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Sample records for gravitational radiation reaction

  1. r-mode instability: Analytical solution with gravitational radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Oscar J.C.; Sa, Paulo M.

    2005-07-15

    Analytical r-mode solutions are investigated within the linearized theory in the case of a slowly rotating, Newtonian, barotropic, nonmagnetized, perfect-fluid star in which the gravitational radiation (GR) reaction force is present. For the GR reaction term we use the 3.5 post-Newtonian order expansion of the GR force, in order to include the contribution of the current quadrupole moment. We find the explicit expression for the r-mode velocity perturbations and we conclude that they are sinusoidal with the same frequency as the well-known GR force-free linear r-mode solution, and that the GR force drives the r-modes unstable with a growth time scale that agrees with the expression first found by Lindblom, Owen, and Morsink. We also show that the amplitude of these velocity perturbations is corrected, relatively to the GR force-free case, by a term of order {omega}{sup 6}, where {omega} is the angular velocity of the star.

  2. Gravitational radiation reaction and inspiral waveforms in the adiabatic limit.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Scott A; Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Eanna E; Franklin, Joel

    2005-06-10

    We describe progress evolving an important limit of binaries in general relativity: stellar mass compact objects spiraling into much larger black holes. Such systems are of great observational interest. We have developed tools to compute for the first time the radiation from generic orbits. Using global conservation laws, we find the orbital evolution and waveforms for special cases. For generic orbits, inspirals and waveforms can be found by augmenting our approach with an adiabatic self-force rule due to Mino. Such waveforms should be accurate enough for gravitational-wave searches. PMID:16090377

  3. Nonchaotic evolution of triangular configuration due to gravitational radiation reaction in the three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kei; Asada, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    Continuing work initiated in an earlier publication [H. Asada, Phys. Rev. D 80, 064021 (2009)], the gravitational radiation reaction to Lagrange's equilateral triangular solution of the three-body problem is investigated in an analytic method. The previous work is based on the energy balance argument, which is sufficient for a two-body system because the number of degrees of freedom (the semimajor axis and the eccentricity in quasi-Keplerian cases, for instance) equals that of the constants of motion such as the total energy and the orbital angular momentum. In a system with three (or more) bodies, however, the number of degrees of freedom is more than that of the constants of motion. Therefore, the present paper discusses the evolution of the triangular system by directly treating the gravitational radiation reaction force to each body. The perturbed equations of motion are solved by using the Laplace transform technique. It is found that the triangular configuration is adiabatically shrinking and is kept in equilibrium by increasing the orbital frequency due to the radiation reaction if the mass ratios satisfy the Newtonian stability condition. Long-term stability involving the first post-Newtonian corrections is also discussed.

  4. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  5. Linked Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Amy; Swearngin, Joseph; Wickes, Alexander; Willem Dalhuisen, Jan; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    The electromagnetic knot is a topologically nontrivial solution to the vacuum Maxwell equations with the property that any two field lines belonging to either the electric, magnetic, or Poynting vector fields are closed and linked exactly once [1]. The relationship between the vacuum Maxwell and linearized Einstein equations, as expressed in the form of the spin-N massless field equations, suggests that gravitational radiation possesses analogous topologically nontrivial field configurations. Using twistor methods we find the analogous spin-2 solutions of Petrov types N, D, and III. Aided by the concept of tendex and vortex lines as recently developed for the physical interpretation of solutions in general relativity [2], we investigate the physical properties of these knotted gravitational fields by characterizing the topology of their associated tendex and vortex lines.[4pt] [1] Ranada, A. F. and Trueba, J. L., Mod. Nonlinear Opt. III, 119, 197 (2002).[2] Nichols, D. A., et al., Phys. Rev. D, 84 (2011).

  6. Approximation methods in gravitational-radiation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The observation of gravitational-radiation damping in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 and the ongoing experimental search for gravitational waves of extraterrestrial origin have made the theory of gravitational radiation an active branch of classical general relativity. In calculations of gravitational radiation, approximation methods play a crucial role. Recent developments are summarized in two areas in which approximations are important: (a) the quadrupole approxiamtion, which determines the energy flux and the radiation reaction forces in weak-field, slow-motion, source-within-the-near-zone systems such as the binary pulsar; and (b) the normal modes of oscillation of black holes, where the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation gives accurate estimates of the complex frequencies of the modes.

  7. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  8. Tidal radiation. [relativistic gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1977-01-01

    The general theory of tides is developed within the framework of Einstein's theory of gravitation. It is based on the concept of Fermi frame and the associated notion of tidal frame along an open curve in spacetime. Following the previous work of the author an approximate scheme for the evaluation of tidal gravitational radiation is presented which is valid for weak gravitational fields. The emission of gravitational radiation from a body in the field of a black hole is discussed, and for some cases of astrophysical interest estimates are given for the contributions of radiation due to center-of-mass motion, purely tidal deformation, and the interference between the center of mass and tidal motions.

  9. Gravitational radiation from extreme Kerr black hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nakamura, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation induced by a test particle falling into an extreme Kerr black hole was investigated analytically. Assuming the radiation is dominated by the infinite sequence of quasi-normal modes which has the limiting frequency m/(2M), where m is an azimuthal eigenvalue and M is the mass of the black hole, it was found that the radiated energy diverges logarithmically in time. Then the back reaction to the black hole was evaluated by appealing to the energy and angular momentum conservation laws. It was found that the radiation has a tendency to increase the ratio of the angular momentum to mass of the black hole, which is completely different from non-extreme case, while the contribution of the test particle is to decrease it.

  10. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  11. Gravitational radiation by cosmic strings in a junction

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, R.; Karouby, J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Khosravi, S.

    2009-01-15

    The formalism for computing the gravitational power radiation from excitations on cosmic strings forming a junction is presented and applied to the simple case of co-planar strings at a junction when the excitations are generated along one string leg. The effects of polarization of the excitations and of the back-reaction of the gravitational radiation on the small scale structure of the strings are studied.

  12. Dipole gravitational radiation in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory of Moffat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.

    1985-07-01

    The generation of gravitational radiation in the nonsymmetric gravitational theory (NGT) of Moffat is analyzed. It is shown that the theory predicts the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from a binary system. The source of the dipole radiation is a vector density S postulated to be proportional to the number density of fermion particles in the components of the system. This radiation is shown to result in a secular decrease in the orbital period of a binary system in addition to that predicted by general relativity. The size of the effect is proportional to the reduced mass of the system and to the square of the difference in l2/[mass] between the two components of the system, where l is a parameter having units of [length] that is related to the number of fermion particles in each component. As part of the analysis, the stress-energy pseudotensor of the NGT, expanded to quadratic order in the gravitational fields, and the NGT gravitational-wave luminosity formula are derived for the first time. With a perfect-fluid model of matter, results are also given for the post-Newtonian expansions of the source densities of the gravitational fields. The results of this analysis are then applied to the binary pulsar system PSR 1913+16 which contains a pulsar orbiting an unobserved companion. With gravitational radiation attributed as the cause of the observed secular decrease in the orbital period, this system provides a test of the prediction by the NGT of dipole gravitational radiation. It is shown that the NGT can only fit the observations of this system provided the l parameter of the unseen companion is <~350 km.

  13. Gravitational radiation quadrupole formula is valid for gravitationally interacting systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M.; Will, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    An argument is presented for the validity of the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation energy loss in the far field of nearly Newtonian (e.g., binary stellar) systems. This argument differs from earlier ones in that it determines beforehand the formal accuracy of approximation required to describe gravitationally self-interacting systems, uses the corresponding approximate equation of motion explicitly, and evaluates the appropriate asymptotic quantities by matching along the correct space-time light cones.

  14. A low temperature gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W. O.

    1971-01-01

    The beginning design of an experiment is discussed for studying gravitational radiation by using massive detectors which are cooled to ultralow temperatures in order to improve the signal to noise ratios and the effective range and stability of the detectors. The gravitational detector, a low detection system, a cooled detector, magnetic support, superconducting shielding, and superconducting accelerometer detector are described.

  15. Gravitational radiation as a test of relativistic gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational radiation can be used to test theories of gravitation. When the waves are ultimately detected directly, their speed and polarization properties can be measured and compared with predictions of alternative theories. The multipole nature of gravitational radiation was already tested in the binary pulsar, where observations of the decay of the orbit verify the quadrupole formula for gravitational radiation damping of general relativity and put strong constraints on dipole gravitational radiation predicted by many alternative theories.

  16. Inhomogeneous cosmology: Gravitational radiation in Bianchi backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, P.J.; Hellings, R.W.; Zimmerman, R.L.; Farhoosh, H.; Levine, D.I.; Zeldich, S.

    1982-02-01

    An exact formalism is developed for describing cosmological models with strong, long wavelength gravitational waves of general polarization propagating over backgrounds corresponding to Bianchi types I through VII. We introduce and discuss a new metric which exhibits the appropriate symmetries of two equivalent independent polarizations of gravitational waves. The formalism is applied to an empty type I cosmology, and it is shown how the original z-dependent chaotic singularity structure transforms itself into gravitational radiation propagating along the z-axis in a Bianchi I background.

  17. Inhomogeneous cosmology - Gravitational radiation in Bianchi backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.; Hellings, R. W.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Farhoosh, H.; Levine, D. I.; Zeldich, S.

    1982-01-01

    An exact formalism is developed for describing cosmological models with strong, long wavelength gravitational waves of general polarization, propagating over backgrounds corresponding to Bianchi types I through VII. A new metric which exhibits the appropriate symmetries of two equivalent independent polarizations of gravitational waves is introduced and discussed. The formalism is applied to an empty type I cosmology, and it is shown how the original z-dependent chaotic singularity structure transforms itself into gravitational radiation propagating along the z-axis in a Bianchi I background.

  18. Emission of gravitational radiation from ultrarelativistic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalis, Ehud B.; Ori, Amos

    2001-09-01

    Recent observations suggest that blobs of matter are ejected with ultrarelativistic speeds in various astrophysical phenomena such as supernova explosions, quasars, and microquasars. In this paper we analyze the gravitational radiation emitted when such an ultrarelativistic blob is ejected from a massive object. We express the gravitational wave by the metric perturbation in the transverse-traceless gauge, and calculate its amplitude and angular dependence. We find that in the ultrarelativistic limit the gravitational wave has a wide angular distribution, like 1+cos θ. The typical burst's frequency is Doppler shifted, with the blueshift factor being strongly beamed in the forward direction. As a consequence, the energy flux carried by the gravitational radiation is beamed. In the second part of the paper we estimate the anticipated detection rate of such bursts by a gravitational-wave detector, for blobs ejected in supernova explosions. Dar and De Rujula recently proposed that ultrarelativistic blobs ejected from the central core in supernova explosions constitute the source of gamma-ray bursts. Substituting the most likely values of the parameters as suggested by their model, we obtain an estimated detection rate of about 1 per year by the advanced LIGO-II detector.

