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Sample records for gravitational lensing explanation

  1. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  2. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  3. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW Gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Gravitational lensing has developed into one of the most powerful tools for the analysis of the dark universe. This review summarizes the theory of gravitational lensing, its main current applications and representative results achieved so far. It has two parts. In the first, starting from the equation of geodesic deviation, the equations of thin and extended gravitational lensing are derived. In the second, gravitational lensing by stars and planets, galaxies, galaxy clusters and large-scale structures is discussed and summarized.

  5. Gravitational lensing by globular clusters and dwarf galaxies-- the explanation of quasar-galaxy associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushchenko, A.; Kim, C.; Sergeev, A.

    2003-04-01

    Quasar-galaxy associations can be explained as gravitational lensing by globular clusters, located in the halos of the foreground galaxies and dwarf galaxies in small groups of galaxies. We propose an observational test for checking this hypothesis. We used the SUPERCOSMOS sky survey to find the overdensities of star-like sources with zero proper motions in the vicinities of the~foreground galaxies from the CfA3 catalog. The results obtained for 19413 galaxies are presented. We show the results of calculations of number densities of star-like sources with zero proper motions in the vicinity of 19413 galaxies. Two different effects can explain the observational data: lensing by globular clusters and lensing by dwarf galaxies. We carried out the CCD 3-color photometry with the 2.0-m telescope of the~Terskol Observatory and the 1.8-m telescope of the Bohyunsan Observatory (South Korea) to select extremely lensed objects around several galaxies for future spectroscopic observations. From ads Wed Jan 12 06:25:17 2005 Return-Path: Received: (from ads@localhost) by head.cfa.harvard.edu (d/w) id j0CBPHjt007159; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:25:17 -0500 (EST) Received: from cfa.harvard.edu (cfa.harvard.edu [131.142.10.1]) by head.cfa.harvard.edu (d/w) with ESMTP id j0CBOuKD007095 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:24:56 -0500 (EST) Received: from uqbar.mao.kiev.ua (mao.gluk.org [194.183.183.193]) by cfa.harvard.edu (8.12.9-20030924/8.12.9/cfunix Mast-Sol 1.0) with ESMTP id j0CBOgRv026875 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 06:24:51 -0500 (EST) Received: from maoling.mao.kiev.ua (root@maoling.mao.kiev.ua [194.44.216.101]) by uqbar.mao.kiev.ua (8.11.6/8.11.6) with ESMTP id j0CBOdv08381 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 13:24:39 +0200 Received: from maoling.mao.kiev.ua (gallaz@localhost [127.0.0.1]) by maoling.mao.kiev.ua (8.12.3/8.12.3/Debian-7.1) with ESMTP id j0CBObPb014682 for ; Wed, 12 Jan 2005 13:24:37 +0200 Received: (from gallaz

  6. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy

  7. Gravitational lensing by gravastars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    As a possible method to detect gravastars (gravitational-vacuum-star), which was originally proposed by Mazur and Mottola, we study their gravitational lensing effects. Specifically, we adopt a spherical thin-shell model of a gravastar developed by Visser and Wiltshire, which connects interior de Sitter geometry and exterior Schwarzschild geometry, and assume that its surface is optically transparent. We calculate the image of a companion which rotates around the gravastar; we find that some characteristic images appear, depending on whether the gravastar possess unstable circular orbits of photons (Model 1) or not (Model 2). For Model 2, we calculate the total luminosity change, which is called microlensing effects; the maximal luminosity could be considerably larger than the black hole with the same mass.

  8. Gravitational lensing in quasar samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeskens, Jean-François; Surdej, Jean

    The first cosmic mirage was discovered approximately 20 years ago as the double optical counterpart of a radio source. This phenomenon had been predicted some 70 years earlier as a consequence of General Relativity. We present here a summary of what we have learnt since. The applications are so numerous that we had to concentrate on a few selected aspects of this new field of research. This review is focused on strong gravitational lensing, i.e. the formation of multiple images, in QSO samples. It is intended to give the reader an up-to-date status of the observations and to present an overview of its most interesting potential applications in cosmology and astrophysics, as well as numerous important results achieved so far. The first section follows an intuitive approach to the basics of gravitational lensing and is developed in view of our interest in multiply imaged quasars. The astrophysical and cosmological applications of gravitational lensing are outlined in Sect. 2 and the most important results are presented in Sect. 5. Sections 3 and 4 are devoted to the observations. Finally, conclusions are summarized in the last section. We have tried to avoid duplication with existing (and excellent) introductions to the field of gravitational lensing. For this reason, we did not concentrate on the individual properties of specific lens models, as these are already well presented in Narayan and Bartelmann (1996) and on a more intuitive ground in Refsdal and Surdej (1994). Wambsganss (1998) proposes a broad view on gravitational lensing in astronomy; the reviews by Fort and Mellier (1994) and Hattori et al. (1999) deal with lensing by galaxy clusters; microlensing in the Galaxy and the local group is reviewed by Paczynski (1996) and a general panorama on weak lensing is given by Bartelmann and Schneider (1999) and Mellier (1999). The monograph on the theory of gravitational lensing by Schneider, Ehlers and Falco (1992) also remains a reference in the field.

  9. Intermediate Strength Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, John

    2005-03-17

    Weak lensing is found in the correlations of shear in {approx}10{sup 4} galaxy images, strong lensing is detected by the obvious distortion of a single galaxy image, whereas intermediate lensing requires detection of less obvious curvature in several neighboring galaxies. Small impact-parameter lensing causes a sextupole distortion whose orientation is correlated with the quadrupole distortion (shear). By looking within a field for the spatial correlation of this sextupole-quadrupole correlation, an intermediate lensing regime is observed. This technique requires correction for the sextupole as well as the quadrupole content of the PSF. We remove the HST PSF and uncover intermediate lensing in the Hubble deep fields. Correlations of the type expected are found.

  10. Gravitational Lenses in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ros, Rosa M.

    2008-01-01

    It is not common to introduce current astronomy in school lessons. This article presents a set of experiments about gravitational lenses. It is normal to simulate them by means of computers, but it is very simple to simulate similar effects using a drinking glass full of liquid or using only the glass base. These are, of course, cheap and easy…

  11. HUBBLE'S TOP TEN GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope serendipitous survey of the sky has uncovered exotic patterns, rings, arcs and crosses that are all optical mirages produced by a gravitational lens, nature's equivalent of having giant magnifying glass in space. Shown are the top 10 lens candidates uncovered in the deepest 100 Hubble fields. Hubble's sensitivity and high resolution allow it to see faint and distant lenses that cannot be detected with ground-based telescopes whose images are blurred by Earth's atmosphere. [Top Left] - HST 01248+0351 is a lensed pair on either side of the edge-on disk lensing galaxy. [Top Center] - HST 01247+0352 is another pair of bluer lensed source images around the red spherical elliptical lensing galaxy. Two much fainter images can be seen near the detection limit which might make this a quadruple system. [Top Right] - HST 15433+5352 is a very good lens candidate with a bluer lensed source in the form of an extended arc about the redder elliptical lensing galaxy. [Middle Far Left] - HST 16302+8230 could be an 'Einstein ring' and the most intriguing lens candidate. It has been nicknamed the 'the London Underground' since it resembles that logo. [Middle Near Left] - HST 14176+5226 is the first, and brightest lens system discovered in 1995 with the Hubble telescope. This lens candidate has now been confirmed spectroscopically using large ground-based telescopes. The elliptical lensing galaxy is located 7 billion light-years away, and the lensed quasar is about 11 billion light-years distant. [Middle Near Right] - HST 12531-2914 is the second quadruple lens candidate discovered with Hubble. It is similar to the first, but appears smaller and fainter. [Middle Far Right] - HST 14164+5215 is a pair of bluish lensed images symmetrically placed around a brighter, redder galaxy. [Bottom Left] - HST 16309+8230 is an edge-on disk-like galaxy (blue arc) which has been significantly distorted by the redder lensing elliptical galaxy. [Bottom Center] - HST 12368

  12. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  13. Gravitational lensing in plasmic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S. Tsupko, O. Yu.

    2015-07-15

    The influence of plasma on different effects of gravitational lensing is reviewed. Using the Hamiltonian approach for geometrical optics in a medium in the presence of gravity, an exact formula for the photon deflection angle by a black hole (or another body with a Schwarzschild metric) embedded in plasma with a spherically symmetric density distribution is derived. The deflection angle in this case is determined by the mutual combination of different factors: gravity, dispersion, and refraction. While the effects of deflection by the gravity in vacuum and the refractive deflection in a nonhomogeneous medium are well known, the new effect is that, in the case of a homogeneous plasma, in the absence of refractive deflection, the gravitational deflection differs from the vacuum deflection and depends on the photon frequency. In the presence of a plasma nonhomogeneity, the chromatic refractive deflection also occurs, so the presence of plasma always makes gravitational lensing chromatic. In particular, the presence of plasma leads to different angular positions of the same image if it is observed at different wavelengths. It is discussed in detail how to apply the presented formulas for the calculation of the deflection angle in different situations. Gravitational lensing in plasma beyond the weak deflection approximation is also considered.

  14. Gravitational Lensing: Einstein's unfinished symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Ellis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational lensing - the deflection of light rays by gravitating matter - has become a major tool in the armoury of the modern cosmologist. Proposed nearly a hundred years ago as a key feature of Einstein's theory of general relativity, we trace the historical development since its verification at a solar eclipse in 1919. Einstein was apparently cautious about its practical utility and the subject lay dormant observationally for nearly 60 years. Nonetheless there has been rapid progress over the past twenty years. The technique allows astronomers to chart the distribution of dark matter on large and small scales thereby testing predictions of the standard cosmological model which assumes dark matter comprises a massive weakly-interacting particle. By measuring the distances and tracing the growth of dark matter structure over cosmic time, gravitational lensing also holds great promise in determining whether the dark energy, postulated to explain the accelerated cosmic expansion, is a vacuum energy density or a failure of general relativity on large scales. We illustrate the wide range of applications which harness the power of gravitational lensing, from searches for the earliest galaxies magnified by massive clusters to those for extrasolar planets which temporarily brighten a background star. We summarise the future prospects with dedicated ground and space-based facilities designed to exploit this remarkable physical phenomenon.

  15. Gravitational Lensing in TeVe S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Mu-Chen; Ko, Chung-Ming; Tian, Yong

    Gravitational Lensing is an important tool to understand the "missing mass" problem, especially for Modified Gravity. Recently, Bekenstein proposed a relativistic gravitation theory for Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) paradigm which resolves the "missing mass" problem well on abnormal dynamical behaviors in extragalactic region. Our work follow Bekenstein's approach to investigating gravitational lensing to get theoretical prediction.

  16. Gravitational Lensing Extends SETI Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, Richard

    Microwave SETI (The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) focuses on two primary strategies, the "Targeted Search" and the "All-Sky Survey." Although the goal of both strategies is the unequivocal discovery of a signal transmitted by intelligent species outside our solar system, they pursue the strategies in very different manners and have vastly different requirements. This chapter introduces Gravitational Lensing SETI (GL-SETI), a third strategy. Its goal is the unequivocal discovery of an extraterrestrial signal, with equipment and data processing requirements that are substantially different from the commonly-used strategies. This strategy is particularly suitable for use with smaller radio telescopes and has budgetary requirements suitable for individual researchers.

  17. Gravitational lensing by straight cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotvytskiy, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    We consider effects due to gravitational lensing by hypothetical cosmic strings. We briefly review facts concerning infinite straight strings, obtain the equation for a gravitational lens produced by an infinite string in the classical form, and analyze features of the gravitational lensing for a given object in detail. We consider a finite straight string. We present caustics and critical curves for strings with different lengths and also some images produced by the considered gravitational lens. We propose a method for constructing brightness curves numerically. As an example of the working capacity of this method, we construct a concrete brightness curve for certain gravitational lens parameters.

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies

  19. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yun; Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Edwin L.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss the gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries, in the context of advanced LIGO type gravitational wave detectors. We consider properties of the expected observational data with cut on the signal-to-noise ratio \\rho, i.e., \\rho>\\rho_0. An advanced LIGO should see unlensed inspiral events with a redshift distribution with cut-off at a redshift z_{\\rm max} < 1 for h \\leq 0.8. Any inspiral events detected at z>z_{\\rm max} should be lensed. We compute the expected total number of events which are present due to gravitational lensing and their redshift distribution for an advanced LIGO in a flat Universe. If the matter fraction in compact lenses is close to 10\\%, an advanced LIGO should see a few strongly lensed events per year with \\rho >5.

  20. Cosmological Applications of Strong Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraficz, Danuta

    2009-11-01

    One of the most intriguing recent results in physics is the growing evidence that an unknown energy field and an unknown kind of matter are the major components of the Universe (70% and 30%, respectively; see e.g. Riess et al. 1998, Spergel et al. 2007). Understanding and estimating the precise value of the energy density of the two above components, together with measuring the Hubble constant that determines the age of the Universe, is a major goal of modern astrophysics. An interesting method for estimating these parameters is strong gravitational lensing of quasars (QSOs). As shown by Refsdal (1964), H0, !m and !! can be measured based on the time delay ("t) between multiply lensed images of QSOs, because "t depends on H0 and on the distances to lens and source, hence!m and !!. Determination of cosmological parameters using gravitational lensing suffers from some degeneracies, but it is based on well understood physics and unlike distance ladder methods there are no calibration issues. Moreover, it has an advantage over some of the leading methods (such as Type Ia SNe) in that it is a purely cosmological approach. In this thesis, the property of strong gravitational lensing - time delay - is extensively explored. Strong gravitational lensing, and in particular time delays, are investigated here both theoretically and observationally. The focus is on the time delay as a cosmological and astrophysical tool to constrain H0, !m, !!, and to measure the masses of lensing galaxies. The first Chapter presents a historical background of gravitational lensing. It explains the process involved in creating the theory of gravitational lenses. It shows how Newton and then Einstein developed the concept and how Refsdal and others made it a cosmological tool. We present in more detail how gravitational lensing influenced the history of physics by being the first proof of Einstein's theory of gravity. The Chapter ends by discussing the first observational discovery of a strong

  1. Gravitational lensing in observational cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottale, L.

    This paper reviews some previous theoretical and observational results concerning the various effects of gravitational lensing, and also presents still unpublished results in this field. The theoretical section deals with the Optical Scalar Equation (OSE) approach. We recall the form of these equations, which relate the deformations of the cross sectional area of a light beam to the material and energetic distribution it encounters, via the two basic contributions to lensing, the matter or Ricci term and the shear term. The introduction of a new distance, the optical distance, allows to write the OSE in a simplified way from which new solutions are easily derived. We demonstrate here that a general form may be obtained for the amplification formula in the exact relativistic treatment, provided the Universe is assumed to be Friedmannian in the mean. New results are also presented concerning the probability distribution of amplifications, the relation from matter term to shear terms (the first ones give the mean of the second ones) and the problem of energy conservation. We recall how our method let to an analytical formula yielding the amplification by any number of lenses placed anywhere along the line of sight and present new general solutions for lensing by large scale density inhomogeneities. The gravitational redshift effects are also considered, either due to the crossing by photons of inhomogeneities, or intrinsic to them ; generalized solutions to the last problem are given. Some observational evidence concerning various lensing effects, either statistical or applying to individual sources, are considered. We first recall how the dependence of the amplification formula on the various physical parameters points towards the optimisation of lensing by very rich clusters of galaxies lying at redshifts around 0.7, which may give rise to very large amplifications for reasonable values of the density parameter. Recent results concerning a statistical effect of

  2. Investigations of Galaxy Clusters Using Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, Matthew P.

    2014-08-01

    In this dissertation, we discuss the properties of galaxy clusters that have been determined using strong and weak gravitational lensing. A galaxy cluster is a collection of galaxies that are bound together by the force of gravity, while gravitational lensing is the bending of light by gravity. Strong lensing is the formation of arcs or rings of light surrounding clusters and weak lensing is a change in the apparent shapes of many galaxies. In this work we examine the properties of several samples of galaxy clusters using gravitational lensing. In Chapter 1 we introduce astrophysical theory of galaxy clusters and gravitational lensing. In Chapter 2 we examine evidence from our data that galaxy clusters are more concentrated than cosmology would predict. In Chapter 3 we investigate whether our assumptions about the number of galaxies in our clusters was valid by examining new data. In Chapter 4 we describe a determination of a relationship between mass and number of galaxies in a cluster at higher redshift than has been found before. In Chapter 5 we describe a model of the mass distribution in one of the ten lensing systems discovered by our group at Fermilab. Finally in Chapter 6 we summarize our conclusions.

  3. Gravitational lensing of active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, J N

    1995-01-01

    Most of the known cases of strong gravitational lensing involve multiple imaging of an active galactic nucleus. The properties of lensed active galactic nuclei make them promising systems for astrophysical applications of gravitational lensing; in particular, they show structure on scales of milliseconds of arc to tens of seconds of arc, they are variable, and they are polarized. More than 20 cases of strong gravitational lenses are now known, and about half of them are radio sources. High-resolution radio imaging is making possible the development of well-constrained lens models. Variability studies at radio and optical wavelengths are beginning to yield results of astrophysical interest, such as an independent measure of the distance scale and limits on source sizes. PMID:11607613

  4. Gravitational lenses and dark matter - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical models are presented for guiding the application of gravitational lenses to probe the characteristics of dark matter in the universe. Analytical techniques are defined for quantifying the mass associated with lensing galaxies (in terms of the image separation), determining the quantity of dark mass of the lensing bodies, and estimating the mass density of the lenses. The possibility that heavy halos are made of low mass stars is considered, along with the swallowing of central images of black holes or cusps in galactic nuclei and the effects produced on a lensed quasar image by nonbaryonic halos. The observable effects of dense groups and clusters and the characteristics of dark matter strings are discussed, and various types of images which are possible due to lensing phenomena and position are described.

  5. Time delay in Swiss cheese gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2010-08-15

    We compute time delays for gravitational lensing in a flat {Lambda} dominated cold dark matter Swiss cheese universe. We assume a primary and secondary pair of light rays are deflected by a single point mass condensation described by a Kottler metric (Schwarzschild with {Lambda}) embedded in an otherwise homogeneous cosmology. We find that the cosmological constant's effect on the difference in arrival times is nonlinear and at most around 0.002% for a large cluster lens; however, we find differences from time delays predicted by conventional linear lensing theory that can reach {approx}4% for these large lenses. The differences in predicted delay times are due to the failure of conventional lensing to incorporate the lensing mass into the mean mass density of the universe.

  6. HST Observations of New Class Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal

    1995-07-01

    We propose to examine a few of the very best lens candidates from a new gravitational lens survey, the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) made with the VLA. We are virtually certain that we have one new lens system (1600+434) and another (1609+655) has a radio configuration which almost invariably indicates gravitational lensing. The other cases are systems which have a high probability of being lenses (statistically we would expect at least 5 of the 10 objects should be lensed, since we have imaged >3000 radio sources and experience shows that 1 in 500 are lensed). All have separations which make them difficult to study from the ground and therefore uniquely suited to the capabilities of the HST. In this investigation we will study 1600+434 and 1609+655 and attempt to image the lensing galaxy. We will image the remainder in an attempt to confirm their lens status (which requires 0.1" resolution imaging typically) and search for lensing galaxies and/or clusters in those found to be lensed systems.

  7. Bayesian Inference of CMB Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderes, Ethan; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Lavaux, Guilhem

    2015-08-01

    The Planck satellite, along with several ground-based telescopes, has mapped the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at sufficient resolution and signal-to-noise so as to allow a detection of the subtle distortions due to the gravitational influence of the intervening matter distribution. A natural modeling approach is to write a Bayesian hierarchical model for the lensed CMB in terms of the unlensed CMB and the lensing potential. So far there has been no feasible algorithm for inferring the posterior distribution of the lensing potential from the lensed CMB map. We propose a solution that allows efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling from the joint posterior of the lensing potential and the unlensed CMB map using the Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. The main conceptual step in the solution is a re-parameterization of CMB lensing in terms of the lensed CMB and the “inverse lensing” potential. We demonstrate a fast implementation on simulated data, including noise and a sky cut, that uses a further acceleration based on a very mild approximation of the inverse lensing potential. We find that the resulting Markov Chain has short correlation lengths and excellent convergence properties, making it promising for applications to high-resolution CMB data sets in the future.

  8. Cosmological test using strong gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, C. C.; Wang, F. Y.

    2015-09-01

    As one of the probes of universe, strong gravitational lensing systems allow us to compare different cosmological models and constrain vital cosmological parameters. This purpose can be reached from the dynamic and geometry properties of strong gravitational lensing systems, for instance, time-delay Δτ of images, the velocity dispersion σ of the lensing galaxies and the combination of these two effects, Δτ/σ2. In this paper, in order to carry out one-on-one comparisons between ΛCDM universe and Rh = ct universe, we use a sample containing 36 strong lensing systems with the measurement of velocity dispersion from the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamic survey (LSD) survey. Concerning the time-delay effect, 12 two-image lensing systems with Δτ are also used. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations are used to compare the efficiency of the three methods as mentioned above. From simulations, we estimate the number of lenses required to rule out one model at the 99.7 per cent confidence level. Comparing with constraints from Δτ and the velocity dispersion σ, we find that using Δτ/σ2 can improve the discrimination between cosmological models. Despite the independence tests of these methods reveal a correlation between Δτ/σ2 and σ, Δτ/σ2 could be considered as an improved method of σ if more data samples are available.

  9. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  10. CONSTRAINING SOURCE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Wittman, D.; Dawson, W. A.

    2012-09-10

    We introduce a new method for constraining the redshift distribution of a set of galaxies, using weak gravitational lensing shear. Instead of using observed shears and redshifts to constrain cosmological parameters, we ask how well the shears around clusters can constrain the redshifts, assuming fixed cosmological parameters. This provides a check on photometric redshifts, independent of source spectral energy distribution properties and therefore free of confounding factors such as misidentification of spectral breaks. We find that {approx}40 massive ({sigma}{sub v} = 1200 km s{sup -1}) cluster lenses are sufficient to determine the fraction of sources in each of six coarse redshift bins to {approx}11%, given weak (20%) priors on the masses of the highest-redshift lenses, tight (5%) priors on the masses of the lowest-redshift lenses, and only modest (20%-50%) priors on calibration and evolution effects. Additional massive lenses drive down uncertainties as N{sub lens}{sup -1/2}, but the improvement slows as one is forced to use lenses further down the mass function. Future large surveys contain enough clusters to reach 1% precision in the bin fractions if the tight lens-mass priors can be maintained for large samples of lenses. In practice this will be difficult to achieve, but the method may be valuable as a complement to other more precise methods because it is based on different physics and therefore has different systematic errors.

  11. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves in Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Piórkowska, Aleksandra; Biesiada, Marek; Zhu, Zong-Hong E-mail: marek.biesiada@us.edu.pl

    2013-10-01

    Gravitational wave experiments have entered a new stage which gets us closer to the opening a new observational window on the Universe. In particular, the Einstein Telescope (ET) is designed to have a fantastic sensitivity that will provide with tens or hundreds of thousand NS-NS inspiral events per year up to the redshift z = 2. Some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral NS-NS events in the Einstein telescope. Being conservative we consider the lens population of elliptical galaxies. It turns out that depending on the local insipral rate ET should detect from one per decade detection in the pessimistic case to a tens of detections per year for the most optimistic case. The detection of gravitationally lensed source in gravitational wave detectors would be an invaluable source of information concerning cosmography, complementary to standard ones (like supernovae or BAO) independent of the local cosmic distance ladder calibrations.

  12. The geometry of gravitational lensing magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aazami, Amir Babak; Werner, Marcus C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a definition of unsigned magnification in gravitational lensing valid on arbitrary convex normal neighborhoods of time oriented Lorentzian manifolds. This definition is a function defined at any two points along a null geodesic that lie in a convex normal neighborhood, and foregoes the usual notions of lens and source planes in gravitational lensing. Rather, it makes essential use of the van Vleck determinant, which we present via the exponential map, and Etherington's definition of luminosity distance for arbitrary spacetimes. We then specialize our definition to spacetimes, like Schwarzschild's, in which the lens is compact and isolated, and show that our magnification function is monotonically increasing along any geodesic contained within a convex normal neighborhood.

  13. Gravitational lensing statistics of amplified supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Schneider, P.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification statistics of gravitationally lensed supernovae can provide a valuable probe of the lensing matter in the universe. A general probability distribution for amplification by compact objects is derived which allows calculation of the lensed fraction of supernovae at or greater than an amplification A and at or less than an apparent magnitude. Comparison of the computed fractions with future results from ongoing supernova searches can lead to determination of the mass density of compact dark matter components with masses greater than about 0.001 solar mass, while the time-dependent amplification (and polarization) of the expanding supernovae constrain the individual masses. Type II supernovae are found to give the largest fraction for deep surveys, and the optimum flux-limited search is found to be at approximately 23d magnitude, if evolution of the supernova rate is neglected.

  14. SimpLens: Interactive gravitational lensing simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Prasenjit; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2016-06-01

    SimpLens illustrates some of the theoretical ideas important in gravitational lensing in an interactive way. After setting parameters for elliptical mass distribution and external mass, SimpLens displays the mass profile and source position, the lens potential and image locations, and indicate the image magnifications and contours of virtual light-travel time. A lens profile can be made shallower or steeper with little change in the image positions and with only total magnification affected.

  15. Gravitational Lensing: Recent Progress & Future Goals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, Tereasa

    2001-01-01

    This award was intended to provide financial support for an international astrophysics conference on gravitational lensing which was held at Boston University from July 25 to July 30, 1999. Because of the nature of the award, no specific research was proposed, nor was any carried out. The participants at the conference presented results of their on-going research efforts, and written summaries of their presentations have been published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific as part of their conference series. The reference to the conference proceedings book is Gravitational Lensing: Recent Progress and Future Goals, ASP Conference Series volume 237, eds. T. G. Brainerd and C. S. Kochanek (2001). The ISBN number of this book is 1-58381-074-9. The goal of the conference was to bring together both senior and junior investigators who were actively involved in all aspects of gravitational lensing research. This was the first conference in four years to address gravitational lensing from such a broad perspective (the previous such conference being IAU Symposium 173 held in Melbourne, Australia in July 1995). The conference was attended by 190 participants, who represented of order 70 different institutions and of order 15 different countries. The Scientific Organizing Committee members were Matthias Bartelmann (co-chair), Tereasa Brainerd (co-chair), Ian Browne, Richard Ellis, Nick Kaiser, Yannick Mellier, Sjur Refsdal, HansWalter Rix, Joachim Wambsganss, and Rachel Webster. The Local Organizing Committee members were Tereasa Brainerd (chair), Emilio Falco, Jacqueline Hewitt, Christopher Kochanek, and Irwin Shapiro. The oral sessions were organized around specific applications of gravitational lensing and included invited reviews, invited 'targeted talks', and contributed talks. The review speakers were Roger Blandford, Tereasa Brainerd, Gus Evrard, Nick Kaiser, Guinevere Kaufmann, Chris Kochanek, Charley Lineweaver, Gerry Luppino, Shude Mao, Paul Schechter, Peter

  16. Baryons, neutrinos, feedback and weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OverWhelmingly Large hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for z < 1.5, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than 2 per cent for scales k < 10 h Mpc-1 and better than 5 per cent for 10 < k < 100 h Mpc-1. Equipped with this precise tool, this paper presents the first constraint on baryonic feedback models using gravitational lensing data, from the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). In this analysis, we show that the effect of neutrino mass on the mass power spectrum is degenerate with the baryonic feedback at small angular scales and cannot be ignored. Assuming a cosmology precision fixed by WMAP9, we find that a universe with massless neutrinos is rejected by the CFHTLenS lensing data with 85-98 per cent confidence, depending on the baryon feedback model. Some combinations of feedback and non-zero neutrino masses are also disfavoured by the data, although it is not yet possible to isolate a unique neutrino mass and feedback model. Our study shows that ongoing weak gravitational lensing surveys (KiDS, HSC and DES) will offer a unique opportunity to probe the physics of baryons at galactic scales, in

  17. The CASTLES Imaging Survey of Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C. Y.; Falco, E. E.; Lehar, J.; Impey, C. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; McLeod, B. A.; Rix, H.-W.

    1997-12-01

    The CASTLES survey (Cfa-Arizona-(H)ST-Lens-Survey) is imaging most known small-separation gravitational lenses (or lens candidates), using the NICMOS camera (mostly H-band) and the WFPC2 (V and I band) on HST. To date nearly half of the IR imaging survey has been completed. The main goals are: (1) to search for lens galaxies where none have been directly detected so far; (2) obtain photometric redshift estimates (VIH) for the lenses where no spectroscopic redshifts exist; (3) study and model the lens galaxies in detail, in part to study the mass distribution within them, in part to identify ``simple" systems that may permit accurate time delay estimates for H_0; (3) measure the M/L evolution of the sample of lens galaxies with look-back time (to z ~ 1); (4) determine directly which fraction of sources are lensed by ellipticals vs. spirals. We will present the survey specifications and the images obtained so far.

  18. Fitting gravitational lenses: truth or delusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. Wyn; Witt, Hans J.

    2003-11-01

    The observables in a strong gravitational lens are usually just the image positions and sometimes the flux ratios. We develop a new and simple algorithm which allows a set of models to be fitted exactly to the observations. Taking our cue from the strong body of evidence that early-type galaxies are close to isothermal, we assume that the lens is scale-free with a flat rotation curve. External shear can be easily included. Our algorithm allows full flexibility regarding the angular structure of the lensing potential. Importantly, all the free parameters enter linearly into the model and so the lens and flux ratio equations can always be solved by straightforward matrix inversion. The models are only restricted by the fact that the surface mass density must be positive. We use this new algorithm to examine some of the claims made for anomalous flux ratios. It has been argued that such anomalies betray the presence of substantial amounts of substructure in the lensing galaxy. We demonstrate by explicit construction that some of the lens systems for which substructure has been claimed can be well fitted by smooth lens models. This is especially the case when the systematic errors in the flux ratios (caused by microlensing or differential extinction) are taken into account. However, there is certainly one system (B1422+231) for which the existing smooth models are definitely inadequate and for which substructure may be implicated. Within a few tens of kpc of the lensing galaxy centre, dynamical friction and tidal disruption are known to be very efficient at dissolving any substructure. Very little substructure is projected within the Einstein radius. The numbers of strong lenses for which substructure is currently being claimed may be so large that this contradicts rather than supports cold dark matter theories.

  19. Modulation of a chirp gravitational wave from a compact binary due to gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2005-05-15

    A possible wave effect in the gravitational lensing phenomenon is discussed. We consider the interference of two coherent gravitational waves of slightly different frequencies from a compact binary, due to the gravitational lensing by a galaxy halo. This system shows the modulation of the wave amplitude. The lensing probability of such the phenomenon is of order 10{sup -5} for a high-z source, but it may be advantageous to the observation due to the magnification of the amplitude.

  20. Gravitational lensing by rotating naked singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, Galin N.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2008-10-15

    We model massive compact objects in galactic nuclei as stationary, axially symmetric naked singularities in the Einstein-massless scalar field theory and study the resulting gravitational lensing. In the weak deflection limit we study analytically the position of the two weak field images, the corresponding signed and absolute magnifications as well as the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are static post-Newtonian corrections to the signed magnification and their sum as well as to the critical curves, which are functions of the scalar charge. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly for the weakly naked and vastly for the strongly naked singularities with the increase of the scalar charge. The pointlike caustics drift away from the optical axis and do not depend on the scalar charge. In the strong deflection limit approximation, we compute numerically the position of the relativistic images and their separability for weakly naked singularities. All of the lensing quantities are compared to particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities.

  1. GLAMER - II. Multiple-plane gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Margarita; Metcalf, R. Benton; Giocoli, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    We present an extension to multiple planes of the gravitational lensing code GLAMER. The method entails projecting the mass in the observed light-cone on to a discrete number of lens planes and inverse ray-shooting from the image to the source plane. The mass on each plane can be represented as haloes, simulation particles, a projected mass map extracted form a numerical simulation or any combination of these. The image finding is done in a source-oriented fashion, where only regions of interest are iteratively refined on an initially coarse image plane grid. The calculations are performed in parallel on shared memory machines. The code is able to handle different types of analytic haloes (NFW, NSIE, power law, etc.), haloes extracted from numerical simulations and clusters constructed from semi-analytic models (MOKA). Likewise, there are several different options for modelling the source(s) which can be distributed throughout the light-cone. The distribution of matter in the light-cone can be either taken from a pre-existing N-body numerical simulations, from halo catalogues, or are generated from an analytic mass function. We present several tests of the code and demonstrate some of its applications such as generating mock images of galaxy and galaxy cluster lenses.

  2. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kockanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant has supported papers which present a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. During the second year we have focused more closely on the relationship of baryons and dark matter.

  3. What is Gravitational Lensing?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Alexie, Leauthaud; Reiko, Nakajima [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Berkely, California, United States

    2010-01-08

    July 28, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  4. What is Gravitational Lensing? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Nakajima, Reiko

    2009-07-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  5. What is Gravitational Lensing? (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Leauthaud, Alexie; Nakajima, Reiko [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Gravitational lensing is explained by Einstein's general theory of relativity: galaxies and clusters of galaxies, which are very massive objects, act on spacetime by causing it to become curved. Alexie Leauthaud and Reiko Nakajima, astrophysicists with the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, will discuss how scientists use gravitational lensing to investigate the nature of dark energy and dark matter in the universe.

  6. Atomic Inference from Weak Gravitational Lensing Data

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Phil; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-12-14

    We present a novel approach to reconstructing the projected mass distribution from the sparse and noisy weak gravitational lensing shear data. The reconstructions are regularized via the knowledge gained from numerical simulations of clusters, with trial mass distributions constructed from n NFW profile ellipsoidal components. The parameters of these ''atoms'' are distributed a priori as in the simulated clusters. Sampling the mass distributions from the atom parameter probability density function allows estimates of the properties of the mass distribution to be generated, with error bars. The appropriate number of atoms is inferred from the data itself via the Bayesian evidence, and is typically found to be small, reecting the quality of the data. Ensemble average mass maps are found to be robust to the details of the noise realization, and succeed in recovering the demonstration input mass distribution (from a realistic simulated cluster) over a wide range of scales. As an application of such a reliable mapping algorithm, we comment on the residuals of the reconstruction and the implications for predicting convergence and shear at specific points on the sky.

  7. Weak gravitational lensing with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Bacon, D.; Camera, S.; Harrison, I.; Joachimi, B.; Metcalf, R. B.; Pourtsidou, A.; Takahashi, K.; Zuntz, J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bridle, S.; Jarvis, M.; Kitching, T.; Miller, L.; Patel, P.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the capabilities of various stages of the SKA to perform world-leading weak gravitational lensing surveys. We outline a way forward to develop the tools needed for pursuing weak lensing in the radio band. We identify the key analysis challenges and the key pathfinder experiments that will allow us to address them in the run up to the SKA. We identify and summarize the unique and potentially very powerful aspects of radio weak lensing surveys, facilitated by the SKA, that can solve major challenges in the field of weak lensing. These include the use of polarization and rotational velocity information to control intrinsic alignments, and the new area of weak lensing using intensity mapping experiments. We show how the SKA lensing surveys will both complement and enhance corresponding efforts in the optical wavebands through cross-correlation techniques and by way of extending the reach of weak lensing to high redshift.

  8. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The grant has supported the completion of 16 papers and 4 conference proceedings to date. During the first year of the project we completed five papers, each of which represents a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. In the first paper, "The Importance of Einstein Rings", we developed the first theory for the formation and structure of the Einstein rings formed by lensing extended sources like the host galaxies of quasar and radio sources. We applied the theory to three lenses with lensed host galaxies. For the time delay lens PG 1115+080 we found that the structure of the Einstein ring ruled out models of the gravitational potential which permitted a large Hubble constant (70 km/s Mpc). In the second paper, :Cusped Mass Models Of Gravitational Lenses", we introduced a new class of lens models where the central density is characterized by a cusp ( rho proportional to tau(sup -gamma), 1 less than gamma less than 2) as in most modern models and theories of galaxies rather than a finite core radius. In the third paper, "Global Probes of the Impact of Baryons on Dark Matter Halos", we made the first globally consistent models for the separation distribution of gravitational lenses including both galaxy and cluster lenses. We show that the key physics for the origin of the sharp separation cutoff in the separation distribution near 3 arc sec is the effect of the cooling baryons in galaxies on the density structure of the system.

  9. Constraints on cosmological models from strong gravitational lensing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Shuo; Pan, Yu; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Biesiada, Marek; Godlowski, Wlodzimierz E-mail: panyu@cqupt.edu.cn E-mail: godlowski@uni.opole.pl

    2012-03-01

    Strong lensing has developed into an important astrophysical tool for probing both cosmology and galaxies (their structure, formation, and evolution). Using the gravitational lensing theory and cluster mass distribution model, we try to collect a relatively complete observational data concerning the Hubble constant independent ratio between two angular diameter distances D{sub ds}/D{sub s} from various large systematic gravitational lens surveys and lensing by galaxy clusters combined with X-ray observations, and check the possibility to use it in the future as complementary to other cosmological probes. On one hand, strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems create such a new opportunity by combining stellar kinematics (central velocity dispersion measurements) with lensing geometry (Einstein radius determination from position of images). We apply such a method to a combined gravitational lens data set including 70 data points from Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) and Lens Structure and Dynamics survey (LSD). On the other hand, a new sample of 10 lensing galaxy clusters with redshifts ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 carefully selected from strong gravitational lensing systems with both X-ray satellite observations and optical giant luminous arcs, is also used to constrain three dark energy models (ΛCDM, constant w and CPL) under a flat universe assumption. For the full sample (n = 80) and the restricted sample (n = 46) including 36 two-image lenses and 10 strong lensing arcs, we obtain relatively good fitting values of basic cosmological parameters, which generally agree with the results already known in the literature. This results encourages further development of this method and its use on larger samples obtained in the future.

  10. Gravitational lensing by black holes: The case of Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, V.

    2014-01-14

    The strong gravitational fields created by black holes dramatically affect the propagation of photons by bending their trajectories. Gravitational lensing thus stands as the main source of information on the space-time structure in such extreme regimes. We will review the theory and phenomenology of gravitational lensing by black holes, with the generation of higher order images and giant caustics by rotating black holes. We will then focus on Sgr A*, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, for which next-to-come technology will be able to reach resolutions of the order of the Schwarzschild radius and ultimately test the existence of an event horizon.

  11. Data mining for gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, Adriano; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target-selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine-learning techniques and demonstrate that a two-step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step, we use catalogue-level information (griz+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to pre-select targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (gradient-boosted trees), to form a final set of candidates. The results from this procedure can be used to further refine the simpler SQLS algorithms, with a twofold (or threefold) gain in purity and the same (or 80 per cent) completeness at target-selection stage, or a purity of 70 per cent and a completeness of 60 per cent after the candidate-selection step. Simpler photometric searches in griz+WISE based on colour cuts would provide samples with 7 per cent purity or less. Our technique is extremely fast, as a list of candidates can be obtained from a Stage III experiment (e.g. DES catalogue/data base) in a few CPU hours. The techniques are easily extendable to Stage IV experiments like LSST with the addition of time domain information.

  12. HerMES: CANDIDATE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXIES AND LENSING STATISTICS AT SUBMILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Wardlow, Julie L.; Cooray, Asantha; De Bernardis, Francesco; Calanog, J.; Amblard, A.; Arumugam, V.; Aussel, H.; Bethermin, M.; Blundell, R.; Bussmann, R. S.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Carpenter, J. M.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Casey, C. M.; and others

    2013-01-01

    We present a list of 13 candidate gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) from 95 deg{sup 2} of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, a surface density of 0.14 {+-} 0.04 deg{sup -2}. The selected sources have 500 {mu}m flux densities (S {sub 500}) greater than 100 mJy. Gravitational lensing is confirmed by follow-up observations in 9 of the 13 systems (70%), and the lensing status of the four remaining sources is undetermined. We also present a supplementary sample of 29 (0.31 {+-} 0.06 deg{sup -2}) gravitationally lensed SMG candidates with S {sub 500} = 80-100 mJy, which are expected to contain a higher fraction of interlopers than the primary candidates. The number counts of the candidate lensed galaxies are consistent with a simple statistical model of the lensing rate, which uses a foreground matter distribution, the intrinsic SMG number counts, and an assumed SMG redshift distribution. The model predicts that 32%-74% of our S {sub 500} {>=} 100 mJy candidates are strongly gravitationally lensed ({mu} {>=} 2), with the brightest sources being the most robust; this is consistent with the observational data. Our statistical model also predicts that, on average, lensed galaxies with S {sub 500} = 100 mJy are magnified by factors of {approx}9, with apparently brighter galaxies having progressively higher average magnification, due to the shape of the intrinsic number counts. 65% of the sources are expected to have intrinsic 500 {mu}m flux densities less than 30 mJy. Thus, samples of strongly gravitationally lensed SMGs, such as those presented here, probe below the nominal Herschel detection limit at 500 {mu}m. They are good targets for the detailed study of the physical conditions in distant dusty, star-forming galaxies, due to the lensing magnification, which can lead to spatial resolutions of {approx}0.''01 in the source plane.

  13. Is There a Quad Problem Among Pptical Gravitational Lenses?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune

    2007-06-06

    Most of optical gravitational lenses recently discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) have two-images rather than four images, in marked contrast to radio lenses for which the fraction of four-image lenses (quad fraction) is quite high. We revisit the quad fraction among optical lenses by taking the selection function of the SQLS into account. We find that the current observed quad fraction in the SQLS is indeed lower than, but consistent with, the prediction of our theoretical model. The low quad fraction among optical lenses, together with the high quad fraction among radio lenses, implies that the quasar optical luminosity function has a relatively shallow faint end slope.

  14. PICS: Simulations of Strong Gravitational Lensing in Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Gladders, Michael D.; Rangel, Esteban M.; Florian, Michael K.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Fasel, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    Gravitational lensing has become one of the most powerful tools available for investigating the “dark side” of the universe. Cosmological strong gravitational lensing, in particular, probes the properties of the dense cores of dark matter halos over decades in mass and offers the opportunity to study the distant universe at flux levels and spatial resolutions otherwise unavailable. Studies of strongly lensed variable sources offer even further scientific opportunities. One of the challenges in realizing the potential of strong lensing is to understand the statistical context of both the individual systems that receive extensive follow-up study, as well as that of the larger samples of strong lenses that are now emerging from survey efforts. Motivated by these challenges, we have developed an image simulation pipeline, Pipeline for Images of Cosmological Strong lensing (PICS), to generate realistic strong gravitational lensing signals from group- and cluster-scale lenses. PICS uses a low-noise and unbiased density estimator based on (resampled) Delaunay Tessellations to calculate the density field; lensed images are produced by ray-tracing images of actual galaxies from deep Hubble Space Telescope observations. Other galaxies, similarly sampled, are added to fill in the light cone. The pipeline further adds cluster member galaxies and foreground stars into the lensed images. The entire image ensemble is then observed using a realistic point-spread function that includes appropriate detector artifacts for bright stars. Noise is further added, including such non-Gaussian elements as noise window-paning from mosaiced observations, residual bad pixels, and cosmic rays. The aim is to produce simulated images that appear identical—to the eye (expert or otherwise)—to real observations in various imaging surveys.

  15. On the probability of magnification by cosmologically distributed gravitational lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical method for calculating the statistical properties of source magnification caused by gravitational lenses randomly distributed throughout the universe is presented. Two lenses are considered at different redshifts to show that such an assumption is a statistically adequate approximation. The derived general formulas are applied to point-mass lenses with both point and extended sources. Analytical results of the magnification probability for point sources are accurate to within 10 percent in comparison with the available numerical simulations to moderate redshifts of less than about 2. In terms of the flux conservation, the results are accurate to within 18 percent at a redshift of 6 with respect to the Dyer-Roeder model of a clumpy universe. It is concluded that the present formulas are adequate for statistical studies of magnification by random gravitational lenses on cosmological scales.

  16. Lensing of 21-cm fluctuations by primordial gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Book, Laura; Kamionkowski, Marc; Schmidt, Fabian

    2012-05-25

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r~10(-9)-far smaller than those currently accessible-to be probed. PMID:23003237

  17. Lensing of 21-cm Fluctuations by Primordial Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Laura; Kamionkowski, Marc; Schmidt, Fabian

    2012-05-01

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r˜10-9—far smaller than those currently accessible—to be probed.

  18. Gravitational Lenses and the Structure and Evolution of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Kochanek, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    During the first year of the project we completed five papers, each of which represents a new direction in the theory and interpretation of gravitational lenses. In the first paper, The Importance of Einstein Rings, we developed the first theory for the formation and structure of the Einstein rings formed by lensing extended sources like the host galaxies of quasar and radio sources. In the second paper, Cusped Mass Models Of Gravitational Lenses, we introduced a new class of lens models. In the third paper, Global Probes of the Impact of Baryons on Dark Matter Halos, we made the first globally consistent models for the separation distribution of gravitational lenses including both galaxy and cluster lenses. The last two papers explore the properties of two lenses in detail. During the second year we have focused more closely on the relationship of baryons and dark matter. In the third year we have been further examining the relationship between baryons and dark matter. In the present year we extended our statistical analysis of lens mass distributions using a self-similar model for the halo mass distribution as compared to the luminous galaxy.

  19. Magnified Views of Relativistic Outflows in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, G.; Cappi, M.; Hamann, F.; Eracleous, M.; Strickland, S.; Vignali, C.; Dadina, M.; Giustini, M.; Saez, C.; Misawa, T.

    2016-06-01

    We presents results from X-ray observations of relativistic outflows in lensed quasars. The lensing magnification of the observed objects provides high signal-to-noise X-ray spectra of quasars showing the absorption signatures of relativistic outflows at redshifts near a crucial phase of black hole growth and the peak of cosmic AGN activity. We summarise the properties of the wide-angle relativistic outflow of the z = 1.51 NAL quasar HS 0810 detected in recent deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of this object. We also present preliminary results from a mini-survey of gravitationally lensed mini-BAL quasars performed with XMM-Newton.

  20. Strong gravitational lensing in a noncommutative black-hole spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun; Kang, Shuai; Chen, Chang-Yong; Chen, Songbai; Jing, Jiliang

    2011-04-01

    Noncommutative geometry may be a starting point to a quantum gravity. We study the influence of the spacetime noncommutative parameter on the strong field gravitational lensing in the noncommutative Schwarzschild black-hole spacetime and obtain the angular position and magnification of the relativistic images. Supposing that the gravitational field of the supermassive central object of the galaxy can be described by this metric, we estimate the numerical values of the coefficients and observables for strong gravitational lensing. In comparison to the Reissner-Norström black hole, we find that the influences of the spacetime noncommutative parameter is similar to those of the charge, but these influences are much smaller. This may offer a way to distinguish a noncommutative black hole from a Reissner-Norström black hole, and may permit us to probe the spacetime noncommutative constant ϑ by the astronomical instruments in the future.

  1. Weak shear study of galaxy clusters by simulated gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coss, David

    Gravitational lensing has been simulated for numerical galaxy clusters in order to characterize the effects of substructure and shape variations of dark matter halos on the weak lensing properties of clusters. In order to analyze realistic galaxy clusters, 6 high-resolution Adaptive Refinement Tree N-body simulations of clusters with hydrodynamics are used, in addition to a simulation of one group undergoing a merger. For each cluster, the three-dimensional particle distribution is projected perpendicular to three orthogonal lines of sight, providing 21 projected mass density maps. The clusters have representative concentration and mass values for clusters in the concordance cosmology. Two gravitational lensing simulation methods are presented. In the first method, direct integration is used to calculate deflection angles. To overcome computational constraints inherent in this method, a distributed computing project was created for parallel computation. In addition to its use in gravitational lensing simulation, a description of the setup and function of this distributed computing project is presented as an alternative to in-house computing clusters, which has the added benefit of public enrollment in science and low cost. In the second method, shear maps are created using a fast Fourier transform method. From these shear maps, the effects of substructure and shape variation are related to observational gravitational lensing studies. Average shear in regions less than and greater than half of the virial radius demonstrates distinct dispersion, varying by 24% from the mean among the 21 maps. We estimate the numerical error in shear calculations to be of the order of 5%. Therefore, this shear dispersion is a reliable consequence of shape dispersion, correlating most strongly with the ratio of smallest-to-largest principal axis lengths of a cluster isodensity shell. On the other hand, image ellipticities, which are of great importance in mass reconstruction, are shown

  2. The general theory of secondary weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is normally assumed to have only two principle effects: a magnification of a source and a distortion of the sources shape in the form of a shear. However, further distortions are actually present owing to changes in the gravitational field across the scale of the ray bundle of light propagating to us, resulting in the familiar arcs in lensed images. This is normally called the flexion, and is approximated by Taylor expanding the shear and magnification across the image plane. However, the physical origin of this effect arises from higher-order corrections in the geodesic deviation equation governing the gravitational force between neighbouring geodesics— so involves derivatives of the Riemann tensor. We show that integrating the second-order geodesic deviation equation results in a `Hessian map' for gravitational lensing, which is a higher-order addition to the Jacobi map. We derive the general form of the Hessian map in an arbitrary spacetime paying particular attention to the separate effects of local Ricci versus non-local Weyl curvature. We then specialise to the case of a perturbed FLRW model, and give the general form of the Hessian for the first time. This has a host of new contributions which could in principle be used as tests for modified gravity.

  3. Resolving high energy emission of jets using strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Chandra observations of M87 in 2004 uncovered an outburst originating in distant knot along the jet hundreds of parsecs from the core. This discovery challenges our understanding of the origin of high energy flares. Current technology is inadequate to resolve jets at distances greater than M87, or observed at higher energies. We propose to use gravitationally lensed jets to investigate the structure of more distant sources. Photons emitted at different sites cross the lens plane at different distances, thus magnification ratios and time delays differ between the mirage images. Monitoring of flares from lensed jets reveals the origin of the emission. With detectors like Chandra, lensed systems are a tool for resolving the structure of the jets and for investigating their cosmic evolution.

  4. Gravitational lensing in a cold dark matter universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; White, Simon D. M.

    1988-01-01

    Gravitational lensing due to mass condensations in a biased cold dark matter (CDM) universe is investigated using the Press-Schechter (1974) theory with density fluctuation amplitudes taken from previous N-body work. Under the critical assumption that CDM haloes have small core radii, a distribution of image angular separations for high-z lensed quasars with a peak at about 1 arcsec and a half-width of a factor of about 10. Allowing for selection effects at small angular separations, this is in good agreement with the observed separations. The estimated frequency of lensing is somewhat lower than that observed, but the discrepancy can be removed by invoking amplification bias and by making a small upward adjustment to the density fluctuation amplitudes assumed in the CDM model.

  5. Observing cosmic string loops with gravitational lensing surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Katherine J.; Wesley, Daniel H.; King, Lindsay J.

    2007-12-15

    We show that the existence of cosmic strings can be strongly constrained by the next generation of gravitational lensing surveys at radio frequencies. We focus on cosmic string loops, which simulations suggest would be far more numerous than long (horizon-sized) strings. Using simple models of the loop population and minimal assumptions about the lensing cross section per loop, we estimate the optical depth to lensing and show that extant radio surveys such as CLASS have already ruled out a portion of the cosmic string model parameter space. Future radio interferometers, such as LOFAR and especially SKA, may constrain G{mu}/c{sup 2}<10{sup -9} in some regions of parameter space, outperforming current constraints from pulsar timing and the cosmic microwave backgound by up to two orders of magnitude. This method relies on direct detections of cosmic strings, and so is less sensitive to the theoretical uncertainties in string network evolution that weaken other constraints.

  6. Higher-order gravitational lensing reconstruction using Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S.; Waalewijn, Wouter J. E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu E-mail: ayadav@physics.ucsd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We develop a method for calculating the correlation structure of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using Feynman diagrams, when the CMB has been modified by gravitational lensing, Faraday rotation, patchy reionization, or other distorting effects. This method is used to calculate the bias of the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator in reconstructing the lensing power spectrum up to  O (φ{sup 4}) in the lensing potential φ. We consider both the diagonal noise TT TT, EB EB, etc. and, for the first time, the off-diagonal noise TT TE, TB EB, etc. The previously noted large  O (φ{sup 4}) term in the second order noise is identified to come from a particular class of diagrams. It can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the φ expansion. These improved estimators have almost no bias for the off-diagonal case involving only one B component of the CMB, such as EE EB.

  7. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle α-circumflex and corresponding parameters ā and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as θ{sub ∞}, s and r{sub m}.

  8. Using gravitationally lensed images to investigate the intrinsic AGN variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Muller, S.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss about how the relative flux densities among the images of gravitationally-lensed active galactic nuclei (AGN), can be used to study the intrinsic AGN variability with high accuracy. Multi-frequency monitoring observations of resolved gravitational lenses can allow us to detect signals of very weak variability and also provide information about the jet opacity and structure. As an example, we investigate the variability of the flux-density ratio between the two lensed images of the blazar B 0218+357, using dual-frequency cm-wave observations. Similar to our previously reported submm-wave observations of the lensed blazar PKS 1830-211, we observe a clear chromatic variability, starting short before an increase in the flux-density of the blazar. The evolution of the flux-density ratios between the blazar images shows a more clear and rich structure than that of the mere lightcurves of each individual image. The accuracy in the ratio measurements is allowing us to see variability episodes in the blazar that are weaker than the natural scatter in the absolute flux-density measurements. A simple opacity model in the jet is used to consistently explain the difference between the flux-density-ratio evolution at the two frequencies.

  9. An X-ray study of gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2004-11-01

    Gravitational lensing of distant quasars by intervening galaxies is a spectacular phenomenon in the universe. With the advent of Chandra, it is possible to resolve for the first time in the X-ray band lensed quasar images with separations greater than about 0.35 arcsec. We use lensing as a tool to study AGN and Cosmology with Chandra and XMM-Newton. First, we present results from a mini-survey of relatively high redshift (1.7 < z < 4) gravitationally lensed radio-quiet quasars observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and with XMM-Newton. The lensing magnification effect allows us to search for changes in quasar spectroscopic and flux variability properties with redshift over three orders of magnitude in intrinsic X-ray luminosity. It extends the study of quasar properties to unlensed X-ray flux levels as low as a few times 10 -15 erg cm -2 s -1 in the observed 0.4-8 keV band. For the first time, these observations of lensed quasars have provided medium to high signal-to-noise ratio X-ray spectra of a sample of relatively high-redshift and low X-ray luminosity quasars. We find a possible correlation between the X-ray powerlaw photon index and X-ray luminosity of the gravitationally lensed radio-quiet quasar sample. The X-ray spectral slope steepens as the X-ray luminosity increases. This correlation is still signific ant when we combine our data with other samples of radio-quiet quasars with z > 1.5, especially in the low luminosity range between 10^43 -10^45.5 erg s -1 . This result is surprising considering that such a correlation is not found for quasars with redshifts below 1.5. We suggest that this correlation can be understood in the context of the hot-corona model for X-ray emission from quasar accretion disks, under the hypothesis that the quasars in our sample accrete very close to their Eddington limits and the observed luminosity range is set by the range of black hole masses (this hypothesis is consistent with recent predictions of semi

  10. Gravitational lensing size scales for quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chartas, G.; Rhea, C.; Kochanek, C.; Dai, X.; Morgan, C.; Blackburne, J.; Chen, B.; Mosquera, A.; MacLeod, C.

    2016-05-01

    We review results from our monitoring observations of several lensed quasars performed in the optical, UV, and X-ray bands. Modeling of the multi-wavelength light curves provides constraints on the extent of the optical, UV, and X-ray emission regions. One of the important results of our analysis is that the optical sizes as inferred from the microlensing analysis are significantly larger than those predicted by the theoretical-thin-disk estimate. In a few cases we also constrain the slope of the size-wavelength relation. Our size constraints of the soft and hard X-ray emission regions of quasars indicate that in some objects of our sample the hard X-ray emission region is more compact than the soft and in others the soft emission region is smaller. This difference may be the result of the relative strengths of the disk-reflected (harder and extended) versus corona-direct (softer and compact) components in the quasars of our sample. Finally, we present the analysis of several strong microlensing events where we detect an evolution of the relativistic Fe line profile as the magnification caustic traverses the accretion disk. These caustic crossings are used to provide constraints on the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) radius and the accretion disk inclination angle of the black hole in quasar RX J1131-1231.

  11. The HST Frontier Fields: Gravitational Lensing Models Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.; Lotz, J.; Natarajan, P.; Richard, J.; Zitrin, A.; Kneib, J.; Ebeling, H.; Sharon, K.; Johnson, T.; Limousin, M.; Bradac, M.; Hoag, A.; Cain, B.; Merten, J.; Williams, L. L.; Sebesta, K.; Meneghetti, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Barker, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) is a Director's Discretionary Time (DDT) program to deeply observe up to six massive strong-lensing galaxy clusters and six "blank" fields in parallel. These complementary observations will yield magnified and direct images of some of the most distant galaxies yet observed. The strongly lensed images will be our deepest views of our universe to date. Interpretation of some (but not all) observed properties of the strongly lensed galaxies requires gravitational lens modeling. In order to maximize the value of this public dataset to the extragalactic community, STScI commissioned five teams funded by NASA to derive the best possible lens models from existing data. After coordinating to share observational constraints, including measured redshifts of strongly lensed galaxies, the teams independently derived lens models using robust, established methodologies. STScI released these models to the community in October before HFF observations of the first cluster, Abell 2744. Here we describe these models as well as a web tool which allows users to extract magnification estimates with uncertainties from all models for any galaxy strongly lensed by a HFF cluster. Inputs are the galaxy's coordinates (RA and Dec), redshift, and (optionally) observed radius. We also discuss ongoing work to study lens model uncertainties by modeling simulated clusters.

  12. QUANTIFYING THE BIASES OF SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED GRAVITATIONAL LENSES

    SciTech Connect

    Arneson, Ryan A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S. E-mail: joelbrownstein@astro.utah.edu

    2012-07-01

    Spectroscopic selection has been the most productive technique for the selection of galaxy-scale strong gravitational lens systems with known redshifts. Statistically significant samples of strong lenses provide a powerful method for measuring the mass-density parameters of the lensing population, but results can only be generalized to the parent population if the lensing selection biases are sufficiently understood. We perform controlled Monte Carlo simulations of spectroscopic lens surveys in order to quantify the bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies in velocity dispersion, mass axis ratio, and mass-density profile. For parameters typical of the SLACS and BELLS surveys, we find (1) no significant mass axis ratio detection bias of lenses relative to parent galaxies; (2) a very small detection bias toward shallow mass-density profiles, which is likely negligible compared to other sources of uncertainty in this parameter; (3) a detection bias toward smaller Einstein radius for systems drawn from parent populations with group- and cluster-scale lensing masses; and (4) a lens-modeling bias toward larger velocity dispersions for systems drawn from parent samples with sub-arcsecond mean Einstein radii. This last finding indicates that the incorporation of velocity-dispersion upper limits of non-lenses is an important ingredient for unbiased analyses of spectroscopically selected lens samples. In general, we find that the completeness of spectroscopic lens surveys in the plane of Einstein radius and mass-density profile power-law index is quite uniform, up to a sharp drop in the region of large Einstein radius and steep mass-density profile, and hence that such surveys are ideally suited to the study of massive field galaxies.

  13. Strong gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from double compact binaries—perspectives for the Einstein Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Biesiada, Marek; Ding, Xuheng; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Piórkowska, Aleksandra E-mail: dingxuheng@mail.bnu.edu.cn E-mail: zhuzh@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) experiments are entering their advanced stage which should soon open a new observational window on the Universe. Looking into this future, the Einstein Telescope (ET) was designed to have a fantastic sensitivity improving significantly over the advanced GW detectors. One of the most important astrophysical GW sources supposed to be detected by the ET in large numbers are double compact objects (DCO) and some of such events should be gravitationally lensed by intervening galaxies. We explore the prospects of observing gravitationally lensed inspiral DCO events in the ET. This analysis is a significant extension of our previous paper [1]. We are using the intrinsic merger rates of the whole class of DCO (NS-NS,BH-NS,BH-BH) located at different redshifts as calculated by [2] by using StarTrack population synthesis evolutionary code. We discuss in details predictions from each evolutionary scenario. Our general conclusion is that ET would register about 50–100 strongly lensed inspiral events per year. Only the scenario in which nascent BHs receive strong kick gives the predictions of a few events per year. Such lensed events would be dominated by the BH-BH merging binary systems. Our results suggest that during a few years of successful operation ET will provide a considerable catalog of strongly lensed events.

