of graphite ore from southeast Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    Graphite ore obtained from Kolaka Regency, South East Sulawesi, Indonesia have been succesfully investigated for beneficiation by froth flotation technique. Preliminary study have been done to determine the minerals types, fixed carbon content and liberation size of the graphite. Graphite is naturally floatable due to its hydrophobic property. Some suitable reagents are usually added to increase effectiveness of recovery. In this article, enrichment of graphite by froth flotation was studied by investigating the effect of reagents concentrations, rotation speed and particle size on the carbon grade and recovery of the concentrate. The carbon grade increased from 3.00% to 60.00% at the optimum flotation conditions.

  20. Chemical Sputtering Studies of Lithiated Graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Priya; Groll, Andrew; Abrams, Tyler; Curreli, Davide; Andruczyk, Daniel; Ruzic, D. N.

    2012-10-01

    Lithium treatments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment have shown dramatic improvements in plasma performance. In order to understand the complex system of lithiated ATJ graphite, chemical sputtering measurements of plain and lithiated ATJ graphite are conducted in IIAX (Ion Surface Interaction Experiment) facility with a differentially pumped Magnetic Sector Residual Gas Analyzer (MSRGA). The ATJ graphite target is mounted in such way that the target can be translated along a line to different positions to get direct comparison of ATJ and lithiated ATJ. Target is heated using joule heating and is connected to a biasing circuitry. Chemical sputtering of graphite is dependent on the ion energy and substrate temperature, hence the total effects of treating ATJ graphite with lithium in hydrogen plasma is investigated in terms of different target temperatures and bias voltages. For this purpose, lithium is evaporated in-situ onto ATJ graphite and chemically sputtered species in hydrogen plasma is measured using MSRGA. The dominant chemical sputtering product is CH4. It was found that lithium treatments have suppressed the chemical sputtering of ATJ Graphite. The suppression of chemical sputtering effect is presented as a function of varying lithium thickness on ATJ Graphite.

  1. Solder-Graphite Network Composite Sheets as High-Performance Thermal Interface Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Munish; Chung, D. D. L.

    2015-03-01

    Low-cost solder-graphite composite sheets (≥55 vol.% solder), with solder and graphite forming interpenetrating networks to a degree, are excellent thermal interface materials (TIMs). Solders 63Sn-37Pb and 95.5Sn-4Ag-0.5Cu are separately used, with the latter performing better. In composite fabrication, a mixture of micrometer-size solder powder and ozone-treated exfoliated graphite is compressed to form a graphite network, followed by fluxless solder reflow and subsequent hot pressing to form the solder network. The network connectivity (enhanced by ozone treatment) is lower in the through-thickness direction. The electrical conductivity obeys the rule of mixtures (parallel model in-plane and series model through-thickness), with anisotropy 7. Thermal contact conductance ≤26 × 104 W/(m2 K) (with 15- μm-roughness copper sandwiching surfaces), through-thickness thermal conductivity ≤52 W/(m K), and in-plane thermal expansion coefficient 1 × 10-5/°C are obtained. The contact conductance exceeds or is comparable to that of all other TIMs, provided that solder reflow has occurred and the composite thickness is ≤100 μm. Upon decreasing the thickness below 100 μm, the sandwich thermal resistivity decreases abruptly, the composite through-thickness thermal conductivity increases abruptly to values comparable to the calculated values based on the rule of mixtures (parallel model), and the composite-copper interfacial thermal resistivity (rather than the composite resistivity) becomes dominant.

  2. Study of high resistance inorganic coatings on graphite fibers. [for graphite-epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Veltri, R. D.; Scola, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings made of boron, silicon carbide, silica, and silica-like materials were studied to determine their ability to increase resistance of graphite fibers. The most promising results were attained by chemical vapor depositing silicon carbide on graphite fiber followed by oxidation, and drawing graphite fiber through ethyl silicate followed by appropriate heat treatments. In the silicon carbide coating studies, no degradation of the graphite fibers was observed and resistance values as high as three orders of magnitude higher than that of the uncoated fiber was attained. The strength of a composite fabricated from the coated fiber had a strength which compared favorably with those of composites prepared from uncoated fiber. For the silica-like coated fiber prepared by drawing the graphite fiber through an ethyl silicate solution followed by heating, coated fiber resistances about an order of magnitude greater than that of the uncoated fiber were attained. Composites prepared using these fibers had flexural strengths comparable with those prepared using uncoated fibers, but the shear strengths were lower.

  3. Low-energy electron diffraction study of potassium adsorbed on single-crystal graphite and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ferralis, N.; Diehl, R.D.; Pussi, K.; Lindroos, M.; Finberg, S.E.; Smerdon, J.; McGrath, R.

    2004-12-15

    Potassium adsorption on graphite has been a model system for the understanding of the interaction of alkali metals with surfaces. The geometries of the (2x2) structure of potassium on both single-crystal graphite (SCG) and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were investigated for various preparation conditions for graphite temperatures between 55 and 140 K. In all cases, the geometry was found to consist of K atoms in the hollow sites on top of the surface. The K-graphite average perpendicular spacing is 2.79{+-}0.03 A , corresponding to an average C-K distance of 3.13{+-}0.03 A , and the spacing between graphite planes is consistent with the bulk spacing of 3.35 A. No evidence was observed for a sublayer of potassium. The results of dynamical LEED studies for the clean SCG and HOPG surfaces indicate that the surface structures of both are consistent with the truncated bulk structure of graphite.

  4. Metasomatism and graphite formation at a lithological interface in Malaspina (Alpine Corsica, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Matthieu E.; Martinez, Isabelle; Beyssac, Olivier; Benzerara, Karim; Agrinier, Pierre; Assayag, Nelly

    2013-12-01

    Multiple pieces of geologic evidence suggest that interfaces between contrasted lithologies exert a strong control on the fate of volatiles in subduction zones. Here we present results from a contact between serpentinites and sediments, located in Corsica and metamorphosed in the blueschist facies during the alpine orogeny. It was shown previously that carbonates in the sediments have been reduced to graphitic carbonaceous material within a 5-10-cm-thick reaction zone at the contact with serpentinites. In an effort to investigate the mechanisms governing this unusual process, bulk rock geochemical analyses incorporating a statistical analysis of compositional data are presented. Observations show that the fate of C was decoupled from that of other elements such as O, H, and large-ion lithophile elements—e.g. K, Sr, Ba...,As—that were extensively leached from the reaction zone. Notably, Na is strongly enriched in the reaction zone and structurally linked to pectolite. Reducing conditions, manifested by the depletion of O in the reaction zone compared to the bulk metasediment, were likely maintained by the presence of Fe(II) in the serpentinite. Moreover, thermodynamic calculations show that the low solubility of carbon in COH fluids at high-pressure and low-temperature conditions was the main driver for graphite precipitation synchronously with carbonate destabilization. This may have been kinetically favored by the presence of already existing graphitized carbonaceous material and phengite in the metasediment. Limited lateral flow might have contributed as well to the geochemical and petrological patterns observed in these rocks.

  5. Nickel-Graphite Composite Compliant Interface and/or Hot Shoe Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Chun-Yip Li, Billy; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Caillat, Thierry; Anjunyan, Harut

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation high-temperature thermoelectric-power-generating devices will employ segmented architectures and will have to reliably withstand thermally induced mechanical stresses produced during component fabrication, device assembly, and operation. Thermoelectric materials have typically poor mechanical strength, exhibit brittle behavior, and possess a wide range of coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. As a result, the direct bonding at elevated temperatures of these materials to each other to produce segmented leg components is difficult, and often results in localized microcracking at interfaces and mec hanical failure due to the stresses that arise from the CTE mismatch between the various materials. Even in the absence of full mechanical failure, degraded interfaces can lead to increased electrical and thermal resistances, which adversely impact conversion efficiency and power output. The proposed solution is the insertion of a mechanically compliant layer, with high electrical and thermal conductivity, between the low- and high-temperature segments to relieve thermomechanical stresses during device fabrication and operation. This composite material can be used as a stress-relieving layer between the thermoelectric segments and/or between a thermoelectric segment and a hot- or cold-side interconnect material. The material also can be used as a compliant hot shoe. Nickel-coated graphite powders were hot-pressed to form a nickel-graphite composite material. A freestanding thermoelectric segmented leg was fabricated by brazing the compliant pad layer between the high-temperature p- Zintl and low-temperature p-SKD TE segments using Cu-Ag braze foils. The segmented leg stack was heated in vacuum under a compressive load to achieve bonding. The novelty of the innovation is the use of composite material that re duces the thermomechanical stresses en - countered in the construction of high-efficiency, high-temperature therm - o-electric devices. The

  6. Efficient simulations of the aqueous bio-interface of graphitic nanostructures with a polarisable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Zak E.; Tomásio, Susana M.; Walsh, Tiffany R.

    2014-04-01

    To fully harness the enormous potential offered by interfaces between graphitic nanostructures and biomolecules, detailed connections between adsorbed conformations and adsorption behaviour are needed. To elucidate these links, a key approach, in partnership with experimental techniques, is molecular simulation. For this, a force-field (FF) that can appropriately capture the relevant physics and chemistry of these complex bio-interfaces, while allowing extensive conformational sampling, and also supporting inter-operability with known biological FFs, is a pivotal requirement. Here, we present and apply such a force-field, GRAPPA, designed to work with the CHARMM FF. GRAPPA is an efficiently implemented polarisable force-field, informed by extensive plane-wave DFT calculations using the revPBE-vdW-DF functional. GRAPPA adequately recovers the spatial and orientational structuring of the aqueous interface of graphene and carbon nanotubes, compared with more sophisticated approaches. We apply GRAPPA to determine the free energy of adsorption for a range of amino acids, identifying Trp, Tyr and Arg to have the strongest binding affinity and Asp to be a weak binder. The GRAPPA FF can be readily incorporated into mainstream simulation packages, and will enable large-scale polarisable biointerfacial simulations at graphitic interfaces, that will aid the development of biomolecule-mediated, solution-based graphene processing and self-assembly strategies.To fully harness the enormous potential offered by interfaces between graphitic nanostructures and biomolecules, detailed connections between adsorbed conformations and adsorption behaviour are needed. To elucidate these links, a key approach, in partnership with experimental techniques, is molecular simulation. For this, a force-field (FF) that can appropriately capture the relevant physics and chemistry of these complex bio-interfaces, while allowing extensive conformational sampling, and also supporting inter

  7. Combined friction force microscopy and quantum chemical investigation of the tribotronic response at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Atkin, R; Page, A J

    2015-06-28

    The energetic origins of the variation in friction with potential at the propylammonium nitrate-graphite interface are revealed using friction force microscopy (FFM) in combination with quantum chemical simulations. For boundary layer lubrication, as the FFM tip slides energy is dissipated via (1) boundary layer ions and (2) expulsion of near-surface ion layers from the space between the surface and advancing tip. Simulations reveal how changing the surface potential changes the ion composition of the boundary and near surface layer, which controls energy dissipation through both pathways, and thus the friction. PMID:26027558

  8. Experimental study of graphitic nanoribbon films for ammonia sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jason L.; Behnam, Ashkan; An, Yanbin; Pearton, S. J.; Ural, Ant

    2011-06-01

    We fabricate and study the ammonia sensing properties of graphitic nanoribbon films consisting of multi-layer graphene nanoribbons. These films show very good sensitivity to parts-per-million (ppm) level concentrations of ammonia, which is further enhanced by platinum functionalization, resulting in a relative resistance response of ˜70% when exposed to 50 ppm ammonia. In addition, the sensing response exhibits excellent repeatability and full recovery in air. We also study in detail the dependence of the sensing response on ammonia concentration and temperature. We find that the relative resistance response of the graphitic nanoribbon films shows a power-law dependence on the ammonia concentration, which can be explained based on the Freundlich isotherm. The activation energy obtained from an Arrhenius plot of the temperature-dependent measurements is ˜50 meV, which is consistent with the theoretical calculations of the adsorption energies of ammonia on large graphene sheets and nanoribbons. Their simple and low-cost fabrication process and good sensing response open up the possibility of using graphitic nanoribbon films for large-scale sensing applications.

  9. Micro-mechanical studies on graphite strength prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanse, Deepak; Khan, I. A.; Bhasin, V.; Vaze, K. K.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of type of loading and size-effects on the failure strength of graphite were studied using Weibull model. It was observed that this model over-predicts size effect in tension. However, incorporation of grain size effect in Weibull model, allows a more realistic simulation of size effects. Numerical prediction of strength of four-point bend specimen was made using the Weibull parameters obtained from tensile test data. Effective volume calculations were carried out and subsequently predicted strength was compared with experimental data. It was found that Weibull model can predict mean flexural strength with reasonable accuracy even when grain size effect was not incorporated. In addition, the effects of microstructural parameters on failure strength were analyzed using Rose and Tucker model. Uni-axial tensile, three-point bend and four-point bend strengths were predicted using this model and compared with the experimental data. It was found that this model predicts flexural strength within 10%. For uni-axial tensile strength, difference was 22% which can be attributed to less number of tests on tensile specimens. In order to develop failure surface of graphite under multi-axial state of stress, an open ended hollow tube of graphite was subjected to internal pressure and axial load and Batdorf model was employed to calculate failure probability of the tube. Bi-axial failure surface was generated in the first and fourth quadrant for 50% failure probability by varying both internal pressure and axial load.

  10. A versatile microcomputer interface and peripheral devices: An application in deuterium lamp background correction graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökmen, A.; Yalcin, S.

    1992-01-01

    A versatile interface card for Apple IIe computer and various peripheral devices are designed to control instruments which generates transient signals like in graphite furnace atomic spectrometer. The interface card consists of a multiplexed analog-to-digital converter, a digital-to-analog converter, and a timer/counter chip. The timer/counter chip with 16 built-in registers can be programmed in many modes which provides a time base for real-time measurements. A stepper motor runs under the control of timer/counter chip independent of computer. A light chopper connected to the stepper motor is controlled easily by computer. A dual high-voltage switch can modulate dc light sources under computer control. This system is applied to D2-lamp background correction graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. The D2 lamp is chopped by a mechanical chopper driven by a stepper motor and a hollow cathode lamp is modulated electronically. The data acquisition program is written in machine language and synchronization between light sources and computer is provided by chopper position signal through the interrupts. A sampling rate of 16 during a signal period at 50-Hz chopping frequency is found to be the optimum value. A large number of data collected during atomization period is compressed in machine code. This saved storage space and analysis time.

  11. Coordinated Isotopic and TEM Studies of Presolar Graphites from Murchison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Stadermann, F. J.; Zinner, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2004-03-01

    TEM and NanoSIMS investigations of the same presolar Murchison KFC graphites revealed high Zr, Mo, and Ru content in refractory carbides within the graphites. Along with isotopically light carbon, these suggest a low-metallicity AGB source.

  12. Application of Hybrid Fillers for Improving the Through-Plane Heat Transport in Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Thermal Interface Layers

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane alignment of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers suppresses the though-plane heat transport thus limiting the performance of GNPs in the geometry normally required for thermal management applications. Here we report a disruption of the GNP in-plane alignment by addition of spherical microparticles. The degree of GNP alignment was monitored by measurement of the anisotropy of electrical conductivity which is extremely sensitive to the orientation of high aspect ratio filler particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of TIM layer cross-sections confirmed the suppression of the in-plane alignment. The hybrid filler formulations reported herein resulted in a synergistic enhancement of the through-plane thermal conductivity of GNP/Al2O3 and GNP/Al filled TIM layers confirming that the control of GNP alignment is an important parameter in the development of highly efficient GNP and graphene-based TIMs. PMID:26279183

  13. Application of Hybrid Fillers for Improving the Through-Plane Heat Transport in Graphite Nanoplatelet-Based Thermal Interface Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaojuan; Itkis, Mikhail E.; Haddon, Robert C.

    2015-08-01

    The in-plane alignment of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) in thin thermal interface material (TIM) layers suppresses the though-plane heat transport thus limiting the performance of GNPs in the geometry normally required for thermal management applications. Here we report a disruption of the GNP in-plane alignment by addition of spherical microparticles. The degree of GNP alignment was monitored by measurement of the anisotropy of electrical conductivity which is extremely sensitive to the orientation of high aspect ratio filler particles. Scanning Electron Microscopy images of TIM layer cross-sections confirmed the suppression of the in-plane alignment. The hybrid filler formulations reported herein resulted in a synergistic enhancement of the through-plane thermal conductivity of GNP/Al2O3 and GNP/Al filled TIM layers confirming that the control of GNP alignment is an important parameter in the development of highly efficient GNP and graphene-based TIMs.

  14. Photoemission studies of fluorine functionalized porous graphitic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ganegoda, Hasitha; Olive, Daniel; Cheng, Lidens; Segre, Carlo U.; Terry, Jeff; Jensen, David S.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-03-01

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) has unique properties desirable for liquid chromatography applications when used as a stationary phase. The polar retention effect on graphite (PREG) allows efficient separation of polar and non-polar solutes. Perfluorinated hydrocarbons however lack polarizabilty and display strong lipo- and hydrophobicity, hence common lipophilic and hydrophilic analytes have low partition coefficiency in fluorinated stationary phases. Attractive interaction between fluorinated stationary phase and fluorinated analytes results in strong retention compared to non-fluorinated analytes. In order to change the selectivities of PGC, it is necessary to develop a bonded PGC stationary phase. In this study, we have synthesized perfluorinated, PGC using hepatadecafluoro-1-iodooctane, under different temperature conditions. Surface functionalization of the raw material was studied using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results indicate the existence of fluorine containing functional groups, -CF, -CF{sub 2} along with an intercalated electron donor species. Multiple oxygen functional groups were also observed, likely due to the presence of oxygen in the starting material. These oxygen species may be responsible for significant modifications to planer and tetrahedral carbon ratios.

  15. Photoemission studies of fluorine functionalized porous graphitic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganegoda, Hasitha; Jensen, David S.; Olive, Daniel; Cheng, Lidens; Segre, Carlo U.; Linford, Matthew R.; Terry, Jeff

    2012-03-01

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) has unique properties desirable for liquid chromatography applications when used as a stationary phase. The polar retention effect on graphite (PREG) allows efficient separation of polar and non-polar solutes. Perfluorinated hydrocarbons however lack polarizabilty and display strong lipo- and hydrophobicity, hence common lipophilic and hydrophilic analytes have low partition coefficiency in fluorinated stationary phases. Attractive interaction between fluorinated stationary phase and fluorinated analytes results in strong retention compared to non-fluorinated analytes. In order to change the selectivities of PGC, it is necessary to develop a bonded PGC stationary phase. In this study, we have synthesized perfluorinated, PGC using hepatadecafluoro-1-iodooctane, under different temperature conditions. Surface functionalization of the raw material was studied using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results indicate the existence of fluorine containing functional groups, -CF, -CF2 along with an intercalated electron donor species. Multiple oxygen functional groups were also observed, likely due to the presence of oxygen in the starting material. These oxygen species may be responsible for significant modifications to planer and tetrahedral carbon ratios.

  16. Interaction of boron with graphite: A van der Waals density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Chen; Liang, Tongxiang; Lai, Wensheng

    2016-08-01

    Boron doping has been widely investigated to improve oxidation resistance of graphite. In this work the interaction of boron with graphite is investigated by a van der Waals density-functional approach (vdW-DF). The traditional density-functional theory (DFT) is well accounted for the binding in boron-substituted graphite. However, to investigate the boron atom on graphite surface and the interstitial impurities require use of a description of graphite interlayer binding. Traditional DFT cannot describe the vdW physics, for instance, GGA calculations show no relevant binding between graphite sheets. LDA shows some binding, but they fail to provide an accurate account of vdW forces. In this paper, we compare the calculation results of graphite lattice constant and cohesive energy by several functionals, it shows that vdW-DF such as two optimized functionals optB88-vdW and optB86b-vdW give much improved results than traditional DFT. The vdW-DF approach is then applied to study the interaction of boron with graphite. Boron adsorption, substitution, and intercalation are discussed in terms of structural parameters and electronic structures. When adsorbing on graphite surface, boron behaves as π electron acceptor. The π electron approaches boron atom because of more electropositive of boron than carbon. For substitution situation, the hole introduced by boron mainly concentrates on boron and the nearest three carbon atoms. The B-doped graphite system with the hole has less ability to offer electrons to oxygen, ultimately resulted in the inhibition of carbon oxidation. For interstitial doping, vdW-DFs show more accurate formation energy than LDA. PBE functional cannot describe the interstitial boron in graphite reasonably because of the ignoring binding of graphite sheets. The investigation of electron structures of boron doped graphite will play an important role in understanding the oxidation mechanism in further study.

  17. Ultrafast transformation of graphite to diamond: an ab initio study of graphite under shock compression.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Christopher J; Curioni, Alessandro; Goldman, Nir; Will Kuo, I-F; Reed, Evan J; Fried, Laurence E; Ianuzzi, Marcella

    2008-05-14

    We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of graphite under shock compression in conjunction with the multiscale shock technique. Our simulations reveal that a novel short-lived layered diamond intermediate is formed within a few hundred of femtoseconds upon shock loading at a shock velocity of 12 kms (longitudinal stress>130 GPa), followed by formation of cubic diamond. The layered diamond state differs from the experimentally observed hexagonal diamond intermediate found at lower pressures and previous hydrostatic calculations in that a rapid buckling of the graphitic planes produces a mixture of hexagonal and cubic diamond (layered diamond). Direct calculation of the x-ray absorption spectra in our simulations reveals that the electronic structure of the final state closely resembles that of compressed cubic diamond. PMID:18532830

  18. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  19. Two-year biocompatibility study of ORNL graphite.

    PubMed

    Kenner, G H; Williams, W S; Lovell, J E; Eatherly, W P

    1975-07-01

    A new grade of graphite-isotropic, fine-grained, and of superior strength-has been produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The possibility of using this material in orthopedic implants is under study at the University of Illinois. As part of this program, plugs 1/8 in. in diam were inserted in holes drilled in the proximal femur of 2 groups of 8-week old male rabbits. The groups were sacrificed at the end of 1 and 2 years. A single i.m. injection of achromycin was given 2 days prior to sacrifice. Thin sections of the plugs and surrounding tissue were examined by microradiography and optical microscopy (white light, polarizing, and fluorescent). All bone was normal. Minimal evidence of irritation or fibrous encapsulation appeared. PMID:1176511

  20. Imaging surface nanobubbles at graphite-water interfaces with different atomic force microscopy modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chih-Wen; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2013-05-01

    We have imaged nanobubbles on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces in pure water with different atomic force microscopy (AFM) modes, including the frequency-modulation, the tapping, and the PeakForce techniques. We have compared the performance of these modes in obtaining the surface profiles of nanobubbles. The frequency-modulation mode yields a larger height value than the other two modes and can provide more accurate measurement of the surface profiles of nanobubbles. Imaging with PeakForce mode shows that a nanobubble appears smaller and shorter with increasing peak force and disappears above a certain peak force, but the size returns to the original value when the peak force is reduced. This indicates that imaging with high peak forces does not cause gas removal from the nanobubbles. Based on the presented findings and previous AFM observations, the existing models for nanobubbles are reviewed and discussed. The model of gas aggregate inside nanobubbles provides a better explanation for the puzzles of the high stability and the contact angle of surface nanobubbles.

  1. Brazing graphite to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, George R.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite is joined to graphite by employing both fine molybdenum powder as the brazing material and an annealing step that together produce a virtually metal-free joint exhibiting properties similar to those found in the parent graphite. Molybdenum powder is placed between the faying surfaces of two graphite parts and melted to form molybdenum carbide. The joint area is thereafter subjected to an annealing operation which diffuses the carbide away from the joint and into the graphite parts. Graphite dissolved by the dispersed molybdenum carbide precipitates into the joint area, replacing the molybdenum carbide to provide a joint of virtually graphite.