  19. The generation of gravitational radiation by escaping supernova neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, R.

    1978-01-01

    Formulae for the gravitational radiation due to the anisotropic axisymmetric emission of neutrinos from a small source are derived. We find that a burst of neutrinos released anisotropically from a supernova will generate a burst of gravitational radiation that may be comparable in amplitude and energy to the gravitational radiation generated by the fluid motion in the collapse of the supernova core.

  20. Radiative processes in external gravitational fields

    SciTech Connect

    Papini, Giorgio

    2010-07-15

    Kinematically forbidden processes may be allowed in the presence of external gravitational fields. These can be taken into account by introducing generalized particle momenta. The corresponding transition probabilities can then be calculated to all orders in the metric deviation from the field-free expressions by simply replacing the particle momenta with their generalized counterparts. The procedure applies to particles of any spin and to any gravitational fields. Transition probabilities, emission power, and spectra are, to leading order, linear in the metric deviation. It is also shown how a small dissipation term in the particle wave equations can trigger a strong backreaction that introduces resonances in the radiative process and deeply affects the resulting gravitational background.

  1. Gravitational radiation from massless particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, Andrei; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    We compute classical gravitational bremsstrahlung from the gravitational scattering of two massless particles at leading order in the (centre of mass) deflection angle θ ∼ 4G\\sqrt{s}/b=8{GE}/b\\ll 1. The calculation, although non-perturbative in the gravitational constant, is surprisingly simple and yields explicit formulae—in terms of multidimensional integrals—for the frequency and angular distribution of the radiation. In the range {b}-1\\lt ω \\lt {({GE})}-1, the GW spectrum behaves like {log}(1/{GE}ω ){{d}}ω , is confined to cones of angular sizes (around the deflected particle trajectories) ranging from O(θ ) to O(1/ω b), and exactly reproduces, at its lower end, a well-known zero-frequency limit. At ω \\gt {({GE})}-1 the radiation is confined to cones of angular size of order θ {({GE}ω )}-1/2 resulting in a scale-invariant ({{d}}ω /ω ) spectrum. The total efficiency in GW production is dominated by this ‘high frequency’ region and is formally logarithmically divergent in the UV. If the spectrum is cutoff at the limit of validity of our approximations (where a conjectured bound on GW power is also saturated), the fraction of incoming energy radiated away turns out to be \\tfrac{1}{2π }{θ }2{log}{θ }-2 at leading logarithmic accuracy.

  2. A Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1997-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking searches for gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we describe a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. This technique provides also a way for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by nongravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector of gravitational radiation. In the assumption of calibrating the frequency fluctuations induced by the interplanetary plasma, a strain sensitivity equal to 4.7 x 10(exp -18) at 10(exp -3) Hz is estimated. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  3. Omnidirectional Gravitational Radiation Observatory: Proceedings of the First International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velloso, W. F.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    1997-08-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Foreword * Introduction: The OMNI-1 Workshop and the beginning of the International Gravitational Radiation Observatory * Opening Talks * Gravitational radiation sources for Acoustic Detectors * The scientific and technological benefits of gravitational wave research * Operating Second and Third Generation Resonant-Mass Antennas * Performance of the ALLEGRO detector -- and what our experience tells us about spherical detectors * The Perth Niobium resonant mass antenna with microwave parametric transducer * The gravitational wave detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS * Gravitational Waves and Astrophysical Sources for the Next Generation Observatory * What is the velocity of gravitational waves? * Superstring Theory: how it change our ideas about the nature of Gravitation * Statistical approach to the G.W. emission from radio pulsars * Gravitational waves from precessing millisecond pulsars * The production rate of compact binary G.W. sources in elliptical galaxies * On the possibility to detect Gravitational Waves from precessing galactic neutron stars * Gravitational wave output of the head-on collision of two black holes * SN as a powerfull source of gravitational radiation * Long thick cosmic strings radiating gravitational waves and particles * Non-Parallel Electric and Magnetic Fields in a gravitational background, stationary G.W. and gravitons * Exact solutions of gravitational waves * Factorization method for linearized quantum gravity at tree-level. Graviton, photon, electron processes * Signal Detection with Resonant-Mass Antennas * Study of coalescing binaries with spherical gravitational waves detectors * Influence of transducer asymmetries on the isotropic response of a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Performances and preliminary results of the cosmic-ray detector associated with NAUTILUS * Possible transducer configurations for a spherical gravitational wave antenna * Detectability of

  4. Stochastic microhertz gravitational radiation from stellar convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. F.; Melatos, A.

    2014-09-01

    High Reynolds-number turbulence driven by stellar convection in main-sequence stars generates stochastic gravitational radiation. We calculate the wave-strain power spectral density as a function of the zero-age main-sequence mass for an individual star and for an isotropic, universal stellar population described by the Salpeter initial mass function and redshift-dependent Hopkins-Beacom star formation rate. The spectrum is a broken power law, which peaks near the turnover frequency of the largest turbulent eddies. The signal from the Sun dominates the universal background. For the Sun, the far-zone power spectral density peaks at S(f {sub peak}) = 5.2 × 10{sup –52} Hz{sup –1} at frequency f {sub peak} = 2.3 × 10{sup –7} Hz. However, at low observing frequencies f < 3 × 10{sup –4} Hz, the Earth lies inside the Sun's near zone and the signal is amplified to S {sub near}(f {sub peak}) = 4.1 × 10{sup –27} Hz{sup –1} because the wave strain scales more steeply with distance (∝d {sup –5}) in the near zone than in the far zone (∝d {sup –1}). Hence the Solar signal may prove relevant for pulsar timing arrays. Other individual sources and the universal background fall well below the projected sensitivities of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and next-generation pulsar timing arrays. Stellar convection sets a fundamental noise floor for more sensitive stochastic gravitational-wave experiments in the more distant future.

  5. Simulation of Merger of Two Black Holes and Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a simulation of the merger of two black holes and the resulting emission of gravitational radiation. The colored fields represent a component of the curvature of space-time. The ou...

  6. Cosmic string structure at the gravitational radiation scale

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2007-06-15

    We use our model of the small scale structure on cosmic strings to develop further the result of Siemens, Olum, and Vilenkin that the gravitational radiation length scale on cosmic strings is smaller than the previously assumed {gamma}G{mu}t. We discuss some of the properties of cosmic string loops at this cutoff scale, and we argue that recent network simulations point to two populations of cosmic string loops, one near the horizon scale and one near the gravitational radiation cutoff.

  7. Modeling Gravitational Radiation Waveforms from Black Hole Mergers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. G.; Centrelia, J. M.; Choi, D.; Koppitz, M.; VanMeter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from merging binary black hole systems is anticipated as a key source for gravitational wave observations. Ground-based instruments, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) may observe mergers of stellar-scale black holes, while the space-based Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) observatory will be sensitive to mergers of massive galactic-center black holes over a broad range of mass scales. These cataclysmic events may emit an enormous amount of energy in a brief time. Gravitational waves from comparable mass mergers carry away a few percent of the system's mass-energy in just a few wave cycles, with peak gravitational wave luminosities on the order of 10^23 L_Sun. Optimal analysis and interpretation of merger observation data will depend on developing a detailed understanding, based on general relativistic modeling, of the radiation waveforms. We discuss recent progress in modeling radiation from equal mass mergers using numerical simulations of Einstein's gravitational field equations, known as numerical relativity. Our simulations utilize Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) to allow high-resolution near the black holes while simultaneously keeping the outer boundary of the computational domain far from the black holes, and making it possible to read out gravitational radiation waveforms in the weak-field wave zone. We discuss the results from simulations beginning with the black holes orbiting near the system's innermost stable orbit, comparing the recent simulations with earlier "Lazarus" waveform estimates based on an approximate hybrid numerical/perturbative technique.

  8. Gravitational radiation damping and the three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Zachary Edward

    2003-11-01

    A model of three-body motion is developed which includes the effects of gravitational radiation reaction. The radiation reaction due to the emission of gravitational waves is the only post-Newtonian effect that is included here. For simplicity, all of the motion is taken to be planar. Two of the masses are viewed as a binary system and the third mass, whose motion will be a fixed orbit around the center-of-mass of the binary system, is viewed as a perturbation. This model aims to describe the motion of a relativistic binary pulsar that is perturbed by a third mass. Numerical integration of this simplified model reveals that given the right initial conditions and parameters one can see resonances. These (m, n) resonances are defined by the resonance condition, mω = 2 nΩ, where m and n are relatively prime integers and ω and Ω are the angular frequencies of the binary orbit and third mass orbit (around the center-of- mass of the binary), respectively. The resonance condition consequently fixes a value for the semimajor axis of the binary orbit for the duration of the resonance; therefore, the binary energy remains constant on the average while its angular momentum changes during the resonance. Numerical integration of an equation of relative motion that approximates the binary gives evidence of such resonances. This paper outlines a method of averaging developed by Chicone, Mashhoon, and Retzloff which renders a nonlinear system that undergoes resonance capture into a mathematically amenable form. This method is applied to the present system and one arrives at an analytical solution that describes the average motion during resonance. Furthermore, prominent features of the full nonlinear system, such as the frequency of oscillation and antidamping, accord with their analytically derived formulae.

  9. Gravitational radiation from collapsing magnetized dust

    SciTech Connect

    Sotani, Hajime; Yoshida, Shijun; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2007-04-15

    In this article we study the influence of magnetic fields on the axial gravitational waves emitted during the collapse of a homogeneous dust sphere. We found that while the energy emitted depends weakly on the initial matter perturbations it has strong dependence on the strength and the distribution of the magnetic field perturbations. The gravitational wave output of such a collapse can be up to an order of magnitude larger or smaller calling for detailed numerical 3D studies of collapsing magnetized configurations.

  10. Gravitational radiation observations on the moon

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, R.T. ); Armstrong, J.W. ); Bender, P.L. Quantum Physics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology ); Drever, R.W.P. ); Hellings, R.W. ); Saulson, P.R. )

    1990-07-05

    A Laser-Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is planned for operation in the United States, with two antennas separated by several thousand kilometers. Each antenna would incorporate laser interferometers with 4 km arm lengths, operating in vacuum. The frequency range covered initially would be from a few tens of Hz to a few kHz, with possible extension to lower frequencies later. Similar systems are likely to be constructed in Europe, and there is a possibility of at least one system in Asia or Australia. It will be possible to determine the direction to a gravitational wave source by measuring the difference in the arrival times at the various antennas for burst signals or the phase difference for short duration nearly periodic signals. The addition of an antenna on the Moon, operating in support of the Earth-based antennas, would improve the angular resolution for burst signals by about a factor 50 in the plane containing the source, the Moon, and the Earth. This would be of major importance in studies of gravitational wave sources. There is also a possibility of somewhat lower noise at frequencies near 1 Hz for a lunar gravitational wave antenna, because of lower gravity gradient noise and microseismic noise on the Moon. However, for frequencies near 0.1 Hz and below, a 10{sup 7} km laser gravitational wave antenna in solar orbit would be much more sensitive.