  14. Exploring the Dark and Dusty Universe with Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elíasdóttir, Árdís

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis, gravitational lensing is used as a tool to study the dusty and dark distant universe. The first part of the thesis presents the first systematic study of dust extinction in lensing galaxies using gravitationally lensed background quasars. It is shown the these galaxies vary greatly both in the amount and type of dust and can vary significantly from the dust seen in the Milky Way. This is a significant result since, due to lack of knowledge on extragalactic dust, Milky Way type of extinction is frequently assumed when calibrating high precision cosmological data (e.g. supernova Ia dark energy surveys). Studying the dust extinction in the very large lensing data sets which will arise serendipitously in future planned space based missions (such as the SNAP dark energy survey), it will be possible to constrain the evolution of dust with redshift and morphology, providing these surveys with an independent estimate of one of their major sources of systematic error. The second topic of this thesis is dark matter in galaxies and clusters. It starts with a theoretical study of the strong lensing properties of the Sérsic profile and compares it to those of the NFW profile. The NFW profile is the standard description of dark matter, but recently it has been suggested that the Sérsic profile, more commonly used to describe baryonic matter in galaxies, may be a more accurate description. The results show that it is often possible to find an NFW profile which accurately reproduces the strong lensing signal of a Sérsic profile. However, in other cases, the difference between these profiles could contribute to explaining the discrepancy in the mass and concentration estimates from strong lensing on the one hand, and from weak lensing and X-ray measurements on the other. Next, a mass reconstruction of the galaxy cluster Abell 2218 is deduced using strong lensing constraints. The mass distribution is found to be bimodal in agreement with previous models of Abell

  15. TESTING THE DARK ENERGY WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Shuo; Zhu Zonghong; Covone, Giovanni

    2012-08-10

    We study the redshift distribution of two samples of early-type gravitational lenses, extracted from a larger collection of 122 systems, to constrain the cosmological constant in the {Lambda}CDM model and the parameters of a set of alternative dark energy models (XCDM, Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati, and Ricci dark energy models), in a spatially flat universe. The likelihood is maximized for {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.70 {+-} 0.09 when considering the sample excluding the Sloan Lens ACS systems (known to be biased toward large image-separation lenses) and no-evolution, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.81 {+-} 0.05 when limiting to gravitational lenses with image separation {Delta}{theta} > 2'' and no-evolution. In both cases, results accounting for galaxy evolution are consistent within 1{sigma}. The present test supports the accelerated expansion, by excluding the null hypothesis (i.e., {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0) at more than 4{sigma}, regardless of the chosen sample and assumptions on the galaxy evolution. A comparison between competitive world models is performed by means of the Bayesian information criterion. This shows that the simplest cosmological constant model-that has only one free parameter-is still preferred by the available data on the redshift distribution of gravitational lenses. We perform an analysis of the possible systematic effects, finding that the systematic errors due to sample incompleteness, galaxy evolution, and model uncertainties approximately equal the statistical errors, with present-day data. We find that the largest sources of systemic errors are the dynamical normalization and the high-velocity cutoff factor, followed by the faint-end slope of the velocity dispersion function.

  16. Gravitationally Lensed X-Ray Sources at the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Rottler, L.

    2012-01-01

    More than two thousand x-ray sources located within 20 pc of the Galactic Center (GC) have been identified by Muno et al. (2003). If an x-ray source is located behind the Galactic Center and offset by a small angle from the GC projected on the sky, then that x-ray source could be gravitationally lensed. The consequences of finding gravitationally lensed sources at the Galactic Center include the ability to independently measure the mass of the GC as well as provide a new probe of the density distribution of the GC (e.g. Wardle & Yusef-Zadeh 1992). Inspecting x-ray images of the GC we were immediately drawn to a set of four x-ray objects. The identified objects are cataloged as CXOJ 174541.0-290014, 174540.1-290005, 174540.0-290031, and 174538.1-290022. These are the brightest and most obvious variable x-ray objects whose positions suggest patterns of images that may either be an inclined quad or two sets of dual gravitational lens patterns. Based on the image patterns, and image brightnesses and relative variations, we modeled possible lens systems using two algorithms. Both of the algorithms describing gravitational lenses are based on the Fermat potential and its time derivatives. For a lens radius of R = 0.01 pc, the total enclosed mass is 2.6 x 107 M⊙ and for R = 0.001 pc, the total enclosed mass is 2.6 x 105 M⊙. These masses are consistent with other measurements of the mass of the GC, such as 4.5 x 106 M⊙ (Ghez et al. 2008). We will present these results and our plans to further study the nature of these x-ray objects.

  17. The Third Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) Challenge Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Bosch, James; Chang, Chihway; Courbin, Frederic; Gill, Mandeep; Jarvis, Mike; Kannawadi, Arun; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Lackner, Claire; Leauthaud, Alexie; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Rhodes, Jason; Simet, Melanie; Zuntz, Joe; Armstrong, Bob; Bridle, Sarah; Coupon, Jean; Dietrich, Jörg P.; Gentile, Marc; Heymans, Catherine; Jurling, Alden S.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kirkby, David; Margala, Daniel; Massey, Richard; Melchior, Peter; Peterson, John; Roodman, Aaron; Schrabback, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 3 (GREAT3) challenge is the third in a series of image analysis challenges, with a goal of testing and facilitating the development of methods for analyzing astronomical images that will be used to measure weak gravitational lensing. This measurement requires extremely precise estimation of very small galaxy shape distortions, in the presence of far larger intrinsic galaxy shapes and distortions due to the blurring kernel caused by the atmosphere, telescope optics, and instrumental effects. The GREAT3 challenge is posed to the astronomy, machine learning, and statistics communities, and includes tests of three specific effects that are of immediate relevance to upcoming weak lensing surveys, two of which have never been tested in a community challenge before. These effects include many novel aspects including realistically complex galaxy models based on high-resolution imaging from space; a spatially varying, physically motivated blurring kernel; and a combination of multiple different exposures. To facilitate entry by people new to the field, and for use as a diagnostic tool, the simulation software for the challenge is publicly available, though the exact parameters used for the challenge are blinded. Sample scripts to analyze the challenge data using existing methods will also be provided. See http://great3challenge.info and http://great3.projects.phys.ucl.ac.uk/leaderboard/ for more information.

  18. Infrared observations of gravitational lensing in Abell 2219 with CIRSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Meghan E.; Ellis, Richard S.; Refregier, Alexandre; Bézecourt, Jocelyn; McMahon, Richard G.; Beckett, Martin G.; Mackay, Craig D.; Hoenig, Michael D.

    2000-10-01

    We present the first detection of a gravitational depletion signal at near-infrared wavelengths, based on deep panoramic images of the cluster Abell 2219 (z=0.22) taken with the Cambridge Infrared Survey Instrument (CIRSI) at the prime focus of the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Infrared studies of gravitational depletion offer a number of advantages over similar techniques applied at optical wavelengths, and can provide reliable total masses for intermediate-redshift clusters. Using the maximum-likelihood technique developed by Schneider, King & Erben, we detect the gravitational depletion at the 3σ confidence level. By modelling the mass distribution as a singular isothermal sphere and ignoring the uncertainty in the unlensed number counts, we find an Einstein radius of θE ~= 13.7+3.9-4.2 arcsec (66per cent confidence limit). This corresponds to a projected velocity dispersion of σv~800kms-1, in agreement with constraints from strongly lensed features. For a Navarro, Frenk & White mass model, the radial dependence observed indicates a best-fitting halo scalelength of 125h-1kpc. We investigate the uncertainties arising from the observed fluctuations in the unlensed number counts, and show that clustering is the dominant source of error. We extend the maximum-likelihood method to include the effect of incompleteness, and discuss the prospects of further systematic studies of lensing in the near-infrared band.

  19. Weak Gravitational Lensing from Regular Bardeen Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarnejad, Hossein; niad, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    In this article we study weak gravitational lensing of regular Bardeen black hole which has scalar charge g and mass m. We investigate the angular position and magnification of non-relativistic images in two cases depending on the presence or absence of photon sphere. Defining dimensionless charge parameter q= {g}/{2m} we seek to disappear photon sphere in the case of |q|>{24√5}/{125} for which the space time metric encounters strongly with naked singularities. We specify the basic parameters of lensing in terms of scalar charge by using the perturbative method and found that the parity of images is different in two cases: (a) The strongly naked singularities is present in the space time. (b) singularity of space time is weak or is eliminated (the black hole lens).

  20. Three Gravitationally Lensed Supernovae Behind Clash Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurbh W.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Riess, Adam G.; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Holoien, Thomas W. -S.; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benitez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Bradley, Larry; Broadhurst, Tom; Cenko, Stephen Bradley; Donahue, Megan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ford, Holland; Garnavich, Peter; Grillo, Claudio; Infante, Leopoldo; Jouvel, Stephanie; Kelson, Daniel; Koekemoer, Anton; Lahav, Ofer; Lemze, Doron; Maoz, Dan; Medezinski, Elinor; Melchior, Peter; Meneghetti, Massimo; Molino, Alberto; Moustakas, John; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Nonino, Mario; Rosati, Piero; Seitz, Stella; Strolger, Louis G.; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was approx. 1.0 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is approx. 0.2 +/- 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log10 µ): 0.83 +/- 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 +/- 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 +/- 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  1. A comparison of cosmological models using strong gravitational lensing galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng E-mail: jjwei@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems from the Sloan Lens ACS and Lens Structure and Dynamics surveys suitable for this analysis, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, ΛCDM, and the R{sub h}=ct universe, which has thus far been favored by the application of model selection tools to other kinds of data. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution modeled as a singular isothermal ellipsoid, though with some scatter among individual sources. Future work can greatly improve the precision of these measurements by focusing on lensing systems with galaxies as close as possible to the background sources. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule out either model at a ∼99.7% confidence level. We find that if the real cosmology is ΛCDM, a sample of ∼200 strong gravitational lenses would be sufficient to rule out R{sub h}=ct at this level of accuracy, while ∼300 strong gravitational lenses would be required to rule out ΛCDM if the real universe were instead R{sub h}=ct. The difference in required sample size reflects the greater number of free parameters available to fit the data with ΛCDM. We point out that, should the R{sub h}=ct universe eventually

  2. A Comparison of Cosmological Models Using Strong Gravitational Lensing Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melia, Fulvio; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Strongly gravitationally lensed quasar-galaxy systems allow us to compare competing cosmologies as long as one can be reasonably sure of the mass distribution within the intervening lens. In this paper, we assemble a catalog of 69 such systems from the Sloan Lens ACS and Lens Structure and Dynamics surveys suitable for this analysis, and carry out a one-on-one comparison between the standard model, ΛCDM, and the {{R}h}=ct universe, which has thus far been favored by the application of model selection tools to other kinds of data. We find that both models account for the lens observations quite well, though the precision of these measurements does not appear to be good enough to favor one model over the other. Part of the reason is the so-called bulge-halo conspiracy that, on average, results in a baryonic velocity dispersion within a fraction of the optical effective radius virtually identical to that expected for the whole luminous-dark matter distribution modeled as a singular isothermal ellipsoid, though with some scatter among individual sources. Future work can greatly improve the precision of these measurements by focusing on lensing systems with galaxies as close as possible to the background sources. Given the limitations of doing precision cosmological testing using the current sample, we also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on the current lens measurements to estimate how large the source catalog would have to be in order to rule out either model at a ˜ 99.7% confidence level. We find that if the real cosmology is ΛCDM, a sample of ˜ 200 strong gravitational lenses would be sufficient to rule out {{R}h}=ct at this level of accuracy, while ˜ 300 strong gravitational lenses would be required to rule out ΛCDM if the real universe were instead {{R}h}=ct. The difference in required sample size reflects the greater number of free parameters available to fit the data with ΛCDM. We point out that, should the {{R}h}=ct universe eventually emerge as

  3. A note on a linearized approach to gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, S. J.; Forbes, L. K.

    2011-10-01

    A recent paper by Walters, Forbes and Jarvis presented new kinematic formulae for ray tracing in gravitational lensing models. The approach can generate caustic maps, but is computationally expensive. Here, a linearized approximation to that formulation is presented. Although still complicated, the linearized equations admit a remarkable closed-form solution. As a result, linearized approximations to the caustic patterns may be generated extremely rapidly, and are found to be in good agreement with the results of full non-linear computation. The usual Einstein-angle approximation is derived as a small angle approximation to the solution presented here.

  4. Strong Gravitational Lensing Insights into Dark Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Keeton, C. R.; Sigurdson, K. R.; Cyr-Racine, F.; Fadely, R.; Dobler, G.; Marshall, P. J.; OMEGA Explorer Science Team

    2013-01-01

    The thermal or interaction properties of dark matter are expected to lead to different levels of sub-galactic structure within Milky-Way scale galaxies. Through observations of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses, it is possible to statistically map the details of these structures. In recent theoretical and simulation work examined through Importance Sampling approaches, we demonstrate how efficiently dark matter substructures can be statistically constrained through select ground- and space-based measurements, and map out forecasts for how well possible Hubble Space Telescope and possible future space based experiments may perform.

  5. Simulating Gravity: Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Jes; Stang, Jared; Anderson, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the universe but very little of a standard introductory physics curriculum. Here we present our construction and use of a spandex sheet-style gravity simulator to qualitatively demonstrate two aspects of modern physics related to dark matter. First, we describe an activity in which students explore the dependence of orbital velocities on the central mass of a system, in a demonstration of how scientists first discovered dark matter. Second, we discuss the use of the gravity simulator as a visualization of gravitational lensing, a current astronomical technique for mapping dark matter in the sky. After providing the necessary background for the phenomena of interest, we describe our construction of the gravity simulator and detail our facilitation of these two activities. Together, these activities provide a conceptual visualization of gravitational phenomena related to indirect detection techniques for studying dark matter.

  6. Cross-correlation of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, D.; Omori, Y.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Cawthon, R.; Chang, C.; Larsen, P.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Crawford, T. M.; Dodelson, S.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Holder, G.; Jain, B.; Kacprzak, T.; Lahav, O.; MacCrann, N.; Nicola, A.; Refregier, A.; Sheldon, E.; Story, K. T.; Troxel, M. A.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reichardt, C. L.; Roodman, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Simard, G.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Wechsler, R. H.; Weller, J.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg2 of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of zmed ˜ 0.7, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at z ˜ 2. The resulting cross-correlation is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at z ˜ 0.44. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fitting cosmology, the amplitude of the DES×SPT cross-power is found to be ASPT = 0.88 ± 0.30 and that from DES×Planck to be APlanck = 0.86 ± 0.39, where A = 1 corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of 2.9σ and 2.2σ, respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photo-z uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. We calculate a value of A = 1.08 ± 0.36 for DES×SPT when we correct the observations with a simple intrinsic alignment model. With three measurements of this cross-correlation now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of cross-correlation. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.

  7. A gravitationally lensed water maser in the early Universe.

    PubMed

    Impellizzeri, C M Violette; McKean, John P; Castangia, Paola; Roy, Alan L; Henkel, Christian; Brunthaler, Andreas; Wucknitz, Olaf

    2008-12-18

    Water masers are found in dense molecular clouds closely associated with supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies. On the basis of the understanding of the local water-maser luminosity function, it was expected that masers at intermediate and high redshifts would be extremely rare. However, galaxies at redshifts z > 2 might be quite different from those found locally, not least because of more frequent mergers and interaction events. Here we use gravitational lensing to search for masers at higher redshifts than would otherwise be possible, and find a water maser at redshift 2.64 in the dust- and gas-rich, gravitationally lensed type-1 quasar MG J0414+0534 (refs 6-13). The isotropic luminosity is 10,000 (, solar luminosity), which is twice that of the most powerful local water maser and half that of the most distant maser previously known. Using the locally determined luminosity function, the probability of finding a maser this luminous associated with any single active galaxy is 10(-6). The fact that we see such a maser in the first galaxy we observe must mean that the volume densities and luminosities of masers are higher at redshift 2.64. PMID:19092930

  8. Are some BL Lacs artefacts of gravitational lensing?

    PubMed

    Ostriker, J P; Vietri, M

    1990-03-01

    WE suggested in 1985 that a significant fraction of BL Lacertae objects, a kind of lineless quasar, seen in nearby galaxies are in fact images, gravitationally lensed and substantially amplified by stars in the nearby galaxy, of background objects, optically violent variable (OVV) quasars at redshifts z > 1 (ref. 1). This hypothesis was made on the basis of certain general similarities between BL Lacs and O Ws, but for two recently observed BL Lacs(2,3) a strong case can be made that the accompanying elliptical galaxy is a foreground object. In addition, we argue that the distribution of BL Lac redshifts is hard to understand without gravitational lensing, unless we happen to be at a very local maximum of the spatial cosmic distribution of BL Lacs. Our analysis also indicates that the galaxies whose stars are likely to act as microlenses will be found in two peaks, one nearby, with redshift 0.05-0.10, and the other near the distant quasar. PMID:18278021

  9. Model-independent characterisation of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J.; Bartelmann, M.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a new approach to extracting model-independent information from observations of strong gravitational lenses. The approach is based on the generic properties of images near the fold and cusp catastrophes in caustics and critical curves. The observables we used are the relative image positions, the magnification ratios and ellipticities of extended images, and time delays between images with temporally varying intensity. We show how these observables constrain derivatives and ratios of derivatives of the lensing potential near a critical curve. Based on these measured properties of the lensing potential, classes of parametric lens models can then easily be restricted to the parameter values that are compatible with the measurements, thus allowing fast scans of a large variety of models. Applying our approach to a representative galaxy (JVAS B1422+231) and a galaxy-cluster lens (MACS J1149.5+2223), we show which model-independent information can be extracted in each case and demonstrate that the parameters obtained by our approach for known parametric lens models agree well with those found by detailed model fitting.

  10. The central image of a gravitationally lensed quasar.

    PubMed

    Winn, Joshua N; Rusin, David; Kochanek, Christopher S

    2004-02-12

    A galaxy can act as a gravitational lens, producing multiple images of a background object. Theory predicts that there should be an odd number of images produced by the lens, but hitherto almost all lensed objects have two or four images. The missing 'central' images, which should be faint and appear near the centre of the lensing galaxy, have long been sought as probes of galactic cores too distant to resolve with ordinary observations. There are five candidates for central images, but in one case the third image is not necessarily the central one, and in the others the putative central images might be foreground sources. Here we report a secure identification of a central image, based on radio observations of one of the candidates. Lens models using the central image reveal that the massive black hole at the centre of the lensing galaxy has a mass of <2 x 10(8) solar masses (M(o)), and the galaxy's surface density at the location of the central image is > 20,000M(o) pc(-2), which is in agreement with expections based on observations of galaxies that are much closer to the Earth. PMID:14961114

  11. Broad Iron Emission from Gravitationally Lensed Quasars Observed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D. J.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gravitationally lensed quasars to extend measurements of black hole spin out to high redshift with the current generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present an analysis of a large sample of 27 lensed quasars in the redshift range 1.0≲ z≲ 4.5 observed with Chandra, utilizing over 1.6 Ms of total observing time, focusing on the rest-frame iron K emission from these sources. Although the X-ray signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) currently available does not permit the detection of iron emission from the inner accretion disk in individual cases in our sample, we find significant structure in the stacked residuals. In addition to the narrow core, seen almost ubiquitously in local active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we find evidence for an additional underlying broad component from the inner accretion disk, with a clear red wing to the emission profile. Based on simulations, we find the detection of this broader component to be significant at greater than the 3σ level. This implies that iron emission from the inner disk is relatively common in the population of lensed quasars, and in turn further demonstrates that, with additional observations, this population represents an opportunity to significantly extend the sample of AGN spin measurements out to high redshift.

  12. Strong field gravitational lensing by a charged Galileon black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shan-Shan; Xie, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Strong field gravitational lensings are dramatically disparate from those in the weak field by representing relativistic images due to light winds one to infinity loops around a lens before escaping. We study such a lensing caused by a charged Galileon black hole, which is expected to have possibility to evade no-hair theorem. We calculate the angular separations and time delays between different relativistic images of the charged Galileon black hole. All these observables can potentially be used to discriminate a charged Galileon black hole from others. We estimate the magnitudes of these observables for the closest supermassive black hole Sgr A*. The strong field lensing observables of the charged Galileon black hole can be close to those of a tidal Reissner-Nordström black hole or those of a Reissner-Nordström black hole. It will be helpful to distinguish these black holes if we can separate the outermost relativistic images and determine their angular separation, brightness difference and time delay, although it requires techniques beyond the current limit.

  13. Search for strong gravitational lensing effect in the current GRB data of BATSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ChunYu; Li, LiXin

    2014-08-01

    Because gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) trace the high- z universe, there is an appreciable probability for a GRB to be gravitational lensed by galaxies in the universe. Herein we consider the gravitational lensing effect of GRBs contributed by the dark matter halos in galaxies. Assuming that all halos have the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) mass profile in the mass range 1010 h -1 M ⊙ < M < 2×1013 h -1 M ⊙ and all GRB samples follow the intrinsic redshift distribution and luminosity function derived from the Swift LGRBs sample, we calculated the gravitational lensing probability in BATSE, Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM GRBs, respectively. With an derived probability result in BATSE GRBs, we searched for lensed GRB pairs in the BATSE5B GRB Spectral catalog. The search did not find any convincing gravitationally lensed events. We discuss our result and future observations for GRB lensing observation.

  14. Uncertainties in pixel-based source reconstruction for gravitationally lensed objects and applications to lensed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagore, Amitpal Singh

    Gravitational lens modeling of spatially resolved sources is a challenging inverse problem that can involve many observational constraints and model parameters. I present a new software package, pixsrc, that works in conjunction with the lensmodel software and builds on established pixel-based source reconstruction (PBSR) algorithms for de-lensing a source and constraining lens model parameters. Using test data, I explore statistical and systematic uncertainties associated with gridding, source regularization, interpolation errors, noise, and telescope pointing. I compare two gridding schemes in the source plane: a fully adaptive grid and an adaptive Cartesian grid. I also consider regularization schemes that minimize derivatives of the source and introduce a scheme that minimizes deviations from an analytic source profile. Careful choice of gridding and regularization can reduce "discreteness noise" in the chi2 surface that is inherent in the pixel-based methodology. With a gridded source, errors due to interpolation need to be taken into account (especially for high S/N data). Different realizations of noise and telescope pointing lead to slightly different values for lens model parameters, and the scatter between different "observations" can be comparable to or larger than the model uncertainties themselves. The same effects create scatter in the lensing magnification at the level of a few percent for a peak S/N of 10. I then apply pixsrc to observations of lensed, high-redshift galaxies. SDSS J0901+1814, is an ultraluminous infrared galaxy at z=2.26 that is also UV-bright, and it is lensed by a foreground group of galaxies at z=0.35. I constrain the lens model using maps of CO(3-2) rotational line emission and optical imaging and apply the lens model to observations of CO(1-0), H-alpha, and [NII] line emission as well. Using the de-lensed images, I calculate properties of the source, such as the gas mass fraction and dynamical mass. Finally, I examine a

  15. Three Gravitational Lenses for the Price of One: Enhanced Strong Lensing Through Galaxy Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Fassnacht, Chris D.; McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Treu, T.; Blandford, R.D.; Auger, M.W.; Jeltema, T.E.; Lubin, L.M.; Margoniner, V.E.; Wittman, D.; /UC, Davis /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen /UC, Santa Barbara /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2006-04-03

    We report the serendipitous discovery of two strong gravitational lens candidates (ACS J160919+6532 and ACS J160910+6532) in deep images obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, each less than 40'' from the previously known gravitational lens system CLASS B1608+656. The redshifts of both lens galaxies have been measured with Keck and Gemini: one is a member of a small galaxy group at z {approx} 0.63, which also includes the lensing galaxy in the B1608+656 system, and the second is a member of a foreground group at z {approx} 0.43. By measuring the effective radii and surface brightnesses of the two lens galaxies, we infer their velocity dispersions based on the passively evolving Fundamental Plane (FP) relation. Elliptical isothermal lens mass models are able to explain their image configurations within the lens hypothesis, with a velocity dispersion compatible with that estimated from the FP for a reasonable source-redshift range. Based on the large number of massive early-type galaxies in the field and the number-density of faint blue galaxies, the presence of two additional lens systems around CLASS B1608+656 is not unlikely in hindsight. Gravitational lens galaxies are predominantly early-type galaxies, which are clustered, and the lensed quasar host galaxies are also clustered. Therefore, obtaining deep high-resolution images of the fields around known strong lens systems is an excellent method of enhancing the probability of finding additional strong gravitational lens systems.

  16. Three gravitationally lensed supernovae behind clash galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Brandon; McCully, Curtis; Jha, Saurabh W.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Rodney, Steven A.; Jones, David O.; Graur, Or; Riess, Adam G.; Merten, Julian; Zitrin, Adi; Matheson, Thomas; Sako, Masao; Postman, Marc; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Bartelmann, Matthias; Balestra, Italo; Benítez, Narciso; Bouwens, Rychard; Broadhurst, Tom; and others

    2014-05-01

    We report observations of three gravitationally lensed supernovae (SNe) in the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) Multi-Cycle Treasury program. These objects, SN CLO12Car (z = 1.28), SN CLN12Did (z = 0.85), and SN CLA11Tib (z = 1.14), are located behind three different clusters, MACSJ1720.2+3536 (z = 0.391), RXJ1532.9+3021 (z = 0.345), and A383 (z = 0.187), respectively. Each SN was detected in Hubble Space Telescope optical and infrared images. Based on photometric classification, we find that SNe CLO12Car and CLN12Did are likely to be Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), while the classification of SN CLA11Tib is inconclusive. Using multi-color light-curve fits to determine a standardized SN Ia luminosity distance, we infer that SN CLO12Car was ∼1.0 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia at a similar redshift and ascribe this to gravitational lens magnification. Similarly, SN CLN12Did is ∼0.2 ± 0.2 mag brighter than field SNe Ia. We derive independent estimates of the predicted magnification from CLASH strong+weak-lensing maps of the clusters (in magnitude units, 2.5 log{sub 10}μ): 0.83 ± 0.16 mag for SN CLO12Car, 0.28 ± 0.08 mag for SN CLN12Did, and 0.43 ± 0.11 mag for SN CLA11Tib. The two SNe Ia provide a new test of the cluster lens model predictions: we find that the magnifications based on the SN Ia brightness and those predicted by the lens maps are consistent. Our results herald the promise of future observations of samples of cluster-lensed SNe Ia (from the ground or space) to help illuminate the dark-matter distribution in clusters of galaxies, through the direct determination of absolute magnifications.

  17. Karhunen-Loeve Analysis for Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderplas, Jacob T.

    In the past decade, weak gravitational lensing has become an important tool in the study of the universe at the largest scale, giving insights into the distribution of dark matter, the expansion of the universe, and the nature of dark energy. This thesis research explores several applications of Karhunen-Loève (KL) analysis to speed and improve the comparison of weak lensing shear catalogs to theory in order to constrain cosmological parameters in current and future lensing surveys. This work addresses three related aspects of weak lensing analysis: Three-dimensional Tomographic Mapping: (Based on work published in Vanderplas et al 2011) We explore a new fast approach to three-dimensional mass mapping in weak lensing surveys. The KL approach uses a KL-based filtering of the shear signal to reconstruct mass structures on the line-of-sight, and provides a unified framework to evaluate the efficacy of linear reconstruction techniques. We find that the KL-based filtering leads to near-optimal angular resolution, and computation times which are faster than previous approaches. We also use the KL formalism to show that linear non-parametric reconstruction methods are fundamentally limited in their ability to resolve lens redshifts. Shear Peak Statistics with Incomplete Data: (Based on work published in Vanderplas et al 2012) We explore the use of KL eigenmodes for interpolation across masked regions in observed shear maps. Mass mapping is an inherently non-local calculation, meaning gaps in the data can have a significant effect on the properties of the derived mass map. Our KL mapping procedure leads to improvements in the recovery of detailed statistics of peaks in the mass map, which holds promise of improved cosmological constraints based on such studies. Two-point parameter estimation with KL modes: The power spectrum of the observed shear can yield powerful cosmological constraints. Incomplete survey sky coverage, however, can lead to mixing of power between

  18. Probing dark matter halos with strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    Strong gravitational lensing over galaxy scales allows us to explore dark matter halos and their connection with the luminous component. In this talk we present recent work on a sample extracted from the SLACS dataset, where the spectroscopic information from SDSS allows us to study the effect of a non-universal initial mass function on the stellar mass-to-light ratio. In addition, by studying galaxies where the background source probes the central part of the lens, we can derive significant constraints on the properties of the dark matter halo. This is one of the few observational methods that can be used to contrast with the standard concentration-virial mass relationships proposed by numerical simulations.

  19. Gravitational Lensing Science with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarization Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Englen, Alexander; Atacama Cosmology Telescope Team

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has emerged as a new probe of precision cosmology. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope is currently undergoing its second year surveying the CMB sky at arcminute angular resolution. CMB maps obtained from this survey can be used to reconstruct the density of dark matter along the line of sight between us and the CMB last-scattering surface. These maps can be used both on their own and in cross-correlation with other probes of large scale structure to trace the history of structure growth in the Universe. In this talk I will summarize recent results from these analyses, highlighting constraints on the neutrino mass and dark energy as well as the history of star formation obtained from cross-correlation with maps of the cosmic infrared background.

  20. Gravitational lensing beyond the weak-field approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Perlick, Volker

    2014-01-14

    Gravitational lensing is considered in the full spacetime formalism of general relativity, assuming that the light rays are lightlike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. The review consists of three parts. The first part is devoted to spherically symmetric and static spacetimes. In particular, an exact lens map for this situation is discussed. The second part is on axisymmetric and stationary spacetimes. It concentrates on the investigation of the photon region, i.e., the region filled by spherical lightlike geodesics, in the Kerr spacetime. The photon region is of crucial relevance for the formation of a shadow. Finally, the third part briefly addresses two topics that apply to spacetimes without symmetry, namely Fermat’s principle and the exact lens map of Frittelli and Newman.

  1. Gravitational lensing beyond the weak-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational lensing is considered in the full spacetime formalism of general relativity, assuming that the light rays are lightlike geodesics in a Lorentzian manifold. The review consists of three parts. The first part is devoted to spherically symmetric and static spacetimes. In particular, an exact lens map for this situation is discussed. The second part is on axisymmetric and stationary spacetimes. It concentrates on the investigation of the photon region, i.e., the region filled by spherical lightlike geodesics, in the Kerr spacetime. The photon region is of crucial relevance for the formation of a shadow. Finally, the third part briefly addresses two topics that apply to spacetimes without symmetry, namely Fermat's principle and the exact lens map of Frittelli and Newman.

  2. SPACE WARPS - I. Crowdsourcing the discovery of gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Philip J.; Verma, Aprajita; More, Anupreeta; Davis, Christopher P.; More, Surhud; Kapadia, Amit; Parrish, Michael; Snyder, Chris; Wilcox, Julianne; Baeten, Elisabeth; Macmillan, Christine; Cornen, Claude; Baumer, Michael; Simpson, Edwin; Lintott, Chris J.; Miller, David; Paget, Edward; Simpson, Robert; Smith, Arfon M.; Küng, Rafael; Saha, Prasenjit; Collett, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    We describe SPACE WARPS, a novel gravitational lens discovery service that yields samples of high purity and completeness through crowdsourced visual inspection. Carefully produced colour composite images are displayed to volunteers via a web-based classification interface, which records their estimates of the positions of candidate lensed features. Images of simulated lenses, as well as real images which lack lenses, are inserted into the image stream at random intervals; this training set is used to give the volunteers instantaneous feedback on their performance, as well as to calibrate a model of the system that provides dynamical updates to the probability that a classified image contains a lens. Low-probability systems are retired from the site periodically, concentrating the sample towards a set of lens candidates. Having divided 160 deg2 of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey imaging into some 430 000 overlapping 82 by 82 arcsec tiles and displaying them on the site, we were joined by around 37 000 volunteers who contributed 11 million image classifications over the course of eight months. This stage 1 search reduced the sample to 3381 images containing candidates; these were then refined in stage 2 to yield a sample that we expect to be over 90 per cent complete and 30 per cent pure, based on our analysis of the volunteers performance on training images. We comment on the scalability of the SPACE WARPS system to the wide field survey era, based on our projection that searches of 105 images could be performed by a crowd of 105 volunteers in 6 d.

  3. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, I.; Komatsu, E.; Suyu, S. H.

    2015-11-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential (GM/r) and a mass (GM) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size (r) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an external convergence, and an anisotropic velocity dispersion. We find that the effect of external convergence cancels out when dividing the time delays and velocity dispersion measurements. We derive a formula for the uncertainty in the angular diameter distance in terms of the uncertainties in the observables. As an application, we use two existing strong lens systems, B1608+656 (zL=0.6304) and RXJ1131-1231 (zL=0.295), to show that the uncertainty in the inferred angular diameter distances is dominated by that in the velocity dispersion, σ2, and its anisotropy. We find that the current data on these systems should yield about 16% uncertainty in DA per object. This improves to 13% when we measure σ2 at the so-called sweet-spot radius. Achieving 7% is possible if we can determine σ2 with 5% precision.

  4. The Distance Duality Relation from Strong Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kai; Li, Zhengxiang; Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Under very general assumptions of the metric theory of spacetime, photons traveling along null geodesics and photon number conservation, two observable concepts of cosmic distance, i.e., the angular diameter and the luminosity distances are related to each other by the so-called distance duality relation (DDR) {D}L={D}A{(1+z)}2. Observational validation of this relation is quite important because any evidence of its violation could be a signal of new physics. In this paper we introduce a new method to test the DDR based on strong gravitational lensing systems and type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) under a flat universe. The method itself is worth attention because unlike previously proposed techniques, it does not depend on all other prior assumptions concerning the details of cosmological model. We tested it using a new compilation of strong lensing (SL) systems and JLA compilation of SNe Ia and found no evidence of DDR violation. For completeness, we also combined it with previous cluster data and showed its power on constraining the DDR. It could become a promising new probe in the future in light of forthcoming massive SL surveys and because of expected advances in galaxy cluster modeling.

  5. Cross-correlation of gravitational lensing from DES Science Verification data with SPT and Planck lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, D.; et al.

    2015-12-14

    We measure the cross-correlation between weak lensing of galaxy images and of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The effects of gravitational lensing on different sources will be correlated if the lensing is caused by the same mass fluctuations. We use galaxy shape measurements from 139 deg$^{2}$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and overlapping CMB lensing from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and Planck. The DES source galaxies have a median redshift of $z_{\\rm med} {\\sim} 0.7$, while the CMB lensing kernel is broad and peaks at $z{\\sim}2$. The resulting cross-correlation is maximally sensitive to mass fluctuations at $z{\\sim}0.44$. Assuming the Planck 2015 best-fit cosmology, the amplitude of the DES$\\times$SPT cross-power is found to be $A = 0.88 \\pm 0.30$ and that from DES$\\times$Planck to be $A = 0.86 \\pm 0.39$, where $A=1$ corresponds to the theoretical prediction. These are consistent with the expected signal and correspond to significances of $2.9 \\sigma$ and $2.2 \\sigma$ respectively. We demonstrate that our results are robust to a number of important systematic effects including the shear measurement method, estimator choice, photometric redshift uncertainty and CMB lensing systematics. Significant intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes would increase the cross-correlation signal inferred from the data; we calculate a value of $A = 1.08 \\pm 0.36$ for DES$\\times$SPT when we correct the observations with a simple IA model. With three measurements of this cross-correlation now existing in the literature, there is not yet reliable evidence for any deviation from the expected LCDM level of cross-correlation, given the size of the statistical uncertainties and the significant impact of systematic errors, particularly IAs. We provide forecasts for the expected signal-to-noise of the combination of the five-year DES survey and SPT-3G.

  6. OBSERVING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING EFFECTS BY Sgr A* WITH GRAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bozza, V.; Mancini, L. E-mail: mancini@mpia-hd.mpg.de

    2012-07-01

    The massive black hole Sgr A* at the Galactic center is surrounded by a cluster of stars orbiting around it. Light from these stars is bent by the gravitational field of the black hole, giving rise to several phenomena: astrometric displacement of the primary image, the creation of a secondary image that may shift the centroid of Sgr A*, and magnification effects on both images. The soon-to-be second-generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer instrument GRAVITY will perform observations in the near-infrared of the Galactic center at unprecedented resolution, opening the possibility of observing such effects. Here we investigate the observability limits for GRAVITY of gravitational lensing effects on the S-stars in the parameter space 1[D{sub LS}, {gamma}, K], where D{sub LS} is the distance between the lens and the source, {gamma} is the alignment angle of the source, and K is the source's apparent magnitude in the K band. The easiest effect to observe in future years is the astrometric displacement of primary images. In particular, the shift of the star S17 from its Keplerian orbit will be detected as soon as GRAVITY becomes operative. For exceptional configurations, it will be possible to detect effects related to the spin of the black hole or post-Newtonian orders in the deflection.

  7. Observing Gravitational Lensing Effects by Sgr A* with GRAVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, V.; Mancini, L.

    2012-07-01

    The massive black hole Sgr A* at the Galactic center is surrounded by a cluster of stars orbiting around it. Light from these stars is bent by the gravitational field of the black hole, giving rise to several phenomena: astrometric displacement of the primary image, the creation of a secondary image that may shift the centroid of Sgr A*, and magnification effects on both images. The soon-to-be second-generation Very Large Telescope Interferometer instrument GRAVITY will perform observations in the near-infrared of the Galactic center at unprecedented resolution, opening the possibility of observing such effects. Here we investigate the observability limits for GRAVITY of gravitational lensing effects on the S-stars in the parameter space 1[D LS, γ, K], where D LS is the distance between the lens and the source, γ is the alignment angle of the source, and K is the source's apparent magnitude in the K band. The easiest effect to observe in future years is the astrometric displacement of primary images. In particular, the shift of the star S17 from its Keplerian orbit will be detected as soon as GRAVITY becomes operative. For exceptional configurations, it will be possible to detect effects related to the spin of the black hole or post-Newtonian orders in the deflection.

  8. Gravitational lensing of massive particles in Schwarzschild gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xionghui; Yang, Nan; Jia, Junji

    2016-09-01

    Both massless light ray and objects with nonzero mass experience trajectory bending in a gravitational field. In this work the bending of trajectories of massive objects in a Schwarzschild spacetime and the corresponding gravitational lensing (GL) effects are studied. A particle sphere for Schwarzschild black hole (BH) is found with its radius a simple function of the particle velocity and proportional to the BH mass. A single master formula for both the massless and massive particle bending angle is found, in the form of an elliptic function depending only on the velocity and impact parameter. This bending angle is expanded in both large and small velocity limits and large and small impact parameter limits. The corresponding deflection angle for weak and strong GL of massive particles are analyzed, and their corrections to the light ray deflection angles are obtained. The dependence of the deflection angles on the source angle and the particle speed is investigated. Finally we discuss the potential applications of the results in hypervelocity star observations and in determining mass/mass hierarchy of slow particles/objects.

  9. Gravitational lensing: a unique probe of dark matter and dark energy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Richard S

    2010-03-13

    I review the development of gravitational lensing as a powerful tool of the observational cosmologist. After the historic eclipse expedition organized by Arthur Eddington and Frank Dyson, the subject lay observationally dormant for 60 years. However, subsequent progress has been astonishingly rapid, especially in the past decade, so that gravitational lensing now holds the key to unravelling the two most profound mysteries of our Universe-the nature and distribution of dark matter, and the origin of the puzzling cosmic acceleration first identified in the late 1990s. In this non-specialist review, I focus on the unusual history and achievements of gravitational lensing and its future observational prospects. PMID:20123743

  10. Gravitational lensing: a unique probe of dark matter and dark energy

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    I review the development of gravitational lensing as a powerful tool of the observational cosmologist. After the historic eclipse expedition organized by Arthur Eddington and Frank Dyson, the subject lay observationally dormant for 60 years. However, subsequent progress has been astonishingly rapid, especially in the past decade, so that gravitational lensing now holds the key to unravelling the two most profound mysteries of our Universe—the nature and distribution of dark matter, and the origin of the puzzling cosmic acceleration first identified in the late 1990s. In this non-specialist review, I focus on the unusual history and achievements of gravitational lensing and its future observational prospects. PMID:20123743

  11. Gravitational lensing and structural stability of dark matter caustic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Onemli, V. K.

    2006-12-15

    In a cold dark matter (CDM) paradigm, density perturbations enter the nonlinear regime of structure formation where shell crossings occur, and caustics form. A dark matter caustic is generically a surface in space where the CDM particles are naturally focussed, and hence, the density is very large. The caustic ring model of galactic halo formation predicts a minimal caustic structure classified as outer caustics and caustic rings at certain locations in the halos. It provides a well-defined density profile and geometry near the caustics. Using this model, I show that the gravitational lensing by the cusps (A{sub -3} catastrophes) of caustic rings at cosmological distances may offer the tantalizing opportunity to detect CDM indirectly, and discriminate between axions and weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The lensing effects of the caustic rings increase as the line of sight approaches to the cusps where it diverges in the limit of zero velocity dispersion. In the presence of finite velocity dispersion, the caustics are smeared out in space, and hence, the divergence is cut off. Primordial smearing distance of caustics may be used to obtain an upper bound for the lensing effects. Evidences found for the caustic rings, on the other hand, were used to estimate an upper bound for the smearing distance, which may be used to obtain a lower bound for the lensing effects. In that range of smearing out, the magnification of a cosmological axion caustic ring is constrained between 3% and 2800% at the outer cusp, and between 2% and 46% at the nonplanar cusps. For a cosmological WIMP caustic ring, the magnification is constrained between 3% and 28% at the outer cusp, and between 2% and 5% at the nonplanar cusps. As pointlike background sources cross behind the axion (WIMP) folds, the time scale of brightness change is about an hour (a year). Thus, they may be used to probe the cusps and discriminate between axions and WIMPs by present instruments. Finally, I derive

  12. Gravitational lensing in the supernova legacy survey (SNLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronborg, T.; Hardin, D.; Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Jönsson, J.; Pain, R.; Pedersen, K.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: The observed brightness of type Ia supernovae is affected by gravitational lensing caused by the mass distribution along the line of sight, which introduces an additional dispersion into the Hubble diagram. We look for evidence of lensing in the SuperNova Legacy Survey 3-year data set. Methods: We investigate the correlation between the residuals from the Hubble diagram and the gravitational magnification based on a modeling of the mass distribution of foreground galaxies. A deep photometric catalog, photometric redshifts, and well established mass luminosity relations are used. Results: We find evidence of a lensing signal with a 2.3σ significance. The current result is limited by the number of SNe, their redshift distribution, and the other sources of scatter in the Hubble diagram. Separating the galaxy population into a red and a blue sample has a positive impact on the significance of the signal detection. On the other hand, increasing the depth of the galaxy catalog, the precision of photometric redshifts or reducing the scatter in the mass luminosity relations have little effect. We show that for the full SuperNova Legacy Survey sample (~400 spectroscopically confirmed type Ia SNe and ~200 photometrically identified type Ia SNe), there is an 80% probability of detecting the lensing signal with a 3σ significance. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii. This work is based in part on data products produced at the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey, a collaborative project of NRC and CNRS. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory using the Very Large Telescope on

  13. Future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    We discuss the future detectability of gravitational-wave induced lensing from high-sensitivity cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. Gravitational waves can induce a rotational component of the weak-lensing deflection angle, usually referred to as the curl mode, which would be imprinted on the CMB maps. Using the technique of reconstructing lensing signals involved in CMB maps, this curl mode can be measured in an unbiased manner, offering an independent confirmation of the gravitational waves complementary to B-mode polarization experiments. Based on the Fisher matrix analysis, we first show that with the noise levels necessary to confirm the consistency relation for the primordial gravitational waves, the future CMB experiments will be able to detect the gravitational-wave induced lensing signals. For a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r ≲0.1 , even if the consistency relation is difficult to confirm with a high significance, the gravitational-wave induced lensing will be detected at more than 3 σ significance level. Further, we point out that high-sensitivity experiments will be also powerful to constrain the gravitational waves generated after the recombination epoch. Compared to the B-mode polarization, the curl mode is particularly sensitive to gravitational waves generated at low redshifts (z ≲10 ) with a low frequency (k ≲1 0-3 Mpc-1 ), and it could give a much tighter constraint on their energy density ΩGW by more than 3 orders of magnitude.

  14. Time delay and magnification centroid due to gravitational lensing by black holes and naked singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Virbhadra, K. S.; Keeton, C. R.

    2008-06-15

    We model the massive dark object at the center of the Galaxy as a Schwarzschild black hole as well as Janis-Newman-Winicour naked singularities, characterized by the mass and scalar charge parameters, and study gravitational lensing (particularly time delay, magnification centroid, and total magnification) by them. We find that the lensing features are qualitatively similar (though quantitatively different) for Schwarzschild black holes, weakly naked, and marginally strongly naked singularities. However, the lensing characteristics of strongly naked singularities are qualitatively very different from those due to Schwarzschild black holes. The images produced by Schwarzschild black hole lenses and weakly naked and marginally strongly naked singularity lenses always have positive time delays. On the other hand, strongly naked singularity lenses can give rise to images with positive, zero, or negative time delays. In particular, for a large angular source position the direct image (the outermost image on the same side as the source) due to strongly naked singularity lensing always has a negative time delay. We also found that the scalar field decreases the time delay and increases the total magnification of images; this result could have important implications for cosmology. As the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric also describes the exterior gravitational field of a scalar star, naked singularities as well as scalar star lenses, if these exist in nature, will serve as more efficient cosmic telescopes than regular gravitational lenses.

  15. Cosmic superstring gravitational lensing phenomena: Predictions for networks of (p,q) strings

    SciTech Connect

    Shlaer, Benjamin; Wyman, Mark

    2005-12-15

    The unique, conical space-time created by cosmic strings brings about distinctive gravitational lensing phenomena. The variety of these distinctive phenomena is increased when the strings have nontrivial mutual interactions. In particular, when strings bind and create junctions, rather than intercommute, the resulting configurations can lead to novel gravitational lensing patterns. In this brief note, we use exact solutions to characterize these phenomena, the detection of which would be strong evidence for the existence of complex cosmic string networks of the kind predicted by string theory-motivated cosmic string models. We also correct some common errors in the lensing phenomenology of straight cosmic strings.

  16. Large-scale correlations between QSOs and galaxies - an effect caused by gravitational lensing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, M.; Schneider, P.

    1993-02-01

    Large-scale correlations between Lick galaxies and radio-loud, distant QSOs have been observed and interpreted in terms of gravitational lensing (Fugmann 1990). We argue that, if gravitational lensing is indeed responsible for such correlations, this is a most remarkable observation, and try to understand whether lensing may account for it. To do so, we use the lensing properties of a model for dark matter inhomogeneities on large scales, based on the adhesion approximation, to construct artificial QSO samples. (Model) galaxy counts in the vicinity of the (synthetic) sample QSOs are then subjected to rank-order statistical analyses. We find that statistically significant large-scale correlations between QSOs and galaxies can indeed be caused by gravitational lensing, but the amplitude of this effect depends sensitively on the assumed intrinsic luminosity function of the QSOs, the flux threshold of the (synthetic) sample, and the source redshift. We conclude that gravitational lensing can indeed account for QSO-galaxy associations on angular scales as large as some ten arc minutes. We also find that this effect can only be understood in terms of lensing by dark matter inhomogeneities.

  17. Measuring the cosmic microwave background gravitational lensing potential from 500 deg2 of SPTpol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocanu, Laura Monica; South Pole Telescope Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure in the universe causes deflections in the paths of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. This effect introduces non-Gaussian correlations in the observed CMB temperature and polarization fields. The signature of lensing can be used to reconstruct the projected gravitational lensing potential with a quadratic estimator technique; this provides a measure of the integrated mass distribution out to the surface of last scattering, sourced primarily from redshifts between 0.1 and 5. The power spectrum of the lensing potential encodes information about the geometry of the universe and the growth of structure and can be used to place constraints on the sum of neutrino masses and dark energy. High signal-to-noise mass maps from CMB lensing are also powerful for cross-correlating with other tracers of large-scale structure and for delensing the CMB in search for primordial gravitational waves. This poster will describe recent progress on measuring the CMB gravitational lensing potential and its power spectrum using data from 500 deg2 of sky observed with the polarization-sensitive receiver installed on the South Pole Telescope, SPTpol.

  18. UP TO 100,000 RELIABLE STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES IN FUTURE DARK ENERGY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Serjeant, S.

    2014-09-20

    The Euclid space telescope will observe ∼10{sup 5} strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens events in its wide field imaging survey over around half the sky, but identifying the gravitational lenses from their observed morphologies requires solving the difficult problem of reliably separating the lensed sources from contaminant populations, such as tidal tails, as well as presenting challenges for spectroscopic follow-up redshift campaigns. Here I present alternative selection techniques for strong gravitational lenses in both Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array, exploiting the strong magnification bias present in the steep end of the Hα luminosity function and the H I mass function. Around 10{sup 3} strong lensing events are detectable with this method in the Euclid wide survey. While only ∼1% of the total haul of Euclid lenses, this sample has ∼100% reliability, known source redshifts, high signal-to-noise, and a magnification-based selection independent of assumptions of lens morphology. With the proposed Square Kilometre Array dark energy survey, the numbers of reliable strong gravitational lenses with source redshifts can reach 10{sup 5}.

  19. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bogazzi, C.; Bormuth, R.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; De Rosa, G.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Dumas, A.; Eberl, T.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fermani, P.; Folger, F.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Herrero, A.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kooijman, P.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, E.; Lambard, G.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Mathieu, A.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Müller, C.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaš, G. E.; Perrina, C.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richter, R.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tayalati, Y.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Visser, E.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yatkin, K.; Yepes, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Falco, E. E.

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 1046 erg s-1. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  20. Weak Gravitational Lensing by Galaxy Troughs in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Daniel; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is in the process of imaging 5000 sq. deg. of the southern sky in five broad-band filters. Its primary purpose is to constrain cosmology and the physics of dark energy using weak gravitational lensing, galaxy clusters, baryonic acoustic oscillations, and supernova distance measurements.I will give an overview of weak gravitational lensing results from early DES data, with a focus on the newly developed galaxy trough statistics. Using the latter, we have made the highest signal-to-noise lensing measurements of the low density Universe to date, probing gravity and structure formation in the underdense regime. Besides these recent results, I will give an outlook on cosmological and astrophysical applications of the trough lensing signal.

  1. Constraining the neutrino emission of gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars with ANTARES data

    SciTech Connect

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Ardid, M.; Bou-Cabo, M.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bertin, V.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Basa, S.; Biagi, S.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; and others

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes to exploit gravitational lensing effects to improve the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes to the intrinsic neutrino emission of distant blazar populations. This strategy is illustrated with a search for cosmic neutrinos in the direction of four distant and gravitationally lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars. The magnification factor is estimated for each system assuming a singular isothermal profile for the lens. Based on data collected from 2007 to 2012 by the ANTARES neutrino telescope, the strongest constraint is obtained from the lensed quasar B0218+357, providing a limit on the total neutrino luminosity of this source of 1.08× 10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}. This limit is about one order of magnitude lower than those previously obtained in the ANTARES standard point source searches with non-lensed Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars.

  2. Weak gravitational lensing systematic errors in the dark energy survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plazas, Andres Alejandro

    Dark energy is one of the most important unsolved problems in modern Physics, and weak gravitational lensing (WL) by mass structures along the line of sight ("cosmic shear") is a promising technique to learn more about its nature. However, WL is subject to numerous systematic errors which induce biases in measured cosmological parameters and prevent the development of its full potential. In this thesis, we advance the understanding of WL systematics in the context of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We develop a testing suite to assess the performance of the shapelet-based DES WL measurement pipeline. We determine that the measurement bias of the parameters of our Point Spread Function (PSF) model scales as (S/N )-2, implying that a PSF S/N > 75 is needed to satisfy DES requirements. PSF anisotropy suppression also satisfies the requirements for source galaxies with S/N ≳ 45. For low-noise, marginally-resolved exponential galaxies, the shear calibration errors are up to about 0.06% (for shear values ≲ 0.075). Galaxies with S/N ≳ 75 present about 1% errors, sufficient for first-year DES data. However, more work is needed to satisfy full-area DES requirements, especially in the high-noise regime. We then implement tests to validate the high accuracy of the map between pixel coordinates and sky coordinates (astrometric solution), which is crucial to detect the required number of galaxies for WL in stacked images. We also study the effect of atmospheric dispersion on cosmic shear experiments such as DES and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in the four griz bands. For DES (LSST), we find systematics in the g and r (g, r, and i) bands that are larger than required. We find that a simple linear correction in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r ( i) band for DES (LSST). More complex corrections will likely reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band

  3. Probing cluster potentials through gravitational lensing of background X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refregier, A.; Loeb, A.

    1996-01-01

    The gravitational lensing effect of a foreground galaxy cluster, on the number count statistics of background X-ray sources, was examined. The lensing produces a deficit in the number of resolved sources in a ring close to the critical radius of the cluster. The cluster lens can be used as a natural telescope to study the faint end of the (log N)-(log S) relation for the sources which account for the X-ray background.

  4. SDSS J0246-0825: A New Gravitationally Lensed Quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, N; Burles, S; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; Schechter, P L; Eisenstein, D J; Oguri, M; Castander, F J; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Pindor, B; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; White, R L; Brinkmann, J; Szalay, A; York, D G

    2005-11-10

    We report the discovery of a new two-image gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J024634.11-082536.2 (SDSS J0246-0825). This object was selected as a lensed quasar candidate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by the same algorithm that was used to discover other SDSS lensed quasars (e.g., SDSS J0924+0219). Multicolor imaging with the Magellan Consortium's Walter Baade 6.5-m telescope and the spectroscopic observations using the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope confirm that SDSS J0246-0825 consists of two lensed images ({Delta}{theta} = 1''.04) of a source quasar at z = 1.68. Imaging observations with the Keck telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope reveal an extended object between the two quasar components, which is likely to be a lensing galaxy of this system. From the absorption lines in the spectra of quasar components and the apparent magnitude of the galaxy, combined with the expected absolute magnitude from the Faber-Jackson relation, we estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be z = 0.724. A highly distorted ring is visible in the Hubble Space Telescope images, which is likely to be the lensed host galaxy of the source quasar. Simple mass modeling predicts the possibility that there is a small (faint) lensing object near the primary lensing galaxy.

  5. Discovery of a new component in the gravitationally lensed quasar 0957 + 561

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C.; Stern, C.; Falco, E.; Forman, W.; David, L.; Shapiro, I.; Fabian, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    X-ray observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar 0957 + 561 with the Einstein Observatory High Resolution Imager indicate the presence of a new component in the system. The significantly greater X-ray intensity of image A compared with image B and the extended X-ray emission can be interpreted as the gravitational lensing of a quasi-circular X-ray emitting region into a partial Einstein ring. It is suggested that the observed X-ray emission is produced by a strong cooling flow which could arise were 0957 + 561 embedded in a group of cluster galaxies.

  6. SDSS J094604.90+183541.8: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR AT z = 4.8

    SciTech Connect

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui; Bian Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Hall, Patrick B.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Strauss, Michael A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2010-08-15

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed quasar identified serendipitously in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The object, SDSS J094604.90+183541.8, was initially targeted for spectroscopy as a luminous red galaxy, but the SDSS spectrum has the features of both a z = 0.388 galaxy and a z = 4.8 quasar. We have obtained additional imaging that resolves the system into two quasar images separated by 3.''06 and a bright galaxy that is strongly blended with one of the quasar images. We confirm spectroscopically that the two quasar images represent a single-lensed source at z = 4.8 with a total magnification of 3.2, and we derive a model for the lensing galaxy. This is the highest redshift lensed quasar currently known. We examine the issues surrounding the selection of such an unusual object from existing data and briefly discuss implications for lensed quasar surveys.

  7. Probabilities for gravitational lensing by point masses in a locally inhomogeneous universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Jeffrey A.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1989-01-01

    Probability functions for gravitational lensing by point masses that incorporate Poisson statistics and flux conservation are formulated in the Dyer-Roeder construction. Optical depths to lensing for distant sources are calculated using both the method of Press and Gunn (1973) which counts lenses in an otherwise empty cone, and the method of Ehlers and Schneider (1986) which projects lensing cross sections onto the source sphere. These are then used as parameters of the probability density for lensing in the case of a critical (q0 = 1/2) Friedmann universe. A comparison of the probability functions indicates that the effects of angle-averaging can be well approximated by adjusting the average magnification along a random line of sight so as to conserve flux.

  8. Can Palomar Transient Factory Survey Data Be Used to Confirm Gravitationally Lensed Quasar Candidates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Isaac; Quimby, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Strongly lensed quasars can be used to study the Hubble constant and the lens mass by measuring time delay and image separation. These objects can require years of data to confirm however, so using data from preexisting surveys could greatly reduce the amount of time required to study them. We attempt to use Palomar Transient Factory survey data to detect variability in strongly lensed quasars and to measure time delays between the quasar images. We test our procedure using known gravitationally lensed quasars with measured time delays.

  9. Analysis of luminosity distributions and the shape parameters of strong gravitational lensing elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernaux, J.; Magain, P.; Sluse, D.; Chantry, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The luminosity profiles of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses can be tricky to study. Indeed, strong gravitational lensing images display several lensed components, both point-like and diffuse, around the lensing galaxy. Those objects limit the study of the galaxy luminosity to its inner parts. Therefore, the usual fitting methods perform rather badly on such images. Previous studies of strong lenses luminosity profiles using software such as GALFIT or IMFITFITS and various PSF-determining methods have resulted in somewhat discrepant results. Aims: The present work aims at investigating the causes of those discrepancies, as well as at designing more robust techniques for studying the morphology of early-type lensing galaxies with the ability to subtract a lensed signal from their luminosity profiles. Methods: We design a new method to independently measure each shape parameter, namely, the position angle, ellipticity, and half-light radius of the galaxy. Our half-light radius measurement method is based on an innovative scheme for computing isophotes that is well suited to measuring the morphological properties of gravititational lensing galaxies. Its robustness regarding various specific aspects of gravitational lensing image processing is analysed and tested against GALFIT. It is then applied to a sample of systems from the CASTLES database. Results: Simulations show that, when restricted to small, inner parts of the lensing galaxy, the technique presented here is more trustworthy than GALFIT. It gives more robust results than GALFIT, which shows instabilities regarding the fitting region, the value of the Sérsic index, and the signal-to-noise ratio. It is therefore better suited than GALFIT for gravitational lensing galaxies. It is also able to study lensing galaxies that are not much larger than the PSF. New values for the half-light radius of the objects in our sample are presented and compared to previous works. Table 6 is only available

  10. Gravitational lensing analysis of the Kilo-Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijken, Konrad; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Nakajima, Reiko; Erben, Thomas; de Jong, Jelte T. A.; Viola, Massimo; Choi, Ami; Hoekstra, Henk; Miller, Lance; van Uitert, Edo; Amon, Alexandra; Blake, Chris; Brouwer, Margot; Buddendiek, Axel; Conti, Ian Fenech; Eriksen, Martin; Grado, Aniello; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Helmich, Ewout; Herbonnet, Ricardo; Irisarri, Nancy; Kitching, Thomas; Klaes, Dominik; La Barbera, Francesco; Napolitano, Nicola; Radovich, Mario; Schneider, Peter; Sifón, Cristóbal; Sikkema, Gert; Simon, Patrick; Tudorica, Alexandru; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2015-12-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) is a multi-band imaging survey designed for cosmological studies from weak lensing and photometric redshifts. It uses the European Southern Observatory VLT Survey Telescope with its wide-field camera OmegaCAM. KiDS images are taken in four filters similar to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey ugri bands. The best seeing time is reserved for deep r-band observations. The median 5σ limiting AB magnitude is 24.9 and the median seeing is below 0.7 arcsec. Initial KiDS observations have concentrated on the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) regions near the celestial equator, where extensive, highly complete redshift catalogues are available. A total of 109 survey tiles, 1 square degree each, form the basis of the first set of lensing analyses of halo properties of GAMA galaxies. Nine galaxies per square arcminute enter the lensing analysis, for an effective inverse shear variance of 69 arcmin-2. Accounting for the shape measurement weight, the median redshift of the sources is 0.53. KiDS data processing follows two parallel tracks, one optimized for weak lensing measurement and one for accurate matched-aperture photometry (for photometric redshifts). This technical paper describes the lensing and photometric redshift measurements (including a detailed description of the Gaussian aperture and photometry pipeline), summarizes the data quality and presents extensive tests for systematic errors that might affect the lensing analyses. We also provide first demonstrations of the suitability of the data for cosmological measurements, and describe our blinding procedure for preventing confirmation bias in the scientific analyses. The KiDS catalogues presented in this paper are released to the community through http://kids.strw.leidenuniv.nl.

  11. Kernel regression estimates of time delays between gravitationally lensed fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL Otaibi, Sultanah; Tiňo, Peter; Cuevas-Tello, Juan C.; Mandel, Ilya; Raychaudhury, Somak

    2016-06-01

    Strongly lensed variable quasars can serve as precise cosmological probes, provided that time delays between the image fluxes can be accurately measured. A number of methods have been proposed to address this problem. In this paper, we explore in detail a new approach based on kernel regression estimates, which is able to estimate a single time delay given several data sets for the same quasar. We develop realistic artificial data sets in order to carry out controlled experiments to test the performance of this new approach. We also test our method on real data from strongly lensed quasar Q0957+561 and compare our estimates against existing results.

  12. The Dust-to-Gas Ratio in the Damped Ly alpha Clouds Towards the Gravitationally Lensed QSO 0957+561

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuo, Lin; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    We present HST/FOS spectra of the two bright images (A and B) of the gravitationally lensed QSO 0957+561 in the wavelength range 2200-3300 A. We find that the absorption system (Z(sub abs)) = 1.3911) near z(sub em) is a weak, damped Ly alpha system with strong Ly alpha absorption lines seen in both images. However, the H(I) column densities are different, with the line of sight to image A intersecting a larger column density. The continuum shapes of the two spectra differ in the sense that the flux level of image A increases more slowly toward shorter wavelengths than that of image B. We explain this as the result of differential reddening by dust grains in the damped Ly alpha absorber. A direct outcome of this explanation is a determination of the dust-to-gas ratio, k, in the damped Ly alpha system. We derive k = 0.55 + 0.18 for a simple 1/lambda extinction law and k = 0.31 + 0.10 for the Galactic extinction curve. For gravitationally lensed systems with damped Ly alpha absorbers, our method is a powerful tool for determining the values and dispersion of k, and the shapes of extinction curves, especially in the FUV and EUV regions. We compare our results with previous work.