  2. Graphitic carbon in the Allende meteorite - A microstructural study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. P. K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows that carbon in the Allende carbonaceous chondrite meteorite is predominantly a poorly crystalline graphite. Such material is of interest as an important carrier of the isotopically anomalous noble gases found in carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Overall evaluation study for isotropic graphite as fusion first wall material in japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashina, Toshiro; Hino, Tomoaki

    1989-04-01

    Isotropie graphite has been widely used as first wall material in present large fusion devices. For isotropic graphites with different properties, however, overall evaluations with respect to vacuum engineering properties, thermal-mechanical properties and interations with plasmas have not been performed systematically. In 1986, under the support of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the "Graphite Project Team" was organized. Fifteen institutions participated in this project and eighteen isotropic graphites supplied from seven graphite manufactures of Japan were studied as "common samples". From each company, both high- and low-density graphites were supplied since it was presumed that the vacuum engineering and thermal-mechanical properties depended on the density. During an approximately two years research period, we have obtained several interesting results on surface roughness, gas desorption, hydrogen permeation, failure due to heat load and fracture toughness. It was found that the vacuum engineering properties such as the surface area, the gas desorption and the hydrogen permeation depended significanly on the pore structure of the graphite. The surface area increased with the bulk density and the hydrogen permeation rate decreased with the bulk density. The gas desorption was very small for the graphite baked in vacuum. Treated in the same way, the amount of gas released from low-density graphite was smaller. The ash content of the graphite could be reduced to ppm levels by halogen gas treatment. The heat load experiments showed that most of the graphites failed at roughly the same heat load. The measured value of the fracture toughness was approximately the same. The change of the surface morphology by hydrogen ion irradiation and the desorption of trapped ions are also discussed.

  4. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Holt, W.H.; Mock, W., Jr.

    1980-07-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  5. Positron annihilation studies of moisture in graphite-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Holt, W. H.; Mock, W., Jr.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The positron lifetime technique of monitoring absorbed moisture is applied to several composites, including graphite/polymides which are candidates for high-temperature (over 260 C) applications. The experimental setup is a conventional fast-slow coincidence system wherein the positron lifetime is measured with respect to a reference time determined by the detection of a nuclear gamma ray emitted simultaneously with the positron. From the experiments, a rate of change of positron mean lifetime per unit mass of water can be determined for each type of specimen. Positron lifetime spectra are presented for a graphite/polyimide composite and for a pure polyimide.

  6. Graphite pseudomorphs after diamonds: An experimental study of graphite morphology and the role of H2O in the graphitisation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakov, Andrey V.; Zhimulev, Egor I.; Mikhailenko, Denis S.; Demin, Sergey P.; Kozmenko, Olga A.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at 1 atmosphere and 2.0-2.5 GPa over a range of temperatures of 1400-2100 °C have been carried out to investigate the diamond-to-graphite transformation in "dry" and "wet" systems. Internal and external morphologies of graphite pseudomorphs after diamonds were studied by Raman spectroscopy, reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In a "dry" system, the results show that at 2.0-2.5 GPa, graphite pseudomorphs preserve the finest details of external morphology of original diamond crystals, whereas at 1 atmosphere only the general outline of diamond crystals can be recognised on these pseudomorphs. In all experimental runs at P = 2.0-2.5 GPa under various temperatures, the growth of oriented graphite crystallites was observed only on the {111} diamond faces, while randomly oriented graphite crystals were observed on the {100} and especially {110} diamond faces. In a "wet" system, we were unable to reproduce graphite pseudomorphs after diamond. However, newly formed large graphite crystals were found on the partly dissolved diamonds. The diamond crystal form has been changed from that of a sharp octahedron to octahedron having rounded edges and corners. Flat-bottomed negatively oriented trigons were formed on the octahedral {111} faces. Large graphite crystals tend to be concentrated at {100} and {110} surfaces. Rare single euhedral graphite flakes occur on the {111} faces. Visible growth spirals on {001} faces of graphite crystals appear on all crystals. The {111} faces of diamond crystal are partly covered by translucent graphite coat. The diamond-to-graphite transformation in the "wet" system occurs via coupled dissolution-precipitation processes. All morphological features (e.g., negatively oriented trigons, rounded edges) described for partly dissolved diamonds are easily recognised. None of these features have been detected so far for partly graphitised metamorphic diamond crystals. Our results suggest that in geological

  7. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performancemore » was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.« less

  8. Quantum limit studies in single-crystal and pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Dillon, R. O.; Spain, I. L.

    1974-01-01

    The occupied regions of momentum space in graphite are confined to very elongated volumes near the hexagonal Brillouin zone edges. The elongation is along the hexagonal axis (c axis) so that cross-sectional areas perpendicular to that axis are very small. Hence, when magnetic fields are applied parallel to the c axis only the n = 0 Landau levels remain below the Fermi energy for fields above 7 T (Woollam, 1971). The energy bands in graphite can be described by a set of seven parameters (McClure, 1971) (including the Fermi energy as a parameter). In a quantizing magnetic field the Landau levels are described by a secular equation determined by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian (McClure, 1960). A major unusual feature for the levels along the Brillouin zone edge is that the n = 0 Landau level for electrons is independent of magnetic field, while that for holes is field dependent.

  9. Quantum limit studies in single crystal and pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Sellmyer, D. J.; Dillon, R. O.; Spain, I. L.

    1972-01-01

    The occupied regions of momentum space in graphite are confined to elongated volumes near the hexagonal Brillouin zone edges. The elongation is along the hexagonal axis (c-axis), so that cross sectional areas perpendicular to that axis are very small. When magnetic fields are applied parallel to the c-axis, only the n = 0 Landau levels remain below the Fermi energy for fields above 7 tesla. The energy bands in graphite can be described by a set of seven parameters (including the Fermi energy as a parameter). In a quantizing magnetic field the Landau levels are described by a secular equation determined by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian. A major feature for the levels along the Brillouin zone edge is that the n = 0 Landau level for electrons is independent of magnetic field, while that for holes is field-dependent.

  10. First-principles study of Se-intercalated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    BARTKOWIAK,M.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; SOFO,J.O.; MAHAN,G.D.

    2000-05-11

    Se-intercalated graphite compounds (Se-GICs) are considered as promising candidates for room-temperature thermoelectric cooling devices. Here the authors analyze the crystallographic structure and electronic properties of these materials within the framework of density-functional theory. First, the Adaptive-Coordinate Real-space Electronic Structure (ACRES) code is used to determine the stable structure of a representative stage-2 Se-GIC by relaxing atomic positions. The stable configuration is found to be a pendant-type structure, in which each selenium is bonded covalently to two atoms within the same carbon layer, causing a local distortion of the in-plane conjugation of the graphite. Then, they use the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to calculate the electronic band structure of the material and discuss its properties. Near the Fermi energy E{sub F}, there are wide bands originating from the host graphitic electronic structure and a few very narrow bands mainly of Se 4p character. The latter bands contribute to high peaks in the density of states close to E{sub F}. They show that this feature, although typical of many good thermoelectrics, does not necessarily imply high thermopower in the case of Se-GICs.

  11. Study of poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) as binder for graphite anode and LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. S.; Jow, T. R.

    We evaluated poly(acrylonitrile-methyl methacrylate) (AMMA, AN/MMA=94:6) as a binder for the graphite anode and the LiMn 2O 4 cathode of Li-ion batteries by studying the cycling performance of lithium half-cells. The results showed that, using AMMA binder, both graphite and LiMn 2O 4 could be cycled well in 1 m LiPF 6 3:3:4 (weight) PC/EC/EMC electrolyte with less capacity fading. AMMA is chemically more stable than poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) against the lithiated graphite. More importantly, AMMA can help graphite to form a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) film. An impedance study showed that the SEI film formed with AMMA is more stable than the one formed with PVDF. Therefore, self-delithiation of the lithiated graphite can be reduced by use of AMMA instead of PVDF, which improves the storage performance of Li-ion batteries.

  12. Parametric study of graphite foam fins and application in heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Michael

    This thesis focuses on the simulation and experimental studies of finned graphite foam extended surfaces to test their heat transfer characteristics and potential applications in condensers. Different fin designs were developed to conduct a parametric study on the thermal effectiveness with respect to thickness, spacing and fin offset angle. Each fin design was computationally simulated to estimate the heat transfer under specific conditions. The simulations showed that this optimal fin configuration could conduct more than 297% the amount of thermal energy as compared to straight aluminum fins. Graphite foam fins were then implemented into a simulation of the condenser system. The condenser was simulated with six different orientations of baffles to examine the incoming vapor and resulting two-phase flow patterns. The simulations showed that using both horizontal and vertical baffling provided the configuration with the highest heat transfer and minimized the bypass regions where the vapor would circumvent the graphite foam. This baffle configuration increased the amount of vapor flow through the inner graphite fins and cold water pipes, which gave this configuration the highest heat transfer. The results from experimental tests using the condenser system confirmed that using three baffles will increase performance consistent with the simulation results. The experimental data showed that the condenser using graphite foam had five times the heat transfer compared to the condenser using only aluminum fins. Incorporating baffles into the condenser using graphite foam enabled this system to conduct nearly ten times more heat transfer than the condenser system which only had aluminum fins without baffles. The results from this research indicate that graphite foam is a far superior material heat transfer enhancement material for heat transfer compared to aluminum used as an extended surface. The longitudinal and horizontal baffles incorporated into the condenser system

  13. Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K.

    2013-06-12

    Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a {sup 233}U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

  14. Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a 233U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

  15. Nonlinear optical studies of polymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R. |

    1993-11-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical processes can be used as effective surface probes. They can provide some unique opportunities for studies of polymer interfaces. Here the author describes two examples to illustrate the potential of the techniques. One is on the formation of metal/polymer interfaces. The other is on the alignment of liquid crystal films by mechanically rubbed polymer surfaces.

  16. Electronically induced structure transformations in graphite & silver, studied using ultrafast electron crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Ramani K.

    photoexcited graphite surface. It is shown that such photoemission plays a minor role in the refraction shifts observed in the UEC study and a sub-surface dipole field is sufficient to explain the structural and charge relaxations observed. Investigations utilizing scanning electron microscope imaging of structures generated from laser ablation of graphite reveals the creation of geometrically faceted crystalline features, whose Raman spectrum exhibit sp3 like characteristics, though unambiguous identification of diamond structures generated requires further study. In the case of silver nanocrystals (Ag NC), photoexcitation near the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is observed to lead to fragmentation at fluences below their melting threshold. By isolating each NC from other neighboring NCs in a surface supported geometry, the normally irreversible process becomes reversible and amenable to multi-shot pump-probe diffraction investigations just below the fragmentation threshold. Transient structural, thermal and Coulombic signatures of the pre-fragmented state are extracted from the UEC investigation and combined with a progressive Reverse Monte-Carlo structure refinement scheme to visualize the atomic dynamics leading up to the fragmentation. Such multi-faceted analysis reveals the fragmentation to proceed through the creation and growth of undercoordinated defect sites along which the lattice is weakened. These defects are likely seeded by the strong coupling between SPR dephasing pathways and inter-band transitions that can lead to bond-softening effects and local valence instabilities. The creation of sufficient number of such defect sites at elevated fluences are believed to lead to the eventual fragmentation of the entire NC. This thesis also details the design and principle of UEC systems employed in a surface probing geometry for the study of nanostructures and interfaces.

  17. Structural efficiency study of graphite-epoxy aircraft rib structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gary D.; Gurdal, Zafer; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Attention is given to the structural efficiencies obtainable with optimally designed graphite/epoxy wing rib panel configurations that are potentially economically manufacturable. Some ribs are commonly used as fuel cell closeout panels, and are accordingly subjected to out-of-plane pressure loads in addition to the in-plane axial compressive and shear loads resulting from the wing loading. The present minimum-weight panel designs satisfy buckling and strength constraints for wing rib panels subjected to a wide range of combined load conditions.

  18. Further studies of the interaction of hydrogen with graphite nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C.; Anderson, P.E.; Chambers, A.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Rodriguez, N.M.

    1999-12-02

    Catalytically grown graphite nanofibers (GNF) are molecularly engineered structures that are produced by the interaction of carbon-containing gases with small metal particles at temperatures around 600 C. The fibrous solids consist of minuscule graphene sheets stacked at various angles with respect to the fiber axis. This arrangement generates a material possessing unique chemical properties because unlike conventional graphite crystals, only edges are exposed. Such a conformation produces a material composed entirely of nanopores that can accommodate small-sized adsorbate molecules, such as hydrogen, in the most efficient manner. In addition, the nonrigid pore walls can expand to accommodate the gas in a multilayer conformation. GNF exhibit extraordinary behavior toward the sorption and retention of hydrogen at high pressures and abnormally high temperatures. In this paper the authors discuss some of the critical factors involved in the adsorption of molecular hydrogen and the influence that this process exerts on the structural characteristics of the material. In addition, the deleterious effect of water vapor on the performance of the GNF is highlighted.

  19. High temperature ceramic interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monolithic SiC and Si3N4 are susceptible to contact stress damage at static and sliding interfaces. Transformation-toughened zirconia (TTZ) was evaluated under sliding contact conditions to determine if the higher material fracture toughness would reduce the susceptibility to contact stress damage. Contact stress tests were conducted on four commercially available TTZ materials at normal loads ranging from 0.455 to 22.7 kg (1 to 50 pounds) at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1204C (2200 F). Static and dynamic friction were measured as a function of temperature. Flexural strength measurements after these tests determined that the contact stress exposure did not reduce the strength of TTZ at contact loads of 0.455, 4.55, and 11.3 kg (1, 10, and 25 pounds). Prior testing with the lower toughness SiC and Si3N4 materials resulted in a substantial strength reduction at loads of only 4.55 and 11.3 kg (10 and 25 pounds). An increase in material toughness appears to improve ceramic material resistance to contact stress damage. Baseline material flexure strength was established and the stress rupture capability of TTZ was evaluated. Stress rupture tests determined that TTZ materials are susceptible to deformation due to creep and that aging of TTZ materials at elevated temperatures results in a reduction of material strength.

  20. A kinetic model based on experimental study of structural evolution of natural carbonaceous material to graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Yoshino, T.; Satish-Kumar, M.

    2015-12-01

    We report here new experimental kinetic data on the structural evolution of carbonaceous materials (CM) to graphite in a wide range of temperature conditions (1000 and 1450 °C) and treatment time (10 min to 115 hrs) under a pressure condition of 1GPa. The morphologies and crystallinities of natural CM, extracted from sediments in the Shimanto accretionary complex and Hidaka metamorphic belt, transformed to fully ordered graphite with increasing temperature and annealing duration. The time-temperature relations of each crystal parameter obtained using XRD analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy demonstrated sigmoidal transformations from amorphous to graphitic structure, suggesting the complexity of chemical reactions undergoing during graphitization. To assess these kinetic processes, the results were analyzed using a superposition method in which the crystal parameters were superposed to reference temperature with non-linear regression curves. The master curves fitted by sigmoidal and power functions exhibited very good correlation coefficients of 0.940 to 0.991, suggesting the Arrhenian relation between temperature and time. On the basis of master curves and shift values, we obtained the effective activation energies of 274 +/- 9 kJmol-1 and 339 +/- 6 kJmol-1 for two different natural CM. When compared with the previous studies, our data gave remarkably low activation energies for natural graphitization, which can be represented in a time-temperature relation. In addition, the sigmoidal functions obtained from time-temperature relations can be extrapolated for low temperature condition at 1GPa. Our kinetic model predicts that if the CM underwent metamorphism for about one million years, it begins to crystallize at ≈ 420 °C and transform to fully ordered graphite at over ≈ 510 °C. Thus, natural graphitization could be discussed by the laboratory experiments using natural precursor materials under realistic pressure condition and time span in the Earth's crust.

  1. Study on joining method for Graphite Epoxy tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Tasuku; Namba, Kazuroh

    Graphite/Epoxy (GE) tubes are commonly used to construct truss assemblies for spacecraft applications. One of the most important items for developing these tubes is the joining method. The joining of these tubes usually employs metallic end fittings which are adhesively bonded to tubes. These methods, however, are not suitable for joining GE tubes because of heavy weight on metallic end fittings. This paper describes the design, fabrication and evaluation of the whole GE tubes which are formed into screwthreads on the inner surface of the tube simultaneously. Three types of tubes with different fiber arrangement in the region of the screw are designed. 40-mm diameter tubes constituted of 290 GPa modulus fibers in epoxy prepreg are used to fabricate 600 mm length specimens. The specimens are tested to measure the tensile strength and stiffness. The maximum loads of specimens range from 120 kN to 240 kN by the difference in fiber arrangement.

  2. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  3. NANOSIMS, TEM, and XANES Studies of a Unique Presolar Supernova Graphite Grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groopman, Evan; Nittler, Larry R.; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst

    2014-07-01

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the nanocrystalline cores of HD graphite grains. We also report on X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements of G6. The complex isotopic- and micro-structure of G6 provides evidence for mixing and/or granular transport in SN ejecta.

  4. NanoSIMS, TEM, and XANES studies of a unique presolar supernova graphite grain

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, Evan; Bernatowicz, Thomas; Zinner, Ernst; Nittler, Larry R.

    2014-07-20

    We report on isotopic and microstructural investigations of a unique presolar supernova (SN) graphite grain, referred to as G6, isolated from the Orgueil CI chondrite. G6 contains complex heterogeneities in its isotopic composition and in its microstructure. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometer isotope images of ultramicrotome sections reveal heterogeneities in its C, N, and O isotopic compositions, including anomalous shell-like structures. Transmission electron microscope studies reveal a nanocrystalline core surrounded by a turbostratic graphite mantle, the first reported nanocrystalline core from a low-density SN graphite grain. Electron diffraction analysis shows that the nanocrystalline core consists of randomly oriented 2-4 nm graphene particles, similar to those in cores of high-density (HD) presolar graphite grains from asymptotic giant branch stars. G6's core also exhibits evidence for planar stacking of these graphene nano-sheets with a domain size up to 4.5 nm, which was unobserved in the nanocrystalline cores of HD graphite grains. We also report on X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements of G6. The complex isotopic- and micro-structure of G6 provides evidence for mixing and/or granular transport in SN ejecta.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic study on interfacial reaction and diamond graphitization of Cu—Fe-based diamond composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Hong-Feng; Chu, Ke; Wang, Shun-Cai; Liu, Yi; Li, Ya-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cu—Fe based diamond composites used for saw-blade segments are directly fabricated by vacuum and pressure-assisted sintering. The carbide forming elements Cr and Ti are added to improve interfacial bonding between diamond and the Cu—Fe matrix. The interfacial reactions between diamond/graphite and Cr or Ti, and diamond graphitization are investigated by thermodynamics/kinetics analyses and experimental methods. The results show that interfacial reactions and graphitization of diamond can automatically proceed thermodynamically. The Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and TiC are formed at the interfaces of composites by reactions between diamond and Cr or Ti; diamond graphitization does not occur because of the kinetic difficulty at 1093 K under the pressure of 13 MPa.

  6. A micrographic and gravimetric study of intercalation and deintercalation of graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Intercalation and deintercalation of Union Carbide P-100 graphite fibers with liquid and vaporous bromine was studied gravimetrically and microscopically. The mass of the bromine intercalated fibers was found to be 17 to 20 percent greater than their pristine counterpart. This variation decreased to 17 to 18 percent after heating in air for 3 days at 200 C and to 14.5 to 18 percent after 6 days of 260 C heating. The fiber length did not change throughout the experiment. The fiber diameter increased during intercalation and decreased slightly upon deintercalation but was not affected by heating to 260 C for 3 days in air. Comparing the mass and volume data to those with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite or natural single crystal graphite suggested the possibility that the intercalated P-100 fibers could be mostly stage 4.

  7. Bound and free self-interstitial defects in graphite and bilayer graphene: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Gulans, Andris; Puska, Martti J.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2011-07-01

    The role of self-interstitials in the response of layered carbon materials such as graphite, bilayer graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes to irradiation has long remained a puzzle. Using density-functional-theory methods with an exchange and correlation functional which takes into account the interlayer van der Waals interaction in these systems without any material-specific empirical parameters, we study the energetics and migration of single- and di-interstitials in graphite and bilayer graphene. We show that two classes of interstitials, ''bound'' and ''free,'' can coexist. The latter are mobile at room and lower temperatures, which explains the experimental data and reconciles them with the results of atomistic simulations. Our results shed light on the behavior of graphite and carbon nanotubes under irradiation and have implications for irradiation-mediated processing of bilayer graphene.

  8. NMR studies of the conformation and motion of tetrahydrofuran in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Caplan, D. F.

    1991-11-01

    The behavior of tetrahydrofuran (THF) molecules intercalated in graphite layers in compounds Cs(THF){sub 1.3}C{sub 24} and K(THF){sub 2.5}C{sub 24} was studied by proton NMR. The graphite layers in these compounds impose a uniform ordering on the THF molecules, giving rise to sharp NMR spectra. Experimental and simulated proton NMR spectra were used to investigate geometry, orientation and conformation of intercalated THF, and to determine whether pseudorotation, a large amplitude low-frequency vibration observed in gaseous THF, can also occur in the constrained environment provided by the graphite intercalation compounds. Deuterium and multiple quantum proton NMR spectra were also simulated in order to determine if these techniques could further refine the proton NMR results.

  9. a Study on the Thermal Vibration Analysis of the Graphite Disk Under Thermal Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Shin; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Duck-Hoi; Ku, Seong-Hoi; Moon, Soon-Il

    Graphite is applied to structural material of the high temperature reactor and nozzle of high energy rocket engine. The excessive vibration and stress field can be occurred for this material due to the severe thermal condition. In this study, the thermal stress and vibration characteristics of ATJ graphite under high temperature condition are investigated by finite element analysis (FEA). The specimen is designed as a disk shape in order to simulate the rocket nozzle combustion condition. The experiment of thermal heat is also conducted using by CO2 laser.

  10. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  11. Solar thermochemical process interface study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The design and analyses of a subsystem of a hydrogen production process are described. The process is based on solar driven thermochemical reactions. The subject subsystem receives sulfuric acid of 60% concentration at 100 C, 1 atm pressure. The acid is further concentrated, vaporized, and decomposed (at a rate of 122 g moles/sec H2SO4) into SO2, O2, and water. The produce stream is cooled to 100 C. Three subsystem options, each being driven by direct solar energy, were designed and analyzed. The results are compared with a prior study case in which solar energy was provided indirectly through a helium loop.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of graphitic materials and interfacial interactions in carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Hema L.

    This dissertation involves the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) study of the chemistry associated with carbon fiber-reinforced composites fabricated using PAN-based carbon fibers and a thermoplastic polyimide resin. The mechanical properties of the ultimate composite are significantly affected by the nature of the fiber/matrix interface. Interfacial interaction can be promoted by the electrochemical modification of the fiber surface. The determination of carbon fiber microstructure was conducted through angle-resolved valence band photoemission studies of highly ordered graphite. The change in orientation of the basal planes and reactive edge sites with take-off angle provided a method for the determination of surface microstructure. The electronic structure of solid-state graphite was described using a band structure model and the results obtained were compared with the multiple scattered wave X a calculations. PAN-based fibers were electrochemically oxidized and studied using monochromatic X-radiation. The extremely narrow natural linewidth of the monochromatized Al K a radiation allowed previously unresolved features to be seen. In addition, sample decomposition due to radiative heat from the X-ray source is eliminated. Fibers that were pretreated by the manufacturer were subjected to further electrochemical oxidation. The fibers behaved in an erratic and non-reproducible manner. The surface treatment was removed by heating the fibers in vacuum, followed by XPS analysis and electrochemical oxidation. The fiber/matrix interface was simulated by coating a very thin layer of the polyimide resin on the surface of the fiber followed by XPS analysis. The validity of a proposed structure for the resin was confirmed by comparison with ab initio calculations conducted on the resin repeat unit. A high level of fiber/matrix interaction was observed for electrochemically oxidized fibers. The possibility of solvent interaction with the fiber surface was eliminated by

  13. Mössbauer Study of Graphite-Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorescu, Monica; Trotta, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Graphite-doped hematite and magnetite nanoparticles systems (~50 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical activation for milling times ranging from 2 to 12 hours. Their structural and magnetic properties were studied by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The spectra corresponding to the hematite milled samples were analyzed by considering two sextets, corresponding to the incorporation of carbon atoms into the iron oxide structure. For ball-milling time of 12 hours a quadrupole split doublet has been added, representing the contribution of ultrafine particles. The Mössbauer spectra of graphite-doped magnetite were resolved considering a sextet and a magnetic hyperfine field distribution, corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sublattices of magnetite, respectively. A quadrupole split doublet was incorporated in the fitting of the 12-hour milled sample. The recoilless fraction for all samples was determined using our previously developed dual absorber method. It was found that the recoilless fraction of the graphite-doped hematite nanoparticles decreases as function of ball-milling time. The f factor of graphite-containing magnetite nanoparticles for the tetrahedral sites stays constant, while that of the octahedral sublattice decreases as function of ball-milling time. These findings reinforce the idea that carbon atoms exhibit preference for the octahedral sites of magnetite.