  11. Gravitational radiation from primordial solitons and soliton-star binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that both the formation of nontopological solitons in a primordial second-order phase transition and binary systems of soliton stars could generate a stochastic gravitational-wave background is examined. The present contribution of gravitational radiation to the energy density of the universe from these processes is estimated for a number of different models. The detectability of such contributions from the timing measurements of the millisecond pulsar and spaceborne laser interferometry is briefly discussed and compared to other cosmological and local sources of background gravitational waves.

  12. Gravitational radiation from magnetically funneled supernova fallback onto a magnetar

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Priymak, M. E-mail: m.priymak@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au

    2014-10-20

    Protomagnetars spun up to millisecond rotation periods by supernova fallback are predicted to radiate gravitational waves via hydrodynamic instabilities for ∼10{sup 2} s before possibly collapsing to form a black hole. It is shown that magnetic funneling of the accretion flow (1) creates a magnetically confined polar mountain, which boosts the gravitational wave signal, and (2) 'buries' the magnetic dipole moment, delaying the propeller phase and assisting black hole formation.

  13. Constraints on Lorentz violation from gravitational Čerenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostelecký, V. Alan; Tasson, Jay D.

    2015-10-01

    Limits on gravitational Čerenkov radiation by cosmic rays are obtained and used to constrain coefficients for Lorentz violation in the gravity sector associated with operators of even mass dimensions, including orientation-dependent effects. We use existing data from cosmic-ray telescopes to obtain conservative two-sided constraints on 80 distinct Lorentz-violating operators of dimensions four, six, and eight, along with conservative one-sided constraints on three others. Existing limits on the nine minimal operators at dimension four are improved by factors of up to a billion, while 74 of our explicit limits represent stringent first constraints on nonminimal operators. Prospects are discussed for future analyses incorporating effects of Lorentz violation in the matter sector, the role of gravitational Čerenkov radiation by high-energy photons, data from gravitational-wave observatories, the tired-light effect, and electromagnetic Čerenkov radiation by gravitons.

  14. Accretion Acceleration of Neutron Stars and Effects of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yan-yan; Zhang, Yue-zhu; Wei, Yi-huan; Zhang, Cheng-min; Yu, Shao-hua; Pan, Yuan-yue; Guo, Yuan-qi; Wang, De-hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we studied the neutron star's spin acceleration in the accretion process of the neutron star binary system, and the relation how the spin period changes with the accreted mass. We analyzed further the evolutions of both magnetic field and spin period of a neutron star, and compared the modeled results with the observational data of pulsars, to show that they are consistent with each other. Based on above studies, we investigated the effect of gravitational radiation on the spin-up process of a neutron star, and derived the change rate of the neutron star's spin period in the accretion process. We also estimated the critical angular velocity Ωcr, at which the accretion torque is balanced by that of gravitational radiation, and discussed the influence of gravitational radiation on the neutron star's spin evolution.

  15. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  16. Gravitational radiation from a cylindrical naked singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Ken-ichi; Morisawa, Yoshiyuki

    2005-06-15

    We construct an approximate solution which describes the gravitational emission from a naked singularity formed by the gravitational collapse of a cylindrical thick shell composed of dust. The assumed situation is that the collapsing speed of the dust is very large. In this situation, the metric variables are obtained approximately by a kind of linear perturbation analysis in the background Morgan solution which describes the motion of cylindrical null dust. The most important problem in this study is what boundary conditions for metric and matter variables should be imposed at the naked singularity. We find a boundary condition that all the metric and matter variables are everywhere finite at least up to the first order approximation. This implies that the spacetime singularity formed by this high-speed dust collapse is very similar to that formed by the null dust and the final singularity will be a conical one. Weyl curvature is completely released from the collapsed dust.

  17. Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jr, John T. Giblin; Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu

    2010-08-01

    Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

  18. Gravitational radiation theory. M.A. Thesis - Rice Univ.; [survey of current research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of current research in the theory of gravitational radiation. The mathematical structure of gravitational radiation is stressed. Furthermore, the radiation problem is treated independently from other problems in gravitation. The development proceeds candidly through three points of view - scalar, rector, and tensor radiation theory - and the corresponding results are stated.

  19. Gravitational radiation from first-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Child, Hillary L.; Giblin, John T. Jr. E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu

    2012-10-01

    It is believed that first-order phase transitions at or around the GUT scale will produce high-frequency gravitational radiation. This radiation is a consequence of the collisions and coalescence of multiple bubbles during the transition. We employ high-resolution lattice simulations to numerically evolve a system of bubbles using only scalar fields, track the anisotropic stress during the process and evolve the metric perturbations associated with gravitational radiation. Although the radiation produced during the bubble collisions has previously been estimated, we find that the coalescence phase enhances this radiation even in the absence of a coupled fluid or turbulence. We comment on how these simulations scale and propose that the same enhancement should be found at the Electroweak scale; this modification should make direct detection of a first-order electroweak phase transition easier.

  20. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  1. Gravitational Radiation from Post-Newtonian Sources and Inspiralling Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Luc

    2014-02-01

    To be observed and analyzed by the network of gravitational wave detectors on ground (LIGO, VIRGO, etc.) and by the future detectors in space (eLISA, etc.), inspiralling compact binaries -- binary star systems composed of neutron stars and/or black holes in their late stage of evolution -- require high-accuracy templates predicted by general relativity theory. The gravitational waves emitted by these very relativistic systems can be accurately modelled using a high-order post-Newtonian gravitational wave generation formalism. In this article, we present the current state of the art on post-Newtonian methods as applied to the dynamics and gravitational radiation of general matter sources (including the radiation reaction back onto the source) and inspiralling compact binaries. We describe the post-Newtonian equations of motion of compact binaries and the associated Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, paying attention to the self-field regularizations at work in the calculations. Several notions of innermost circular orbits are discussed. We estimate the accuracy of the post-Newtonian approximation and make a comparison with numerical computations of the gravitational self-force for compact binaries in the small mass ratio limit. The gravitational waveform and energy flux are obtained to high post-Newtonian order and the binary's orbital phase evolution is deduced from an energy balance argument. Some landmark results are given in the case of eccentric compact binaries -- moving on quasi-elliptical orbits with non-negligible eccentricity. The spins of the two black holes play an important role in the definition of the gravitational wave templates. We investigate their imprint on the equations of motion and gravitational wave phasing up to high post-Newtonian order (restricting to spin-orbit effects which are linear in spins), and analyze the post-Newtonian spin precession equations as well as the induced precession of the orbital plane.

  2. Gravitational radiation from rotating monopole-string systems

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, E.; Dokuchaev, V.; Kachelriess, M.

    2005-02-15

    We study the gravitational radiation from a rotating monopole-antimonopole pair connected by a string. While at not too high frequencies the emitted gravitational spectrum is described asymptotically by P{sub n}{proportional_to}n{sup -1}, the spectrum is exponentially suppressed in the high-frequency limit, P{sub n}{proportional_to}exp(-n/n{sub cr}). Below n{sub cr}, the emitted spectrum of gravitational waves is very similar to the case of an oscillating monopole pair connected by a string, and we argue, therefore, that the spectrum found holds approximately for any moving monopole-string system. As an application, we discuss the stochastic gravitational wave background generated by monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by strings in the early Universe and gravitational wave bursts emitted at present by monopole-string networks. We confirm that advanced gravitational wave detectors have the potential to detect a signal for string tensions as small as G{mu}{approx}10{sup -13}.

  3. Imprints of relic gravitational waves in cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, D.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Polnarev, A. G.

    2006-10-01

    A strong variable gravitational field of the very early Universe inevitably generates relic gravitational waves by amplifying their zero-point quantum oscillations. We begin our discussion by contrasting the concepts of relic gravitational waves and inflationary “tensor modes”. We explain and summarize the properties of relic gravitational waves that are needed to derive their effects on cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies. The radiation field is characterized by four invariants I, V, E, B. We reduce the radiative transfer equations to a single integral equation of Voltairre type and solve it analytically and numerically. We formulate the correlation functions CℓXX' for X, X'=T, E, B and derive their amplitudes, shapes and oscillatory features. Although all of our main conclusions are supported by exact numerical calculations, we obtain them, in effect, analytically by developing and using accurate approximations. We show that the TE correlation at lower ℓ’s must be negative (i.e. an anticorrelation), if it is caused by gravitational waves, and positive if it is caused by density perturbations. This difference in TE correlation may be a signature more valuable observationally than the lack or presence of the BB correlation, since the TE signal is about 100 times stronger than the expected BB signal. We discuss the detection by WMAP of the TE anticorrelation at ℓ≈30 and show that such an anticorrelation is possible only in the presence of a significant amount of relic gravitational waves (within the framework of all other common assumptions). We propose models containing considerable amounts of relic gravitational waves that are consistent with the measured TT, TE and EE correlations.

  4. Inertia, gravitation, and radiation time delays

    SciTech Connect

    Graneau, P.

    1987-05-01

    This note explains how an instantaneous action-at-a-distance theory gives rise to time delays between a cause in one location and its effect at another. The key to this is a suitable law of induction which itself does not produce the time delay, but contains the cause in the form of a time derivative. The many-body solution process for an array of simultaneous induction equations then reveals retardation between cause and effect without the transport of energy at finite velocity. It is suggested that a suitable law of induction of inertia applied to an object in the solar system and the many-body universe may furnish the quantitative connection between inertia and Newtonian gravitation.

  5. Persistent Gravitational Radiation from Glitching Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melatos, A.; Douglass, J. A.; Simula, T. P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum mechanical simulations of neutron star rotational glitches, triggered by vortex avalanches in the superfluid stellar interior, reveal that vortices pin nonaxisymmetrically to the crust during the intervals between glitches. Hence a glitching neutron star emits a persistent current quadrupole gravitational wave signal at the star’s rotation frequency, whose interglitch amplitude is constant and determined by the avalanche history since birth. The signal can be detected in principle by coherent searches planned for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), whether or not a glitch occurs during the observation, if the power-law distribution of glitch sizes extends up to {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max}/{{Ω }}≳ {10}-6{η }-1{({{Δ }}φ )}-1{({{Ω }}/{10}3 {rad} {{{s}}}-1)}-3(D/1 {kpc}) in the targeted object, where {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} and {{Δ }}φ are the largest angular velocity jump and avalanche opening angle, respectively, to have occurred in a glitch since birth, Ω is the angular velocity at present, η is the crustal fraction of the moment of inertia, and D is the distance from the Earth. A major caveat concerning detectability is whether the nonaxisymmetries observed in existing simulations with ≲ {10}3 vortices extrapolate to realistic neutron stars with ≳ {10}15 vortices. The arguments for and against extrapolation are discussed critically in the context of avalanche dynamics in self-organized critical systems, but the issue cannot be resolved without larger simulations and tighter observational limits on η {{Δ }}φ {{Δ }}{{{Ω }}}{max} from future LIGO (non)detections and radio timing campaigns.