  13. Testing the MOND paradigm of modified dynamics with galaxy-galaxy gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, Mordehai

    2013-07-26

    The MOND paradigm of modified dynamics predicts that the asymptotic gravitational potential of an isolated, bounded (baryonic) mass, M, is ϕ(r)=(MGa0)1/2ln(r). Relativistic MOND theories predict that the lensing effects of M are dictated by ϕ(r) as general-relativity lensing is dictated by the Newtonian potential. Thus MOND predicts that the asymptotic Newtonian potential deduced from galaxy-galaxy gravitational lensing will have (1) a logarithmic r dependence, and (2) a normalization (parametrized standardly as 2σ2) that depends only on M: σ=(MGa0/4)1/4. I compare these predictions with recent results of galaxy-galaxy lensing, and find agreement on all counts. For the “blue”-lenses subsample (“spiral” galaxies) MOND reproduces the observations well with an r′-band M/Lr′∼(1–3)(M/L)⊙, and for “red” lenses (“elliptical” galaxies) with M/Lr′∼(3–6)(M/L)⊙, both consistent with baryons only. In contradistinction, Newtonian analysis requires, typically, M/Lr′∼130(M/L)⊙, bespeaking a mass discrepancy of a factor ∼40. Compared with the staple, rotation-curve tests, MOND is here tested in a wider population of galaxies, through a different phenomenon, using relativistic test objects, and is probed to several-times-lower accelerations–as low as a few percent of a0. PMID:23931350

  14. Gravitational lens equation for embedded lenses; magnification and ellipticity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2011-10-15

    We give the lens equation for light deflections caused by point mass condensations in an otherwise spatially homogeneous and flat universe. We assume the signal from a distant source is deflected by a single condensation before it reaches the observer. We call this deflector an embedded lens because the deflecting mass is part of the mean density. The embedded lens equation differs from the conventional lens equation because the deflector mass is not simply an addition to the cosmic mean. We prescribe an iteration scheme to solve this new lens equation and use it to compare our results with standard linear lensing theory. We also compute analytic expressions for the lowest order corrections to image amplifications and distortions caused by incorporating the lensing mass into the mean. We use these results to estimate the effect of embedding on strong lensing magnifications and ellipticities and find only small effects, <1%, contrary to what we have found for time delays and for weak lensing, {approx}5%.

  15. Reducing the weak lensing noise for the gravitational wave Hubble diagram using the non-Gaussianity of the magnification distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Cutler, Curt

    2010-06-15

    Gravitational wave sources are a promising cosmological standard candle because their intrinsic luminosities are determined by fundamental physics (and are insensitive to dust extinction). They are, however, affected by weak lensing magnification due to the gravitational lensing from structures along the line of sight. This lensing is a source of uncertainty in the distance determination, even in the limit of perfect standard candle measurements. It is commonly believed that the uncertainty in the distance to an ensemble of gravitational wave sources is limited by the standard deviation of the lensing magnification distribution divided by the square root of the number of sources. Here we show that by exploiting the non-Gaussian nature of the lensing magnification distribution, we can improve this distance determination, typically by a factor of 2-3; we provide a fitting formula for the effective distance accuracy as a function of redshift for sources where the lensing noise dominates.

  16. Constraining Horava-Lifshitz gravity by weak and strong gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Zsolt; Gergely, Laszlo A.; Keresztes, Zoltan; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S. N.

    2011-10-15

    We discuss gravitational lensing in the Kehagias-Sfetsos space-time emerging in the framework of Horava-Lifshitz gravity. In weak lensing, we show that there are three regimes, depending on the value of {lambda}=1/{omega}d{sup 2}, where {omega} is the Horava-Lifshitz parameter and d characterizes the lensing geometry. When {lambda} is close to zero, light deflection typically produces two images, as in Schwarzschild lensing. For very large {lambda}, the space-time approaches flatness, therefore there is only one undeflected image. In the intermediate range of {lambda}, only the upper focused image is produced due to the existence of a maximal deflection angle {delta}{sub max}, a feature inexistent in the Schwarzschild weak lensing. We also discuss the location of Einstein rings, and determine the range of the Horava-Lifshitz parameter compatible with present-day lensing observations. Finally, we analyze in the strong lensing regime the first two relativistic Einstein rings and determine the constraints on the parameter range to be imposed by forthcoming experiments.

  17. A strategy for finding gravitationally-lensed distant supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Nugent, Peter; Smail, Ian; Madau, Piero

    2000-07-17

    Distant Type Ia and II supernovae (SNe) can serve as valuable probes of the history of the cosmic expansion and star formation, and provide important information on their progenitor models. At present, however, there are few observational constraints on the abundance of SNe at high redshifts. A major science driver for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) is the study of very distant supernovae. In this paper we discuss strategies for finding and counting distant SNe by using repeat imaging of super-critical intermediate redshift clusters whose mass distributions are well-constrained via modelling of strongly-lensed features. For a variety of different models for the star formation history and supernova progenitors, we estimate the likelihood of detecting lensed SNe as a function of their redshift. In the case of a survey conducted by HST, we find a high probability of seeing a supernova in a single return visit with either WFPC-2 or ACS, and a much higher probability of detecting examples with z &62; 1 in the lensed case. Most events would represent magnified SNe II at z{approximately}1, and a fraction will be more distant examples. We discuss various ways to classify such events using ground-based infrared photometry. We demonstrate an application of the method using the HST archival data and discuss the case of a possible event found in the rich cluster AC 114 (z=0.31).

  18. GRAVITATIONAL LENSING CORRECTIONS IN FLAT {Lambda}CDM COSMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Kantowski, Ronald; Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu E-mail: Bin.Chen-1@ou.ed

    2010-08-01

    We compute the deflection angle to order (m/r {sub 0}){sup 2} and m/r{sub 0} x {Lambda}r {sup 2}{sub 0} for a light ray traveling in a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology that encounters a completely condensed mass region. We use a Swiss cheese model for the inhomogeneities and find that the most significant correction to the Einstein angle occurs not because of the nonlinear terms but instead occurs because the condensed mass is embedded in a background cosmology. The Swiss cheese model predicts a decrease in the deflection angle of {approx}2% for weakly lensed galaxies behind the rich cluster A1689 and that the reduction can be as large as {approx}5% for similar rich clusters at z {approx} 1. Weak-lensing deflection angles caused by galaxies can likewise be reduced by as much as {approx}4%. We show that the lowest order correction in which {Lambda} appears is proportional to m/r{sub 0} x {radical}({Lambda}r{sub 0}{sup 2}) and could cause as much as a {approx}0.02% increase in the deflection angle for light that passes through a rich cluster. The lowest order nonlinear correction in the mass is proportional to m/r{sub 0}x{radical}(m/r{sub 0}) and can increase the deflection angle by {approx}0.005% for weak lensing by galaxies.

  19. Nonlinear relativistic corrections to cosmological distances, redshift and gravitational lensing magnification: I. Key results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeh, Obinna; Clarkson, Chris; Maartens, Roy

    2014-10-01

    The next generation of telescopes will usher in an era of precision cosmology, capable of determining the cosmological model to beyond the percent level. For this to be effective, the theoretical model must be understood to at least the same level of precision. A range of subtle relativistic effects remain to be explored theoretically, and offer the potential for probing general relativity in this new regime. We present the distance-redshift relation to second order in cosmological perturbation theory for a general dark energy model. This relation determines the magnification of sources at high precision, as well as redshift space distortions in the mildly non-linear regime. We identify a range of new lensing effects, including: double-integrated and nonlinear-integrated Sachs-Wolfe contributions, transverse Doppler effects, lensing from the induced vector mode and gravitational wave backgrounds, in addition to lensing from the second-order potential. Modifications to Doppler lensing from redshift space distortions are identified. Finally, we find a new double-coupling between the density fluctuations integrated along the line of sight, and gradients in the density fluctuations coupled to transverse velocities along the line of sight. These can be large and thus offer important new probes of gravitational lensing and general relativity. This paper accompanies paper II (Umeh, Clarkson and Maartens 2014 Class. Quantum Grav. 31 205001) , where a comprehensive derivation is given.

  20. Rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization from weak gravitational lensing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang

    2014-01-31

    When a cosmic microwave background (CMB) photon travels from the surface of last scatter through spacetime metric perturbations, the polarization vector may rotate about its direction of propagation. This gravitational rotation is distinct from, and occurs in addition to, the lensing deflection of the photon trajectory. This rotation can be sourced by linear vector or tensor metric perturbations and is fully coherent with the curl deflection field. Therefore, lensing corrections to the CMB polarization power spectra as well as the temperature-polarization cross correlations due to nonscalar perturbations are modified. The rotation does not affect lensing by linear scalar perturbations, but needs to be included when calculations go to higher orders. We present complete results for weak lensing of the full-sky CMB power spectra by general linear metric perturbations, taking into account both deflection of the photon trajectory and rotation of the polarization. For the case of lensing by gravitational waves, we show that the B modes induced by the rotation largely cancel those induced by the curl component of deflection. PMID:24580435

  1. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of zL = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (Mmax) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts zgtrsim 13 detected in the angular region θE/2 <= θ <= 2θE (where θE is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ~ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν0 ~ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν0 ~ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of zgtrsim 6 and zgtrsim 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as Mmax ~ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (Lmin ≈ 2.5 × 1026 and 1.2 × 1027 erg s-1 Hz-1) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  2. Complete treatment of galaxy two-point statistics: Gravitational lensing effects and redshift-space distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2009-01-15

    We present a coherent theoretical framework for computing gravitational lensing effects and redshift-space distortions in an inhomogeneous universe and investigate their impacts on galaxy two-point statistics. Adopting the linearized Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric, we derive the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects that include the weak lensing distortion, magnification, and time delay effects, and the redshift-space distortion, Sachs-Wolfe, and integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects, respectively. Based on this framework, we first compute their effects on observed source fluctuations, separating them as two physically distinct origins: the volume effect that involves the change of volume and is always present in galaxy two-point statistics, and the source effect that depends on the intrinsic properties of source populations. Then we identify several terms that are ignored in the standard method, and we compute the observed galaxy two-point statistics, an ensemble average of all the combinations of the intrinsic source fluctuations and the additional contributions from the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects. This unified treatment of galaxy two-point statistics clarifies the relation of the gravitational lensing and the generalized Sachs-Wolfe effects to the metric perturbations and the underlying matter fluctuations. For near-future dark energy surveys, we compute additional contributions to the observed galaxy two-point statistics and analyze their impact on the anisotropic structure. Thorough theoretical modeling of galaxy two-point statistics would be not only necessary to analyze precision measurements from upcoming dark energy surveys, but also provide further discriminatory power in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms.

  3. Nemesis, Tyche, Planet Nine Hypotheses. I. Can We Detect the Bodies Using Gravitational Lensing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippov, J. P.; Chobanu, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the hypothesis of the existence of a massive dark body (Nemesis, Tyche, Planet Nine, or any other trans-Plutonian planet) at the Solar system periphery is analysed. Basic physical properties and orbital characteristics of such massive bodies are considered. The problem of the definition of a scattering angle of a photon in the gravitational field of a spherical lens is studied. It is shown that, the required value of the scattering angle can be measured for the cases of Nemesis and Tyche. The formation of gravitational lensing images is studied here for a point mass event. It is demonstrated that in most cases of the close rapprochement of a source and the lens (for Nemesis and Tyche), it is possible to resolve two images. The possibility of resolving these images is one of the main arguments favouring the gravitational lensing method as its efficiency in searching for dark massive objects at the edge of the Solar System is higher than the one corresponding to other methods such as stellar occultation. For the cases of Planet Nine and any other trans-Plutonian planet, the strong gravitational lensing is impossible because at least one of the images is always eclipsed.

  4. SDSS J102111.02+491330.4: A Newly discovered gravitationally lensed quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Pindor, Bart; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Becker, Robert H.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Hall, Patrick B.; Johnston, David E.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Turner, Edwin L.; Brasi, Guido; Hinz, Philip M.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Miller, Doug; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept. /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /Tokyo U. /Princeton U. Observ. /York U., Canada /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Mt. Suhora Observ., Cracow /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2005-09-01

    We report follow-up observations of two gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) dataset. We have confirmed that SDSS J102111.02+491330.4 is a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. This lens system exhibits two images of a z = 1.72 quasar, with an image separation of 1.14'' {+-} 0.04''. Optical and near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Observations of SDSS J112012.12+671116.0 indicate that it is more likely a binary quasar than a gravitational lens. This system has two quasars at a redshift of z = 1.49, with an angular separation of 1.49'' {+-} 0.02''. However, the two quasars have markedly different SEDs and no lens galaxy is apparent in optical and near-IR images of this system. We also present a list of 31 SDSS lens candidates which follow-up observations have confirmed are not gravitational lenses.

  5. SDSSJ102111.02+491330.4: A Newly Discovered Gravitationally Lensed Quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Pindor, B; Eisenstein, D J; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; Inada, N; Oguri, M; Hall, P B; Johnston, D E; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Turner, E L; Brasi, G; Hinz, P M; Kenworthy, M A; Miller, D; Barentine, J C; Brewington, H J; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S J; Krzesinski, J; Long, D; Neilsen Jr., E H; Newman, P R; Nitta, A; Snedden, S A; York, D G

    2005-11-10

    We report follow-up observations of two gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) dataset. We have confirmed that SDSS J102111.02+491330.4 is a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. This lens system exhibits two images of a z = 1.72 quasar, with an image separation of 1''.14 {+-} 0.04. Optical and near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Observations of SDSS J112012.12+671116.0 indicate that it is more likely a binary quasar than a gravitational lens. This system has two quasars at a redshift of z = 1.49, with an angular separation of 1''.49 {+-} 0.02. However, the two quasars have markedly different SEDs and no lens galaxy is apparent in optical and near-IR images of this system. We also present a list of 31 SDSS lens candidates which follow-up observations have confirmed are not gravitational lenses.

  6. Equatorial gravitational lensing by accelerating and rotating black hole with NUT parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Iftikhar, Sehrish

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study equatorial gravitational lensing in accelerating and rotating black hole with a NUT parameter in the strong field limit. For this purpose, we first calculate null geodesic equation using the Hamilton-Jacobi separation method. We then numerically obtain deflection angle and deflection coefficients which depend on acceleration and spin parameter of the black hole. We also investigate observables in the strong field limit by taking the example of a black hole in the center of galaxy. It is concluded that acceleration parameter has a significant effect on the strong field lensing in the equatorial plane.

  7. Constraining modified gravitational theories by weak lensing with Euclid

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Matteo; Calabrese, Erminia; De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Scaramella, Roberto

    2011-01-15

    Future proposed satellite missions such as Euclid can offer the opportunity to test general relativity on cosmic scales through mapping of the galaxy weak-lensing signal. In this paper we forecast the ability of these experiments to constrain modified gravity scenarios such as those predicted by scalar-tensor and f(R) theories. We find that Euclid will improve constraints expected from the Planck satellite on these modified theories of gravity by 2 orders of magnitude. We discuss parameter degeneracies and the possible biases introduced by modifications to gravity.

  8. Analysis of gravitational effects on liquid lenses (ANGEL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Kevin; Stephens, Kyle

    2012-09-01

    Liquid lenses have been developed as a means for fast and reliable variable-focus optics by using an adjustable curvature in a liquid-liquid interface. The use of liquid lenses also provides the benefit of reducing the number of elements in a system, and providing a degree of freedom without any moving parts. Different methods for surface curvature actuation have been developed, including aperture adjustment, mechanical actuators, stimuli-responsive hydrogels, and mechanical-wetting. Current liquid lens designs are limited to small apertures (less than 4mm) and density-matching fluids to lessen the negative effects of gravity. By creating a lens intended for use in a microgravity environment, the aperture size can be increased by orders of magnitude, and optimal fluids can be used regardless of their density. Using a large-aperture (12mm) liquid lens, image and surface metrology was conducted using a fixed-focus configuration. The Software Configurable Optical Test System (SCOTS) method was utilized to test the effect of microgravity, standard gravity, and hypergravity on the liquid lens during parabolic flights. Under standard gravity, the RMS wavefront error (WFE) was 27 wavelengths, while microgravity conditions allowed an improvement to 17 wavelengths RMS WFE. Test performance can be improved by using lower viscosity fluids or longer duration microgravity flights. The experiment also served as an engineering demonstration for the SCOTS method in an environment where other methods of optical metrology would be impossible.

  9. Source-position transformation: an approximate invariance in strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Peter; Sluse, Dominique

    2014-04-01

    The main obstacle that gravitational lensing has in determining accurate masses of deflectors, or in determining precise estimates for the Hubble constant, is the degeneracy of lensing observables with respect to the mass-sheet transformation (MST). The MST is a global modification of the mass distribution which leaves all image positions, shapes, and flux ratios invariant, but which changes the time delay. Here we show that another global transformation of lensing mass distributions exists which leaves image positions and flux ratios almost invariant, and of which the MST is a special case. As is the case for the MST, this new transformation only applies if one considers only those source components that are at the same distance from us. Whereas for axi-symmetric lenses this source position transformation exactly reproduces all strong lensing observables, it does so only approximately for more general lens situations. We provide crude estimates for the accuracy with which the transformed mass distribution can reproduce the same image positions as the original lens model, and present an illustrative example of its performance. This new invariance transformation is most likely the reason why the same strong lensing information can be accounted for with rather different mass models.

  10. Detecting Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Eric Jones

    2014-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) leading to a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of the cluster lensing effect offers the exciting possibility of constraining the masses of galaxy clusters using CMB data alone. Improved constraints on cluster masses are in turn essential to the use of clusters as cosmological probes: uncertainties in cluster masses are currently the dominant systematic affecting cluster abundance constraints on cosmology. To date, however, the CMB cluster lensing signal remains undetected because of its small magnitude and angular size. In this thesis, we develop a maximum likelihood approach to extracting the signal from CMB temperature data. We validate the technique by applying it to mock data designed to replicate as closely as possible real data from the South Pole Telescope’s (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) survey: the effects of the SPT beam, transfer function, instrumental noise and cluster selection are incorporated. We consider the effects of foreground emission on the analysis and show that uncertainty in amount of foreground lensing results in a small systematic error on the lensing constraints. Additionally, we show that if unaccounted for, the SZ effect leads to unacceptably large biases on the lensing constraints and develop an approach for removing SZ contamination. The results of the mock analysis presented here suggest that a 4σ first detection of the cluster lensing effect can be achieved with current SPT-SZ data.

  11. Planck 2013 results. XVII. Gravitational lensing by large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    On the arcminute angular scales probed by Planck, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are gently perturbed by gravitational lensing. Here we present a detailed study of this effect, detecting lensing independently in the 100, 143, and 217 GHz frequency bands with an overall significance of greater than 25σ. We use thetemperature-gradient correlations induced by lensing to reconstruct a (noisy) map of the CMB lensing potential, which provides an integrated measure of the mass distribution back to the CMB last-scattering surface. Our lensing potential map is significantly correlated with other tracers of mass, a fact which we demonstrate using several representative tracers of large-scale structure. We estimate the power spectrum of the lensing potential, finding generally good agreement with expectations from the best-fitting ΛCDM model for the Planck temperature power spectrum, showing that this measurement at z = 1100 correctly predicts the properties of the lower-redshift, later-time structures which source the lensing potential. When combined with the temperature power spectrum, our measurement provides degeneracy-breaking power for parameter constraints; it improves CMB-alone constraints on curvature by a factor of two and also partly breaks the degeneracy between the amplitude of the primordial perturbation power spectrum and the optical depth to reionization, allowing a measurement of the optical depth to reionization which is independent of large-scale polarization data. Discarding scale information, our measurement corresponds to a 4% constraint on the amplitude of the lensing potential power spectrum, or a 2% constraint on the root-mean-squared amplitude of matter fluctuations at z ~ 2.

  12. Witnessing the Differential Evolution in Luminosity and Size of Disk Galaxies via Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Kaushala; Crampton, D.; Peng, C. Y.; Simard, L.

    2012-01-01

    We take advantage of the magnification in size and flux of a galaxy, provided by gravitational lensing, to analyze the properties of 62 strongly lensed galaxies of the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The sample of lensed galaxies span a redshift range of 0.20 <= z <= 1.20 with a median redshift of z = 0.61. We use the lens modeling code LENSFIT to derive the luminosities, sizes and Sersic indices of the lensed galaxies. The measured properties of the lensed galaxies show a primarily compact, "disk"-like population with the peaks of the size and Sersic index distributions corresponding to ˜1.50 kpc and n˜1 respectively. Comparison of the SLACS lensed galaxies to a non-lensing, broad-band imaging based survey shows that a lensing survey allows us to probe a galaxy population that is typically ˜ 2 magnitudes fainter. Our analysis allows us to compare the = 0.61 disk galaxy sample (n <= 2.5) to an unprecedented local galaxy sample of 670,131 SDSS galaxies at z ˜ 0.1, which indicates that the evolution of the luminosity-size relation since z ˜ 1 cannot be explained fully in terms of pure size evolution but must be caused by a combination of luminosity and size evolution. Our observations are in excellent agreement with recent numerical simulations of disk galaxies since z ˜ 1 that show evidence of mass-dependent evolution where high-mass disk galaxies (stellar mass > 109 solar masses) evolve more in size and low-mass disk galaxies (stellar mass <= 109 solar masses) evolve more in luminosity. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support from the National Research Council of Canada and NSERC through Discovery grants. CYP is grateful for funding support through the Plaskett Fellowship of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics (National Research Council of Canada).

  13. Around the Clock Observations of the Q0957+561A,B Gravitationally Lensed Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colley, Wesley N.; Schild, Rudolph E.; Abajas, Cristina; Alcalde, David; Aslan, Zeki; Barrena, Rafael; Dudinov, Vladimir; Khamitov, Irek; Kjernsmo, Kjetil; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jonghwan; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Licandro, Javier; Maoz, Dan; Mediavilla, Evencio; Motta, Verónica; Muñoz, Jose; Oscoz, Alex; Serra-Ricart, Miquel; Sinelnikov, Igor; Stabell, Rolf; Teuber, Jan; Zheleznyak, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    An observing campaign with 10 participating observatories has undertaken to monitor the optical brightness of the Q0957 gravitationally lensed quasar for 10 consecutive nights in 2000 January. The resulting A image brightness curve has significant brightness fluctuations and makes a photometric prediction for the B image light curve for a second campaign planned for 2001 March 12-21. The ultimate purpose is to determine the gravitational lens time delay to a fraction of an hour and to seek evidence of rapid microlensing.

  14. Cosmological constraints from strong gravitational lensing in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Kneib, Jean-Paul; D'Aloisio, Anson; Limousin, Marceau; Richard, Johan; Schimd, Carlo

    2010-08-20

    Current efforts in observational cosmology are focused on characterizing the mass-energy content of the universe. We present results from a geometric test based on strong lensing in galaxy clusters. Based on Hubble Space Telescope images and extensive ground-based spectroscopic follow-up of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1689, we used a parametric model to simultaneously constrain the cluster mass distribution and dark energy equation of state. Combining our cosmological constraints with those from x-ray clusters and the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data gives Omega(m) = 0.25 +/- 0.05 and w(x) = -0.97 +/- 0.07, which are consistent with results from other methods. Inclusion of our method with all other available techniques brings down the current 2sigma contours on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w(x) by approximately 30%. PMID:20724628

  15. Constraints on a phiCDM model from strong gravitational lensing and updated Hubble parameter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Cao, Shuo; Huang, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    We constrain the scalar field dark energy model with an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V(phi) propto phi-α (α > 0), from a set of recent cosmological observations by compiling an updated sample of Hubble parameter measurements including 30 independent data points. Our results show that the constraining power of the updated sample of H(z) data with the HST prior on H0 is stronger than those of the SCP Union2 and Union2.1 compilations. A recent sample of strong gravitational lensing systems is also adopted to confine the model even though the results are not significant. A joint analysis of the strong gravitational lensing data with the more restrictive updated Hubble parameter measurements and the Type Ia supernovae data from SCP Union2 indicates that the recent observations still can not distinguish whether dark energy is a time-independent cosmological constant or a time-varying dynamical component.

  16. The Effect of Weak Gravitational Lensing on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, L. L. R.

    1996-12-01

    If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cosmologically distributed standard candles and are associated with the luminous galaxies, then the observed angular distribution of all GRBs is altered as a result of weak gravitational lensing of bursts by density inhomogeneities. The amplitude of the effect is generally small. For example, if the current catalogs extend to z_max_ ~ 1 and we live in a flat {OMEGA} = 1 universe, the angular autocorrelation function of GRBs will be enhanced by ~8% as a result of lensing, on all angular scales. For an extreme case of z_max_ = 1.5 and ({OMEGA}, {LAMBDA}) = (0.2, 0.8), an enhancement of ~33% is predicted. If the observed distribution of GRBs is used in the future to derive power spectra of mass density fluctuations on large angular scales, the effect of weak lensing should probably be taken into account.

  17. Gravitational lensing by a massive black hole at the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wardle, Mark; Yusef-Zadeh, Farhad

    1992-01-01

    The manifestations of gravitational lensing by a massive black hole at the Galactic center, with particular attention given to lensing of stars in the stellar cluster that lie behind Sgr A*, and of Sgr A east, a nonthermal extended radio source which is known with certainty to lie behind the Galactic center. Lensing of the stellar cluster produces a deficit of stellar images within 10 mas of the center, and a surplus between 30 and 300 mas. The results suggest that the proper motion of the stars will produce brightness variations of stellar images on a time scale of a few years or less. Both images of such a source should be visible, and will rise and fall in luminosity together.

  18. Spectroscopic identification of 25 disk galaxy candidate gravitational lenses in the SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, P.; Rossetti, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Galaxy-scale gravitational lenses are powerful tools, which can be used to address major astrophysical questions that are still open. They can be identified either through imaging or through spectroscopy, which is less efficient than imaging but offers the major advantage of having both source and deflector red shift previously measured at discovery. Spectroscopic identification requires huge data sets of high spectral quality, such as the SDSS, and has so far focused on early-type galaxies, as the most massive galaxies are found among them. Aims: We aimed to perform spectroscopic identification of disk galaxies acting as gravitational lenses. Methods: We have selected about 300 000 galaxy spectra with EW(Hα) ≤-10 Å from the SDSS DR 8. On these spectra, we ran our original code RES, which is a fast, reliable tool able to provide a red-shift measure and to identify discordant red-shift systems if present. We have required RES to identify only systems based on a minimum number of four emission lines. We have inspected all the (54) SDSS images of the double z systems identified by RES and discarded systems for which z duplicity could be easily ascribed to the presence of two distinct objects. The remaining 25 systems, for which double z is very likely to be due to the gravitational lensing phenomenon, constitute our sample. Results: For each gravitational lens candidate system, we provide SDSS identification and image emission lines detected by RES and activity classification, when derivable. The disky nature of our candidate lenses is confirmed by their images, stellar mass estimates, g - r rest-frame colours and occurrence of star burst phenomena.

  19. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong, extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded images of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies s-1 core-1 with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multiband observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  20. An accurate and practical method for inference of weak gravitational lensing from galaxy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Armstrong, Robert; Krawiec, Christina; March, Marisa C.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate highly accurate recovery of weak gravitational lensing shear using an implementation of the Bayesian Fourier Domain (BFD) method proposed by Bernstein & Armstrong (2014, BA14), extended to correct for selection biases. The BFD formalism is rigorously correct for Nyquist-sampled, background-limited, uncrowded image of background galaxies. BFD does not assign shapes to galaxies, instead compressing the pixel data D into a vector of moments M, such that we have an analytic expression for the probability P(M|g) of obtaining the observations with gravitational lensing distortion g along the line of sight. We implement an algorithm for conducting BFD's integrations over the population of unlensed source galaxies which measures ≈10 galaxies/second/core with good scaling properties. Initial tests of this code on ≈109 simulated lensed galaxy images recover the simulated shear to a fractional accuracy of m = (2.1 ± 0.4) × 10-3, substantially more accurate than has been demonstrated previously for any generally applicable method. Deep sky exposures generate a sufficiently accurate approximation to the noiseless, unlensed galaxy population distribution assumed as input to BFD. Potential extensions of the method include simultaneous measurement of magnification and shear; multiple-exposure, multi-band observations; and joint inference of photometric redshifts and lensing tomography.

  1. A NEW APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING THE MOST POWERFUL GRAVITATIONAL LENSING TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.; Hogg, David W.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.

    2013-05-20

    The best gravitational lenses for detecting distant galaxies are those with the largest mass concentrations and the most advantageous configurations of that mass along the line of sight. Our new method for finding such gravitational telescopes uses optical data to identify projected concentrations of luminous red galaxies (LRGs). LRGs are biased tracers of the underlying mass distribution, so lines of sight with the highest total luminosity in LRGs are likely to contain the largest total mass. We apply this selection technique to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and identify the 200 fields with the highest total LRG luminosities projected within a 3.'5 radius over the redshift range 0.1 {<=} z {<=} 0.7. The redshift and angular distributions of LRGs in these fields trace the concentrations of non-LRG galaxies. These fields are diverse; 22.5% contain one known galaxy cluster and 56.0% contain multiple known clusters previously identified in the literature. Thus, our results confirm that these LRGs trace massive structures and that our selection technique identifies fields with large total masses. These fields contain two to three times higher total LRG luminosities than most known strong-lensing clusters and will be among the best gravitational lensing fields for the purpose of detecting the highest redshift galaxies.

  2. Caustics of 1/rn binary gravitational lenses: from galactic haloes to exotic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozza, V.; Melchiorre, C.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the caustic topologies for binary gravitational lenses made up of two objects whose gravitational potential declines as 1/rn. With n<1 this corresponds to power-law dust distributions like the singular isothermal sphere. The n>1 regime can be obtained with some violations of the energy conditions, one famous example being the Ellis wormhole. Gravitational lensing provides a natural arena to distinguish and identify such exotic objects in our Universe. We find that there are still three topologies for caustics as in the standard Schwarzschild binary lens, with the main novelty coming from the secondary caustics of the close topology, which become huge at higher n. After drawing caustics by numerical methods, we derive a large amount of analytical formulae in all limits that are useful to provide deeper insight in the mathematics of the problem. Our study is useful to better understand the phenomenology of galaxy lensing in clusters as well as the distinct signatures of exotic matter in complex systems.

  3. Algorithms and Programs for Strong Gravitational Lensing In Kerr Space-time Including Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, Eddie; Maddumage, Prasad

    2015-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars are important astrophysical objects to understand. Recently, microlensing observations have constrained the size of the quasar X-ray emission region to be of the order of 10 gravitational radii of the central supermassive black hole. For distances within a few gravitational radii, light paths are strongly bent by the strong gravity field of the central black hole. If the central black hole has nonzero angular momentum (spin), then a photon’s polarization plane will be rotated by the gravitational Faraday effect. The observed X-ray flux and polarization will then be influenced significantly by the strong gravity field near the source. Consequently, linear gravitational lensing theory is inadequate for such extreme circumstances. We present simple algorithms computing the strong lensing effects of Kerr black holes, including the effects on polarization. Our algorithms are realized in a program “KERTAP” in two versions: MATLAB and Python. The key ingredients of KERTAP are a graphic user interface, a backward ray-tracing algorithm, a polarization propagator dealing with gravitational Faraday rotation, and algorithms computing observables such as flux magnification and polarization angles. Our algorithms can be easily realized in other programming languages such as FORTRAN, C, and C++. The MATLAB version of KERTAP is parallelized using the MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox and the Distributed Computing Server. The Python code was sped up using Cython and supports full implementation of MPI using the “mpi4py” package. As an example, we investigate the inclination angle dependence of the observed polarization and the strong lensing magnification of AGN X-ray emission. We conclude that it is possible to perform complex numerical-relativity related computations using interpreted languages such as MATLAB and Python.

  4. Gravitational lensing effects of vacuum strings - Exact solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. R., III

    1985-01-01

    Exact interior and exterior solutions to Einstein's field equations are derived for vacuum strings. The exterior solution for a uniform density vacuum string corresponds to a conical space while the interior solution is that of a spherical cap. For Mu equals 0-1/4 the external metric is ds-squared = -dt-squared + dr-squared + (1-4 Mu)-squared r-squared dphi-squared + dz-squared, where Mu is the mass per unit length in the string in Planck masses per Planck length. A maximum mass per unit length for a string is 6.73 x 10 to the 27th g/cm. It is shown that strings cause temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background and produce equal brightness double QSO images separated by up to several minutes of arc. Formulae for lensing probabilities, image splittings, and time delays are derived for strings in a realistic cosmological setting. String searches using ST, the VLA, and the COBE satellite are discussed.

  5. Model-free analysis of quadruply imaged gravitationally lensed systems and substructured galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woldesenbet, Addishiwot G.; Williams, Liliya L. R.

    2015-11-01

    Multiple image gravitational lens systems, and especially quads, are invaluable in determining the amount and distribution of mass in galaxies. This is usually done by mass modelling using parametric or free-form methods. An alternative way of extracting information about lens mass distribution is to use lensing degeneracies and invariants. Where applicable, they allow one to make conclusions about whole classes of lenses without model fitting. Here, we use approximate, but observationally useful invariants formed by the three relative polar angles of quad images around the lens centre to show that many smooth elliptical+shear lenses can reproduce the same set of quad image angles within observational error. This result allows us to show in a model-free way what the general class of smooth elliptical+shear lenses looks like in the three-dimensional (3D) space of image relative angles, and that this distribution does not match that of the observed quads. We conclude that, even though smooth elliptical+shear lenses can reproduce individual quads, they cannot reproduce the quad population. What is likely needed is substructure, with clump masses larger than those responsible for flux ratio anomalies in quads, or luminous or dark nearby perturber galaxies.

  6. Candidate Gravitationally Lensed Dusty Star-forming Galaxies in the Herschel Wide Area Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayyeri, H.; Keele, M.; Cooray, A.; Riechers, D. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Harris, A. I.; Frayer, D. T.; Baker, A. J.; Chapman, S. C.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Fu, H.; Marchetti, L.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Scott, D.; Vaccari, M.; Vieira, J.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a list of candidate gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) from the HerMES Large Mode Survey and the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey. Together, these partially overlapping surveys cover 372 deg2 on the sky. After removing local spiral galaxies and known radio-loud blazars, our candidate list of lensed DSFGs is composed of 77 sources with 500 μm flux densities (S 500) greater than 100 mJy. Such sources are dusty starburst galaxies similar to the first bright sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs) discovered with SCUBA. We expect a large fraction of this list to be strongly lensed, with a small fraction made up of bright SMG–SMG mergers that appear as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies ({L}{IR}\\gt {10}13 {L}ȯ ). Thirteen of the 77 candidates have spectroscopic redshifts from CO spectroscopy with ground-based interferometers, putting them at z\\gt 1 and well above the redshift of the foreground lensing galaxies. The surface density of our sample is 0.21 ± 0.03 deg‑2. We present follow-up imaging of a few of the candidates to confirm their lensing nature. The sample presented here is an ideal tool for higher-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations to understand the detailed properties of starburst phenomena in distant galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  7. SDSS J133401.39+331534.3: A NEW SUBARCSECOND GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Iye, Masanori; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Minowa, Yosuke; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    The quasar SDSS J133401.39+331534.3 at z = 2.426 is found to be a two-image gravitationally lensed quasar with an image separation of 0.''833. The object is first identified as a lensed quasar candidate in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search, and then confirmed as a lensed system from follow-up observations at the Subaru and University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescopes. We estimate the redshift of the lensing galaxy to be 0.557 based on absorption lines in the quasar spectra as well as the color of the galaxy. In particular, we observe the system with the Subaru Telescope AO188 adaptive optics with a laser guide star, in order to derive accurate astrometry, which well demonstrates the usefulness of the laser guide star adaptive optics imaging for studying strong lens systems. Our mass modeling with improved astrometry implies that a nearby bright galaxy {approx}4'' apart from the lensing galaxy is likely to affect the lens potential.

  8. WITNESSING THE DIFFERENTIAL EVOLUTION OF DISK GALAXIES IN LUMINOSITY AND SIZE VIA GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Bandara, Kaushala; Crampton, David; Peng, Chien; Simard, Luc

    2013-11-01

    We take advantage of the magnification in size and flux of a galaxy provided by gravitational lensing to analyze the properties of 62 strongly lensed galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. The sample of lensed galaxies spans a redshift range of 0.20 ≤ z ≤ 1.20 with a median redshift of z = 0.61. We use the lens modeling code LENSFIT to derive the luminosities, sizes, and Sérsic indices of the lensed galaxies. The measured properties of the lensed galaxies show a primarily compact, {sup d}isk{sup -}like population with the peaks of the size and Sérsic index distributions corresponding to ∼1.50 kpc and n ∼ 1, respectively. Comparison of the SLACS galaxies to a non-lensing, broadband imaging survey shows that a lensing survey allows us to probe a galaxy population that reaches ∼2 mag fainter. Our analysis allows us to compare the (z) = 0.61 disk galaxy sample (n ≤ 2.5) to an unprecedented local galaxy sample of ∼670, 000 SDSS galaxies at z ∼ 0.1; this analysis indicates that the evolution of the luminosity-size relation since z ∼ 1 may not be fully explained by a pure-size or pure-luminosity evolution but may instead require a combination of both. Our observations are also in agreement with recent numerical simulations of disk galaxies that show evidence of a mass-dependent evolution since z ∼ 1, where high-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} > 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in size and low-mass disk galaxies (M{sub *} ≤ 10{sup 9} M{sub ☉}) evolve more in luminosity.

  9. Evidence for gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background polarization from cross-correlation with the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Borys, C; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Linder, E; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Poletti, D; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Rotermund, K; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B D; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tikhomirov, A; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics. PMID:24745402

  10. Evidence for Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization from Cross-Correlation with the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Borys, C.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Poletti, D.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Rotermund, K.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B. D.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tikhomirov, A.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We reconstruct the gravitational lensing convergence signal from cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data taken by the Polarbear experiment and cross-correlate it with cosmic infrared background maps from the Herschel satellite. From the cross spectra, we obtain evidence for gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization at a statistical significance of 4.0σ and indication of the presence of a lensing B-mode signal at a significance of 2.3σ. We demonstrate that our results are not biased by instrumental and astrophysical systematic errors by performing null tests, checks with simulated and real data, and analytical calculations. This measurement of polarization lensing, made via the robust cross-correlation channel, not only reinforces POLARBEAR auto-correlation measurements, but also represents one of the early steps towards establishing CMB polarization lensing as a powerful new probe of cosmology and astrophysics.

  11. New insights into peculiar thermonuclear supernovae and line of sight effects in gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCully, Curtis

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and gravitational lensing are important cosmological probes, but both are limited by theoretical, systematic uncertainties. One key uncertainty in distances derived using SNe Ia is our lack of understanding of the explosion mechanism for normal SNe Ia. We have studied peculiar type Iax supernovae that appear to be related to normal SNe Ia with the goal of understanding white dwarf explosions as a whole. In Chapter 2, using late-time Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of SN 2008A and SN 2005hk, both prototypical SNe Iax, we argue that these objects are pure deflagration explosions that do not unbind the white dwarf. In Chapter 3, we present observations of the type Iax SN 2012Z, one of the nearest ever discovered. Fortunately for us, its host galaxy, NGC 1309, was observed extensively with HST/ACS (to measure a Cepheid distance), giving us incredibly deep pre-explosion images of the site of SN 2012Z. We find that there is a source coincident with the position of the SN. We argue that the source is likely a helium star companion to the white dwarf that exploded. In galaxy-scale gravitational lenses, one of the largest systematic uncertainties arises due to other mass in the environment of the lens or along the line of sight (LOS). In Chapter 4, we develop an analytic framework to account for LOS effects. Our framework employs a hybrid approach treating a few perturbing galaxies as strong lenses, making it accurate, while treating the rest in the weak lensing approximation, making it also computationally efficient. In Chapter 5, we test our framework using simulations of realistic mass models. We suggest a method to characterize the strength of the LOS effects allowing us to systematically test when the weak lensing approximation is valid. We show that LOS effects are not equivalent to a single shear, but these non-linear effects are correctly captured by our framework. Our new methodology can be used to constrain cosmological

  12. Constraining the minimum luminosity of high redshift galaxies through gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the effects of gravitational lensing on the source count of high redshift galaxies as projected to be observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields program and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in the near future. Taking the mass density profile of the lensing object to be the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) or the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, we model a lens residing at a redshift of z{sub L} = 0.5 and explore the radial dependence of the resulting magnification bias and its variability with the velocity dispersion of the lens, the photometric sensitivity of the instrument, the redshift of the background source population, and the intrinsic maximum absolute magnitude (M{sub max}) of the sources. We find that gravitational lensing enhances the number of galaxies with redshifts z∼> 13 detected in the angular region θ{sub E}/2 ≤ θ ≤ 2θ{sub E} (where θ{sub E} is the Einstein angle) by a factor of ∼ 3 and 1.5 in the HUDF (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 9 nJy) and medium-deep JWST surveys (df/dν{sub 0} ∼ 6 nJy). Furthermore, we find that even in cases where a negative magnification bias reduces the observed number count of background sources, the lensing effect improves the sensitivity of the count to the intrinsic faint-magnitude cut-off of the Schechter luminosity function. In a field centered on a strong lensing cluster, observations of z∼> 6 and z∼> 13 galaxies with JWST can be used to infer this cut-off magnitude for values as faint as M{sub max} ∼ -14.4 and -16.1 mag (L{sub min} ≈ 2.5 × 10{sup 26} and 1.2 × 10{sup 27} erg s{sup −1} Hz{sup −1}) respectively, within the range bracketed by existing theoretical models. Gravitational lensing may therefore offer an effective way of constraining the low-luminosity cut-off of high-redshift galaxies.

  13. Gravitational lensing by self-dual black holes in loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Satyabrata; Lochan, Kinjalk; Narasimha, D.

    2015-03-01

    We study gravitational lensing by a recently proposed black hole solution in loop quantum gravity. We highlight the fact that the quantum gravity corrections to the Schwarzschild metric in this model evade the "mass suppression" effects (that the usual quantum gravity corrections are susceptible to) by virtue of one of the parameters in the model being dimensionless, which is unlike any other quantum gravity motivated parameter. Gravitational lensing in the strong and weak deflection regimes is studied, and a sample consistency relation is presented which could serve as a test of this model. We discuss that, though the consistency relation for this model is qualitatively similar to what would have been in Brans-Dicke, in general it can be a good discriminator between many alternative theories. Although the observational prospects do not seem to be very optimistic even for a galactic supermassive black hole case, time delay between relativistic images for a billion solar mass black holes in other galaxies might be within reach of future relativistic lensing observations.

  14. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BY THE SUPER-MASSIVE cD GALAXY IN ABELL 3827

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, E. R.; Gomez, P. L.; Lee, H.; Diaz, R.; Bergmann, M.; Turner, J. E. H.; Miller, B. W.; West, M. J.; Verdugo, T.

    2010-06-01

    We have discovered strong gravitational lensing features in the core of the nearby cluster Abell 3827 by analyzing Gemini South GMOS images. The most prominent strong lensing feature is a highly magnified, ring-shaped configuration of four images around the central cD galaxy. GMOS spectroscopic analysis puts this source at z {approx} 0.2. Located {approx}20'' away from the central galaxy is a secondary tangential arc feature which has been identified as a background galaxy with z {approx} 0.4. We have modeled the gravitational potential of the cluster core, taking into account the mass from the cluster, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and other galaxies. We derive a total mass of (2.7 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 13} M {sub sun} within 37 h {sup -1} kpc. This mass is an order of magnitude larger than that derived from X-ray observations. The total mass derived from lensing data suggests that the BCG in this cluster is perhaps the most massive galaxy in the nearby universe.

  15. Weak gravitational lensing due to large-scale structure of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroszynski, Michal; Park, Changbom; Paczynski, Bohdan; Gott, J. Richard, III

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the large-scale structure of the universe on the propagation of light rays is studied. The development of the large-scale density fluctuations in the omega = 1 universe is calculated within the cold dark matter scenario using a smooth particle approximation. The propagation of about 10 to the 6th random light rays between the redshift z = 5 and the observer was followed. It is found that the effect of shear is negligible, and the amplification of single images is dominated by the matter in the beam. The spread of amplifications is very small. Therefore, the filled-beam approximation is very good for studies of strong lensing by galaxies or clusters of galaxies. In the simulation, the column density was averaged over a comoving area of approximately (1/h Mpc)-squared. No case of a strong gravitational lensing was found, i.e., no 'over-focused' image that would suggest that a few images might be present. Therefore, the large-scale structure of the universe as it is presently known does not produce multiple images with gravitational lensing on a scale larger than clusters of galaxies.

  16. How gravitational lensing helps γ-ray photons avoid γ – γ absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacka, Anna; Böttcher, Markus; Sushch, Iurii E-mail: Markus.Bottcher@nwu.ac.za

    2014-08-01

    We investigate potential γ – γ absorption of γ-ray emission from blazars arising from inhomogeneities along the line of sight, beyond the diffuse Extragalactic Background Light (EBL). As plausible sources of excess γ – γ opacity, we consider (1) foreground galaxies, including cases in which this configuration leads to strong gravitational lensing, (2) individual stars within these foreground galaxies, and (3) individual stars within our own galaxy, which may act as lenses for microlensing events. We found that intervening galaxies close to the line of sight are unlikely to lead to significant excess γ – γ absorption. This opens up the prospect of detecting lensed gamma-ray blazars at energies above 10 GeV with their gamma-ray spectra effectively only affected by the EBL. The most luminous stars located either in intervening galaxies or in our galaxy provide an environment in which these gamma-rays could, in principle, be significantly absorbed. However, despite a large microlensing probability due to stars located in intervening galaxies, γ-rays avoid absorption by being deflected by the gravitational potentials of such intervening stars to projected distances ({sup i}mpact parameters{sup )} where the resulting γ – γ opacities are negligible. Thus, neither of the intervening excess photon fields considered here, provide a substantial source of excess γ – γ opacity beyond the EBL, even in the case of very close alignments between the background blazar and a foreground star or galaxy.

  17. High-Resolution Infrared Imaging of FSC 10214+4724: Evidence for Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, James R.; Liu, Michael C.

    1995-08-01

    We present near-infrared observations of the ultraluminous high-redshift (z = 2.286) IRAS source FSC 10214+4724 obtained in 0."4 seeing at the W. M. Keck telescope. These observations show that FSC 10214+4724 consists of a highly symmetric circular arc centered on a second weaker source. The arc has an angular extent of about 140 deg and is probably unresolved in the transverse direction. This morphology constitutes compelling prima facie evidence for a gravitationally lensed system. Our images also contain evidence for the faint counterimage predicted by the lens hypothesis. The morphology of FSC 10214+4724 can be explained in terms of a gravitationally lensed background source if the object at the center of curvature of the arc is an L* galaxy at z ~ 0.7. If FSC 10214+4724 is lensed, then there is significant magnification and its luminosity has been overestimated by a large factor. Our results suggest that FSC 10214+4724 is not a uniquely luminous object but ranks among the most powerful quasars and ultraluminous IRAS galaxies.

  18. PROBING THE INNER KILOPARSEC OF MASSIVE GALAXIES WITH STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Marshall, Philip J.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2015-01-30

    We examine the prospects of detecting demagnified images of gravitational lenses in observations of strongly lensed millimeter-wave molecular emission lines with ALMA. We model the lensing galaxies as a superposition of a dark matter component, a stellar component, and a central super-massive black hole (SMBH) and assess the detectability of the central images for a range of relevant parameters (e.g., stellar core, black hole mass, and source size). We find that over a large range of plausible parameters, future deep observations of lensed molecular lines with ALMA should enable the detection of the central images at ≳3σ significance. We use a Fisher analysis to examine the constraints that could be placed on these parameters in various scenarios and find that for large stellar cores, both the core size and the mass of the central SMBHs can be accurately measured. We also study the prospects for detecting binary SMBHs with such observations and find that only under rare conditions and with very long integrations (∼40 hr) the masses of both SMBHs may be measured using the distortions of central images.

  19. Gravitational lenses in generalized Einstein-aether theory: The bullet cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.-C.; Matsuo, Reijiro; Starkman, Glenn

    2008-11-15

    We study the lensing properties of an asymmetric mass distribution and vector field in generalized Einstein-aether (GEA) theory. As vector-field fluctuations are responsible in GEA for seeding baryonic structure formation, vector-field concentrations can exist independently of baryonic matter. Such concentrations would not be expected to be tied to baryonic matter except gravitationally, and so, like dark matter halos, would become separated from baryonic matter in interacting systems such as the bullet cluster. These vector-field concentrations cause metric deviations that affect weak lensing. Therefore, the distribution of weak lensing deviates from that which would be inferred from the luminous mass distribution, in a way that numerical calculations demonstrate can be consistent with observations. This suggests that MOND-inspired theories can reproduce weak lensing observations, but makes clear the price: the existence of a coherent large-scale fluctuation of a field(s) weakly tied to the baryonic matter, not completely dissimilar to a dark matter halo.

  20. Strong field limit analysis of gravitational lensing in Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Fu, Chun-E; Yang, Ke E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.cn E-mail: yangke09@lzu.edu.cn

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the quasi-equatorial lensing by the stationary, axially-symmetric black hole in Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime in the strong field limit. The deflection angle of light ray and other strong deflection limit coefficients are obtained numerically and they are found to be closely dependent on the NUT charge n and spin a. We also compute the magnification and the positions of the relativistic images. The caustics are studied and the results show that these caustics drift away from the optical axis, which is quite different from the Schwarzschild black hole case. Moreover, the intersections of the critical curves on the equatorial plane are obtained and it is shown that they increase with the NUT charge. These results show that there is a significant effect of the NUT charge on the strong gravitational lensing.

  1. Infrared imaging of MG 0414 + 0534 - The red gravitational lens systems as lensed radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annis, James; Luppino, Gerard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present an IR image of the gravitational lens system MG 0414 + 0534, and IR photometry of PG 1115 + 080, H1413 + 117, and Q1429 - 008. The IR of MG 0414 + 0534 shows a morphology that is similar to the radio and optical morphologies. The object is bright (K-prime = 13.7) and extremely red (I-K-prime = 5.7). MG 0414 + 0534 thus becomes the second radio-selected lens system to have very red optical IR colors. When plotted on a color-magnitude diagram of objects from a radio survey, MG 0414 + 0534 and the other very red system, MG 1131 + 0456, lie near the locus of radio galaxies. We therefore suggest that these systems are lensed high-redshift radio galaxies. In general, lensed radio galaxies should be common among lens systems selected from radio surveys, since a high proportion of radio sources are radio galaxies.

  2. THE WEIGHT OF EMPTINESS: THE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING SIGNAL OF STACKED VOIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Elisabeth; Dore, Olivier; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Umetsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-10

    The upcoming new generation of spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys will provide large samples of cosmic voids, large distinct, underdense structures in the universe. Combining these with future galaxy imaging surveys, we study the prospects of probing the underlying matter distribution in and around cosmic voids via the weak gravitational lensing effects of stacked voids, utilizing both shear and magnification information. The statistical precision is greatly improved by stacking a large number of voids along different lines of sight, even when taking into account the impact of inherent miscentering and projection effects. We show that Dark Energy Task Force Stage IV surveys, such as the Euclid satellite and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, should be able to detect the void lensing signal with sufficient precision from stacking abundant medium-sized voids, thus providing direct constraints on the matter density profile of voids independent of assumptions on galaxy bias.

  3. The CASSOWARY spectroscopy survey: a new sample of gravitationally lensed galaxies in SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Daniel P.; Auger, Matthew; Belokurov, Vasily; Jones, Tucker; Robertson, Brant; Ellis, Richard S.; Sand, David J.; Moiseev, Alexei; Eagle, Will; Myers, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Bright gravitationally lensed galaxies provide our most detailed view of galaxies at high redshift. The very brightest (r < 21) systems enable high spatial and spectral resolution measurements, offering unique constraints on the outflow energetics, metallicity gradients and stellar populations in high-redshift galaxies. Yet as a result of the small number of ultrabright z ≃ 2 lensed systems with confirmed redshifts, most detailed spectroscopic studies have been limited in their scope. With the goal of increasing the number of bright lensed galaxies available for detailed follow-up, we have undertaken a spectroscopic campaign targeting wide separation (≳3 arcsec) galaxy-galaxy lens candidates within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Building on the earlier efforts of our Cambridge and Sloan Survey Of Wide Arcs in Thesky survey, we target a large sample of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems in SDSS using a well-established search algorithm which identifies blue arc-like structures situated around luminous red galaxies. In this paper, we present a new redshift catalogue containing 29 lensed sources in SDSS confirmed through spectroscopic follow-up of candidate galaxy-galaxy lens systems. Included in this new sample are two of the brightest galaxies (r = 19.6 and 19.7) known at z ≃ 2, a low metallicity (12 + log (O/H) ≃ 8.0) extreme nebular line emitting galaxy at z = 1.43, and numerous systems for which detailed follow-up will be possible. The source redshifts span 0.9 < z < 2.5 (median redshift of 1.9), and their optical magnitudes are in the range 19.6 ≲ r ≲ 22.3. We present a brief source-by-source discussion of the spectroscopic properties extracted from our confirmatory spectra and discuss some initial science results. Preliminary lens modelling reveals average source magnifications of 5-10 times. With more than 50 gravitationally lensed z ≳ 1 galaxies now confirmed within SDSS, it will soon be possible for the first time to develop generalized

  4. Analyzing Star Formation Properties in Dusty Early Universe Galaxies Using Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradli, Jaclyn C.; Bussmann, R. Shane; Riechers, Dominik A.; Clements, David; Perez-Fournon, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Strong gravitational lensing has recently become one of the most important tools for studying star formation properties in extremely high redshift galaxies. Dust-obscured star-forming galaxies found at far-infrared/sub-millimeter wavelengths are important in the assembly of stellar mass and the evolution of massive galaxies. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) imaging of Lockman 102, a strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy at z=5.29, discovered by the Herschel Space Observatory. The system was observed at 250, 350, 500 and 1000 microns, corresponding to rest frame wavelengths of 40, 56, 80, and 159 microns respectively. The observations were targeted at the thermal dust emission and the [CII] interstellar medium cooling line. We report an estimated photometric redshift of ~1.9 for the lensing galaxy, making it possibly the most distant lens currently known. We use uvmcmcfit, a publicly available Markov Chain Monte Carlo software tool we have developed for interferometric data, to fit lens models to Lockman 102. The results obtained from uvmcmcfit suggest the lensed system is composed of a single lensing galaxy and two extended sources. We have strong constraints on an intrinsic flux density of Lockman 102 of 4.55 + 0.45 mJy magnified by a factor of 12.5 + 1.2. From a modified blackbody fit we compute an intrinsic far infrared luminosity of 5.5e12 L⊙.This implies a star formation rate of ~950 M⊙ yr-1, making Lockman 102 an extremely active dusty galaxy. We also compare Lockman 102 to other dusty luminous starburst galaxies at similar redshift, HLS0918 (Rawle et al. 2014) and AzTEC-3 (Riechers et al. 2014a) and determine it is among the most luminous and active galaxies ~1 Gyr after the Big Bang. It is only with strong lensing that the SMA is able to undertake such a detailed study of a galaxy at this distance; the continued improvements from new facilities such as ALMA offer a promising future in observing even more distant lensed systems.

  5. Gravitational Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes cosmic flukes which offer a unique window on new information about the universe. Discusses the historical background, theory, and detection of this effect. Proposes the importance of information found by the examination of these phenomena. (CW)

  6. Constraints on a φCDM model from strong gravitational lensing and updated Hubble parameter measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yun; Geng, Chao-Qiang; Cao, Shuo; Huang, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Zong-Hong E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw E-mail: huangymei@gmail.com

    2015-02-01

    We constrain the scalar field dark energy model with an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V(φ) ∝ φ{sup −α} (α > 0), from a set of recent cosmological observations by compiling an updated sample of Hubble parameter measurements including 30 independent data points. Our results show that the constraining power of the updated sample of H(z) data with the HST prior on H{sub 0} is stronger than those of the SCP Union2 and Union2.1 compilations. A recent sample of strong gravitational lensing systems is also adopted to confine the model even though the results are not significant. A joint analysis of the strong gravitational lensing data with the more restrictive updated Hubble parameter measurements and the Type Ia supernovae data from SCP Union2 indicates that the recent observations still can not distinguish whether dark energy is a time-independent cosmological constant or a time-varying dynamical component.

  7. SDSS J131339.98+515128.3: A new GravitationallyLensed Quasar Selected Based on Near-infrared Excess

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, E.O.; Oguri, M.; Jackson, N.; Inada, N.; Kayo, I.

    2007-09-28

    We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar, SDSS J131339.98+515128.3, at a redshift of 1:875 with an image separation of 1: 0024. The lensing galaxy is clearly detected in visible-light follow-up observations. We also identify three absorption-line doublets in the spectra of the lensed quasar images, from which we measure the lens redshift to be 0:194. Like several other known lenses, the lensed quasar images have different continuum slopes. This difference is probably the result of reddening and microlensing in the lensing galaxy. The lensed quasar was selected by correlating Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic quasars with Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) sources and choosing quasars that show near-infrared (IR) excess. The near-IR excess can originate, for example, from the contribution of the lensing galaxy at near-IR wavelengths. We show that the near-IR excess technique is indeed an efficient method to identify lensed systems from a large sample of quasars.

  8. Gravitational lensing limits on the cosmological constant in a flat universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.

    1990-01-01

    Inflationary cosmological theories predict, and some more general aesthetic criteria suggest, that the large-scale spatial curvature of the universe k should be accurately zero (i.e., flat), a condition which is satisfied when the universe's present mean density and the value of the cosmological constant Lambda have certain pairs of values. Available data on the frequency of multiple image-lensing of high-redshift quasars by galaxies suggest that the cosmological constant cannot make a dominant contribution to producing a flat universe. In particular, if the mean density of the universe is as small as the baryon density inferred from standard cosmic nucleosynthesis calculations or as determined from typical dynamical studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters, then a value of Lambda large enough to produce a k = 0 universe would result in a substantially higher frequency of multiple-image lensing of quasars than has been observed so far. Shortcomings of the available lens data and uncertainties concerning galaxy properties allow some possibility of escaping this conclusion, but systematic searches for a gravitational lenses and continuing investigations of galaxy mass distributions should soon provide decisive information. It is also noted that nonzero-curvature cosmological models can account for the observed frequency of galaxy-quasar lens systems and for a variety of other constraints.

  9. Fast Variability and Millimeter/IR Flares in GRMHD Models of Sgr A* from Strong-field Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Medeiros, Lia; Marrone, Daniel; Saḑowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-10-01

    We explore the variability properties of long, high-cadence general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations across the electromagnetic spectrum using an efficient, GPU-based radiative transfer algorithm. We focus on both standard and normal evolution (SANE) and magnetically arrested disk (MAD) simulations with parameters that successfully reproduce the time-averaged spectral properties of Sgr A* and the size of its image at 1.3 mm. We find that the SANE models produce short-timescale variability with amplitudes and power spectra that closely resemble those inferred observationally. In contrast, MAD models generate only slow variability at lower flux levels. Neither set of models shows any X-ray flares, which most likely indicates that additional physics, such as particle acceleration mechanisms, need to be incorporated into the GRMHD simulations to account for them. The SANE models show strong, short-lived millimeter/infrared (IR) flares, with short (≲1 hr) time lags between the millimeter and IR wavelengths, that arise from the combination of short-lived magnetic flux tubes and strong-field gravitational lensing near the horizon. Such events provide a natural explanation for the observed IR flares with no X-ray counterparts.

  10. Strong gravitational lensing by an electrically charged black hole in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotani, Hajime; Miyamoto, Umpei

    2015-08-01

    We systematically examine the properties of null geodesics around an electrically charged, asymptotically flat black hole in Eddington-inspired Born-Infeld gravity, varying the electric charge of the black hole and the coupling constant in the theory. We find that the radius of the unstable circular orbit for a massless particle decreases with the coupling constant, if the value of the electrical charge is fixed. Additionally, we consider the strong gravitational lensing around such a black hole. We show that the deflection angle, the position angle of the relativistic images, and the magnification due to the light bending in strong gravitational field are quite sensitive to the parameters determining the black hole solution. Thus, through the accurate observations associated with the strong gravitational lensing, it might be possible to reveal the gravitational theory in a strong field regime.