  14. A molecular dynamics study of diamond and graphite under tritium bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, A. R.; Duffy, D. M.

    2011-11-15

    Carbon has proven to be a promising plasma facing material in tokamak reactors because of its high thermal conductivity and limited radiative cooling as a plasma contaminant. It is used in a range of forms, mostly graphitic or amorphous. Diamond, however, has superior thermal properties to other forms of carbon but has been largely overlooked due to fears of graphitisation. Tritium retention is, perhaps, the major disadvantage of using carbon as a plasma facing material in a deuterium-tritium fusion reactor. Here, we use molecular dynamics to study the relative performance of diamond and graphite on exposure to tritium bombardment. We model the cumulative bombarded of diamond and graphitic surfaces with a high flux (10{sup 29} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) of low energy 15 eV tritium atoms. This was done for substrate temperatures in the range 300-2100 K. Below temperatures of graphitisation ({approx}1000 K) the diamond structure confined tritium to the upper surface, this inhibited further structural damage and resulted in lower total retention. The graphitic surface allowed for deeper tritium penetration and therefore greater retention. These results corroborate with recent experimental evidence.

  15. A study of the structural efficiency of fluted core graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1990-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded graphite-epoxy sandwich panels with fluted cores is studied to determine their weight saving potential. Graphite-epoxy equilateral triangular elements are used to construct the fluted cores for the sandwich panels. Two panel configurations are considered. One configuration has two layers of triangular elements in the fluted core and the second configuration has only one layer of triangular elements in the core. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight design for each panel configuration. Laminate ply orientations are limited to approx. 45, 0, and 90 deg. A constraint on the axial stiffness is included in the design process so the panel will conform to typical constraints for aircraft wing structures. Minimum thickness requirements for each laminate and maximum allowable strains are also included. A comparison is made of the calculated structural efficiency of the fluted core panels to the structural efficiency of aluminum transport aircraft structures and simple blade-stiffened graphite-epoxy panels. Limited experimental results are also included for comparison with the analytical predictions and to identify the critical failure mechanisms of graphite-epoxy fluted-core sandwich panels.

  16. Gas Gun Studies of Interface Wear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Tyler; Kennedy, Greg; Thadhani, Naresh

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of interface wear were studied by performing gas gun experiments at velocities up to 1 km/s. The approach involved developing coefficients of constitutive strength models for Al 6061 and OFHC-Cu, then using those to design die geometry for interface wear gas gun experiments. Taylor rod-on-anvil impact experiments were performed to obtain coefficients of the Johnson-Cook constitutive strength model by correlating experimentally obtained deformed states of impacted samples with those predicted using ANSYS AUTODYN hydrocode. Simulations were used with validated strength models to design geometry involving acceleration of Al rods through a copper concentric cylindrical angular extrusion die. Experiments were conducted using 7.62 mm and 80 mm diameter gas guns. Differences in the microstructure of the interface layer and microhardness values illustrate that stress-strain conditions produced during acceleration of Al through the hollow concentric copper die, at velocities less than 800 m/s, result in formation of a layer via solid state alloying due to severe plastic deformation, while higher velocities produce an interface layer consisting of melted and re-solidified aluminum.

  17. Orientation relationships in graphitic cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sooho; Phillips, D. S.

    1987-11-01

    Ferrite/graphite and martensite/graphite interfaces in three commercial cast irons have been analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. Two recurring orientation relationships have been found to account for over 60 pct of the ferrite/graphite interfaces analyzed. A similar pair of relationships discovered in martensitic material strongly suggests that the prior austenite/graphite interface was also ordered. The same relationships were prominent in gray and ductile irons. One of the relationships observed can be transformed through the Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship to a previously-reported austenite/graphite relationship.

  18. A vibrational spectroscopy study of the orientational ordering in CH 3 Cl monolayers physisorbed on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalezinski, R.; Bradshaw, A. M.; Knorr, K.

    1997-12-01

    Methylchloride physisorbed on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) has been investigated by infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). The results confirm the change in orientation of the molecules from flat to inclined between the two 2D crystalline monolayer phases and the up-down staggering in the inclined phase as suggested by previous diffraction studies. At lower coverages the molecules are found to be oriented perpendicular to the substrate, in disagreement with calculations for single, isolated molecules physisorbed on a smooth graphite surface. Measurements of the transient growth behaviour show that this latter state is long-lived and gives rise to complex growth laws. The results show that IRAS is a valuable tool for the study of physisorbed molecular layers.

  19. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Garah, M.; Santana Bonilla, A.; Ciesielski, A.; Gualandi, A.; Mengozzi, L.; Fiorani, A.; Iurlo, M.; Marcaccio, M.; Gutierrez, R.; Rapino, S.; Calvaresi, M.; Zerbetto, F.; Cuniberti, G.; Cozzi, P. G.; Paolucci, F.; Samorì, P.

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to

  20. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    PubMed

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices. PMID:27376633

  1. Trade study plan for Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document (with support from TA 1) describes the trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination For this most suitable configuration the structural attachment of the wing, and the most suitable GCPS composite materials for intertank, wing, tail and thrust structure are identified. This trade study analysis uses extensive information derived in the TA 1 trade study plan and is identified within the study plan. In view of this, for convenience, the TA 1 study plan is included as an appendix to this document.

  2. Two-Fluid Interface Instability Being Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The interface between two fluids of different density can experience instability when gravity acts normal to the surface. The relatively well known Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability results when the gravity is constant with a heavy fluid over a light fluid. An impulsive acceleration applied to the fluids results in the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. The RM instability occurs regardless of the relative orientation of the heavy and light fluids. In many systems, the passing of a shock wave through the interface provides the impulsive acceleration. Both the RT and RM instabilities result in mixing at the interface. These instabilities arise in a diverse array of circumstances, including supernovas, oceans, supersonic combustion, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The area with the greatest current interest in RT and RM instabilities is ICF, which is an attempt to produce fusion energy for nuclear reactors from BB-sized pellets of deuterium and tritium. In the ICF experiments conducted so far, RM and RT instabilities have prevented the generation of net-positive energy. The $4 billion National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed to study these instabilities and to attempt to achieve net-positive yield in an ICF experiment.

  3. Feasibility Study of Graphite Epoxy Antenna for a Microwave Limb Sounder Radiometer (MLSR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented of a feasibility study to design graphite epoxy antenna reflectors for a jet propulsion laboratory microwave limb sounder instrument (MLSR). Two general configurations of the offset elliptic parabolic reflectors are presented that will meet the requirements on geometry and reflector accuracy. The designs consist of sandwich construction for the primary reflectors, secondary reflector support structure and cross-tie members between reflector pairs. Graphite epoxy materials of 3 and 6 plies are used in the facesheets of the sandwich. An aluminum honeycomb is used for the core. A built-in adjustment system is proposed to reduce surface distortions during assembly. The manufacturing and environmental effects are expected to result in surface distortions less than .0015 inch and pointing errors less than .002 degree.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of catalyzed aluminum carbide formation at aluminum-carbon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabenberg, L.; Maruyama, Benji

    1990-01-01

    Aluminum carbide may form at aluminum-graphite interfaces during the high-temperature processing of graphite fiber-reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites. The chemical interactions leading to the formation of the aluminum carbide in the solid state involve the breaking of the carbon-carbon bonds within the graphite, the transport of the carbon atoms across the interface, and the reaction with the aluminum to form Al4C3. The aluminum carbide formation process has been followed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of model, thin-film, reaction couples. The overall reaction is shown to be catalyzed by the presence of water vapor. Water at the interface increases reaction kinetics by apparently weakening the bonds between the surface carbon atoms and their substrate. This result is in general agreement with what is known to occur during the oxidation of graphite in air.

  5. Discrete polygonal supramolecular architectures of isocytosine-based Pt(ii) complexes at the solution/graphite interface.

    PubMed

    El Garah, Mohamed; Sinn, Stephan; Dianat, Arezoo; Santana-Bonilla, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Rafael; De Cola, Luisa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-25

    Polygonal supramolecular architectures of a Pt(ii) complex including trimers, tetramers, pentamers and hexamers were self-assembled via hydrogen bonding between isocytosine moieties; their structure at the solid/liquid interface was unravelled by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy imaging. Density functional theory calculations provided in-depth insight into the thermodynamics of their formation by exploring the different energy contributions attributed to the molecular self-assembly and adsorption processes. PMID:27561126

  6. Fluorosulfates of graphite and boron nitride and other high oxidation state studies

    SciTech Connect

    Biagioni, R.N.

    1980-10-01

    The adduct XeF/sub 2/.AsF/sub 5/ was re-examined and assessed to be intermediate between the salt formulation (FXe)/sup +/AsF/sub 6//sup -/ and the fluorine bridged molecular adduct. A series of graphite fluorosulfates were prepared, using as the oxidizing agent S/sub 2/O/sub 6/F/sub 2/, and the effects of incorporating varying amounts of fluorosulfonic acid were studied. Physical data indicated that the S/sub 2/O/sub 6/F/sub 2/ was incorported as SO/sub 3/F/sup -/, and the HSO/sub 3/F was bound tightly, probably due to hydrogen bonding. The c-spacings of HSO/sub 3/F containing materials were larger than those of acid free materials, and the influences of charging, guest size and guest orientation were examined. X-ray diffractometer studies of graphite slabs intercalated with SO/sub 3/F/HSO/sub 3/F and IrF/sub 6/ indicated structures consistent with the characterization of these materials as containing tetrahedral SO/sub 3/F and octahedral IrF/sub 6/. Boron nitride reacted with S/sub 2/O/sub 6/F/sub 2/ to yield a deep blue, conducting intercalation compound. This material was in many respects similar to its graphite analog, but chemically more labile.

  7. Studies of dielectrics on graphite and large-area graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkle, Adam R.

    Graphene is a promising material as an alternative to Si in future logic devices due to extremely high carrier mobility and other attractive physical and electronic properties. While the exact structure of commercially viable graphene-based device architectures is not yet clear, adoption of graphene in such an architecture will certainly require the deposition of scaled dielectrics. Numerous challenges arise, many due to the surface chemistry of graphene which is dramatically different from that of bulk semiconductors due to the absence of bonding states resulting from the two-dimensional nature of sp2 C-C bonds in graphene. The low surface reactivity means that application of conventional dielectric deposition processes generally results in poor, non-uniform nucleation, hindering dielectric scaling below thicknesses of 20-50 nm. This dissertation focuses on studies of the graphene surface and potential routes to scalable dielectric deposition by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD). The role of initial surface condition and cleanliness is considered, and several approaches for the formation of dielectric nucleation layers are studied. Several physical and electrical techniques are employed including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrical characterization of graphene FETs and capacitors. Additionally, the lack of commercial availability of high quality large-area graphene samples required for these dielectric studies led to the development of in-house capability for CVD growth of graphene on copper substrates and transfer to insulating substrates. Studies of this growth and transfer process are presented.

  8. AFM and STM studies of the carbonization and graphitization of polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, B.; Roux, J.-C.; Flandrois, S.; Daulan, C.; Saadaoui, H.

    1993-11-01

    Kapton polyimide and high-modulus polyimide (PPT) films were carbonized and graphitized at various temperatures from 600 to 3000 °C. Their surface was studied by atomic-force microscopy and/or by scanning tunneling microscopy in order to follow the modification of the large-scale morphology and the atomic structure as a function of the heat-treatment temperature (HTT). On the pristine Kapton films, the local order of the molecules is brought to the fore. With increasing HTT (600 to 1000 °C) the structure becomes more disordered while at larger scale a bumpy morphology appears. During graphitization, the bumpy morphology gradually disappears and is replaced by graphitized terraces whose size increases with HTT. At atomic scale, it is shown that the graphene layers progressively grow for HTT higher than 1800 °C. On the films treated between 1800 and 2400 °C, graphene layers containing point defects are imaged and (√3 × √3 )R 30° superstructures are observed near large defects. On the samples treated at 2400 and 2600 °C, moiré patterns are observed and are attributed to stacking faults (turbostratic structure).

  9. Analysis of solid electrolyte interface formation reaction and surface deposit of natural graphite negative electrode employing polyacrylic acid as a binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ui, Koichi; Fujii, Daisuke; Niwata, Yuki; Karouji, Tomohiro; Shibata, Yu; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Shimada, Kazuaki; Kumagai, Naoaki

    2014-02-01

    We analyzed the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formation reaction and surface deposit of a natural graphite (NG-3) electrode employing polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a binder in an ethylene carbonate-based electrolyte because it was reported that the initial charge-discharge characteristics of the NG-3 electrode were improved by employing the PAA binder. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) as a binder was used for comparison. We investigated the influence of the binder types on the coating of the NG-3 particles using the B.E.T. specific surface areas. The difference in the above phenomenon was explained by the relationship between the B.E.T. specific surface area and the irreversible capacity. The surface chemical composition of the NG-3 electrode was investigated by FE-SEM/EDX and XPS and then the difference between the PAA binder and the PVdF binder was discussed. The FE-SEM/EDX and the XPS results showed that the amount of the inorganic components of the SEI was relatively small in the case of the PAA binder NG-3 electrode. The AC impedance results showed that the SEI film resistance of the PAA binder NG-3 electrode was lower at 0.2 V. It was clarified that the binder types affected the coating state, the SEI formation reaction, and the SEI film composition.

  10. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  11. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C.; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J.; Evans, J. W.; Thiel, P. A.

    2014-11-05

    In this study, we observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  12. Determining whether metals nucleate homogeneously on graphite: A case study with copper

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Han, Yong; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Shao, Dahai; Kwolek, Emma J; Evans, J W; Thiel, P A

    2014-11-01

    We observe that Cu clusters grow on surface terraces of graphite as a result of physical vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. We show that the observation is incompatible with a variety of models incorporating homogeneous nucleation and calculations of atomic-scale energetics. An alternative explanation, ion-mediated heterogeneous nucleation, is proposed and validated, both with theory and experiment. This serves as a case study in identifying when and whether the simple, common observation of metal clusters on carbon-rich surfaces can be interpreted in terms of homogeneous nucleation. We describe a general approach for making system-specific and laboratory-specific predictions.

  13. Spectroscopic study of energetic helium-ion irradiation effects on nuclear graphite tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Wan; Lee, K. W.; Choi, D. M.; Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-02-01

    Helium ion-irradiation effects on the nuclear graphite tiles were studied in order to understand the structural modifications and damages that can be produced by fusion reaction in tokamaks. The surface morphological changes due to increasing dose of the irradiation were examined by the field-effect scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy elucidated the changes in the shallow surface bonding configurations caused by the energetic irradiation. Raman spectroscopy revealed the structural defects and diamond-like carbon sites that increased with increasing irradiation dose, and the average inter-defect distance was found from the Raman peak intensities as a function of the irradiation dose.

  14. GRAPHITE EXTRUSIONS

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, T.M.

    1959-01-20

    A new lubricant for graphite extrusion is described. In the past, graphite extrusion mixtures have bcen composed of coke or carbon black, together with a carbonaceous binder such as coal tar pitch, and a lubricant such as petrolatum or a colloidal suspension of graphite in glycerin or oil. Sinee sueh a lubricant is not soluble in, or compatible with the biiider liquid, such mixtures were difficult to extrude, and thc formed pieees lacked strength. This patent teaches tbe use of fatty acids as graphite extrusion lubricants and definite improvemcnts are realized thereby since the fatty acids are soluble in the binder liquid.

  15. Experimental study on the oxidation of nuclear graphite and development of an oxidation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung Soo; NO, Hee Cheon

    2006-02-01

    The present study investigates the graphite oxidation, which is one of the most serious problems during an air-ingress accident of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In our study, oxidation experiments have been performed for IG-110 graphite by gas analysis under the various temperatures and oxygen concentrations. As a result, the order of reaction ( n) and activation energy ( Ea) were estimated as 0.75 ± 0.146 and 218 ± 3.76 kJ/mol, respectively within a 95% confidence level. The CO/CO 2 ratios were also measured and compared with Aurthur's and Rossberg's correlations. Most of data lie between their predictions, but for better prediction, an empirical correlation was newly developed. We measured reaction rates and analyzed them with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation by incorporating the oxidation parameters and the CO/CO 2 ratio estimated here. Finally, an analytical model that includes both the chemical reaction and mass transfer was proposed and validated against experimental data.

  16. Study of conformation and dynamic of surfactant molecules in graphite oxide via NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, X. Q.; Ma, L. G.

    2016-08-01

    The conformation and dynamic of surfactant in graphite oxide (GO) was investigated by solid-state 13C magic-angle-spinning NMR and 1H-13C cross-polarization/magic-angle-spinning NMR spectra. The conformation ordering of the alkyl chains in the confined system shows strong dependence on its orientation. While the alkyl chains parallel to the GO layer in lateral monolayer arrangement are in gauche conformation in addition to a small amount of all-trans conformation, those with orientation radiating away from the GO in paraffin bilayer arrangement is in all-trans conformation in addition to some gauche conformation even though high-order diffraction peaks appears. NMR results suggest that the least mobile segment is located at the GO-surfactant interface corresponding to the N-methylene group. Further from it, the mobility of the alkyl chain increases. The terminal methyl and N-methyl carbon groups have the highest mobile. The chains in all-trans conformational state are characterized as more rigid than chains with gauche conformation; each segment of the confined alkyl chains with the lateral monolayer arrangement exhibits less mobility as compared to that with the paraffin bilayer arrangement.

  17. Analytical study of graphite-epoxy tube response to thermal loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, Tamara W.; Hyer, M. W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermally-induced stresses and deformations in graphite-epoxy tubes with aluminum foil bonded to both inner and outer surfaces, and to the outer surface only are computed. Tubes fabricated from three material systems, T300/934, P75s/934, and P75s/BP907, and having a 1 inch inner radius and a lamination sequence of (+15/0 + or - 10/0)sub s are studied. Radial, axial, and circumferential stresses in the various layers of the tube, in the foil, and in the adhesive bonding the foil to the tubes are computed using an elasticity solution. The results indicate that the coatings have no detrimental effect on the stress state in the tube, particularly those stresses that lead to microcracking. The addition of the aluminum foil does, however, significantly influence the axial expansion of the T300/934 tube, the tube with the softer graphite fibers. The addition of foil can change the sign of the axial coefficient of thermal expansion. Twist tendencies of the tubes are only slightly affected by the addition of the coatings, but are of second order compared to the axial response.

  18. Structural study and crystal chemistry of the first stage calcium graphite intercalation compound

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Nicolas; Herold, Claire . E-mail: Claire.Herold@lcsm.uhp-nancy.fr; Lagrange, Philippe

    2005-09-15

    A novel and efficient synthesis method concerning the preparation of the first stage calcium graphite intercalation compound is provided. It makes use of a reaction between liquid metallic alloy and pyrolytic graphite. From now on it is especially easy to obtain bulk CaC{sub 6} samples. Thanks to such samples, it was possible to study in detail the crystal structure of this binary intercalation compound. It has been entirely specified, so that we know that CaC{sub 6} crystal is rhombohedral and belongs to the R3-bar m space group with the following parameters: a=517pm and {alpha}=49.55 deg. The elemental unit cell contains one calcium atom and six carbon atoms. In this paper, we show also how the various MC{sub 6} structures evolve according to the size of the intercalated element and to the bond nature that appears in the final compound. CaC{sub 6} is unique, since all the other MC{sub 6} compounds exhibit a hexagonal symmetry.

  19. Dynamics explorer: Interface definition study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Work done in response to the work statement wherein a specific deliverable was not identified but where design and analysis tasks were identified is reported. The summary and baseline change list is included along with design notes for the spacecraft system, thermal subsystem, power subsystem, communications subsystem, plasma wave instrument interface definition, and the structure.

  20. Graphite-diamond phase coexistence study employing a neural-network mapping of the ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Eshet, Hagai; Kühne, Thomas D.; Behler, Jörg; Parrinello, Michele

    2010-03-01

    An interatomic potential for the diamond and graphite phases of carbon has been created using a neural-network (NN) representation of the ab initio potential energy surface. The NN potential combines the accuracy of a first-principles description of both phases with the efficiency of empirical force fields and allows one to perform a molecular-dynamics study, of ab initio quality, of the thermodynamics of graphite-diamond coexistence. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated coexistence curves is achieved if nuclear quantum effects are included in the simulation.

  1. A study of the deposition of carbide coatings on graphite fibers. [to increase electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suplinskas, R. J.; Henze, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of boron carbide and silicon carbide on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistance was studied. Silicon carbide coatings were applied without degradation of the mechanical properties of the filaments. These coatings typically added 1000 ohms to the resistance of a filament as measured between two mercury pools. When SiC-coated filaments were oxidized by refluxing in boiling phosphoric acid, average resistance increased by an additional 1000 ohms; in addition resistance increases as high as 150 K ohms and breakdown voltages as high as 17 volts were noted. Data on boron carbide coatings indicated that such coatings would not be effective in increasing resistance, and would degrade the mechanical properties.

  2. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  3. Comparative Study of Atomic Force Imaging of DNA on Graphite and Mica Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinov, Dmitry; Dwir, Benjamin; Kapon, Eli; Borovok, Natalia; Molotsky, Tatiana; Kotlyar, Alexander

    2006-09-01

    Various DNA-based structures (single-, double-, triple-stranded and quadruplex-DNA) were characterized using non-contact atomic-force microscopy on two substrates: modified highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and mica. Deposition on mica, a conventional substrate used in studies of bio-molecules, results in strong deformation of all above types of molecules while deposition on modified HOPG affects the morphology of DNA much less compared to mica. This is demonstrated by a larger measured height of the DNA molecules deposited on HOPG, as compared to mica, and an increased flexibility of the molecules, evidenced by a shorter molecular end-to-end distance on HOPG. The estimated heights of the triplex and the quadruplex DNA measured on HOPG are similar to the diameter of these molecules in liquid. We thus conclude that modified HOPG is a substrate more suitable than mica for AFM characterization of DNA morphology.

  4. Electronic applications of flexible graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiangcheng; Chugh, Randy; Biller, Brian C.; Hoi, Yie Meng; Chung, D. D. L.

    2002-05-01

    Flexible graphite is effective for electronic applications, specifically electromagnetic interference (EMI) gasketing, resistive heating, thermoelectric-energy generation, and heat dissipation. It is comparable to or better than conductive-filled silicone materials for EMI gasketing. The shielding effectiveness reaches 125 dB. Flexible graphite as a heating element provides temperatures up to 980°C, response half-time down to 4 sec, and heat output at 60 sec up to 5600 J. The through-thickness, absolute thermoelectric power of flexible graphite is -2.6 µV/°C. Flexible graphite is effective as a thermal-interface material if the thickness is low (0.13 mm), the density is low (1.1 g/cm3), and the contact pressure is high (11.1 MPa). These applications make use of the flexibility and compliance of flexible graphite, in addition to its electronic and thermal behavior. Compliance is particularly important for the use of flexible graphite as interface materials, whether the interface is electrom agnetic, thermoelectric, or thermal.