  6. Gravitational radiation and the ultimate speed in Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    In Rosen's bimetric theory of gravity the (local) speed of gravitational radiation is determined by the combined effects of cosmological boundary values and nearby concentrations of matter. It is possible for the speed of gravitational radiation to be less than the speed of light. It is here shown that the emission of gravitational radiation prevents particles of nonzero rest mass from exceeding the speed of gravitational radiation. Observations of relativistic particles place limits on the speed of gravitational radiation and the cosmological boundary values today, and observations of synchroton radiation from compact radio sources place limits on the cosmological boundary values in the past.

  7. Radiation from highly relativistic geodesics. [gravitational wave generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misner, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A number of recent works are reviewed concerning the generation and emission of gravitational waves. It is shown that at high frequencies, the generation of gravitational radiation is a local phenomenon. Two examples are described illustrating this generation when a high-energy particle collides against the space-time curvature. One, after Matzner and Nutku, uses a method of virtual photons; the other, after Chrzanowski and Misner, is based on the W.K.B. approximation, corresponding to geometric optics, for the inhomogeneous wave equation. This method uses a factorized integral representation of the Green function which is valid asymptotically to infinity in space.

  8. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  9. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  10. Radiation Reaction and Thomson Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, James

    2007-07-11

    In recent years high power high irradiance lasers of peta-watt order have been or are under construction. In addition, in the next 10 years lasers of unprecedented powers, exa-watt, could be built If lasers such as these are focused to very small spot sizes, extremely high laser irradiances will be achieved. When electrons interact with such a laser, they become highly relativistic over very short time and spatial scales. Usually the motion of an electron under the influence of electromagnetic fields is influenced to a small extent by radiation emission from acceleration. However, under such violent acceleration the amount of radiation emitted by electrons can become so large that significant damping of the electron motion by the emission of this radiation can occur. In this lecture note we will study this problem of radiation reaction by first showing how the equations of motion are obtained. Then, we will examine the problems with such equations and what approximations are made. We will specifically examine the effects of radiation reaction on the Thomson scattering of radiation from counter-streaming laser pulses and high energy electrons through the numerical integration of the equations of motion. We will briefly address the fundamental physics, which can be addressed by using such high irradiance lasers interacting with high energy electrons.

  11. Method for numerical relativity: simulation of axisymmetric gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation generation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.R. II

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented that allows fully self-consistent numerical simulation of asymptotically flat axisymmetric nonrotating general relativistic systems. These techniques were developed to model and understand resulting relativistic effects in gravitational core collapse and gravitational radiation generation. Both vacuum (Brill) spacetimes and matter-filled configurations can be treated. The author uses the (3 + 1) composition of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner to write general relativity in a dynamical form. The conformal approach, including the transverse-traceless decomposition of extrinsic curvature due to York, is used to solve the initial-value problem. In addition, these techniques are extended to provide a fully constrained evolution scheme. Several new boundary conditions, applied at large but finite radius, are derived for the elliptic constraint equations. The method uses a simplifying three-gauge, placing the metric in quasi-isotropic form. The resulting three-metric contains only two components that must be solved. One, the conformal factor, is fixed by the Hamiltonian constraint. The second has nice radiative features and is related in the weak-field limit to the usual transverse-traceless gravitational wave amplitude. The time slicing is determined by implementation of the maximal slicing condition.

  12. Thermal Stability Analysis for a Heliocentric Gravitational Radiation Detection Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W.; McElroy, P.; Miyake, R.; Bender, P.; Stebbins, R.; Supper, W.

    1994-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission is designed for detailed studies of low-frequency gravitational radiation. The mission is currently a candidate for ESA's post-Horizon 2000 program. Thermal noise affects the measurement in at least two ways. Thermal variation of the length of the optical cavity to which the lasers are stabilized introduces phase variations in the interferometer signal, which have to be corrected for by using data from the two arms separately.

  13. A method for numerical relativity: Simulation of axisymmetric gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. R., II

    A method is presented which allows fully self-consistent numerical simulation of asymptotically flat axisymmetric nonrotating general relativistic systems. These techniques have been developed to model and understand resulting relativistic effects in gravitational core collapse and gravitational radiation generation. Both vacuum (Brill) spacetimes and matter-filled configurations can be treated. The (3 + 1) decomposition of Arnowitt, Deser and Misner is used to write general relativity in a dynamical form. The conformal approach, including the transverse-traceless decomposition of extrinsic curvature due to York, is used to solve the initial value problem. In addition, these techniques are extended to provide a fully constrained evolution scheme. Several new boundary conditions, applied at large but finite radius, are derived for the elliptic constraint equations. This method uses a simplifying three-gauge, placing the metric in quasi-isotropic form.

  14. Gravitational Radiation from Compact Binary Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, John

    An outstanding question in modern Physics is whether general relativity (GR) is a complete description of gravity among bodies at macroscopic scales. Currently, the best experiments supporting this hypothesis are based on high-precision timing of radio pulsars. This chapter reviews recent advances in the field with a focus on compact binary millisecond pulsars with white-dwarf (WD) companions. These systems—if modeled properly—provide an unparalleled test ground for physically motivated alternatives to GR that deviate significantly in the strong-field regime. Recent improvements in observational techniques and advances in our understanding of WD interiors have allowed for a series of precise mass measurements is such systems. These masses, combined with high-precision radio timing of the pulsars, result to stringent constraints on the radiative properties of gravity, qualitatively very different from what was available in the past.

  15. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  16. Radiation recall reaction causing cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Masri, Sofia Carolina; Misselt, Andrew James; Dudek, Arkadiusz; Konety, Suma H

    2014-01-01

    Radiation recall phenomenon is a tissue reaction that develops within a previously irradiated area, precipitated by the subsequent administration of certain chemotherapeutic agents. It commonly affects the skin, but can also involve internal organs with functional consequences. To our best knowledge, this phenomenon has never been reported as a complication on the heart and should be consider as a potential cause of cardiotoxicity. PMID:24755097

  17. Gravitational radiation in Bianchi Type V cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of the theory of embedding gravitational radiation fields in expanding universes pioneered by Hawking. The problem of embedding such fields in the expanding Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker dust-filled universe, considered by Hawking, is reexamined in a new formalism which permits an easy analysis, in particular, of the relationship between the boundary conditions and the satisfaction, by the Weyl tensor, of the conventional peeling-off behavior. Since gravity wave detectors are expected to pick up plane-fronted gravitational waves, the main thrust of this paper concerns the development of a formulation of Bianchi Type V cosmological models which enables the embedding of such plane-fronted waves to be carried out. This is worked out explicitly in the case of a perfect fluid, with pressure proportional to energy density, and with the histories of the fluid particles orthogonal to the surfaces of homogeneity. 18 references.

  18. Observational limits on a millihertz stochastic background of gravitational radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Boughn, S.P.; Vanhook, S.J.; O'neill, C.M. Princeton Univ., NJ )

    1990-05-01

    An analysis of 100 station years of quiet seismic data shows no evidence of the excitation of earth by a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. The absence of excitation of the two quadrupole modes which couple most strongly to gravitational waves (GWs) implies 1 sigma upper limts on a GW background of 1.7 x 10 to the -5th J/cu cm Hz and 6.1 x 10 to the -6th J/cu m Hz at frequencies of 0.31 mHz and 1.72 mHz, respectively. Although these limits are factors of 1300 and 33 lower than previous limits at these frequencies they are both above the critical density of the universe per octave and are, therefore, relatively uninteresting from a cosmological point of view. 15 refs.

  19. Radiation reaction in binary systems in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennefick, Daniel John

    1997-09-01

    This thesis is concerned with current problems in, and historical aspects of, the problem of radiation reaction in stellar binary systems in general relativity. Part I addresses current issues in the orbital evolution due to gravitational radiation damping of compact binaries. A particular focus is on the inspiral of small bodies orbiting large black holes, employing a perturbation formalism. In addition, the merger, at the end of the insprial, of comparable mass compact binaries, such as neutron star binaries is also discussed. The emphasis of Part I is on providing detailed descriptions of sources and signals with a view to optimising signal analysis in gravitational wave detectors, whether ground- or space- based interferometers, or resonant mass detectors. Part II of the thesis examines the historical controversies surrounding the problem of gravitational waves, and gravitational radiation damping in stellar binaries. In particular, it focuses on debates in the mid 20th-century on whether binary star systems would really exhibit this type of damping and emit gravitational waves, and on the 'quadrupole formula controversy' of the 1970s and 1980s, on the question whether the standard formular describing energy loss due to emission of gravitational waves was correctly derived for such systems. The study shed light on the role of analogy in science, especially where its use is controversial, on the importance of style in physics and on the problem of identity in science, as the use of history as a rhetorical device in controversial debate is examined. The concept of the Theoretician's Regress is introduced to explain the difficulty encountered by relativists in closing debate in this controversy, which persisted in one forms or another for several decades.

  20. Radiation reaction at ultrahigh intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2010-06-15

    Intensities of 10{sup 22} W cm{sup -2} have been reached and it is expected that this will be increased by two orders of magnitude in the near future. At these intensities the radiation reaction force is important, especially in calculating the terminal velocity of an electron. The following briefly describes some of the problems of the existing most well-known equations and describes an approach based on conservation of energy. The resulting equation is compared to the Landau Lifshitz and Ford O'Connell equations, and laboratory tests are proposed.

  1. Escape of gravitational radiation from the field of massive bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Richard H.; Pullin, Jorge; Kundu, Prasun K.

    1993-01-01

    We consider a compact source of gravitational waves of frequency omega in or near a massive spherically symmetric distribution of matter or a black hole. Recent calculations have led to apparently contradictory results for the influence of the massive body on the propagation of the waves. We show here that the results are in fact consistent and in agreement with the 'standard' viewpoint in which the high-frequency compact source produces the radiation as if in a flat background, and the background curvature affects the propagation of these waves.

  2. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, B. J.; Baker, J. G.; Boggs, W. D.; Centrella, J. M.; vanMeter, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source, applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the l = m modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  3. Gravitational Radiation Characteristics of Nonspinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Barnard

    2008-01-01

    "We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical relativity simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our analysis covers amplitude and phase characteristics of the radiation, suggesting a unified picture of the waveforms' dominant features in terms of an implicit rotating source. applying uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We construct a model of the late-stage frequency evolution that fits the $\\ell = m$ modes, and identify late-time relationships between waveform frequency and amplitude. These relationships allow us to construct a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modelling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model."