  11. Correcting the z ˜ 8 Galaxy Luminosity Function for Gravitational Lensing Magnification Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Charlotte A.; Treu, Tommaso; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Collett, Thomas E.; Trenti, Michele; Marshall, Philip J.; Barone-Nugent, Robert; Bradley, Larry D.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Wyithe, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    We present a Bayesian framework to account for the magnification bias from both strong and weak gravitational lensing in estimates of high-redshift galaxy luminosity functions (LFs). We illustrate our method by estimating the z ˜ 8 UV LF using a sample of 97 Y-band dropouts (Lyman break galaxies) found in the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey and from the literature. We find the LF is well described by a Schechter function with characteristic magnitude of {{M}\\star }=-19.85-0.35+0.30, faint-end slope of α =-1.72-0.29+0.30, and number density of {{log }10}{{{\\Psi }}\\star }(Mp{{c}-3})=-3.00-0.31+0.23. These parameters are consistent within the uncertainties with those inferred from the same sample without accounting for the magnification bias, demonstrating that the effect is small for current surveys at z ˜ 8, and cannot account for the apparent overdensity of bright galaxies compared to a Schechter function found recently by Bowler et al. and Finkelstein et al. We estimate that the probability of finding a strongly lensed z ˜ 8 source in our sample is in the range ˜3-15% depending on limiting magnitude. We identify one strongly lensed candidate and three cases of intermediate lensing in BoRG (estimated magnification μ > 1.4) in addition to the previously known candidate group-scale strong lens. Using a range of theoretical LFs we conclude that magnification bias will dominate wide field surveys—such as those planned for the Euclid and WFIRST missions—especially at z > 10. Magnification bias will need to be accounted for in order to derive accurate estimates of high-redshift LFs in these surveys and to distinguish between galaxy formation models.

  12. Effects of dark matter substructures on gravitational lensing: results from the Aquarius simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D. D.; Mao, Shude; Wang, Jie; Springel, V.; Gao, Liang; White, S. D. M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Jenkins, Adrian; Li, Guoliang; Navarro, Julio F.

    2009-09-01

    We use the high-resolution Aquarius simulations of the formation of Milky Way-sized haloes in the Λ cold dark matter cosmology to study the effects of dark matter substructures on gravitational lensing. Each halo is resolved with ~108 particles (at a mass resolution mp ~ 103 to 104h-1Msolar) within its virial radius. Subhaloes with masses msub >~ 105h-1Msolar are well resolved, an improvement of at least two orders of magnitude over previous lensing studies. We incorporate a baryonic component modelled as a Hernquist profile and account for the response of the dark matter via adiabatic contraction. We focus on the `anomalous' flux ratio problem, in particular on the violation of the cusp-caustic relation due to substructures. We find that subhaloes with masses less than ~108h-1Msolar play an important role in causing flux anomalies; such low-mass subhaloes have been unresolved in previous studies. There is large scatter in the predicted flux ratios between different haloes and between different projections of the same halo. In some cases, the frequency of predicted anomalous flux ratios is comparable to that observed for the radio lenses, although in most cases it is not. The probability for the simulations to reproduce the observed violations of the cusp lenses is ~10-3. We therefore conclude that the amount of substructure in the central regions of the Aquarius haloes is insufficient to explain the observed frequency of violations of the cusp-caustic relation. These conclusions are based purely on our dark matter simulations which ignore the effect of baryons on subhalo survivability.

  13. WEAK GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS A PROBE OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SUBSTRUCTURES IN DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato

    2015-02-01

    We propose a novel method to select satellite galaxies in outer regions of galaxy groups or clusters using weak gravitational lensing. The method is based on the theoretical expectation that the tangential shear pattern around satellite galaxies would appear with negative values at an offset distance from the center of the main halo. We can thus locate the satellite galaxies statistically with an offset distance of several lensing smoothing scales by using the standard reconstruction of surface mass density maps from weak lensing observation. We test the idea using high-resolution cosmological simulations. We show that subhalos separated from the center of the host halo are successfully located even without assuming the position of the center. For a number of such subhalos, the characteristic mass and offset length can be also estimated on a statistical basis. We perform a Fisher analysis to show how well upcoming weak lensing surveys can constrain the mass density profile of satellite galaxies. In the case of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope with a sky coverage of 20,000 deg{sup 2}, the mass of the member galaxies in the outer region of galaxy clusters can be constrained with an accuracy of ∼0.1 dex for galaxy clusters with mass 10{sup 14} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉} at z = 0.15. Finally we explore the detectability of tidal stripping features for subhalos having a wide range of masses of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 13} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}.

  14. Small-scale structures of dark matter and flux anomalies in quasar gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, R. Benton; Amara, Adam

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the statistics of flux anomalies in gravitationally lensed quasi-stellar objects as a function of dark matter halo properties such as substructure content and halo ellipticity. We do this by creating a very large number of simulated lenses with finite source sizes to compare with the data. After analysing these simulations, we conclude the following. (1) The finite size of the source is important. The point source approximation commonly used can cause biased results. (2) The widely used Rcusp statistic is sensitive to halo ellipticity as well as the lens' substructure content. (3) For compact substructure, we find new upper bounds on the amount of substructure from the fact that no simple single-galaxy lenses have been observed with a single source having more than four well separated images. (4) The frequency of image flux anomalies is largely dependent on the total surface mass density in substructures and the size-mass relation for the substructures, and not on the range of substructure masses. (5) Substructure models with the same size-mass relation produce similar numbers of flux anomalies even when their internal mass profiles are different. (6) The lack of high image multiplicity lenses puts a limit on a combination of the substructures' size-mass relation, surface density and mass. (7) Substructures with shallower mass profiles and/or larger sizes produce less extra images. (8) The constraints that we are able to measure here with current data are roughly consistent with Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) N-body simulations.

  15. CHARACTERIZING LENSES AND LENSED STARS OF HIGH-MAGNIFICATION SINGLE-LENS GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS WITH LENSES PASSING OVER SOURCE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Collaboration: muFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-05-20

    We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all of the events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For seven events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, five events are found to have Einstein radii of less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses very low mass star or brown dwarf candidates. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of {theta}{sub E} {approx} 0.08 mas combined with the short timescale of t{sub E} {approx} 2.7 days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of {approx}0.84 M{sub Sun} is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we did not find planetary signals for any of the events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.

  16. Characterizing Lenses and Lensed Stars of High-magnification Single-lens Gravitational Microlensing Events with Lenses Passing over Source Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-Y.; Shin, I.-G.; Park, S.-Y.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Street, R.; Dominik, M.; Allen, W.; Almeida, L. A.; Bos, M.; Christie, G. W.; Depoy, D. L.; Dong, S.; Drummond, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gaudi, B. S.; Henderson, C. B.; Hung, L.-W.; Jablonski, F.; Janczak, J.; Lee, C.-U.; Mallia, F.; Maury, A.; McCormick, J.; McGregor, D.; Monard, L. A. G.; Moorhouse, D.; Muñoz, J. A.; Natusch, T.; Nelson, C.; Park, B.-G.; Pogge, R. W.; "TG" Tan, T.-G.; Thornley, G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Abe, F.; Barnard, E.; Baudry, J.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Freeman, M.; Fukui, A.; Furusawa, K.; Hayashi, F.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Hosaka, S.; Itow, Y.; Kamiya, K.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Kobara, S.; Korpela, A.; Lin, W.; Ling, C. H.; Makita, S.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Miyake, N.; Muraki, Y.; Nagaya, M.; Nishimoto, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Okumura, T.; Omori, K.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, To.; Skuljan, L.; Sullivan, D. J.; Suzuki, D.; Suzuki, K.; Sweatman, W. L.; Takino, S.; Tristram, P. J.; Wada, K.; Yock, P. C. M.; MOA Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; OGLE Collaboration; Albrow, M. D.; Bachelet, E.; Batista, V.; Bennett, C. S.; Bowens-Rubin, R.; Brillant, S.; Cassan, A.; Cole, A.; Corrales, E.; Coutures, Ch.; Dieters, S.; Dominis Prester, D.; Donatowicz, J.; Fouqué, P.; Greenhill, J.; Kane, S. R.; Menzies, J.; Sahu, K. C.; Wambsganss, J.; Williams, A.; Zub, M.; PLANET Collaboration; Allan, A.; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Clay, N.; Fraser, S.; Horne, K.; Kains, N.; Mottram, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I.; Tsapras, Y.; RoboNet Collaboration; Alsubai, K. A.; Bozza, V.; Burgdorf, M. J.; Calchi Novati, S.; Dodds, P.; Dreizler, S.; Finet, F.; Gerner, T.; Glitrup, M.; Grundahl, F.; Hardis, S.; Harpsøe, K.; Hinse, T. C.; Hundertmark, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Kerins, E.; Liebig, C.; Maier, G.; Mancini, L.; Mathiasen, M.; Penny, M. T.; Proft, S.; Rahvar, S.; Ricci, D.; Scarpetta, G.; Schäfer, S.; Schönebeck, F.; Skottfelt, J.; Surdej, J.; Southworth, J.; Zimmer, F.; MiNDSTEp Consortium

    2012-05-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of nine high-magnification single-lens gravitational microlensing events with lenses passing over source stars, including OGLE-2004-BLG-254, MOA-2007-BLG-176, MOA-2007-BLG-233/OGLE-2007-BLG-302, MOA-2009-BLG-174, MOA-2010-BLG-436, MOA-2011-BLG-093, MOA-2011-BLG-274, OGLE-2011-BLG-0990/MOA-2011-BLG-300, and OGLE-2011-BLG-1101/MOA-2011-BLG-325. For all of the events, we measure the linear limb-darkening coefficients of the surface brightness profile of source stars by measuring the deviation of the light curves near the peak affected by the finite-source effect. For seven events, we measure the Einstein radii and the lens-source relative proper motions. Among them, five events are found to have Einstein radii of less than 0.2 mas, making the lenses very low mass star or brown dwarf candidates. For MOA-2011-BLG-274, especially, the small Einstein radius of θE ~ 0.08 mas combined with the short timescale of t E ~ 2.7 days suggests the possibility that the lens is a free-floating planet. For MOA-2009-BLG-174, we measure the lens parallax and thus uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens. We also find that the measured lens mass of ~0.84 M ⊙ is consistent with that of a star blended with the source, suggesting that the blend is likely to be the lens. Although we did not find planetary signals for any of the events, we provide exclusion diagrams showing the confidence levels excluding the existence of a planet as a function of the separation and mass ratio.

  17. Improving three-dimensional mass mapping with weak gravitational lensing using galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Context. The weak gravitational lensing distortion of distant galaxy images (defined as sources) probes the projected large-scale matter distribution in the Universe. The availability of redshift information in galaxy surveys also allows us to recover the radial matter distribution to a certain degree. Aims: To improve quality in the mass mapping, we combine the lensing information with the spatial clustering of a population of galaxies (defined as tracers) that trace the matter density with a known galaxy bias. Methods: We construct a minimum-variance estimator for the 3D matter density that incorporates the angular distribution of galaxy tracers, which are coarsely binned in redshift. Merely the second-order bias of the tracers has to be known, which can in principle be self-consistently constrained in the data by lensing techniques. This synergy introduces a new noise component because of the stochasticity in the matter-tracer density relation. We give a description of the stochasticity noise in the Gaussian regime, and we investigate the estimator characteristics analytically. We apply the estimator to a mock survey based on the Millennium Simulation. Results: The estimator linearly mixes the individual lensing mass and tracer number density maps into a combined smoothed mass map. The weighting in the mix depends on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the individual maps and the correlation, R, between the matter and galaxy density. The weight of the tracers can be reduced by hand. For moderate mixing, the S/N in the mass map improves by a factor ~2-3 for R ≳ 0.4. Importantly, the systematic offset between a true and apparent mass peak distance (defined as z-shift bias) in a lensing-only map is eliminated, even for weak correlations of R ~ 0.4. Conclusions: If the second-order bias of tracer galaxies can be determined, the synergy technique potentially provides an option to improve redshift accuracy and completeness of the lensing 3D mass map. Herein, the aim

  18. News from z ˜ 6--10 Galaxy Candidates Found Behind Gravitational Lensing Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaerer, D.; Pelló, R.; Egami, E.; Hempel, A.; Richard, J.; Le Borgne, J.-F.; Kneib, J.-P.; Wise, M.; Boone, F.; Combes, F.

    2007-12-01

    We summarise the current status of our project to identify and study z ˜ 6-10 galaxies thanks to strong gravitational lensing. Building on the detailed work from tet{sch:richard06}, we present results from new follow-up observations (imaging) undertaken with ACS/HST and the Spitzer Space Telescope and compare our results with findings from the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (UDF). These new observations are in agreement with the high-z nature for the vast majority of the candidates presented in tet{sch:richard06}. We also discuss the properties of other optical dropout sources found in our searches and related objects (EROs, sub-mm galaxies, etc.) from other surveys.

  19. Gravitational lensing effects in a time-variable cosmological 'constant' cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratra, Bharat; Quillen, Alice

    1992-01-01

    A scalar field phi with a potential V(phi) varies as phi exp -alpha(alpha is greater than 0) has an energy density, behaving like that of a time-variable cosmological 'constant', that redshifts less rapidly than the energy densities of radiation and matter, and so might contribute significantly to the present energy density. We compute, in this spatially flat cosmology, the gravitational lensing optical depth, and the expected lens redshift distribution for fixed source redshift. We find, for the values of alpha of about 4 and baryonic density parameter Omega of about 0.2 consistent with the classical cosmological tests, that the optical depth is significantly smaller than that in a constant-Lambda model with the same Omega. We also find that the redshift of the maximum of the lens distribution falls between that in the constant-Lambda model and that in the Einstein-de Sitter model.

  20. Planck's dusty GEMS: The brightest gravitationally lensed galaxies discovered with the Planck all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañameras, R.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Guery, D.; McKenzie, T.; König, S.; Petitpas, G.; Dole, H.; Frye, B.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Montier, L.; Negrello, M.; Beelen, A.; Boone, F.; Dicken, D.; Lagache, G.; Le Floc'h, E.; Altieri, B.; Béthermin, M.; Chary, R.; de Zotti, G.; Giard, M.; Kneissl, R.; Krips, M.; Malhotra, S.; Martinache, C.; Omont, A.; Pointecouteau, E.; Puget, J.-L.; Scott, D.; Soucail, G.; Valtchanov, I.; Welikala, N.; Yan, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of CO spectroscopy and infrared-to-millimetre dust photometry of 11 exceptionally bright far-infrared (FIR) and sub-mm sources discovered through a combination of the Planck all-sky survey and follow-up Herschel-SPIRE imaging - "Planck's Dusty Gravitationally Enhanced subMillimetre Sources". Each source has a secure spectroscopic redshift z = 2.2-3.6 from multiple lines obtained through a blind redshift search with EMIR at the IRAM 30-m telescope. Interferometry was obtained at IRAM and the SMA, and along with optical/near-infrared imaging obtained at the CFHT and the VLT reveal morphologies consistent with strongly gravitationally lensed sources, including several giant arcs. Additional photometry was obtained with JCMT/SCUBA-2 and IRAM/GISMO at 850 μm and 2 mm, respectively. The SEDs of our sources peak near either the 350 μm or 500 μm bands of SPIRE with peak flux densities between 0.35 and 1.14 Jy. All objects are extremely bright isolated point sources in the 18'' beam of SPIREat 250 μm, with apparent FIR luminosities of up to 3 × 1014 L⊙ (not correcting for the lensing effect). Their morphologies, sizes, CO line widths, CO luminosities, dust temperatures, and FIR luminosities provide additional empirical evidence that these are amongst the brightest strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies on the sub-mm sky. Our programme extends the successful wide-area searches for strongly gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies (carried out with the South Pole Telescope and Herschel) towards even brighter sources, which are so rare that their systematic identification requires a genuine all-sky survey like Planck. Six sources are above the ≃600 mJy 90% completeness limit of the Planck catalogue of compact sources (PCCS) at 545 and 857 GHz, which implies that these must literally be amongst the brightest high-redshift FIR and sub-mm sources on the extragalactic sky. We discuss their dust masses and temperatures, and use

  1. Gravitational lensing effects of a Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Tang, Jianfeng; He, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the influence of cosmological constant Λ on gravitational lensing. By the method of an elliptic integral, we give out the solution to the null geodesic equation in the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter spacetime. The deflection angle of light is obtained by studying the intrinsic geometry of the spatial equatorial plane in the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter spacetime. By applying the expansion of elliptic integrals, we find the deflection angle in the weak field limit and in the strong field limit, respectively. We find the angular position and magnification of images and discuss its behavior under changed Λ . At last, we give out the higher-order term in the strong field limit.

  2. NEW DEVELOPMENTS ON INVERSE POLYGON MAPPING TO CALCULATE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING MAGNIFICATION MAPS: OPTIMIZED COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mediavilla, E.; Lopez, P.; Gonzalez-Morcillo, C.; Jimenez-Vicente, J.

    2011-11-01

    We derive an exact solution (in the form of a series expansion) to compute gravitational lensing magnification maps. It is based on the backward gravitational lens mapping of a partition of the image plane in polygonal cells (inverse polygon mapping, IPM), not including critical points (except perhaps at the cell boundaries). The zeroth-order term of the series expansion leads to the method described by Mediavilla et al. The first-order term is used to study the error induced by the truncation of the series at zeroth order, explaining the high accuracy of the IPM even at this low order of approximation. Interpreting the Inverse Ray Shooting (IRS) method in terms of IPM, we explain the previously reported N {sup -3/4} dependence of the IRS error with the number of collected rays per pixel. Cells intersected by critical curves (critical cells) transform to non-simply connected regions with topological pathologies like auto-overlapping or non-preservation of the boundary under the transformation. To define a non-critical partition, we use a linear approximation of the critical curve to divide each critical cell into two non-critical subcells. The optimal choice of the cell size depends basically on the curvature of the critical curves. For typical applications in which the pixel of the magnification map is a small fraction of the Einstein radius, a one-to-one relationship between the cell and pixel sizes in the absence of lensing guarantees both the consistence of the method and a very high accuracy. This prescription is simple but very conservative. We show that substantially larger cells can be used to obtain magnification maps with huge savings in computation time.

  3. Dissecting the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich-gravitational lensing cross-correlation with hydrodynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojjati, Alireza; McCarthy, Ian G.; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Hinshaw, Gary; Le Brun, Amandine M. C.

    2015-10-01

    We use the cosmo-OWLS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which includes different galactic feedback models, to predict the cross-correlation signal between weak gravitational lensing and the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) y-parameter. The predictions are compared to the recent detection reported by van Waerbeke and collaborators. The simulations reproduce the weak lensing-tSZ cross-correlation, ξyκ(θ), well. The uncertainty arising from different possible feedback models appears to be important on small scales only (0θ lesssim 1 arcmin), while the amplitude of the correlation on all scales is sensitive to cosmological parameters that control the growth rate of structure (such as σ8, Ωm and Ωb). This study confirms our previous claim (in Ma et al.) that a significant proportion of the signal originates from the diffuse gas component in low-mass (Mhalo lesssim 1014 Msolar) clusters as well as from the region beyond the virial radius. We estimate that approximately 20% of the detected signal comes from low-mass clusters, which corresponds to about 30% of the baryon density of the Universe. The simulations also suggest that more than half of the baryons in the Universe are in the form of diffuse gas outside halos (gtrsim 5 times the virial radius) which is not hot or dense enough to produce a significant tSZ signal or be observed by X-ray experiments. Finally, we show that future high-resolution tSZ-lensing cross-correlation observations will serve as a powerful tool for discriminating between different galactic feedback models.

  4. MULTIPOLE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AND HIGH-ORDER PERTURBATIONS ON THE QUADRUPOLE LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Z.; Lin, W. P.; Li, G. L.; Kang, X. E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2013-03-10

    An arbitrary surface mass density of the gravitational lens can be decomposed into multipole components. We simulate the ray tracing for the multipolar mass distribution of the generalized Singular Isothermal Sphere model based on deflection angles, which are analytically calculated. The magnification patterns in the source plane are then derived from an inverse shooting technique. As has been found, the caustics of odd mode lenses are composed of two overlapping layers for some lens models. When a point source traverses this kind of overlapping caustics, the image numbers change by {+-}4, rather than {+-}2. There are two kinds of caustic images. One is the critical curve and the other is the transition locus. It is found that the image number of the fold is exactly the average value of image numbers on two sides of the fold, while the image number of the cusp is equal to the smaller one. We also focus on the magnification patterns of the quadrupole (m = 2) lenses under the perturbations of m = 3, 4, and 5 mode components and found that one, two, and three butterfly or swallowtail singularities can be produced, respectively. With the increasing intensity of the high-order perturbations, the singularities grow up to bring sixfold image regions. If these perturbations are large enough to let two or three of the butterflies or swallowtails make contact, then eightfold or tenfold image regions can be produced as well. The possible astronomical applications are discussed.

  5. A Sneak Peek at the JWST Era: Observing Galaxies Below the Hubble Limit with Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livermore, Rachael C.

    2016-01-01

    The installation of WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope pushed the frontier of high-redshift galaxy studies to only 500 Myr after the Big Bang. However, observations in this epoch remain challenging and are limited to the brightest galaxies; the fainter sources believed to be responsible for reionizing the Universe remain beyond the grasp of Hubble. With gravitational lensing, however, we can benefit from the magnification of faint sources, which brings them within reach of today's telescopes. The Hubble Frontier Fields program is a deep survey of strongly lensing clusters observed in the optical and near-infrared. Unfortunately, detecting highly magnified, intrinsically faint galaxies in these fields has proved challenging due to the bright foregound cluster galaxies and intracluster light. We have developed a technique using wavelet decomposition to overcome these difficulties and detect galaxies at z~7 with intrinsic UV magnitudes as faint as MUV = -13. We present this method and the resulting luminosity functions, which support a steep faint-end slope extending out to the observational limits. Our method has uncovered hundreds of galaxies at z > 6 fainter than any that have been seen before, providing our first insight into the small galaxy population during the epoch of reionization and a preview of the capabilities of JWST.

  6. Constraints on the identity of the dark matter from strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Frenk, Carlos S.; Cole, Shaun; Gao, Liang; Bose, Sownak; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2016-07-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model unambiguously predicts that a large number of haloes should survive as subhaloes when they are accreted into a larger halo. The CDM model would be ruled out if such substructures were shown not to exist. By contrast, if the dark matter consists of Warm Dark Matter (WDM) particles, then below a threshold mass that depends on the particle mass far fewer substructures would be present. Finding subhaloes below a certain mass would then rule out warm particle masses below some value. Strong gravitational lensing provides a clean method to measure the subhalo mass function through distortions in the structure of Einstein rings and giant arcs. Using mock lensing observations constructed from high-resolution N-body simulations, we show that measurements of approximately 100 strong lens systems with a detection limit of Mlow = 107 h-1 M⊙ would clearly distinguish CDM from WDM in the case where this consists of 7 keV sterile neutrinos such as those that might be responsible for the 3.5 keV X-ray emission line recently detected in galaxies and clusters.

  7. Strong gravitational lensing as a tool to investigate the structure of jets at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Benbow, Wystan; Dell'antonio, Ian P.

    2014-06-20

    The components of blazar jets that emit radiation span a factor of 10{sup 10} in scale. The spatial structure of these emitting regions depends on the observed energy. Photons emitted at different sites cross the lens plane at different distances from the mass-weighted center of the lens. Thus there are differences in magnification ratios and time delays between the images of lensed blazars observed at different energies. When the lens structure and redshift are known from optical observations, these constraints can elucidate the structure of the source at high energies. At these energies, current technology is inadequate to resolve these sources, and the observed light curve is thus the sum of the images. Durations of γ-ray flares are short compared with typical time delays; thus both the magnification ratio and the time delay can be measured for the delayed counterparts. These measurements are a basis for localizing the emitting region along the jet. To demonstrate the power of strong gravitational lensing, we build a toy model based on the best studied and the nearest relativistic jet M87.

  8. Constraints on the identity of the dark matter from strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Frenk, Carlos S.; Cole, Shaun; Gao, Liang; Bose, Sownak; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2016-07-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model unambigously predicts that a large number of haloes should survive as subhaloes when they are accreted into a larger halo. The CDM model would be ruled out if such substructures were shown not to exist. By contrast, if the dark matter consists of warm particles (WDM), then below a threshold mass that depends on the particle mass far fewer substructures would be present. Finding subhaloes below a certain mass would then rule out warm particle masses below some value. Strong gravitational lensing provides a clean method to measure the subhalo mass function through distortions in the structure of Einstein rings and giant arcs.Using mock lensing observations constructed from high-resolution N-body simulations, we show that measurements of approximately 100 strong lens systems with a detection limit of $10^7 h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$ would clearly distinguish CDM from WDM in the case where this consists of 7 keV sterile neutrinos such as those that might be responsible for the 3.5 keV X-ray emission line recently detected in galaxies and clusters.

  9. Visualizing the gravitational lensing and vortex and tendex lines of colliding black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Haroon; Lovelace, Geoffery; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves (GW's) are ripples of space and time that are created when the universe unleashes its violent nature in the presence of strong gravity. Merging black holes (BH) are one of the most promising sources of GW's. In order to detect and physically study the GW's emitted by merging BH with ground based detectors such as Advanced LIGO, we must accurately predict how the waveforms look and behave. This can only be done by numerically simulating BH mergers on supercomputers, because all analytical approximations fail near the time of merger. This poster focuses on using these simulations to answer the question of ``What do merging BH look like''? I will present visualizations made using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) and in particular a raytracing lensing code, developed by the SXS Lensing team, that shows how merging BH bend the light around them. I will also present visualizations of the vortex and tendex lines for a binary BH system, using SpEC. Vortex lines describe how an observer will be twisted by the BH and the tendex lines describe how much an observer would be stretched and squeezed. I am exploring how these lines change with time.

  10. Constraints on the identity of the dark matter from strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Frenk, Carlos S.; Cole, Shaun; Gao, Liang; Bose, Sownak; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2016-04-01

    The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmological model unambigously predicts that a large number of haloes should survive as subhaloes when they are accreted into a larger halo. The CDM model would be ruled out if such substructures were shown not to exist. By contrast, if the dark matter consists of Warm Dark Matter particles (WDM), then below a threshold mass that depends on the particle mass far fewer substructures would be present. Finding subhaloes below a certain mass would then rule out warm particle masses below some value. Strong gravitational lensing provides a clean method to measure the subhalo mass function through distortions in the structure of Einstein rings and giant arcs. Using mock lensing observations constructed from high-resolution N-body simulations, we show that measurements of approximately 100 strong lens systems with a detection limit of Mlow = 107h-1M⊙ would clearly distinguish CDM from WDM in the case where this consists of 7 keV sterile neutrinos such as those that might be responsible for the 3.5 keV X-ray emission line recently detected in galaxies and clusters.

  11. Subaru Telescope adaptive optics observations of gravitationally lensed quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Cristian E.; Oguri, Masamune; Minowa, Yosuke; Iye, Masanori; Inada, Naohisa; Oya, Shin; Kayo, Issha; Hayano, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Terada, Hiroshi; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an imaging observation campaign conducted with the Subaru Telescope adaptive optics system (IRCS+AO188) on 28 gravitationally lensed quasars and candidates (23 doubles, 1 quad, 1 possible triple, and 3 candidates) from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search. We develop a novel modelling technique that fits analytical and hybrid point spread functions (PSFs), while simultaneously measuring the relative astrometry, photometry, as well as the lens galaxy morphology. We account for systematics by simulating the observed systems using separately observed PSF stars. The measured relative astrometry is comparable with that typically achieved with the Hubble Space Telescope, even after marginalizing over the PSF uncertainty. We model for the first time the quasar host galaxies in five systems, without a priori knowledge of the PSF, and show that their luminosities follow the known correlation with the mass of the supermassive black hole. For each system, we obtain mass models far more accurate than those previously published from low-resolution data, and we show that in our sample of lensing galaxies the observed light profile is more elliptical than the mass, for ellipticity ≳0.25. We also identify eight doubles for which the sources of external and internal shear are more reliably separated, and should therefore be prioritized in monitoring campaigns aimed at measuring time delays in order to infer the Hubble constant.

  12. Gravitational Lensing by Kerr-Sen Dilaton-Axion Black Hole in the Weak Deflection Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulchev, G. N.; Yazadjiev, S. S.

    2010-11-25

    We investigate analytically gravitational lensing by charged, stationary, axially symmetric Kerr-Sen dilaton-axion black hole in the weak deflection limit. Approximate solutions to the lightlike equations of motion are present up to and including third-order terms in M/b, a/b and r{sub {alpha}}/b, where M is the black hole mass, a is the angular momentum, r{sub {alpha}}= Q{sup 2}/M,Q being the charge and b is the impact parameter of the light ray. We compute the positions of the two weak field images up to post-Newtonian order. The shift of the critical curves as a function of the lens angular momentum is found, and it is shown that they decrease slightly with the increase of the charge. The lensing observables are compared to these characteristics for particular cases as Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes as well as the Gibbons-Maeda-Garfinkle-Horowitz-Strominger black hole.

  13. The imprint of f(R) gravity on weak gravitational lensing I: Connection between observables and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Yuichi; Shirasaki, Masato

    2016-04-01

    We study the effect of f(R) gravity on the statistical properties of various large-scale structures which can be probed in weak gravitational lensing measurements. A set of ray-tracing simulations of gravitational lensing in f(R) gravity enables us to explore cosmological information on (i) stacking analyses of weak lensing observables and (ii) peak statistics in reconstructed lensing mass maps. For the f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, the measured lensing signals of dark matter haloes in the stacking analysis would show a ≲ 10% difference between the standard ΛCDM and the f(R) model when the additional degree of freedom in f(R) model would be |fR0| ˜ 10-5. Among various large-scale structures to be studied in stacking analysis, troughs, i.e, underdensity regions in projected plane of foreground massive haloes, could be promising to constrain the model with |fR0| ˜ 10-5, while stacking analysis around voids is found to be difficult to improve the constraint of |fR0| even in future lensing surveys with a sky coverage of ˜1000 square degrees. On the peak statistics, we confirm the correspondence between local maxima and dark matter haloes along the line of sight, regardless of the modification of gravity in our simulation. Thus, the number count of high significance local maxima would be useful to probe the mass function of dark matter haloes even in the f(R) model with |f_R0| ≲ 10^{-5}. We also find that including local minima in lensing mass maps would be helpful to improve the constant on f(R) gravity down to |fR0| = 10-5 in ongoing weak lensing surveys.

  14. The imprint of f(R) gravity on weak gravitational lensing - I. Connection between observables and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Yuichi; Shirasaki, Masato

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of f(R) gravity on the statistical properties of various large-scale structures which can be probed in weak gravitational lensing measurements. A set of ray-tracing simulations of gravitational lensing in f(R) gravity enables us to explore cosmological information on (i) stacking analyses of weak lensing observables and (ii) peak statistics in reconstructed lensing mass maps. For the f(R) model proposed by Hu & Sawicki, the measured lensing signals of dark matter haloes in the stacking analysis would show a ≲10 per cent difference between the standard Λcold dark matter and the f(R) model when the additional degree of freedom in f(R) model would be |fR0| ˜ 10-5. Among various large-scale structures to be studied in stacking analysis, troughs, i.e. underdensity regions in projected plane of foreground massive haloes, could be promising to constrain the model with |fR0| ˜ 10-5, while stacking analysis around voids is found to be difficult to improve the constraint of |fR0| even in future lensing surveys with a sky coverage of ˜1000 deg2. On the peak statistics, we confirm the correspondence between local maxima and dark matter haloes along the line of sight, regardless of the modification of gravity in our simulation. Thus, the number count of high significance local maxima would be useful to probe the mass function of dark matter haloes even in the f(R) model with |fR0| ≲ 10-5. We also find that including local minima in lensing mass maps would be helpful to improve the constant on f(R) gravity down to |fR0| = 10-5 in ongoing weak lensing surveys.

  15. Test of relativistic gravity using microlensing of relativistically broadened lines in gravitationally lensed quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, A.; Vovk, Ie.

    2016-01-01

    We show that observation of the time-dependent effect of microlensing of relativistically broadened emission lines (such as e.g. the Fe K α line in x rays) in strongly lensed quasars could provide data on celestial mechanics of circular orbits in the direct vicinity of the horizon of supermassive black holes. This information can be extracted from the observation of evolution of the red/blue edge of the magnified line just before and just after the period of crossing of the innermost stable circular orbit by the microlensing caustic. The functional form of this evolution is insensitive to numerous astrophysical parameters of the accreting black hole and of the microlensing caustics network system (as opposed to the evolution of the full line spectrum). Measurement of the temporal evolution of the red/blue edge could provide a precision measurement of the radial dependence of the gravitational redshift and of velocity of the circular orbits, down to the innermost stable circular orbit. These measurements could be used to discriminate between general relativity and alternative models of the relativistic gravity in which the dynamics of photons and massive bodies orbiting the gravitating center is different from that of the geodesics in the Schwarzschild or Kerr space-times.

  16. RCSLenS: testing gravitational physics through the cross-correlation of weak lensing and large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Chris; Joudaki, Shahab; Heymans, Catherine; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Joachimi, Benjamin; Nakajima, Reiko; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Viola, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    The unknown nature of `dark energy' motivates continued cosmological tests of large-scale gravitational physics. We present a new consistency check based on the relative amplitude of non-relativistic galaxy peculiar motions, measured via redshift-space distortion, and the relativistic deflection of light by those same galaxies traced by galaxy-galaxy lensing. We take advantage of the latest generation of deep, overlapping imaging and spectroscopic data sets, combining the Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We quantify the results using the `gravitational slip' statistic EG, which we estimate as 0.48 ± 0.10 at z = 0.32 and 0.30 ± 0.07 at z = 0.57, the latter constituting the highest redshift at which this quantity has been determined. These measurements are consistent with the predictions of General Relativity, for a perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric in a Universe dominated by a cosmological constant, which are EG = 0.41 and 0.36 at these respective redshifts. The combination of redshift-space distortion and gravitational lensing data from current and future galaxy surveys will offer increasingly stringent tests of fundamental cosmology.

  17. STRIDES: Galaxy Evolution over Cosmic Time from new samples of Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    When a quasar is gravitationally lensed by a galaxy, its multiple images show light-curves that are offset by awell defined time delay, which depends on the mass profile of the lens and on cosmological distances to the lens and the source. By measuring the time-delay and accurately modelling the deflector's mass profile, this provides one-step measurements of cosmological distances to objects at redshift $z\\sim1,$ whence the cosmological parameters (primarily $H_0$). One can turn this argument around and learn about galaxies instead, or even perform a joint (and less biased) inference. The joint modelling of the lens, the source structure and time-variability implies that the DM halos of lens galaxies at z~0.4-1 and the source properties of quasars and their hosts at z~1-2are inferred, besides information on cosmology that is complementary to other low-redshift probes such as SN Ia and BAO.A large (N~100) sample of lensed quasars will be transformative in this sense, as these systems are rare on the sky.I will describe our STRIDES[*] searches in the Dark Energy Survey, aiming at 120 previously unknown lensed quasars brighter than i=21. Candidates have been selected with a variety of data mining techniques and flagged for follow-up (on spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging and lightcurve variability), which will take place in the following months. I will also cover recent modelling development of already monitored lenses within our collaboration, including a sharp multi-band reconstruction of the sources and use of stellar kinematics to ensure unbiased uncertainties on the lens mass profiles.This will lead to: (i) percent-level uncertainties on cosmological parameters(ii) insight on the coevolution of quasars and their host galaxies throughout cosmic time, up to z~2(iii) a quantative description of dark matter density profiles and the substructure content in massive galaxies up to z~1.[*] strides.physics.ucsb.edu

  18. OT2_eegami_6: SPIRE Snapshot Survey II: Using SPT/CODEX Massive Clusters as Powerful Gravitational Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, E.

    2011-09-01

    On the extragalactic side, one of the most remarkable results coming out of Herschel is the discovery of extremely bright (>100 mJy in the SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed galaxies. The great sensitivity and mapping speed of SPIRE have enabled us to find these rare extraordinary objects. What is truly exciting about these bright lensed galaxies is that they enable a variety of detailed multi-wavelength follow-up observations, shedding new light on the physical properties of these high-redshift sources. In this regard, our OT1 program, "SPIRE Snapshot Survey of Massive Galaxy Clusters" turned out to be a great success. After imaging ~50 galaxies out of 279 in the program, we have already found two spectacularly bright lensed galaxies, one of which is at a redshift of 4.69. This type of cluster-lensed sources are not only bright but also spatially stretched over a large scale, so ALMA (or NOEMA in the north) is likely to be able to study them at the level of individual GMCs. Such studies will open up a new frontier in the study of high-redshift galaxies. Here, we propose to extend this highly efficient and effective survey of gravitationally lensed galaxies to another 353 clusters carefully chosen from the SPT and CODEX cluster samples. These samples contain newly discovered high-redshift (z>0.3) massive (>3-4e14 Msun) clusters, which can be used as powerful gravitational lenses to magnify sources at high redshift. With the OT1 and OT2 surveys together, we expect to find ~20 highly magnified SPIRE sources with exceptional brightnesses (assuming a discovery rate of ~1/30). Such a unique sample of extraordinary objects will enable a variety of follow-up sciences, and will therefore remain as a great legacy of the Herschel mission for years to come.

  19. Discovery of a Gravitationally Lensed Quasar from theSloan Digital Sky Survey: SDSS J133222.62+034739.9

    SciTech Connect

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Ichikawa, Shin-Ichi; Kawano, Yozo; Tokita, Kouichi; Kayo, Issha; Hall, Patrick B.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Richards, Gordon T.; York, Donald G.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Princeton U. /Tokyo, Astron. Observ. /Nagoya U. /York U., Canada /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Johns Hopkins U. /Drexel U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-09-28

    We report the discovery of the two-image gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J133222.62+034739.9 (SDSS J1332+0347) with an image separation of {Delta}{theta} = 1.14''. This system consists of a source quasar at z{sub s} = 1.445 and a lens galaxy at z{sub l} = 0.191. The agreement of the luminosity, ellipticity and position angle of the lens galaxy with those expected from lens model confirms the lensing hypothesis.

  20. Keck Spectroscopy of Gravitationally Lensed z ~= 4 Galaxies: Improved Constraints on the Escape Fraction of Ionizing Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2013-12-01

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from young star-forming galaxies is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the role of galaxies in cosmic reionization. Yet traditional techniques for measuring this fraction are inapplicable at the redshifts of interest due to foreground screening by the Lyα forest. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a reduction in the equivalent width of low-ionization absorption lines in composite spectra of Lyman break galaxies at z ~= 4 compared to similar measures at z ~= 3. This might imply a lower covering fraction of neutral gas and hence an increase with redshift in the escape fraction of ionizing photons. However, our spectral resolution was inadequate to differentiate between several alternative explanations, including changes with redshift in the outflow kinematics. Here we present higher quality spectra of three gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxies at z ~= 4 with a spectral resolution sufficient to break this degeneracy of interpretation. We present a method for deriving the covering fraction of low-ionization gas as a function of outflow velocity and compare the results with similar quality data taken for galaxies at lower redshift. We find an interesting but tentative trend of lower covering fractions of low-ionization gas for galaxies with strong Lyα emission. In combination with the demographic trends of Lyα emission with redshift from our earlier work, our results provide new evidence for a reduction in the average H I covering fraction, and hence an increase in the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from Lyman break galaxies, with redshift.

  1. Keck spectroscopy of gravitationally lensed z ≅ 4 galaxies: Improved constraints on the escape fraction of ionizing photons

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2013-12-10

    The fraction of ionizing photons that escape from young star-forming galaxies is one of the largest uncertainties in determining the role of galaxies in cosmic reionization. Yet traditional techniques for measuring this fraction are inapplicable at the redshifts of interest due to foreground screening by the Lyα forest. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a reduction in the equivalent width of low-ionization absorption lines in composite spectra of Lyman break galaxies at z ≅ 4 compared to similar measures at z ≅ 3. This might imply a lower covering fraction of neutral gas and hence an increase with redshift in the escape fraction of ionizing photons. However, our spectral resolution was inadequate to differentiate between several alternative explanations, including changes with redshift in the outflow kinematics. Here we present higher quality spectra of three gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxies at z ≅ 4 with a spectral resolution sufficient to break this degeneracy of interpretation. We present a method for deriving the covering fraction of low-ionization gas as a function of outflow velocity and compare the results with similar quality data taken for galaxies at lower redshift. We find an interesting but tentative trend of lower covering fractions of low-ionization gas for galaxies with strong Lyα emission. In combination with the demographic trends of Lyα emission with redshift from our earlier work, our results provide new evidence for a reduction in the average H I covering fraction, and hence an increase in the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from Lyman break galaxies, with redshift.

  2. Joint reconstruction of galaxy clusters from gravitational lensing and thermal gas. I. Outline of a non-parametric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad, S.; Majer, C. L.; Meyer, S.; Sarli, E.; Bartelmann, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present a method of estimating the lensing potential from massive galaxy clusters for given observational X-ray data. The concepts developed and applied in this work can be easily combined with other techniques to infer the lensing potential, e.g. weak gravitational lensing or galaxy kinematics, to obtain an overall best-fit model for the lensing potential. After elaborating on the physical details and assumptions the method is based on, we explain how the numerical algorithm itself is implemented with a Richardson-Lucy algorithm as a central part. Our reconstruction method is tested on simulated galaxy clusters with a spherically symmetric NFW density profile filled with gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. We describe in detail how these simulated observational data sets are created and how they need to be fed into our algorithm. We tested the robustness of the algorithm against small parameter changes and estimate the quality of the reconstructed lensing potentials. As it turns out, we achieve a very high degree of accuracy in reconstructing the lensing potential. The statistical errors remain below 2.0%, whereas the systematical error does not exceed 1.0%.

  3. On the bias of the distance-redshift relation from gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Nick; Peacock, John A.

    2016-02-01

    A long-standing question in cosmology is whether gravitational lensing changes the distance-redshift relation D (z) or the mean flux density of sources. Interest in this has been rekindled by recent studies in non-linear relativistic perturbation theory that find biases in both the area of a surface of constant redshift and in the mean distance to this surface, with a fractional bias in both cases of the order of the mean squared convergence <κ2>. Any such area bias could alter cosmic microwave background (CMB) cosmology, and the corresponding bias in mean flux density could affect supernova cosmology. We show that the perturbation to the area of a surface of constant redshift is in reality much smaller, being of the order of the cumulative bending angle squared, or roughly a part-in-a-million effect. This validates the arguments of Weinberg that the mean magnification of sources is unity and of Kibble & Lieu that the mean direction-averaged inverse magnification is unity. It also validates the conventional treatment of CMB lensing. But the existence of a scatter in magnification will cause any non-linear function of these conserved quantities to be statistically biased. The fractional bias in such quantities is generally of order <κ2>, which is orders of magnitude larger than the area perturbation. Claims for large bias in area or flux density of sources appear to have resulted from misinterpretation of such effects: they do not represent a new non-Newtonian effect, nor do they invalidate standard cosmological analyses.

  4. Probing Dark Energy via Weak Gravitational Lensing with the Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    SNAP is a candidate for the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) that seeks to place constraints on the dark energy using two distinct methods. The first, Type Ia SN, is discussed in a separate white paper. The second method is weak gravitational lensing, which relies on the coherent distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass structures. The excellent spatial resolution and photometric accuracy afforded by a 2-meter space-based observatory are crucial for achieving the high surface density of resolved galaxies, the tight control of systematic errors in the telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF), and the exquisite redshift accuracy and depth required by this project. These are achieved by the elimination of atmospheric distortion and much of the thermal and gravity loads on the telescope. The SN and WL methods for probing dark energy are highly complementary and the error contours from the two methods are largely orthogonal. The nominal SNAP weak lensing survey covers 1000 square degrees per year of operation in six optical and three near infrared filters (NIR) spanning the range 350 nm to 1.7 {micro}m. This survey will reach a depth of 26.6 AB magnitude in each of the nine filters and allow for approximately 100 resolved galaxies per square arcminute, {approx} 3 times that available from the best ground-based surveys. Photometric redshifts will be measured with statistical accuracy that enables scientific applications for even the faint, high redshift end of the sample. Ongoing work aims to meet the requirements on systematics in galaxy shape measurement, photometric redshift biases, and theoretical predictions.

  5. THE EINSTEIN CROSS: CONSTRAINT ON DARK MATTER FROM STELLAR DYNAMICS AND GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, Glenn; Falcon-Barroso, Jesus; Cappellari, Michele; Miller, Bryan W.; De Zeeuw, P. Tim

    2010-08-20

    We present two-dimensional line-of-sight stellar kinematics of the lens galaxy in the Einstein Cross, obtained with the GEMINI 8 m telescope, using the GMOS integral-field spectrograph. The stellar kinematics extend to a radius of 4'' (with 0.''2 spaxels), covering about two-thirds of the effective (or half-light) radius R{sub e} {approx_equal} 6'' of this early-type spiral galaxy at redshift z{sub l} {approx_equal} 0.04, of which the bulge is lensing a background quasar at redshift z{sub s} {approx_equal} 1.7. The velocity map shows regular rotation up to {approx}100 km s{sup -1} around the minor axis of the bulge, consistent with axisymmetry. The velocity dispersion map shows a weak gradient increasing toward a central (R < 1'') value of {sigma}{sub 0} = 170 {+-} 9 km s{sup -1}. We deproject the observed surface brightness from Hubble Space Telescope imaging to obtain a realistic luminosity density of the lens galaxy, which in turn is used to build axisymmetric dynamical models that fit the observed kinematic maps. We also construct a gravitational lens model that accurately fits the positions and relative fluxes of the four quasar images. We combine these independent constraints from stellar dynamics and gravitational lensing to study the total mass distribution in the inner parts of the lens galaxy. We find that the resulting luminous and total mass distribution are nearly identical around the Einstein radius R{sub E} = 0.''89, with a slope that is close to isothermal, but which becomes shallower toward the center if indeed mass follows light. The dynamical model fits to the observed kinematic maps result in a total mass-to-light ratio Y{sub dyn} = 3.7 {+-} 0.5 Y{sub sun,I} (in the I band). This is consistent with the Einstein mass M{sub E} = 1.54 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} divided by the (projected) luminosity within R{sub E} , which yields a total mass-to-light ratio of Y {sub E} = 3.4 Y{sub sun,I}, with an error of at most a few percent. We estimate from

  6. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  7. Gravitational lensing of supernovae by dark matter candidates of mass M greater than about 0.001 solar masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagoner, Robert V.; Linder, Eric V.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented concerning the gravitational lensing of supernovae by intervening condensed objects, including dark matter candidates such as dim stars and black holes. the expansion of the supernova beam within the lens produces characteristic time-dependent amplification and polarization which depend upon the mass of the lens. The effects of the shearing of the beam due to surrounding masses are considered, although the study of these effects is confined to isolated masses whose size is much less than that of the supernova (about 10 to the 15th cm). Equations for the effects of lensing and graphs comparing these effects in different classes of supernovae are compared. It is found that candidates for lensing would be those supernovae at least as bright as their parent galaxy, or above the range of luminosities expected for their spectral class.

  8. Resolving the High-energy Universe with Strong Gravitational Lensing: The Case of PKS 1830-211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Benbow, Wystan

    2015-08-01

    Gravitational lensing is a potentially powerful tool for elucidating the origin of gamma-ray emission from distant sources. Cosmic lenses magnify the emission from distant sources and produce time delays between mirage images. Gravitationally induced time delays depend on the position of the emitting regions in the source plane. The Fermi/LAT telescope continuously monitors the entire sky and detects gamma-ray flares, including those from gravitationally lensed blazars. Therefore, temporal resolution at gamma-ray energies can be used to measure these time delays, which, in turn, can be used to resolve the origin of the gamma-ray flares spatially. We provide a guide to the application and Monte Carlo simulation of three techniques for analyzing these unresolved light curves: the autocorrelation function, the double power spectrum, and the maximum peak method. We apply these methods to derive time delays from the gamma-ray light curve of the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211. The result of temporal analysis combined with the properties of the lens from radio observations yield an improvement in spatial resolution at gamma-ray energies by a factor of 10,000. We analyze four active periods. For two of these periods the emission is consistent with origination from the core, and for the other two the data suggest that the emission region is displaced from the core by more than ˜1.5 kpc. For the core emission, the gamma-ray time delays, 23+/- 0.5 {days} and 19.7+/- 1.2 days, are consistent with the radio time delay of {26}-5+4 days.

  9. Spatially Resolved WFC3/Grism Spectral Line Imaging of Gravitational Lensed Herschel-selected Luminous Dusty Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Asantha

    2013-10-01

    We propose WFC3 G102 and G141 grism spectral imaging of two gravitationally lensed dusty, starburst galaxies found with the 600 square degree Herschel-ATLAS survey. One galaxy is the brightest {both in far-IR at 250 micron and in near-IR in J/K-band}, while the second is the largest {11 arcsec on the sky} of the lensed sub-mm galaxies in a sample of 200 imaged with WFC3/F110W. The two galaxies are at redshifts that are optimal for grism observations with HST/WFC3. The lensing flux magnification and spatial enhancement makes them very unique for the study proposed hereand will increase the number of lensed galaxies imaged in spectral lines with WFC3 grisms to three from existing single serendipitous lens studied in HST-3D survey. With WFC3 grism spectra taken in a specific orientation to minimize foreground and lensing galaxy confusion we can map each of these galaxies in a variety of spatially-resolved spectral lines in the rest-frame optical, including impostant Balmer lines for studies on the interstellar medium. The grism spectra will allow us to determine the gas-phase metallicities of these two galaxies and to study the extinction of optically-thin regions compared to direct sub-mm emission seen in interferometric continuum images of optically thick dust in starbursting knots and clumps. With spatial resolution provided by gravitational lensing combined with HST/WFC3 resolution, we will be able to study the dependence of line ratios in high density/SFR regions to low dense diffuse environments.

  10. RESOLVING THE CLUMPY STRUCTURE OF THE OUTFLOW WINDS IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR SDSS J1029+2623

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Toru; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Gandhi, Poshak; Horiuchi, Takashi; Koyamada, Suzuka; Okamoto, Rina

    2014-10-20

    We study the geometry and the internal structure of the outflowing wind from the accretion disk of a quasar by observing multiple sightlines with the aid of strong gravitational lensing. Using Subaru/High Dispersion Spectrograph, we performed high-resolution (R ∼ 36,000) spectroscopic observations of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1029+2623 (at z {sub em} ∼ 2.197) whose image separation angle, θ ∼ 22.''5, is the largest among those discovered so far. We confirm that the difference in absorption profiles in images A and B discovered by Misawa et al. has remained unchanged since 2010, implying the difference is not due to time variability of the absorption profiles over the delay between the images, Δt ∼ 744 days, but rather due to differences along the sightlines. We also discovered a time variation of C IV absorption strength in both images A and B due to a change in the ionization condition. If a typical absorber's size is smaller than its distance from the flux source by more than five orders of magnitude, it should be possible to detect sightline variations among images of other smaller separation, galaxy-scale gravitationally lensed quasars.

  11. Resolving the Clumpy Structure of the Outflow Winds in the Gravitationally Lensed Quasar SDSS J1029+2623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Gandhi, Poshak; Horiuchi, Takashi; Koyamada, Suzuka; Okamoto, Rina

    2014-10-01

    We study the geometry and the internal structure of the outflowing wind from the accretion disk of a quasar by observing multiple sightlines with the aid of strong gravitational lensing. Using Subaru/High Dispersion Spectrograph, we performed high-resolution (R ~ 36,000) spectroscopic observations of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed quasar SDSS J1029+2623 (at z em ~ 2.197) whose image separation angle, θ ~ 22.''5, is the largest among those discovered so far. We confirm that the difference in absorption profiles in images A and B discovered by Misawa et al. has remained unchanged since 2010, implying the difference is not due to time variability of the absorption profiles over the delay between the images, Δt ~ 744 days, but rather due to differences along the sightlines. We also discovered a time variation of C IV absorption strength in both images A and B due to a change in the ionization condition. If a typical absorber's size is smaller than its distance from the flux source by more than five orders of magnitude, it should be possible to detect sightline variations among images of other smaller separation, galaxy-scale gravitationally lensed quasars. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  12. SELF-CALIBRATION OF GRAVITATIONAL SHEAR-GALAXY INTRINSIC ELLIPTICITY CORRELATION IN WEAK LENSING SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pengjie

    2010-09-10

    The galaxy intrinsic alignment is a severe challenge to precision cosmic shear measurement. We propose self-calibrating the induced gravitational shear-galaxy intrinsic ellipticity correlation (the GI correlation) in weak lensing surveys with photometric redshift measurements. (1) We propose a method to extract the intrinsic ellipticity-galaxy density cross-correlation (I-g) from the galaxy ellipticity-density measurement in the same redshift bin. (2) We also find a generic scaling relation to convert the extracted I-g correlation to the necessary GI correlation. We perform a concept study under simplified conditions and demonstrate its capability to significantly reduce GI contamination. We discuss the impact of various complexities on the two key ingredients of the self-calibration technique, namely the method for extracting the I-g correlation and the scaling relation between the I-g and the GI correlation. We expect that none of them will likely be able to completely invalidate the proposed self-calibration technique.

  13. Observations of radio-quiet quasars at 10-mas resolution by use of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Neal; Tagore, Amitpal S.; Roberts, Carl; Sluse, Dominique; Stacey, Hannah; Vives-Arias, Hector; Wucknitz, Olaf; Volino, Filomena

    2015-11-01

    We present Very Large Array detections of radio emission in 4 four-image gravitational lens systems with quasar sources: HS 0810+2554, RX J0911+0511, HE 0435-1223 and SDSS J0924+0219, and extended Multi-Element Remote Linked Interferometer (e-MERLIN) observations of two of the systems. The first three are detected at a high level of significance, and SDSS J0924+0219 is detected. HS 0810+2554 is resolved, allowing us for the first time to achieve 10-mas resolution of the source frame in the structure of a radio-quiet quasar. The others are unresolved or marginally resolved. All four objects are among the faintest radio sources yet detected, with intrinsic flux densities in the range 1-5 μJy; such radio objects, if unlensed, will only be observable routinely with the Square Kilometre Array. The observations of HS 0810+2554, which is also detected with e-MERLIN, strongly suggest the presence of a mini active galactic nucleus, with a radio core and milliarcsecond scale jet. The flux densities of the lensed images in all but HE 0435-1223 are consistent with smooth galaxy lens models without the requirement for smaller scale substructure in the model, although some interesting anomalies are seen between optical and radio flux densities. These are probably due to microlensing effects in the optical.

  14. THE REMARKABLE {gamma}-RAY ACTIVITY IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830-211

    SciTech Connect

    Donnarumma, I.; De Rosa, A.; Vittorini, V.; Tavani, M.; Striani, E.; Pacciani, L.; Popovic, L. C.; Simic, S.; Kuulkers, E.; Vercellone, S.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Giommi, P.; Barbiellini, G.; Bulgarelli, A.

    2011-08-01

    We report the extraordinary {gamma}-ray activity (E > 100 MeV) of the gravitationally lensed blazar PKS 1830-211 (z = 2.507) detected by AGILE between 2010 October and November. On October 14, the source experienced a factor of {approx}12 flux increase with respect to its average value and remained brightest at this flux level ({approx}500 x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) for about four days. The one-month {gamma}-ray light curve across the flare showed a mean flux F(E > 100 MeV) = 200 x 10{sup -8} photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which resulted in a factor of four enhancement with respect to the average value. Following the {gamma}-ray flare, the source was observed in near-IR (NIR)-optical energy bands at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory and in X-Rays by Swift/X-Ray Telescope and INTEGRAL/IBIS. The main result of these multifrequency observations is that the large variability observed in {gamma}-rays does not have a significant counterpart at lower frequencies: no variation greater than a factor of {approx}1.5 appeared in the NIR and X-Ray energy bands. PKS 1830-211 is then a good '{gamma}-ray only flaring' blazar showing substantial variability only above 10-100 MeV. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings.

  15. Testing metallicity indicators at z ˜ 1.4 with the gravitationally lensed galaxy CASSOWARY 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan L.; Pettini, Max; Christensen, Lise; Auger, Matthew W.; Becker, George D.; King, Lindsay J.; Quider, Anna M.; Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-05-01

    We present X-shooter observations of CASSOWARY 20 (CSWA 20), a star-forming (SFR ˜ 6 M⊙ yr-1) galaxy at z = 1.433, magnified by a factor of 11.5 by the gravitational lensing produced by a massive foreground galaxy at z = 0.741. We analysed the integrated physical properties of the H II regions of CSWA 20 using temperature- and density-sensitive emission lines. We find the abundance of oxygen to be ˜1/7 of solar, while carbon is ˜50 times less abundant than in the Sun. The unusually low C/O ratio may be an indication of a particularly rapid time-scale of chemical enrichment. The wide wavelength coverage of X-shooter gives us access to five different methods for determining the metallicity of CSWA 20, three based on emission lines from H II regions and two on absorption features formed in the atmospheres of massive stars. All five estimates are in agreement, within the factor of ˜2 uncertainty of each method. The interstellar medium (ISM) of CSWA 20 only partially covers the star-forming region as viewed from our direction; in particular, absorption lines from neutrals and first ions are exceptionally weak. We find evidence for large-scale outflows of the ISM with speeds of up 750 km s-1, similar to the values measured in other high-z galaxies sustaining much higher rates of star formation.

  16. Probing the cosmic distance duality with strong gravitational lensing and supernovae Ia data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and perform a new test of the cosmic distance-duality relation (CDDR), DL(z) / DA(z) (1 + z)2 = 1, where DA is the angular diameter distance and DL is the luminosity distance to a given source at redshift z, using strong gravitational lensing (SGL) and type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data. We show that the ratio D=DA12/DA2 and D*=DL12/DL2, where the subscripts 1 and 2 correspond, respectively, to redshifts z1 and z2, are linked by D/D*=(1+z1)2 if the CDDR is valid. We allow departures from the CDDR by defining two functions for η(z1), which equals unity when the CDDR is valid. We find that combination of SGL and SNe Ia data favours no violation of the CDDR at 1σ confidence level (η(z) simeq 1), in complete agreement with other tests and reinforcing the theoretical pillars of the CDDR.

  17. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: temperature and gravitational lensing power spectrum measurements from three seasons of data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Nolta, Michael R.; Addison, Graeme E.; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lupton, Robert H.; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menanteau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Reese, Erik D.; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sehgal, Neelima; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Swetz, Daniel S.; Switzer, Eric R.; Thornton, Robert; Trac, Hy; Wollack, Ed

    2014-04-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ΛCDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6σ detection significance.

  18. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Temperature and Gravitational Lensing Power Spectrum Measurements from Three Seasons of Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sudeep; Louis, Thibaut; Nolta, Michael R.; Addison, Graeme E.; Battisetti, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Irwin, Kent D; Kosowsky, Arthur; Wollack, Ed

    2014-01-01

    We present the temperature power spectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) derived from the three seasons of data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) at 148 GHz and 218 GHz, as well as the cross-frequency spectrum between the two channels. We detect and correct for contamination due to the Galactic cirrus in our equatorial maps. We present the results of a number of tests for possible systematic error and conclude that any effects are not significant compared to the statistical errors we quote. Where they overlap, we cross-correlate the ACT and the South Pole Telescope (SPT) maps and show they are consistent. The measurements of higher-order peaks in the CMB power spectrum provide an additional test of the ?CDM cosmological model, and help constrain extensions beyond the standard model. The small angular scale power spectrum also provides constraining power on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects and extragalactic foregrounds. We also present a measurement of the CMB gravitational lensing convergence power spectrum at 4.6s detection significance.

  19. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnello, A.; Treu, T.; Ostrovski, F.; Schechter, P. L.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Auger, M. W.; Courbin, F.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Frieman, J.; Kuropatkin, N.; Marshall, P. J.; McMahon, R. G.; Meylan, G.; More, A.; Suyu, S. H.; Rusu, C. E.; Finley, D.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new gravitationally lensed quasars, discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) based on their multiband photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show a red galaxy with two blue point sources at either side, which are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64 as obtained by our long-slit spectroscopic data. The Einstein radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51 arcsec. DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fibre spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption by Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. Our long-slit spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein radius is 0.68 arcsec, corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M⊙. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES data set.

  20. Analytical discussion on strong gravitational lensing for a massive source with a f (R ) global monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jingyun; Cheng, Hongbo

    2015-07-01

    Here we investigate the gravitational lensing in the strong field limit of a Schwarzschild black hole with a solid deficit angle owing to a global monopole within the context of the f (R ) gravity theory. We obtain the expressions of the deflection angle and time delay in the forms of elliptic integrals and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the elliptic integrals to find the explicit formulas of the angle and time difference in the strong field limit. We show that the deflection angle and the time delay between multiple images are related not only to the monopole but also to the f (R ) correction ψ0 by taking the cosmological boundary into account. Some observables such as the minimum impact parameter, the angular separation, the relative magnification, and the compacted angular position are estimated as well. It is intriguing that a tiny modification on standard general relativity will make a remarkable deviation on the angle and the time lag, offering a significant way to explore some possible distinct signatures of the topological soliton and the correction of Einstein's general relativity.