  5. Disposal options for burner ash from spent graphite fuel. Final study report November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, A.P.

    1994-08-01

    Three major disposal alternatives are being considered for Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSVR) and Peach Bottom Reactor (PBR) spent fuels: direct disposal of packaged, intact spent fuel elements; (2) removal of compacts to separate fuel into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW); and (3) physical/chemical processing to reduce waste volumes and produce stable waste forms. For the third alternative, combustion of fuel matrix graphite and fuel particle carbon coatings is a preferred technique for head-end processing as well as for volume reduction and chemical pretreatment prior to final fixation, packaging, and disposal of radioactive residuals (fissile and fertile materials together with fission and activation products) in a final repository. This report presents the results of a scoping study of alternate means for processing and/or disposal of fissile-bearing particles and ash remaining after combustion of FSVR and PBR spent graphite fuels. Candidate spent fuel ash (SFA) waste forms in decreasing order of estimated technical feasibility include glass-ceramics (GCs), polycrystalline ceramic assemblages (PCAs), and homogeneous amorphous glass. Candidate SFA waste form production processes in increasing order of estimated effort and cost for implementation are: low-density GCs via fuel grinding and simultaneous combustion and waste form production in a slagging cyclone combustor (SCC); glass or low-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by conventional melting of SFA and frit; PCAs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) of SFA/frit mixtures; and high-density GCs via fluidized bed SFA production followed by HIPing of Calcine/Frit/SFA mixtures.

  6. Comparative study of van der Waals corrections to the bulk properties of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rêgo, Celso R. C.; Oliveira, Luiz N.; Tereshchuk, Polina; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    2015-10-01

    Graphite is a stack of honeycomb (graphene) layers bound together by nonlocal, long-range van der Waals (vdW) forces, which are poorly described by density functional theory (DFT) within local or semilocal exchange-correlation functionals. Several approximations have been proposed to add a vdW correction to the DFT total energies (Stefan Grimme (D2 and D3) with different damping functions (D3-BJ), Tkatchenko-Scheffler (TS) without and with self-consistent screening (TS  +  SCS) effects). Those corrections have remarkly improved the agreement between our results and experiment for the interlayer distance (from 3.8 to 0.1%) and high-level random-phase approximation (RPA) calculations for interlayer binding energy (from 56.2 to 0.6%). We report a systematic investigation of various structural, energetic and electron properties with the aforementioned vdW corrections followed by comparison with experimental and theoretical RPA data. Comparison between the resulting relative errors shows that the TS  +  SCS correction provides the best results; the other corrections yield significantly larger errors for at least one of the studied properties. If considerations of computational costs or convergence problems rule out the TS  +  SCS approach, we recommend the D3-BJ correction. Comparison between the computed {πz}Γ\\text{ } -splitting and experimental results shows disagreements of 10% or more with all vdW corrections. Even the computationally more expensive hybrid PBE0 has proved unable to improve the agreement with the measured splitting. Our results indicate that improvements of the exchange-correlation functionals beyond the vdW corrections are necessary to accurately describe the band structure of graphite.

  7. Micro-engineered cathode interface studies

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, R.; Kueper, T.; Nagy, Z.; Krumpelt, M.

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this work is to increase the performance of the cathode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at 1,000 C by decreasing the polarization resistance from 0.2 {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 300 mA/cm{sup 2}. Decreased polarization resistance will allow operation at higher current densities. This work is in support of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology using YSZ electrolyte and strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode. As a result of work performed last year at Argonne National Laboratory and information derived from the literature, the limitations at the cathode/electrolyte interface can be classified into two main areas. First, the ionic conductivity of the LSM cathode material is low which limits the reaction zone to an area very close to the interface, while the rest of the cathode thickness acts essentially as current collector with channels for gas access. Second, the electronic conductivity in YSZ is very low which limits the reaction zone to areas that are the boundaries between LSM and YSZ rather than the YSZ surface away from LSM at the interface. Possible solutions to this problem being pursued are: (1) introducing an ionic conducting YSZ phase in LSM to form a porous two-phase mixture of LSM and YSZ; (2) applying a thin interlayer between the electrolyte and the cathode where the interlayer has high ionic and electronic conductivity and high catalytic activity for reduction of O{sub 2}; (3) increasing the ionic conductivity in the LSM by suitable doping; and (4) increasing the electronic conductivity in the electrolyte by doping or by depositing an appropriate mixed conducting layer on the YSZ before applying the cathode.

  8. Electronic and total energy properties of ternary and quaternary semiconductor compounds, alloys, and superlattices: Theoretical study of Cu/graphite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambrecht, Walter R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The goals of the research were to provide a fundamental science basis for why the bonding of Cu to graphite is weak, to critically evaluate the previous analysis of the wetting studies with particular regard to the values used for the surface energies of Cu and graphite, and to make recommendations for future experiments or other studies which could advance the understanding and solution of this technological problem. First principles electronic structure calculations were used to study the problem. These are based on density functional theory in the local density approximation and the use of the linear muffin-tin orbital band structure method. Calculations were performed for graphite monolayers, single crystal graphite with the hexagonal AB stacking, bulk Cu, Cu(111) surface, and Cu/graphite superlattices. The study is limited to the basal plane of graphite because this is the graphite plane exposed to Cu and graphite surface energies and combined with the measured contact angles to evaluate the experimental adhesion energy.

  9. DUSTS AND RESIDUES FROM MACHINING AND INCINERATING GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES. A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary laboratory experiments were carried out to obtain some information on the nature of potential carbon fiber emissions resulting from the machining and incineration of graphite/epoxy composites. Examination of residues by scanning electron microscopy following exposure ...

  10. Dye removal from textile industrial effluents by adsorption on exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Carvallho, Marilda N; da Silva, Karolyne S; Sales, Deivson C S; Freire, Eleonora M P L; Sobrinho, Maurício A M; Ghislandi, Marcos G

    2016-01-01

    The concept of physical adsorption was applied for the removal of direct and reactive blue textile dyes from industrial effluents. Commercial graphite nanoplatelets were used as substrate, and the quality of the material was characterized by atomic force and transmission electron microscopies. Dye/graphite nanoplatelets water solutions were prepared varying their pH and initial dye concentration. Exceptionally high values (beyond 100 mg/L) for adsorptive capacity of graphite nanoplatelets could be achieved without complicated chemical modifications, and equilibrium and kinetic experiments were performed. Our findings were compared with the state of the art, and compared with theoretical models. Agreement between them was satisfactory, and allowed us to propose novel considerations describing the interactions of the dyes and the graphene planar structure. The work highlights the important role of these interactions, which can govern the mobility of the dye molecules and the amount of layers that can be stacked on the graphite nanoplatelets surface. PMID:27148721

  11. First-principles study on the adsorption properties of phenylalanine on carbon graphitic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kwon, Dae-Gyeon; Park, Sora; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2015-12-01

    Using ab-initio density functional theory, we investigate the binding properties of phenylalanine, an amino acid, on graphitic carbon structures, such as graphene, nanotubes, and their modified structures. We focus especially on the effect of the adsorbate on the geometrical and the electronic structures of the absorbents. The phenylalanine molecule is found to bind weakly on pristine graphitic structures with a binding energy of 40-70 meV and not to change the electronic configuration of the graphitic structures, implying that the phenylalanine molecule may not be detected on pristine graphitic structures. On the other hand, the phenylalanine molecule exhibits a substantial increase in its binding energy up to ~2.60 eV on the magnesium-decorated boron-doped graphitic structures. We discover that the Fermi level of the system, which was shifted below the Dirac point of the graphitic structures due to p-doping by boron substitution, can be completely restored to the Dirac point because of the amino acid adsorption. This behavior implies that such modified structures can be utilized to detect phenylalanine molecules.

  12. Carbon isotope fractionation between calcite, graphite and CO2: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheele, Norbert; Hoefs, Jochen

    1992-10-01

    The partitioning of stable carbon isotopes between calcite, graphite and CO2 was experimentally determined at temperatures from 500 to 1200 °C and 1 to 15 kbar pressure. Attainment of carbon isotope equilibrium in CO2-calcite runs was proven by achieving the same fractionation from isotopically opposite directions. The resultant CO2-calcite fractionation curve for carbon differs from Bottinga's calculation by 1.2‰ and confirms recent experiments of Chacko et al. and Mattey et al. In CO2-graphite experiments equilibrium fractions were extrapolated by applying the partial-exchange technique of Northrop and Clayton and by optimizing the contribution of surface reaction in graphite. CO2-graphite fractionations at temperatures up to 800 °C are in fair agreement with Bottinga's calculation, but yield a surprisingly high fractionation of ≈5‰ at upper mantle temperatures. The combination of CO2-calcite (carbon) and CO2-graphite fractionation results in a new experimentally determined calcite-grapite fractionation curve, expressed by the equation: 410_2004_Article_BF00310954_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} 10^3 {text{ ln }}α _{{text{cc - gr}}} = 7.99 × 10^6 /T^2 - 9.58 × 10^3 / + 5.76 \\ {text{ (873 - 1473 Kelvin)}} \\ Applying the experimentally determined fractionation curve on graphite-bearing metacarbonates yields metamorphic temperatures distinctly higher than those obtained by Valley and O'Neil.

  13. Study of interaction between radioactive nuclides and graphite surface by the first-principles and statistic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaofeng; Fang, Chao; Li, Xin; Lai, Wensheng; Sun, Lifeng; Liang, Tongxiang

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption and desorption of four kinds of main radioactive productions (cesium, iodine, strontium and silver) on graphite surface in high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) have been studied. Using the first-principles density-functional theory, adsorptive geometry, energy and electron structure on the perfect and defective graphite surfaces have been calculated. It turns out that the adsorption of Cs, I and Sr atoms belongs to chemisorption while the adsorption of Ag is a pure physisorption. When introducing a vacancy in graphite surface, nuclide adatoms will be trapped by the vacancy and form chemical bonds with three nearest neighbor carbon atoms, leading to significant increase of the adsorption energy. In addition, a model of grand canonical ensemble is employed to deduce the adsorption rate as a function of temperature and partial pressure of nuclides produced. The transition temperate from adsorption to desorption of nuclides on graphite surface is defined as the inflexion point of the adsorption rate and its variation with nuclide density is obtained.

  14. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible. PMID:27343464

  15. A study of void effects on the interlaminar shear strength of unidirectional graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Frimpong, Stephen

    1990-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of voids on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of a polyimide matrix composite system. The graphite/PRM-15 composite was chosen for study because of the extensive amount of experience that has been amassed in the processing of this material. Composite densities and fiber contents of more than thirty different laminates were measured along with ILSS. Void contents were calculated and the void geometry and distribution were noted using microscopic techniques such as those used in metallography. It was found that there was a good empirical correlation between ILSS and composite density. The most acceptable relationship between the ILSS and density was found to be a power equation which closely resembles theoretically derived expressions. An increase in scatter in the strength data was observed as the void content increased. In laminates with low void content, the void appears to be more segregated in one area of the laminate. It was found that void free composites could be processed in matched metal die molds at pressures greater than 1.4 and less than 6.9 MPa.

  16. Spectroscopic study of graphene nanoribbons formed by crystallographic etching of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Yoshihiro; Kubo, Osamu; Omura, Ryosuke; Shigehara, Masaaki; Tabata, Hiroshi; Mori, Nobuya; Katayama, Mitsuhiro

    2014-09-01

    We report a scanning tunneling spectroscopy study systematically performed on graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with various widths and layer numbers. The GNRs are formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by crystallographic etching, as reported by Datta and co-workers [Nano Lett. 8, 1912 (2008)]. Regardless of the width and layer numbers, GNRs having zigzag edges exhibit a peak at the Fermi energy in their local density of states (LDOS) when measured near the edges, whereas no peak appears away from the edges. On the other hand, a depression of the LDOS emerges at the Fermi energy in the case of a GNR having armchair edges with no relation to the measured position in an identical GNR. The energy gap of the LDOS depression monotonically decreases with increasing GNR width, whereas there is no apparent dependence on the layer numbers. By comparison with the band structure calculated by a nearest-neighbor tight-binding method, it is suggested that the overlap of wave functions between the topmost layer and the underlayers is negligible, resulting in an LDOS similar to that on an isolated monolayer GNR even on an HOPG substrate. From the quantitative scaling of energy gaps (Egap) of LDOS depression with respect to GNR widths (W), the relation between the two is obtained as Egap = 1.9 [eV nm]/W.

  17. Laboratory simulation and modeling of size, shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boruah, Manash J.; Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the light scattering properties of size and shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is presented. The light scattering properties of dust particles of arbitrary shapes having sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm were computed using DDSCAT 7.3.0 software package and an indigenously developed post-processing tool for size and shape averaging. In order to model realistic samples of graphite dust and compute their light scattering properties using DDA, different target geometries were generated to represent the graphite particle composition in terms of surface smoothness, surface roughness and aggregation or their combination, for using as the target for DDSCAT calculations. A comparison of the theoretical volume scattering function at 543.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident wavelengths with laboratory simulation is also presented in this paper.

  18. Energy corrugation in atomic-scale friction on graphite revisited by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Qi, Yi-Zhou; Ouyang, Wengen; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Li, Qunyang

    2015-12-01

    Although atomic stick-slip friction has been extensively studied since its first demonstration on graphite, the physical understanding of this dissipation-dominated phenomenon is still very limited. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite surface. In contrast to the common wisdom, our MD results suggest that the energy barrier associated lateral sliding (known as energy corrugation) comes not only from interaction between the tip and the top layer of graphite but also from interactions among the deformed atomic layers of graphite. Due to the competition of these two subentries, friction on graphite can be tuned by controlling the relative adhesion of different interfaces. For relatively low tip-graphite adhesion, friction behaves normally and increases with increasing normal load. However, for relatively high tip-graphite adhesion, friction increases unusually with decreasing normal load leading to an effectively negative coefficient of friction, which is consistent with the recent experimental observations on chemically modified graphite. Our results provide a new insight into the physical origins of energy corrugation in atomic scale friction.

  19. Experimental study of interface properties between layer and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Ray T.; Nagy, Peter B.; Adler, Laszlo

    A meshed intervening layer technique which makes it possible to study the interface properties between layer and substrate is presented. It is argued that the bonding condition of the interface can be monitored through the variation of the phase velocity of the modified Rayleigh mode. The experimental setup of the measurement of the reflection of ultrasonic waves from a layered substrate specimen is shown, and the frequency spectra from three typical bonding cases - perfectly bonded, partially bonded, and completely misbonded - are illustrated.

  20. In situ scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the SEI formation on graphite electrodes for Li(+)-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Lukas; Martens, Slađana; Ma, Jiwei; Stimming, Ulrich; Schneider, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    The SEI-formation on graphitic electrodes operated as an Li(+)-ion battery anode in a standard 1 M LiPF6 EC/DMC (1 : 1) electrolyte has been studied in situ by EC-STM. Two different modes of in situ study were applied, one, which allowed to follow topographic and crystallographic changes (solvent cointercalation, graphite exfoliation, SEI precipitation on the HOPG basal plane) of the graphite electrode during SEI-formation, and the second, which gave an insight into the SEI precipitation on the HOPG basal plane in real time. From the in situ EC-STM studies, not only conclusions about the SEI-topography could be drawn, but also about the formation mechanism and the chemical composition, which strongly depend on the electrode potential. It was shown that above 1.0 V vs. Li/Li(+) the SEI-formation is still reversible, since the molecular structure of the solvent molecules remains intact during an initial reduction step. During further reduction, the molecular structures of the solvents are destructed, which causes the irreversible charge loss. The STM studies were completed by electrochemical methods, like cyclic voltammetry, the potentiostatic intermittent titration technique and charge/discharge tests of MCMB electrodes. PMID:27140292

  1. Study of GaAs-oxide interface by transient capacitance spectroscopy - Discrete energy interface states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Kazior, T. E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Interface states and bulk GaAs energy levels were simultaneously investigated in GaAs MOS structures prepared by anodic oxidation. These two types of energy levels were successfully distinguished by carrying out a comparative analysis of deep level transient capacitance spectra of the MOS structures and MS structures prepared on the same samples of epitaxially grown GaAs. The identification and study of the interface states and bulk levels was also performed by investigating the transient capacitance spectra as a function of the filling pulse magnitude. It was found that in the GaAs-anodic oxide interface there are states present with a discrete energy rather than with a continuous energy distribution. The value of the capture cross section of the interface states was found to be 10 to the 14th to 10 to the 15th/sq cm, which is more accurate than the extremely large values of 10 to the -8th to 10 to the -9th/sq cm reported on the basis of conductance measurements.

  2. High-temperature compatibility study of iridium (DOP-26 alloy) with graphite and plutonia

    SciTech Connect

    Axler, K.M.; Eash, D.T.

    1987-12-01

    This report outlines the materials compatibility tests conducted on DOP-26 iridium alloy and carbon. The carbon used was in the form of woven graphite as present in the impact shell used to encase plutonia in nuclear heat sources. In addition, compatibility tests of the DOP-26 alloy with plutonia are described. The reactivity observed in both systems is discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites - An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Results pertaining to graphite reinforced composites containing styrene-terminated oligomers as the matrix material are summarized. The processing parameters are determined and the properties of the resulting composite are evaluated. In terms of solvent impregnation techniques, CH2Cl2 is the preferred solvent due to its easy removal during the prepreg drying and consolidation steps.

  4. Physicochemical Characterization, and Relaxometry Studies of Micro-Graphite Oxide, Graphene Nanoplatelets, and Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Paratala, Bhavna S.; Jacobson, Barry D.; Kanakia, Shruti; Francis, Leonard Deepak; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    The chemistry of high-performance magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents remains an active area of research. In this work, we demonstrate that the potassium permanganate-based oxidative chemical procedures used to synthesize graphite oxide or graphene nanoparticles leads to the confinement (intercalation) of trace amounts of Mn2+ ions between the graphene sheets, and that these manganese intercalated graphitic and graphene structures show disparate structural, chemical and magnetic properties, and high relaxivity (up to 2 order) and distinctly different nuclear magnetic resonance dispersion profiles compared to paramagnetic chelate compounds. The results taken together with other published reports on confinement of paramagnetic metal ions within single-walled carbon nanotubes (a rolled up graphene sheet) show that confinement (encapsulation or intercalation) of paramagnetic metal ions within graphene sheets, and not the size, shape or architecture of the graphitic carbon particles is the key determinant for increasing relaxivity, and thus, identifies nano confinement of paramagnetic ions as novel general strategy to develop paramagnetic metal-ion graphitic-carbon complexes as high relaxivity MRI contrast agents. PMID:22685555

  5. Lifetime experimental study of graphite cathode for relativistic backward wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Chen, Changhua

    2016-07-01

    Graphite cathodes are widely used due to their good emission properties, especially their long lifetime. Some previous papers have researched their lifetime under certain conditions and uncovered some important phenomena. This paper is dedicated to research the lifetime of the graphite cathode under higher power. In the lifetime test, the voltage and current amplitudes are about 970 kV and 9.7 kA, respectively. The repetition rate is 20 Hz. An X-band relativistic backward wave oscillator is used to generate high power microwave by utilizing the electron beam energy. The experimental results demonstrate that the emission property of the graphite cathode remains quite stable during 105 pulses, despite some slight deteriorations regarding the beam and microwave parameters. The macroscopic morphology change of the cathode blade due to material evaporation is observed by a laser microscope. The mass loss of the graphite cathode is about 60 μg/C. Meanwhile, the observation by a scanning electron microscope uncovers that the original numerous flaky micro-structures are totally replaced by a relatively smooth surface at the mid region of the cathode blade and a large number of new micro-protrusions at the blade edges during the lifetime test.

  6. Experimental Study of the Effect of Graphite Dispersion on the Heat Transfer Phenomena in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Vaghetto, Rodolfo; Capone, Luigi; Hassan, Yassin A

    2011-05-31

    An experimental activity was performed to observe and study the effects of graphite dispersion and deposition on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). The small-scale RCCS experimental facility (16.5 x 16.5 x 30.4 cm) used for this activity represents half of the reactor cavity with an electrically heated vessel. Water flowing through five vertical pipes removes the heat produced in the vessel and releases it into the environment by mixing with cold water in a large tank. The particle image velocimetry technique was used to study the velocity field of the air inside the cavity. A set of 52 thermocouples was installed in the facility to monitor the temperature profiles of the vessel, pipe walls, and air. Ten grams of a fine graphite powder (average particle size 2 m) was injected into the cavity through a spraying nozzle placed at the bottom of the vessel. The temperatures and air velocity field were recorded and compared with the measurements obtained before the graphite dispersion, showing a decrease of the temperature surfaces that was related to an increase in their emissivity. The results contribute to the understanding of RCCS capability in an accident scenario.

  7. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and theoretical studies of 1-halohexane monolayers on graphite

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Thomas; Werblowsky, Tova L.; Florio, Gina M.; Berne, Bruce J.; Flynn, George W.

    2005-01-01

    A simple model system for the 2D self-assembly of functionalized organic molecules on surfaces was examined in a concerted experimental and theoretical effort. Monolayers of 1-halohexanes were formed through vapor deposition onto graphite surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum. Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy allowed the molecular conformation, orientation, and monolayer crystallographic parameters to be determined. Essentially identical noncommensurate monolayer structures were found for all 1-halohexanes, with differences in image contrast ascribed mainly to electronic factors. Energy minimizations and molecular dynamics simulations reproduced structural parameters of 1-bromohexane monolayers quantitatively. An analysis of interactions driving the self-assembly process revealed the crucial role played by small but anisotropic electrostatic forces associated with the halogen substituent. While alkyl chain dispersion interactions drive the formation of a close-packed adsorbate monolayer, electrostatic headgroup forces are found to compete successfully in the control of both the angle between lamella and backbone axes and the angle between surface and backbone planes. This competition is consistent with energetic tradeoffs apparent in adsorption energies measured in earlier temperature-programmed desorption studies. In accordance with the higher degree of disorder observed in scanning tunneling microscopy images of 1-fluorohexane, theoretical simulations show that electrostatic forces associated with the fluorine substituent are sufficiently strong to upset the delicate balance of interactions required for the formation of an ordered monolayer. The detailed dissection of the driving forces for self-assembly of these simple model systems is expected to aid in the understanding of the more complex self-assembly processes taking place in the presence of solvent. PMID:15758073

  8. Interlayer interactions in graphites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Tian, Fuyang; Persson, Clas; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Nan-xian

    2013-01-01

    Based on ab initio calculations of both the ABC- and AB-stacked graphites, interlayer potentials (i.e., graphene-graphene interaction) are obtained as a function of the interlayer spacing using a modified Möbius inversion method, and are used to calculate basic physical properties of graphite. Excellent consistency is observed between the calculated and experimental phonon dispersions of AB-stacked graphite, showing the validity of the interlayer potentials. More importantly, layer-related properties for nonideal structures (e.g., the exfoliation energy, cleave energy, stacking fault energy, surface energy, etc.) can be easily predicted from the interlayer potentials, which promise to be extremely efficient and helpful in studying van der Waals structures. PMID:24192753

  9. Interlayer interactions in graphites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaobin; Tian, Fuyang; Persson, Clas; Duan, Wenhui; Chen, Nan-Xian

    2013-11-01

    Based on ab initio calculations of both the ABC- and AB-stacked graphites, interlayer potentials (i.e., graphene-graphene interaction) are obtained as a function of the interlayer spacing using a modified Möbius inversion method, and are used to calculate basic physical properties of graphite. Excellent consistency is observed between the calculated and experimental phonon dispersions of AB-stacked graphite, showing the validity of the interlayer potentials. More importantly, layer-related properties for nonideal structures (e.g., the exfoliation energy, cleave energy, stacking fault energy, surface energy, etc.) can be easily predicted from the interlayer potentials, which promise to be extremely efficient and helpful in studying van der Waals structures.