  4. Radiation reaction of multipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2007-08-01

    A Poincaré-invariant description is proposed for the effective dynamics of a localized system of charged particles in classical electrodynamics in terms of the intrinsic multipole moments of the system. A relativistic-invariant definition for the intrinsic multipole moments of a system of charged particles is given. A new generally covariant action functional for a relativistic perfect fluid is proposed. In the case of relativistic charged dust, it is proven that the description of the problem of radiation reaction of multipole moments by the model of particles is equivalent to the description of this problem by a hydrodynamic model. An effective model is obtained for a pointlike neutral system of charged particles that possesses an intrinsic dipole moment, and the free dynamics of this system is described. The bound momentum of a point dipole is found.

  5. Linking electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We expand on our study of the gravitational and electromagnetic emissions from the late stage of an inspiraling neutron star binary as presented in Palenzuela et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 061105 (2013)]. Interactions between the stellar magnetospheres, driven by the extreme dynamics of the merger, can yield considerable outflows. We study the gravitational and electromagnetic waves produced during the inspiral and merger of a binary neutron star system using a full relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamics evolution code. We show that the interaction between the stellar magnetospheres extracts kinetic energy from the system and powers radiative Poynting flux and heat dissipation. These features depend strongly on the configuration of the initial stellar magnetic moments. Our results indicate that this power can strongly outshine pulsars in binaries and have a distinctive angular and time-dependent pattern. Our discussion provides more detail than Palenzuela et al., showing clear evidence of the different effects taking place during the inspiral. Our simulations include a few milliseconds after the actual merger and study the dynamics of the magnetic fields during the formation of the hypermassive neutron star. We also briefly discuss the possibility of observing such emissions.

  6. Critical phenomena in the aspherical gravitational collapse of radiation fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, Thomas W.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2015-12-01

    We study critical phenomena in the gravitational collapse of a radiation fluid. We perform numerical simulations in both spherical symmetry and axisymmetry, and observe critical scaling in both supercritical evolutions, which lead to the formation of a black hole, and subcritical evolutions, in which case the fluid disperses to infinity and leaves behind flat space. We identify the critical solution in spherically symmetric collapse, find evidence for its universality, and study the approach to this critical solution in the absence of spherical symmetry. For the cases that we consider, aspherical deviations from the spherically symmetric critical solution decay in damped oscillations in a manner that is consistent with the behavior found by Gundlach in perturbative calculations. Our simulations are performed with an unconstrained evolution code, implemented in spherical polar coordinates, and adopting "moving-puncture" coordinates.

  7. Nonlinear solutions of long-wavelength gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.

    1991-05-01

    In a significant improvement over homogeneous minisuperspace models, it is shown that the classical nonlinear evolution of inhomogeneous scalar fields and the metric is tractable when the wavelength of the fluctuations is larger than the Hubble radius. Neglecting second-order spatial gradients, one can solve the energy constraint as well as the evolution equations by invoking a transformation to new canonical variables. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation is separable and complete solutions are given for gravitational radiation and multiple scalar fields interacting through an exponential potential. Although the time parameter is arbitrary, the natural choice is the determinant of the three-metric. The momentum constraint may be simply expressed in terms of the new canonical variables which define the spatial coordinates. The long-wavelength analysis is essential for a proper formulation of stochastic inflation which enables one to model non-Gaussian primordial fluctuations for structure formation.

  8. Electrodynamics of Radiating Charges in a Gravitational Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grøn, Øyvind

    The electrodynamics of a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field based upon the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation are discussed both with reference to an inertial reference frame and a uniformly accelerated reference frame. It is demonstrated that energy and momentum are conserved during runaway motion of a radiating charge and during free fall of a charge in a field of gravity. This does not mean that runaway motion is really happening. It may be an unphysical solution of the LAD equation of motion of a radiating charge due to the unrealistic point particle model of the charge upon which it is based. However it demonstrates the consistency of classical electrodynamics, including the LAD equation which is deduced from Maxwell's equations and the principle of energy-momentum conservation applied to a radiating charge and its electromagnetic field. The decisive role of the Schott energy in this connection is made clear and an answer is given to the question: What sort of energy is the Schott energy and where is it found? It is the part of the electromagnetic field energy which is proportional to (minus) the scalar product of the velocity and acceleration of a moving accelerated charged particle. In the case of the electromagnetic field of a point charge it is localized at the particle. This energy is negative if the acceleration is in the same direction as the velocity and positive if it is in the opposite direction. During runaway motion the Schott energy becomes more and more negative and in the case of a charged particle with finite extension, it is localized in a region with increasing extension surrounding the particle. The Schott energy provides the radiated energy of a freely falling charge. Also it is pointed out that a proton and a neutron fall with the same acceleration in a uniform gravitational field, although the proton radiates and the neutron does not. It is made clear that the question as to whether or not a charge radiates has a reference

  9. The quantum gravitational back-reaction on inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsamis, N.C. |; Woodard, R.P.

    1995-02-01

    We describe our recent calculation of the dominant late time behavior of the expectation value of the metric at two loops in a locally de Sitter background on the manifold T{sup 3} {times} {Re}. If correct, our result proves that quantum gravitational effects slow the rate of inflation by an amount which becomes non-perturbatively large at late times. 11 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Investigation of Advanced Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiqing

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors depends on both the antenna cross-section and the detector noise. The cross-section is determined by the sound velocity VS and density rho of the antenna material, as well as the antenna geometry. The principal detector noise sources are thermal Nyquist noise and noise due to the readout electromechanical amplifier. The cross-section is proportional to rho V_sp{S}{5} for a given frequency and antenna geometry while the thermal noise is inversely proportional to the antenna's mechanical quality factor Q for a given temperature. Materials with high VS could, in principle, provide about a hundred-fold increase in the antenna cross -section as compared to current generation detectors. In this dissertation we report the results of measurements of the temperature-dependent mechanical losses in several suitable high sound velocity materials. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of detectors made of these materials could be improved by a factor of 15 to 100 at 4 K as compared to current detectors with aluminum antennas. A spherical gravitational wave antenna is very promising for gravitational wave astronomy because of its large cross-section, isotropic sky coverage, and the capability it can provide for determining the wave direction. In this dissertation several aspects of spherical detectors, including the eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of the normal-modes of an elastic sphere, the energy cross-section, and the response functions that are used to obtain the noise-free solution to the inverse problem are discussed. Using the maximum likelihood estimation method the inverse problem in the presence of noise is solved. We also determine the false-alarm probability and the detection probability for a network of spherical detectors and estimate the detectable event rates for supernovae core collapses and binary coalescences. Six identical cylindrical detectors, with a suitable arrangement of

  11. Gravitational radiation as radiation same level of electromagnetic and its generation in pulsed high-current discharge. Theory and experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Stanislav; Fisenko, Igor

    2015-04-01

    The notion of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as the electromagnetic radiation is based on theoretically proved and experimentally confirmed fact of existence of stationary states of an electron in its gravitational field characterized by the gravitational constant K = 1042 G (G is the Newtonian gravitational constant) and unrecoverable space-time curvature Λ. This paper gives an overview of the authors' works, which set out the relevant results. Additionally, data is provided on the broadening of the spectra characteristic radiation. The data show that this broadening can be explained only by the presence of excited states of electrons in their gravitational field. What is more, the interpretation of the new line of X-ray emission spectrum according to the results of observation of MOS-camera of XMM-Newton observatory is of interest. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational radiation spectrum such that amplification of gravitational radiation may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  12. Spacecraft to Spacecraft Coherent Laser Tracking as a Xylophone Interferometer Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for gravitational radiation can be performed in space with two spacecraft tracking each other with coherent laser light. This experimental technique could be implemented with two spacecraft carrying an appropriate optical payload, or with the proposed broad-band, space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational waves operated in this non-interferometric mode.

  13. Quantum Radiation Reaction: From Interference to Incoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Victor; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-01-01

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  14. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft Doppler tracking is discussed for detecting gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. A new method is derived for removing from combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. The remaining non-zero gravitational wave signal could be used for detecting gravitational waves.

  15. Search for correlations between the University of Maryland and the University of Rome gravitational radiation antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, V.; Pizzella, G.; Lee, M.; Weber, J.

    1982-05-15

    Results are presented for analyses of the outputs of gravitational radiation antennas in Rome and in Maryland during July 1978. These data give evidence for an external background exciting both antennas.

  16. Detecting radiation reaction at moderate laser intensities.

    PubMed

    Heinzl, Thomas; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Bulanov, Stepan S; Rykovanov, Sergey; Schroeder, Carl B; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim P

    2015-02-01

    We propose a new method of detecting radiation reaction effects in the motion of particles subjected to laser pulses of moderate intensity and long duration. The effect becomes sizable for particles that gain almost no energy through the interaction with the laser pulse. Hence, there are regions of parameter space in which radiation reaction is actually the dominant influence on charged particle motion. PMID:25768626

  17. On the contribution of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation to the timing noise of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of a stochastic and isotropic background of gravitational radiation on timing measurements of pulsars is investigated, and it is shown that pulsar timing noise may be used to establish a significant upper limit of about 10 to the -10th on the total energy density of very long-wavelength stochastic gravitational waves. This places restriction on the strength of very long wavelength gravitational waves in the Friedmann model, and such a background is expected to have no significant effect on the approximately 3 K electromagnetic background radiation or on the dynamics of a cluster of galaxies.

  18. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  19. Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes: Advances in the Perturbative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousto, C. O.

    2005-08-01

    After the work of Regge, Wheeler, Zerilli, Teukolsky and others in the 1970s, it became possible to accurately compute the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of two black holes (in the extreme-mass limit). It was soon evident that, to first perturbative order, a particle in a circular orbit would continue orbiting forever if the radiative corrections to the particle motion that make the orbit decay were not taken into account. When I entered the field in 1996, a quick search of the literature showed that this problem was still unsolved. A straightforward computation leads to infinities produced by the representation of the particle in terms of Dirac delta functions. Since 1938, when Dirac had solved the equivalent problem in electromagnetic theory, nobody had succeeded in regularizing this in a self-consistent manner. Fortunately, the solution was arrived at much sooner than we expected. In 1997, Mino, Sasaki and Tanaka, and Quinn and Wald published the equations of motion that a particle obeys after self-force corrections. This essentially gave birth to the field of radiation reaction/self-force computations. The aim of this programme is first to obtain the corrections to the geodesic motion of a particle in the background of a single black hole, and then to use this corrected trajectory to compute second-order perturbations of the gravitational field. This will give us the energy-momentum radiated to infinity and into the hole, as well as the waveforms that we will eventually be able to measure with ground- or space-based gravitational wave detectors. As mentioned, the programme as a whole will give us waveforms accurate to second perturbative order in the mass ratio of the black holes, i.e. Script O[(m/M)2]. This will be a good approximation for galactic binary black holes of the order of a few solar masses, in the right frequency range (few hundred Hertz) to be detected by ground-based gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO and VIRGO

  20. Gravitational radiation from binary neutron star mergers: Magnetic and microphysical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Binary neutron star mergers will be important sources of gravitational radiation for Advanced LIGO. Understanding how different physical processes-such as magnetic and microphysical effects due to equations of state or neutrino cooling-are imprinted on the radiation is important for learning more about these systems. We perform a series of binary neutron star mergers to examine some of these effects on the gravitational radiation. We use three different realistic equations of state, ranging from soft to stiff, initially magnetized stars, and include neutrino cooling of the post-merger system using a leakage scheme. We discuss possible observational signatures for these systems.