  1. Gravitational lensing by spinning black holes in astrophysics, and in the movie Interstellar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Oliver; von Tunzelmann, Eugénie; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-03-01

    Interstellar is the first Hollywood movie to attempt depicting a black hole as it would actually be seen by somebody nearby. For this, our team at Double Negative Visual Effects, in collaboration with physicist Kip Thorne, developed a code called Double Negative Gravitational Renderer (DNGR) to solve the equations for ray-bundle (light-beam) propagation through the curved spacetime of a spinning (Kerr) black hole, and to render IMAX-quality, rapidly changing images. Our ray-bundle techniques were crucial for achieving IMAX-quality smoothness without flickering; and they differ from physicists’ image-generation techniques (which generally rely on individual light rays rather than ray bundles), and also differ from techniques previously used in the film industry’s CGI community. This paper has four purposes: (i) to describe DNGR for physicists and CGI practitioners, who may find interesting and useful some of our unconventional techniques. (ii) To present the equations we use, when the camera is in arbitrary motion at an arbitrary location near a Kerr black hole, for mapping light sources to camera images via elliptical ray bundles. (iii) To describe new insights, from DNGR, into gravitational lensing when the camera is near the spinning black hole, rather than far away as in almost all prior studies; we focus on the shapes, sizes and influence of caustics and critical curves, the creation and annihilation of stellar images, the pattern of multiple images, and the influence of almost-trapped light rays, and we find similar results to the more familiar case of a camera far from the hole. (iv) To describe how the images of the black hole Gargantua and its accretion disk, in the movie Interstellar, were generated with DNGR—including, especially, the influences of (a) colour changes due to doppler and gravitational frequency shifts, (b) intensity changes due to the frequency shifts, (c) simulated camera lens flare, and (d) decisions that the film makers made about

  2. Unfolding the matter distribution using three-dimensional weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, P.; Taylor, A. N.; Hartlap, J.

    2009-10-01

    Combining redshift and galaxy shape information offers new exciting ways of exploiting the gravitational lensing effect for studying the large scales of the cosmos. One application is the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the matter density distribution which is explored in this paper. We give a generalization of an already known minimum-variance estimator of the 3D matter density distribution that facilitates the combination of thin redshift slices of sources with samples of broad redshift distributions for an optimal reconstruction; sources can be given individual statistical weights. We show how, in principle, intrinsic alignments of source ellipticities or shear/intrinsic alignment correlations can be accommodated, albeit these effects are not the focus of this paper. We describe an efficient and fast way to implement the estimator on a contemporary desktop computer. Analytic estimates for the noise and biases in the reconstruction are given. Some regularization (Wiener filtering) of the estimator, adjustable by a tuning parameter, is necessary to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to a sensible level and to suppress oscillations in radial direction. This, however, introduces as side effect a systematic shift and stretch of structures in radial direction. This bias can be expressed in terms of a radial point-spread function (PSF) comprising the limitations of the reconstruction due to given source shot noise and a lack of knowledge of the exact source redshifts. We conclude that a 3D mass-density reconstruction on galaxy cluster scales (~1Mpc) is feasible but, for foreseeable surveys, a map with a S/N >~ 3 threshold is limited to structures with M200 >~ 1 × 1014 or 7 × 1014Msolarh-1, at low to moderate redshifts (z = 0.1 or 0.6). However, we find that a heavily smoothed full-sky map of the very large-scale density field may also be possible as the S/N of reconstructed modes increases towards larger scales. Future improvements of the method may be

  3. Characterizing the zone of influence of dark matter clumps on image positions and flux ratios in gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jyothisraj; Keeton, Charles R.; Brennan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model of the universe predicts that there should be hundreds to thousands of clumps surrounding a massive galaxy. However, observations have shown that we only see dozens of dwarf galaxies and not the hundreds to thousands that are predicted. This means that either the CDM model prediction is wrong, or most of the substructure consists of dark matter that cannot be observed directly. Massive galaxies serve as natural gravitational lenses throughout the universe that allow us to indirectly observe these dark matter perturbations. Strong gravitational lensing occurs when these massive elliptical galaxies have the critical density required to bend light from a source located behind it and produce multiple images of that same source. Dark matter clumps located near these multiple images affect their positions and flux ratios. We used lensing simulations to quantify how dark matter clumps affect image properties and to characterize this zone of influence through color maps of chi-squared values. Our results showed regions around each of the image positions that display significant perturbations for low mass clumps. For higher mass clumps, however, these distinct regions bleed together. We found that there is a correlation between the mass of the dark matter clump and the area it perturbs.This research has been supported by NSF grant PHY-1263280.

  4. W.M. Keck Telescope High Resolution Near-Infrared Imaging of FSC 10214+4724: Evidence for Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Michael C.; Graham, James R.

    1995-05-01

    We present near--infrared observations of the ultraluminous high--redshift (z=2.286) IRAS source FSC 10214+4724 obtained in 0.''4 seeing at the W. M. Keck Telescope. These new observations show that FSC 10214+4724 consists of a highly symmetric circular arc centered on a second weaker source. The arc has an angular extent of about 140(deg) and is probably unresolved in the transverse direction. This morphology constitutes compelling prima facie evidence for a gravitationally lensed system. Our images also contain evidence for the faint counter image predicted by the lens hypothesis. The morphology of FSC 10214+4724 can be explained in terms of a gravitationally lensed background source if the object located close to the center of the arc is an L(*) galaxy located at z~ 0.4 . The origin of the luminosity of FSC 10214+4724 is unclear -- it may be a protogalaxy undergoing its initial burst of star formation or a highly obscured quasar. If FSC 10214+4724 is lensed then there is significant magnification and its luminosity has been overestimated by a large factor. Our results suggest FSC 10214+4724 is not a uniquely luminous object but ranks among the most powerful quasars and ultraluminous IRAS galaxies.

  5. A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Gravitational Lensing Potential from 100 Square Degrees of SPTpol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, K. T.; Hanson, D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Austermann, J. E.; Beall, J. A.; Bender, A. N.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiang, H. C.; Cho, H.-M.; Citron, R.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Everett, W.; Gallicchio, J.; Gao, J.; George, E. M.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hoover, S.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Huang, N.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Li, D.; Liang, C.; Luong-Van, D.; McMahon, J. J.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Montroy, T. E.; Natoli, T.; Nibarger, J. P.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Smecher, G.; Stark, A. A.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Zahn, O.

    2015-09-01

    We present a measurement of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) gravitational lensing potential using data from the first two seasons of observations with SPTpol, the polarization-sensitive receiver currently installed on the South Pole Telescope. The observations used in this work cover 100 deg2 of sky with arcminute resolution at 150 GHz. Using a quadratic estimator, we make maps of the CMB lensing potential from combinations of CMB temperature and polarization maps. We combine these lensing potential maps to form a minimum-variance (MV) map. The lensing potential is measured with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than one for angular multipoles between 100\\lt L\\lt 250. This is the highest signal-to-noise mass map made from the CMB to date and will be powerful in cross-correlation with other tracers of large-scale structure. We calculate the power spectrum of the lensing potential for each estimator, and we report the value of the MV power spectrum between 100\\lt L\\lt 2000 as our primary result. We constrain the ratio of the spectrum to a fiducial ΛCDM model to be AMV = 0.92 ± 0.14 (Stat.) ± 0.08 (Sys.). Restricting ourselves to polarized data only, we find APOL = 0.92 ± 0.24 (Stat.) ± 0.11 (Sys.). This measurement rejects the hypothesis of no lensing at 5.9σ using polarization data alone, and at 14σ using both temperature and polarization data.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Luminous IRAS Source FSC 10214+4724: A Gravitationally Lensed Infrared Quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Armus, Lee; Hogg, David W.; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.; Werner, Michael W.

    1996-01-01

    With a redshift of 2.3, the IRAS source FSC 10214+4724 is apparently one of the most luminous objects known in the universe. We present an image of FSC 10214+4724 at 0.8 pm obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 Planetary Camera. The source appears as an unresolved (less then 0.06) arc 0.7 long, with significant substructure along its length. The center of curvature of the arc is located near an elliptical galaxy 1.18 to the north. An unresolved component 100 times fainter than the arc is clearly detected on the opposite side of this galaxy. The most straightforward interpretation is that FSC 10214+4724 is gravitationally lensed by the foreground elliptical galaxy, with the faint component a counter-image of the IRAS source. The brightness of the arc in the HST image is then magnified by approx. 100, and the intrinsic source diameter is approx. 0.0l (80 pc) at 0.25 microns rest wavelength. The bolometric luminosity is probably amplified by a smaller factor (approx. 30) as a result of the larger extent expected for the source in the far-infrared. A detailed lensing model is presented that reproduces the observed morphology and relative flux of the arc and counterimage and correctly predicts the position angle of the lensing galaxy. The model also predicts reasonable values for the velocity dispersion, mass, and mass-to-light ratio of the lensing galaxy for a wide range of galaxy redshifts. A redshift for the lensing galaxy of -0.9 is consistent with the measured surface brightness profile from the image, as well as with the galaxy's spectral energy distribution. The background lensed source has an intrinsic luminosity approx. 2 x 10(exp 13) L(solar mass) and remains a highly luminous quasar with an extremely large ratio of infrared to optical/ultraviolet luminosity.

  7. Probing Structure in Cold Gas at z <~ 1 with Gravitationally Lensed Quasar Sightlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha

    2014-10-01

    Absorption lines in quasar spectra offer a powerful tool to study distant galaxies and intergalactic matter (IGM). The strongest of these absorbers, the damped Lyman-alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA absorbers constitute a large fraction of the neutral gas in galaxies. Galaxies located in front of gravitationally lensed quasars (GLQs) are probed by multiple sightlines; so DLA/sub-DLAs in these sightlines can probe the internal structure of interstellar material (ISM) and/or the environment of these galaxies. From the lens galaxy images, impact parameters of the absorbing regions from the galaxy centers can be obtained accurately. Unfortunately, very little information exists on the neutral gas and metal content of DLA/sub-DLAs located in front of GLQs with confirmed lens galaxies. This is because at low redshift where lens galaxies are well-imaged, the H I and key metal lines lie in the UV. Here we propose to study 6 GLQs with known lens redshifts and a total of 14 closely separated double or quadruple images, that show candidate DLA/sub-DLAs along multiple sightlines. Our goal is to measure H I Lyman-alpha absorption in these sightlines. Many of these absorbers are at the lens redshift, with impact parameters 0.6-5.8 kpc. Our observations will therefore allow us to constrain gradients in H I column density and metallicity (combining H I with ground-based metal line measurements) within these galaxies. Our data will also help to constrain the sizes of DLA/sub-DLA absorbing regions by increasing the existing sample of DLA/sub-DLAs probed at < 10 kpc separations by a factor of ~3. HST is essential because of the need for both UV coverage and high spatial resolution.

  8. TIME DELAYS IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR H1413+117 (CLOVERLEAF)

    SciTech Connect

    Goicoechea, Luis J.

    2010-01-10

    The quadruple quasar H1413+117 (z{sub s} = 2.56) has been monitored with the 2.0 m Liverpool Telescope in the r Sloan band from 2008 February to July. This optical follow-up leads to accurate light curves of the four quasar images (A-D), which are defined by 33 epochs of observation and an average photometric error of approx15 mmag. We then use the observed (intrinsic) variations of approx50-100 mmag to measure the three time delays for the lens system for the first time (1sigma confidence intervals): DELTAtau{sub AB} = -17 +- 3, DELTAtau{sub AC} = -20 +- 4, and DELTAtau{sub AD} = 23 +- 4 days (DELTAtau{sub ij} = tau{sub j} - tau{sub i}; B and C are leading, while D is trailing). Although time delays for lens systems are often used to obtain the Hubble constant (H{sub 0}), the unavailability of the spectroscopic lens redshift (z{sub l} ) in the system H1413+117 prevents a determination of H{sub 0} from the measured delays. In this paper, the new time-delay constraints and a concordance expansion rate (H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}) allow us to improve the lens model and to estimate the previously unknown z{sub l} . Our 1sigma estimate z{sub l} = 1.88{sup +0.09}{sub -0.11} is an example of how to infer the redshift of very distant galaxies via gravitational lensing.

  9. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baxter, E. J.; Keisler, R.; Dodelson, S.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Ashby, M. L.N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; et al

    2015-06-22

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We also develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error andmore » find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly 0.85σ in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. Furthermore, we apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.1σ. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: M200,lens = 0.83+0.38-0.37 M200,SZ (68% C.L., statistical error only).« less

  10. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, E. J.; Keisler, R.; Dodelson, S.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Ashby, M. L.N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. -M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Millea, M.; Mocanu, L. M.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-06-22

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We also develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error and find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly 0.85σ in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. Furthermore, we apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their Sunyaev–Zeldovich (SZ) signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.1σ. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: M200,lens = 0.83+0.38-0.37 M200,SZ (68% C.L., statistical error only).

  11. A Measurement of Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters Using Data from the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, E. J.; Keisler, R.; Dodelson, S.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H.-M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hou, Z.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Millea, M.; Mocanu, L. M.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Song, J.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; van Engelen, A.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-06-01

    Clusters of galaxies are expected to gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby generate a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurements of this effect can be used to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters with CMB data alone. Here we present a measurement of lensing of the CMB by galaxy clusters using data from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We develop a maximum likelihood approach to extract the CMB cluster lensing signal and validate the method on mock data. We quantify the effects on our analysis of several potential sources of systematic error and find that they generally act to reduce the best-fit cluster mass. It is estimated that this bias to lower cluster mass is roughly 0.85σ in units of the statistical error bar, although this estimate should be viewed as an upper limit. We apply our maximum likelihood technique to 513 clusters selected via their Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signatures in SPT data, and rule out the null hypothesis of no lensing at 3.1σ. The lensing-derived mass estimate for the full cluster sample is consistent with that inferred from the SZ flux: {M}200,{lens}={0.83}-0.37+0.38 {M}200,{SZ} (68% C.L., statistical error only).

  12. RINGFINDER: Automated detection of galaxy-scale gravitational lenses in ground-based multi-filter imaging data

    SciTech Connect

    Gavazzi, Raphaël; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Sonnenfeld, Alessandro

    2014-04-20

    We present RINGFINDER, a tool for finding galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses in multi-band imaging data. By construction, the method is sensitive to configurations involving a massive foreground ETG and a faint, background, blue source. RINGFINDER detects the presence of blue residuals embedded in an otherwise smooth red light distribution by difference imaging in two bands. The method is automated for efficient application to current and future surveys, having originally been designed for the 150 deg{sup 2} Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). We describe each of the steps of RINGFINDER. We then carry out extensive simulations to assess completeness and purity. For sources with magnification μ > 4, RINGFINDER reaches 42% (25%) completeness and 29% (86%) purity before (after) visual inspection. The completeness of RINGFINDER is substantially improved in the particular range of Einstein radii 0.''8 ≤ R {sub Ein} ≤ 2.''0 and lensed images brighter than g = 22.5, where it can be as high as ∼70%. RINGFINDER does not introduce any significant bias in the source or deflector population. We conclude by presenting the final catalog of RINGFINDER CFHTLS galaxy-scale strong lens candidates. Additional information obtained with Hubble Space Telescope and Keck adaptive optics high-resolution imaging, and with Keck and Very Large Telescope spectroscopy, is used to assess the validity of our classification and measure the redshift of the foreground and the background objects. From an initial sample of 640,000 ETGs, RINGFINDER returns 2500 candidates, which we further reduce by visual inspection to 330 candidates. We confirm 33 new gravitational lenses from the main sample of candidates, plus an additional 16 systems taken from earlier versions of RINGFINDER. First applications are presented in the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey galaxy-scale lens sample paper series.

  13. MEASURING THE GEOMETRY OF THE UNIVERSE FROM WEAK GRAVITATIONAL LENSING BEHIND GALAXY GROUPS IN THE HST COSMOS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, James E.; Massey, Richard J.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Tanaka, Masayuki; George, Matthew R.; Rhodes, Jason; Ellis, Richard; Scoville, Nick; Kitching, Thomas D.; Capak, Peter; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ilbert, Olivier; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jullo, Eric; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-04-20

    Gravitational lensing can provide pure geometric tests of the structure of spacetime, for instance by determining empirically the angular diameter distance-redshift relation. This geometric test has been demonstrated several times using massive clusters which produce a large lensing signal. In this case, matter at a single redshift dominates the lensing signal, so the analysis is straightforward. It is less clear how weaker signals from multiple sources at different redshifts can be stacked to demonstrate the geometric dependence. We introduce a simple measure of relative shear which for flat cosmologies separates the effect of lens and source positions into multiplicative terms, allowing signals from many different source-lens pairs to be combined. Applying this technique to a sample of groups and low-mass clusters in the COSMOS survey, we detect a clear variation of shear with distance behind the lens. This represents the first detection of the geometric effect using weak lensing by multiple, low-mass groups. The variation of distance with redshift is measured with sufficient precision to constrain the equation of state of the universe under the assumption of flatness, equivalent to a detection of a dark energy component {Omega}{sub X} at greater than 99% confidence for an equation-of-state parameter -2.5 {<=} w {<=} -0.1. For the case w = -1, we find a value for the cosmological constant density parameter {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.85{sup +0.044}{sub -}0{sub .19} (68% CL) and detect cosmic acceleration (q{sub 0} < 0) at the 98% CL. We consider the systematic uncertainties associated with this technique and discuss the prospects for applying it in forthcoming weak-lensing surveys.

  14. Bayesian and Profile Likelihood Approaches to Time Delay Estimation for Stochastic Time Series of Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, Hyungsuk; Mandel, Kaisey; van Dyk, David A.; Kashyap, Vinay; Meng, Xiao-Li; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational field of a galaxy can act as a lens and deflect the light emitted by a more distant object such as a quasar. If the galaxy is a strong gravitational lens, it can produce multiple images of the same quasar in the sky. Since the light in each gravitationally lensed image traverses a different path length and gravitational potential from the quasar to the Earth, fluctuations in the source brightness are observed in the several images at different times. We infer the time delay between these fluctuations in the brightness time series data of each image, which can be used to constrain cosmological parameters. Our model is based on a state-space representation for irregularly observed time series data generated from a latent continuous-time Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We account for microlensing variations via a polynomial regression in the model. Our Bayesian strategy adopts scientifically motivated hyper-prior distributions and a Metropolis-Hastings within Gibbs sampler. We improve the sampler by using an ancillarity-sufficiency interweaving strategy, and adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. We introduce a profile likelihood of the time delay as an approximation to the marginal posterior distribution of the time delay. The Bayesian and profile likelihood approaches complement each other, producing almost identical results; the Bayesian method is more principled but the profile likelihood is faster and simpler to implement. We demonstrate our estimation strategy using simulated data of doubly- and quadruply-lensed quasars from the Time Delay Challenge, and observed data of quasars Q0957+561 and J1029+2623.

  15. The Search for HI Emission at z ≈ 0.4 in Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Pisano, D. J.; Edel, S.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral hydrogen (Hi) provides a very important fuel for star formation, but is difficult to detect at high redshift due to weak emission, limited sensitivity of modern instruments, and terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) at low frequencies. We report the first attempt to use gravitational lensing to detect Hi line emission from three gravitationally lensed galaxies behind the cluster Abell 773, two at redshifts of 0.398 and one at z = 0.487, using the Green Bank Telescope. We find that a 3σ upper limit for a galaxy with a rotation velocity of 200 km s‑1 is M H i = 6.58 × 109 and 1.5 × 1010 M ⊙ at z = 0.398 and z = 0.487. The estimated Hi masses of the sources at z = 0.398 and z = 0.487 are factors of 3.7 and ∼30 times lower than our detection limits at the respective redshifts. To facilitate these observations we have used sigma-clipping to remove both narrow- and wideband RFI but retain the signal from the source. We are able to reduce the noise of the spectrum by ∼25% using our routine instead of discarding observations with too much RFI. The routine is most effective when ∼10% of the integrations or fewer contain RFI. These techniques can be used to study Hi in highly magnified distant galaxies that are otherwise too faint to detect.

  16. The Search for HI Emission at z ≈ 0.4 in Gravitationally Lensed Galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Pisano, D. J.; Edel, S.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral hydrogen (Hi) provides a very important fuel for star formation, but is difficult to detect at high redshift due to weak emission, limited sensitivity of modern instruments, and terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) at low frequencies. We report the first attempt to use gravitational lensing to detect Hi line emission from three gravitationally lensed galaxies behind the cluster Abell 773, two at redshifts of 0.398 and one at z = 0.487, using the Green Bank Telescope. We find that a 3σ upper limit for a galaxy with a rotation velocity of 200 km s‑1 is M H i = 6.58 × 109 and 1.5 × 1010 M ⊙ at z = 0.398 and z = 0.487. The estimated Hi masses of the sources at z = 0.398 and z = 0.487 are factors of 3.7 and ˜30 times lower than our detection limits at the respective redshifts. To facilitate these observations we have used sigma-clipping to remove both narrow- and wideband RFI but retain the signal from the source. We are able to reduce the noise of the spectrum by ˜25% using our routine instead of discarding observations with too much RFI. The routine is most effective when ˜10% of the integrations or fewer contain RFI. These techniques can be used to study Hi in highly magnified distant galaxies that are otherwise too faint to detect.

  17. PROSPECTS FOR MEASURING THE MASS OF BLACK HOLES AT HIGH REDSHIFTS WITH RESOLVED KINEMATICS USING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.

    2014-08-20

    Application of the most robust method of measuring black hole masses, spatially resolved kinematics of gas and stars, is presently limited to nearby galaxies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) and 30m class telescopes (the Thirty Meter Telescope, the Giant Magellan Telescope, and the European Extremely Large Telescope) with milli-arcsecond resolution are expected to extend such measurements to larger distances. Here, we study the possibility of exploiting the angular magnification provided by strong gravitational lensing to measure black hole masses at high redshifts (z ∼ 1-6), using resolved gas kinematics with these instruments. We show that in ∼15% and ∼20% of strongly lensed galaxies, the inner 25 and 50 pc could be resolved, allowing the mass of ≳ 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} black holes to be dynamically measured with ALMA, if moderately bright molecular gas is present at these small radii. Given the large number of strong lenses discovered in current millimeter surveys and future optical surveys, this fraction could constitute a statistically significant population for studying the evolution of the M-σ relation at high redshifts.

  18. Detecting gravitationally lensed Population III galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, Erik; Zitrin, Adi; Trenti, Michele; Rydberg, Claes-Erik; Guaita, Lucia; Schaerer, Daniel; Broadhurst, Tom; Östlin, Göran; Ström, Tina

    2012-12-01

    Small galaxies consisting entirely of Population III (pop III) stars may form at high redshifts, and could constitute one of the best probes of such stars. Here, we explore the prospects of detecting gravitationally lensed pop III galaxies behind the galaxy cluster J0717.5+3745 (J0717) with both the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). By projecting simulated catalogues of pop III galaxies at z ≈ 7-15 through the J0717 magnification maps, we estimate the lensed number counts as a function of flux detection threshold. We find that the ongoing HST survey Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH), targeting a total of 25 galaxy clusters including J0717, potentially could detect a small number of pop III galaxies if ˜1 per cent of the baryons in these systems have been converted into pop III stars. Using JWST exposures of J0717, this limit can be pushed to ˜0.1 per cent of the baryons. Ultradeep JWST observations of unlensed fields are predicted to do somewhat worse, but will be able to probe pop III galaxies with luminosities intermediate between those detectable in HST/CLASH and in JWST observations of J0717. We also explain how current measurements of the galaxy luminosity function at z = 7-10 can be used to constrain pop III galaxy models with very high star formation efficiencies (˜10 per cent of the baryons converted into pop III stars).

  19. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars with image separations of 3 arcseconds from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Richards, Gordon T.; Johnston, David E.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Pindor, Bartosz; Strauss, Michael A.; Brunner, Robert J.; Becker, Robert H.; Castander, Francisco J.; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; York, Donald G. /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Fermilab /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys. /Illinois U., Urbana, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis /LLNL, Livermore /Barcelona, IEEC /York U., Canada /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Chicago U., EFI

    2004-11-01

    We report the discovery of two doubly-imaged quasars, SDSS J100128.61+502756.9 and SDSS J120629.65+433217.6, at redshifts of 1.838 and 1.789 and with image separations of 2.86'' and 2.90'', respectively. The objects were selected as lens candidates from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Based on the identical nature of the spectra of the two quasars in each pair and the identification of the lens galaxies, we conclude that the objects are gravitational lenses. The lenses are complicated; in both systems there are several galaxies in the fields very close to the quasars, in addition to the lens galaxies themselves. The lens modeling implies that these nearby galaxies contribute significantly to the lens potentials. On larger scales, we have detected an enhancement in the galaxy density near SDSS J100128.61+502756.9. The number of lenses with image separation of {approx} 3'' in the SDSS already exceeds the prediction of simple theoretical models based on the standard Lambda-dominated cosmology and observed velocity function of galaxies.

  20. Laboratory simulation of Euclid-like sky images to study the impact of CCD radiation damage on weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prod'homme, T.; Verhoeve, P.; Oosterbroek, T.; Boudin, N.; Short, A.; Kohley, R.

    2014-07-01

    Euclid is the ESA mission to map the geometry of the dark universe. It uses weak gravitational lensing, which requires the accurate measurement of galaxy shapes over a large area in the sky. Radiation damage in the 36 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) composing the Euclid visible imager focal plane has already been identified as a major contributor to the weak-lensing error budget; radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) distorts the galaxy images and introduces a bias in the galaxy shape measurement. We designed a laboratory experiment to project Euclid-like sky images onto an irradiated Euclid CCD. In this way - and for the first time - we are able to directly assess the effect of CTI on the Euclid weak-lensing measurement free of modelling uncertainties. We present here the experiment concept, setup, and first results. The results of such an experiment provide test data critical to refine models, design and test the Euclid data processing CTI mitigation scheme, and further optimize the Euclid CCD operation.

  1. CALCLENS: Curved-sky grAvitational Lensing for Cosmological Light conE simulatioNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew R.

    2012-10-01

    CALCLENS, written in C and employing widely available software libraries, efficiently computes weak gravitational lensing shear signals from large N-body light cone simulations over a curved sky. The algorithm properly accounts for the sky curvature and boundary conditions, is able to produce redshift-dependent shear signals including corrections to the Born approximation by using multiple-plane ray tracing, and properly computes the lensed images of source galaxies in the light cone. The key feature of this algorithm is a new, computationally efficient Poisson solver for the sphere that combines spherical harmonic transform and multgrid methods. As a result, large areas of sky (~10,000 square degrees) can be ray traced efficiently at high-resolution using only a few hundred cores on widely available machines. Coupled with realistic galaxy populations placed in large N-body light cone simulations, CALCLENS is ideally suited for the construction of synthetic weak lensing shear catalogs to be used to test for systematic effects in data analysis procedures for upcoming large-area sky surveys.

  2. VLT/X-SHOOTER NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND HST IMAGING OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED z ∼ 2 COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Geier, S.; Man, A. W. S.; Krühler, T.; Toft, S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Richard, J.; Marchesini, D.

    2013-11-10

    Quiescent massive galaxies at z ∼ 2 are thought to be the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals. Observations revealed them to be extraordinarily compact. Until now, the determination of stellar ages, star formation rates, and dust properties via spectroscopic measurements has been feasible only for the most luminous and massive specimens (∼3 × M*). Here we present a spectroscopic study of two near-infrared-selected galaxies that are close to the characteristic stellar mass M* (∼0.9 × M* and ∼1.3 × M*) and whose observed brightness has been boosted by the gravitational lensing effect. We measure the redshifts of the two galaxies to be z = 1.71 ± 0.02 and z = 2.15 ± 0.01. By fitting stellar population synthesis models to their spectrophotometric spectral energy distributions we determine their ages to be 2.4{sup +0.8}{sub -0.6} Gyr and 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr, respectively, which implies that the two galaxies have higher mass-to-light ratios than most quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies in other studies. We find no direct evidence for active star formation or active galactic nucleus activity in either of the two galaxies, based on the non-detection of emission lines. Based on the derived redshifts and stellar ages we estimate the formation redshifts to be z=4.3{sup +3.4}{sub -1.2} and z=4.3{sup +1.0}{sub -0.6}, respectively. We use the increased spatial resolution due to the gravitational lensing to derive constraints on the morphology. Fitting Sérsic profiles to the de-lensed images of the two galaxies confirms their compactness, with one of them being spheroid-like and the other providing the first confirmation of a passive lenticular galaxy at a spectroscopically derived redshift of z ∼ 2.

  3. A weak gravitational lensing recalibration of the scaling relations linking the gas properties of dark haloes to their mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenting; White, Simon D. M.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Henriques, Bruno; Anderson, Michael E.; Han, Jiaxin

    2016-03-01

    We use weak gravitational lensing to measure mean mass profiles around locally brightest galaxies (LBGs). These are selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic and photometric catalogues to be brighter than any neighbour projected within 1.0 Mpc and differing in redshift by <1000 km s-1. Most (>83 per cent) are expected to be the central galaxies of their dark matter haloes. Previous stacking analyses have used this LBG sample to measure mean Sunyaev-Zeldovich flux and mean X-ray luminosity as a function of LBG stellar mass. In both cases, a simulation of the formation of the galaxy population was used to estimate effective halo mass for LBGs of given stellar mass, allowing the derivation of scaling relations between the gas properties of haloes and their mass. By comparing results from a variety of simulations to our lensing data, we show that this procedure has significant model dependence reflecting: (i) the failure of any given simulation to reproduce observed galaxy abundances exactly; (ii) a dependence on the cosmology underlying the simulation; and (iii) a dependence on the details of how galaxies populate haloes. We use our lensing results to recalibrate the scaling relations, eliminating most of this model dependence and explicitly accounting both for residual modelling uncertainties and for observational uncertainties in the lensing results. The resulting scaling relations link the mean gas properties of dark haloes to their mass over an unprecedentedly wide range, 1012.5 < M500/M⊙ < 1014.5, and should fairly and robustly represent the full halo population.

  4. COSMOGRAIL: the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses. XII. Time delays of the doubly lensed quasars SDSS J1206+4332 and HS 2209+1914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eulaers, E.; Tewes, M.; Magain, P.; Courbin, F.; Asfandiyarov, I.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh.; Rathna Kumar, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Prabhu, T. P.; Meylan, G.; Van Winckel, H.

    2013-05-01

    Aims: Within the framework of the COSMOGRAIL collaboration we present 7- and 8.5-year-long light curves and time-delay estimates for two gravitationally lensed quasars: SDSS J1206+4332 and HS 2209+1914. Methods: We monitored these doubly lensed quasars in the R-band using four telescopes: the Mercator, Maidanak, Himalayan Chandra, and Euler telescopes, together spanning a period of 7 to 8.5 observing seasons from mid-2004 to mid-2011. The photometry of the quasar images was obtained through simultaneous deconvolution of these data. The time delays were determined from these resulting light curves using four very different techniques: a dispersion method, a spline fit, a regression difference technique, and a numerical model fit. This minimizes the bias that might be introduced by the use of a single method. Results: The time delay for SDSS J1206+4332 is ΔtAB = 111.3 ± 3 days with A leading B, confirming a previously published result within the error bars. For HS 2209+1914 we present a new time delay of ΔtBA = 20.0 ± 5 days with B leading A. Conclusions: The combination of data from up to four telescopes have led to well-sampled and nearly 9-season-long light curves, which were necessary to obtain these results, especially for the compact doubly lensed quasar HS 2209+1914. Based on observations made with the 1.2-m Swiss Euler telescope (La Silla, Chile), the 1.5-m AZT-22 telescope (Maidanak Observatory, Uzbekistan), the 2.0-m HCT telescope (Hanle, India), and the 1.2-m Mercator Telescope. Mercator is operated on the island of La Palma by the Flemish Community, at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias.Numerical values of light curves are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/553/A121 and at http://www.cosmograil.org

  5. An Automated Search for Gravitationally Lensed Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Pranav; Sivakumar, Janani N.; Nebres, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Quasar lensing is a powerful tool in deciphering the characteristics of dark matter and dark energy. Given the availability of "big data" on quasars, including the SDSS DR12 and the recently released DES data set, a robust automated algorithm for the detection of lensed quasars is rapidly becoming a necessity. We report results from an automated search for lensed quasars consisting of two complementary algorithms: a morphological algorithm directed at finding wide-separation lens candidates and a PSF-difference-based algorithm aimed at identifying close-separation lens candidates. This research started with a baseline data set of over 450,000 quasars and 996,317 spatial neighbors within 16 arcseconds of each quasar in the SDSS DR12. This threshold can identify quasars lensed by galaxy-scale to cluster-scale matter concentrations. The first part of the automated method matched redshift and color characteristics of images and compared key emission lines in the spectrum of the quasars and their neighbors. The second portion applied image segmentation techniques to deblend close-separation candidates identified as one photometric object by SDSS. Cross-matching with observations of the same targets across other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum and elimination of confirmed binary quasars increased the confidence level of the resulting candidate list. The automated search efficiently produced output consistent with results reported in the literature. In addition, the algorithms identified many new lens candidates not yet reported in the literature which warrant detailed follow-up observations.

  6. Distinguishing general relativity and f (R ) gravity with the gravitational lensing Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chenxiaoji; Wang, Qiao; Li, Ran; Li, Baojiu; Wang, Jie; Gao, Liang

    2015-09-01

    We explore the Minkowski functionals (MFs) of weak lensing convergence map to distinguish between f (R ) gravity and the general relativity (GR). The mock weak lensing convergence maps are constructed with a set of high-resolution simulations assuming different gravity models. It is shown that the lensing MFs of f (R ) gravity can be considerably different from that of GR because of the environmentally dependent enhancement of structure formation. We also investigate the effect of lensing noise on our results, and find that it is likely to distinguish F5, F6, and GR gravity models with a galaxy survey of ˜3000 degree2 and with a background source number density of ng=30 arcmin-2 , comparable to an upcoming survey dark energy survey (DES).We also find that the f (R ) signal can be partially degenerate with the effect of changing cosmology, but combined use of other observations, such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, can help break this degeneracy.

  7. Mass and Light Correlated with Galaxies on Local and Cosmic Scales: Weak Gravitational Lensing in the Deep Lens Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ami

    In this dissertation, we describe the results of applying weak gravitational lensing techniques to probe the connection between luminous galaxies and the dark matter halos in which they live. Specifically, we study galaxy-shear correlations in the Deep Lens Survey, and we investigate how this function changes with observable galaxy properties such as stellar mass, luminosity, color, and redshift. In Chapter 3, we examine the galaxy-shear correlation function on a large range of scales from small radii where the dominant contribution is from halos associated with individual galaxies to large radii where the dominant contribution is from neighboring galaxies and large-scale structure. We study the lensing signal for galaxies binned by luminosity and find that more luminous galaxies are more massive. More interestingly, the galaxy-shear correlation function shows features consistent with satellite and 2-halo terms from the halo model and cannot be fit with a single power law out to 15 Mpc. We also find more correlated large scale structure mass at lower redshift, consistent with the paradigm of bottom-up hierarchical structure formation. In Chapter 4, we focus on a subset of the survey with ancillary infrared data that allow estimates of stellar mass. We study the lensing signal for galaxies binned by stellar mass and infer the nature and evolution of the relationship between virial mass and stellar mass. We show that stellar mass and virial mass scale such that galaxies with smaller stellar masses also have smaller virial masses. This work has implications for the idea of downsizing, but does not yet have the S/N to provide competitive constraints. In the process of making lensing measurements on the Deep Lens Survey, we have also investigated errors related to the two most important variables: shapes and photometric redshifts. we discuss our findings in the context of the survey characteristics in Chapter 2 and in the simulations section of Chapter 3. While neither

  8. Implications for gravitational lensing and the dark matter content in clusters of galaxies from spatially resolved x-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, M.

    1994-01-01

    A simple method for deriving well-behaved temperature solutions to the equation of hydrostatic equilibrium for intracluster media with X-ray imaging observations is presented and applied to a series of generalized models as well as to observations of the Perseus cluster and Abell 2256. In these applications the allowed range in the ratio of nonbaryons to baryons as a function of radius is derived, taking into account the uncertainties and crude spatial resolution of the X-ray spectra and considering a range of physically reasonable mass models with various scale heights. Particular attention is paid to the central regions of the cluster, and it is found that the dark matter can be sufficiently concentrated to be consistent with the high central mass surface densities for moderate-redshift clusters from their gravitational lensing properties.

  9. DETECTION OF SUBSTRUCTURE IN THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR MG0414+0534 USING MID-INFRARED AND RADIO VLBI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Jones, Ramsey; Agol, Eric; Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2013-08-10

    We present 11.2 {mu}m observations of the gravitationally lensed, radio-loud z{sub s} = 2.64 quasar MG0414+0534, obtained using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. We find a flux ratio anomaly of A2/A1 = 0.93 {+-} 0.02 for the quasar images A1 and A2. When combined with the 11.7 {mu}m measurements from Minezaki et al., the A2/A1 flux ratio is nearly 5{sigma} from the expected ratio for a model based on the two visible lens galaxies. The mid-IR flux ratio anomaly can be explained by a satellite (substructure), 0.''3 northeast of image A2, as can the detailed very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) structures of the jet produced by the quasar. When we combine the mid-IR flux ratios with high-resolution VLBI measurements, we find a best-fit mass between 10{sup 6.2} and 10{sup 7.5} M{sub Sun} inside the Einstein radius for a satellite substructure modeled as a singular isothermal sphere at the redshift of the main lens (z{sub l} = 0.96). We are unable to set an interesting limit on the mass to light ratio due to its proximity to the quasar image A2. While the observations used here were technically difficult, surveys of flux anomalies in gravitational lenses with the James Webb Space Telescope will be simple, fast, and should well constrain the abundance of substructure in dark matter halos.

  10. 3D-HST GRISM SPECTROSCOPY OF A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED, LOW-METALLICITY STARBURST GALAXY AT z = 1.847

    SciTech Connect

    Brammer, Gabriel B.; Sanchez-Janssen, Ruben; Labbe, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Erb, Dawn K.; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Marchesini, Danilo; Quadri, Ryan

    2012-10-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and spectroscopy of the gravitational lens SL2SJ02176-0513, a cusp arc at z = 1.847. The UV continuum of the lensed galaxy is very blue, which is seemingly at odds with its redder optical colors. The 3D-HST WFC3/G141 near-infrared spectrum of the lens reveals the source of this discrepancy to be extremely strong [O III] {lambda}5007 and H{beta} emission lines with rest-frame equivalent widths of 2000 {+-} 100 and 520 {+-} 40 A, respectively. The source has a stellar mass {approx}10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, sSFR {approx} 100 Gyr{sup -1}, and detection of [O III] {lambda}4363 yields a metallicity of 12 + log (O/H) = 7.5 {+-} 0.2. We identify local blue compact dwarf analogs to SL2SJ02176-0513, which are among the most metal-poor galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The local analogs resemble the lensed galaxy in many ways, including UV/optical spectral energy distribution, spatial morphology, and emission line equivalent widths and ratios. Common to SL2SJ02176-0513 and its local counterparts is an upturn at mid-IR wavelengths likely arising from hot dust heated by starbursts. The emission lines of SL2SJ02176-0513 are spatially resolved owing to the combination of the lens and the high spatial resolution of HST. The lensed galaxy is composed of two clumps with combined size r{sub e} {approx}300 pc, and we resolve significant differences in UV color and emission line equivalent width between them. Though it has characteristics occasionally attributed to active galactic nuclei, we conclude that SL2SJ02176-0513 is a low-metallicity star-bursting dwarf galaxy. Such galaxies will be found in significant numbers in the full 3D-HST grism survey.

  11. Direct Observation of Cosmic Strings Via Their Strong Gravitational Lensing Effect. 1. Predictions for High Resolution Imaging Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, Maria Alice; Marshall, Phil; Treu, Tommaso; Morganson, Eric; Dubath, Florian; /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-11-14

    We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the single most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension G{mu}/c{sup 2} can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0'.14), it is sufficient to survey of order a square degree -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -8}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by an order of magnitude on that available from the cosmic microwave background. At the resolution (0'.028) attainable with the next generation of large ground based instruments, both in the radio and the infra-red with adaptive optics, surveying a sky area of order ten square degrees will allow us to probe the G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -9} regime. These limits will not be improved significantly by increasing the solid angle of the survey.

  12. Modelling the Accretion History of the Galactic Disk (and the Gravitational Lensing of a High-z Galaxy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Over its long history, the Milky Way is expected to have accreted many dwarf galaxies. The debris from the destruction of most of these dwarf galaxies will by now be fully phase-mixed throughout the Galaxy and hence undetectable as local over-densities in position-space. However, the debris from these systems could have distinct kinematic signatures that may help distinguish these stars from, for example, the Galactic disk. We aim to construct a reliable method of determining the contributions to the Milky Way disk from accreted structures that could be applied to current kinematic data sets, such as SDSS's APOGEE survey. In an effort to mimic the kinematic traits of an accreted satellite, we construct single-orbit models to compare to a cosmologically motivated simulation of satellite accretion. We find that these orbit models adhere to the kinematic signatures of certain types of accreted galaxies better than others, giving us insight on which parameters to trust when searching for accreted populations. As a bonus, we describe a separate project in which we attempt to deduce the intrinsic properties of the 8 o'clock arc, a gravitationally lensed Lyman break galaxy at redshift 2.73. Using the lensmodel code and its pixel-based source reconstruction extension pixsrc, we derive a de-lensed image of the galaxy in the source plane.

  13. TESTING THE UNIVERSALITY OF THE FUNDAMENTAL METALLICITY RELATION AT HIGH REDSHIFT USING LOW-MASS GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard S.; Jones, Tucker; Richard, Johan

    2013-08-01

    We present rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of nine low-mass star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 1.5 < z < 3 which are gravitationally lensed by foreground clusters. We used Triplespec, an echelle spectrograph at the Palomar 200 inch telescope that is very effective for this purpose as it samples the entire near-infrared spectrum simultaneously. By measuring the flux of nebular emission lines, we derive gas-phase metallicities and star formation rates, and by fitting the optical to infrared spectral energy distributions we obtain stellar masses. Taking advantage of the high magnification due to strong lensing, we are able to probe the physical properties of galaxies with stellar masses in the range 7.8 < log M/M{sub Sun} < 9.4 whose star formation rates are similar to those of typical star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We compare our results with the locally determined relation between stellar mass, gas metallicity, and star formation rate. Our data are in excellent agreement with this relation, with an average offset ({Delta}log (O/H)) = 0.01 {+-} 0.08, suggesting a universal relationship. Remarkably, the scatter around the fundamental metallicity relation is only 0.24 dex, smaller than that observed locally at the same stellar masses, which may provide an important additional constraint for galaxy evolution models.

  14. Explanation of the Quantum-Mechanical Particle-Wave Duality through the Emission of Watt-Less Gravitational Waves by the Dirac Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2016-01-01

    An explanation of the quantum-mechanical particle-wave duality is given by the watt-less emission of gravitational waves from a particle described by the Dirac equation. This explanation is possible through the existence of negative energy, and hence negative mass solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations. They permit to understand the Dirac equation as the equation for a gravitationally bound positive-negative mass (pole-dipole particle) two-body configuration, with the mass of the Dirac particle equal to the positive mass of the gravitational field binding the positive with the negative mass particle, and with the mass particles making a luminal "Zitterbewegung" (quivering motion), emitting a watt-less oscillating positive-negative space curvature wave. It is shown that this thusly produced "Zitterbewegung" reproduces the quantum potential of the Madelung-transformed Schrödinger equation. The watt-less gravitational wave emitted by the quivering particles is conjectured to be de Broglie's pilot wave. The hypothesised connection of the Dirac equation to gravitational wave physics could, with the failure to detect gravitational waves by the LIGO antennas and pulsar timing arrays, give a clue to extended theories of gravity, or a correction of astrophysical models for the generation of such waves.

  15. VLT/X-Shooter Near-infrared Spectroscopy and HST Imaging of Gravitationally Lensed z ~ 2 Compact Quiescent Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, S.; Richard, J.; Man, A. W. S.; Krühler, T.; Toft, S.; Marchesini, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2013-11-01

    Quiescent massive galaxies at z ~ 2 are thought to be the progenitors of present-day massive ellipticals. Observations revealed them to be extraordinarily compact. Until now, the determination of stellar ages, star formation rates, and dust properties via spectroscopic measurements has been feasible only for the most luminous and massive specimens (~3 × Msstarf). Here we present a spectroscopic study of two near-infrared-selected galaxies that are close to the characteristic stellar mass Msstarf (~0.9 × Msstarf and ~1.3 × Msstarf) and whose observed brightness has been boosted by the gravitational lensing effect. We measure the redshifts of the two galaxies to be z = 1.71 ± 0.02 and z = 2.15 ± 0.01. By fitting stellar population synthesis models to their spectrophotometric spectral energy distributions we determine their ages to be 2.4^{+0.8}_{-0.6} Gyr and 1.7 ± 0.3 Gyr, respectively, which implies that the two galaxies have higher mass-to-light ratios than most quiescent z ~ 2 galaxies in other studies. We find no direct evidence for active star formation or active galactic nucleus activity in either of the two galaxies, based on the non-detection of emission lines. Based on the derived redshifts and stellar ages we estimate the formation redshifts to be z=4.3^{+3.4}_{-1.2} and z=4.3^{+1.0}_{-0.6}, respectively. We use the increased spatial resolution due to the gravitational lensing to derive constraints on the morphology. Fitting Sérsic profiles to the de-lensed images of the two galaxies confirms their compactness, with one of them being spheroid-like and the other providing the first confirmation of a passive lenticular galaxy at a spectroscopically derived redshift of z ~ 2. Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under programs 087.B-0812 (PI: Toft) and 073.A-0537 (PI: Kneib).

  16. COSMOS 5921+0638: characterization and analysis of a new strong gravitationally lensed AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anguita, T.; Faure, C.; Kneib, J.-P.; Wambsganss, J.; Knobel, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Limousin, M.

    2009-11-01

    Context: Strong lens candidates have been newly identified within the COSMOS field. We present VLT/FORS1 spectroscopic follow-up observations and HST/WFPC2 imaging of the system COSMOS 5921+0638, which exhibits quadruply lensed images and a perfect Einstein ring. Aims: We investigate the nature of COSMOS 5921+0638 by studying its photometric, spectroscopic and physical properties. Methods: By analyzing our VLT/FORS1 spectroscopy and Subaru/CFHT/HST imaging of COSMOS 5921+0638, we completed both an environmental analysis and detailed analytical and grid-based mass modeling to determine it properties. Results: We measured the redshifts of the lensing galaxy in COSMOS 5921+0638 (zl = 0.551 ± 0.001) and 9 additional galaxies in the field (5 of them at z ~ 0.35). The redshift of the lensed source was inferred by identifying a candidate Lyα line at zs = 3.14 ± 0.05. The mass modeling reveals the requirement of a small external shear (γ = 0.038), which is slightly larger than the lensing contribution expected by galaxy groups along the line-of-sight obtained from the zCOSMOS optical group catalog (κ_groups ~ 0.01 and γ_groups ~ 0.005). The estimated time-delays between the different images are of the order of hours to half a week and the total magnification of the background source is μ ≈ 150. The measured mass-to-light ratio of the lensing galaxy within the Einstein ring is M/LB ≈ 8.5 ± 1.6. Anomalies are observed between the measured and expected flux ratios of the images of the background AGN. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that the ring and point-like structures in COSMOS 5921+0638 consist of a lensed high redshift galaxy hosting a low luminosity AGN (LLAGN). The observed flux ratio anomalies are probably due to microlensing by stars in the lensing galaxy and/or a combination of static phenomena. Multi-epoch, multi-band space-based observations would allow us to differentiate between the possible causes of these anomalies, since static and/or dynamic

  17. Planck 2013 results. XVIII. The gravitational lensing-infrared background correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The multi-frequency capability of the Planck satellite provides information both on the integrated history of star formation (via the cosmic infrared background, or CIB) and on the distribution of dark matter (via the lensing effect on the cosmic microwave background, or CMB). The conjunction of these two unique probes allows us to measure directly the connection between dark and luminous matter in the high redshift (1 ≤ z ≤ 3) Universe. We use a three-point statistic optimized to detect the correlation between these two tracers, using lens reconstructions at 100, 143, and 217 GHz, together with CIB measurements at 100-857 GHz. Following a thorough discussion of possible contaminants and a suite of consistency tests, we report the first detection of the correlation between the CIB and CMB lensing. The well matched redshift distribution of these two signals leads to a detection significance with a peak value of 42/19σ (statistical/statistical + systematics) at 545 GHz and a correlation as high as 80% across these two tracers. Our full set of multi-frequency measurements (both CIB auto- and CIB-lensing cross-spectra) are consistent with a simple halo-based model, with a characteristic mass scale for the halos hosting CIB sources of log10(M/M⊙) = 10.5 ± 0.6. Leveraging the frequency dependence of our signal, we isolate the high redshift contribution to the CIB, and constrain the star formation rate (SFR) density at z ≥ 1. We measure directly the SFR density with around 2σ significance for three redshift bins between z = 1 and 7, thus opening a new window into the study of the formation of stars at early times.

  18. Strings: A possible alternative explanation for the Unification of Gravitation Field and Electromagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Susana

    Throughout the last century, since the last decades of the XIX century, until present day, there had been many attempts to achieve the unification of the Forces of Nature. First unification was done by James Clerk Maxwell, with his Electromagnetic Theory. Then Max Plank developed his Quantum Theory. In 1905, Albert Einstein gave birth to the Special Relativity Theory, and in 1916 he came out with his General Relativity Theory. He noticed that there was an evident parallelism between the Gravitational Force, and the Electromagnetic Force. So, he tried to unify these forces of Nature. But Quantum Theory interposed on his way. On the 1940’s it had been developed the Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), and with it, the unified field theory had an arise interest. On the 60’s and 70’s there was developed the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Along with these theories came the discovery of the strong interaction force and weak interaction force. And though there had been many attempts to unify all these forces of the nature, it could only be achieved the Unification of strong interaction, weak interaction and Electromagnetic Force. On the late 80”s and throughout the last two decades, theories such as “super-string theory”, “or the “M-theory”, among others, groups of Scientists, had been doing grand efforts and finally they came out with the unification of the forces of nature, being the only limitation the use of more than 11 dimensions. Using an ingenious mathematical tool known as the super symmetries, based on the Kaluza - Klein work, they achieve this goal. The strings of these theories are in the rank of 10-33 m. Which make them undetectable. There are many other string theories. The GEUFT theory is based on the existence of concentrated energy lines, which vibrates, expands and contracts, submitting and absorbing energy, matter and antimatter, and which yields a determined geometry, that gives as a result the formation of stars, galaxies, nebulae, clusters

  19. COSMOGRAIL: the COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses. XV. Assessing the achievability and precision of time-delay measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonvin, V.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Kuntzer, T.; Sluse, D.; Meylan, G.

    2016-01-01

    COSMOGRAIL is a long-term photometric monitoring of gravitationally lensed quasars aimed at implementing Refsdal's time-delay method to measure cosmological parameters, in particular H0. Given the long and well sampled light curves of strongly lensed quasars, time-delay measurements require numerical techniques whose quality must be assessed. To this end, and also in view of future monitoring programs or surveys such as the LSST, a blind signal processing competition named Time Delay Challenge 1 (TDC1) was held in 2014. The aim of the present paper, which is based on the simulated light curves from the TDC1, is double. First, we test the performance of the time-delay measurement techniques currently used in COSMOGRAIL. Second, we analyse the quantity and quality of the harvest of time delays obtained from the TDC1 simulations. To achieve these goals, we first discover time delays through a careful inspection of the light curves via a dedicated visual interface. Our measurement algorithms can then be applied to the data in an automated way. We show that our techniques have no significant biases, and yield adequate uncertainty estimates resulting in reduced χ2 values between 0.5 and 1.0. We provide estimates for the number and precision of time-delay measurements that can be expected from future time-delay monitoring campaigns as a function of the photometric signal-to-noise ratio and of the true time delay. We make our blind measurements on the TDC1 data publicly available.

  20. Probing high-equivalent-width nebular emission at z~7 through spectroscopic confirmation of gravitationally lensed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Benjamin; Egami, Eiichi; Richard, Johan; Schaerer, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Gravitationally lensed high-redshift galaxies are powerful for constraining the abundance and properties of lower-luminosity galaxies in the reionization era. Here, I present the results from a spectroscopic survey of strongly lensed galaxies in massive cluster fields that resulted in the detection of the Lyman-α line for galaxies at redshifts 5.5 < z < 7. Candidates for follow-up were selected by applying the dropout technique to the extremely deep HST/ACS and HST/WFC3 data obtained by several HST programs including the CLASH MCT program and the Frontier Fields program. By combining the optical and near-infrared data with deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging, one can map out the spectral energy distribution from the rest-frame UV to optical and derive physical properties of this faint and distant galaxy population. However, it is now suspected that IRAC 3.6/4.5 μm broad-band measurements of z>6 galaxies may be significantly affected by the presence of strong nebular emission lines such as Hα, Hβ, and [O III] 4959/5007Å lines. Most notably, at 6.76.7 with very blue [3.6] - [4.5] colors that cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light. This allows us to provide for the first time a clean measurement of the combined strength of these nebular emission lines at high redshift

  1. LoCuSS: A COMPARISON OF SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT AND GRAVITATIONAL-LENSING MEASUREMENTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, Daniel P.; Culverhouse, Thomas; Carlstrom, John E.; Greer, Christopher; Hennessy, Ryan; Leitch, Erik M.; Loh, Michael; Pryke, Clem; Smith, Graham P.; Hamilton-Morris, Victoria; Richard, Johan; Joy, Marshall; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James W.; Muchovej, Stephen; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2009-08-20

    We present the first measurement of the relationship between the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signal and the mass of galaxy clusters that uses gravitational lensing to measure cluster mass, based on 14 X-ray luminous clusters at z {approx_equal} 0.2 from the Local Cluster Substructure Survey. We measure the integrated Compton y-parameter, Y, and total projected mass of the clusters (M {sub GL}) within a projected clustercentric radius of 350 kpc, corresponding to mean overdensities of 4000-8000 relative to the critical density. We find self-similar scaling between M {sub GL} and Y, with a scatter in mass at fixed Y of 32%. This scatter exceeds that predicted from numerical cluster simulations, however, it is smaller than comparable measurements of the scatter in mass at fixed T{sub X} . We also find no evidence of segregation in Y between disturbed and undisturbed clusters, as had been seen with T{sub X} on the same physical scales. We compare our scaling relation to the Bonamente et al. relation based on mass measurements that assume hydrostatic equilibrium, finding no evidence for a hydrostatic mass bias in cluster cores (M {sub GL} = 0.98 {+-} 0.13 M {sub HSE}), consistent with both predictions from numerical simulations and lensing/X-ray-based measurements of mass-observable scaling relations at larger radii. Overall our results suggest that the SZE may be less sensitive than X-ray observations to the details of cluster physics in cluster cores.

  2. Limits on the power-law mass and luminosity density profiles of elliptical galaxies from gravitational lensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Yao, Meng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We use 118 strong gravitational lenses observed by the SLACS, BOSS emission-line lens survey (BELLS), LSD and SL2S surveys to constrain the total mass profile and the profile of luminosity density of stars (light tracers) in elliptical galaxies up to redshift z ˜ 1. Assuming power-law density profiles for the total mass density, ρ = ρ0(r/r0)-α, and luminosity density, ν = ν0(r/r0)-δ, we investigate the power-law index and its first derivative with respect to the redshift. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior likelihood taking the Planck's best-fitting cosmology as a prior, we find γ = 2.132 ± 0.055 with a mild trend ∂γ/∂zl = -0.067 ± 0.119 when α = δ = γ, suggesting that the total density profile of massive galaxies could have become slightly steeper over cosmic time. Furthermore, similar analyses performed on sub-samples defined by different lens redshifts and velocity dispersions indicate the need of treating low-, intermediate- and high-mass galaxies separately. Allowing δ to be a free parameter, we obtain α = 2.070 ± 0.031, ∂α/∂zl = -0.121 ± 0.078 and δ = 2.710 ± 0.143. The model in which mass traces light is rejected at >95 per cent confidence, and our analysis robustly indicates the presence of dark matter in the form of a mass component that is differently spatially extended than the light. In this case, intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies (200 km s-1 <σap ≤ 300 km s-1) show the best consistency with the singular isothermal sphere as an effective model of galactic lenses.

  3. Search and Analysis of Galaxy-Scale Strong Gravitational Lenses in Cosmological Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brault, F.

    2013-11-01

    This article focuses on the development of a novel detector of strong galaxy-galaxy lenses based on the massive modelling of candidates in wide-field ground-based imaging data. Indeed, not only are these events rare in the Universe, but they are at the same time very valuable to understand galaxy formation and evolution in a cosmological context. We use parametric models, which are optimized by MCMC in a bayesian framework, so that we know the distribution of errors. We first generate several training samples : a hundred lenses simulated in HST and CFHT conditions, along with 325 observed lens candidates resulting from a series of preselections on the CFHTLS-Wide galaxies, and that we classify according to their credibility. The whole challenge in designing this detector lies in a subtle balance between the quality of models and the execution time. We massively run the modelling on our samples, beginning with ideal application conditions that we make more complex by stages so as to get closer to the observation conditions and save time. We show that a 7-parameter model assuming a spherical source can recover the Einstein radius from the CFHT simulations with a precision of 7%. We apply a mask to the input data that noticeably enhances the robustness of the models facing environment problems, with a median convergence time of 4 minutes that could be easily reduced by a factor of 10 with more direct optimization techniques. From our results, we define selection contours in the parameter space, resulting in a completeness of 38% and a purity of 55% for the sample of 51 candidates accepted by our robot among the 325 preselected systems.

  4. LensPerfect: Exact Massmap Solutions for Gravitationally Lensed Multiple Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan A.; Fuselier, E.; Benítez, N.; Broadhurst, T.; Ford, H.; ACS Science Team

    2006-12-01

    A new approach to massmap reconstruction is presented that delenses all multiple images of each lensed galaxy back to the exact same source position. Image sizes, shapes, and orientations may also be perfectly constrained. The massmap solution is obtained instantaneously without need for iterations. However, there is no unique solution given a set of multiple images, and other solutions may be obtained by adjusting the free parameters: the source positions and the basis function and its parameter(s). From these exact solutions, the user may choose that which best fits other observables: shears of singly-imaged galaxies, number count depletion, etc. No assumptions are made about the form of the massmap (although a basis function must be selected). And even though LensPerfect makes no assumptions about mass tracing light, we show that it is able to faithfully reproduce the significant features found in previous analyses of the lensing cluster Abell 1689. This new method is made possible by a recent advance in mathematics that allows for curl-free interpolation of a vector field (here, the image deflection) given at scattered data points (the image positions). LensPerfect is extremely straightforward and easy to use, and the software is made publicly available at http://www.iaa.es/ coe/LensPerfect/. --- ACS was developed under NASA contract NAS 5-32865, and this research is supported by NASA grant NAG5-7697. We are grateful for an equipment grant from the Sun Microsystems, Inc. This work has also been supported by the European Commission Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant 017288-BPZ and the PNAYA grant AYA2005-09413-C02.

  5. Strong gravitational lensing and the stellar IMF of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Charlot, Stéphane; Bruzual, Gustavo; La Barbera, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Systematic variations of the initial mass function (IMF) in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km s-1. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope (μ ≲ 2.2, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30 per cent, where μ = 1.3 corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the 1σ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power-law parametrization of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained (Γ ≲ 1.5, where Γ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of ≳25 per cent to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within 1Re. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalizations in a few massive lensing ETGs.

  6. Strong Gravitational Lensing and the Stellar IMF of Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, Dominik; Ferreras, Ignacio; Saha, Prasenjit; Charlot, Stéphane; Bruzual, Gustavo; La Barbera, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Systematic variations of the IMF in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km s-1. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope (μ ≲ 2.2, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30%, where μ = 1.3 corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the 1 σ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power law parameterisation of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained (Γ ≲ 1.5, where Γ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of ≲ 25% to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within 1Re. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalisations in a few massive lensing ETGs.

  7. Galaxies near distant quasars - Observational evidence for statistical gravitational lensing. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugmann, W.

    1989-09-01

    A new statistical analysis of the data presented by Fugmann (1988) indicating that the association of the nearest neighboring galaxies with distant flat-spectrum radio quasars is significant at the 97.5 percent level. The distribution of nearest-neighbor distances is consistent with model calculations of gravitational microlensing, although very small angular distances may be systematically depleted. The overdensity of galaxies near the radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars of this sample seems to exceed that implied by the results of Webster et al. (1988) for a sample of optically selected QSOs.

  8. Gravitational lens models based on submillimeter array imaging of Herschel -selected strongly lensed sub-millimeter galaxies at z > 1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann, R. S.; Gurwell, M. A.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Amber, S.; Calanog, J.; De Bernardis, F.; Wardlow, J.; Dannerbauer, H.; Harris, A. I.; Krips, M.; Lapi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Omont, A.; Riechers, D.; Baker, A. J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bock, J.; and others

    2013-12-10

    Strong gravitational lenses are now being routinely discovered in wide-field surveys at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) high-spatial resolution imaging and Gemini-South and Multiple Mirror Telescope optical spectroscopy of strong lens candidates discovered in the two widest extragalactic surveys conducted by the Herschel Space Observatory: the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). From a sample of 30 Herschel sources with S {sub 500} > 100 mJy, 21 are strongly lensed (i.e., multiply imaged), 4 are moderately lensed (i.e., singly imaged), and the remainder require additional data to determine their lensing status. We apply a visibility-plane lens modeling technique to the SMA data to recover information about the masses of the lenses as well as the intrinsic (i.e., unlensed) sizes (r {sub half}) and far-infrared luminosities (L {sub FIR}) of the lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The sample of lenses comprises primarily isolated massive galaxies, but includes some groups and clusters as well. Several of the lenses are located at z {sub lens} > 0.7, a redshift regime that is inaccessible to lens searches based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. The lensed SMGs are amplified by factors that are significantly below statistical model predictions given the 500 μm flux densities of our sample. We speculate that this may reflect a deficiency in our understanding of the intrinsic sizes and luminosities of the brightest SMGs. The lensed SMGs span nearly one decade in L {sub FIR} (median L {sub FIR} = 7.9 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}) and two decades in FIR luminosity surface density (median Σ{sub FIR} = 6.0 × 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉} kpc{sup –2}). The strong lenses in this sample and others identified via (sub-)mm surveys will provide a wealth of information regarding the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range in redshift.