  10. [Study on the determination of trace gallium in molybdenum-coated pyrolytic graphite tube by electrothermal absorption spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-an; Zhou, Fang-qin; Long, Si-hua; Yang, Liu

    2004-02-01

    The effects on gallium atomization in the pyrolytic graphite tube imposed by different matrix modifiers and different coatings were discussed detailedly in this paper. In the presence of matrix modifier of Ni(NO3)2 the matrix interference was eliminated efficiently. The pyrolytic graphite tubes were coated differently with lanthanum, zirconium, and molybdenum to avoid producing gallium carbide. Results showed that the tube with molybdenum coating was the best. On this basis, the mechanism of gallium atomization in the molybdenum-coated pyrolytic graphite tube using Ni(NO3)2 as a matrix modifier was studied furthermore; in addition, the parameters of the operation were optimized. As a result, a new method improved in many aspects was developed to detect trace gallium in complicated sample of gangue. The outcomes of practical applications indicated that the method could satisfy the requests of analysis and that the manipulations were simple to achieve. The characteristic content, the detection limit, and the adding recoveries were 2.12 x 10(-11) g, 1.4 x 10(-10) g and 97.4%-102.7% respectively, and the relative standard deviation was less than or equal to 3.6% (n = 11). PMID:15769028

  11. Combined study of the ground and unoccupied electronic states of graphite by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhenbao; Löffler, Stefan; Eder, Franz; Meyer, Jannik C.; Su, Dangsheng; Schattschneider, Peter

    2013-11-14

    Both the unoccupied and ground electronic states of graphite have been studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Electron energy-loss near-edge structures of the K-edge of carbon have been investigated in detail for scattering angles from 0 to 2.8 mrad. The π{sup *} and σ{sup *} components were separated. The angular and energy dependences of the π{sup *} and σ{sup *} structures were in fair agreement with theory. Electron energy loss Compton spectra of graphite were recorded at scattering angles from 45 to 68 mrad. One Compton scattering spectrum was obtained in 1 min compared with several hours or days using photons. The contributions of core electrons were calculated by the exact Hartree-Slater method in the Compton scattering region. The electron Compton profile for graphite is in good agreement with other conventional Compton profile measurements, as well as with theory, thus establishing the validity of the technique.

  12. Interfaces in polymer nanocomposites - An NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Ute; Scheler, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is applied for the investigation of polymer nanocomposites. Solid-state NMR is applied to study the modification steps to compatibilize layered double hydroxides with non-polar polymers. 1H relaxation NMR gives insight on the polymer dynamics over a wide range of correlation times. For the polymer chain dynamics the transverse relaxation time T2 is most suited. In this presentation we report on two applications of T2 measurements under external mechanical stress. In a low-field system relaxation NMR studies are performed in-situ under uniaxial stress. High-temperature experiments in a Couette cell permit the investigation of the polymer dynamics in the melt under shear flow.

  13. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  14. High speed hydrogen/graphite interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Hamman, R.; Sharma, O. P.; Harrje, D. T.

    1974-01-01

    Various aspects of a research program on high speed hydrogen/graphite interaction are presented. Major areas discussed are: (1) theoretical predictions of hydrogen/graphite erosion rates; (2) high temperature, nonequilibrium hydrogen flow in a nozzle; and (3) molecular beam studies of hydrogen/graphite erosion.

  15. Computer modelling studies of the bilayer/water interface.

    PubMed

    Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Baczynski, Krzysztof; Markiewicz, Michal; Murzyn, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    This review summarises high resolution studies on the interface of lamellar lipid bilayers composed of the most typical lipid molecules which constitute the lipid matrix of biomembranes. The presented results were obtained predominantly by computer modelling methods. Whenever possible, the results were compared with experimental results obtained for similar systems. The first and main section of the review is concerned with the bilayer-water interface and is divided into four subsections. The first describes the simplest case, where the interface consists only of lipid head groups and water molecules and focuses on interactions between the lipid heads and water molecules; the second describes the interface containing also mono- and divalent ions and concentrates on lipid-ion interactions; the third describes direct inter-lipid interactions. These three subsections are followed by a discussion on the network of direct and indirect inter-lipid interactions at the bilayer interface. The second section summarises recent computer simulation studies on the interactions of antibacterial membrane active compounds with various models of the bacterial outer membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26825705

  16. High Resolution Angle Resolved Photoemission Studies on Quasi-Particle Dynamics in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Leem, C.S.

    2010-06-02

    We obtained the spectral function of the graphite H point using high resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The extracted width of the spectral function (inverse of the photo-hole lifetime) near the H point is approximately proportional to the energy as expected from the linearly increasing density of states (DOS) near the Fermi energy. This is well accounted by our electron-phonon coupling theory considering the peculiar electronic DOS near the Fermi level. And we also investigated the temperature dependence of the peak widths both experimentally and theoretically. The upper bound for the electron-phonon coupling parameter is 0.23, nearly the same value as previously reported at the K point. Our analysis of temperature dependent ARPES data at K shows that the energy of phonon mode of graphite has much higher energy scale than 125K which is dominant in electron-phonon coupling.

  17. A study of the effect of selected material properties on the ablation performance of artificial graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Eighteen material properties were measured on 45 different, commercially available, artificial graphites. Ablation performance of these same graphites were also measured in a Mach 2 airstream at a stagnation pressure of 5.6 atm. Correlations were developed, where possible, between pairs of the material properties. Multiple regression equations were then formulated relating ablation performance to the various material properties, thus identifying those material properties having the strongest effect on ablation performance. These regression equations reveal that ablation performance in the present test environment depends primarily on maximum grain size, density, ash content, thermal conductivity, and mean pore radius. For optimization of ablation performance, grain size should be small, ash content low, density and thermal conductivity high, and mean pore radius large.

  18. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  19. On the way to fullerenes: Molecular dynamics study of the curling and closure of graphitic ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.H.; Brenner, D.W.; White, C.T.

    1992-07-23

    The short-time behavior of isolated graphitic ribbons is simulated at high temperature using a model hydrocarbon potential. These ribbons show large instantaneous deviations from planarity that often result in the formation of open-ended hollow carbon structures representing good fullerene precursors. While confirming the importance of pentagon formation in the production of these precursors, these results also point to the central role of relatively high temperatures in these processes. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  1. Electron Microscopy Studies of Solid Surfaces and Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    1991-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques for study of surfaces and interfaces have been investigated and applied to (100) and (111) surfaces of MgO and to interfaces of Mo/Si multilayers and CoSi_2/Si epitaxial films. MgO surfaces subjected to different annealing and chemical treatments have been characterized by reflection electron microscopy imaging, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). An oxygen rich (sqrt {3} times sqrt{3})R 30^circ reconstruction was found on the polar (111) surface upon annealing in oxygen at temperatures higher than 1500 ^circC. Transformation of the surface topography and segregation of calcium were observed on the cleaved (100) surface due to annealing. RHEED resonance conditions have been employed and studied with geometrical constructions, rocking curves and REELS. These conditions are associated with parabolas in the Kikuchi (K) patterns whose nature had been subject of much controversy. The parabolas have been explained as K lines of two-dimensional (2D) lattices in a general scheme which describes the K pattern geometry in terms of intersections of Brillouin zone boundaries with a sphere of reflections. Full treatment of the cases of 2D and 1D real lattices has revealed previously unknown boundaries in the form of parabolic surfaces (2D) and paraboloids of revolution (1D). These boundaries have been applied to lines which arise from electron channeling in 3D crystals and to RHEED parabolas from 2D surface reconstructions. Nanodiffraction, low angle dark-field imaging, electron holography, high spatial resolution EELS, and shadow imaging have been evaluated as means for measuring interface abruptness and change in mean-inner potential and compared to other microscopy techniques. Refraction effects at interfaces were observed as streaking of the nanodiffraction disks which was found to depend on the crystalline nature of the interface. For polycrystalline

  2. Comprehensive Study of High-Tc Interface Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Logvenov, G.; Gozar A.; Butko, V.Y.; Bollinger, A.T.; Bozovic, N.; Radovic, Z.; Bozovic, I.

    2010-08-01

    Using ALL-MBE technique, we have synthesized different heterostructures consisting of an insulator La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (I) and a metal La{sub 1.56}Sr{sub 0.44}CuO{sub 4} (M) layer neither of which is superconducting by itself. The M-I bilayers were superconducting with a critical temperature T{sub c} {approx} 30-36 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined within 1-2 nm from the interface and is primarily caused by the redistribution of doped holes across the interface. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study of the interface superconductivity by a range of experimental techniques including transport measurements of superconducting properties.

  3. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  4. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  5. Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite Enhanced Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardesty, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A thermally conductive composite material, a thermal transfer device made of the material, and a method for making the material are disclosed. Apertures or depressions are formed in aluminum or aluminum alloy. Plugs are formed of thermal pyrolytic graphite. An amount of silicon sufficient for liquid interface diffusion bonding is applied, for example by vapor deposition or use of aluminum silicon alloy foil. The plugs are inserted in the apertures or depressions. Bonding energy is applied, for example by applying pressure and heat using a hot isostatic press. The thermal pyrolytic graphite, aluminum or aluminum alloy and silicon form a eutectic alloy. As a result, the plugs are bonded into the apertures or depressions. The composite material can be machined to produce finished devices such as the thermal transfer device. Thermally conductive planes of the thermal pyrolytic graphite plugs may be aligned in parallel to present a thermal conduction path.

  6. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  7. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  8. Airborne Precision Spacing for Dependent Parallel Operations Interface Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Paul M.; Takallu, M. A.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Weiser, Jarold; Turner, Dexter

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a usability study of proposed cockpit interfaces to support Airborne Precision Spacing (APS) operations for aircraft performing dependent parallel approaches (DPA). NASA has proposed an airborne system called Pair Dependent Speed (PDS) which uses their Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes (ASTAR) algorithm to manage spacing intervals. Interface elements were designed to facilitate the input of APS-DPA spacing parameters to ASTAR, and to convey PDS system information to the crew deemed necessary and/or helpful to conduct the operation, including: target speed, guidance mode, target aircraft depiction, and spacing trend indication. In the study, subject pilots observed recorded simulations using the proposed interface elements in which the ownship managed assigned spacing intervals from two other arriving aircraft. Simulations were recorded using the Aircraft Simulation for Traffic Operations Research (ASTOR) platform, a medium-fidelity simulator based on a modern Boeing commercial glass cockpit. Various combinations of the interface elements were presented to subject pilots, and feedback was collected via structured questionnaires. The results of subject pilot evaluations show that the proposed design elements were acceptable, and that preferable combinations exist within this set of elements. The results also point to potential improvements to be considered for implementation in future experiments.

  9. Insights from the study of high-temperature interface superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, J; Bollinger, A T; Logvenov, G; Gozar, A; Panagopoulos, C; Bozović, I

    2012-10-28

    A brief overview is given of the studies of high-temperature interface superconductivity based on atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE). A number of difficult materials science and physics questions have been tackled, frequently at the expense of some technical tour de force, and sometimes even by introducing new techniques. ALL-MBE is especially suitable to address questions related to surface and interface physics. Using this technique, it has been demonstrated that high-temperature superconductivity can occur in a single copper oxide layer-the thinnest superconductor known. It has been shown that interface superconductivity in cuprates is a genuine electronic effect-it arises from charge transfer (electron depletion and accumulation) across the interface driven by the difference in chemical potentials rather than from cation diffusion and mixing. We have also understood the nature of the superconductor-insulator phase transition as a function of doping. However, a few important questions, such as the mechanism of interfacial enhancement of the critical temperature, are still outstanding. PMID:22987034

  10. Nonlinear optical studies of aqueous interfaces, polymers, and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Robert Michael

    Understanding the structure and composition of aqueous interfaces is one of the most important current problems in modern science. Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from aerosols to cellular structures. Aerosol chemistry is presently the most significant unknown factor in predicting climate change, and an understanding of the chemistry that occurs at aerosol interfaces would significantly improve climate models. Similarly, the nature of aqueous biological interfaces has a profound effect on the structure and function of proteins and other biological structures. Despite the importance of these problems, aqueous interfaces remain incompletely understood due to the challenges of experimentally probing them. Recent experimental and theoretical results have firmly established the existence of enhanced concentrations of selected ions at the air/water interface. In this dissertation, I use an interface-specific technique, UV second harmonic generation (SHG), to further investigate the adsorption of ions to the air/water interface and to extend the study of ion adsorption towards more biologically relevant systems, alcohol/water interfaces. In Chapter 2, I describe resonant UV-SHG studies of the strongly chaotropic thiocyanate ion adsorbed to the interface formed by water and a monolayer of dodecanol, wherein the Gibbs free energy of adsorption was determined to be -6.7 +/- 1.1 and -6.3 +/- 1.8 kJ/mol for sodium and potassium thiocyanate, respectively, coincident with the value determined for thiocyanate at the air/water interface. Interestingly, at concentrations near and above 4 M, the resonant SHG signal increases discontinuously, indicating a structural change in the interfacial region. Recent experimental and theoretical work has demonstrated that the adsorption of bromide is particularly important for chemical reactions on atmospheric aerosols, including the depletion of ozone. In Chapter 3, UV-SHG resonant with the bromide charge

  11. Atomic force microscopy study of nitrogen molecule self-assembly at the HOPG-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Hsien; Yang, Chih-Wen; Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we investigated the evolution of the graphite-water interface in a nitrogen atmosphere by using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). A highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) sample was immersed in pre-degassed water and subsequently placed in the nitrogen environment. The dissolved nitrogen molecules diffused in water and self-assembled into ordered row-like structural domains at the interface. Nucleation and growth processes of the domains were observed. When the coverage of the ordered structure surpassed 50%, small clusters began to appear on the ordered structure. The number density of the clusters increases as the coverage of the ordered structures increases and these clusters may hop on the ordered structures. A model is proposed to explain the evolution of the nitrogen molecule self-assembly process at the interface. The observation of nitrogen clusters may shed light on the nature and nucleation of the so-called nanobubbles at hydrophobic-water interfaces.

  12. Determination of Neutron Spectra in a Graphite Sphere for Fusion Reactor Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashter, I. B.; Cooper, P. N.

    Calculated and experimental results for the neutron spectra at different radii in a graphite sphere irradiated with 14.1 MeV neutrons were shown to be in satisfactory agreement over the energy range 14.1 to 1.8 MeV neutrons. A group of curves were constructed which gives the radius of a graphite sphere shield required to attenuate the neutron intensity to a certain value. The data set used in the present work, with carbon-12 cross section, is shown to be useful for spherical calculations.Translated AbstractDie Bestimmung der Neutronenspektren in einer GraphitkugelDie Übereinstimmung experimentell bestimmter und berechneter Neutronenspektren in Abhängigkeit vom Ort in einer Graphitkugel wird in einem Energiebereich von 14,1 bis 1,8 MeV (bei einer Ausgangsenergie von 14,1 MeV je Neutron) gezeigt. Eine Gruppe von Kurven wird konstruiert, die den für eine bestimmte Dämpfung der Neutronenintensität notwendigen Radius einer Graphitkugel angeben. Es wird nachgewiesen, daß die in der Arbeit benutzte Datenbank für den 12C-Wirkungsquerschnitt in sphärischen Geometrien anwendbar ist.

  13. Constraints on Grain Formation Around Carbon Stars from Laboratory Studies of Presolar Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Akande, O. W.; Croat, T. K.; Cowsik, R.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation into the physical conditions in the mass outflows of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) carbon stars that are required for the formation of micron-sized presolar graphite grains, either with or without internal crystals of titanium carbide (TiC). In addition to providing detailed information about stellar nucleosynthesis, the structure and composition of presolar grains give unique information about the conditions of grain formation. In the present work we use laboratory observations of presolar graphite to gain insight into the physical conditions in circumstellar outflows from carbon AGB stars. The periodic pulsation of AGB stars enhances the gas density through shocks in the stellar atmosphere above the photosphere, promoting the condensation of dust grains. Copious mass outflow occurs largely because grains are coupled to the radiation field of the star, which accelerates them by radiation pressure; momentum is in turn transferred to gas molecules by collisions with grains. The dust/gas mixture is effectively a two-component fluid whose motion depends on atmospheric structure and which, in turn, influences that structure. In particular, the radiation pressure on the grains determines the velocity field of the outflow and thus the density distribution, while the density distribution itself determines the conditions of radiative transfer within the outflow and thus the effective radiation pressure.

  14. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  15. Interaction of a Self-Assembled Ionic Liquid Layer with Graphite(0001): A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Florian; Forster-Tonigold, Katrin; Bozorgchenani, Maral; Gross, Axel; Behm, R Jürgen

    2016-01-21

    The interaction between (sub)monolayers of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide [BMP](+)[TFSA](-) and graphite(0001), which serves as a model for the anode|electolyte interface in Li-ion batteries, was investigated under ultrahigh vacuum conditions in a combined experimental and theoretical approach. High-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) calculations were employed. After vapor deposition at 300 K, XPS indicates molecular adsorbates with a 1:1 ratio of cations/anions. Cool down to ∼100 K leads to the formation of an ordered (2D) crystalline phase, which coexists with a mobile (2D) liquid. DFT-D calculations reveal that adsorbed [BMP](+) and [TFSA](-) species are arranged alternately in a row-like adsorption structure (cation-anion-cation-anion) and that adsorption is dominated by dispersion interactions between adlayer and substrate, on the one hand, and electrostatic interactions between the ions in a row, on the other hand. Simulated STM images of that structure closely resemble the experimental molecular resolved STM images and show that the resolved features mostly stem from the cations. PMID:26713562

  16. DEMS study of gas evolution at thick graphite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries: the effect of γ-butyrolactone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Martin; Novák, Petr

    Differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) was used to study the reductive decomposition of an electrolyte based on ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate (EC/DMC), as well as the formation of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) in this electrolyte, at thick (75-100 μm) porous graphite composite electrodes. A number of graphite electrodes differing in their electrochemical lithium intercalation properties were investigated in potential-sweep experiments. They proved to be similar with respect to the evolution of ethylene and hydrogen gas during the first two charge/discharge cycles. Due to an incomplete coulombic conversion, a high irreversible capacity, as well as slow diffusion kinetics and an enhanced ohmic resistance of the electrodes, SEI formation on these thick electrodes was not yet complete after the first charge/discharge cycle. Undesired gas evolution can be reduced by adding γ-butyrolactone (GBL) as an electrolyte co-solvent. The amount of ethylene and hydrogen gas evolved decreases with increasing percentages of GBL in an EC/DMC electrolyte, indicating that the SEI layer is built up from GBL rather than from EC decomposition products.

  17. Study of SEI layer formed on graphite anodes in PC/LiBOB electrolyte using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, G.V.; Xu, K.; Jow, T.R.; Ross Jr., P.N.

    2003-10-30

    Formation of the SEI layer on graphite anodes cycled in propylene carbonate (PC) lithium bis(oxolato)borate (LiBOB) electrolyte was studied by ex-situ Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis in the attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode. The results provide a more refined description of the composition than earlier analyses with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The vibrational spectra clearly show that electrochemical reduction of the BOB anion is a part of the SEI formation chemistry. Carboxylate and/or oxalate functional groups derived from the BOB anion were the components assigned as the ''semicarbonate'' species in the C 1s XPS spectra of the SEI layer formed in LiBOB electrolyte. Reduction of the BOB anion changes the oxygen coordination around the B atom from tetrahedral BO4 to trigonal BO3, e.g., meta- or orthoborate. Based on the combination of electrochemical and FTIR data, we propose that the preferential reduction of the BOB anion versus the PC solvent molecule is responsible for the cyclability of graphite anodes in purely PC-based electrolyte.

  18. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy studies of angle-dependent van Hove singularities on twisted graphite surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Luo, Hong

    2013-12-01

    Slightly misoriented surface graphene layer on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) can result in Moiré patterns (MP). Two van Hove singularity (VHS) peaks in the density of states are observed with scanning tunneling spectroscopy on a series of the MPs with different periods on HOPG surface, flanking the Fermi energy. The energy difference between the two VHS peaks (ΔEVHS) is linearly proportional to the sine of interlayer rotation angle. A similar relation between ΔEVHS and MP periods has recently been reported on twisted graphene layers. Compared to the case of twisted graphene layers, the Fermi velocity of MPs on a HOPG surface is found to be larger, and the interlayer hopping is enhanced.

  20. Synthesis of few layer graphene by direct exfoliation of graphite and a Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Gayathri, S.; Jayabal, P.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Kottaisamy, M.

    2014-02-15

    The exfoliation of graphene from pristine graphite in a liquid phase was achieved successfully via sonication followed by centrifugation method. Ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectra of the obtained graphene dispersions at different exfoliation time indicated that the concentration of graphene dispersion increased markedly with increasing exfoliation time. The sheet-like morphology of the exfoliated graphene was revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image. Further, the morphological change in different exfoliation time was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A complete structural and defect characterization was probed using micro-Raman spectroscopic technique. The shape and position of the 2D band of Raman spectra revealed the formation of bilayer to few layer graphene. Also, Raman mapping confirmed the presence of uniformly distributed bilayer graphene sheets on the substrate.

  1. Experimental study on the reaction between nuclear graphite IG-110 and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung Soo; No, Hee Cheon

    2006-03-01

    With nuclear graphite IG-110, we measured various kinetic parameters and reaction rates of the C/CO 2 reaction. As a result, its activation energy is 295 ± 8 kJ/mol and the order of reaction is 0.9. It turns out that the rate of C/CO 2 reaction is much smaller than the rate of the C/O 2 reaction which is dominant in HTGR air-ingress below 1400 °C. Finally, we propose the following rate equation for the C/CO 2 reaction of IG-110: r(kg/m3s)=3.95×103·exp-{290 000}/{R·T}·(p)0.9.

  2. Experimental studies of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle ply laminates in shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, T.

    1977-01-01

    The nonlinear/inelastic response under inplane shear of a large variety of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle-ply laminates was tested. Their strength allowables were obtained and the mechanisms which govern their mode of failure were determined. Two types of specimens for the program were chosen, tested, and evaluated: shear panels stabilized by an aluminum honeycomb core and shear tubes. A modified biaxially compression/tension loaded picture frame was designed and utilized in the test program with the shear panels. The results obtained with this test technique categorically prefer the shear panels, rather than the tubes, for adequate and satisfactory experimental definition of the objectives. Test results indicate the existence of a so-called core-effect which ought to be considered when reducing experimental data for weak in shear laminates.

  3. H-1 NMR study of ternary ammonia-alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Fronko, R. M.; Resing, H. A.; Qian, X. W.; Solin, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    For the first-stage ternary ammonia-alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds M(NH3)(x)C24(x of about 4, M = K, Rb, Cs), three sets of triplet H-1 NMR spectral lines have been observed at various temperatures and orientations due to the H-1 - H-1 and N-14 - H-1 dipolar interactions. The structures of these compounds have been inferred as mobile (liquid-like) intercalant layers of planar M(NH3)4 ions in between the carbon layers. For the intercalated ammonia molecules, the potential barrier is about 0.2 eV and the molecular geometry is very close to the free NH3 in gas phase.

  4. Thermal behavior of deuterium implanted into nuclear graphite studied by NRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Moncoffre, N.; Bérerd, N.; Perrat-Mabilon, A.; Rapegno, R.

    2014-08-01

    This paper focuses on the thermal behavior of deuterium, simulating tritium, implanted into virgin nuclear graphite of French gas-cooled reactors, which are being decommissioned. Deuterium ions D+ were implanted into graphite (around 3 at.% at the projected range Rp) at two different depths (around 670 nm and 2.8 μm) and annealed up to about 300 h in a temperature range from 200 °C to 1200 °C under vacuum or argon flow. Before and after heat treatments, D distribution profiles in the samples were followed using the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, with a millimetric beam at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of IPNL (Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, France). The results show that the deuterium release becomes significant at temperatures higher than 600 °C and is almost totally completed at 1200 °C. The comparison of the results, obtained for both implantation depths, points out the role of the porosity with respect to deuterium permeation. The release follows two stages: a rapid step where it occurs within a few hours, followed by a much slower step during which the release of deuterium saturates. The initial stage is characterized by an activation energy of 1.3 eV and might correspond to detrapping of D located at crystallite edges and its diffusion at the crystallite surfaces. We assume that the second stage kinetics corresponds to a very slow diffusion of D located inside the crystallites and chemisorbed to carbon atoms through sp2 or sp3 bonds.