  1. Study of gravitational radiation from cosmic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Saikawa, Ken'ichi E-mail: saikawa@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, following the previous study, we evaluate the spectrum of gravitational wave background generated by domain walls which are produced if some discrete symmetry is spontaneously broken in the early universe. We apply two methods to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum: One is to calculate the gravitational wave spectrum directly from numerical simulations, and another is to calculate it indirectly by estimating the unequal time anisotropic stress power spectrum of the scalar field. Both analysises indicate that the slope of the spectrum changes at two characteristic frequencies corresponding to the Hubble radius at the decay of domain walls and the width of domain walls, and that the spectrum between these two characteristic frequencies becomes flat or slightly red tilted. The second method enables us to evaluate the GW spectrum for the frequencies which cannot be resolved in the finite box lattice simulations, but relies on the assumptions for the unequal time correlations of the source.

  2. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  3. Prospects for detection of gravitational radiation by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Wahlquist, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a calculation of the effect of gravitational radiation on the observed Doppler shift of a sinusoidal electromagnetic signal transmitted to, and coherently transponded from, distant spacecraft. It is found that the effect of plane gravitational waves on such observations is not intuitively immediate, and in fact depends sensitively on the spacecraft direction, which suggests the possibility of detecting such plane waves by simultaneous Doppler tracking of several spacecraft. The need for broad band gravitational wave observations, the required stabilities of time keeping standards, and astrophysical sources expected in the Very Low Frequency band are briefly discussed.

  4. Core Collapse Supernovae Using CHIMERA: Gravitational Radiation from Non-Rotating Progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yakunin, Konstantin; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Chertkow, Merek A; Hix, William Raphael; Blondin, J. M.; Lentz, Eric J; Messer, Bronson; Yoshida, S.

    2011-01-01

    The CHIMERA code is a multi-dimensional multi-physics engine dedicated primarily to the simulation of core collapse supernova explosions. One of the most important aspects of these explosions is their capacity to produce gravitational radiation that is detectable by earth-based laser-interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as LIGO and VIRGO. We present here preliminary gravitational signatures of two-dimensional models with non-rotating progenitors. These simulations exhibit explosions, which are followed for more than half a second after stellar core bounce.

  5. Astronomical polarization studies at radio and infrared wavelengths. Part 1: Gravitational deflection of polarized radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    The gravitational field is probed in a search for polarization dependence in the light bending. This involves searching for a splitting of a source image into orthogonal polarizations as the radiation passes through the solar gravitational field. This search was carried out using the techniques of very long and intermediate baseline interferometry, and by seeking a relative phase delay in orthogonal polarizations of microwaves passing through the solar gravitational field. In this last technique a change in the total polarization of the Helios 1 carrier wave was sought as the spacecraft passed behind the sun. No polarization splitting was detected.

  6. Gravitational radiation from the radial infall of highly relativistic point particles into Kerr black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, José P.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the gravitational radiation generated by the collision of highly relativistic particles with rotating Kerr black holes. We use the Sasaki-Nakamura formalism to compute the waveform, energy spectra, and total energy radiated during this process. We show that the gravitational spectrum for high-energy collisions has definite characteristic universal features, which are independent of the spin of the colliding objects. We also discuss the possible connections between these results and black-hole black-hole collisions at the speed of light. Our results show that during the high-speed collision of a nonrotating hole with a rotating one, at most 35% of the total energy can get converted into gravitational waves. This 35% efficiency occurs only in the most optimistic situation, that of a zero impact parameter collision, along the equatorial plane, with an almost extreme Kerr black hole. In the general situation, the total gravitational energy radiated is expected to be much less, especially if the impact parameter increases. Thus, if one is able to produce black holes at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, at most 35% of the partons’ energy should be emitted during the so-called balding phase. This energy will be missing, since we do not have gravitational wave detectors able to measure such amplitudes. The collision at the speed of light between one rotating black hole and a nonrotating one or two rotating black holes turns out to be the most efficient gravitational wave generator in the Universe.

  7. Detecting a Non-Gaussian Stochastic Background of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2002-12-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  8. Radiative reactions in halo effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupak, Gautam

    2016-03-01

    In this article we review the recent progress in radiative reaction calculations in halo effective field theory. We look at radiative capture and breakup processes that involve a halo nucleus with a single valence neutron or proton. Looking at 7Li(n,γ) 8Li,14C(n,γ)15C and related reactions, the dominant source of theoretical uncertainty in s- and p-wave halo nuclei reaction calculations is quantified in a model-independent framework. The analysis for neutron halos is extended to proton halo systems. The effective field theory results quantify which observable parameters of the strong interaction at low energy need to be determined more precisely for accurate cross-section calculations.

  9. INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE EFFECT FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna, Pablo; Larson, Shane L.; Spergel, David; Yunes, Nicolas

    2010-05-20

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are messengers carrying valuable information about their sources. For sources at cosmological distances, the waves will also contain the imprint left by the intervening matter. The situation is in close analogy with cosmic microwave photons, for which the large-scale structures the photons traverse contribute to the observed temperature anisotropies, in a process known as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. We derive the GW counterpart of this effect for waves propagating on a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background with scalar perturbations. We find that the phase, frequency, and amplitude of the GWs experience Sachs-Wolfe-type integrated effects, in addition to the magnification effects on the amplitude from gravitational lensing. We show that for supermassive black hole binaries, the integrated effects could account for measurable changes on the frequency, chirp mass, and luminosity distance of the binary, thus unveiling the presence of inhomogeneities, and potentially dark energy, in the universe.

  10. HEAD I: Gravitational Radiation From Astrophysical Sources Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1998-12-01

    There has been significant progress recently in improving the sensitivity of searches for gravitational waves. The thresholds of new detectors being planned or under construction may for the first time reach predicted levels of gravity waves from coalescing neutron stars. Space-based detectors may be sensitive to signals from coalescing massive black holes. This session will present aspects of both expected predictions, current measurements and future expectations for gravity wave detection.

  11. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  12. Gravitational radiation from binary systems in alternative metric theories of gravity - Dipole radiation and the binary pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The generation of gravitational radiation in several currently viable metric theories of gravitation (Brans-Dicke, Rosen, Ni, and Lightman-Lee) is analyzed, and it is shown that these theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation from systems containing gravitationally bound objects. In the binary system PSR 1913 + 16, this radiation results in a secular change in the orbital period of the system with a nominal magnitude of 3 parts in 100,000 per year. The size of the effect is proportional to the reduced mass of the system, to the square of the difference in (self-gravitational energy)/(mass) between the two components of the system, and to a parameter, xi, whose value varies from theory to theory. In general relativity xi equals 0, in Rosen's (1973) theory xi equals -20/3, and in Ni's (1973) theory xi equals -400/3. The current upper limit on such a secular period change is one part in 1 million per year. It is shown that further observations of the binary system that tighten this limit and that establish the masses of the components and the identity of the companion may provide a crucial test of otherwise viable alternatives to general relativity.

  13. Center of mass and spin for isolated sources of gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozameh, Carlos N.; Quiroga, Gonzalo D.

    2016-03-01

    We define the center of mass and spin of an isolated system in general relativity. The resulting relationships between these variables and the total linear and angular momentum of the gravitational system are remarkably similar to their Newtonian counterparts, though only variables at the null boundary of an asymptotically flat spacetime are used for their definition. We also derive equations of motion linking their time evolution to the emitted gravitational radiation. The results are then compared to other approaches. In particular, one obtains unexpected similarities as well as some differences with results obtained in the post-Newtonian literature. These equations of motion should be useful when describing the radiation emitted by compact sources, such as coalescing binaries capable of producing gravitational kicks, supernovas, or scattering of compact objects.

  14. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  15. Patterns of auxin distribution during gravitational induction of reaction wood in poplar and pine.

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Jenny M; Olofsson, Kjell; Sundberg, Björn

    2004-05-01

    Gravistimulation of tree stems affects wood development by unilaterally inducing wood with modified properties, called reaction wood. Commonly, it also stimulates cambial growth on the reaction wood side. Numerous experiments involving applications of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or IAA-transport inhibitors have suggested that reaction wood is induced by a redistribution of IAA around the stem. However, in planta proof for this model is lacking. Therefore, we have mapped endogenous IAA distribution across the cambial region tissues in both aspen (Populus tremula, denoted poplar) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) trees forming reaction wood, using tangential cryosectioning combined with sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Moreover, we have documented the kinetics of IAA during reaction wood induction in these species. Our analysis of endogenous IAA demonstrates that reaction wood is formed without any obvious alterations in IAA balance. This is in contrast to gravitropic responses in roots and shoots where a redistribution of IAA has been documented. It is also of interest that cambial growth on the tension wood side was stimulated without an increase in IAA. Taken together, our results suggest a role for signals other than IAA in the reaction wood response, or that the gravitational stimulus interacts with the IAA signal transduction pathway. PMID:15122024

  16. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, R. N.

    2015-05-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO and eLISA will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present progress in the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar- tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as “direct integration of the relaxed Einstein equations,” appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity. In another, mixed black hole- neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter.

  17. Gravitational radiation from compact binaries in scalar-tensor gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ryan

    2014-03-01

    General relativity (GR) has been extensively tested in the solar system and in binary pulsars, but never in the strong-field, dynamical regime. Soon, gravitational-wave (GW) detectors like Advanced LIGO will be able to probe this regime by measuring GWs from inspiraling and merging compact binaries. One particularly interesting alternative to GR is scalar-tensor gravity. We present the calculation of second post-Newtonian (2PN) gravitational waveforms for inspiraling compact binaries in a general class of scalar-tensor theories. The waveforms are constructed using a standard GR method known as ``Direct Integration of the Relaxed Einstein equations,'' appropriately adapted to the scalar-tensor case. We find that differences from general relativity can be characterized by a reasonably small number of parameters. Among the differences are new hereditary terms which depend on the past history of the source. In one special case, mixed black hole-neutron star systems, all differences from GR can be characterized by only a single parameter. In another, binary black hole systems, we find that the waveform is indistinguishable from that of general relativity.