  9. Nbody Simulations and Weak Gravitational Lensing using new HPC-Grid resources: the PI2S2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.; Costa, A.; Comparato, M.

    2008-08-01

    We present the main project of the new grid infrastructure and the researches, that have been already started in Sicily and will be completed by next year. The PI2S2 project of the COMETA consortium is funded by the Italian Ministry of University and Research and will be completed in 2009. Funds are from the European Union Structural Funds for Objective 1 regions. The project, together with a similar project called Trinacria GRID Virtual Laboratory (Trigrid VL), aims to create in Sicily a computational grid for e-science and e-commerce applications with the main goal of increasing the technological innovation of local enterprises and their competition on the global market. PI2S2 project aims to build and develop an e-Infrastructure in Sicily, based on the grid paradigm, mainly for research activity using the grid environment and High Performance Computer systems. As an example we present the first results of a new grid version of FLY a tree Nbody code developed by INAF Astrophysical Observatory of Catania, already published in the CPC program Library, that will be used in the Weak Gravitational Lensing field.

  10. ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC VARIANCE IN STUDIES OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES IN THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELD CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brant E.; Stark, Dan P.; Ellis, Richard S.; Dunlop, James S.; McLure, Ross J.; McLeod, Derek

    2014-12-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides a powerful means for studying faint galaxies in the distant universe. By magnifying the apparent brightness of background sources, massive clusters enable the detection of galaxies fainter than the usual sensitivity limit for blank fields. However, this gain in effective sensitivity comes at the cost of a reduced survey volume and, in this Letter, we demonstrate that there is an associated increase in the cosmic variance uncertainty. As an example, we show that the cosmic variance uncertainty of the high-redshift population viewed through the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744 increases from ∼35% at redshift z ∼ 7 to ≳ 65% at z ∼ 10. Previous studies of high-redshift galaxies identified in the Frontier Fields have underestimated the cosmic variance uncertainty that will affect the ultimate constraints on both the faint-end slope of the high-redshift luminosity function and the cosmic star formation rate density, key goals of the Frontier Field program.

  11. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Agnello, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64. The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51''. DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. Furthermore, the Einstein Radius is 0.68'' corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.

  12. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnello, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at zs = 1.64. The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is 0.51''. DES J2146-0047 is in the area of overlap between DES andmore » the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at zs = 2.38 and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at zl = 0.799, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. Furthermore, the Einstein Radius is 0.68'' corresponding to an enclosed mass of 1.6 × 1011 M⊙. Three other candidates were observed and rejected, two being low-redshift pairs of starburst galaxies, and one being a quasar behind a blue star. These first confirmation results provide an important empirical validation of the data-mining and model-based selection that is being applied to the entire DES dataset.« less

  13. A search for gravitational lensing among highly luminous quasars - New results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magain, P.; Remy, M.; Surdej, J.; Swings, J.-P.; Smette, A.

    Images of highly luminous QSOs are analyzed to determine whether the gravitational magnification of the background QSO by matter associated with the foreground galaxies accounts for the excess of galaxies in the fields of distant QSOs. Galaxy detection is increased by utilizing red-filter images, 40 taken with the EFOSC at the ESO 3.6-m telescope and 43 taken with a direct CCD camera at the ESO/MPI 2.2-m telescope. The R-magnitude ranges from 22.5 to 23.0 for the sample, for which the number of galaxies is counted by eye, showing 45 galaxies of radio and optical type. The overdensity found is not as pronounced as that of Fugmann (1988) or that of Webster et al. (1988). A systematic subtraction of the point spread function is also described to investigate the idea that some galaxies responsible for the QSO light magnification are within the inner 3-arcsec circle. The galaxies very close to the line-of-sight are theorized to contribute significantly to the magnification of these QSOs.

  14. Can the Masses of Isolated Planetary-mass Gravitational Lenses be Measured by Terrestrial Parallax?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Christie, G. W.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Moorhouse, D. M.; Muraki, Y.; Natusch, T.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Skowron, J.; Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tan, T.-G.; Tristram, P. J.; Yock, P. C. M.

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits >=10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M J and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ~40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  15. CAN THE MASSES OF ISOLATED PLANETARY-MASS GRAVITATIONAL LENSES BE MEASURED BY TERRESTRIAL PARALLAX?

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Botzler, C. S.; Bray, J. C.; Cherrie, J. M.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Philpott, L. C.; Abe, F.; Muraki, Y.; Albrow, M. D.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Christie, G. W.; Natusch, T.; Dionnet, Z.; Gould, A.; Han, C.; Heyrovský, D.; McCormick, J. M.; Skowron, J.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Recently Sumi et al. reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits ≥10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large, and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3σ level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 ± 0.30 M {sub J} and 0.80 ± 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ∼40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.

  16. SDSS J2222+2745: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED SEXTUPLE QUASAR WITH A MAXIMUM IMAGE SEPARATION OF 15.''1 DISCOVERED IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Dahle, H.; Groeneboom, N.; Gladders, M. D.; Abramson, L. E.; Sharon, K.; Bayliss, M. B.; Wuyts, E.; Koester, B. P.; Brinckmann, T. E.; Kristensen, M. T.; Lindholmer, M. O.; Nielsen, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2013-08-20

    We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSS J2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a z{sub s} = 2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z{sub l} = 0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.''1. Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity are in themselves rare among known lensed quasars, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present data sets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow-up and verification with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from 2011 September to 2012 September reveals significant variability at the {approx}10%-30% level in some of the quasar images, indicating that measurements of the relative time delay between quasar images will be feasible. In this lens system, we also identify a bright (g = 21.5) giant arc corresponding to a strongly lensed background galaxy at z{sub s} = 2.30. We fit parametric models of the lens system, constrained by the redshift and positions of the quasar images and the redshift and position of the giant arc. The predicted time delays between different pairs of quasar images range from {approx}100 days to {approx}6 yr.

  17. THE METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES FROM REDSHIFT 0 TO 3: COMBINING MAGNITUDE-LIMITED SURVEY WITH GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, T.-T.; Kewley, L. J.; Richard, J.

    2013-01-20

    We present a comprehensive observational study of the gas-phase metallicity of star-forming galaxies from z {approx} 0 {yields} 3. We combine our new sample of gravitationally lensed galaxies with existing lensed and non-lensed samples to conduct a large investigation into the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at z > 1. We apply a self-consistent metallicity calibration scheme to investigate the metallicity evolution of star-forming galaxies as a function of redshift. The lensing magnification ensures that our sample spans an unprecedented range of stellar mass (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }). We find that at the median redshift of z = 2.07, the median metallicity of the lensed sample is 0.35 dex lower than the local SDSS star-forming galaxies and 0.18 dex lower than the z {approx} 0.8 DEEP2 galaxies. We also present the z {approx} 2 MZ relation using 19 lensed galaxies. A more rapid evolution is seen between z {approx} 1 {yields} 3 than z {approx} 0 {yields} 1 for the high-mass galaxies (10{sup 9.5} M {sub Sun} < M {sub *} < 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }), with almost twice as much enrichment between z {approx} 1 {yields} 3 than between z {approx} 1 {yields} 0. We compare this evolution with the most recent cosmological hydrodynamic simulations with momentum-driven winds. We find that the model metallicity is consistent with the observed metallicity within the observational error for the low-mass bins. However, for higher masses, the model overpredicts the metallicity at all redshifts. The overprediction is most significant in the highest mass bin of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }.

  18. High Dynamic Range VLA Observations of the Gravitationally Lensed Quasar 0957+561

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvanek, Michael; Stocke, John T.; Morse, Jon A.; Rhee, George

    1997-12-01

    We present 2, 3.6, 6, and 20 cm radio maps of the gravitationally leased quasar 0957+561 obtained with the VLA in A configuration. Besides the well-known jet and lobe structure associated with image A and the point sources associated with image B and the radio source G, the new 3.6 cm maps show interesting extensions of radio source G towards and away from B and the 20 cm map shows a large amount of extended structure, some of it not seen before. We argue that at least some of the 3.6 cm extensions of G are the radio jet associated with image B placing the caustic for multiple images outside the radio jet emitting region. The central portion of the extended 20 cm emission may be an "Einstein ring" produced by faint radio emission located at the caustic while the northern and southern portions of the extended 20 cm emission resemble the outer lobes of a faint "classical double" source with an axis nearly perpendicular to the axis of the jet and lobe emission associated with image A. If these outer "lobes" are second images of the lobes associated with image A then they are very difficult to understand theoretically. Most likely they are the radio lobes of the galaxy G1. Relative point source positions are presented and compared to published VLBI positions and recently obtained optical positions from HST confirming that the VLA source G is coincident (±0.02") with both the VLBI source G' and the nucleus of the leasing galaxy G 1. However, all or a portion of radio source G/G' may still be the elusive third image of the quasar rather than a radio source associated with galaxy G1. Fluxes, spectral indices and flux ratios are presented and compared to values found in the literature. A portion of the 20 cm extended emission occurs in a region where extended X-ray emission was reported to be detected by Einstein and ROSAT. However, a re-analysis of the ROSAT data shows little evidence for this emission.

  19. THE OPTICAL GRAVITATIONAL LENSING EXPERIMENT: ANALYSIS OF THE BULGE RR LYRAE POPULATION FROM THE OGLE-III DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrukowicz, P.; Udalski, A.; Soszynski, I.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Poleski, R.; Kozlowski, S.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Ulaczyk, K.; Nataf, D. M.

    2012-05-10

    We have analyzed the data on 16,836 RR Lyrae (RR Lyr) variables observed toward the Galactic bulge during the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III), which took place in 2001-2009. Using these standard candles, we show that the ratio of total-to-selective extinction toward the bulge is given by R{sub I} = A{sub I} /E(V - I) = 1.080 {+-} 0.007 and is independent of color. We demonstrate that the bulge RR Lyr stars form a metal-uniform population, slightly elongated in its inner part. The photometrically derived metallicity distribution is sharply peaked at [Fe/H] = -1.02 {+-} 0.18, with a dispersion of 0.25 dex. In the inner regions (|l| < 3 Degree-Sign , |b| < 4 Degree-Sign ) the RR Lyr tend to follow the barred distribution of the bulge red clump giants. The distance to the Milky Way center inferred from the bulge RR Lyr is R{sub 0} = 8.54 {+-} 0.42 kpc. We report a break in the mean density distribution at a distance of {approx}0.5 kpc from the center indicating its likely flattening. Using the OGLE-III data, we assess that (4-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} type ab RR Lyr variables should be detected toward the bulge area of the ongoing near-IR VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) survey, where the uncertainty partially results from the unknown RR Lyr spatial density distribution within 0.2 kpc from the Galactic center.

  20. SDSS J1029+2623: A Gravitationally Lensed Quasar with an Image Separation of 22.5 Arcseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Yasuda, Naoki; Becker, Robert H.; Richards, Gordon T.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Kayo, Issha; Konishi, Kohki; Utsunomiya, Hiroyuki; Shin, Min-Su; Strauss, Michael A.; Sheldon, Erin S.; York, Donald G.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Dai, Xinyu; Fukugita, Masataka; /Tokyo U., Inst. Astron. /JSPS, Tokyo /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Princeton U. Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Drexel U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Nagoya U. /CCPP, New York /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2006-11-15

    The authors report the discovery of a cluster-scale lensed quasar, SDSS J1029+2623, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The lens system exhibits two lensed images of a quasar at z{sub s} = 2.197. The image separation of 22.5 makes it the largest separation lensed quasar discovered to date. The similarity of the optical spectra and the radio loudnesses of the two components support the lensing hypothesis. Images of the field show a cluster of galaxies at z{sub l} {approx} 0.55 that is responsible for the large image separation. The lensed images and the cluster light center are not collinear, which implies that the lensing cluster has a complex structure.

  1. A Snapshot Survey for Gravitational Lenses among z>=4.0 Quasars. II. Constraints on the 4.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Haiman, Zoltán; Pindor, Bartosz; Strauss, Michael A.; Fan, Xiaohui; Eisenstein, Daniel; Schneider, Donald P.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka

    2006-01-01

    We report on i-band snapshot observations of 157 Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars at 4.0gravitational lensing of these sources. None of the quasars appear to be strongly lensed and multiply imaged at the angular resolution (~0.1") and sensitivity of HST. The nondetection of strong lensing in these systems constrains the z=4-5 luminosity function to an intrinsic slope of β>-3.8 (3 σ), assuming a break in the quasar luminosity function at M*1450~-24.5. This constraint is considerably stronger than the limit of β>-4.63 obtained from the absence of lensing in four z>5.7 quasars. Such constraints are important to our understanding of the true space density of high-redshift quasars and the ionization state of the early universe. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program 9472.

  2. The Orphan Lenses Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Brownstein, J.; Fadely, R.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Gavazzi, R.; Goodsall, T.; Griffith, R. L.; Keeton, C. R.; Kneib, J. P.; Koekemoer, A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Marshall, P. J.; Merten, J.; Metcalf, R. B.; Oguri, M.; Papovich, C.; Rein, H.; Ryan, R.; Stewart, K. R.; Treu, T.

    2012-01-01

    Strong gravitational lenses are uniquely suited for the study of dark matter structure and substructure within massive halos of many scales, act as gravitational telescopes for distant faint objects, and can give powerful and competitive cosmological constraints. Some 300 lenses have been identified in the literature in one form or another; many others have been found, but perhaps have not warranted dedicated publications. The Orphan Lenses project aims to be a master compilation of all strong gravitational lenses that are known, and a community repository for candidate lenses. A clear and uniform database of basic properties and gravitational lens models is being developed, which will be available online and through a smartphone interactive application. I will present the project, and scientific highlights with this dataset.

  3. OMEGACAM and Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Fabrice Frédéric Thiébaut

    2007-04-01

    Het proefschrift van Fabrice Christen gaat over de ontwikkeling van nieuwe methoden voor het corrigeren van (digitale) foto's van melkwegstelsels. Met deze methoden kunnen de beelden uit het heelal beter worden geanalyseerd. Het eerste gedeelte is gewijd aan het werk dat bij ESO is uitgevoerd aan de CCD's van de OmegaCAM camera, het enige instrument van de VST. OmegaCAM is een optische groothoekcamera met een beeldveld van een vierkante graad, opgebouwd uit een mozaiek van 8 bij 4 CCD's. Van elk onderdeel moeten alle kenmerken volledig bekend zijn voordat het in het CCD mozaiek geplaatst kan worden. In het tweede deel van dit proefschrift wordt de ontwikkeling van een nieuwe methode voor het corrigeren van de ``point-spread function'' (PSF) en schatten van de ellipticiteit van de melkwegstelsels besproken. De nieuwe techniek wordt getest en vergeleken met een door sterrenkundigen algemeen gebruikte methode in het veld van zwaartekrachtslenzen, de Kaiser, Squire en Broadhurst (KSB) methode. De nieuwe methode, gebaseerd op shapelet ontleding (vergelijkbaar met wavelet ontleding), gaat verder, en is sneller en theoretisch preciezer dan de KSB methode. Door gebruik te maken van de gecorrigeerde ellipticiteit, kunnen we een statistische analyse uitvoeren om er een kosmisch vervormingssignaal uit te halen. De licht vervormde beelden van de melkwegstelsels bewij zen dat de niet-homogene massaverdeling op megaparsec-schaal voornamelijk bestaat uit grote hoeveelheden donkere materie. Verder vergelijken we de schattingen van de ellipticiteit van de shapelet en KSB methode. Bovendien voeren we ook nog een melkwegstelsel-melkwegstelsel lens analyse uit op de 50 VLT Fors1 afbeeldingen en slagen we erin de belangrijkste eigenschappen van de halo's van de stelsels, die zich op een afstand van een- tot tweeduizend megaparsec (1 parsec = 3,26 lichtjaar = 3,085 x 10^16 meter) bevinden, te bepalen door gebruik te maken van twee modellen van melkwegstelselhalo's. Vergeleken met andere overzichtsmetingen vinden we vergelijkbare resultaten.

  4. A Keck Adaptive Optics Survey of a Representative Sample of Gravitationally Lensed Star-forming Galaxies: High Spatial Resolution Studies of Kinematics and Metallicity Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Jones, Tucker A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.; Richard, Johan; Zitrin, Adi; Auger, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    We discuss spatially resolved emission line spectroscopy secured for a total sample of 15 gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at a mean redshift of z≃ 2 based on Keck laser-assisted adaptive optics observations undertaken with the recently improved OSIRIS integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph. By exploiting gravitationally lensed sources drawn primarily from the CASSOWARY survey, we sample these sub-L{}* galaxies with source-plane resolutions of a few hundred parsecs ensuring well-sampled 2D velocity data and resolved variations in the gas-phase metallicity. Such high spatial resolution data offer a critical check on the structural properties of larger samples derived with coarser sampling using multiple-IFU instruments. We demonstrate how kinematic complexities essential to understanding the maturity of an early star-forming galaxy can often only be revealed with better sampled data. Although we include four sources from our earlier work, the present study provides a more representative sample unbiased with respect to emission line strength. Contrary to earlier suggestions, our data indicate a more diverse range of kinematic and metal gradient behavior inconsistent with a simple picture of well-ordered rotation developing concurrently with established steep metal gradients in all but merging systems. Comparing our observations with the predictions of hydrodynamical simulations suggests that gas and metals have been mixed by outflows or other strong feedback processes, flattening the metal gradients in early star-forming galaxies.

  5. The Red Radio Ring: a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared radio galaxy at z = 2.553 discovered through the citizen science project SPACE WARPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geach, J. E.; More, A.; Verma, A.; Marshall, P. J.; Jackson, N.; Belles, P.-E.; Beswick, R.; Baeten, E.; Chavez, M.; Cornen, C.; Cox, B. E.; Erben, T.; Erickson, N. J.; Garrington, S.; Harrison, P. A.; Harrington, K.; Hughes, D. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Jordan, C.; Lin, Y.-T.; Leauthaud, A.; Lintott, C.; Lynn, S.; Kapadia, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Macmillan, C.; Makler, M.; Miller, G.; Montaña, A.; Mujica, R.; Muxlow, T.; Narayanan, G.; Briain, D. Ó.; O'Brien, T.; Oguri, M.; Paget, E.; Parrish, M.; Ross, N. P.; Rozo, E.; Rusu, C. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez-Argüelles, D.; Simpson, R.; Snyder, C.; Schloerb, F. P.; Tecza, M.; Wang, W.-H.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Wilcox, J.; Viero, M.; Wilson, G. W.; Yun, M. S.; Zeballos, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed hyperluminous infrared galaxy (intrinsic LIR ≈ 1013 L⊙) with strong radio emission (intrinsic L1.4 GHz ≈ 1025 W Hz-1) at z = 2.553. The source was identified in the citizen science project SPACE WARPS through the visual inspection of tens of thousands of iJKs colour composite images of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), groups and clusters of galaxies and quasars. Appearing as a partial Einstein ring (re ≈ 3 arcsec) around an LRG at z = 0.2, the galaxy is extremely bright in the sub-millimetre for a cosmological source, with the thermal dust emission approaching 1 Jy at peak. The redshift of the lensed galaxy is determined through the detection of the CO(3→2) molecular emission line with the Large Millimetre Telescope's Redshift Search Receiver and through [O III] and Hα line detections in the near-infrared from Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph. We have resolved the radio emission with high-resolution (300-400 mas) eMERLIN L-band and Very Large Array C-band imaging. These observations are used in combination with the near-infrared imaging to construct a lens model, which indicates a lensing magnification of μ ≈ 10. The source reconstruction appears to support a radio morphology comprised of a compact (<250 pc) core and more extended component, perhaps indicative of an active nucleus and jet or lobe.

  6. The dark matter haloes of moderate luminosity X-ray AGN as determined from weak gravitational lensing and host stellar masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leauthaud, Alexie; J. Benson, Andrew; Civano, Francesca; L. Coil, Alison; Bundy, Kevin; Massey, Richard; Schramm, Malte; Schulze, Andreas; Capak, Peter; Elvis, Martin; Kulier, Andrea; Rhodes, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between galaxies hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the dark matter haloes in which they reside is key to constraining how black hole fuelling is triggered and regulated. Previous efforts have relied on simple halo mass estimates inferred from clustering, weak gravitational lensing, or halo occupation distribution modelling. In practice, these approaches remain uncertain because AGN, no matter how they are identified, potentially live a wide range of halo masses with an occupation function whose general shape and normalization are poorly known. In this work, we show that better constraints can be achieved through a rigorous comparison of the clustering, lensing, and cross-correlation signals of AGN hosts to the fiducial stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) derived for all galaxies, irrespective of nuclear activity. Our technique exploits the fact that the global SHMR can be measured with much higher accuracy than any statistic derived from AGN samples alone. Using 382 moderate luminosity X-ray AGN at z < 1 from the COSMOS field, we report the first measurements of weak gravitational lensing from an X-ray-selected sample. Comparing this signal to predictions from the global SHMR, we find that, contrary to previous results, most X-ray AGN do not live in medium size groups - nearly half reside in relatively low mass haloes with M200b ˜ 1012.5 M⊙. The AGN occupation function is well described by the same form derived for all galaxies but with a lower normalization - the fraction of haloes with AGN in our sample is a few per cent. The number of AGN satellite galaxies scales as a power law with host halo mass with a power-law index α = 1. By highlighting the relatively `normal' way in which moderate luminosity X-ray AGN hosts occupy haloes, our results suggest that the environmental signature of distinct fuelling modes for luminous quasars compared to moderate luminosity X-ray AGN is less obvious than previously claimed.

  7. Physical Models from the Cosmos to the Factory: from Gravitational Lenses as a Probe of Cosmology, to Electric Field Analysis in Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Chung Norman

    1998-11-01

    There are basically two major parts in this thesis. The first part will involve a strong gravitational lensing study and the second part will be two industrial problems solved by electric field analysis. In part I, we examine whether a cosmologically significant distribution of dark galaxy groups can have an optical depth for multiple imaging of distant background sources which is comparable to that from known galaxies while at the same time producing angular splittings of the same order of magnitude. Modeling such systems as isothermal spheres with core radii, we find that independent of the cosmology an allowed parameter range exists that is comparable in velocity dispersion to that for known compact groups of galaxies, although the preferred core radii are somewhat smaller than that normally assumed for compact groups. After discussing dark structures which are responsible for lensing galaxies, we study statistical limits on the density parameter Ω o from a strong gravitational lensing analysis based on observed multiple lensing images in optical quasar surveys. A best fit from maximum likelihood analysis gives the value of Ω o to be 0.25 in a flat universe model, with 95% confidence level at about Ω o < 0.75. An open cosmology is not favored under the same analysis. In part II, two industrial and applied areas, capacitive sensors and radiofrequency thermal ablation, are introduced and analyzed. In the former case, we present progress of research and design in the area of liquid sensors for condition-based maintenance where accurate portable devices for monitoring hydraulic and lubricating fluids are desired. Issues addressed include dielectric modeling, capacitive calculations, and a novel 'electrogravity' mechanism. Measurements of capacitance, of frequency response, and of breakdown voltages, all as a function of contaminant concentration, have been carried out. The latter case is a study of theoretical modeling and experimental tests of that modeling for

  8. All Creatures Great and Small: Probing the Evolution and Structure of Mass from Sub-Galactic to Supercluster Scales using Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagattuta, David James

    Understanding the distribution of mass on cosmic scales provides context for a number of astrophysical topics, including galaxy evolution, structure formation, and cosmology. In this dissertation, I present new research into the distribution of mass throughout the universe, ranging from small (sub-galactic) to large (Supercluster) scales. This work is spread over four separate studies, each focusing on slightly different cosmological distance scales. In the first study, I employ strong and weak gravitational lensing to measure the mass profiles of a sample of massive elliptical galaxies at moderate redshift (z ˜ 0.6). I find that the total mass profile is best described by an isothermal (r -2) distribution, which disagrees with predictions made by numerical simulations. This disagreement provides important clues about the poorly understood interactions between dark matter and baryons. Furthermore, I compare these results to those of a low-redshift (z ˜ 0.2) galaxy sample, and this allows me to constrain the evolution of galaxy-scale mass profiles over a timescale of ˜ 7 billion years. In the second and third studies, I combine strong lensing constraints and high-resolution adaptive optics imaging to develop new mass models for the lens systems B0128+437 and B1938+666. I use these models to search for the presence of small-scale substructures (satellite galaxies) in the vicinity of the host lens. While structure formation models predict a large number of substructure galaxies orbiting a host, this does not agree with observations of the local universe, where only a handful of satellites are seen. I compare the upper-limit substructure constraints from the two strong lenses to the properties of known Milky Way satellites, and lay the foundation for a comprehensive census of extragalactic substructure, using a large sample of lenses to better resolve the tension between theory and observation. Finally, in the fourth study, I focus on mass at super-galactic scales

  9. A direct probe of cosmological power spectra of the peculiar velocity field and the gravitational lensing magnification from photometric redshift surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Nusser, Adi; Feix, Martin; Branchini, Enzo E-mail: branchin@fis.uniroma3.it

    2013-01-01

    The cosmological peculiar velocity field (deviations from the pure Hubble flow) of matter carries significant information on dark energy, dark matter and the underlying theory of gravity on large scales. Peculiar motions of galaxies introduce systematic deviations between the observed galaxy redshifts z and the corresponding cosmological redshifts z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}. A novel method for estimating the angular power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field based on observations of galaxy redshifts and apparent magnitudes m (or equivalently fluxes) is presented. This method exploits the fact that a mean relation between z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}} and m of galaxies can be derived from all galaxies in a redshift-magnitude survey. Given a galaxy magnitude, it is shown that the z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) relation yields its cosmological redshift with a 1σ error of σ{sub z} ∼ 0.3 for a survey like Euclid ( ∼ 10{sup 9} galaxies at z∼<2), and can be used to constrain the angular power spectrum of z−z{sub c{sub o{sub s}}}(m) with a high signal-to-noise ratio. At large angular separations corresponding to l∼<15, we obtain significant constraints on the power spectrum of the peculiar velocity field. At 15∼gravitational lensing magnification dominate, allowing us to probe the line-of-sight integral of the gravitational potential. Effects related to the environmental dependence in the luminosity function can easily be computed and their contamination removed from the estimated power spectra. The amplitude of the combined velocity and lensing power spectra at z ∼ 1 can be measured with ∼<5% accuracy.

  10. The impact of strong gravitational lensing on observed Lyman-break galaxy numbers at 4 ≤ z ≤ 8 in the GOODS and the XDF blank fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone-Nugent, R. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Trenti, M.; Treu, T.; Oesch, P.; Bouwens, R.; Illingworth, G. D.; Schmidt, K. B.

    2015-06-01

    Detections of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at high-redshift are affected by gravitational lensing induced by foreground deflectors not only in galaxy clusters, but also in blank fields. We quantify the impact of strong magnification in the samples of B435, V606, i775 and z850 & Y105 dropouts (4 ≲ z ≲ 8) observed in the eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) and the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) fields by investigating the proximity of dropouts to foreground objects. We find that ˜6 per cent of bright z ˜ 7 LBGs (m_{H_{160}}<26) have been strongly lensed (μ > 2) by foreground objects. This fraction decreases from ˜3.5 per cent at z ˜ 6 to ˜1.5 per cent at z ˜ 4. Since the observed fraction of strongly lensed LBGs is a function of the shape of the luminosity function (LF), it can be used to derive Schechter parameters, α and M⋆, independently from galaxy number counts. Our magnification bias analysis yields Schechter-function parameters in close agreement with those determined from galaxy counts albeit with larger uncertainties. Extrapolation of our analysis to z ≳ 8 suggests that surveys with JWST, WFIRST and Euclid should find excess LBGs at the bright end, over an intrinsic exponential cutoff. Finally, we highlight how the magnification bias measurement near the XDF detection limit can be used to probe the population of galaxies beyond this limit. Preliminary results suggest that the magnification bias at MUV ˜ -18 is weaker than expected if α ≲ -1.7 extends well below the current detection limits. This could imply a flattening of the LF at MUV ≳ -16.5. However, selection effects and completeness estimates are difficult to quantify precisely. Thus, we do not rule out a steep LF extending to MUV ≳ -15.

  11. Fast and Accurate Fourier Series Solutions to Gravitational Lensing by a General Family of Two-Power-Law Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun

    2002-04-01

    Fourier series solutions to the deflection and magnification by a family of three-dimensional cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are presented. The cusped two-power-law ellipsoidal mass distributions are characterized by inner and outer power-law radial indices and a break (or transition) radius. The model family includes mass models mimicking Jaffe, Hernquist, and η models and dark matter halo profiles from numerical simulations. The Fourier series solutions for the cusped two-power-law mass distributions are relatively simple and allow a very fast calculation, even for a chosen small fractional calculational error (e.g., 10-5). These results will be particularly useful for studying lensed systems that provide a number of accurate lensing constraints and for systematic analyses of large numbers of lenses. Subroutines employing these results for the two-power-law model and the results by Chae, Khersonsky, & Turnshek for the generalized single-power-law mass model are made publicly available.

  12. The Systematic Error Test for PSF Correction in Weak Gravitational Lensing Shear Measurement By the ERA Method By Idealizing PSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2016-08-01

    We improve the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial image (ERA) method of point-spread function (PSF) correction in a weak lensing shear analysis in order to treat the realistic shape of galaxies and the PSF. This is done by re-smearing the PSF and the observed galaxy image using a re-smearing function (RSF) and allows us to use a new PSF with a simple shape and to correct the PSF effect without any approximations or assumptions. We perform a numerical test to show that the method applied for galaxies and PSF with some complicated shapes can correct the PSF effect with a systematic error of less than 0.1%. We also apply the ERA method for real data of the Abell 1689 cluster to confirm that it is able to detect the systematic weak lensing shear pattern. The ERA method requires less than 0.1 or 1 s to correct the PSF for each object in a numerical test and a real data analysis, respectively.

  13. HerMES: A Deficit in the Surface Brightness of the Cosmic Infrared Background due to Galaxy Cluster Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, M.; Blain, A.; Cooray, A.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Marsden, G.; Nguyen, H. T.; Oliver, S. J.; Richard, J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I_{250 \\, \\mu {m}} \\gt 0.69_{-0.03}^{+0.03} ({stat.}) _{-0.06}^{+0.11} ({sys.}) MJy sr-1, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  14. HerMES: A DEFICIT IN THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DUE TO GALAXY CLUSTER GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Bock, J.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Blain, A.; Bethermin, M.; Conley, A.; Glenn, J.; Conversi, L.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Marsden, G.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; and others

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I{sub 250{mu}m}>0.69{sub -0.03}{sup +0.03}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.11}(sys.) MJy sr{sup -1}, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.

  15. Light deflection, lensing, and time delays from gravitational potentials and Fermat's principle in the presence of a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Ishak, Mustapha

    2008-11-15

    The contributions of the cosmological constant to the deflection angle and the time delays are derived from the integration of the gravitational potential as well as from Fermat's principle. The findings are in agreement with recent results using exact solutions to Einstein's equations and reproduce precisely the new {lambda} term in the bending angle and the lens equation. The consequences on time-delay expressions are explored. While it is known that {lambda} contributes to the gravitational time delay, it is shown here that a new {lambda} term appears in the geometrical time delay as well. Although these newly derived terms are perhaps small for current observations, they do not cancel out as previously claimed. Moreover, as shown before, at galaxy cluster scale, the {lambda} contribution can be larger than the second-order term in the Einstein deflection angle for several cluster lens systems.

  16. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHELL AT z = 3.5 SEEN IN THE THREE SIGHTLINES TOWARD THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QSO B1422+231

    SciTech Connect

    Hamano, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Tsujimoto, Takuji; Okoshi, Katsuya; Shigeyama, Toshikazu

    2012-08-01

    Using the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope with the IRCS Echelle spectrograph, we obtained high-resolution (R = 10,000) near-infrared (1.01-1.38 {mu}m) spectra of images A and B of the gravitationally lensed QSO B1422+231 (z = 3.628) consisting of four known lensed images. We detected Mg II absorption lines at z = 3.54, which show a large variance of column densities ({approx}0.3 dex) and velocities ({approx}10 km s{sup -1}) between sightlines A and B with a projected separation of only 8.4h{sup -1}{sub 70} pc at that redshift. This is the smallest spatial structure of the high-z gas clouds ever detected after Rauch et al. found a 20 pc scale structure for the same z = 3.54 absorption system using optical spectra of images A and C. The observed systematic variances imply that the system is an expanding shell as originally suggested by Rauch et al. By combining the data for three sightlines, we managed to constrain the radius and expansion velocity of the shell ({approx}50-100 pc, 130 km s{sup -1}), concluding that the shell is truly a supernova remnant (SNR) rather than other types of shell objects, such as a giant H II region. We also detected strong Fe II absorption lines for this system, but with much broader Doppler width than that of {alpha}-element lines. We suggest that this Fe II absorption line originates in a localized Fe II-rich gas cloud that is not completely mixed with plowed ambient interstellar gas clouds showing other {alpha}-element low-ion absorption lines. Along with the Fe richness, we conclude that the SNR is produced by an SN Ia explosion.

  17. Massive star clusters in a z=1 star-forming galaxy seen at a 100 pc scale thanks to strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava; Cava, Antonio; Richard, Johan; Schaerer, Daniel; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-08-01

    Deep and high-resolution imaging has revealed clumpy, rest-frame UV morphologies among z=1-3 galaxies. The majority of these galaxies has been shown to be dominated by ordered disk rotation, which led to the conclusion that the observed giant clumps, resolved on kpc-scales, are generated from disk fragmentation due to gravitational instability. State-of-the-art numerical simulations show that they may occupy a relevant role in galaxy evolution, contributing to the galactic bulge formation. Despite the high resolution attained by the most advanced ground- and space-based facilities, as well as in numerical simulations, the intrinsic typical masses and scale sizes of these star-forming clumps remain unconstrained, since they are barely resolved at z=1-3.Thanks to the amplification and stretching power provided by strong gravitational lensing, we are likely to reach the spatial resolving power for unveiling the physics of these star-forming regions. We report on the study of clumpy star formation observed in the Cosmic Snake, a strongly lensed galaxy at z=1, representative of the typical star-forming population close to the peak of Universe activity. About 20 clumps are identified in the HST images. Benefiting from extreme amplification factors up to 100, they are resolved down to an intrinsic scale of 100 pc, never reached before at z=1.The HST multi-wavelength analysis of these individual star clusters allows us to determine their intrinsic physical properties, showing stellar masses (Ms) from 106 to 108.3 Msun, sizes from 100 to 400 pc, and ages from 106 to 108.5 yr. The masses we find are in line with the new, very high resolution numerical simulations, which also suggest that the massive giant clumps previously observed at high redshift with Ms as high as 109-10 Msun may suffer from low resolution effects, being unresolved conglomerates of less massive star clusters. We also compare our results with those of massive young clusters in nearby galaxies. Our approved

  18. Discovery of an exceptionally bright giant arc at z = 2.369, gravitationally lensed by the Planck cluster PSZ1 G311.65-18.48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, H.; Aghanim, N.; Guennou, L.; Hudelot, P.; Kneissl, R.; Pointecouteau, E.; Beelen, A.; Bayliss, M.; Douspis, M.; Nesvadba, N.; Hempel, A.; Gronke, M.; Burenin, R.; Dole, H.; Harrison, D.; Mazzotta, P.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-05-01

    As part of an all-sky follow-up of the Planck catalogue of Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) cluster candidates detected in the first 14 months of data, we are observing cluster candidates in the southern sky in the optical imaging and spectroscopy through an ESO Large Programme. Inspection of ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT) R-and z-band imaging data from our programme has revealed an unusually large and bright arc in the field of PSZ1 G311.65-18.48. We establish the basic photometric and morphological properties of the arc and provide conclusive evidence for the gravitational lensing nature of this object. Guided by the NTT images, we have obtained a long-slit spectrum with IMACS on the Magellan-I Baade Telescope, covering a part of the arc and the brightest cluster galaxy of PSZ1 G311.65-18.48. Our imaging data confirm the presence of a galaxy cluster coinciding (within 0.´6) with the position of the Planck SZ source. The arc is separated by ~30″ from the brightest cluster galaxy, which closely coincides with the center of curvature of the arc. A photometric analysis yields integrated (Vega) magnitudes of (R,z,J,Ks) = (17.82,17.38,16.75,15.43) for the arc, more than one magnitude brighter than any previously known lensed arc at z ~ 2-3. The arc is a vigorously star-forming galaxy at z = 2.369, while the Planck SZ cluster lens is at z = 0.443.Even when allowing for lensing magnifications as high as μ = 100 still leads to the conclusion that the source galaxy is among the intrinsically most luminous normal (i.e., non-AGN) galaxies known at z ~ 2-3. FITS files of all the reduced images are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/590/L4

  19. A survey of the cold molecular gas in gravitationally lensed star-forming galaxies at z > 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, M.; Spilker, J. S.; Bethermin, M.; Bothwell, M.; Chapman, S. C.; de Breuck, C.; Furstenau, R. M.; Gónzalez-López, J.; Greve, T. R.; Litke, K.; Ma, J.; Malkan, M.; Marrone, D. P.; Murphy, E. J.; Stark, A.; Strandet, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Weiss, A.; Welikala, N.; Wong, G. F.; Collier, J. D.

    2016-04-01

    Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we conducted a survey of CO J = 1 - 0 and J = 2 - 1 line emission towards strongly lensed high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) previously discovered with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). Our sample comprises 17 sources that had CO-based spectroscopic redshifts obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment. We detect all sources with known redshifts in either CO J = 1 - 0 or J = 2 - 1. 12 sources are detected in the 7-mm continuum. The derived CO luminosities imply gas masses in the range (0.5-11) × 1010 M⊙ and gas depletion time-scales tdep < 200 Myr, using a CO to gas mass conversion factor αCO = 0.8 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1. Combining the CO luminosities and dust masses, along with a fixed gas-to-dust ratio, we derive αCO factors in the range 0.4-1.8 M⊙ (K km s-1 pc2)-1, similar to what is found in other starbursting systems. We find small scatter in αCO values within the sample, even though inherent variations in the spatial distribution of dust and gas in individual cases could bias the dust-based αCO estimates. We find that lensing magnification factors based on the CO linewidth to luminosity relation (μCO) are highly unreliable, but particularly when μ < 5. Finally, comparison of the gas and dynamical masses suggest that the average molecular gas fraction stays relatively constant at z = 2-5 in the SPT DSFG sample.

  20. Weak lensing corrections to tSZ-lensing cross correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tröster, Tilman; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    The cross correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing in wide field has recently been measured. It can be used to probe the distribution of the diffuse gas in large scale structure, as well as inform us about the missing baryons. As for any lensing-based quantity, higher order lensing effects can potentially affect the signal. Here, we extend previous higher order lensing calculations to the case of tSZ-lensing cross correlations. We derive terms analogous to corrections due to the Born approximation, lens-lens coupling, and reduced shear up to order l gtrsim 3000.

  1. Resolved Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed L^{*} Lyman Break Galaxy at z˜5: Evidence for a Starburst-Driven, Galactic-Scale Bi-Polar Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, M.

    2007-12-01

    We exploit the gravitational potential of a massive, rich cluster as a natural magnifying glass to study the internal properties of the highly magnified galaxy at z=4.88. Using high resolution HST imaging we construct a detailed mass model and, together with optical (VIMOS) and near-infrared (SINFONI) Integral Field Spectroscopy, we have mapped the source-frame morphology of the lensed galaxy behind galaxy cluster RCS0224-002 on 200pc scales to find an ˜L^{*} Lyman-break galaxy with a dynamical mass of 1.0×10^{10} M_{⊙} within 2 kpc and infer an integrated star-formation rate of just 12±2 M_{⊙} yr^{-1}. By combing the spatially resolved velocities from the [O II] and Lyα emission and UV ISM absorption lines we suggest that this galaxy is surrounded by a galactic-scale bi-polar outflow which has recently burst out of the system and is escaping at a speed of ˜500 km s^{-1}. The geometry and velocity of the outflow suggests that the ejected material is travelling far faster than escape velocity and we estimate that it will travel at least 1 Mpc (comoving) before eventually stalling. The enriched, outflowing material is therefore efficient at expelling baryons which are likely to subsequently play no further part in the star-formation history of this galaxy, but rather will pollute the IGM in a volume of at least 3Mpc^{3}.

  2. Mass reconstruction of galaxies clusters: Abell 2219, RXC J2248.7-4431, and SDSS J1004+4112 using strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaelani, Anton T.; Premadi, Premana W.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents mass reconstruction of galaxies cluster from strong lens analysis for Abell 2219 (z = 0.225), RXC J2248,7-4431 (z = 0.348), and SDSS J1004+4112 (z = 0.68) using parametric model sofware for strong gravitational lensing, glafic (Oguri 2010). We use assumptions of point source and source-plane approximation for minimization. We find that our parametric model well reproduces the positions of multiply imaged galaxies and quasars and time delays between quasar images. We find that the best-fit centroid of the dark halo (NFW) is quite consistent with the distribution of gas from observed X-ray. Radius enclosed mass profile and mass profile from hidrostatic assumption on distribution of gas from X-ray agree quite well with each other, including the radial slopes of the profiles with average discrepancies, Mlens/MX = 1.52 on the outer radius of images. Existence of dominant galaxy associate with compactness of cluster as lens. We find increasing of fraction of galaxies morphology from distribution of cluster members increase with redshift.

  3. Gravitational lens time delays and gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A. Department of Astronomy Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 ); Harari, D.D.; Surpi, G.C. )

    1994-10-15

    Using Fermat's principle, we analyze the effects of very long wavelength gravitational waves upon the images of a gravitationally lensed quasar. We show that the lens equation in the presence of gravity waves is equivalent to that of a lens with a different alignment between source, deflector, and observer in the absence of gravity waves. Contrary to a recent claim, we conclude that measurements of time delays in gravitational lenses cannot serve as a method to detect or constrain a stochastic background of gravitational waves of cosmological wavelengths, because the wave-induced time delay is observationally indistinguishable from an intrinsic time delay due to the lens geometry.

  4. Gamma-Ray Flaring Activity from the Gravitationally Lensed Blazar PKS 1830-211 Observed by Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Buehler, R.; Bulmash, D.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830-211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ~3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 1050 erg s-1, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830-211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  5. GAMMA-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY FROM THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED BLAZAR PKS 1830–211 OBSERVED BY Fermi LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Amin, M. A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bulmash, D. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@asdc.asi.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it E-mail: sara.buson@pd.infn.it E-mail: dammando@ira.inaf.it; and others

    2015-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope routinely detects the MeV-peaked flat-spectrum radio quasar PKS 1830–211 (z = 2.507). Its apparent isotropic γ-ray luminosity (E > 100 MeV), averaged over ∼3 years of observations and peaking on 2010 October 14/15 at 2.9 × 10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}, makes it among the brightest high-redshift Fermi blazars. No published model with a single lens can account for all of the observed characteristics of this complex system. Based on radio observations, one expects time-delayed variability to follow about 25 days after a primary flare, with flux about a factor of 1.5 less. Two large γ-ray flares of PKS 1830–211 have been detected by the LAT in the considered period, and no substantial evidence for such a delayed activity was found. This allows us to place a lower limit of about 6 on the γ-ray flux ratio between the two lensed images. Swift XRT observations from a dedicated Target of Opportunity program indicate a hard spectrum with no significant correlation of X-ray flux with the γ-ray variability. The spectral energy distribution can be modeled with inverse Compton scattering of thermal photons from the dusty torus. The implications of the LAT data in terms of variability, the lack of evident delayed flare events, and different radio and γ-ray flux ratios are discussed. Microlensing effects, absorption, size and location of the emitting regions, the complex mass distribution of the system, an energy-dependent inner structure of the source, and flux suppression by the lens galaxy for one image path may be considered as hypotheses for understanding our results.

  6. New Constraints on the Faint End of the UV Luminosity Function at z ~ 7-8 Using the Gravitational Lensing of the Hubble Frontier Fields Cluster A2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atek, Hakim; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Jauzac, Mathilde; Schaerer, Daniel; Clement, Benjamin; Limousin, Marceau; Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant universe far beyond the limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster A2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at z ~ 7 and eight candidates at z ~ 8 in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin2 in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function (LF) at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements reliably extend the z ~ 7 UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of M UV ~ -15.5. We find a characteristic magnitude of M\\star UV = -20.90+0.90-0.73 mag and a faint-end slope α =-2.01+0.20-0.28, close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01 L sstarf. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at z ~ 8 also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1 L sstarf. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at z > 7 that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide even better constraints on the buildup of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs 13495, 11386, 13389, and 11689. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS

  7. Inference of the cold dark matter substructure mass function at z = 0.2 using strong gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vegetti, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Auger, M. W.; Treu, T.; Bolton, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of a search for galaxy substructures in a sample of 11 gravitational lens galaxies from the Sloan Lens ACS Survey by Bolton et al. We find no significant detection of mass clumps, except for a luminous satellite in the system SDSS J0956+5110. We use these non-detections, in combination with a previous detection in the system SDSS J0946+1006, to derive constraints on the substructure mass function in massive early-type host galaxies with an average redshift ˜ 0.2 and an average velocity dispersion <σeff> ˜ 270 km s-1. We perform a Bayesian inference on the substructure mass function, within a median region of about 32 kpc2 around the Einstein radius ( ˜ 4.2 kpc). We infer a mean projected substructure mass fraction f = 0.0076_{-0.0052}^{+0.0208} at the 68 per cent confidence level and a substructure mass function slope α < 2.93 at the 95 per cent confidence level for a uniform prior probability density on α. For a Gaussian prior based on cold dark matter (CDM) simulations, we infer f = 0.0064^{+0.0080}_{-0.0042} and a slope of α = 1.90^{+0.098}_{-0.098} at the 68 per cent confidence level. Since only one substructure was detected in the full sample, we have little information on the mass function slope, which is therefore poorly constrained (i.e. the Bayes factor shows no positive preference for any of the two models). The inferred fraction is consistent with the expectations from CDM simulations and with inference from flux ratio anomalies at the 68 per cent confidence level.

  8. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. I. Classical Cepheids in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszynski, I.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzynski, G.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first part of a new catalog of variable stars (OIII-CVS) compiled from the data collected in the course of the third phase of the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-III). In this paper we describe the catalog of 3361 classical Cepheids detected in the approx 40 square degrees area in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The sample consists of 1848 fundamental-mode (F), 1228 first-overtone (1O), 14 second-overtone (2O), 61 double-mode F/1O, 203 double-mode 1O/2O, 2 double-mode 1O/3O, and 5 triple-mode classical Cepheids. This sample is supplemented by the list of 23 ultra-low amplitude variable stars which may be Cepheids entering or exiting instability strip. The catalog data include VI high-quality photometry collected since 2001, and for some stars supplemented by the OGLE-II photometry obtained between 1997 and 2000. We provide basic parameters of the stars: coordinates, periods, mean magnitudes, amplitudes and parameters of the Fourier light curve decompositions. Our sample of Cepheids is cross-identified with previously published catalogs of these variables in the LMC. Individual objects of particular interest are discussed, including single-mode second-overtone Cepheids, multiperiodic pulsators with unusual period ratios or Cepheids in eclipsing binary systems. We discuss the variations of the Fourier coefficients with periods and point out on the sharp feature for periods around 0.35 days of first-overtone Cepheids, which can be explained by the occurrence of 2:1 resonance between the first and fifth overtones. Similar behavior at P approx 3 days for 1O Cepheids and P approx 10 days for F Cepheids are also interpreted as an effect of resonances between two radial modes. We fit the period-luminosity relations to our sample of Cepheids and compare these functions with previous determinations.

  9. An ISOCAM survey through gravitationally lensing galaxy clusters. III. New results from mid-infrared observations of the cluster Abell 2219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coia, D.; Metcalfe, L.; McBreen, B.; Biviano, A.; Smail, I.; Altieri, B.; Kneib, J.-P.; McBreen, S.; Sanchez-Fernandez, C.; O'Halloran, B.

    2005-01-01

    The massive cluster of galaxies Abell 2219 (z = 0.228) with two spectacular gravitational lensing arcs was observed at 14.3 μm (hereafter 15 μm) with the Infrared Space Observatory and results were published by Barvainis et al. (\\cite{1999AJ....118..645B}). These observations have been reanalyzed using a method specifically designed for the detection of faint sources that had been applied to other clusters. Five new sources were detected and the resulting cumulative total of ten sources all have optical counterparts. The mid-infrared sources are identified with three cluster members, three foreground galaxies, an Extremely Red Object, a star and two galaxies of unknown redshift. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the galaxies are fit with models from a selection, using the program GRASIL. Best-fits are obtained, in general, with models of galaxies with ongoing star formation. Infrared luminosities and star formation rates are obtained for six sources: the cluster members and the foreground galaxies. For the three cluster members the infrared luminosities derived from the model SEDs are between ˜5.7 × 1010 L⊙ and 1.4 × 1011 L⊙, corresponding to infrared star formation rates between 10 and 24 M⊙ yr-1. The two cluster galaxies that have optical classifications are in the Butcher-Oemler region of the color-magnitude diagramme. The three foreground galaxies have infrared luminosities between 1.5 × 1010 L⊙ and 9.4 × 1010 L⊙ yielding infrared star formation rates between 3 and 16 M⊙ yr-1. Two of the foreground galaxies are located in two foreground galaxy enhancements (Boschin et al. \\cite{2004A&A...416..839B}). Including Abell 2219, six distant clusters of galaxies have been mapped with ISOCAM and luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) have been found in three of them. The presence of LIRGs in Abell 2219 strengthens the association between luminous infrared galaxies in clusters and recent or ongoing cluster merger activity. Based on observations

  10. An explanation of forms of planetary orbits and estimation of angular shift of the Mercury' perihelion using the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    This work develops a statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies to calculate the orbits of planets and explore forms of planetary orbits with regard to the Alfvén oscillating force [1] in the Solar system and other exoplanetary systems. The statistical theory of formation of gravitating spheroidal bodies has been proposed in [2]-[5]. Starting the conception for forming a spheroidal body inside a gas-dust protoplanetary nebula, this theory solves the problem of gravitational condensation of a gas-dust protoplanetary cloud with a view to planetary formation in its own gravitational field [3] as well as derives a new law of the Solar system planetary distances which generalizes the wellknown laws [2], [3]. This work also explains an origin of the Alfvén oscillating force modifying forms of planetary orbits within the framework of the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies [5]. Due to the Alfvén oscillating force moving solid bodies in a distant zone of a rotating spheroidal body have elliptic trajectories. It means that orbits for the enough remote planets from the Sun in Solar system are described by ellipses with focus in the origin of coordinates and with small eccentricities. The nearby planet to Sun named Mercury has more complex trajectory. Namely, in case of Mercury the angular displacement of a Newtonian ellipse is observed during its one rotation on an orbit, i.e. a regular (century) shift of the perihelion of Mercury' orbit occurs. According to the statistical theory of gravitating spheroidal bodies [2]-[5] under the usage of laws of celestial mechanics in conformity to cosmogonic bodies (especially, to stars) it is necessary to take into account an extended substance called a stellar corona. In this connection the stellar corona can be described by means of model of rotating and gravitating spheroidal body [5]. Moreover, the parameter of gravitational compression α of a spheroidal body (describing the Sun, in particular) has been

  11. THE SERENDIPITOUS OBSERVATION OF A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXY AT z = 0.9057 FROM THE BLANCO COSMOLOGY SURVEY: THE ELLIOT ARC

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Drabek, E. R.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Frieman, J. A.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Desai, S.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Hansen, S. M.; High, F. W.; Mohr, J. J.; Zenteno, A.; Lin, Y.-T.; Rest, A.; Smith, R. C.; Song, J.

    2011-11-20

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in 2006 October during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph instrument on the Gemini-South 8 m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak-plus-strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N{sub 200}, and fitting to a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) cluster mass density profile, we have made three independent estimates of the mass M{sub 200} which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M{sub 200} = (5.1 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c{sub 200} from the combined fit is c{sub 200} = 5.4{sup +1.4}{sub -1.1}. We have compared our measurements of M{sub 200} and c{sub 200} with predictions for (1) clusters from {Lambda}CDM simulations, (2) lensing-selected clusters from simulations, and (3) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for {Lambda}CDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to {Lambda}CDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [O II]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.

  12. The serendipitous observation of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 0.9057 from the Blanco Cosmology Survey: the Elliot Arc

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Drabek, E. R.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Desai, S.; et al

    2011-11-03

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in October 2006 during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the GMOS instrument on the Gemini South 8m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak plus strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N200, and fitting to an NFW cluster mass density profile, we havemore » made three independent estimates of the mass M200 which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M200 = (5.1 x 1.3) x 1014 circle_dot, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c200 from the combined fit is c200 = 5.4-1.1+1.4. We have compared our measurements of M200 and c200 with predictions for (a) clusters from λCDM simulations, (b) lensing selected clusters from simulations, and (c) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for λCDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to λCDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [OII]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate (SFR) of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.« less

  13. The serendipitous observation of a gravitationally lensed galaxy at z = 0.9057 from the Blanco Cosmology Survey: the Elliot Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lin, H.; Drabek, E. R.; Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Bertin, E.; Brodwin, M.; Desai, S.; Frieman, J. A.; Hansen, S. M.; High, F. W.; Mohr, J. J.; Lin, Y. -T.; Ngeow, C. -C.; Rest, A.; Smith, R. C.; Song, J.; Zenteno, A.

    2011-11-03

    We report on the serendipitous discovery in the Blanco Cosmology Survey (BCS) imaging data of a z = 0.9057 galaxy that is being strongly lensed by a massive galaxy cluster at a redshift of z = 0.3838. The lens (BCS J2352-5452) was discovered while examining i- and z-band images being acquired in October 2006 during a BCS observing run. Follow-up spectroscopic observations with the GMOS instrument on the Gemini South 8m telescope confirmed the lensing nature of this system. Using weak plus strong lensing, velocity dispersion, cluster richness N200, and fitting to an NFW cluster mass density profile, we have made three independent estimates of the mass M200 which are all very consistent with each other. The combination of the results from the three methods gives M200 = (5.1 x 1.3) x 1014 circle_dot, which is fully consistent with the individual measurements. The final NFW concentration c200 from the combined fit is c200 = 5.4-1.1+1.4. We have compared our measurements of M200 and c200 with predictions for (a) clusters from λCDM simulations, (b) lensing selected clusters from simulations, and (c) a real sample of cluster lenses. We find that we are most compatible with the predictions for λCDM simulations for lensing clusters, and we see no evidence based on this one system for an increased concentration compared to λCDM. Finally, using the flux measured from the [OII]3727 line we have determined the star formation rate (SFR) of the source galaxy and find it to be rather modest given the assumed lens magnification.

  14. CMB Lensing Cross Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, Lindsey

    2014-03-01

    A new generation of experiments designed to conduct high-resolution, low-noise observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)--including ACTpol, Planck, POLARBEAR and SPTpol--are producing exquisite measurements of the gravitational lensing of the CMB. Such measurements, covering large fractions of the sky, provide detailed maps of the projected mass distribution extending to the surface of the CMB's last scattering. Concurrently, a large number of deep, wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys (e.g., the Dark Energy Survey (DES),WISE all-sky survey, Subaru HyperSuprimeCam Survey, LSST, MS-DESI, BigBoss, etc.) are, or will soon be, providing maps of the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. Correlations of such tracer populations with lensing data allows new probes of where and how galaxies form in the dark matter skeleton of the Universe. Recent correlations of maps of galaxy and quasar densities with lensing convergence maps have produced significant measurements of galaxy bias. The near-term prospect for improvements in such measurements is notable as more precise lensing data from CMB polarization experiments will help to break cosmological and astrophysical parameter degeneracies. Work by the Planck, SPT, and POLARBEAR collaborations has also focused on the correlation of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) with CMB lensing convergence maps. This correlation is particularly strong as the redshifts of the CIB and CMB lensing kernel are well matched. Such correlations probe high-redshift structure, constraining models of star-formation and the characteristic mass scale for halos hosting CIB galaxies and have also been used to demonstrate the first detection of CMB B-mode polarization--an important milestone in CMB observations. Finally, combining galaxy number density, cosmic shear and CMB lensing maps has the potential to provide valuable systematic tests for upcoming cosmological results from large optical surveys such as LSST.

  15. Strongly Lensed Jets, Time Delays, and the Value of H 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Benbow, Wystan

    2015-01-01

    In principle, the most straightforward method of estimating the Hubble constant relies on time delays between mirage images of strongly lensed sources. It is a puzzle, then, that the values of H 0 obtained with this method span a range from ~50-100 km s-1Mpc-1. Quasars monitored to measure these time delays are multi-component objects. The variability may arise from different components of the quasar or may even originate from a jet. Misidentifying a variable-emitting region in a jet with emission from the core region may introduce an error in the Hubble constant derived from a time delay. Here, we investigate the complex structure of the sources as the underlying physical explanation of the wide spread in values of the Hubble constant based on gravitational lensing. Our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the derived value of the Hubble constant is very sensitive to the offset between the center of the emission and the center of the variable emitting region. Therefore, we propose using the value of H 0 known from other techniques to spatially resolve the origin of the variable emission once the time delay is measured. We particularly advocate this method for gamma-ray astronomy, where the angular resolution of detectors reaches approximately 0.°1 lensed blazars offer the only route for identify the origin of gamma-ray flares. Large future samples of gravitationally lensed sources identified with Euclid, SKA, and LSST will enable a statistical determination of H 0.

  16. A new method for point-spread function correction using the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial images in weak gravitational lensing shear analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Okura, Yuki; Futamase, Toshifumi E-mail: tof@astr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-09-10

    Highly accurate weak lensing analysis is urgently required for planned cosmic shear observations. For this purpose we have eliminated various systematic noises in the measurement. The point-spread function (PSF) effect is one of them. A perturbative approach for correcting the PSF effect on the observed image ellipticities has been previously employed. Here we propose a new non-perturbative approach for PSF correction that avoids the systematic error associated with the perturbative approach. The new method uses an artificial image for measuring shear which has the same ellipticity as the lensed image. This is done by re-smearing the observed galaxy images and observed star images (PSF) with an additional smearing function to obtain the original lensed galaxy images. We tested the new method with simple simulated objects that have Gaussian or Sérsic profiles smeared by a Gaussian PSF with sufficiently large size to neglect pixelization. Under the condition of no pixel noise, it is confirmed that the new method has no systematic error even if the PSF is large and has a high ellipticity.

  17. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:16286284

  18. Fermat Potentials of Embedded Lensing, the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect, and Weak-Lensing of CMB by Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an accurate gravitational lens theory for an inhomogeneity embedded in an otherwise homogeneous universe, which to the lowest order is applicable to any mass distribution. We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a FLRW cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) caused by individual large scale inhomogeneities, in particular, cosmic voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the CMB temperature fluctuation across such a lens as the derivative of the lens Fermat potential. Our formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. Our results are particularly useful for modeling ISW effects extracted through stacking large numbers of cosmic voids and clusters (that is, the aperture photometry method). For structures co-expanding with the background cosmology, i.e., for time-independent density contrasts, we find that the gravitational lensing time delay alone can produce fluctuations of the order of seen in recent observations by WMAP and Planck. We revisit the possibility of explaining the non-Gaussian cold spot on the south hemisphere via the Rees-Sciama effect of a large cosmic void using constraints obtained from the most recent void catalogs and our new void-lensing formalism, and compare it with other explanations such as a collapsing cosmic texture. We also study the remapping of primordial CMB anisotropies, the weak-lensing shear, and magnification caused by void lensing.

  19. A Pilot Survey for C III] Emission in the Reionization Era: Gravitationally Lensed z ˜ 7-8 Galaxies in the Frontier Fields Cluster Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitrin, Adi; Ellis, Richard S.; Belli, Sirio; Stark, Daniel P.

    2015-05-01

    We report results of a search for C iii] λ λ 1907, 1909 Å emission using Keck’s MOSFIRE spectrograph in a sample of 7 {{z}phot}˜ 7-8 candidates (H˜ 27) lensed by the Hubble Frontier Field cluster Abell 2744. Earlier work has suggested the promise of using the C iii] doublet for redshift confirmation of galaxies in the reionization era given that Lyα (λ1216 Å) is likely attenuated by the neutral intergalactic medium. The primary challenge of this approach is the feasibility of locating C iii] emission without advanced knowledge of the spectroscopic redshift. With an integration time of 5 hr in the H band, we reach a 5σ median flux limit (in between the skylines) of 1.5× {{10}-18} ergs cm-2 s-1 but no convincing C iii] emission was found. We also incorporate preliminary measurements from two other CLASH/HFF clusters in which, similarly, no line was detected, but these were observed to lesser depth. Using the known distribution of OH emission and the photometric redshift likelihood distribution of each lensed candidate, we present statistical upper limits on the mean total C iii] rest-frame equivalent width (EW) for our z≃ 7-8 sample. For a signal-to-noise ratio of 5, we estimate that the typical C iii] doublet rest-frame EW is, with 95% confidence, \\lt 26+/- 5 Å. Although consistent with the strength of earlier detections in brighter objects at z≃ 6-7, our study illustrates the necessity of studying more luminous or strongly lensed examples prior to the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.