  5. Experimental study of the oscillating interface of a falling drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhwan; Ward, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The drop interface oscillation generated from detachment from a nozzle due to gravity are experimentally studied. The fluids used in the experiments are glycerol-water mixtures with viscosities ranging from 0.005 to 0.410 Pa s, mineral oil having a viscosity of 0.0270 Pa s, and DI water with viscosity of 0.0009 Pa s. The drop oscillating is taken by fast camera to make observations. For large drops, where the interface relative to a polar angle may be measured, the periodic deformation is plotted as a function of time. For smaller drops we measure the deformation as switching between an oblate and prolate drop as a function of time. The phenomenon is clearly a function of the fluid viscosity but we seek to propose a pinch-off mechanism for understanding the source of the observed oscillations.

  6. X-Ray Studies of Thin Films and Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronick, Steven Charles

    1990-01-01

    Presented here are a series of x-ray studies utilizing synchrotron radiation to investigate a variety of properties of thin films and interfaces in technologically important materials. By far the largest part of this dissertation is devoted to studies of x-ray reflectivity as a function of angle (mainly soft x rays), although some extended x -ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) results are included as reprinted published papers (briefly discussed). The reflectivity discussion covers theory, experimental techniques, data analysis (by curve-fitting), and specific applications. The material systems studied by the x-ray reflectivity technique include: bulk silicon, GaAs, InAs, ~250 -A InAs layers deposited by molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs(100) substrates, four thicknesses (~ 126-1100 A) of SiO_2 /Si(100) produced by dry thermal oxidation, and ~250-A layers of CoSi_2 /Si(111) (two samples, one produced by MBE and one by solid-phase epitaxy). Results determined from the reflectivity measurements include: interfacial roughness parameters, refractive index of materials (in the energy range ~400-1100 eV), and overlayer thicknesses. It has been found for example that the indium -stabilized growth mode of InAs on GaAs(100) results in a smoother buried interface than the arsenic-stabilized growth mode, while the indium-stabilized growth mode on 2^circ-off GaAs(100) produces the smoothest buried interface (with typical roughness parameters in the range 10-19 A). Preliminary results indicate that growth of CoSi_2/Si(111) by MBE produces smoother buried interfaces than growth by solid-phase epitaxy. The roughness parameters have been explained in terms of growth conditions, lattice mismatch, and material inhomogeneity in the vicinity of the buried interface. The oxygen atomic scattering factor for photons in the range 400-800 eV (oxygen K edge ~ 540 eV) has also been deduced from a determination the Si and SiO_2 refractive indices. The EXAFS studies were used to

  7. Atomistic study on the FCC/BCC interface structure with {112}KS orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Keonwook; Beyerlein, Irene; Han, Weizhong; Wang, Jian; Mara, Nathan

    2011-09-23

    In this study, atomistic simulation is used to explore the atomic interface structure, the intrinsic defect network, and mechanism of twin formation from the {112}KS Cu-Nb interface. The interface structure of different material systems AI-Fe and AI-Nb are also compared with Cu-Nb interface.

  8. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT).

    PubMed

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J; Scott, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK's first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600-1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  9. A Study of the Oxidation Behaviour of Pile Grade A (PGA) Nuclear Graphite Using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Tomography (XRT)

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Liam; Heard, Peter J.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Pile grade A (PGA) graphite was used as a material for moderating and reflecting neutrons in the UK’s first generation Magnox nuclear power reactors. As all but one of these reactors are now shut down there is a need to understand the residual state of the material prior to decommissioning of the cores, in particular the location and concentration of key radio-contaminants such as 14C. The oxidation behaviour of unirradiated PGA graphite was studied, in the temperature range 600–1050°C, in air and nitrogen using thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray tomography to investigate the possibility of using thermal degradation techniques to examine 14C distribution within irradiated material. The thermal decomposition of PGA graphite was observed to follow the three oxidation regimes historically identified by previous workers with limited, uniform oxidation at temperatures below 600°C and substantial, external oxidation at higher temperatures. This work demonstrates that the different oxidation regimes of PGA graphite could be developed into a methodology to characterise the distribution and concentration of 14C in irradiated graphite by thermal treatment. PMID:26575374

  10. Propagation of Stream Interfaces: An LFM-helio Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahud, D. M.; Hughes, W.; Merkin, V. G.; McGregor, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    During the last solar minimum, the heliosphere was dominated by steady-state Stream Interaction Regions (SIRs). Carrington Rotation (CR) 2060, which occurred during this period, contained multiple SIRs and was free of transient phenomena which made it a good interval for the study of SIRs. We have used the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) heliospheric 3-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, the LFM-helio, to examine the radial evolution of SIRs, particularly the speed of the stream interface, from 0.1 AU to 2.0 AU. The LFM-helio is an adaptation of the magnetospheric LFM MHD code to heliospheric plasmas and fields. The ideal MHD equations are solved on a uniform spherical grid, excluding 10 degree cones centered at the poles. The inner boundary condition is obtained using the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) coronal model driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements for CR 2060. The global nature of the LFM-helio solution facilitates the study of the steepening of SIRs as well as their speed through the ambient plasma. For the SIR considered, the location of the stream interface is determined using multiple definitions, namely: the location of maximum total pressure, the location of maximum flow vorticity, the location of null azimuthal flow velocity and the location of steepest gradient of entropy. The speed of the plasma at these locations is compared to the mean speed of the interface to determine whether the interfaces are convected with the solar wind or propagate through it. In order to elucidate the physics of the evolution of the SIR, we also ran the LFM-helio using an idealized inner boundary condition. The idealized inner boundary specified the solar wind speed so as to ensure the presence of an SIR. Specifically, a source of fast wind was located at the same latitude as, and longitudinally near, a source of slow wind. The combined effect of radially outward plasma flow and rotation of the inner boundary align the fast wind behind the slow wind, creating an SIR. The

  11. A study of structurally efficient graphite-thermoplastic trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    1993-01-01

    The structural efficiency of compression-loaded trapezoidal-corrugation sandwich and semi-sandwich composite panels is studied to determine their weight savings potential. Sandwich panels with two identical face sheets and a trapezoidal corrugated core between them, and semi-sandwich panels with a corrugation attached to a single skin are considered. An optimization code is used to find the minimum weight designs for critical compressive load levels ranging from 3,000 to 24,000 lb/in. Graphite-thermoplastic panels based on the optimal minimum weight designs were fabricated and tested. A finite-element analysis of several test specimens was also conducted. The results of the optimization study, the finite-element analysis, and the experiments are presented.

  12. a Heat Capacity Study of Para-Hydrogen Monolayers on Graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motteler, Frederick Clark

    The heat capacity of monolayer p-H(,2) adsorbed on graphite foam has been measured over the 0.0631(ANGSTROM)(' -2) to 0.0891(ANGSTROM)('-2) density range and the 2 to 25(DEGREES)K temperature range. Specific heat peaks are observed over almost the entire density range and are similar to those observed for ('4)He and ('3)He monolayers on graphite for similar densities. Low density data (0.0631(ANGSTROM)('-2) to 0.0727(ANGSTROM)(' -2)) contains a heat capacity peak attributed to the commensurate order-disorder transition. At commensurate density. 0.0637(ANGSTROM)(' -2), the peak attains a maximum height of C/Nk(,b) = 11.7 at 21.4(DEGREES)K and may be characterized by the critical exponent (alpha) = 0.33. For temperatures below the order -disorder transition, the commensurate monolayer heat capacity is characterized by Einstein like behavior with (theta)(,E) = 53.4(DEGREES)K. High density data (0.0787(ANGSTROM)('-2) to 0.0815(ANGSTROM)(' -2)) contains a heat capacity peak attributed to the disordering of a close packed triangular incommensurate solid. The incommensurate solid is characterized by its Debye like heat capacity behavior. The density region between the commensurate structure and incommensurate solid (0.0707(ANGSTROM)('-2) to 0.772(ANGSTROM)(' -2)) contains two heat capacity peaks. At about 20(DEGREES)K there is broad rounded remnant of the order-disorder peak. At lower temperatures (6 to 9(DEGREES)K) there is a small, but very sharp heat capacity peak. The peak attains a maximum height of C/Nk(,b) = 0.89 at a density of 0.0727(ANGSTROM)(' -2) and a temperature of 9.54(DEGREES)K. The remnant of the order-disorder transition seen in p-H(,2) data, together with re-examination of ('4)He data indicates that a shoulder-like remnant intersects the melting line. The melting peak of ('4)He undergoes significant change at the intersection point. The low temperature intermediate density region is consistent with a striped phase of domain walls. The sharp low

  13. Ordering in quasi-two-dimensional planar ferromagnets: A neutron scattering study of graphite intercalation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesler, D. G.; Suzuki, M.; Zabel, H.

    1987-11-01

    The magnetic ordering of stage-2 CoCl2- and NiCl2-graphite intercalation compounds (GIC's) has been investigated by neutron diffraction. Both of these compounds are observed to undergo a two-step ordering process. For temperatures within the range Tl

  14. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2010-12-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  15. Study on the cutting mechanism and the brittle ductile transition model of isotropic pyrolyric graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghai; Wang, Hujun; Liu, Zhonghai

    2011-05-01

    Isotropic pyrolyric graphite (IPG) is a new kind of brittle material, it can be used for sealing the aero-engine turbine shaft and the ethylene high-temperature equipment. It not only has the general advantages of ordinal carbonaceous materials such as high temperature resistance, lubrication and abrasion resistance, but also has the advantages of impermeability and machinability that carbon/carbon composite doesn't have. Therefore, it has broad prospects for development. Mechanism of brittle-ductile transition of IPG is the foundation of precision cutting while the plastic deformation of IPG is the essential and the most important mechanical behavior of precision cutting. Using the theory of strain gradient, the mechanism of this material removal during the precision cutting is analyzed. The critical cutting thickness of IPG is calculated for the first time. Furthermore, the cutting process parameters such as cutting depth, feed rate which corresponding to the scale of brittle-ductile transition deformation of IPG are calculated. In the end, based on the theory of micromechanics, the deformation behaviors of IPG such as brittle fracture, plastic deformation and mutual transformation process are all simulated under the Sih.G.C fracture criterion. The condition of the simulation is that the material under the pressure-shear loading conditions .The result shows that the best angle during the IPG precision cutting is -30°. The theoretical analysis and the simulation result are validated by precision cutting experiments.

  16. Density functional studies of functionalized graphitic materials with late transition metals for Oxygen Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Martínez, José Ignacio; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-09-14

    Low-temperature fuel cells are appealing alternatives to the conventional internal combustion engines for transportation applications. However, in order for them to be commercially viable, effective, stable and low-cost electrocatalysts are needed for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) at the cathode. In this contribution, on the basis of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that graphitic materials with active sites composed of 4 nitrogen atoms and transition metal atoms belonging to groups 7 to 9 in the periodic table are active towards ORR, and also towards Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER). Spin analyses suggest that the oxidation state of those elements in the active sites should in general be +2. Moreover, our results verify that the adsorption behavior of transition metals is not intrinsic, since it can be severely altered by changes in the local geometry of the active site, the chemical nature of the nearest neighbors, and the oxidation states. Nonetheless, we find that these catalysts trend-wise behave as oxides and that their catalytic activity is limited by exactly the same universal scaling relations. PMID:21796295

  17. Experimental and analytical study of fatigue damage in notched graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Both tension and compression fatigue behaviors were investigated in four notched graphite/epoxy laminates. After fatigue loading, specimens were examined for damage type and location using visual inspection, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ultrasonic C-scans, and X-radiography. Delamination and ply cracking were found to be the dominant types of fatigue damage. In general, ply cracks did not propagate into adjacent plies of differing fiber orientation. To help understand the varied fatigue observations, the interlaminar stress distribution was calculated with finite element analysis for the regions around the hole and along the straight free edge. Comparison of observed delamination locations with the calculated stresses indicated that both interlaminar shear and peel stresses must be considered when predicting delamination. The effects of the fatigue cycling on residual strength and stiffness were measured for some specimens of each laminate type. Fatigue loading generally caused only small stiffness losses. In all cases, residual strengths were greater than or equal to the virgin strengths.

  18. 2008 ULTRASONIC BENCHMARK STUDIES OF INTERFACE CURVATURE--A SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, L. W.; Huang, R.; Raillon, R.; Mahaut, S.; Leymarie, N.; Lonne, S.; Spies, M.; Lupien, V.

    2009-03-03

    In the 2008 QNDE ultrasonic benchmark session researchers from five different institutions around the world examined the influence that the curvature of a cylindrical fluid-solid interface has on the measured NDE immersion pulse-echo response of a flat-bottom hole (FBH) reflector. This was a repeat of a study conducted in the 2007 benchmark to try to determine the sources of differences seen in 2007 between model-based predictions and experiments. Here, we will summarize the results obtained in 2008 and analyze the model-based results and the experiments.

  19. Video STM Studies of Adsorbate Diffusion at Electrochemical Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansel, T.; Magnussen, O. M.

    2006-01-01

    Direct in situ studies of the surface diffusion of isolated adsorbates at an electrochemical interface by high-speed scanning tunneling microscopy (video STM) are presented for sulfide adsorbates on Cu(100) in HCl solution. As revealed by a quantitative statistical analysis, the adsorbate motion can be described by thermally activated hopping between neighboring adsorption sites with an activation energy that increases linearly with electrode potential by 0.50 eV per V. This can be explained by changes in the adsorbate dipole moment during the hopping process and contributions from coadsorbates.

  20. Unoccupied-electronic-band structure of graphite studied by angle-resolved secondary-electron emission and inverse photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, F.; Takahashi, T.; Ohsawa, H.; Suzuki, S.; Suematsu, H.

    1988-03-01

    Angle-resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy (ARIPES) and angle-resolved secondary-electron emission spectroscopy (ARSEES) have been performed for graphite to establish experimentally the unoccupied-electronic-band structure as well as to study the difference between the two techniques. Remarkable differences have been found in the experimental two-dimensional band structures obtained by the two methods. The experimental results have been compared with the two different band calculations by R. C. Tatar and S. Rabii [Phys. Rev. B 25, 4126 (1982)] and by N. A. W. Holzwarth, S. G. Louie, and S. Rabii [Phys. Rev. B 26, 5382 (1982)] with special attention to the energy position of the three-dimensional interlayer band. The possible origin of the difference between ARIPES and ARSEES has also been discussed.

  1. Analytical and experimental studies of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle ply laminates in shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, T.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a comparison study between a test program on the inelastic response under inplane shear over a wide range of graphite-epoxy and boron-epoxy angle-ply laminates are reported. This investigation was aimed at evaluating the applicability and adequacy of these analyses to predict satisfactorily the responses of angle-ply laminates. It was observed that these analytical tools are inadequate for this purpose as they fail to predict with sufficient confidence the shape of response and in particular the strength values associated with a given laminate configuration. Consequently, they do not provide the sought-after information about failure mechanisms which trigger failure of a particular designed laminate.

  2. Space station automation and robotics study. Operator-systems interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This is the final report of a Space Station Automation and Robotics Planning Study, which was a joint project of the Boeing Aerospace Company, Boeing Commercial Airplane Company, and Boeing Computer Services Company. The study is in support of the Advanced Technology Advisory Committee established by NASA in accordance with a mandate by the U.S. Congress. Boeing support complements that provided to the NASA Contractor study team by four aerospace contractors, the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), and the California Space Institute. This study identifies automation and robotics (A&R) technologies that can be advanced by requirements levied by the Space Station Program. The methodology used in the study is to establish functional requirements for the operator system interface (OSI), establish the technologies needed to meet these requirements, and to forecast the availability of these technologies. The OSI would perform path planning, tracking and control, object recognition, fault detection and correction, and plan modifications in connection with extravehicular (EV) robot operations.

  3. Electrochemical impedance study of the hematite/water interface.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Lasia, Andrzej; Boily, Jean-François

    2012-05-22

    Reactions taking place on hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) surfaces in contact with aqueous solutions are of paramount importance to environmental and technological processes. The electrochemical properties of the hematite/water interface are central to these processes and can be probed by open circuit potentials and cyclic voltammetric measurements of semiconducting electrodes. In this study, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to extract resistive and capacitive attributes of this interface on millimeter-sized single-body hematite electrodes. This was carried out by developing equivalent circuit models for impedance data collected on a semiconducting hematite specimen equilibrated in solutions of 0.1 M NaCl and NH(4)Cl at various pH values. These efforts produced distinct sets of capacitance values for the diffuse and compact layers of the interface. Diffuse layer capacitances shift in the pH 3-11 range from 2.32 to 2.50 μF·cm(-2) in NaCl and from 1.43 to 1.99 μF·cm(-2) in NH(4)Cl. Furthermore, these values reach a minimum capacitance at pH 9, near a probable point of zero charge for an undefined hematite surface exposing a variety of (hydr)oxo functional groups. Compact layer capacitances pertain to the transfer of ions (charge carriers) from the diffuse layer to surface hydroxyls and are independent of pH in NaCl, with values of 32.57 ± 0.49 μF·cm(-2)·s(-φ). However, they decrease with pH in NH(4)Cl from 33.77 at pH 3.5 to 21.02 μF·cm(-2)·s(-φ) at pH 10.6 because of the interactions of ammonium species with surface (hydr)oxo groups. Values of φ (0.71-0.73 in NaCl and 0.56-0.67 in NH(4)Cl) denote the nonideal behavior of this capacitor, which is treated here as a constant phase element. Because electrode-based techniques are generally not applicable to the commonly insulating metal (oxyhydr)oxides found in the environment, this study presents opportunities for exploring mineral/water interface chemistry by EIS studies of single

  4. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  5. Hydrogen and carbon isotope studies on the graphite-bearing metapelites in the northern Kiso district of central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikiyo, Toshiro

    1986-06-01

    Measurements were made of the hydrogen isotope ratios of hydrous silicates (mica and amphibole) and whole rocks, and the carbon isotope ratios of graphite and carbonaceous matter in the metamorphic rocks from the northern Kiso district in central Japan. δD values of hydrous silicates in the graphite-bearing metapelites are always higher than those in graphite-free schists, even though the sample localities of the two rock-types are very close. Hydrogen isotopic equilibrium has been attained between the coexisting minerals. D/H ratios of water in the metamorphic fluids seem to depend strongly on the presence or absence of graphite and seem to be not constant throughout the district. The district is divided into three areas of low (metamorphic zones I, II), medium (zones IIIa V) and high δ 13Cgr value (zones VIa VII) areas. In the high δ 13Cgr values area, the carbon contents of the graphite-bearing rocks decrease slightly from zones VIa to VII, whereas the δ 13Cgr values increase sharply from the upper part of zone VIa to VIb. The δD values of biotite in these graphite-bearing rocks are higher than those in the medium δ 13Cgr area. This suggests that methane enriched in H and12C is produced and liberated by the devolatilization reactions between muscovite, graphite and water. The fluid produced is composed of water, methane and a subordinate amount of carbon dioxide, and its log fO2 value is deduced to be about 1.2 lower than that defined by the FMQ buffer. In the medium δ 13Cgr area, the δ 13C values of graphite are nearly constant (-20.8‰), while the Fe2O3/(Fe2O3 + FeO) ratio of the graphite-bearing rocks apparently decreases with increasing metamorphic grade. δD differences in hydrous silicates between graphite-bearing and graphite-free rocks are observed. These facts are interpreted to mean that methane was produced in addition to water and carbon dioxide, and that its generation (X_{{text{CH}}_{text{4}} } /X_{{text{CO}}_{text{2}} } ratio of the fluid

  6. Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder.

    PubMed

    Scheike, T; Böhlmann, W; Esquinazi, P; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Ballestar, A; Setzer, A

    2012-11-14

    Granular superconductivity in powders of small graphite grains (several tens of micrometers) is demonstrated after treatment with pure water. The temperature, magnetic field and time dependence of the magnetic moment of the treated graphite powder provides evidence for the existence of superconducting vortices with some similarities to high-temperature granular superconducting oxides but even at temperatures above 300 K. Room temperature superconductivity in doped graphite or at its interfaces appears to be possible. PMID:22949348

  7. Ultrafast studies of electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Nien-Hui

    1998-10-01

    Femtosecond time- and angle-resolved two-photon photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study fundamental aspects of excited electron dynamics at metal-dielectric interfaces, including layer-by-layer evolution of electronic structure and two-dimensional electron localization. On bare Ag(111), the lifetimes of image states are dominated by their position with respect to the projected bulk band structure. The n = 2 state has a shorter lifetime than the n = 1 state due to degeneracy with the bulk conduction band. As the parallel momentum of the n = 1 image electron increases, the lifetime decreases. With decreasing temperatures, the n = 1 image electrons, with zero or nonzero parallel momentum, all become longer lived. Adsorption of one to three layers of n-heptane results in an approximately exponential increase in lifetime as a function of layer thickness. This results from the formation of a tunneling barrier through which the interfacial electrons must decay, consistent with the repulsive bulk electron affinity of n-alkanes. The lifetimes of the higher quantum states indicate that the presence of the monolayer significantly reduces coupling of the image states to the bulk band structure. These results are compared with predictions of a dielectric continuum model. The study of electron lateral motion shows that optical excitation creates interfacial electrons in quasifree states for motion parallel to the n-heptane/Ag(111) interface. These initially delocalized electrons decay into a localized state within a few hundred femtoseconds. The localized electrons then decay back to the metal by tunneling through the adlayer potential barrier. The localization time depends strongly on the electron's initial parallel momentum and exhibits a non-Arrhenius temperature dependence. The experimental findings are consistent with a 2-D self-trapping process in which electrons become localized by interacting with the topmost plane of the alkane layer. The energy dependence of

  8. Study of coal and graphite specimens by means of Raman and cathodoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostova, Irena; Tormo, Laura; Crespo-Feo, Elena; Garcia-Guinea, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The weak luminescence shown by coals has been attributed to accessorial minerals and poly-nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, such as exinite, vitrinite or inertinite, while the luminescence quenching has been found in asphaltenes produced by coal hydrogenation or in pyridine extracts. Nowadays, the spatial resolution and the improved luminescence efficiency of the modern spectrometers allow some details of the luminescent emission centers to be explained. We have selected museum historical coal specimens with different rank, i.e., peat, lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous, and anthracite to be analyzed by their spectra from cathodoluminescence probe (CL) of an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), with an energy dispersive spectrometry analyzer (EDS). Additional analytical controls were also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectrometries. We conclude that coals may display different luminescence emission features coming from several different sources, as follows: (i) broadband of intense luminescence from polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, (ii) weakly visible broadband luminescence attributed to band-tail states caused by variations in the energy gap of individual sp2 carbon clusters, which are different in size and/or shape, (iii) silicate impurities causing the common luminescence peak at 325 nm observed in coals. This peak is due to non-bridging oxygen hole centres (tbnd Sisbnd Orad ) probably generated by precursor Sisbnd Osbnd C species formed by tbnd Sisbnd Orad defects and carbon atoms; (iv) a 710 nm CL emission commonly detected also in wood and ivory, which has been correlated with hydrocarbon groups of chlorophyll or lignine. Coals are very complex rocks, composed by both organic and inorganic phases with variable and complex spectra. More analyses are necessary and carbonaceous standards of graphite, silicon carbide, stuffed carbon silica and diamond at variable experimental conditions have to be

  9. Study of coal and graphite specimens by means of Raman and cathodoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Tormo, Laura; Crespo-Feo, Elena; Garcia-Guinea, Javier

    2012-06-01

    The weak luminescence shown by coals has been attributed to accessorial minerals and poly-nuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, such as exinite, vitrinite or inertinite, while the luminescence quenching has been found in asphaltenes produced by coal hydrogenation or in pyridine extracts. Nowadays, the spatial resolution and the improved luminescence efficiency of the modern spectrometers allow some details of the luminescent emission centers to be explained. We have selected museum historical coal specimens with different rank, i.e., peat, lignite, sub-bituminous, bituminous, and anthracite to be analyzed by their spectra from cathodoluminescence probe (CL) of an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), with an energy dispersive spectrometry analyzer (EDS). Additional analytical controls were also performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Raman spectrometries. We conclude that coals may display different luminescence emission features coming from several different sources, as follows: (i) broadband of intense luminescence from polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, (ii) weakly visible broadband luminescence attributed to band-tail states caused by variations in the energy gap of individual sp(2) carbon clusters, which are different in size and/or shape, (iii) silicate impurities causing the common luminescence peak at 325 nm observed in coals. This peak is due to non-bridging oxygen hole centres (≡Si-O·) probably generated by precursor Si-O-C species formed by ≡Si-O· defects and carbon atoms; (iv) a 710 nm CL emission commonly detected also in wood and ivory, which has been correlated with hydrocarbon groups of chlorophyll or lignine. Coals are very complex rocks, composed by both organic and inorganic phases with variable and complex spectra. More analyses are necessary and carbonaceous standards of graphite, silicon carbide, stuffed carbon silica and diamond at variable experimental conditions have to be developed. PMID:22366616

  10. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  11. Supported Lipid Bilayer Technology for the Study of Cellular Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Crites, Travis J.; Maddox, Michael; Padhan, Kartika; Muller, James; Eigsti, Calvin; Varma, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Glass-supported lipid bilayers presenting freely diffusing proteins have served as a powerful tool for studying cell-cell interfaces, in particular, T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) interactions, using optical microscopy. Here we expand upon existing protocols and describe the preparation of liposomes by an extrusion method, and describe how this system can be used to study immune synapse formation by Jurkat cells. We also present a method for forming such lipid bilayers on silica beads for the study of signaling responses by population methods, such as western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene-expression analysis. Finally, we describe how to design and prepare transmembrane-anchored protein-laden liposomes, following expression in suspension CHO (CHOs) cells, a mammalian expression system alternative to insect and bacterial cell lines, which do not produce mammalian glycosylation patterns. Such transmembrane-anchored proteins may have many novel applications in cell biology and immunology. PMID:26331983

  12. Cathode interface studies of polymer light emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiontek, Stephen; Tzolov, Marian

    2010-03-01

    Efficient injection of charge carriers is a key factor for successful operation of any electronic device and especially of devices with non-crystalline or wide band gap active material. Our study concentrates on the cathode interface of light emitting devices with a conjugated polymer as light emitter. We apply two principally different methods for the cathode deposition, physical and chemical, in order to fundamentally understand if in addition to the commonly accepted notion for the matching of the work functions also material modification takes place. The completed devices are studies by steady-state electrical measurements, impedance spectroscopy, current and emission lifetime measurements, and electroluminescence spectroscopy. The morphology of the cathodes is studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy and the formation of additional phases by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The results help to define ways for more cost efficient fabrication of light emitting devices with applications in displays, electronic newspapers, room illumination, etc.