  18. Dressed Charge of Electron by Radiation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SETO, Keita; Zhang, Sen; KOGA, James; Moritaka, Toseo; Homma, Kensuke; Nakamiya, Yoshihide; NAGATOMO, Hideo; MIMA, Kunioki

    2016-03-01

    With the progress of ultraintense short pulse laser technologies, the maximum intensity of the lasers has reached the order of 1022W/cm2. Now, several institutes are aiming at higher intensities of over 1024∼W/cm2. It is expected that these lasers can investigate the regime of the ultra-intense field effects like electron-positron pair creation and annihilation, these high-intense laser fields enters into the non-linear QED regime. However, when an electron interacts with lasers with intensities over 1022W/cm2, it has been predicted that the radiation reaction effect becomes significant. The strong radiation field can induce the fluctuation of QED vacuum (vacuum polarization or photon-photon scatterings). Though the propagator for fields is deformed by it, some kind of a polarized charge exists as the dress. In this paper, we will discuss about this dress of an electron generated by radiation in the description of classical physics. It leads to the avoidance of the mathematical difficulty of the radiation reaction problems.

  19. Bianchi type-I magnetized radiating cosmological model in self creation theory of gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vimal Chand; Jain, Nikhil

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type-I cosmological model in the presence of magnetized field with disordered radiation in Barber's second self-creation theory of gravitation. To obtain exact solution we assume that the component of shear tensor is proportional to expansion ( θ). Some geometrical and physical properties of the model have also been discussed.

  20. Naked singularities in non-self-similar gravitational collapse of radiation shells

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, P.S.; Dwivedi, I.H. )

    1992-03-15

    Non-self-similar gravitational collapse of imploding radiation is shown to give rise to a strong curvature naked singularity. The conditions are specified for the singularity to be globally naked and the strength of the same is examined along nonspacelike curves and along all the families of nonspacelike geodesics terminating at the singularity in the past.

  1. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Narrow-Band Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.; Armstrong, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a filtering technique for reducing the frequency fluctuations due to the troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the ground antenna in spacecraft Doppler tracking searches for gravitational radiation. This method takes advantage of the sinusoidal behavior of the transfer function to the Doppler observable of these noise sources, which displays sharp nulls at selected Fourier components.

  2. Resonance behaviour and partial averaging in a three-body system with gravitational radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Zachary E.

    2003-05-01

    In a previous investigation, a model of three-body motion was developed which included the effects of gravitational radiation reaction. The aim was to describe the motion of a relativistic binary pulsar that is perturbed by a third mass and look for resonances between the binary and third-mass orbits. Numerical integration of an equation of relative motion that approximates the binary gives evidence of such resonances. These (m:n) resonances are defined for the present purposes by the resonance condition, mω= 2nΩ, where m and n are relatively prime integers and ω and Ω are the angular frequencies of the binary orbit and third-mass orbit (around the centre of mass of the binary), respectively. The resonance condition consequently fixes a value for the semimajor axis a of the binary orbit for the duration of the resonance because of the Kepler relationship ω=a-3/2. This paper outlines a method of averaging developed by Chicone, Mashhoon and Retzloff, which renders a non-linear system that undergoes resonance capture into a mathematically amenable form. This method is applied to the present system and one arrives at an analytical solution that describes the average motion during resonance. Furthermore, prominent features of the full non-linear system, such as the frequency of oscillation and antidamping, accord with their analytically derived formulae.

  3. Gravitational Radiation of a Vibrating Physical String as a Model for the Gravitational Emission of an Astrophysical Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ray A.; Modanese, Giovanni

    Vibrating media offer an important testing ground for reconciling conflicts between General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics and other branches of physics. For sources like a Weber bar, the standard covariant formalism for elastic bodies can be applied. The vibrating string, however, is a source of gravitational waves which requires novel computational techniques, based on the explicit construction of a conserved and renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Renormalization (in a classical sense) is necessary to take into account the effect of external constraints, which affect the emission considerably. Our computation also relaxes usual simplifying assumptions like far-field approximation, spherical or plane wave symmetry, TT gauge and absence of internal interference. In a further step towards unification, the method is then adapted to give the radiation field of a transversal Alfven wave in a rarefied astrophysical plasma, where the tension is produced by an external static magnetic field.

  4. Compact dark matter objects, asteroseismology, and gravitational waves radiated by sun

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, Yu. E.

    2015-12-15

    The solar surface oscillations observed by Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Solar Helioseismic Observatory are considered to be excited by a small fraction of Dark Matter in form of Compact Dark Matter Objects (CDMO) in the solar structure. Gravitational Waves (GW) radiated by these CDMO are predicted to be the strongest at the Earth and are easily detectable by European Laser Interferometer Space Antenna or by Gravitational-Wave Observatory “Dulkyn” which can solve two the most challenging tasks in the modern physics: direct detection of GW and DM.

  5. Gravitational radiation from inspiralling compact binaries completed at the third post-Newtonian order.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Luc; Damour, Thibault; Esposito-Farèse, Gilles; Iyer, Bala R

    2004-08-27

    The gravitational radiation from point particle binaries is computed at the third post-Newtonian (3PN) approximation of general relativity. Three previously introduced ambiguity parameters, coming from the Hadamard self-field regularization of the 3PN source-type mass quadrupole moment, are consistently determined by means of dimensional regularization, and proved to have the values xi=-9871/9240, kappa=0, and zeta=-7/33. These results complete the derivation of the general relativistic prediction for compact binary inspiral up to 3.5PN order, and should be of use for searching and deciphering the signals in the current network of gravitational wave detectors. PMID:15447090

  6. Gravitational radiation from a particle in bound orbit around a black hole; relativistic correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ashok; Khanal, Udayaraj

    2016-05-01

    Gravitational radiation from a system of two body, one as test particle and other as black hole (we assume, mi is mass of the test particle and m 2 is mass of black hole in bound orbits (orbital eccentricities e < 1) and E 2 < 1; E is the energy, is calculated with relativistic correction using the method of inertia tensor and multipole formalism. Plots of power versus eccentricity of the bound orbit of first kind are presented, and average total power radiated as a function of eccentricity is plotted according to inertia tensor method. According to multipole formalism the power radiated in gravitational waves from an bound orbit is given by enhancement factor g(n,e) times the function of other parameters is plotted. The calculations apply for arbitrary eccentricity of the relative orbit, assuming orbital velocities are small.

  7. Radiation reaction for a massless charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2003-07-01

    We derive effective equations of motion for a massless charged particle coupled to the dynamical electromagnetic field with regard to the radiation back reaction. It is shown that unlike the massive case, not all the divergences resulting from the self-action of the particle are Lagrangian, i.e., can be cancelled out by adding appropriate counterterms to the original action. Besides, the order of renormalized differential equations governing the effective dynamics turns out to be greater than the order of the corresponding Lorentz-Dirac equation for a massive particle. For the case of a homogeneous external field, the first radiative correction to the Lorentz equation is explicitly derived via the reduction of order procedure.

  8. Impact of gravitational radiation higher order modes on single aligned-spin gravitational wave searches for binary black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Husa, Sascha; Sintes, Alicia M.; Pürrer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Current template-based gravitational wave searches for compact binary coalescences use waveform models that omit the higher order modes content of the gravitational radiation emitted, considering only the quadrupolar (ℓ,|m |)=(2 ,2 ) modes. We study the effect of such omission for the case of aligned-spin compact binary coalescence searches for equal-spin (and nonspinning) binary black holes in the context of two versions of Advanced LIGO: the upcoming 2015 version, known as early Advanced LIGO (eaLIGO) and its zero-detuned high-energy power version, which we will refer to as Advanced LIGO (AdvLIGO). In addition, we study the case of a nonspinning search for initial LIGO (iLIGO). We do this via computing the effectualness of the aligned-spin SEOBNRv1 reduced order model waveform family, which only considers quadrupolar modes, toward hybrid post-Newtonian/numerical relativity waveforms which contain higher order modes. We find that for all LIGO versions losses of more than 10% of events occur in the case of AdvLIGO for mass ratio q ≥6 and total mass M ≥100 M⊙ due to the omission of higher modes, this region of the parameter space being larger for eaLIGO and iLIGO. Moreover, while the maximum event loss observed over the explored parameter space for AdvLIGO is of 15% of events, for iLIGO and eaLIGO, this increases up to (39,23)%. We find that omission of higher modes leads to observation-averaged systematic parameter biases toward lower spin, total mass, and chirp mass. For completeness, we perform a preliminar, nonexhaustive comparison of systematic biases to statistical errors. We find that, for a given signal-to-noise ratio, systematic biases dominate over statistical errors at much lower total mass for eaLIGO than for AdvLIGO.

  9. Backreaction of Hawking radiation on a gravitationally collapsing star I: Black holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mersini-Houghton, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Particle creation leading to Hawking radiation is produced by the changing gravitational field of the collapsing star. The two main initial conditions in the far past placed on the quantum field from which particles arise, are the Hartle-Hawking vacuum and the Unruh vacuum. The former leads to a time-symmetric thermal bath of radiation, while the latter to a flux of radiation coming out of the collapsing star. The energy of Hawking radiation in the interior of the collapsing star is negative and equal in magnitude to its value at future infinity. This work investigates the backreaction of Hawking radiation on the interior of a gravitationally collapsing star, in a Hartle-Hawking initial vacuum. It shows that due to the negative energy Hawking radiation in the interior, the collapse of the star stops at a finite radius, before the singularity and the event horizon of a black hole have a chance to form. That is, the star bounces instead of collapsing to a black hole. A trapped surface near the last stage of the star's collapse to its minimum size may still exist temporarily. Its formation depends on the details of collapse. Results for the case of Hawking flux of radiation with the Unruh initial state, will be given in a companion paper II.

  10. Modeling the Spin Equilibrium of Neutron Stars in LMXBs Without Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, N.; Glampedakis, K.; Haskell, B.; Watts, A. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the spin-equilibrium of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs. We demonstrate that, when combined with a naive spin-up torque, the observed data leads to inferred magnetic fields which are at variance with those of galactic millisecond radiopulsars. This indicates the need for either additional spin-down torques (eg. gravitational radiation) or an improved accretion model. We show that a simple consistent accretion model can be arrived at by accounting for radiation pressure in rapidly accreting systems (above a few percent of the Eddington accretion rate). In our model the inner disk region is thick and significantly sub-Keplerian, and the estimated equilibrium periods are such that the LMXB neutron stars have properties that accord well with the galactic millisecond radiopulsar sample. The implications for future gravitational-wave observations are also discussed briefly.

  11. Shearing and geodesic axially symmetric perfect fluids that do not produce gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, L.; Di Prisco, A.; Ospino, J.; Carot, J.

    2015-01-01

    Using a framework based on the 1 +3 formalism we carry out a study on axially and reflection symmetric perfect and geodesic fluids, looking for possible models of sources radiating gravitational waves. Therefore, the fluid should be necessarily shearing, for otherwise the magnetic part of the Weyl tensor vanishes, leading to a vanishing of the super-Poynting vector. However, for the family of perfect, geodesic fluids considered here, it appears that all possible cases reduce to conformally flat, shear-free, vorticity-free fluids, i.e., Friedman-Robertson-Walker. The super-Poynting vector vanishes and therefore no gravitational radiation is expected to be produced. The physical meaning of the obtained result is discussed.