  20. Types of Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Devices Consumer Products Contact Lenses Types of Contact Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Orthokeratology (Ortho-K) Decorative (Plano) Contact Lenses Soft Contact Lenses Soft contact lenses are made of soft, ...

  1. Roulettes: a weak lensing formalism for strong lensing: I. Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarkson, Chris

    2016-08-01

    We present a new perspective on gravitational lensing. We describe a new extension of the weak lensing formalism capable of describing strongly lensed images. By integrating the nonlinear geodesic deviation equation, the amplification matrix of weak lensing is generalised to a sum over independent amplification tensors of increasing rank. We show how an image distorted by a generic lens may be constructed as a sum over ‘roulettes’, which are the natural curves associated with the independent spin modes of the amplification tensors. Highly distorted images can be constructed even for large sources observed near or within the Einstein radius of a lens where the shear and convergence are large. The amplitude of each roulette is formed from a sum over appropriate derivatives of the lensing potential. Consequently, measuring these individual roulettes for images around a lens gives a new way to reconstruct a strong lens mass distribution without requiring a lens model. This formalism generalises the convergence, shear and flexion of weak lensing to arbitrary order, and provides a unified bridge between the strong and weak lensing regimes. This overview paper is accompanied by a much more detailed paper II, arXiv:1603.04652.

  2. Magnification relations for Kerr lensing and testing cosmic censorship

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, M. C.; Petters, A. O.

    2007-09-15

    A Kerr black hole with mass parameter m and angular momentum parameter a acting as a gravitational lens gives rise to two images in the weak field limit. We study the corresponding magnification relations, namely, the signed and absolute magnification sums and the centroid up to post-Newtonian order. We show that there are post-Newtonian corrections to the total absolute magnification and centroid proportional to a/m, which is in contrast to the spherically symmetric case where such corrections vanish. Hence we also propose a new set of lensing observables for the two images involving these corrections, which should allow measuring a/m with gravitational lensing. In fact, the resolution capabilities needed to observe this for the Galactic black hole should in principle be accessible to current and near-future instrumentation. Since a/m>1 indicates a naked singularity, a most interesting application would be a test of the cosmic censorship conjecture. The technique used to derive the image properties is based on the degeneracy of the Kerr lens and a suitably displaced Schwarzschild lens at post-Newtonian order. A simple physical explanation for this degeneracy is also given.

  3. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z ∼ 7-8 USING THE GRAVITATIONAL LENSING OF THE HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER A2744

    SciTech Connect

    Atek, Hakim; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Richard, Johan; Clement, Benjamin; Jauzac, Mathilde; Schaerer, Daniel; Limousin, Marceau; Jullo, Eric; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald

    2015-02-10

    Exploiting the power of gravitational lensing, the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program aims at observing six massive galaxy clusters to explore the distant universe far beyond the limits of blank field surveys. Using the complete Hubble Space Telescope observations of the first HFF cluster A2744, we report the detection of 50 galaxy candidates at z ∼ 7 and eight candidates at z ∼ 8 in a total survey area of 0.96 arcmin{sup 2} in the source plane. Three of these galaxies are multiply imaged by the lensing cluster. Using an updated model of the mass distribution in the cluster we were able to calculate the magnification factor and the effective survey volume for each galaxy in order to compute the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function (LF) at both redshifts 7 and 8. Our new measurements reliably extend the z ∼ 7 UV LF down to an absolute magnitude of M {sub UV} ∼ –15.5. We find a characteristic magnitude of M{sub UV}{sup ⋆}=−20.90{sub −0.73}{sup +0.90} mag and a faint-end slope α=−2.01{sub −0.28}{sup +0.20}, close to previous determinations in blank fields. We show here for the first time that this slope remains steep down to very faint luminosities of 0.01 L {sup *}. Although prone to large uncertainties, our results at z ∼ 8 also seem to confirm a steep faint-end slope below 0.1 L {sup *}. The HFF program is therefore providing an extremely efficient way to study the faintest galaxy populations at z > 7 that would otherwise be inaccessible with current instrumentation. The full sample of six galaxy clusters will provide even better constraints on the buildup of galaxies at early epochs and their contribution to cosmic reionization.

  4. CMB lensing and primordial non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Smith, Kendrick M.; Challinor, Anthony; Liguori, Michele

    2009-10-15

    We study the effects of gravitational lensing on the estimation of non-Gaussianity from the bispectrum of the CMB temperature anisotropies. We find that the effect of lensing on the bispectrum may qualitatively be described as a smoothing of the acoustic features analogous to the temperature power spectrum. In contrast to previous results, for a Planck-like experiment which is cosmic-variance limited to l{sub max}=2000, we find that lensing causes no significant degradation of our ability to constrain the non-Gaussianity amplitude f{sub NL} for both local and equilateral configurations, provided that the biases due to the cross correlation between the lensing potential and the integrated-Sachs-Wolfe contribution to the CMB temperature are adequately understood. With numerical simulations, we also verify that low-order Taylor approximations to the lensed bispectrum and integrated-Sachs-Wolfe-lensing biases are accurate.

  5. Motivated explanation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Richard; Operskalski, Joachim T; Barbey, Aron K

    2015-01-01

    Although motivation is a well-established field of study in its own right, and has been fruitfully studied in connection with attribution theory and belief formation under the heading of "motivated thinking," its powerful and pervasive influence on specifically explanatory processes is less well explored. Where one has a strong motivation to understand some event correctly, one is thereby motivated to adhere as best one can to normative or "epistemic" criteria for correct or accurate explanation, even if one does not consciously formulate or apply such criteria. By contrast, many of our motivations to explain introduce bias into the processes involved in generating, evaluating, or giving explanations. Non-epistemic explanatory motivations, or following Kunda's usage, "directional" motivations, include self-justification, resolution of cognitive dissonance, deliberate deception, teaching, and many more. Some of these motivations lead to the relaxation or violation of epistemic norms; others enhance epistemic motivation, so that one engages in more careful and thorough generational and evaluative processes. We propose that "real life" explanatory processes are often constrained by multiple goals, epistemic and directional, where these goals may mutually reinforce one another or may conflict, and where our explanations emerge as a matter of weighing and satisfying those goals. We review emerging evidence from psychology and neuroscience to support this framework and to elucidate the central role of motivation in human thought and explanation. PMID:26528166

  6. Motivated explanation

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Richard; Operskalski, Joachim T.; Barbey, Aron K.

    2015-01-01

    Although motivation is a well-established field of study in its own right, and has been fruitfully studied in connection with attribution theory and belief formation under the heading of “motivated thinking,” its powerful and pervasive influence on specifically explanatory processes is less well explored. Where one has a strong motivation to understand some event correctly, one is thereby motivated to adhere as best one can to normative or “epistemic” criteria for correct or accurate explanation, even if one does not consciously formulate or apply such criteria. By contrast, many of our motivations to explain introduce bias into the processes involved in generating, evaluating, or giving explanations. Non-epistemic explanatory motivations, or following Kunda's usage, “directional” motivations, include self-justification, resolution of cognitive dissonance, deliberate deception, teaching, and many more. Some of these motivations lead to the relaxation or violation of epistemic norms; others enhance epistemic motivation, so that one engages in more careful and thorough generational and evaluative processes. We propose that “real life” explanatory processes are often constrained by multiple goals, epistemic and directional, where these goals may mutually reinforce one another or may conflict, and where our explanations emerge as a matter of weighing and satisfying those goals. We review emerging evidence from psychology and neuroscience to support this framework and to elucidate the central role of motivation in human thought and explanation. PMID:26528166

  7. Weak lensing and cosmological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana

    2005-03-01

    In the last few years the scientific community has been dealing with the challenging issue of identifying the dark energy component. We regard weak gravitational lensing as a brand new, and extremely important, tool for cosmological investigation in this field. In fact, the features imprinted on the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation by the lensing from the intervening distribution of matter represent a pretty unbiased estimator, and can thus be used for putting constraints on different dark energy models. This is true in particular for the magnetic-type B-modes of CMB polarization, whose unlensed spectrum at large multipoles (l ~= 1000) is very small even in presence of an amount of gravitational waves as large as currently allowed by the experiments: therefore, on these scales the lensing phenomenon is the only responsible for the observed power, and this signal turns out to be a faithful tracer of the dark energy dynamics. We first recall the formal apparatus of the weak lensing in extended theories of gravity, introducing the physical observables suitable to cast the bridge between lensing and cosmology, and then evaluate the amplitude of the expected effect in the particular case of a Non-Minimally-Coupled model, featuring a quadratic coupling between quintessence and Ricci scalar.

  8. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  9. A Consistent Picture Emerges: A Compact X-Ray Continuum Emission Region in the Gravitationally Lensed Quasar SDSS J0924+0219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Morgan, Christopher W.; Mosquera, A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.; Chen, B.; Dai, X.; Chartas, G.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze the optical, UV, and X-ray microlensing variability of the lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 using six epochs of Chandra data in two energy bands (spanning 0.4-8.0 keV, or 1-20 keV in the quasar rest frame), 10 epochs of F275W (rest-frame 1089 Å) Hubble Space Telescope data, and high-cadence R-band (rest-frame 2770 Å) monitoring spanning 11 years. Our joint analysis provides robust constraints on the extent of the X-ray continuum emission region and the projected area of the accretion disk. The best-fit half-light radius of the soft X-ray continuum emission region is between 5× {10}13 and 1015 cm, and we find an upper limit of 1015 cm for the hard X-rays. The best-fit soft-band size is about 13 times smaller than the optical size, and roughly 7{{GM}}{BH}/{c}2 for a 2.8× {10}8 {M}⊙ black hole, similar to the results for other systems. We find that the UV emitting region falls in between the optical and X-ray emitting regions at 1014 cm \\lt {r}1/2,{UV}\\lt 3× {10}15 cm. Finally, the optical size is significantly larger, by 1.5σ, than the theoretical thin-disk estimate based on the observed, magnification-corrected I-band flux, suggesting a shallower temperature profile than expected for a standard disk.

  10. A Consistent Picture Emerges: A Compact X-Ray Continuum Emission Region in the Gravitationally Lensed Quasar SDSS J0924+0219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Morgan, Christopher W.; Mosquera, A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.; Chen, B.; Dai, X.; Chartas, G.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze the optical, UV, and X-ray microlensing variability of the lensed quasar SDSS J0924+0219 using six epochs of Chandra data in two energy bands (spanning 0.4–8.0 keV, or 1–20 keV in the quasar rest frame), 10 epochs of F275W (rest-frame 1089 Å) Hubble Space Telescope data, and high-cadence R-band (rest-frame 2770 Å) monitoring spanning 11 years. Our joint analysis provides robust constraints on the extent of the X-ray continuum emission region and the projected area of the accretion disk. The best-fit half-light radius of the soft X-ray continuum emission region is between 5× {10}13 and 1015 cm, and we find an upper limit of 1015 cm for the hard X-rays. The best-fit soft-band size is about 13 times smaller than the optical size, and roughly 7{{GM}}{BH}/{c}2 for a 2.8× {10}8 {M}ȯ black hole, similar to the results for other systems. We find that the UV emitting region falls in between the optical and X-ray emitting regions at 1014 cm \\lt {r}1/2,{UV}\\lt 3× {10}15 cm. Finally, the optical size is significantly larger, by 1.5σ, than the theoretical thin-disk estimate based on the observed, magnification-corrected I-band flux, suggesting a shallower temperature profile than expected for a standard disk.

  11. Measuring neutrino masses with weak lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

    2006-11-17

    Weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies by large scale structure (LSS) provides an unbiased way to map the matter distribution in the low redshift universe. This technique, based on the measurement of small distortions in the images of the source galaxies induced by the intervening LSS, is expected to become a key cosmological probe in the future. We discuss how future lensing surveys can probe the sum of the neutrino masses at the 0 05 eV level.

  12. DETECTION OF A COMPANION LENS GALAXY USING THE MID-INFRARED FLUX RATIOS OF THE GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED QUASAR H1413+117

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Agol, Eric; Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-07-10

    We present the first resolved mid-infrared (IR) (11 {mu}m) observations of the four-image quasar lens H1413+117 using the Michelle camera on Gemini North. All previous observations (optical, near-IR, and radio) of this lens show a 'flux anomaly', where the image flux ratios cannot be explained by a simple, central lens galaxy. We attempt to reproduce the mid-IR flux ratios, which are insensitive to extinction and microlensing, by modeling the main lens as a singular isothermal ellipsoid. This model fails to reproduce the flux ratios. However, we can explain the flux ratios simply by adding to the model a nearby galaxy detected in the H band by the Hubble Space Telescope. This perturbing galaxy lies 4.''0 from the main lens and it has a critical radius of 0.''63 {+-} 0.''02 which is similar to that of the main lens, as expected from their similar H-band fluxes. More remarkably, this galaxy is not required to obtain a good fit to the system astrometry, so this represents the first clear detection of an object through its effect on the image fluxes of a gravitational lens. This is a parallel to the detections of visible satellites from astrometric anomalies, and provides a proof of the concept of searching for substructure in galaxies using anomalous flux ratios.

  13. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

    1994-04-26

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

  14. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  15. Weak lensing of the primary CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooray, Asantha; Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo

    2008-06-15

    The bispectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies is a well-known probe of the non-Gaussianity of primordial perturbations. Just as the intervening large-scale structure modifies the CMB angular power spectrum through weak gravitational lensing, the CMB primary bispectrum generated at the last scattering surface is also modified by lensing. We discuss the lensing modification to the CMB bispectrum and show that lensing leads to an overall decrease in the amplitude of the primary bispectrum at multipoles of interest between 100 and 2000 through additional smoothing introduced by lensing. Since weak lensing is not accounted for in current estimators of the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter, the existing measurements of f{sub NL} of the local model with WMAP out to l{sub max}{approx}750 is biased low by about 6%. For a high resolution experiment such as Planck, the lensing modification to the bispectrum must be properly included when attempting to estimate the primordial non-Gaussianity or the bias will be at the level of 30%. For Planck, weak lensing increases the minimum detectable value for the non-Gaussianity parameter of the local type f{sub NL} to 7 from the previous estimate of about 5 without lensing. The minimum detectable value of f{sub NL} for a cosmic variance limited experiment is also increased from less than 3 to {approx}5.

  16. Cosmic string lensing and closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlaer, Benjamin; Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2005-08-01

    In an analysis of the gravitational lensing by two relativistic cosmic strings, we argue that the formation of closed timelike curves proposed by Gott is unstable in the presence of particles (e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation). Because of the attractorlike behavior of the closed timelike curve, we argue that this instability is very generic. A single graviton or photon in the vicinity, no matter how soft, is sufficient to bend the strings and prevent the formation of closed timelike curves. We also show that the gravitational lensing due to a moving cosmic string is enhanced by its motion, not suppressed.

  17. PKS 1830-211: A Possible Compound Gravitational Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; Backus, P. R.; McCullock, P. M.; Sinclair, M. W.; Wilson, W. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; Gough, R. G.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Phillips, C. J.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of the properties of gravitational lenses have the power to tell us what sort of universe we live in. The brightest known radio Einstein ring/gravitational lens PKS 1830-211, whilst obscured by our Galaxy at optical wavelengths, has recently provided a lensing galaxy redshift of 0.89 through the detection of molecular absorption in the millimetre waveband.

  18. Modern Gravitational Lens Cosmology for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Paul; Field, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Recent and exciting discoveries in astronomy and cosmology have inspired many high school students to learn about these fields. A particularly fascinating consequence of general relativity at the forefront of modern cosmology research is gravitational lensing, the bending of light rays that pass near massive objects. Gravitational lensing enables…

  19. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment. The OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars. VII. Classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Szewczyk, O.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2010-03-01

    The seventh part of the OGLE-III Catalog of Variable Stars (OIII-CVS) consists of 4630 classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The sample includes 2626 fundamental-mode (F), 1644 first-overtone (1O), 83 second-overtone (2O), 59 double-mode F/1O, 215 double-mode 1O/2O, and three triple-mode classical Cepheids. For each object basic parameters, multi-epoch VI photometry collected within 8 or 13 years of observations, and finding charts are provided in the OGLE Internet archive. We present objects of particular interest: exceptionally numerous sample of single-mode second-overtone pulsators, five double Cepheids, two Cepheids with eclipsing variations superimposed on the pulsation light curves. At least 139 first-overtone Cepheids exhibit low-amplitude secondary variations with periods in the range 0.60-0.65 of the primary ones. These stars populate three distinct sequences in the Petersen diagram. The origin of this secondary modulation is still unknown. Contrary to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) we found only a few candidates for anomalous Cepheids in the SMC. This fact may be a clue for the explanation of the origin of the anomalous Cepheids. The period and luminosity distributions of Cepheids in both Magellanic Clouds suggest that there are two or three populations of classical Cepheids in each of the galaxies. The main difference between the LMC and SMC lays in different numbers of Cepheids in each group. We fit the period-luminosity (PL) relations of SMC Cepheids and compare them with the LMC PL laws.

  20. Supplement to the paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)])

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Pozdnyakova, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    The paper "Quadratic Sagnac effect — the influence of the gravitational potential of the Coriolis force on the phase difference between the arms of a rotating Michelson interferometer (an explanation of D C Miller's experimental results, 1921 - 1926)" (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 185 431 (2015) [Phys. Usp. 58 398 (2015)]) is amended and supplemented with information concerning earlier work on the influence of rotation on Michelson - Morley's nonzero results.

  1. Cosmic shear from scalar-induced gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Devdeep; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Baumann, Daniel

    2008-05-15

    Weak gravitational lensing by foreground density perturbations generates a gradient mode in the shear of background images. In contrast, cosmological tensor perturbations induce a nonzero curl mode associated with image rotations. In this note, we study the lensing signatures of both primordial gravitational waves from inflation and second-order gravitational waves generated from the observed spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. We derive the curl mode for galaxy lensing surveys at redshifts of 1-3 and for lensing of the cosmic microwave background at a redshift of 1100. We find that the curl mode angular power spectrum associated with secondary tensor modes for galaxy lensing surveys dominates over the corresponding signal generated by primary gravitational waves from inflation. However, both tensor contributions to the shear curl mode spectrum are below the projected noise levels of upcoming galaxy and cosmic microwave background lensing surveys and therefore are unlikely to be detectable.

  2. STRONGLY LENSED JETS, TIME DELAYS, AND THE VALUE OF H {sub 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacka, Anna; Geller, Margaret J.; Benbow, Wystan; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2015-01-20

    In principle, the most straightforward method of estimating the Hubble constant relies on time delays between mirage images of strongly lensed sources. It is a puzzle, then, that the values of H {sub 0} obtained with this method span a range from ∼50-100 km s{sup –1}Mpc{sup –1}. Quasars monitored to measure these time delays are multi-component objects. The variability may arise from different components of the quasar or may even originate from a jet. Misidentifying a variable-emitting region in a jet with emission from the core region may introduce an error in the Hubble constant derived from a time delay. Here, we investigate the complex structure of the sources as the underlying physical explanation of the wide spread in values of the Hubble constant based on gravitational lensing. Our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the derived value of the Hubble constant is very sensitive to the offset between the center of the emission and the center of the variable emitting region. Therefore, we propose using the value of H {sub 0} known from other techniques to spatially resolve the origin of the variable emission once the time delay is measured. We particularly advocate this method for gamma-ray astronomy, where the angular resolution of detectors reaches approximately 0.°1; lensed blazars offer the only route for identify the origin of gamma-ray flares. Large future samples of gravitationally lensed sources identified with Euclid, SKA, and LSST will enable a statistical determination of H {sub 0}.

  3. Lenses for JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Harald; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Repp, Andrew; Atek, Hakim; Egami, Eiichi; Windhorst, Rogier; Edge, Alastair

    2016-08-01

    JWST will dramatically advance our knowledge and understanding of the first generations of galaxies at z>10, their role in the re-ionization of the Universe, and the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the complexity and diversity of galaxies at the current epoch. As demonstrated by HST legacy projects like CLASH and the Hubble Frontier Fields, gravitational amplification by massive galaxy clusters can significantly extend the depth of the required observations. However, for JWST, reducing any diffuse background light will be just as crucial. We here propose Spitzer/IRAC observations of six massive cluster lenses, specifically selected as candidates for observation with JWST. By (a) quantifying the amount of intra-cluster light and (b) enabling us to improve our current lens models, the data resulting from the requested observations will be instrumental for the final selection of cluster targets that maximize the scientific returns of deep JWST observations.

  4. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation - The Correct Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Quantum Gravitation provides a clear, definitive Scientific explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and with distinct Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 certain, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are obviously Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli- Foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  5. Phakic Intraocular Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Implants and Prosthetics Phakic Intraocular Lenses Phakic Intraocular Lenses Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Phakic intraocular lenses are new devices used to correct nearsightedness. These ...

  6. Astrophysical Uses Of Cmb Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    2009-01-01

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB - the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like ACT, SPT and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyse such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology. First, we describe a novel method for simulating high resolution large sky lensed CMB maps. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing. Second, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks become a serious problem. Our method efficiently remedies these problems and the reduces uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. This technique will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure. Next, we exemplify how such cross-correlations can be turned into Cosmological probes. We propose an estimator for cosmological distance ratios based on CMB and galaxy lensing and show that it can be measured to sufficient accuracy in future experiments to be Cosmologically useful. Finally, we show that CMB lensing can be used to constrain the void and the texture hypotheses that have been put forward for explaining the intriguing Cold Spot anomaly in the WMAP data.

  7. Astrophysical uses of CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep

    The future of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research lies in exploiting the arcminute scale secondary anisotropies which encode information about the late time interaction of the CMB photons with the structure in the Universe. A specific form of such interaction is the gravitational lensing of the CMB photons by intervening matter--the main topic of this thesis. Upcoming experiments like the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) and PLANCK will measure these anisotropies with unprecedented resolution and sensitivity. In four separate papers, laid out as four chapters in this thesis, we present new techniques to model and analyze such high resolution data and explore the implications of such measurements on Cosmology, mainly in the context of CMB lensing. The first chapter describes a novel and accurate method for simulating high resolution lensed CMB maps by ray-tracing through a large scale structure simulation. This method does not adopt the flat sky approximation and retains information from large angular scales in the dark matter distribution. Maps simulated through this method will be instrumental in developing the detection and analysis techniques for CMB lensing in high resolution CMB experiments like ACT. In the second chapter, we describe a new and efficient method for measuring the power spectrum of arcminute resolution CMB maps. At these resolutions, the CMB power spectrum is extremely red and is prone to aliasing of power due to hard edges and point source masks. By combining two new techniques, namely, prewhitening and the adaptive multitaper method, we show that these problems can be efficiently remedied and the uncertainties in the final power spectrum estimate can be reduced by several factors over those obtainable by the now standard methods. These techniques will be also useful for estimating higher order statistics from the maps, like the ones related to the detection of CMB lensing and its cross-correlation with large scale structure tracers. In

  8. COSMOGRAIL: Time delays in lensed quasars from Himalayan Chandra Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathna Kumar, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Asfandiyarov, I.; Ibrahimov, M.; Eulaers, E.; Meylan, G.; Prabhu, T. P.; Magain, P.

    Estimating H_0 to an accuracy of few percent is an important challenge today as it will offer key insights into various questions in cosmology. By measuring time delays between the photometric variations in lensed quasar images and subsequent modelling of the mass distribution in the lensing galaxy, it is possible to constrain H_0 in a way well complementary to traditional techniques. Time delays are difficult to measure due to the long time span needed to monitor the sources and photometry is challenging due to the small angular separation between the lensed quasar images. These issues are addressed by the COSMOGRAIL (COSmological MOnitoring of GRAvItational Lenses) collaboration, which uses several telescopes in both the hemispheres to monitor a large sample of gravitationally lensed quasars. As part of this collaboration, 6 sources are being monitored using the 2 m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) in Hanle, India. We present here the preliminary estimates of time delays in these sources.

  9. 'Flux conservation' by a Schwarzschild gravitational lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulami, I.; Avni, Y.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated, by an explicit calculation, that a single, isolated Schwarzschild gravitational lens leads to a vanishing net total amplification on its own, without any 'help' from other lenses. It is shown that, in the limit of small M/R (where M is the mass of the lens in geometrical units and R is the distance from the source to the observers), the positive net total amplification, obtained from the classical approximation of the amplification for small impact angle lensing, is balanced by a negative net total amplification from the first-order term in M/R in an approximation of the amplification for large impact angle lensing derived here. The relation of these results to the common interpretation of average flux conservation by gravitational lenses is discussed as due to the collective action of many lenses in a cosmological framework.

  10. Astrophysical observations: lensing and eclipsing Einstein's theories.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Charles L

    2005-02-11

    Albert Einstein postulated the equivalence of energy and mass, developed the theory of special relativity, explained the photoelectric effect, and described Brownian motion in five papers, all published in 1905, 100 years ago. With these papers, Einstein provided the framework for understanding modern astrophysical phenomena. Conversely, astrophysical observations provide one of the most effective means for testing Einstein's theories. Here, I review astrophysical advances precipitated by Einstein's insights, including gravitational redshifts, gravitational lensing, gravitational waves, the Lense-Thirring effect, and modern cosmology. A complete understanding of cosmology, from the earliest moments to the ultimate fate of the universe, will require developments in physics beyond Einstein, to a unified theory of gravity and quantum physics. PMID:15705841

  11. Optimizing SNAP for Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. W.; Ellis, R. S.; Massey, R. J.; Rhodes, J. D.; Lamoureux, J. I.; SNAP Collaboration

    2004-12-01

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) satellite proposes to measure weak gravitational lensing in addition to type Ia supernovae. Its pixel scale has been set to 0.10 arcsec per pixel as established by the needs of supernova observations. To find the optimal pixel scale for accurate weak lensing measurements we conduct a tradeoff study in which, via simulations, we fix the suvey size in total pixels and vary the pixel scale. Our preliminary results show that with a smaller scale of about 0.08 arcsec per pixel we can minimize the contribution of intrinsic shear variance to the error on the power spectrum of mass density distortion. Currently we are testing the robustness of this figure as well as determining whether dithering yields analogous results.

  12. Glasses and Contact Lenses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Glasses and Contact Lenses KidsHealth > For Kids > Glasses and Contact Lenses Print A A A Text Size What's ... together the way they should. But eyeglasses or contact lenses, also called corrective lenses, can help most ...

  13. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  14. Explanations - Styles of explanation in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwell, John

    2004-06-01

    Our lives, states of health, relationships, behavior, experiences of the natural world, and the technologies that shape our contemporary existence are subject to a superfluity of competing, multi-faceted and sometimes incompatible explanations. Widespread confusion about the nature of "explanation" and its scope and limits pervades popular exposition of the natural sciences, popular history and philosophy of science. This fascinating book explores the way explanations work, why they vary between disciplines, periods, and cultures, and whether they have any necessary boundaries. In other words, Explanations aims to achieve a better understanding of explanation, both within the sciences and the humanities. It features contributions from expert writers from a wide range of disciplines, including science, philosophy, mathematics, and social anthropology.

  15. Electromagnetic waves propagation nearby rotating gravitating astrophysical object with atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Tereshin, A. A.; Fomin, I. V.; Chelnokov, M. B.; Kauts, V. L.; Gladysheva, T. M.; Bazleva, D. D.

    The aim of the article to explore the effects of gravitational lensing and attraction of electromagnetic radiation in the description of the propagation of radiation nearby the atmospheres of rotating astrophysical objects.

  16. Weak Lensing Results of the Merging Cluster A1758

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Bradac, M.

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the weak lensing results of A1758, which is known to have four cluster members undergoing two separate mergers, A1758N and A1758S. Weak lensing results of A1758N agree with previous weak lensing results of clusters lE0657-558 (Bullet cluster) and MACS J0025.4-1222, whose X-ray gas components were found to be largely separated from their clusters' gravitational potentials. A1758N has a geometry that is different from previously published mergers in that one of its X-ray peaks overlays the corresponding gravitational potential and the other X-ray peak is well separated from its cluster's gravitational potential.

  17. Lensing effects in a nematic liquid crystal with topological defects.

    PubMed

    Sátiro, C; Moraes, F

    2006-06-01

    Light traveling through a liquid crystal with disclinations perceives a geometrical background which causes lensing effects similar to the ones predicted for cosmic objects like global monopoles and cosmic strings. In this paper we explore the effective geometry as perceived by light in such media. The comparison between both systems suggests that experiments can be done in the laboratory to simulate optical properties, like gravitational lensing, of cosmic objects. PMID:16775663

  18. Gradient Refractive Index Lenses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the nature of gradient refractive index (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)

  19. Probing spacetime noncommutative constant via charged astrophysical black hole lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chikun; Jing, Jiliang

    2011-10-01

    We study the influence of the spacetime noncommutative parameter on the strong field gravitational lensing in the noncommutative Reissner-Nordström black-hole spacetime. Supposing that the gravitational field of the supermassive central object of the Galaxy is described by this metric, we estimate the numerical values of the coefficients and observables for strong gravitational lensing. Our results show that with the increase of the parameter sqrt {\\vartheta } , the observables θ ∞ and r m decrease, while s increases. Our results also show that i) if sqrt {\\vartheta } is strong, the observables are close to those of the noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole lensing; ii) if sqrt {\\vartheta } is weak, the observables are close to those of the commutative Reissner-Nordström black hole lensing; iii) the detectable scope of ϑ in a noncommutative Reissner-Nordström black hole lensing is 0.12 ≤ sqrt {\\vartheta } ≤ 0.26 , which is wider than that in a noncommutative Schwarzschild black hole lensing, 0.18 ≤ sqrt {\\vartheta } ≤ 0.26 . This may offer a way to probe the spacetime noncommutative constant ϑ by the astronomical instruments in the future.

  20. SUNGLASS: A Weak-lensing Simulation Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiessling, Alina; Taylor, A.; Heavens, A.; Rhodes, J.; Bartlett, J.

    2013-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the dark Universe. Next generation weak-lensing telescope surveys (e.g. Euclid and WFIRST) promise to determine the equation of state of dark energy to 1% as well as probing the possibilities of extra dimensional gravity models and alternative cosmologies. To realize the potential of these new telescope surveys and to test new weak-lensing analysis techniques, challenges must be met. To achieve the small statistical errors required, experiments require full end-to-end simulations of huge volumes, which also probe the non-linear regime to assist in understanding the limitations of the analysis techniques. We have developed a new cosmic shear analysis pipeline SUNGLASS (Simulated UNiverses for Gravitational Lensing Analysis and Shear Surveys) that rapidly generates cosmic shear and convergence catalogues using N-body simulations. In this poster, I introduce the SUNGLASS pipeline and show how the SUNGLASS mock shear catalogues can be used in preparation for upcoming telescope missions and for analysis of existing observational data sets.

  1. CMB lensing constraints on dark energy and modified gravity scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Erminia; Cooray, Asantha; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Slosar, Anze; Smoot, George F.

    2009-11-15

    Weak gravitational lensing leaves a characteristic imprint on the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization angular power spectra. Here, we investigate the possible constraints on the integrated lensing potential from future cosmic microwave background angular spectra measurements expected from Planck and EPIC. We find that Planck and EPIC will constrain the amplitude of the integrated projected potential responsible for lensing at 6% and 1% level, respectively, with very little sensitivity to the shape of the lensing potential. We discuss the implications of such a measurement in constraining dark energy and modified gravity scalar-tensor theories. We then discuss the impact of a wrong assumption on the weak lensing potential amplitude on cosmological parameter inference.

  2. Broadband waveplate lenses.

    PubMed

    Tabiryan, Nelson V; Serak, Svetlana V; Nersisyan, Sarik R; Roberts, David E; Zeldovich, Boris Ya; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2016-04-01

    We report on lenses that operate over the visible wavelength band from 450 nm to beyond 700 nm, and other lenses that operate over a wide region in the near-infrared from 650 nm to beyond 1000 nm. Lenses were recorded in liquid crystal polymer layers only a few micrometers thick, using laser-based photoalignment and UV photopolymerization. Waveplate lenses allowed focusing and defocusing laser beams depending on the sign of the circularity of laser beam polarization. Diffraction efficiency of recorded waveplate lenses was up to 90% and contrast ratio was up to 500:1. PMID:27137003

  3. Finding Galaxy Groups in the Fields of Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Bautz, M. W.

    2006-09-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars can be used as an invaluable cosmological tool, however, the asymmetry observed in many lensed systems requires models of the lens to include a strong external shear component in addition to the lensing galaxy. The lensing galaxy may be a member of a group or cluster which could provide sufficient shear to account for the lensed image configuration. We are searching for X-ray emission from groups and clusters of galaxies in the fields of multiply-imaged quasars using Chandra's resolving power to separate the faint diffuse emission from the much brighter quasar images. We have analyzed all observations of gravitationally lensed quasars available in the Chandra archive from launch through the end of 2005 to search for this diffuse emission. We present a catalog of cluster and group properties for those fields with significant diffuse emission, and upper limits on group properties in fields where no diffuse emission is detected. These measurements are compared with optical data, where available, and with quasar lensing models. This research was supported by NASA contracts NAS-8-38252 and NAS-8-37716.

  4. Compound lensing: Einstein zig-zags and high-multiplicity lensed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collett, Thomas E.; Bacon, David J.

    2016-02-01

    Compound strong gravitational lensing is a rare phenomenon, but a handful of such lensed systems are likely to be discovered in forthcoming surveys. In this work, we use a double singular isothermal sphere lens model to analytically understand how the properties of the system impact image multiplicity for the final source. We find that up to six images of a background source can form, but only if the second lens is multiply imaged by the first and the Einstein radius of the second lens is comparable to, but does not exceed that of the first. We then build a model of compound lensing masses in the Universe, using singular isothermal ellipsoid (SIE) lenses, and assess how the optical depth for multiple imaging by a galaxy-galaxy compound lens varies with source redshift. For a source redshift of 4, we find optical depths of 6 × 10-6 for multiple imaging and 5 × 10-8 for multiplicity of 6 or greater. We find that extreme magnifications are possible, with magnifications of 100 or more for 6 × 10-9 of z = 10 sources with 0.1 kpc radii. We show some of the image configurations that can be generated by compound lenses, and demonstrate that they are qualitatively different to those generated by single-plane lenses; dedicated compound lens finders will be necessary if these systems are to be discovered in forthcoming surveys.

  5. The Master Lens Database and The Orphan Lenses Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustakas, Leonidas

    2012-10-01

    Strong gravitational lenses are uniquely suited for the study of dark matter structure and substructure within massive halos of many scales, act as gravitational telescopes for distant faint objects, and can give powerful and competitive cosmological constraints. While hundreds of strong lenses are known to date, spanning five orders of magnitude in mass scale, thousands will be identified this decade. To fully exploit the power of these objects presently, and in the near future, we are creating the Master Lens Database. This is a clearinghouse of all known strong lens systems, with a sophisticated and modern database of uniformly measured and derived observational and lens-model derived quantities, using archival Hubble data across several instruments. This Database enables new science that can be done with a comprehensive sample of strong lenses. The operational goal of this proposal is to develop the process and the code to semi-automatically stage Hubble data of each system, create appropriate masks of the lensing objects and lensing features, and derive gravitational lens models, to provide a uniform and fairly comprehensive information set that is ingested into the Database. The scientific goal for this team is to use the properties of the ensemble of lenses to make a new study of the internal structure of lensing galaxies, and to identify new objects that show evidence of strong substructure lensing, for follow-up study. All data, scripts, masks, model setup files, and derived parameters, will be public, and free. The Database will be accessible online and through a sophisticated smartphone application, which will also be free.

  6. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  7. WEAK-LENSING RESULTS FOR THE MERGING CLUSTER A1758

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozzine, B.; Clowe, D.; Markevitch, M.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Bradac, M.

    2012-01-10

    Here we present the weak-lensing results for A1758, which is known to consist of four subclusters undergoing two separate mergers, A1758N and A1758S. Weak-lensing results for A1758N agree with previous weak-lensing results for clusters 1E0657-558 (Bullet cluster) and MACS J0025.4-1222, whose X-ray gas components were found to be largely separated from their clusters' gravitational potentials. A1758N has a geometry that is different from previously published mergers in that one of its X-ray peaks overlays the corresponding gravitational potential and the other X-ray peak is well separated from its cluster's gravitational potential. The weak-lensing mass peaks of the two northern clusters are separated at the 2.5{sigma} level. We estimate the combined mass of the clusters in A1758N to be (2.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} and r{sub 200} = 2300{sup +100}{sub -130} kpc. We also detect seven strong-lensing candidates, two of which may provide information that would improve the mass measurements of A1758N.

  8. Analogy, explanation, and proof

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, John E.; Licato, John; Bringsjord, Selmer

    2014-01-01

    People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic) whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof). What do the cognitive operations underlying the inference that the milk is sour have in common with the proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This seemingly small difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning to understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence. PMID:25414655

  9. MAGNIFICENT MAGNIFICATION: EXPLOITING THE OTHER HALF OF THE LENSING SIGNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Eric M.; Graves, Genevieve J.

    2014-01-10

    We describe a new method for measuring galaxy magnification due to weak gravitational lensing. Our method makes use of a tight scaling relation between galaxy properties that are modified by gravitational lensing, such as apparent size, and other properties that are not, such as surface brightness. In particular, we use a version of the well-known fundamental plane relation for early-type galaxies. This modified ''photometric fundamental plane'' uses only photometric galaxy properties, eliminating the need for spectroscopic data. We present the first detection of magnification using this method by applying it to photometric catalogs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. This analysis shows that the derived magnification signal is within a factor of three of that available from conventional methods using gravitational shear. We suppress the dominant sources of systematic error and discuss modest improvements that may further enhance the lensing signal-to-noise available with this method. Moreover, some of the dominant sources of systematic error are substantially different from those of shear-based techniques. With this new technique, magnification becomes a useful measurement tool for the coming era of large ground-based surveys intending to measure gravitational lensing.

  10. LENSING NOISE IN MILLIMETER-WAVE GALAXY CLUSTER SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar; Vanderlinde, Keith; Holder, Gilbert; De Haan, Tijmen

    2013-08-01

    We study the effects of gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters of the background of dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and examine the implications for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-based (SZ) galaxy cluster surveys. At the locations of galaxy clusters, gravitational lensing modifies the probability distribution of the background flux of the DSFGs as well as the CMB. We find that, in the case of a single-frequency 150 GHz survey, lensing of DSFGs leads both to a slight increase ({approx}10%) in detected cluster number counts (due to a {approx}50% increase in the variance of the DSFG background, and hence an increased Eddington bias) and a rare (occurring in {approx}2% of clusters) 'filling-in' of SZ cluster signals by bright strongly lensed background sources. Lensing of the CMB leads to a {approx}55% reduction in CMB power at the location of massive galaxy clusters in a spatially matched single-frequency filter, leading to a net decrease in detected cluster number counts. We find that the increase in DSFG power and decrease in CMB power due to lensing at cluster locations largely cancel, such that the net effect on cluster number counts for current SZ surveys is subdominant to Poisson errors.

  11. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  12. Comparison and Causal Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringer, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Since the classical authors of the nineteenth century, the explanation of macro-social phenomena has been considered as the essential epistemic achievement, hence the "raison d'etre," of comparative analysis in the social sciences. In practice, however, the claims of comparative social enquiry for providing convincing explanations are not easily…

  13. Highlights in gravitation and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, B. R.; Vishveshwara, C. V.; Narlikar, Jayant V.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and observational studies in gravitation and cosmology are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the international conference held in Goa, India on December 14-19, 1987. Sections are devoted to classical relativity, quantum gravity, black holes and compact objects, and gravitational-radiation and gravity experiments. Particular attention is given to exact solutions of the Einstein equations and their classification, the asymptotic structure of isolated systems, the physical properties and parameters of radiative space-times, canonical quantization of generally covariant systems, field theories of quantum gravity, observational and theoretical aspects of dark matter, gravitational lenses, cosmic strings and galaxy formation, black-hole thermodynamics, the general relativity of compact objects, the general-relativistic problem of motion and binary pulsars, and relativity and fifth-force experiments.

  14. One Episode, Two Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drijvers, Paul; Godino, Juan D.; Font, Vicenc; Trouche, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A deep understanding of students' learning processes is one of the core challenges of research in mathematics education. To achieve this, different theoretical lenses are available. The question is how these different lenses compare and contrast, and how they can be coordinated and combined to provide a more comprehensive view on the topic of…

  15. Learning through Different Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    When parents and teachers help gifted kids use the metaphor "learning through different lenses," amazing things happen: Horizons open up. Ideas are focused. Thoughts are magnified and clarified. They see the big picture. Metaphoric thinking offers new and exciting ways to see the world. Viewing the world through different lenses provides…

  16. Evidence of lensing of the cosmic microwave background by dark matter halos.

    PubMed

    Madhavacheril, Mathew; Sehgal, Neelima; Allison, Rupert; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Caligiuri, Jerod; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Datta, Rahul; Devlin, Mark J; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Fogarty, Kevin; Grace, Emily; Hajian, Amir; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hill, J Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D; Hlozek, Renée; Hughes, John P; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D; Page, Lyman A; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin; Sherwin, Blake D; Sievers, Jon; Spergel, David N; Staggs, Suzanne T; Thornton, Robert; Van Engelen, Alexander; Ward, Jonathan T; Wollack, Edward J

    2015-04-17

    We present evidence of the gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background by 10(13) solar mass dark matter halos. Lensing convergence maps from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) are stacked at the positions of around 12 000 optically selected CMASS galaxies from the SDSS-III/BOSS survey. The mean lensing signal is consistent with simulated dark matter halo profiles and is favored over a null signal at 3.2σ significance. This result demonstrates the potential of microwave background lensing to probe the dark matter distribution in galaxy group and galaxy cluster halos. PMID:25933304

  17. The STRong-lensing Insights into Dark Energy Survey (STRIDES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treu, Tommaso; Agnello, Adriano; Strides Team

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that strongly lensed quasars can be used to measure cosmological parameters with high accuracy and precision. The constraints obtained from time delays are comparable in precision to those obtained by baryonic acoustic oscillation experiments and provide a powerful complement to other probes of dark energy like the cosmic microwave background (Suyu et al. 2014). At the moment, a main limitation of this technique is that lensed quasars are rare in the sky and not enough suitable lenses are known. To overcome this challenge we have formed a DES broad external collaboration (STRIDES), aimed at discovering and following-up 100 previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasars. I will present novel search algorithms based on data mining techniques as well as the first results from the search.

  18. CMB lensing and primordial squeezed non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Ruth; Lewis, Antony; Regan, Donough E-mail: antony@cosmologist.info

    2012-03-01

    Squeezed primordial non-Gaussianity can strongly constrain early-universe physics, but it can only be observed on the CMB after it has been gravitationally lensed. We give a new simple non-perturbative prescription for accurately calculating the effect of lensing on any squeezed primordial bispectrum shape, and test it with simulations. We give the generalization to polarization bispectra, and discuss the effect of lensing on the trispectrum. We explain why neglecting the lensing smoothing effect does not significantly bias estimators of local primordial non-Gaussianity, even though the change in shape can be ∼>10%. We also show how τ{sub NL} trispectrum estimators can be well approximated by much simpler CMB temperature modulation estimators, and hence that there is potentially a ∼ 10–30% bias due to very large-scale lensing modes, depending on the range of modulation scales included. Including dipole sky modulations can halve the τ{sub NL} error bar if kinematic effects can be subtracted using known properties of the CMB temperature dipole. Lensing effects on the g{sub NL} trispectrum are small compared to the error bar. In appendices we give the general result for lensing of any primordial bispectrum, and show how any full-sky squeezed bispectrum can be decomposed into orthogonal modes of distinct angular dependence.

  19. Variable practice with lenses improves visuo-motor plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.; Kimball, K. T.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Novel sensorimotor situations present a unique challenge to an individual's adaptive ability. Using the simple and easily measured paradigm of visual-motor rearrangement created by the use of visual displacement lenses, we sought to determine whether an individual's ability to adapt to visuo-motor discordance could be improved through training. Subjects threw small balls at a stationary target during a 3-week practice regimen involving repeated exposure to one set of lenses in block practice (x 2.0 magnifying lenses), multiple sets of lenses in variable practice (x 2.0 magnifying, x 0.5 minifying and up-down reversing lenses) or sham lenses. At the end of training, adaptation to a novel visuo-motor situation (20-degree right shift lenses) was tested. We found that (1) training with variable practice can increase adaptability to a novel visuo-motor situation, (2) increased adaptability is retained for at least 1 month and is transferable to further novel visuo-motor permutations and (3) variable practice improves performance of a simple motor task even in the undisturbed state. These results have implications for the design of clinical rehabilitation programs and countermeasures to enhance astronaut adaptability, facilitating adaptive transitions between gravitational environments.

  20. Optics in a nonlinear gravitational plane wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.

    2015-09-01

    Gravitational waves can act like gravitational lenses, affecting the observed positions, brightnesses, and redshifts of distant objects. Exact expressions for such effects are derived here in general relativity, allowing for arbitrarily-moving sources and observers in the presence of plane-symmetric gravitational waves. At least for freely falling sources and observers, it is shown that the commonly-used predictions of linear perturbation theory can be generically overshadowed by nonlinear effects; even for very weak gravitational waves, higher-order perturbative corrections involve secularly-growing terms which cannot necessarily be neglected when considering observations of sufficiently distant sources. Even on more moderate scales where linear effects remain at least marginally dominant, nonlinear corrections are qualitatively different from their linear counterparts. There is a sense in which they can, for example, mimic the existence of a third type of gravitational wave polarization.

  1. Explanation and Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    The study of explanation, while related to intuitive theories, concepts, and mental models, offers important new perspectives on high-level thought. Explanations sort themselves into several distinct types corresponding to patterns of causation, content domains, and explanatory stances, all of which have cognitive consequences. Although explanations are necessarily incomplete—often dramatically so in laypeople—those gaps are difficult to discern. Despite such gaps and the failure to recognize them fully, people do have skeletal explanatory senses, often implicit, of the causal structure of the world. They further leverage those skeletal understandings by knowing how to access additional explanatory knowledge in other minds and by being particularly adept at using situational support to build explanations on the fly in real time. Across development and cultures, there are differences in preferred explanatory schemes, but rarely are any kinds of schemes completely unavailable to a group. PMID:16318595

  2. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  3. General Relativity and Gravitation, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bartlett, David F.; Wyss, Walker

    2005-10-01

    Part I. Classical Relativity and Gravitation Theory: 1. Global properties of exact solutions H. Friedrich; 2. Numerical relativity T. Nakamura; 3. How fast can a pulsar spin? J. L. Friedman; 4. Colliding waves in general relativity V. Ferrari; Part II. Relativistic Astrophysics, Early Universe, and Classical Cosmology: 5. Observations of cosmic microwave radiation R. B. Partridge; 6. Cosmic microwave background radiation (theory) M. Panek; 7. Inflation and quantum cosmology A. D. Linde; 8. Observations of lensing B. Fort; 9. Gravitational lenses: theory and interpretation R. Blandford; Part III. Experimental Gravitation and Gravitational Waves: 10. Solar system tests of GR: recent results and present plans I. Shapiro; 11. Laser interferometer detectors R. Weiss; 12. Resonant bar gravitational wave experiments G. Pizzella; 13. A non-inverse square law test E. Adelberger; Part IV. Quantum Gravity, Superstrings, Quantum Cosmology: 14. Cosmic strings B. Unruh; 15. String theory as a quantum theory of gravity G. Horowitz; 16. Progress in quantum cosmology J. B. Hartle; 17. Self-duality, quantum gravity, Wilson loops and all that A. V. Ashtekar; Part V. Summary Talk: 18. GR-12 Conference summary J. Ehlers II; Part VI. Reports on Workshops/Symposia: 19. Exact solutions and exact properties of Einstein equations V. Moncrieff; 20. Spinors, twistors and complex methods N. Woodhouse; 21. Alternative gravity theories M. Francaviglia; 22. Asymptotia, singularities and global structure B. G. Schmidt; 23. Radiative spacetimes and approximation methods T. Damour; 24. Algebraic computing M. MacCallum; 25. Numerical relativity J. Centrella; 26. Mathematical cosmology J. Wainwright; 27. The early universe M. Turner; 28. Relativistic astrophysics M. Abramowitz; 29. Astrophysical and observational cosmology B. Carr; 30. Solar system and pulsar tests of gravitation R. Hellings; 31. Earth-based gravitational experiments J. Faller; 32. Resonant bar and microwave gravitational wave

  4. General Relativity and Gravitation, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Neil; Bartlett, David F.; Wyss, Walker

    1990-11-01

    Part I. Classical Relativity and Gravitation Theory: 1. Global properties of exact solutions H. Friedrich; 2. Numerical relativity T. Nakamura; 3. How fast can a pulsar spin? J. L. Friedman; 4. Colliding waves in general relativity V. Ferrari; Part II. Relativistic Astrophysics, Early Universe, and Classical Cosmology: 5. Observations of cosmic microwave radiation R. B. Partridge; 6. Cosmic microwave background radiation (theory) M. Panek; 7. Inflation and quantum cosmology A. D. Linde; 8. Observations of lensing B. Fort; 9. Gravitational lenses: theory and interpretation R. Blandford; Part III. Experimental Gravitation and Gravitational Waves: 10. Solar system tests of GR: recent results and present plans I. Shapiro; 11. Laser interferometer detectors R. Weiss; 12. Resonant bar gravitational wave experiments G. Pizzella; 13. A non-inverse square law test E. Adelberger; Part IV. Quantum Gravity, Superstrings, Quantum Cosmology: 14. Cosmic strings B. Unruh; 15. String theory as a quantum theory of gravity G. Horowitz; 16. Progress in quantum cosmology J. B. Hartle; 17. Self-duality, quantum gravity, Wilson loops and all that A. V. Ashtekar; Part V. Summary Talk: 18. GR-12 Conference summary J. Ehlers II; Part VI. Reports on Workshops/Symposia: 19. Exact solutions and exact properties of Einstein equations V. Moncrieff; 20. Spinors, twistors and complex methods N. Woodhouse; 21. Alternative gravity theories M. Francaviglia; 22. Asymptotia, singularities and global structure B. G. Schmidt; 23. Radiative spacetimes and approximation methods T. Damour; 24. Algebraic computing M. MacCallum; 25. Numerical relativity J. Centrella; 26. Mathematical cosmology J. Wainwright; 27. The early universe M. Turner; 28. Relativistic astrophysics M. Abramowitz; 29. Astrophysical and observational cosmology B. Carr; 30. Solar system and pulsar tests of gravitation R. Hellings; 31. Earth-based gravitational experiments J. Faller; 32. Resonant bar and microwave gravitational wave

  5. Stress-Detection Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    An Ames Research Center scientist invented an infrared lens used in sunglasses to filter out ultraviolet rays. This product finds its origins in research for military enemy detection. Through a Space Act Agreement, Optical Sales Corporation introduced the Hawkeye Lenses not only as sunglasses but as plant stress detection lenses. The lenses enhance the stressed part of the leaf, which has less chlorophyll than healthy leaves, through dyes that filter out certain wavelengths of light. Plant stress is visible earlier, at a stage when something can be done to save the plants.

  6. LensTools: Weak Lensing computing tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, A.

    2016-02-01

    LensTools implements a wide range of routines frequently used in Weak Gravitational Lensing, including tools for image analysis, statistical processing and numerical theory predictions. The package offers many useful features, including complete flexibility and easy customization of input/output formats; efficient measurements of power spectrum, PDF, Minkowski functionals and peak counts of convergence maps; survey masks; artificial noise generation engines; easy to compute parameter statistical inferences; ray tracing simulations; and many others. It requires standard numpy and scipy, and depending on tools used, may require Astropy (ascl:1304.002), emcee (ascl:1303.002), matplotlib, and mpi4py.

  7. Weight, gravitation, inertia, and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Lagoute, Christophe; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with the factors that influence the weight of an object near the Earth's surface. They are: (1) the Earth's gravitational force, (2) the centrifugal force due to the Earth's diurnal rotation, and (3) tidal forces due to the gravitational field of the Moon and Sun, and other solar system bodies to a lesser extent. Each of these three contributions is discussed and expressions are derived. The relationship between weight and gravitation is thus established in a direct and pedagogical manner readily understandable by undergraduate students. The analysis applies to the Newtonian limit of gravitation. The derivation is based on an experimental (or operational) definition of weight, and it is shown that it coincides with the Earth’s gravitational force modified by diurnal rotation around a polar axis and non-uniformity of external gravitational bodies (tidal term). Two examples illustrate and quantify these modifications, respectively the Eötvös effect and the oceanic tides; tidal forces due to differential gravitation on a spacecraft and an asteroid are also proposed as examples. Considerations about inertia are also given and some comments are made about a widespread, yet confusing, explanation of tides based on a centrifugal force. Finally, the expression of the potential energy of the tide-generating force is established rigorously in the appendix.

  8. [Phakic intraocular lenses].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Shajari, M

    2016-06-01

    Refractive surgical procedures are generally divided into additive procedures with, e. g. implantation of an artificial lens and subtractive procedures with ablation of corneal tissue. In this article the current status of phakic intraocular lens (IOL) implantation for correction of refractive errors is reviewed. Phakic IOLs are constructed as angle-supported or iris-fixated anterior chamber lenses and sulcus-fixated posterior chamber lenses. The implantation of phakic IOLs has been demonstrated to be an effective, safe, predictable and stable procedure to correct higher refractive errors. Complications are rare and depend to a large extent on the location. For anterior chamber lenses the main concern is critical endothelial cell loss and for posterior chamber lenses early cataract formation. PMID:27277751

  9. Multiparameter investigation of gravitational slip

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Caldwell, Robert R.; Cooray, Asantha; Serra, Paolo; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    A detailed analysis of gravitational slip, a new post-general relativity cosmological parameter characterizing the degree of departure of the laws of gravitation from general relativity on cosmological scales, is presented. This phenomenological approach assumes that cosmic acceleration is due to new gravitational effects; the amount of spacetime curvature produced per unit mass is changed in such a way that a universe containing only matter and radiation begins to accelerate as if under the influence of a cosmological constant. Changes in the law of gravitation are further manifest in the behavior of the inhomogeneous gravitational field, as reflected in the cosmic microwave background, weak lensing, and evolution of large-scale structure. The new parameter {pi}{sub 0} is naively expected to be of order unity. However, a multiparameter analysis, allowing for variation of all of the standard cosmological parameters, finds that {pi}{sub 0}=0.09{sub -0.59}{sup +0.74}(2{sigma}), where {pi}{sub 0}=0 corresponds to a cosmological constant plus cold dark matter universe under general relativity. Future probes of the cosmic microwave background (Planck) and large-scale structure (Euclid) may improve the limits by a factor of 4.

  10. Neutrino mass and dark energy from weak lensing.

    PubMed

    Abazajian, Kevork N; Dodelson, Scott

    2003-07-25

    Weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies by intervening matter directly probes the mass distribution in the Universe. This distribution is sensitive to both the dark energy and neutrino mass. We examine the potential of lensing experiments to measure features of both simultaneously. Focusing on the radial information contained in a future deep 4000 deg(2) survey, we find that the expected (1-sigma) error on a neutrino mass is 0.1 eV, if the dark-energy parameters are allowed to vary. The constraints on dark-energy parameters are similarly restrictive, with errors on w of 0.09. PMID:12906650

  11. EFFECT OF MASKED REGIONS ON WEAK-LENSING STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-10

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple {chi}{sup 2} analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg{sup 2} survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting {chi}{sup 2}/n{sub dof} = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard {Lambda}CDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  12. Effect of Masked Regions on Weak-lensing Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasaki, Masato; Yoshida, Naoki; Hamana, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Sky masking is unavoidable in wide-field weak-lensing observations. We study how masks affect the measurement of statistics of matter distribution probed by weak gravitational lensing. We first use 1000 cosmological ray-tracing simulations to examine in detail the impact of masked regions on the weak-lensing Minkowski Functionals (MFs). We consider actual sky masks used for a Subaru Suprime-Cam imaging survey. The masks increase the variance of the convergence field and the expected values of the MFs are biased. The bias then compromises the non-Gaussian signals induced by the gravitational growth of structure. We then explore how masks affect cosmological parameter estimation. We calculate the cumulative signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for masked maps to study the information content of lensing MFs. We show that the degradation of S/N for masked maps is mainly determined by the effective survey area. We also perform simple χ2 analysis to show the impact of lensing MF bias due to masked regions. Finally, we compare ray-tracing simulations with data from a Subaru 2 deg2 survey in order to address if the observed lensing MFs are consistent with those of the standard cosmology. The resulting χ2/n dof = 29.6/30 for three combined MFs, obtained with the mask effects taken into account, suggests that the observational data are indeed consistent with the standard ΛCDM model. We conclude that the lensing MFs are a powerful probe of cosmology only if mask effects are correctly taken into account.

  13. Spitzer/IRAC Imaging of Exceptionally Bright Cluster-Lensed Submillimeter Galaxies Discovered by the Herschel Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egami, Eiichi; Ebeling, Harald; Rawle, Timothy; Clement, Benjamin; Walth, Gregory; Pereira, Maria; Richard, Johan; Kneib, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, discoveries of exceptionally bright (e.g., observed S_peak > 100 mJy in the Herschel/SPIRE bands) gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) have generated great excitement. This is because these gravitationally lensed SMGs are so bright that they enable us to perform a variety of follow-up observations using a suite of observing facilities in the submillimeter, millimeter, and radio now available on the ground. Using Herschel, our team has been conducting a survey of such bright lensed galaxies in the fields of massive galaxy clusters: ``The Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS)'' (PI: Egami; 419 hours). This large Herschel program targets a total of 581 X-ray/SZ-selected massive clusters, and is currently 80% complete. Cluster lenses are often more powerful than galaxy lenses, producing larger magnifications. For example, typical magnification factors for galaxy-lensed Herschel sources are x10 or less while cluster-lensed systems can often produce magnification factors of x20-30 and even above x100. Cluster lenses will therefore allow us to detect and study intrinsically less-luminous and/or more distant sources with the ability to provide a view of finer-scale (i.e., sub-kpc) structures. Here, we propose to conduct Spitzer/IRAC imaging of 56 bright lensed SMG candidates we have identified in the ~470 HLS cluster fields observed so far. The main scientific goal is twofold: (1) to locate the underlying stellar component, and (2) to study its properties (e.g., stellar mass, specific star-formation rate) by constraining the rest-frame near-infrared SED and comparing with the Herschel and other submillimeter/millimeter data (e.g., SMA, PdB, ALMA, etc.). These rare bright lensed SMGs will allow us to probe the population of heavily dust-obscured vigorously star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z>1), which is thought to play an important role in the cosmic star-formation history of the Universe and yet has been difficult to study due to the

  14. New window into stochastic gravitational wave background.

    PubMed

    Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2012-11-30

    A stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) would gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. We correct the results provided in existing literature for modifications to the CMB polarization power spectra due to lensing by gravitational waves. Weak lensing by gravitational waves distorts all four CMB power spectra; however, its effect is most striking in the mixing of power between the E mode and B mode of CMB polarization. This suggests the possibility of using measurements of the CMB angular power spectra to constrain the energy density (Ω(GW)) of the SGWB. Using current data sets (QUAD, WMAP, and ACT), we find that the most stringent constraints on the present Ω(GW) come from measurements of the angular power spectra of CMB temperature anisotropies. In the near future, more stringent bounds on Ω(GW) can be expected with improved upper limits on the B modes of CMB polarization. Any detection of B modes of CMB polarization above the expected signal from large scale structure lensing could be a signal for a SGWB. PMID:23368112

  15. Direct measurement of lensing amplification in Abell S1063 using a strongly lensed high redshift HII galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlevich, Roberto; Melnick, Jorge; Terlevich, Elena; Chávez, Ricardo; Telles, Eduardo; Bresolin, Fabio; Plionis, Manolis; Basilakos, Spyros; Fernández Arenas, David; González Morán, Ana Luisa; Díaz, Ángeles I.; Aretxaga, Itziar

    2016-08-01

    ID11 is an actively star-forming, extremely compact galaxy and Lyα emitter at z = 3.117 that is gravitationally magnified by a factor of ~17 by the cluster of galaxies Hubble Frontier Fields AS1063. The observed properties of this galaxy resemble those of low luminosity HII galaxies or giant HII regions such as 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Using the tight correlation correlation between the Balmer-line luminosities and the width of the emission lines (typically L(Hβ) - σ(Hβ)), which are valid for HII galaxies and giant HII regions to estimate their total luminosity, we are able to measure the lensing amplification of ID11. We obtain an amplification of 23 ± 11 that is similar within errors to the value of ~17 estimated or predicted by the best lensing models of the massive cluster Abell S1063. We also compiled, from the literature, luminosities and velocity dispersions for a set of lensed compact star-forming regions. There is more scatter in the L-σ correlation for these lensed systems, but on the whole the results tend to support the lensing model estimates of the magnification. Our result indicates that the amplification can be independently measured using the L - σ relation in lensed giant HII regions or HII galaxies. It also supports the suggestion, even if lensing is model dependent, that the L - σ relation is valid for low luminosity high-z objects. Ad hoc observations of lensed star-forming systems are required to determine the lensing amplification accurately.