  13. Body Machine Interfaces for Neuromotor Rehabilitation: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Pierella, Camilla; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Pedersen, Jessica; Chen, David; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Casadio, Maura

    2015-01-01

    High-level spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors face every day two related problems: recovering motor skills and regaining functional independence. Body machine interfaces (BoMIs) empower people with sever motor disabilities with the ability to control an external device, but they also offer the opportunity to focus concurrently on achieving rehabilitative goals. In this study we developed a portable, and low-cost BoMI that addresses both problems. The BoMI remaps the user’s residual upper body mobility to the two coordinates of a cursor on a computer monitor. By controlling the cursor, the user can perform functional tasks, such as entering text and playing games. This framework also allows the mapping between the body and the cursor space to be modified, gradually challenging the user to exercise more impaired movements. With this approach, we were able to change the behavior of our SCI subject, who initially used almost exclusively his less impaired degrees of freedom - on the left side - for controlling the BoMI. At the end of the few practice sessions he had restored symmetry between left and right side of the body, with an increase of mobility and strength of all the degrees of freedom involved in the control of the interface. This is the first proof of concept that our BoMI can be used to control assistive devices and reach specific rehabilitative goals simultaneously. PMID:25569980

  14. Body machine interfaces for neuromotor rehabilitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pierella, Camilla; Abdollahi, Farnaz; Farshchiansadegh, Ali; Pedersen, Jessica; Chen, David; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Casadio, Maura

    2014-01-01

    High-level spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors face every day two related problems: recovering motor skills and regaining functional independence. Body machine interfaces (BoMIs) empower people with sever motor disabilities with the ability to control an external device, but they also offer the opportunity to focus concurrently on achieving rehabilitative goals. In this study we developed a portable, and low-cost BoMI that addresses both problems. The BoMI remaps the user's residual upper body mobility to the two coordinates of a cursor on a computer monitor. By controlling the cursor, the user can perform functional tasks, such as entering text and playing games. This framework also allows the mapping between the body and the cursor space to be modified, gradually challenging the user to exercise more impaired movements. With this approach, we were able to change the behavior of our SCI subject, who initially used almost exclusively his less impaired degrees of freedom - on the left side - for controlling the BoMI. At the end of the few practice sessions he had restored symmetry between left and right side of the body, with an increase of mobility and strength of all the degrees of freedom involved in the control of the interface. This is the first proof of concept that our BoMI can be used to control assistive devices and reach specific rehabilitative goals simultaneously. PMID:25569980

  15. Study on the structural evolution of modified phenol formaldehyde resin adhesive for the high-temperature bonding of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jigang; Jiang, Nan; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Lang; Song, Jinren

    2006-01-01

    A novel adhesive for carbon materials composed of phenol-formaldehyde resin, boron carbide and fumed silica, was prepared. The adhesive property of graphite joints bonded by the above adhesive treated at high-temperatures was tested. Results showed that the adhesive was found to have outstanding high-temperature bonding properties for graphite. The adhesive structure was dense and uniform even after the graphite joints were heat-treated at 1500 °C. Bonding strength was 17.1 MPa. The evolution of adhesive structure was investigated. The results indicated that the addition of the secondary additive, fumed silica, improved the bonding performance greatly. Borosilicate phase with better stability was formed during the heat-treatment process, and the volume shrinkage was restrained effectively, which was responsible for the satisfactory high-temperature bonding performance of graphite.

  16. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  17. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch-Type Production of Organic Materials in the Solar Nebula: Studies Using Graphite Catalysts and Measuring the Trapping of Noble Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.; Lucas, Christopher; Kimura, Yuki; Hohenberg, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The formation of abundant carbonaceous material in meteorites is a long standing problem and an important factor in the debate on the potential for the origin of life in other stellar systems. The Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) catalytic reduction of CO by hydrogen was once the preferred model for production of organic materials in the primitive solar nebula. We have demonstrated that many grain surfaces can catalyze both FTT and HB-type reactions, including amorphous iron and magnesium silicates, pure silica smokes as well as several minerals. Graphite is not a particularly good FTT catalyst, especially compared to iron powder or to amorphous iron silicate. However, like other silicates that we have studied, it gets better with exposure to CO. N2 and H2 over time: e.g., after formation of a macromolecular carbonaceous layer on the surfaces of the underlying gains. While amorphous iron silicates required only 1 or 2 experimental runs to achieve steady state reaction rates, graphite only achieved steady state after 6 or more experiments. We will present results showing the catalytic action of graphite grains increasing with increasing number of experiments and will also discuss the nature of the final "graphite" grains aster completion of our experiments.

  19. Drainage flows: A mountain-plains interface numerical case study

    SciTech Connect

    Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In January/February, 1991 an intensive set of measurements was taken around Rocky Flats near Denver, CO, USA under the auspices of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. This region of the country is known as the Front Range, and is characterized by a transition from the relatively flat terrain of the Great Plains to the highly varied terrain of the Rocky Mountains. The mountains are oriented north-south and rise from 1800m above mean sea level (MSL) to 3600m MSL at the Continental Divide. Numerous east-west oriented valleys begin in the mountains and end at the plains interface. This terrain makes the Front Range a challenging region to model. One of the more important flows created by this severe terrain are the highly-varying drainage flows found during stagnant, wintertime conditions. These flows can interact with larger-scale mountain and synoptic winds. One goal of the ASCOT 1991 program was to gain insight into multi-scale meteorological interaction by observing wintertime drainage conditions at the mountain-valley-plains interface. ASCOT data included surface and upper air measurements on approximately a 50km{sup 2} scale. Simultaneously, an SF{sub 6} tracer release study was being conducted around Rocky Flats, a nuclear materials production facility. Detailed surface concentration measurements were completed for the SF{sub 6} plume. This combination of meteorological and tracer concentration data provided a unique data set for comparisons of mesoscale and dispersion modeling results with observations and for evaluating our capability to predict pollutant transport. Our approach is to use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model to simulate atmospheric conditions and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to model the dispersion of the SF{sub 6}.

  20. Drainage flows: A mountain-plains interface numerical case study

    SciTech Connect

    Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    In January/February, 1991 an intensive set of measurements was taken around Rocky Flats near Denver, CO, USA under the auspices of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. This region of the country is known as the Front Range, and is characterized by a transition from the relatively flat terrain of the Great Plains to the highly varied terrain of the Rocky Mountains. The mountains are oriented north-south and rise from 1800m above mean sea level (MSL) to 3600m MSL at the Continental Divide. Numerous east-west oriented valleys begin in the mountains and end at the plains interface. This terrain makes the Front Range a challenging region to model. One of the more important flows created by this severe terrain are the highly-varying drainage flows found during stagnant, wintertime conditions. These flows can interact with larger-scale mountain and synoptic winds. One goal of the ASCOT 1991 program was to gain insight into multi-scale meteorological interaction by observing wintertime drainage conditions at the mountain-valley-plains interface. ASCOT data included surface and upper air measurements on approximately a 50km{sup 2} scale. Simultaneously, an SF{sub 6} tracer release study was being conducted around Rocky Flats, a nuclear materials production facility. Detailed surface concentration measurements were completed for the SF{sub 6} plume. This combination of meteorological and tracer concentration data provided a unique data set for comparisons of mesoscale and dispersion modeling results with observations and for evaluating our capability to predict pollutant transport. Our approach is to use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model to simulate atmospheric conditions and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) to model the dispersion of the SF{sub 6}.

  1. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  2. A Case Study on the Design of Learning Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Gabriela Trindade; Schnaid, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The design of educational software interfaces is a complex task, given its high domain dependency and multidisciplinary nature. It requires that teachers' knowledge and pedagogical beliefs be incorporated into the interface, posing a challenge to both teachers and designers, as they have to act as partners from the earliest phases of the process,…

  3. Studies of interfaces and vapors with Optical Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, C. S.

    1993-12-01

    Optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) has been applied to the study of soap-like molecules adsorbed to the water-air interface. By calibrating the signal from a soluble monolayer with that of an insoluble homolog, absolute measurements of the surface density could be obtained and related to the bulk concentration and surface tension. We could then demonstrate that the soluble surfactant forms a single monolayer at the interface. Furthermore, it deviates significantly from the ideal case in that its activity coefficients are far from 1, yet those coefficients remain constant over a broad range of surface pressures. We present evidence of a first-order phase transition taking place during the adsorption of this soluble monolayer. We consider the effects of the non-ideal behavior and the phase transition on the microscopic model of adsorption, and formulate an alternative to the Langmuir picture of adsorption which is just as simple, yet it can more easily allow for non-ideal behavior. The second half of this thesis considers the problem of SHG in bulk metal vapors. The symmetry of the vapor forbids SHG, yet it has been observed. We consider several models whereby the symmetry of the vapor is broken by the presence of the laser and compare their predictions to new observations we have made using a few-picosecond laser pulse. The two-lobed output beam profile shows that it is the vapor-plus-beam combination whose symmetry is important. The dependence on vapor pressure demonstrates the coherent nature of the radiation, while the dependence on buffer gas pressure hints at a change of the symmetry in time. The time-dependence is measured directly with a preliminary pump-probe measurement. The magnitude and intensity dependence of the signal are also measured. All but one of the models are eliminated by this comparison.

  4. Neutron irradiation damage of nuclear graphite studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, R.; Jones, A. N.; McDermott, L.; Marsden, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear graphite components are produced from polycrystalline artificial graphite manufacture from a binder and filler coke with approximately 20% porosity. During the operational lifetime, nuclear graphite moderator components are subjected to fast neutron irradiation which contributes to the change of material and physical properties such as thermal expansion co-efficient, young's modulus and dimensional change. These changes are directly driven by irradiation-induced changes to the crystal structure as reflected through the bulk microstructure. It is therefore of critical importance that these irradiation changes and there implication on component property changes are fully understood. This work examines a range of irradiated graphite samples removed from the British Experimental Pile Zero (BEPO) reactor; a low temperature, low fluence, air-cooled Materials Test Reactor which operated in the UK. Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been employed to characterise the effect of increased irradiation fluence on graphite microstructure and understand low temperature irradiation damage processes. HRTEM confirms the structural damage of the crystal lattice caused by irradiation attributed to a high number of defects generation with the accumulation of dislocation interactions at nano-scale range. Irradiation-induced crystal defects, lattice parameters and crystallite size compared to virgin nuclear graphite are characterised using selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns in TEM and Raman Spectroscopy. The consolidated 'D'peak in the Raman spectra confirms the formation of in-plane point defects and reflected as disordered regions in the lattice. The reduced intensity and broadened peaks of 'G' and 'D' in the Raman and HRTEM results confirm the appearance of turbulence and disordering of the basal planes whilst maintaining their coherent layered graphite structure.

  5. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  6. Multiaxial graphite test specimen

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    A multiaxial test program is to be conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the core component graphite. The objectives of the tests are to obtain failure data under uniaxial and biaxial states of stress in order to construct a failure surface in a two-dimensional stress space. These data will be used in verifying the accuracy of the maximum stress failure theory being proposed for use in designing the core graphite components. Tubular specimens are proposed to be used and are either loaded axially and/or subjected to internal pressure. This report includes a study on three specimen configurations. The conclusions of that study indicate that an elliptical transition geometry procedures the smallest discontinuity effects. Several loading combustions were studied using the elliptical transition specimen. The primary purpose is to establish the location of the highest stress state and its relation to the gage section for all of the loading conditions. The tension/internal pres sure loading condition (1:1) indicated that the high stress area is just outside the gage section but still should be acceptable. 5 refs., 18 figs.

  7. A study of dilational rheological properties of polymers at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xulong; Li, Yang; Jiang, Shengxiang; Sun, Huanquan; Cagna, Alain; Dou, Lixia

    2004-02-15

    Viscoelastic properties of two polymers, partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide and partially hydrolyzed modified polyacrylamide, widely used in chemical flooding in the petroleum industry, were investigated at three interfaces, water-air, water-dodecane, and water-crude oil, by means of a dilational method provided by I.T. Concept, France, at 85 degrees C. Polymer solutions were prepared in brine with 10,000 mg/l sodium chloride and 2000 mg/l calcium chloride. It has been shown that the viscoelastic modulus increases with the increment of polymer concentration in the range of 0-1500 mg/l at the water-air interface. Each polymer shows different viscoelatic behavior at different interfaces. Generally speaking, values of the viscoelastic modulus (E), the real part (E'), and the imaginary part (E") at the crude oil-water interface for each polymer are lower than at the air-water or water-dodecane interface. The two polymers display different interfacial properties at the same interface. Polymer No. 2 gives more viscous interfaces than polymer No. 1. All the information obtained from this paper will be helpful in understanding the interfacial rheology of ultra-high-molecular-weight polymer solutions. PMID:14697692

  8. Pyrolytic graphite collector development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Pyrolytic graphite promises to have significant advantages as a material for multistage depressed collector electrodes. Among these advantages are lighter weight, improved mechanical stiffness under shock and vibration, reduced secondary electron back-streaming for higher efficiency, and reduced outgassing at higher operating temperatures. The essential properties of pyrolytic graphite and the necessary design criteria are discussed. This includes the study of suitable electrode geometries and methods of attachment to other metal and ceramic collector components consistent with typical electrical, thermal, and mechanical requirements.

  9. Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy Studies of Ferromagnet - Semiconductor Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, P. G.; Perrella, A. C.; Yurtsever, A.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    Devices that employ spin as well as charge effects have been the subjects of extensive study recently. The magnetic tunneling transistor (1) is one important device that demonstrates an electrical means of injecting spin-polarized electrons into a semiconductor. A Schottky barrier lies at the heart of the device, and a high quality spatially homogenous and uniform barrier formed on GaAs is highly desirable. We have used ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) to study CoFe, Fe and permalloy deposited on a GaAs substrate to give nanometer resolved evaluation of hot electron transport through the films and across the Schottky barrier. All films give a homogenous, uniform barrier as compared with evaporated Au/GaAs and Ag/GaAs interfaces. We will report on BEEM measurements of the hot electron transfer ratio across the Schottky barrier for the different ferromagnetic materials, and on the energy and spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths of the CoFe, Fe, and permalloy films. (1) Sebastiaan van Dijken, Xin Jiang, Stuart S. P. Parkin, APL, 80, 3364.

  10. Theoretical study of the electronic structure of binary and ternary first-stage alkali intercalation compounds of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Tatar, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Despite the tremendous number of theoretical and experimental studies of the electronic properties of the first-stage heavy alkali intercalation compounds of graphite - KC8, RbC8, and CsC8 - there is still a great deal of uncertainty in the electronic structures of these materials. The electronic structures of these materials - required for the interpretation of experimental results - were calculated previously by several techniques. Because of the inability of these calculations to satisfactorily resolve the interpretation of experiments, and questions concerning the approximations used in the previous calculations, an attempt is made to estimate the electronic structure in these materials using a state-of-the-art, self consistent pseudopotential technique with a mixed basis of plane waves and localized atomic orbitals. The goal is to provide a detailed first principles model of the electronic interactions in these materials that can form the basis for a variety of additional, model calculations that address the experimental issues. In addition, and attempt is made to elucidate more fully the microscopic basis for differences between the heavy-alkali compounds as well as the difference between the heavy-alkali compounds as a class and the compounds formed from the light alkali, lithium.

  11. A coupled thermal and electrochemical study of lithium-ion battery cooled by paraffin/porous-graphite-matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Angelo; Jiang, Xi

    2016-05-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery cooling using a phase change material (PCM)/compressed expanded natural graphite (CENG) composite is investigated, for a cylindrical battery cell and for a battery module scale. An electrochemistry model (average model) is coupled to the thermal model, with the addition of a one-dimensional model for the solution and solid diffusion using the nodal network method. The analysis of the temperature distribution of the battery module scale has shown that a two-dimensional model is sufficient to describe the transient temperature rise. In consequence, a two-dimensional cell-centred finite volume code for unstructured meshes is developed with additions of the electrochemistry and phase change. This two-dimensional thermal model is used to investigate a new and usual battery module configurations cooled by PCM/CENG at different discharge rates. The comparison of both configurations with a constant source term and heat generation based on the electrochemistry model showed the superiority of the new design. In this study, comparisons between the predictions from different analytical and computational tools as well as open-source packages were carried out, and close agreements have been observed.

  12. Radiation Effects in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    The requirements for a solid moderator are reviewed and the reasons that graphite has become the solid moderator of choice discussed. The manufacture and properties of some currently available near-isotropic and isotropic grades are described. The major features of a graphite moderated reactors are briefly outlined. Displacement damage and the induced structural and dimensional changes in graphite are described. Recent characterization work on nano-carbons and oriented pyrolytic graphites that have shed new light on graphite defect structures are reviewed, and the effect of irradiation temperature on the defect structures is highlighted. Changes in the physical properties of nuclear graphite caused by neutron irradiation are reported. Finally, the importance of irradiation induced creep is presented, along with current models and their deficiencies.

  13. Studies of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphite Oxide in the Aspect of Their Possible Application in Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Sabina; Muzyka, Roksana; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Kotyczka-Morańska, Michalina; Setkiewicz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations on resistance structures based on graphite oxide (GRO) and graphene oxide (rGO). The subject matter of the investigations was thaw the sensitivity of the tested structures was affected by hydrogen, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide. The experiments were performed at a temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C in two carrier gases: nitrogen and synthetic air. The measurements were also aimed at characterization of the graphite oxide and graphene oxide. In our measurements we used (among others) techniques such as: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Raman Spectroscopy (RS); Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS). The data resulting from the characterizations of graphite oxide and graphene oxide have made it possible to interpret the obtained results from the point of view of physicochemical changes occurring in these structures. PMID:26784198

  14. Studies of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphite Oxide in the Aspect of Their Possible Application in Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Drewniak, Sabina; Muzyka, Roksana; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Kotyczka-Morańska, Michalina; Setkiewicz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations on resistance structures based on graphite oxide (GRO) and graphene oxide (rGO). The subject matter of the investigations was thaw the sensitivity of the tested structures was affected by hydrogen, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide. The experiments were performed at a temperature range from 30 °C to 150 °C in two carrier gases: nitrogen and synthetic air. The measurements were also aimed at characterization of the graphite oxide and graphene oxide. In our measurements we used (among others) techniques such as: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM); Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM); Raman Spectroscopy (RS); Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray Photoelectron Microscopy (XPS). The data resulting from the characterizations of graphite oxide and graphene oxide have made it possible to interpret the obtained results from the point of view of physicochemical changes occurring in these structures. PMID:26784198

  15. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  16. Experimental study of an isochorically heated heterogeneous interface. A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-20

    Outline of the presentation: Studying possible mix / interface motion between heterogeneous low/high Z interfaces driven by 2-fluid or kinetic plasma effects (Heated to few eV, Sharp (sub µm) interface); Isochoric heating to initialize interface done with Al quasimonoenergetic ion beams on Trident; Have measured isochoric heating in individual materials intended for compound targets; Fielded experiments on Trident to measure interface motion (Gold-diamond, tin-aluminium); Measured heated-sample temperature with streaked optical pyrometry (SOP) (UT Austin led (research contract), SOP tests → heating uniformity Vs thickness on Al foils. Results are being analyzed.

  17. High-energy photoemission studies of oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claessen, Ralph

    2015-03-01

    The interfaces of complex oxide heterostructures can host novel quantum phases not existing in the bulk of the constituents, with the high-mobility 2D electron system (2DES) in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) representing a prominent example. Despite extensive research the origin of the 2DES and its unusual properties - including the supposed coexistence of superconductivity and ferromagnetism - are still a matter of intense debate. Photoelectron spectroscopy, recently extended into the soft (SX-ARPES) and hard (HAXPES) X-ray regime, is a powerful method to provide detailed insight into the electronic structure of these heterostructures and, in particular, of the buried interface. This includes the identification of the orbital character of the 2DES as well as the determination of vital band structure information, such as band alignment, band bending, and even k-resolved band dispersions and Fermi surface topology. Moreover, resonant photoemission at the Ti L-edge reveals the existence of two different species of Ti 3d states, localized and itinerant, which can be distinguished and identified by their different resonance behavior. The role of oxygen vacancies is studied by controlled in-situ oxidation, which allows us to vary the composition from fully stoichiometric to strongly O-deficient. By comparison to free STO surfaces we can thus demonstrate that the metallicity of the heteointerfaces is intrinsic, i . e . it persists even in the absence of O defects. I will discuss our photoemission results on LAO/STO heterostructures in both (100) and (111) orientation as well as on the related system γ-Al2O3/STO(100), which also hosts a 2DES with an even higher mobility. Work in collaboration with J. Mannhart (MPI-FKF, Stuttgart), N. Pryds (TU Denmark), G. Rijnders (U Twente), S. Suga (U Osaka), M. Giorgoi (BESSY, HZB), W. Drube (DESY Photon Science), V.N. Strocov (Swiss Light Source), J. Denlinger (Advanced Light Source, LBNL), and T.-L. Lee (Diamond Light Source). Support by

  18. Wetting transitions of water on graphite and graphene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; dos Santos, Maria Cristina; Cole, Milton W

    2014-09-18

    Water has been predicted theoretically and observed experimentally to exhibit a wetting transition on graphite. Previous study of this problem was based on quite uncertain water-graphite interaction potentials. This paper computes the wetting temperature on graphite using recent, more realistic, interactions. Similar calculations are presented for the case of water on a suspended (free-standing) graphene sheet. PMID:24617914

  19. Kinetics of the Formation of Intercalation Compounds in Crystalline Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Hickey, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    Crystalline graphite has a structure that can be best described as an ordered stack of flat aromatic layers. It is known to form intercalation compounds with bromine and nitric acid. Their formation was studied using thermal measurements and analytical techniques. Samples of graphite treated with either bromine or nitric acid were prepared by contacting these reagents with powdered graphite.

  20. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  1. Ultrafast optical studies of surface reaction processes at semiconductor interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.J.D.

    1993-03-01

    Rectifying properties of semiconductor liquid junctions make them a simple system for converting and storing optical energy. However, interfacial electron or hole carrier transfer and competing non-radiative (energy loss) channels are not well understood at surfaces. This research has explored the use of three optical techniques, Surface Space Charge Electrooptic Sampling, Surface Restricted Transient Grating Spectroscopy, and Femtosecond Optical Kerr Spectroscopy (OKE) to obtain time evolution of the surface spatial distribution of photogenerated charge carriers, photocarrier population dynamics at semiconductor interfaces, and solvent modes responsible for charge localization and separation. These studies have shown that carriers arrive at GaAs(100) surfaces on the hundred femtosecond time scale. Improvements in time resolution, using surface grating spectroscopy, have shown interfacial hole transfer is occurring on the picosecond time scale. The OKE approach to solvent dynamics has determined the response of water to a field is multiexpontential with a major relaxation component of 100 femtoseconds. The observed interfacial hole transfer to Se[sup [minus]2] acceptors is occurring on this same time scale. This observation illustrates charge transfer processes can occur in the strong electronic coupling limit and can be competitive with carrier thermalization.

  2. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  3. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900°C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  4. Study of Composite Interface Fracture and Crack Growth Monitoring Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bily, Mollie A.; Kwon, Young W.; Pollak, Randall D.

    2010-08-01

    Interface fracture of woven fabric composite layers was studied using Mode II fracture testing. Both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites were used with a vinyl ester resin. First, the single-step cured (i.e., co-cured) composite interface strength was compared to that of the two-step cured interface as used in the scarf joint technique. The results showed that the two-step cured interface was as strong as the co-cured interface. Carbon nanotubes were then applied to the composite interface using two-step curing, and then followed by Mode II fracture testing. The results indicated a significant improvement of the interface fracture toughness due to the dispersed carbon nanotube layer for both carbon fiber and E-glass fiber composites. The carbon nanotube layer was then evaluated as a means to monitor crack growth along the interface. Because carbon nanotubes have very high electrical conductivity, the electrical resistance was measured through the interface as a crack grew, thus disrupting the carbon nanotube network and increasing the resistance. The results showed a linear relationship between crack length and interface resistance for the carbon fiber composites, and allowed initial detection of failure in the E-glass fiber composites. This study demonstrated that the application of carbon nanotubes along a critical composite interface not only improves fracture properties but can also be used to detect and monitor interfacial damage.

  5. Discrete Element study of granular material - Bumpy wall interface behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Cheikh, Khadija; Rémond, Sébastien; Pizette, Patrick; Vanhove, Yannick; Djelal, Chafika

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a DEM study of a confined granular material sheared between two parallel bumpy walls. The granular material consists of packed dry spherical particles. The bumpiness is modeled by spheres of a given diameter glued on horizontal planes. Different bumpy surfaces are modeled by varying diameter or concentration of glued spheres. The material is sheared by moving the two bumpy walls at fixed velocity. During shear, the confining pressure applied on each bumpy wall is controlled. The effect of wall bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient and on the granular material behavior at the bumpy walls is reported for various shearing conditions. For given bumpiness and confining pressure that we have studied, it is found that the shear velocity does not affect the shear stress. However, the effective friction coefficient and the behavior of the granular material depend on the bumpiness. When the diameter of the glued spheres is larger than about the average grains diameter of the medium, the latter is uniformly sheared and the effective friction coefficient remains constant. For smaller diameters of the glued spheres, the effective friction coefficient increases with the diameter of glued spheres. The influence of glued spheres concentration is significant only for small glued spheres diameters, typically half of average particle diameter of the granular material. In this case, increasing the concentration of glued spheres leads to a decrease in effective friction coefficient and to shear localization at the interface. For different diameters and concentrations of glued spheres, we show that the effect of bumpiness on the effective friction coefficient can be characterized by the depth of interlocking.

  6. Positron annihilation lifetime study of interfaces in ternary polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghala, D.; Ramya, P.; Pasang, T.; Raj, J. M.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Williams, J. F.

    2013-06-01

    A new method based on positron lifetime spectroscopy is developed to characterize individual interfaces in ternary polymer blends and hence determine the composition dependent miscibility level. The method owes its origin to the Kirkwood-Risemann-Zimm (KRZ) model for the evaluation of the hydrodynamic interaction parameters (αij) which was used successfully for a binary blend with a single interface. The model was revised for the present work for ternary polymer blends to account for three interfaces. The efficacy of this method is shown for two ternary blends namely poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly (ethylene-co-vinylacetate)/poly(vinyl chloride) (SAN/EVA/PVC) and polycaprolactone /poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile)/poly(vinyl chloride) (PCL/SAN/PVC) at different compositions. An effective hydrodynamic interaction parameter, αeff, was introduced to predict the overall miscibility of ternary blends.

  7. Diffusion Of Hydrophobin Proteins In Solution And Interactions With A Graphite Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2011-04-21

    Background Hydrophobins are small proteins produced by filamentous fungi that have a variety of biological functions including coating of spores and surface adhesion. To accomplish these functions, they rely on unique interface-binding properties. Using atomic-detail implicit solvent rigid-body Brownian dynamics simulations, we studied the diffusion of HFBI, a class II hydrophobin from Trichoderma reesei, in aqueous solution in the presence and absence of a graphite surface. Results In the simulations, HFBI exists in solution as a mixture of monomers in equilibrium with different types of oligomers. The oligomerization state depends on the conformation of HFBI. When a Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) layer is present in the simulated system, HFBI tends to interact with the HOPG layer through a hydrophobic patch on the protein. Conclusions From the simulations of HFBI solutions, we identify a tetrameric encounter complex stabilized by non-polar interactions between the aliphatic residues in the hydrophobic patch on HFBI. After the formation of the encounter complex, a local structural rearrangement at the protein interfaces is required to obtain the tetrameric arrangement seen in HFBI crystals. Simulations performed with the graphite surface show that, due to a combination of a geometric hindrance and the interaction of the aliphatic sidechains with the graphite layer, HFBI proteins tend to accumulate close to the hydrophobic surface.

  8. Kinetic studies of the sucrose adsorption onto an alumina interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kaman; Mohan, Sudhanshu

    2004-01-01

    An account is given of an experimental kinetic study of adsorption of analar reagent sucrose (ARS) onto an alumina interface spectrometrically ( λmax=570 nm) at pH 8.0 and at room temperature. The adsorption isotherm is a typical Langmuirian isotherm (S-type) and adsorption parameters have been deduced according to the Langmuir's model. The adsorption coefficient evaluated from the Langmuir's equation was found to be 2.52×10 2 l mol -1. Adsorption mechanism has been interpreted on the basis of metal-saccharide interaction as found in organometallic compounds and interaction due to negatively charged ends on the disaccharide molecules and positively charge groups on the surface on alumina which depends on the pH value. The effects of variation in experimental conditions of the adsorption system have also been investigated. The adsorption exhibited a typical response to the pH effect and on going towards the PZC the net charge decreases and any reaction making dependence on charge and maximum adsorption (amount) was found near the isoelectric point of alumina (pH 9.0). The presence of ions like Cl -, SO 42- and PO 43- affect the adsorbed amount quantitatively and it seems that these anions compete with sucrose for the positively charged surface sites. The addition of similar concentration of cations was found to reduce the adsorbed amount. The temperature was found to have an inverse effect on adsorption. The additions of catonic and anionic detergents influence both the adsorbed amount and the adsorption rate. The thermodynamics of the titled adsorption model indicates the spontaneous and exothermic nature. The negative value of entropy is an indication of probability of favorable and complex nature of the adsorption.

  9. Study of lumineers' interfaces by means of optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade Borges, Erica; Fernandes Cassimiro-Silva, Patrícia; Osório Fernandes, Luana; Leônidas Gomes, Anderson Stevens

    2015-06-01

    OCT has been used to evaluate dental materials, and is employed here to evaluate lumineers for the first time. Lumineers are used as esthetical indirect restoration, and after wearing and aging, several undesirable features such as gaps, bubbles and mismatch can appear in which would only be seen by invasive analysis. The OCT (spectral domain SD-OCT, 930nm central wavelength) was used to evaluate noninvasively the lumineer- cement-tooth interface. We analyzed 20 specimens of lumineers-teeth that were prepared in bovine teeth and randomly allocated in 4 experimental groups (n=5) with two different cementation techniques and two different types of cementing agent (RelyX U200 and RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE, with the adhesive recommended by the manufacture). The lumineers were made of lithium disilicate and obtained using a vacuum injection technique. The analysis was performed by using 2D and 3D OCT images, obtained before and after cementing and the thermal cycling process to simulate thermal stress in a oral cavity. Initial measurements showed that the SD-OCT was able to see through the 500μm thick lumineer, as delivered by the fabricant, and internal stress was observed. Failures were found in the cementing process and also after ageing simulation by thermal cycling. The adhesive failures as bubbles, gaps and degradation of the cementation line are the natural precursors of other defects reported by several studies of clinical follow-up (detachments, fractures and cracks). Bubble dimensions ranging from 146 μm to 1427 μm were measured and the OCT was validated as an investigative and precise tool for evaluation of the lumineer-cement-tooth.

  10. Theoretical studies of radiation effects in composite materials for space use. [graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.

    1982-01-01

    Tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane epoxy cured with diamino diphenyl sulfone was used as a model compound. Computer programs were developed to calculate (1) energy deposition coefficients of protons and electrons of various energies at different depths of the material; (2) ranges of protons and electrons of various energies in the material; and (3) cumulative doses received by the composite in different geometric shapes placed in orbits of various altitudes and inclination. A preliminary study on accelerated testing was conducted and it was found that an elliptical equitorial orbit of 300 km perigee by 2750 km apogee can accumulate, in 2 years or less, enough radiation dose comparable to geosynchronous environment for 30 years. The local plasma model calculated the mean excitation energies for covalent and ionic compounds. Longitudinal and lateral distributions of excited species by electron and proton impact as well as the probability of overlapping of two tracks due to two charged particles within various time intervals were studied.

  11. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided comprising coating the graphite surface with a suspension of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4% by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  12. Coating method for graphite

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

  13. Method for producing dustless graphite spheres from waste graphite fines

    DOEpatents

    Pappano, Peter J; Rogers, Michael R

    2012-05-08

    A method for producing graphite spheres from graphite fines by charging a quantity of spherical media into a rotatable cylindrical overcoater, charging a quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater thereby forming a first mixture of spherical media and graphite fines, rotating the overcoater at a speed such that the first mixture climbs the wall of the overcoater before rolling back down to the bottom thereby forming a second mixture of spherical media, graphite fines, and graphite spheres, removing the second mixture from the overcoater, sieving the second mixture to separate graphite spheres, charging the first mixture back into the overcoater, charging an additional quantity of graphite fines into the overcoater, adjusting processing parameters like overcoater dimensions, graphite fines charge, overcoater rotation speed, overcoater angle of rotation, and overcoater time of rotation, before repeating the steps until graphite fines are converted to graphite spheres.

  14. Swift heavy ion-induced radiation damage in isotropic graphite studied by micro-indentation and in-situ electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, Christian; Voss, Kay Obbe; Bender, Markus; Kupka, Katharina; Romanenko, Anton; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Tomut, Marilena

    2015-12-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-physical properties and radiation hardness, isotropic graphite is presently the most promising material candidate for new high-power ion accelerators which will provide highest beam intensities and energies. Under these extreme conditions, specific accelerator components including production targets and beam protection modules are facing the risk of degradation due to radiation damage. Ion-beam induced damage effects were tested by irradiating polycrystalline, isotropic graphite samples at the UNILAC (GSI, Darmstadt) with 4.8 MeV per nucleon 132Xe, 150Sm, 197Au, and 238U ions applying fluences between 1 × 1011 and 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The overall damage accumulation and its dependence on energy loss of the ions were studied by in situ 4-point resistivity measurements. With increasing fluence, the electric resistivity increases due to disordering of the graphitic structure. Irradiated samples were also analyzed off-line by means of micro-indentation in order to characterize mesoscale effects such as beam-induced hardening and stress fields within the specimen. With increasing fluence and energy loss, hardening becomes more pronounced.

  15. Effective catalytic media using graphitic nitrogen-doped site in graphene for a non-aqueous Li-O2 battery: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Han; Hwang, Yubin; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2015-03-01

    The cell performance of lithium-oxygen batteries using nitrogen doped graphene as a catalytic cathode has been validated in recent research, but the cathode reaction mechanism of lithium and oxygen still remains unclear. Since the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanism by ionic lithium and catalytic surface is predicted to be distinct for different defective sites such as graphitic, pyridinic, and pyrrolic, it is necessary to observe the behavior of ionic lithium and oxygen gas at each defective site in nitrogen doped graphene. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) calculations are adopted to analyze at an atomic scale how effectively each defective site acts as a catalytic cathode. Interestingly, unlike pyridinic or pyrrolic N is known to be the most effective catalytic site for ORR in fuel cells. Among the other defective sites, it is found that the graphitic N site is the most effective catalytic media activating ORR by ionic lithium in lithium-oxygen batteries due to the electron accepting the reaction of Li-O formation by the graphitic N site.

  16. Studies on Hot-Melt Prepregging on PRM-II-50 Polyimide Resin with Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.; Juhas, John; Veverka, Adrienne; Klans, Ojars; Inghram, Linda; Scheiman, Dan; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Zoha, John; Bubnick, Jim

    2004-01-01

    A second generation PMR (in situ Polymerization of Monomer Reactants) polyimide resin PMR-II-50, has been considered for high temperature and high stiffness space propulsion composites applications for its improved high temperature performance. As part of composite processing optimization, two commercial prepregging methods: solution vs. hot-melt processes were investigated with M40J fabrics from Toray. In a previous study a systematic chemical, physical, thermal and mechanical characterization of these composites indicated the poor resin-fiber interfacial wetting, especially for the hot-melt process, resulted in poor composite quality. In order to improve the interfacial wetting, optimization of the resin viscosity and process variables were attempted in a commercial hot-melt prepregging line. In addition to presenting the results from the prepreg quality optimization trials, the combined effects of the prepregging method and two different composite cure methods, i.e. hot press vs. autoclave on composite quality and properties are discussed.

  17. Studies on Hot-Melt Prepregging of PMR-II-50 Polyimide Resin with Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.; Juhas, John; Veverka, Adrienne; Klans, Ojars; Inghram, Linda; Scheiman, Dan; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Zoha, John; Bubnick, Jim

    2003-01-01

    A Second generation PMR (in situ Polymerization of Monomer Reactants) polyimide resin, PMR-II-50, has been considered for high temperature and high stiffness space propulsion composites applications for its improved high temperature performance. As part of composite processing optimization, two commercial prepregging methods: solution vs. hot-melt processes were investigated with M40J fabrics from Toray. In a previous study a systematic chemical, physical, thermal and mechanical characterization of these composites indicated that poor resin-fiber interfacial wetting, especially for the hot-melt process, resulted in poor composite quality. In order to improve the interfacial wetting, optimization of the resin viscosity and process variables were attempted in a commercial hot-melt prepregging line. In addition to presenting the results from the prepreg quality optimization trials, the combined effects of the prepregging method and two different composite cure methods, i.e., hot press vs. autoclave on composite quality and properties are discussed.

  18. FT-IR studies of graphite after keV-energy hydrogen ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Yoshitaka; Kajiura, Soji

    Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FT-IR) studies were made on vapor-grown carbon fiber (VGCF) after successive irradiations of 6, 3 and 1 keV-H + to saturation at 373-923 K, and after the irradiations at 623 K followed by a heat-treatment at 893-1150 K. Reference hydrocarbons, cholesterol (C 27H 45OH) and menthol (C 10H 19OH), were also measured for C-H stretch band frequencies and relative integrated intensity factors, κ--CH x. For the irradiated VGCF, a band was found to be centered at 2892 cm -1, in between a -CH 3 symmetric (2873 cm -1) and a >CH 2 asymmetric (2924 cm -1) stretch band, which was assigned to a >CH- stretch band. Relative densities of the CH x groups, assuming κCH--: κ--CH 3: κ>CH 2: κ>CH-- =0.12:2.2:1.1:1.0, showed that >CH 2 decreases in density with increasing the irradiation temperature beyond 1000 K, while >CH- reaches maximum at around 823 K and then decreases. The -CH 3 group decreases to a minimum from 623 to 823 K, and increases at above 823 K, indicating that methane forms at around 800 K through abstraction of H from >CH- by free CH 3. The density ratio of >CH- to >CH 2 reached a maximum at 0.4 at around 800 K, indicating that, in the keV-H + implantation layer, the implanted H atoms are trapped mainly at >CH 2, and subsidiarily at >CH-, and -CH 3, at defects, below 900 K.

  19. Hypervelocity impacts into graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latunde-Dada, S.; Cheesman, C.; Day, D.; Harrison, W.; Price, S.

    2011-03-01

    Studies have been conducted into the characterisation of the behaviour of commercial graphite (brittle) when subjected to hypervelocity impacts by a range of projectiles. The experiments were conducted with a two-stage gas gun capable of launching projectiles of differing density and strength to speeds of about 6kms-1 at right angles into target plates. The damage caused is quantified by measurements of the crater depth and diameters. From the experimental data collected, scaling laws were derived which correlate the crater dimensions to the velocity and the density of the projectile. It was found that for moderate projectile densities the crater dimensions obey the '2/3 power law' which applies to ductile materials.

  20. XPS Study of Oxide/GaAs and SiO2/Si Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Vasquez, R. P.; Lewis, B. F.; Maserjian, J.; Madhukar, A.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts developed in study of SiO2/Si interface applied to analysis of native oxide/GaAs interface. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been combined with precise chemical-profiling technique and resolution-enhancement methods to study stoichiometry of transitional layer. Results are presented in report now available.

  1. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-01

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp3 carbons and carbon–oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces.

  2. Characterization of a superlubricity nanometer interface by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunsheng; Yang, Xing; Liu, Bingqi; Dong, Hualai; Zheng, Quanshui

    2016-08-12

    Despite being known for almost two decades, the use of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems in commercial applications remains a challenge because of stiction, friction, and the wear of the interface. Superlubricity may be the solution to these challenges. In this paper, we study factors affecting the realization of superlubricity. Raman spectroscopy and other methods were used to characterize a graphite interface which can realize superlubricity and another graphite interface which cannot realize superlubricity. Raman spectra of the interfaces were obtained with the mapping mode and then processed to obtain the Raman images of the characteristic peaks. The Raman spectra provided the distribution of the surface defects and probed defects. Combined with atomic force microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the Raman spectra show that the sp(3) carbons and carbon-oxygen bond stuck at the edge of the graphite mesa are some of the determinants of large-area superlubricity realization. The characterization results can also be used to understand the friction and wear of large-area superlubricity, which are important for development and application of superlubricity. Furthermore, the methods used in this study are useful techniques and tools for the mechanism analysis of other nanometer interfaces. PMID:27348089

  3. Computation of dimensional changes in isotropic cesium-graphite reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joe N.; Heffernan, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    Cs-graphite reservoirs have been utilized in many operating thermionic converters and TFEs, in both in-core and out-of-core tests. The vapor pressure of cesium over Cs-intercalated graphite is well documented for unirradiated reservoirs. The vapor pressure after irradiation is the subject of on-going study. Dimensional changes due to both intercalation and to neutron irradiation have been quantified only for highly oriented graphite. This paper describes extrapolation of the data for intercalated oriented graphite, to provide a qualitative description of the response of isotropic graphite to exposure to both cesium and neutrons.

  4. Recycling Irradiated Nuclear Graphite - A Greener Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Pappano, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the successful recycle of irradiated graphite to fabricate new nuclear graphite using conventional manufacturing processes (albeit on a on a bench scale). Radiological concerns such as the containment of contamination in industrial scale manufacturing plants, or the release of 14C, were not considered. Moreover, a study of the annealing kinetics was conducted to elucidate the extent of property recovery over a representative temperature range. The goal of the preliminary work reported here was to determine if nuclear graphite, produced through the normal graphite fabrication process, but using crushed, previously irradiated nuclear graphite, could be manufactured with sufficient mechanical integrity to warrant further investigation

  5. Recycling Irradiated Nuclear Graphite - A Greener Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Pappano, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the successful recycle of irradiated graphite to fabricate new nuclear graphite using conventional manufacturing processes (albeit on a bench scale). Radiological concerns such as the containment of contamination in industrial scale manufacturing plants, or the release of 14C, were not considered. Moreover, a study of the annealing kinetics was conducted to elucidate the extent of property recovery over a representative temperature range. The goal of the preliminary work reported here was to determine if nuclear graphite, produced through the normal graphite fabrication process, but using crushed, previously irradiated nuclear graphite could be manufactured with sufficient mechanical integrity to warrant further investigation.

  6. Terahertz plasmonic properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. D.; Liu, S.; Kumar, G.; Nahata, A.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is a potentially useful material for plasmonic applications in the terahertz (THz) spectral range. Using THz time-domain spectroscopy, we studied the transmission properties of a ˜7.5 μm thick graphite film made via mechanical exfoliation and found that the complex dielectric constant follows the Drude model with a plasma frequency νp ˜ 34 THz. To assess the graphite plasmonic properties, we fabricated a subwavelength periodic aperture array in the graphite film and in a free-standing stainless steel film. Despite the low conductivity of graphite compared to conventional metals, the resonant transmission properties are similar.

  7. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called “wave-like buckling and slipping” mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition. PMID:25088720

  8. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    PubMed

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures. PMID:22254974

  9. TEM and XPS studies on CdS/CIGS interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jun-feng; Liao, Cheng; Cha, Li-mei; Jiang, Tao; Xie, Hua-mu; Zhao, Kui; Besland, M.-P.

    2014-12-01

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) was deposited by metallic precursors sputtering and subsequently submitted to a selenization process. The upper CdS layers were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CIGS interfaces were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). As checked by XPS analysis, the CIGS surface exhibited a hydroxide-terminated CdSe layer when treated with Cd Partial Electrolyte solution (Cd PE). Its thickness was roughly estimated to several nanometers. A 100 nm thick CdS layer was deposited onto CIGS surface. The TEM images revealed a clear and sharp interface between CdS and CIGS. XPS analysis showed a CIGS surface covered by a pinhole free and homogeneous CdS layer. XPS depth profile measurement of the CdS/CIGS interface did not evidence elemental inter-diffusion between the CIGS and CdS layers, in very good agreement with TEM observations.

  10. Thermal stability study of semimetal graphite n-InP and n-GaN Schottky diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatskiv, R.; Grym, J.

    2013-05-01

    The electrical properties of highly rectifying semimetal-graphite Schottky contacts fabricated by printing colloid graphite on n-type InP and GaN are investigated as a function of annealing temperature by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage techniques. As-deposited Schottky diodes exhibit excellent current-voltage rectifying characteristics of 7.5 × 107 and 1.9 × 1011 with Schottky barrier height of 1.13 and 1.29 eV at room temperature for InP and GaN, respectively. The key aspect of this technique, compared with conventional vacuum evaporation, is low deposition energy process, leaving the surface undisturbed.