  16. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  17. Zooming into the broad line region of the gravitationally lensed quasar QSO 2237 + 0305 ≡ the Einstein Cross. III. Determination of the size and structure of the C iv and C iii] emitting regions using microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Schmidt, R.; Courbin, F.; Hutsemékers, D.; Meylan, G.; Eigenbrod, A.; Anguita, T.; Agol, E.; Wambsganss, J.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: We aim to use microlensing taking place in the lensed quasar QSO 2237 + 0305 to study the structure of the broad line region (BLR) and measure the size of the region emitting the C iv and C iii] lines. Methods: Based on 39 spectrophotometric monitoring data points obtained between Oct. 2004 and Dec. 2007, we derived lightcurves for the C iv and C iii] emission lines. We used three different techniques to analyse the microlensing signal. Different components of the lines (narrow, broad, and very broad) were identified and studied. We built a library of the simulated microlensing lightcurves that reproduce the signal observed in the continuum and in the lines provided only the source size is changed. A Bayesian analysis scheme is then developed to derive the size of the various components of the BLR. Results: 1. The half-light radius of the region emitting the C iv line is found to be RC IV} ˜ 66+110-46} light-days = 0.06+0.09-0.04 pc = 1.7+2.8-1.1 × 1017 cm (at 68.3% CI). Similar values are obtained for C iii]. Relative sizes of the carbon-line and V-band continuum emitting-regions are also derived with median values of Rline/Rcont in the range 4 to 29, depending on the FWHM of the line component. 2. The size of the C iv emitting region agrees with the radius-luminosity relationship derived from reverberation mapping. Using the virial theorem, we derive the mass of the black hole in QSO 2237 + 0305 to be MBH ~ 108.3 ± 0.3 M⊙. 3. We find that the C iv and C iii] lines are produced in at least 2 spatially distinct regions, the most compact one giving rise to the broadest component of the line. The broad and narrow line profiles are slightly different for C iv and C iii]. 4. Our analysis suggests a different structure for the C iv and Fe ii+iii emitting regions, with the latter produced in the inner part of the BLR or in a less extended emitting region than C iv. Based on observations made with the ESO-VLT Unit Telescope # 2 Kueyen (Cerro Paranal, Chile

  18. The Rhetoric of Explanation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Robert J.

    As background to an argument for purposive reintegration of discourse study, this paper examines the concept of explanatory discourse as it developed within the Western rhetorical tradition. Following a discussion of the rise of a rhetoric of explanation, the first section cites the roots of the explanatory pedagogy developing during the first…

  19. Impact of post-Born lensing on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Lensing of the CMB is affected by post-Born lensing, producing corrections to the convergence power spectrum and introducing field rotation. We show numerically that the lensing convergence power spectrum is affected at the lesssim 0.2% level on accessible scales, and that this correction and the field rotation are negligible for observations with arcminute beam and noise levels gtrsim 1 μK arcmin. The field rotation generates ~ 2.5% of the total lensing B-mode polarization amplitude (0.2% in power on small scales), but has a blue spectrum on large scales, making it highly subdominant to the convergence B modes on scales where they are a source of confusion for the signal from primordial gravitational waves. Since the post-Born signal is non-linear, it also generates a bispectrum with the convergence. We show that the post-Born contributions to the bispectrum substantially change the shape predicted from large-scale structure non-linearities alone, and hence must be included to estimate the expected total signal and impact of bispectrum biases on CMB lensing reconstruction quadratic estimators and other observables. The field-rotation power spectrum only becomes potentially detectable for noise levels ll 1 μK arcmin, but its bispectrum with the convergence may be observable at ~ 3σ with Stage IV observations. Rotation-induced and convergence-induced B modes are slightly correlated by the bispectrum, and the bispectrum also produces additional contributions to the lensed BB power spectrum.

  20. Cosmological constraints from weak lensing non-Gaussian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltan; Petri, Andrea; Hill, James; Hui, Lam; Kratochvil, Jan Michael; May, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the most promising techniques to probe dark energy. Our work to date suggests that the information in the nonlinear regime exceeds that in the two-point functions. Using the publicly available data from the 154 deg^2 CFHTLenS survey and a large suite of ray-tracing N-body simulations on a grid of 91 cosmological models, we find that constraints from peak counts are comparable to those from the power spectrum, and somewhat tighter when different smoothing scales are combined.I will also introduce the utility of cross-correlating weak galaxy lensing maps with CMB lensing maps, a technique that will be useful to probe structures at an intermediate redshift of 0.9, as larger weak lensing surveys such as HSC, DES, KiDS, Euclid, and LSST come online. We cross-correlate the CFHTLenS galaxy lensing convergence maps with Planck CMB lensing maps. Our results show two sigma tension with the constraints obtained from the Planck temperature measurements. I will discuss possible sources of the tension, including intrinsic alignments, photo-z uncertainties, masking of tSZ in the CMB maps, and the multiplicative bias.

  1. A VLA gravitational lens survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, J. N.; Turner, E. L.; Burke, B. F.; Lawrence, C. R.; Bennett, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    A VLA survey designed to detect gravitational lensing on sub-arc second and arc second scales is described, and preliminary results of radio data are presented. In particular, it is found that the density of matter in the form of a uniform comoving number density of 10 to the 11th - 10 to the 12th solar mass compact objects, luminous or dark, must be substantially less than the critical density. Data obtained for the radio source 1042+178 are briefly examined.

  2. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GRAVITATIONAL LENS TIME DELAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2009-11-20

    Future large ensembles of time delay (TD) lenses have the potential to provide interesting cosmological constraints complementary to those of other methods. In a flat universe with constant w including a Planck prior, The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope TD measurements for approx4000 lenses should constrain the local Hubble constant h to approx0.007 (approx1%), OMEGA{sub de} to approx0.005, and w to approx0.026 (all 1sigma precisions). Similar constraints could be obtained by a dedicated gravitational lens observatory (OMEGA) which would obtain precise TD and mass model measurements for approx100 well-studied lenses. We compare these constraints (as well as those for a more general cosmology) to the 'optimistic Stage IV' constraints expected from weak lensing, supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and cluster counts, as calculated by the Dark Energy Task Force. TDs yield a modest constraint on a time-varying w(z), with the best constraint on w(z) at the 'pivot redshift' of z approx 0.31. Our Fisher matrix calculation is provided to allow TD constraints to be easily compared to and combined with constraints from other experiments. We also show how cosmological constraining power varies as a function of numbers of lenses, lens model uncertainty, TD precision, redshift precision, and the ratio of four-image to two-image lenses.

  3. Weighing the NIR-Brightest Lensed Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Andrew; Belli, Sirio; Ellis, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We are requesting DDT time to characterize the brightest gravitationally-lensed distant galaxy yet detected at near-infrared wavelengths. Whereas most high-redshift lensed galaxies are star-forming systems, our target at z=1.95 is a rare example of a massive compact quiescent galaxy. Such compact red galaxies present many puzzles if, as is thought, they grow into present day massive ellipticals. Importantly, it is unclear how and when these systems were quenched and what were their progenitors. As our target is gravitationally magnified into a spectacular 20'' arc, it offers a remarkable opportunity to secure spatially-resolved data on the stellar mass distribution to complement resolved kinematics and stellar ages available from recent Keck spectroscopy. 16 min will be sufficient to obtain suitable IRAC images for this remarkable source, which will be used to (i) robustly establish the stellar mass distribution which, in conjunction with our spectroscopic age, will connect the galaxy to a possible progenitor, (ii) compare the total stellar mass with the dynamical equivalent based on our resolved stellar kinematics, and (iii) examine stellar population gradients to discriminate amongst proposed formation histories.

  4. A systematic review of strong gravitational lens modeling software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefor, Alan T.; Futamase, Toshifumi; Akhlaghi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Despite expanding research activity in gravitational lens modeling, there is no particular software which is considered a standard. Much of the gravitational lens modeling software is written by individual investigators for their own use. Some gravitational lens modeling software is freely available for download but is widely variable with regard to ease of use and quality of documentation. This review of 13 software packages was undertaken to provide a single source of information. Gravitational lens models are classified as parametric models or non-parametric models, and can be further divided into research and educational software. Software used in research includes the GRAVLENS package (with both gravlens and lensmodel), Lenstool, LensPerfect, glafic, PixeLens, SimpLens, Lensview, and GRALE. In this review, GravLensHD, G-Lens, Gravitational Lensing, lens and MOWGLI are categorized as educational programs that are useful for demonstrating various aspects of lensing. Each of the 13 software packages is reviewed with regard to software features (installation, documentation, files provided, etc.) and lensing features (type of model, input data, output data, etc.) as well as a brief review of studies where they have been used. Recent studies have demonstrated the utility of strong gravitational lensing data for mass mapping, and suggest increased use of these techniques in the future. Coupled with the advent of greatly improved imaging, new approaches to modeling of strong gravitational lens systems are needed. This is the first systematic review of strong gravitational lens modeling software, providing investigators with a starting point for future software development to further advance gravitational lens modeling research. http://www.ephysics.org/mowgli/

  5. SIZE BIAS AND DIFFERENTIAL LENSING OF STRONGLY LENSED, DUSTY GALAXIES IDENTIFIED IN WIDE-FIELD SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Hezaveh, Yashar D.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2012-12-10

    We address two selection effects that operate on samples of gravitationally lensed dusty galaxies identified in millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength surveys. First, we point out the existence of a ''size bias'' in such samples: due to finite source effects, sources with higher observed fluxes are increasingly biased toward more compact objects. Second, we examine the effect of differential lensing in individual lens systems by modeling each source as a compact core embedded in an extended diffuse halo. Considering the ratio of magnifications in these two components, we find that at high overall magnifications, the compact component is amplified by a much larger factor than the diffuse component, but at intermediate magnifications ({approx}10) the probability of a larger magnification for the extended region is higher. Lens models determined from multi-frequency resolved imaging data are crucial to correct for this effect.

  6. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  7. Children's Sensitivity to Circular Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Laura A.; Danovitch, Judith H.; Keil, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the quality of explanations is an essential part of children's intellectual growth. Explanations can be faulty in structural ways such as when they are circular. A circular explanation reiterates the question as if it were an explanation rather than providing any new information. Two experiments (N=77) examined children's…

  8. Microlensing probes the AGN structure of the lensed quasar J1131-1231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluse, D.; Claeskens, J.-F.; Hutsemékers, D.; Surdej, J.

    2008-04-01

    We present the analysis of single epoch long slit spectra of the three brightest images of the gravitationally lensed system J1131-1231. These spectra provide one of the clearest observational evidence for differential micro-lensing of broad emission lines (BELs) in a gravitationally lensed quasar. The micro-lensing effect enables us: (1) to confirm that the width of the emission lines is anti-correlated to the size of the emitting region; (2) to show that the bulk of Fe II is emitted in the outer parts of the Broad Line Region (BLR) while another fraction of Fe II is produced in a compact region; (3) to derive interesting informations on the origin of the narrow intrinsic Mg II absorption doublet observed in that system.

  9. Aerosol lenses propagation model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model based on the properties of cascading lenses modulation transfer function (MTF) to reproduce the irradiance of a screen illuminated through a dense aerosol cloud. In this model, the aerosol cloud is broken into multiple thin layers considered as individual lenses. The screen irradiance generated by these individual layers is equivalent to the point-spread function (PSF) of each aerosol lens. Taking the Fourier transform of the PSF as a MTF, we cascade the lenses MTF to find the cloud MTF. The screen irradiance is found with the Fourier transform of this MTF. We show the derivation of the model and we compare the results with the Undique Monte Carlo simulator for four aerosols at three optical depths. The model is in agreement with the Monte Carlo for all the cases tested. PMID:21886230

  10. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Biomedical Optical Company of America's (BOCA) suntiger lenses, similar in principle to natural filters in the eyes of hawks and eagles, bar 99 percent of potentially harmful wavelengths, while allowing visually useful colors of light (red, orange, green) to pass through. They also improve visual acuity, night vision and haze or fog visibility. The lenses evolved from work done by James B. Stephens and Dr. Charles G. Miller of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. They developed a formula and produced a commercial welding curtain that absorbs, filters, and scatters light. This research led to protective glasses now used by dentists, workers in hazardous environments, CRT operators and skiers.

  11. Weak Gravitatational Lensing by Illustris-1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brainerd, Tereasa G.; Koh, Patrick H.

    2016-06-01

    We compute the weak gravitational lensing signal of isolated, central galaxies obtained from the z=0.5 timestep of the ΛCDM Illustris-1 simulation. The galaxies have stellar masses ranging from 9.5 ≤ log10(M*/Msun) ≤ 11.0 and are located outside cluster and rich group environments. Although there is local substructure present in the form of small, luminous satellite galaxies, the central galaxies are the dominant objects within the virial radii (r200), and each central galaxy is at least 5 times brighter than any other luminous galaxy within the friends-of-friends halo. We compute the weak lensing signal within projected radii 0.05 < rp/r200 < 1.5 and investigate the degree to which the weak lensing signal is anisotropic. Since CDM halos are non-spherical, the weak lensing signal is expected to be anisotropic; however, the degree of anisotropy that is observed depends upon the symmetry axes that are used to define the geometry. The anisotropy is expected to be maximized when the major axis of the projected dark matter mass distribution is used to define the geomety. In practice in the observed universe, one must necessarily use the projected distribution of the luminous mass to define the geometry. If mass and light are not well-aligned, this results in a suppression of the weak lensing anistropy. Our initial analysis shows that the ellipticity of the projected dark matter halo is uncorrelated with the ellipticity of the projected stellar mass. That is εhalo ≠ f × εlight, where f is a constant multiplicative factor. In addition, in projection on the sky, the major axis of the dark matter mass is offset from that of the stellar mass by ∼40o on average. On scales rp ≤ 0.15 r200, the weak lensing anisotropy obtained when using the stellar mass to define the geometry is of order 7% and agrees well with the anisotropy obtained when using the dark matter mass to define the geometry. On scales rp ∼ r200, the anisotropy obtained when using the stellar mass

  12. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization lensing power spectrum with the POLARBEAR experiment.

    PubMed

    Ade, P A R; Akiba, Y; Anthony, A E; Arnold, K; Atlas, M; Barron, D; Boettger, D; Borrill, J; Chapman, S; Chinone, Y; Dobbs, M; Elleflot, T; Errard, J; Fabbian, G; Feng, C; Flanigan, D; Gilbert, A; Grainger, W; Halverson, N W; Hasegawa, M; Hattori, K; Hazumi, M; Holzapfel, W L; Hori, Y; Howard, J; Hyland, P; Inoue, Y; Jaehnig, G C; Jaffe, A; Keating, B; Kermish, Z; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T; Le Jeune, M; Lee, A T; Linder, E; Leitch, E M; Lungu, M; Matsuda, F; Matsumura, T; Meng, X; Miller, N J; Morii, H; Moyerman, S; Myers, M J; Navaroli, M; Nishino, H; Paar, H; Peloton, J; Quealy, E; Rebeiz, G; Reichardt, C L; Richards, P L; Ross, C; Schanning, I; Schenck, D E; Sherwin, B; Shimizu, A; Shimmin, C; Shimon, M; Siritanasak, P; Smecher, G; Spieler, H; Stebor, N; Steinbach, B; Stompor, R; Suzuki, A; Takakura, S; Tomaru, T; Wilson, B; Yadav, A; Zahn, O

    2014-07-11

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ∼30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat+sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves. PMID:25062161

  13. Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Lensing Power Spectrum with the POLARBEAR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A. E.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapman, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M.; Elleflot, T.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N. W.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hori, Y.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaehnig, G. C.; Jaffe, A.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Le Jeune, M.; Lee, A. T.; Linder, E.; Leitch, E. M.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Meng, X.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; Navaroli, M.; Nishino, H.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Rebeiz, G.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Schanning, I.; Schenck, D. E.; Sherwin, B.; Shimizu, A.; Shimmin, C.; Shimon, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Smecher, G.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Takakura, S.; Tomaru, T.; Wilson, B.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.; Polarbear Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Gravitational lensing due to the large-scale distribution of matter in the cosmos distorts the primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thereby induces new, small-scale B-mode polarization. This signal carries detailed information about the distribution of all the gravitating matter between the observer and CMB last scattering surface. We report the first direct evidence for polarization lensing based on purely CMB information, from using the four-point correlations of even- and odd-parity E- and B-mode polarization mapped over ˜30 square degrees of the sky measured by the POLARBEAR experiment. These data were analyzed using a blind analysis framework and checked for spurious systematic contamination using null tests and simulations. Evidence for the signal of polarization lensing and lensing B modes is found at 4.2σ (stat +sys) significance. The amplitude of matter fluctuations is measured with a precision of 27%, and is found to be consistent with the Lambda cold dark matter cosmological model. This measurement demonstrates a new technique, capable of mapping all gravitating matter in the Universe, sensitive to the sum of neutrino masses, and essential for cleaning the lensing B-mode signal in searches for primordial gravitational waves.

  14. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  15. Cannon Prize: Weak lensing - Revealing the Dark Side of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing, the deflection of light from distant galaxies due to all intervening mass along the line of sight, is one of the most direct ways to observe dark matter. As a result, in the past decade, weak lensing has become a very important tool both for constraining cosmological parameters and for revealing the connection between galaxies and dark matter. I will begin by reviewing some of the most significant recent observational advances that were made possible by weak lensing. Next, I will outline some of the challenges and opportunities facing the lensing community in existing and upcoming imaging surveys. I will conclude with some perspective on how these challenges will be addressed to do ground-breaking work in the fields of cosmology, galaxy formation, and galaxy cluster formation and evolution with weak lensing observations in the next decade.

  16. Fresnel's Lighthouse Lenses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    One of the rewards of walking up the scores of steps winding around the inside of the shaft of a lighthouse is turning inward and examining the glass optical system. This arrangement of prisms, lenses, and reflectors is used to project the light from a relatively small source in a beam that can be seen far at sea.

  17. Rainwater lenses in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, S. C.; Schot, P. P.; Bootsma, M. C.

    2003-04-01

    In the Netherlands, drainage and groundwater abstraction in wetlands has lead to deterioration of fen vegetation through lowering of the phreatic level. This enables recharge of local, acid precipitation and the development of rainwater lenses which float on alkaline groundwater. These lenses prevent upward seeping of the groundwater reaching the fen root zone. In the nature reserve Ilperveld (The Netherlands), a ditch/trench system was dug for the purpose of creating run-off for acid rainwater in wet periods, and to enable neutral surface water in dry periods. Sods were removed to decrease the evapotranspiration. Knowledge of the form and behaviour of rainwater lenses in the root zone of wetlands is a prerequisite in fen restoration projects in order to design effective and cost-efficient measures. With a saturated-unsaturated solute transport model (HYDRUS-2D), numerical simulations were performed. Model results are compared with temporal and spatial measurements of electrical conductivity measured in the Ilperveld. Furthermore, results of temporal dynamics of rainwater lenses are shown as function of (i) the phreatic level, (ii) the number of drainage canals and (iii) the groundwater inflow fluxes.

  18. Weak Lensing with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David M.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Knox, L.; Margoniner, V.; Takada, M.; Tyson, J.; Zhan, H.; LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    Constraining dark energy parameters with weak lensing is one of the primary science goals of the LSST. The LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration has been formed with the goal of optimizing the weak lensing science by optimizing the survey cadence; working with Data Management to insure high-quality pipeline processing which will meet our needs; developing the necessary analysis tools well before the onset of data-taking; participating in high-fidelity simulations to test the system end-to-end; and analyzing the real dataset as it becomes available. We review the major weak lensing probes, the twoand three-point shear correlations, and how they constrain dark energy parameters. We also review the possibility of going beyond dark energy models and testing gravity with the LSST data. To realize the promise of the awesome LSST statistical precision, we must ensure that systematic errors are kept under control. We review the major sources of systematics and our plans for mitigation. We present data that demonstrate that these sources of systematics can be kept to a level smaller than the statistical error.

  19. Quantum Gravity Explanation of the Wave-Particle Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2016-03-01

    A quantum gravity explanation of the quantum-mechanical wave-particle duality is given by the watt-less emission of gravitational waves from a particle described by the Dirac equation. This explanation is possible through the existence of negative energy, and hence negative mass solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations. They permit to understand the Dirac equation as the equation for a gravitationally bound positive-negative mass (pole-dipole particle) two-body configuration, with the mass of the Dirac particle equal to the positive mass of the gravitational field binding the positive with the negative mass particle, and with the positive and negative mass particles making a luminal ``Zitterbewegung'' (quivering motion), emitting a watt-less oscillating positive-negative space curvature wave. Is it shown that this thusly produced ``Zitterbewegung'' reproduces the quantum potential of the Madelung-transformed Schrödinger equation. The watt-less gravitational wave emitted by the quivering particles is conjectured to be the de Broglie pilot wave.

  20. RCSLenS: The Red Cluster Sequence Lensing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, H.; Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Erben, T.; Miller, L.; Nakajima, R.; van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.; Buddendiek, A.; Harnois-Déraps, J.; Hojjati, A.; Joachimi, B.; Joudaki, S.; Kitching, T. D.; Wolf, C.; Gwyn, S.; Johnson, N.; Kuijken, K.; Sheikhbahaee, Z.; Tudorica, A.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), an application of the methods developed for the Canada France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) to the ˜785 deg2, multi-band imaging data of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS2). This project represents the largest public, sub-arcsecond seeing, multi-band survey to date that is suited for weak gravitational lensing measurements. With a careful assessment of systematic errors in shape measurements and photometric redshifts we extend the use of this data set to allow cross-correlation analyses between weak lensing observables and other data sets. We describe the imaging data, the data reduction, masking, multi-colour photometry, photometric redshifts, shape measurements, tests for systematic errors, and a blinding scheme to allow for more objective measurements. In total we analyse 761 pointings with r-band coverage, which constitutes our lensing sample. Residual large-scale B-mode systematics prevent the use of this shear catalogue for cosmic shear science. The effective number density of lensing sources over an unmasked area of 571.7 deg2 and down to a magnitude limit of r ˜ 24.5 is 8.1 galaxies per arcmin2 (weighted: 5.5 arcmin-2) distributed over 14 patches on the sky. Photometric redshifts based on 4-band griz data are available for 513 pointings covering an unmasked area of 383.5 deg2. We present weak lensing mass reconstructions of some example clusters as well as the full survey representing the largest areas that have been mapped in this way. All our data products are publicly available through CADC at http://www.cadc-ccda.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/en/community/rcslens/query.html in a format very similar to the CFHTLenS data release.

  1. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  2. Learning unit: Thin lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, L.-S.

    2012-04-01

    Learning unit: Thin lenses "Why objects seen through lenses are sometimes upright and sometimes reversed" Nita Laura Simona National College of Arts and Crafts "Constantin Brancusi", Craiova, Romania 1. GEOMETRIC OPTICS. 13 hours Introduction (models, axioms, principles, conventions) 1. Thin lenses (Types of lenses. Defining elements. Path of light rays through lenses. Image formation. Required physical quantities. Lens formulas). 2. Lens systems (Non-collated lenses. Focalless systems). 3. Human eye (Functioning as an optical system. Sight defects and their corrections). 4. Optical instruments (Characteristics exemplified by a magnifying glass. Paths of light rays through a simplified photo camera. Path of light rays through a classical microscope) (Physics curriculum for the IXth grade/ 2011). This scenario exposes a learning unit based on experimental sequences (defining specific competencies), as a succession of lessons started by noticing a problem whose solution assumes the setup of an experiment under laboratory conditions. Progressive learning of theme objectives are realised with sequential experimental steps. The central cognitive process is the induction or the generalization (development of new knowledge based on observation of examples or counterexamples of the concept to be learnt). Pupil interest in theme objectives is triggered by problem-situations, for example: "In order to better see small objects I need a magnifying glass. But when using a magnifier, small object images are sometimes seen upright and sometimes seen reversed!" Along the way, pupils' reasoning will converge to the idea: "The image of an object through a lens depends on the relative distances among object, lens, and observer". Associated learning model: EXPERIMENT Specific competencies: derived from the experiment model, in agreement with the following learning unit steps I. Evoking - Anticipation: Size of the problem, formulation of hypotheses and planning of experiment. II

  3. Demagnified gravitational waves from cosmological double neutron stars and gravitational wave foreground cleaning around 1 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Naoki

    2009-11-15

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from cosmological double neutron star binaries (NS+NS) can be significantly demagnified by the strong gravitational lensing effect, and the proposed future missions such as the Big Bang Observer or Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory might miss some of the demagnified GW signals below a detection threshold. The undetectable binaries would form a GW foreground, which might hamper detection of a very weak primordial GW signal. We discuss the outlook of this potential problem, using a simple model based on the singular isothermal sphere lens profile. Fortunately, it is expected that, for a presumable merger rate of NS+NSs, the residual foreground would be below the detection limit {omega}{sub GW,lim}{approx}10{sup -16} realized with the Big Bang Observer/Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory by correlation analysis.

  4. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  5. Tolerances in panoramic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Simon; Dallaire, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Almost every aspect concerning the optical design of panoramic lenses brings new challenges to optical designers. Examples of these include ray tracing programs having problems finding the entrance pupil which is moving through the field-of-view, optimization, production particularities due to the shape of the lenses, and ways of tolerancing these systems having strong distortion. This last topic will be discussed in this paper. We will start from a historical perspective on the understanding of panoramic imagery. This will lead us to the modern panoramic imager called the Panomorph lens. We will discuss the particular case of the tolerance of the front surface (most of the time a freeform surface) and the impact on the image quality, both image footprint and field curvature. We will explain the behavior using first and second order approaches.

  6. Tolerancing panoramic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Jocelyn; Thibault, Simon

    2009-08-01

    Tolerancing a lens is a basic procedure in lens design. It consists in first defining an appropriate set of tolerances for the lens, then in adding compensators with their allowable ranges and finally in selecting an appropriate quality criterion (MTF, RMS spot size, wavefront error, boresight error...) for the given application. The procedure is straightforward for standard optical systems. However, it becomes more complex when tolerancing very wide angle lenses (larger than 150 degrees). With a large field of view, issues such as severe off-axis pupil shift, considerable distortion and low relative illumination must be addressed. The pupil shift affects the raytrace as some rays can no longer be traced properly. For high resolution imagers, particularly for robotic and security applications, the image footprint is most critical in order to limit or avoid complex calibration procedures. We studied various wide angle lenses and concluded that most of the distortion comes from the front surface of the lens. Consequently, any variation of the front surface will greatly affect the image footprint. In this paper, we study the effects on the image footprint of slightly modifying the front surface of four different lenses: a simple double-gauss for comparison, a fisheye lens, a catadioptric system (omnidirectional lens) and a Panomorph lens. We also present a method to analyze variations of the image footprint. Our analysis shows that for wide angle lenses, on which the entrance pupil is much smaller than the front surface, irregularities (amplitude, slope and location) are critical on both aspherical and spherical front surfaces to predict the image footprint variation for high resolution cameras. Finally, we present how the entrance pupil varies (location, size) with the field of view for these optical systems.

  7. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, and Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09' for a 0.14' FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to 0.16' if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  8. Pixelation Effects in Weak Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    High, F. William; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Ellis, Richard

    2007-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing can be used to investigate both dark matter and dark energy but requires accurate measurements of the shapes of faint, distant galaxies. Such measurements are hindered by the finite resolution and pixel scale of digital cameras. We investigate the optimum choice of pixel scale for a space-based mission, using the engineering model and survey strategy of the proposed Supernova Acceleration Probe as a baseline. We do this by simulating realistic astronomical images containing a known input shear signal and then attempting to recover the signal using the Rhodes, Refregier, & Groth algorithm. We find that the quality of shear measurement is always improved by smaller pixels. However, in practice, telescopes are usually limited to a finite number of pixels and operational life span, so the total area of a survey increases with pixel size. We therefore fix the survey lifetime and the number of pixels in the focal plane while varying the pixel scale, thereby effectively varying the survey size. In a pure trade-off for image resolution versus survey area, we find that measurements of the matter power spectrum would have minimum statistical error with a pixel scale of 0.09" for a 0.14" FWHM point-spread function (PSF). The pixel scale could be increased to ~0.16" if images dithered by exactly half-pixel offsets were always available. Some of our results do depend on our adopted shape measurement method and should be regarded as an upper limit: future pipelines may require smaller pixels to overcome systematic floors not yet accessible, and, in certain circumstances, measuring the shape of the PSF might be more difficult than those of galaxies. However, the relative trends in our analysis are robust, especially those of the surface density of resolved galaxies. Our approach thus provides a snapshot of potential in available technology, and a practical counterpart to analytic studies of pixelation, which necessarily assume an idealized shape

  9. Weak lensing cosmology beyond ΛCDM

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Linder, Eric V.; Nakajima, Reiko; Putter, Roland de E-mail: rdeputter@icc.ub.edu E-mail: reiko@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of the cosmological model, dark energy, and dark matter, providing insight into both the cosmic expansion history and large scale structure growth history. Taking into account a broad spectrum of physics affecting growth — dynamical dark energy, extended gravity, neutrino masses, and spatial curvature — we analyze the cosmological constraints. Similarly we consider the effects of a range of systematic uncertainties, in shear measurement, photometric redshifts, intrinsic alignments, and the nonlinear power spectrum, on cosmological parameter extraction. We also investigate, and provide fitting formulas for, the influence of survey parameters such as redshift depth, galaxy number densities, and sky area on the cosmological constraints in the beyond-ΛCDM parameter space. Finally, we examine the robustness of results for different fiducial cosmologies.

  10. Lensing effects in inhomogeneous cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Ghassemi, Sima; Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh; Mansouri, Reza

    2009-05-15

    Concepts developed in the gravitational lensing techniques such as shear, convergence, tangential, and radial arcs maybe used to see how tenable inhomogeneous models proposed to explain the acceleration of the universe models are. We study the widely discussed Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) cosmological models. It turns out that for the observer sitting at origin of a global LTB solution the shear vanishes as in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models, while the value of convergence is different, which may lead to observable cosmological effects. We also consider Swiss-cheese models proposed recently based on LTB with an observer sitting in the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker part. It turns out that they have different behavior as far as the formation of radial and tangential arcs are concerned.

  11. Cusped Density Profiles of Gravitational Lens Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutka, P. T.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed an analytic formulation for axially symmetric GNFW lens model with parametrized cusp slope (α). The lensing theory has several implications, for example strong lensing is very difficult without cusped mass profile. Required cusp strength for strong lensing depends on the lens object mass and concentration. Exceedingly high concentrations are required for profiles, that have α>-1 in order to produce multiple lensed images. We study mass profiles of lens objects with double image lenses, since they are resilient against deviations from axial symmetry, perturbations from microlensing, and halo substructure. The statistics of the observed image flux ratios is connected to the general properties of the of the lens mass density profiles. Our analysis is based on a limiting value for the shallowest cusp slope αCSL able to produce the observed flux ratio with any lens geometry and lens-source alignment. The cusp slope limit (CSL) does not depend on cosmology, total lens mass, concentration or redshifts of the the lens and the lensed object. In case of axial symmetry the limiting value is depending only on the magnification ratio (observed flux ratio of the images). This removes uncertainties in the lens and source distributions from the statistical analysis. Distribution of these threshold values reveals existence of halo population(s) with similar profiles in the sample; most of the halos have cusp slope α = -1.95+/-0.02. We have also found an imprint of a second population with a cusp slope value α = -1.49+/-0.09. There is about 99 per cent estimated probability, that the observed feature in the distribution is produced by the second population of lenses, with their own characteristic density profile. We analyze error sources in our analysis with mock catalogues, and discuss about alternative explanations for the second population signature.

  12. Analytic models of plausible gravitational lens potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune E-mail: pjm@physics.ucsb.edu

    2009-01-15

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modelled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasising that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential. We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modelled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  13. Analytic Models of Plausible Gravitational Lens Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, Edward A.; Marshall, Phil; Oguri, Masamune

    2007-05-04

    Gravitational lenses on galaxy scales are plausibly modeled as having ellipsoidal symmetry and a universal dark matter density profile, with a Sersic profile to describe the distribution of baryonic matter. Predicting all lensing effects requires knowledge of the total lens potential: in this work we give analytic forms for that of the above hybrid model. Emphasizing that complex lens potentials can be constructed from simpler components in linear combination, we provide a recipe for attaining elliptical symmetry in either projected mass or lens potential.We also provide analytic formulae for the lens potentials of Sersic profiles for integer and half-integer index. We then present formulae describing the gravitational lensing effects due to smoothly-truncated universal density profiles in cold dark matter model. For our isolated haloes the density profile falls off as radius to the minus fifth or seventh power beyond the tidal radius, functional forms that allow all orders of lens potential derivatives to be calculated analytically, while ensuring a non-divergent total mass. We show how the observables predicted by this profile differ from that of the original infinite-mass NFW profile. Expressions for the gravitational flexion are highlighted. We show how decreasing the tidal radius allows stripped haloes to be modeled, providing a framework for a fuller investigation of dark matter substructure in galaxies and clusters. Finally we remark on the need for finite mass halo profiles when doing cosmological ray-tracing simulations, and the need for readily-calculable higher order derivatives of the lens potential when studying catastrophes in strong lenses.

  14. Thermal lensing in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang

    2016-08-22

    Average powers from fiber lasers have reached the point that a quantitative understanding of thermal lensing and its impact on transverse mode instability is becoming critical. Although thermal lensing is well known qualitatively, there is a general lack of a simple method for quantitative analysis. In this work, we first conduct a study of thermal lensing in optical fibers based on a perturbation technique. The perturbation technique becomes increasingly inaccurate as thermal lensing gets stronger. It, however, provides a basis for determining a normalization factor to use in a more accurate numerical study. A simple thermal lensing threshold condition is developed. The impact of thermal lensing on transverse mode instability is also studied. PMID:27557260

  15. Measuring Lensing Magnification of Quasars by Large Scale Structure Using the Variability-Luminosity Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Anne H.; Seitz, Stella; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-01

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R 200) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  16. MEASURING LENSING MAGNIFICATION OF QUASARS BY LARGE SCALE STRUCTURE USING THE VARIABILITY-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Anne H.; Jerke, Jonathan; Scalzo, Richard; Rabinowitz, David; Ellman, Nancy; Baltay, Charles

    2011-05-10

    We introduce a technique to measure gravitational lensing magnification using the variability of type I quasars. Quasars' variability amplitudes and luminosities are tightly correlated, on average. Magnification due to gravitational lensing increases the quasars' apparent luminosity, while leaving the variability amplitude unchanged. Therefore, the mean magnification of an ensemble of quasars can be measured through the mean shift in the variability-luminosity relation. As a proof of principle, we use this technique to measure the magnification of quasars spectroscopically identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), due to gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters in the SDSS MaxBCG catalog. The Palomar-QUEST Variability Survey, reduced using the DeepSky pipeline, provides variability data for the sources. We measure the average quasar magnification as a function of scaled distance (r/R{sub 200}) from the nearest cluster; our measurements are consistent with expectations assuming Navarro-Frenk-White cluster profiles, particularly after accounting for the known uncertainty in the clusters' centers. Variability-based lensing measurements are a valuable complement to shape-based techniques because their systematic errors are very different, and also because the variability measurements are amenable to photometric errors of a few percent and to depths seen in current wide-field surveys. Given the volume data of the expected from current and upcoming surveys, this new technique has the potential to be competitive with weak lensing shear measurements of large-scale structure.

  17. Lossy compression of weak lensing data

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderveld, R. Ali; Bernstein, Gary M.; Stoughton, Chris; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Dobke, Benjamin M.

    2011-07-12

    Future orbiting observatories will survey large areas of sky in order to constrain the physics of dark matter and dark energy using weak gravitational lensing and other methods. Lossy compression of the resultant data will improve the cost and feasibility of transmitting the images through the space communication network. We evaluate the consequences of the lossy compression algorithm of Bernstein et al. (2010) for the high-precision measurement of weak-lensing galaxy ellipticities. This square-root algorithm compresses each pixel independently, and the information discarded is by construction less than the Poisson error from photon shot noise. For simulated space-based images (without cosmic rays) digitized to the typical 16 bits per pixel, application of the lossy compression followed by image-wise lossless compression yields images with only 2.4 bits per pixel, a factor of 6.7 compression. We demonstrate that this compression introduces no bias in the sky background. The compression introduces a small amount of additional digitization noise to the images, and we demonstrate a corresponding small increase in ellipticity measurement noise. The ellipticity measurement method is biased by the addition of noise, so the additional digitization noise is expected to induce a multiplicative bias on the galaxies measured ellipticities. After correcting for this known noise-induced bias, we find a residual multiplicative ellipticity bias of m {approx} -4 x 10-4. This bias is small when compared to the many other issues that precision weak lensing surveys must confront, and furthermore we expect it to be reduced further with better calibration of ellipticity measurement methods.

  18. Lossy compression of weak lensing data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vanderveld, R. Ali; Bernstein, Gary M.; Stoughton, Chris; Rhodes, Jason; Massey, Richard; Dobke, Benjamin M.

    2011-07-12

    Future orbiting observatories will survey large areas of sky in order to constrain the physics of dark matter and dark energy using weak gravitational lensing and other methods. Lossy compression of the resultant data will improve the cost and feasibility of transmitting the images through the space communication network. We evaluate the consequences of the lossy compression algorithm of Bernstein et al. (2010) for the high-precision measurement of weak-lensing galaxy ellipticities. This square-root algorithm compresses each pixel independently, and the information discarded is by construction less than the Poisson error from photon shot noise. For simulated space-based images (without cosmicmore » rays) digitized to the typical 16 bits per pixel, application of the lossy compression followed by image-wise lossless compression yields images with only 2.4 bits per pixel, a factor of 6.7 compression. We demonstrate that this compression introduces no bias in the sky background. The compression introduces a small amount of additional digitization noise to the images, and we demonstrate a corresponding small increase in ellipticity measurement noise. The ellipticity measurement method is biased by the addition of noise, so the additional digitization noise is expected to induce a multiplicative bias on the galaxies measured ellipticities. After correcting for this known noise-induced bias, we find a residual multiplicative ellipticity bias of m {approx} -4 x 10-4. This bias is small when compared to the many other issues that precision weak lensing surveys must confront, and furthermore we expect it to be reduced further with better calibration of ellipticity measurement methods.« less

  19. Fermat's principle, caustics, and the classification of gravitational lens images

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.; Narayan, R.

    1986-11-01

    A scalar description of gravitational lensing based on Fermat's principle is described. The lensing mass is assumed to be confined to a single plane between the source and the observer, and a time delay is associated with each position in the sky of a potential image. The extrema of this time surface then give the true positions of the images. A topological classification of image configurations is presented, and the results are generalized to cases of three and five-image lensing geometries. A computer-graphical approach to the study of lensing by model galaxies and clusters is described, and the design of a simple optical apparatus which could be used for fast modelling of image geometries is outlined. The connection between the Fermat approach and the classical theory of caustics and the more recent general theory of catastrophies is developed. The extension of the results to multiple scattering is considered. 42 references.

  20. Gravitational Lensing in the Strong Field Limit for Kar's Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Carlos A.; Cárdenas-Avendaño, Alejandro; Larranaga, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we calculate the strong field limit deflection angle for a light ray passing near a scalar charged spherically symmetric object, described by a metric which comes from the low-energy limit of heterotic string theory. Then, we compare the expansion parameters of our results with those obtained in the Einstein's canonical frame, obtained by a conformal transformation, and we show that, at least at first order, the results do not agree.

  1. Integral field spectrophotometry of gravitationally lensed QSOs with PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisotzki, L.; Becker, T.; Christensen, L.; Jahnke, K.; Helms, A.; Kelz, A.; Roth, M. M.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2004-02-01

    We present spatially resolved spectrophotometric observations of multiply imaged QSOs, using the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer (PMAS), with the intention to search for spectral differences between components indicative of either microlensing or dust extinction. For the quadruple QSO HE 0435-1223 we find that the continuum shapes are indistinguishable, therefore differential extinction is negligible. The equivalent widths of the broad emission lines are however significantly different, and we argue that this is most likely due to microlensing. Contrariwise, the two components of the well-known object UM 673 have virtually identical emission line properties, but the continuum slopes differ significantly and indicate different dust extinction along both lines of sight.

  2. Simulating Gravity: Dark Matter and Gravitational Lensing in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jes; Stang, Jared; Anderson, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the universe but very little of a standard introductory physics curriculum. Here we present our construction and use of a spandex sheet-style gravity simulator to qualitatively demonstrate two aspects of modern physics related to dark matter. First, we describe an activity in which students explore the…

  3. Analytical formulas for gravitational lensing: Higher order calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Amore, Paolo; Arceo, Santiago; Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2006-10-15

    We extend to higher order a recently published method for calculating the deflection angle of light in a general static and spherically symmetric metric. We have tested our method on the metric of Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, on the metric of a charged black hole coupled to Born-Infeld electrodynamics and on the metric of Weyl gravity. Since our method is geometrically convergent, as proved in our previous work, our analytical formulas obtained working to fourth order are sufficient to reach errors of few percents even in proximity of the photon sphere.

  4. Exact gravitational lensing by cosmic strings with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, Teruaki

    2008-08-15

    We point out that the results by Brandenberger et al. [Phys. Rev. D 77, 083502 (2008)] that the geometry around the straight cosmic strings with stationary junctions is flat to linear order in the string tension can be immediately extended to any order.

  5. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  6. Neutrino halos in clusters of galaxies and their weak lensing signature

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Peña-Garay, Carlos; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Quilis, Vicent E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.es E-mail: vicent.quilis@uv.es

    2011-06-01

    We study whether non-linear gravitational effects of relic neutrinos on the development of clustering and large-scale structure may be observable by weak gravitational lensing. We compute the density profile of relic massive neutrinos in a spherical model of a cluster of galaxies, for several neutrino mass schemes and cluster masses. Relic neutrinos add a small perturbation to the mass profile, making it more extended in the outer parts. In principle, this non-linear neutrino perturbation is detectable in an all-sky weak lensing survey such as EUCLID by averaging the shear profile of a large fraction of the visible massive clusters in the universe, or from its signature in the general weak lensing power spectrum or its cross-spectrum with galaxies. However, correctly modeling the distribution of mass in baryons and cold dark matter and suppressing any systematic errors to the accuracy required for detecting this neutrino perturbation is severely challenging.

  7. A Simple Gravitational Lens Model for Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We present a simple gravitational lens model to illustrate the ease of using the embedded lensing theory when studying cosmic voids. It confirms the previously used repulsive lensing models for deep voids. We start by estimating magnitude fluctuations and weak-lensing shears of background sources lensed by large voids. We find that sources behind large (˜90 Mpc) and deep voids (density contrast about -0.9) can be magnified or demagnified with magnitude fluctuations of up to ˜0.05 mag and that the weak-lensing shear can be up to the ˜10-2 level in the outer regions of large voids. Smaller or shallower voids produce proportionally smaller effects. We investigate the “wiggling” of the primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies caused by intervening cosmic voids. The void-wiggling of primary CMB temperature gradients is of the opposite sign to that caused by galaxy clusters. Only extremely large and deep voids can produce wiggling amplitudes similar to galaxy clusters, ˜15 μK by a large void of radius ˜4° and central density contrast -0.9 at redshift 0.5 assuming a CMB background gradient of ˜10 μK arcmin-1. The dipole signal is spread over the entire void area, and not concentrated at the lens center as it is for clusters. Finally, we use our model to simulate CMB sky maps lensed by large cosmic voids. Our embedded theory can easily be applied to more complicated void models and used to study gravitational lensing of the CMB, to probe dark matter profiles, to reduce the lensing-induced systematics in supernova Hubble diagrams, and to study the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect.

  8. Astronomers Discover Six-Image Gravitational Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-08-01

    An international team of astronomers has used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to discover the first gravitational lens in which the single image of a very distant galaxy has been split into six different images. The unique configuration is produced by the gravitational effect of three galaxies along the line of sight between the more-distant galaxy and Earth. Optical and Radio Images of Gravitational Lens "This is the first gravitational lens with more than four images of the background object that is produced by a small group of galaxies rather than a large cluster of galaxies," said David Rusin, who just received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. "Such systems are expected to be extremely rare, so this discovery is an important stepping stone. Because this is an intermediate case between gravitational lenses produced by single galaxies and lenses produced by large clusters of galaxies, it will give us insights we can't get from other types of lenses," Rusin added. The gravitational lens, called CLASS B1359+154, consists of a galaxy more than 11 billion light-years away in the constellation Bootes, with a trio of galaxies more than 7 billion light-years away along the same line of sight. The more-distant galaxy shows signs that it contains a massive black hole at its core and also has regions in which new stars are forming. The gravitational effect of the intervening galaxies has caused the light and radio waves from the single, more-distant galaxy to be "bent" to form six images as seen from Earth. Four of these images appear outside the triangle formed by the three intermediate galaxies and two appear inside that triangle. "This lens system is a very interesting case to study because it is more complicated than lenses produced by single galaxies, and yet simpler than lenses produced by clusters of numerous galaxies," said Chris Kochanek of the Harvard

  9. Explanation and inference: mechanistic and functional explanations guide property generalization

    PubMed Central

    Lombrozo, Tania; Gwynne, Nicholas Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to generalize from the known to the unknown is central to learning and inference. Two experiments explore the relationship between how a property is explained and how that property is generalized to novel species and artifacts. The experiments contrast the consequences of explaining a property mechanistically, by appeal to parts and processes, with the consequences of explaining the property functionally, by appeal to functions and goals. The findings suggest that properties that are explained functionally are more likely to be generalized on the basis of shared functions, with a weaker relationship between mechanistic explanations and generalization on the basis of shared parts and processes. The influence of explanation type on generalization holds even though all participants are provided with the same mechanistic and functional information, and whether an explanation type is freely generated (Experiment 1), experimentally provided (Experiment 2), or experimentally induced (Experiment 2). The experiments also demonstrate that explanations and generalizations of a particular type (mechanistic or functional) can be experimentally induced by providing sample explanations of that type, with a comparable effect when the sample explanations come from the same domain or from a different domains. These results suggest that explanations serve as a guide to generalization, and contribute to a growing body of work supporting the value of distinguishing mechanistic and functional explanations. PMID:25309384

  10. OPTIMAL MASS CONFIGURATIONS FOR LENSING HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Kenneth C.; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Ammons, S. Mark; Keeton, Charles R.

    2012-06-20

    We investigate the gravitational lensing properties of lines of sight containing multiple cluster-scale halos, motivated by their ability to lens very high redshift (z {approx} 10) sources into detectability. We control for the total mass along the line of sight, isolating the effects of distributing the mass among multiple halos and of varying the physical properties of the halos. Our results show that multiple-halo lines of sight can increase the magnified source-plane region compared to the single cluster lenses typically targeted for lensing studies and thus are generally better fields for detecting very high redshift sources. The configurations that result in optimal lensing cross sections benefit from interactions between the lens potentials of the halos when they overlap somewhat on the sky, creating regions of high magnification in the source plane not present when the halos are considered individually. The effect of these interactions on the lensing cross section can even be comparable to changing the total mass of the lens from 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun} to 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M{sub Sun }. The gain in lensing cross section increases as the mass is split into more halos, provided that the lens potentials are projected close enough to interact with each other. A nonzero projected halo angular separation, equal halo mass ratio, and high projected halo concentration are the best mass configurations, whereas projected halo ellipticity, halo triaxiality, and the relative orientations of the halos are less important. Such high-mass, multiple-halo lines of sight exist in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  11. RHIC electron lenses upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Altinbas, Z.; Bruno, D.; Binello, S.; Costanzo, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D. M.; Hock, J.; Hock, K.; Harvey, M.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Mi, C.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Samms, T.; Shrey, T. C.; Schoefer, V.; Tan, Y.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2015-05-03

    In the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) 100 GeV polarized proton run in 2015, two electron lenses were used to partially compensate for the head-on beam-beam effect for the first time. Here, we describe the design of the current electron lens, detailing the hardware modifications made after the 2014 commissioning run with heavy ions. A new electron gun with 15-mm diameter cathode is characterized. The electron beam transverse profile was measured using a YAG screen and fitted with a Gaussian distribution. During operation, the overlap of the electron and proton beams was achieved using the electron backscattering detector in conjunction with an automated orbit control program.

  12. MEASURING MICROLENSING USING SPECTRA OF MULTIPLY LENSED QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, V.; Mediavilla, E.; Munoz, J. A. E-mail: emg@iac.es E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es

    2012-08-10

    We report on a program of spectroscopic observations of gravitationally lensed QSOs with multiple images. We seek to establish whether microlensing is occurring in each QSO image using only single-epoch observations. We calculate flux ratios for the cores of emission lines in image pairs to set a baseline for no microlensing. The offset of the continuum flux ratios relative to this baseline yields the microlensing magnification free from extinction, as extinction affects the continuum and the lines equally. When we find chromatic microlensing, we attempt to constrain the size of the QSO accretion disk. SDSSJ1004+4112 and HE1104-1805 show chromatic microlensing with amplitudes 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.6 and 0.2 < |{Delta}m| < 0.4 mag, respectively. Modeling the accretion disk with a Gaussian source (I{proportional_to}exp (- R{sup 2}/2r{sup 2}{sub s})) of size r{sub s} {proportional_to}{lambda}{sup p} and using magnification maps to simulate microlensing, we find r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 7 {+-} 3 lt-day(18.1 {+-} 7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 1.1 {+-} 0.4 for SDSS1004+4112, and r{sub s} ({lambda}3363) = 6 {+-} 2 lt-day(15.5 {+-} 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm) and p = 0.7 {+-} 0.1 for HE1104-1805. For SDSSJ1029+2623, we find strong chromaticity of {approx}0.4 mag in the continuum flux ratio, which probably arises from microlensing, although not all the available data fit within this explanation. For Q0957+561, we measure B - A magnitude differences of 0.4 mag, much greater than the {approx}0.05 mag amplitude usually inferred from light-curve variability. It may substantially modify the current interpretations of microlensing in this system, likely favoring the hypothesis of smaller sources and/or larger microdeflectors. For HS0818+1227, our data yield possible evidence of microlensing.

  13. Possible explanation of the correlations between events recorded by underground detectors during the Supernova 1987A explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeyev, E. N.

    2010-02-15

    A possible explanation of the time correlations between the data from underground detectors (Baksan telescope, LSD, IMB, Kamiokande II) and from the Rome and Maryland gravitational-wave antennas obtained during the Supernova 1987A explosion is proposed. It is shown that the synchronization of the events recorded by various underground facilities could be produced by gravitational radiation from the Supernova.

  14. Gravitational microlensing results from MACHO

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.; MACHO Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    The MACHO project is searching for dark qter inthe form of massive compact haio objects (Machos), by monitoring the brightness of millions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds to search for gravitational microlensing events. Analysis of our 1st 2.3 years of data for 8.5 million stars in the LMC yields 8 candidate microlensing events, well in excess of the {approx} 1 event expected from lensing by known low-mass stars. The event timescales range from 34 to 145 days, and the estimated optical depth is N 2x10{sup -7}, about half of that expected from a `standard` halo. Likelihood analysis indicates the typical lens mass is 0.5{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2}M{sub {circle_dot}}, suggesting they may be old white dwarfs.

  15. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  16. Disentangling dark sector models using weak lensing statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, Carlo; Metcalf, R. Benton; Baldi, Marco; Meneghetti, Massimo; Moscardini, Lauro; Petkova, Margarita

    2015-09-01

    We perform multiplane ray tracing using the GLAMER gravitational lensing code within high-resolution light-cones extracted from the CoDECS simulations: a suite of cosmological runs featuring a coupling between dark energy and cold dark matter (CDM). We show that the presence of the coupling is evident not only in the redshift evolution of the normalization of the convergence power spectrum, but also in differences in non-linear structure formation with respect to ΛCDM. Using a tomographic approach under the assumption of a ΛCDM cosmology, we demonstrate that weak lensing measurements would result in a σ8 value that changes with the source redshift if the true underlying cosmology is a coupled dark energy (cDE) one. This provides a generic null test for these types of models. We also find that different models of cDE can show either an enhanced or a suppressed correlation between convergence maps with differing source redshifts as compared to ΛCDM. This would provide a direct way to discriminate between different possible realizations of the cDE scenario. Finally, we discuss the impact of the coupling on several lensing observables for different source redshifts and angular scales with realistic source redshift distributions for current ground-based and future space-based lensing surveys.

  17. Extreme value statistics of cosmic microwave background lensing deflection angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Philipp M.; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2015-10-01

    The smaller the angular scales on which the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are probed the more important their distortion due to gravitational lensing becomes. Here we investigate the maxima and minima of the CMB lensing deflection field using general extreme value statistics. Since general extreme value statistics applies to uncorrelated data in first place, we consider appropriately low-pass-filtered deflection maps. Besides the suppression of correlations filtering is required for another reason: the lensing field itself is not directly observable but needs to be (statistically) reconstructed from the lensed CMB by means of a quadratic estimator. This reconstruction, though, is noise dominated and therefore requires smoothing too. In idealized Gaussian realizations as well as in realistically reconstructed data, we find that both maxima and minima of the deflection angle components follow consistently a general extreme value distribution of Weibull type. However, its shape, location and scale parameters vary significantly between different realizations. The statistics' potential power to constrain cosmological models appears, therefore, rather limited.

  18. Competing Explanations of Undergraduate Noncompletion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attewell, Paul; Heil, Scott; Reisel, Liza

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyze longitudinal data from a nationally representative panel of college entrants to test and compare several theoretical explanations of college degree attainment and noncompletion. So far, relatively little emphasis has been placed on determining the relative and combined predictive power of competing explanations or…

  19. GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING BY THE ELLIS WORMHOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, F.

    2010-12-10

    A method to calculate light curves of the gravitational microlensing of the Ellis wormhole is derived in the weak-field limit. In this limit, lensing by the wormhole produces one image outside the Einstein ring and another image inside. The weak-field hypothesis is a good approximation in Galactic lensing if the throat radius is less than 10{sup 11} km. The light curves calculated have gutters of approximately 4% immediately outside the Einstein ring crossing times. The magnification of the Ellis wormhole lensing is generally less than that of Schwarzschild lensing. The optical depths and event rates are calculated for the Galactic bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud fields according to bound and unbound hypotheses. If the wormholes have throat radii between 100 and 10{sup 7} km, are bound to the galaxy, and have a number density that is approximately that of ordinary stars, detection can be achieved by reanalyzing past data. If the wormholes are unbound, detection using past data is impossible.

  20. Difference Imaging of Lensed Quasar Candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Supernova Survey Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune

    2009-06-01

    Difference imaging provides a new way to discover gravitationally lensed quasars because few nonlensed sources will show spatially extended, time variable flux. We test the method on the fields of lens candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Supernova Survey region from the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) and one serendipitously discovered lensed quasar. Starting from 20,536 sources, including 49 SDSS quasars, 32 candidate lenses/lensed images, and one known lensed quasar, we find that 174 sources including 35 SDSS quasars, 16 candidate lenses/lensed images, and the known lensed quasar are nonperiodic variable sources. We can measure the spatial structure of the variable flux for 119 of these variable sources and identify only eight as candidate extended variables, including the known lensed quasar. Only the known lensed quasar appears as a close pair of sources on the difference images. Inspection of the remaining seven suggests they are false positives, and only two were spectroscopically identified quasars. One of the lens candidates from the SQLS survives our cuts, but only as a single image instead of a pair. This indicates a false positive rate of order ~1/4000 for the method, or given our effective survey area of order 0.82 deg2, ~5 per deg2 in the SDSS Supernova Survey. The fraction of quasars not found to be variable and the false positive rate would both fall if we had analyzed the full, later data releases for the SDSS fields. While application of the method to the SDSS is limited by the resolution, depth, and sampling of the survey, several future surveys such as Pan-STARRS, LSST, and SNAP will significantly improve on these limitations.

  1. Warm dark haloes accretion histories and their gravitational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Mahdi, Hareth S.; Power, Chris; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2014-11-01

    We study clusters in warm dark matter (WDM) models of a thermally produced dark matter particle 0.5 keV in mass. We show that, despite clusters in WDM cosmologies having similar density profiles as their cold dark matter (CDM) counterparts, the internal properties, such as the amount of substructure, show marked differences. This result is surprising as clusters are at mass scales that are a thousand times greater than that at which structure formation is suppressed. WDM clusters gain significantly more mass via smooth accretion and contain fewer substructures than their CDM brethren. The higher smooth mass accretion results in subhaloes which are physically more extended and less dense. These fine-scale differences can be probed by strong gravitational lensing. We find, unexpectedly, that WDM clusters have higher lensing efficiencies than those in CDM cosmologies, contrary to the naive expectation that WDM clusters should be less efficient due to the fewer substructures they contain. Despite being less dense, the larger WDM subhaloes are more likely to have larger lensing cross-sections than CDM ones. Additionally, WDM subhaloes typically reside at larger distances, which radially stretches the critical lines associated with strong gravitational lensing, resulting in excess in the number of clusters with large radial cross-sections at the ˜2σ level. Though lensing profile for an individual cluster vary significantly with the line of sight, the radial arc distribution based on a sample of ≳100 clusters may prove to be the crucial test for the presence of WDM.

  2. LENSED: a code for the forward reconstruction of lenses and sources from strong lensing observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessore, Nicolas; Bellagamba, Fabio; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2016-09-01

    Robust modelling of strong lensing systems is fundamental to exploit the information they contain about the distribution of matter in galaxies and clusters. In this work, we present LENSED, a new code which performs forward parametric modelling of strong lenses. LENSED takes advantage of a massively parallel ray-tracing kernel to perform the necessary calculations on a modern graphics processing unit (GPU). This makes the precise rendering of the background lensed sources much faster, and allows the simultaneous optimisation of tens of parameters for the selected model. With a single run, the code is able to obtain the full posterior probability distribution for the lens light, the mass distribution and the background source at the same time. LENSED is first tested on mock images which reproduce realistic space-based observations of lensing systems. In this way, we show that it is able to recover unbiased estimates of the lens parameters, even when the sources do not follow exactly the assumed model. Then, we apply it to a subsample of the SLACS lenses, in order to demonstrate its use on real data. The results generally agree with the literature, and highlight the flexibility and robustness of the algorithm.

  3. Subaru Weak Lensing Measurements of Four Strong Lensing Clusters: Are Lensing Clusters Over-Concentrated?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dahle, Haakon; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin P.; Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew

    2009-01-29

    We derive radial mass profiles of four strong lensing selected clusters which show prominent giant arcs (Abell 1703, SDSS J1446+3032, SDSS J1531+3414, and SDSS J2111-0115), by combining detailed strong lens modeling with weak lensing shear measured from deep Subaru Suprime-cam images. Weak lensing signals are detected at high significance for all four clusters, whose redshifts range from z = 0.28 to 0.64. We demonstrate that adding strong lensing information with known arc redshifts significantly improves constraints on the mass density profile, compared to those obtained from weak lensing alone. While the mass profiles are well fitted by the universal form predicted in N-body simulations of the {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model, all four clusters appear to be slightly more centrally concentrated (the concentration parameters c{sub vir} {approx} 8) than theoretical predictions, even after accounting for the bias toward higher concentrations inherent in lensing selected samples. Our results are consistent with previous studies which similarly detected a concentration excess, and increases the total number of clusters studied with the combined strong and weak lensing technique to ten. Combining our sample with previous work, we find that clusters with larger Einstein radii are more anomalously concentrated. We also present a detailed model of the lensing cluster Abell 1703 with constraints from multiple image families, and find the dark matter inner density profile to be cuspy with the slope consistent with -1, in agreement with expectations.

  4. Probability of lensing magnification by cosmologically distributed galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pei, Yichuan C.

    1993-01-01

    We present the analytical formulae for computing the magnification probability caused by cosmologically distributed galaxies. The galaxies are assumed to be singular, truncated-isothermal spheres without both evolution and clustering in redshift. We find that, for a fixed total mass, extended galaxies produce a broader shape in the magnification probability distribution and hence are less efficient as gravitational lenses than compact galaxies. The high-magnification tail caused by large galaxies is well approximated by an A exp -3 form, while the tail by small galaxies is slightly shallower. The mean magnification as a function of redshift is, however, found to be independent of the size of the lensing galaxies. In terms of the flux conservation, our formulae for the isothermal galaxy model predict a mean magnification to within a few percent with the Dyer-Roeder model of a clumpy universe.

  5. Weak Lensing from Space I: Instrumentation and Survey Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, Jason; Refregier, Alexandre; Massey, Richard; Albert, Justin; Bacon, David; Bernstein, Gary; Ellis, Richard; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Kim, Alex; Lampton, Mike; McKay, Tim; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bercovitz, J.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.; Harvey, P.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Kreiger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.; Devin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch, A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, D.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-04-23

    A wide field space-based imaging telescope is necessary to fully exploit the technique of observing dark matter via weak gravitational lensing. This first paper in a three part series outlines the survey strategies and relevant instrumental parameters for such a mission. As a concrete example of hardware design, we consider the proposed Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP). Using SNAP engineering models, we quantify the major contributions to this telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF). These PSF contributions are relevant to any similar wide field space telescope. We further show that the PSF of SNAP or a similar telescope will be smaller than current ground-based PSFs, and more isotropic and stable over time than the PSF of the Hubble Space Telescope. We outline survey strategies for two different regimes - a ''wide'' 300 square degree survey and a ''deep'' 15 square degree survey that will accomplish various weak lensing goals including statistical studies and dark matter mapping.

  6. Constraints on holographic