  12. Relativistic astrophysics. [studies of gravitational radiation in asymptotic de sitter space and post Newtonian approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    The coordinate independence of gravitational radiation and the parameterized post-Newtonian approximation from which it is extended are described. The general consistency of the field equations with Bianchi identities, gauge conditions, and the Newtonian limit of the perfect fluid equations of hydrodynamics are studied. A technique of modification is indicated for application to vector-metric or double metric theories, as well as to scalar-tensor theories.

  13. Enhanced polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation from thermal gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Mohanty, Subhendra; Nautiyal, Akhilesh

    2006-12-22

    If inflation was preceded by a radiation era, then at the time of inflation there will exist a decoupled thermal distribution of gravitons. Gravitational waves generated during inflation will be amplified by the process of stimulated emission into the existing thermal distribution of gravitons. Consequently, the usual zero temperature scale invariant tensor spectrum is modified by a temperature dependent factor. This thermal correction factor amplifies the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation by an order of magnitude at large angles, which may now be in the range of observability of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. PMID:17280339

  14. Reducing spurious gravitational radiation in binary-black-hole simulations by using conformally curved initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2009-06-01

    At early times in numerical evolutions of binary black holes, current simulations contain an initial burst of spurious gravitational radiation (also called 'junk radiation') which is not astrophysically realistic. The spurious radiation is a consequence of how the binary-black-hole initial data are constructed: the initial data are typically assumed to be conformally flat. In this paper, I adopt a curved conformal metric that is a superposition of two boosted, non-spinning black holes that are approximately 15 orbits from merger. I compare junk radiation of the superposed-boosted-Schwarzschild (SBS) initial data with the junk of corresponding conformally flat, maximally sliced (CFMS) initial data. The SBS junk is smaller in amplitude than the CFMS junk, with the junk's leading-order spectral modes typically being reduced by a factor of order 2 or more.

  15. On the gravitational field of a radiating, isothermal perfect gas cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a static isotropic self-gravitating perfect gas in the presence of thermal radiation. The gravitational field is specified in terms of the radiation and gas pressures. Assuming that the thermodynamic internal energy is small compared with relativistic rest energy, it is shown that the gas pressure satisfies the Lane-Emden equation; the assumption of dominant intrinsic relativistic rest energy is satisfied by the hottest stars. Six-solutions of the Lane-Enden equation are obtained together with the corresponding gravitational fields. The basis for comparison is the singular solution I decaying like the inverse square of the radius, that is the leading term of the asymptotic solution V. Two semi-linear solutions are obtained using as variables nonlinear functions of the gas pressure, leading to nonlinear second-order differential equations that can be linearized; one solution II holds for small radius and leads to zero, finite or infinite central pressure, and the other solution III holds asymptomatically and exhibits pressure oscillations. The singular solution I for large radius is matched to a power series solution IV for small radius leading to a solution valid for all radii. The asymptotic solutions III and V: (i) coincide in their common domain of validity; (ii) can be truncated with good accuracy leading to the solution VI.

  16. Gravitational radiation by point particle eccentric binary systems in the linearised characteristic formulation of general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cedeño Montaña, C. E.; de Araujo, J. C. N.

    2016-04-01

    We study a binary system composed of point particles of unequal masses in eccentric orbits in the linear regime of the characteristic formulation of general relativity, generalising a previous study found in the literature in which a system of equal masses in circular orbits is considered. We also show that the boundary conditions on the time-like world tubes generated by the orbits of the particles can be extended beyond circular orbits. Concerning the power lost by the emission of gravitational waves, it is directly obtained from the Bondi's News function. It is worth stressing that our results are completely consistent, because we obtain the same result for the power derived by Peters and Mathews, in a different approach, in their seminal paper of 1963. In addition, the present study constitutes a powerful tool to construct extraction schemes in the characteristic formalism to obtain the gravitational radiation produced by binary systems during the inspiralling phase.

  17. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  18. Upper limits on the isotropic gravitational radiation background from pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.; Downs, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A pulsar and the earth may be thought of as end masses of a free-mass gravitational wave antenna in which the relative motion of the masses is monitored by observing the Doppler shift of the pulse arrival times. Using timing residuals from PSR 1133 + 16, 1237 + 25, 1604-00, and 2045-16, an upper limit to the spectrum of the isotropic gravitational radiation background has been derived in the frequency band 4 x 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -7th Hz. This limit is found to be S(E) = 10 to the 21st f-cubed ergs/cu cm Hz, where S(E) is the energy density spectrum and f is the frequency in Hz. This would limit the energy density at frequencies below 10 to the -8th Hz to be 0.00014 times the critical density.

  19. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  20. Gravitational radiation from a spinning compact object around a supermassive Kerr black hole in circular orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wenbiao

    2010-10-15

    The gravitational waves and energy radiation from a spinning compact object with stellar mass in a circular orbit in the equatorial plane of a supermassive Kerr black hole are investigated in this paper. The effect of how the spin acts on energy and angular moment fluxes is discussed in detail. The calculation results indicate that the spin of a small body should be considered in waveform-template production for the upcoming gravitational wave detections. It is clear that when the direction of spin axes is the same as the orbitally angular momentum ('positive' spin), spin can decrease the energy fluxes which radiate to infinity. For antidirection spin ('negative'), the energy fluxes to infinity can be enlarged. And the relations between fluxes (both infinity and horizon) and spin look like quadratic functions. From frequency shift due to spin, we estimate the wave-phase accumulation during the inspiraling process of the particle. We find that the time of particle inspiral into the black hole is longer for positive spin and shorter for negative compared with the nonspinning particle. Especially, for extreme spin value, the energy radiation near the horizon of the extreme Kerr black hole is much more than that for the nonspinning one. And consequently, the maximum binging energy of the extreme spinning particle is much larger than that of the nonspinning particle.

  1. Gravitational-wave radiation from double compact objects with eLISA in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Zhang, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The phase of inspiral of double compact objects (DCOs: NS + WD, NS + NS, BH + NS, and BH + BH binaries) in the disk field population of the Galaxy provides a potential source in the frequency range from 10-4 to 0.1 Hz, which can be detected by the European New Gravitational Observatory (NGO: eLISA is derived from the previous LISA proposal) project. In this frequency range, much stronger gravitational wave (GW) radiation can be obtained from DCO sources because they possess more mass than other compact binaries (e.g., close double white dwarfs). In this study, we aim to calculate the gravitational wave signals from the resolvable DCO sources in the Galaxy using a binary population synthesis approach, and determine physical properties of these binaries using Monte Carlo simulations. Combining the sensitivity curve of the eLISA detector and a confusion-limited noise floor of close double white dwarfs, we find that only a handful of DCO sources can be detected by the eLISA detector. The detectable number of DCO sources reaches 160; in the context of low-frequency eLISA observations we find that the number of NS + WD, NS + NS, BH + NS, and BH + BH objects are 132, 16, 3, and 6, respectively.

  2. Emerging Hawking-Like Radiation from Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Beyond the Planck Scale.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-10-23

    We argue that, as a consequence of the graviton's spin-2, its bremsstrahlung in trans-Planckian-energy (E≫M(P)) gravitational scattering at small deflection angle can be nicely expressed in terms of helicity-transformation phases and their transfer within the scattering process. The resulting spectrum exhibits deeply sub-Planckian characteristic energies of order M(P)(2)/E≪M(P) (reminiscent of Hawking radiation), a suppressed fragmentation region, and a reduced rapidity plateau, in broad agreement with recent classical estimates. PMID:26551096

  3. Emerging Hawking-Like Radiation from Gravitational Bremsstrahlung Beyond the Planck Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    We argue that, as a consequence of the graviton's spin-2, its bremsstrahlung in trans-Planckian-energy (E ≫MP ) gravitational scattering at small deflection angle can be nicely expressed in terms of helicity-transformation phases and their transfer within the scattering process. The resulting spectrum exhibits deeply sub-Planckian characteristic energies of order MP2/E ≪MP (reminiscent of Hawking radiation), a suppressed fragmentation region, and a reduced rapidity plateau, in broad agreement with recent classical estimates.

  4. Gravitational instability of a quasi-homogeneous plasma cloud with radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranjes, J.

    1990-11-01

    The present consideration of small, propagating perturbations in the central region of a gas cloud takes radiative pressure into account and derives an instability criterion analogous to that of Jeans (1902). The basic state is treated locally as quasi-homogeneous; the first derivatives of all basic state quantities can accordingly be neglected, in keeping with the Poisson's equation describing the gravitational potential in the basic state. It is established that the inhomogeneity can act either to stabilize or destabilize the system, depending on the value of the second derivative of the basic state temperature.

  5. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-01

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped.

  6. Theory-Agnostic Constraints on Black-Hole Dipole Radiation with Multiband Gravitational-Wave Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Barausse, Enrico; Yunes, Nicolás; Chamberlain, Katie

    2016-06-17

    The aLIGO detection of the black-hole binary GW150914 opens a new era for probing extreme gravity. Many gravity theories predict the emission of dipole gravitational radiation by binaries. This is excluded to high accuracy in binary pulsars, but entire classes of theories predict this effect predominantly (or only) in binaries involving black holes. Joint observations of GW150914-like systems by aLIGO and eLISA will improve bounds on dipole emission from black-hole binaries by 6 orders of magnitude relative to current constraints, provided that eLISA is not dramatically descoped. PMID:27367380

  7. Gravitation research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Muehlner, D. J.; Benford, R. L.; Owens, D. K.; Pierre, N. A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon measurements were made of the far infrared background radiation. The radiometer used and its calibration are discussed. An electromagnetically coupled broadband gravitational antenna is also considered. The proposed antenna design and noise sources in the antenna are reviewed. A comparison is made between interferometric broadband and resonant bar antennas for the detection of gravitational wave pulses.

  8. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. II. THE RADIATIVE COOLING CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Michael, Scott; McConnell, Caitlin R.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: durisen@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: carmccon@indiana.edu

    2013-05-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protoplanetary disk subject to gravitational instabilities (GIs) at a time of approximate balance between heating produced by the GIs and radiative cooling governed by realistic dust opacities. We examine cooling times, characterize GI-driven spiral waves and their resultant gravitational torques, and evaluate how accurately mass transport can be represented by an {alpha}-disk formulation. Four simulations, identical except for azimuthal resolution, are conducted with a grid-based three-dimensional hydrodynamics code. There are two regions in which behaviors differ as resolution increases. The inner region, which contains 75% of the disk mass and is optically thick, has long cooling times and is well converged in terms of various measures of structure and mass transport for the three highest resolutions. The longest cooling times coincide with radii where the Toomre Q has its minimum value. Torques are dominated in this region by two- and three-armed spirals. The effective {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses is typically a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and is only roughly consistent with local balance of heating and cooling when time-averaged over many dynamic times and a wide range of radii. On the other hand, the outer disk region, which is mostly optically thin, has relatively short cooling times and does not show convergence as resolution increases. Treatment of unstable disks with optical depths near unity with realistic radiative transport is a difficult numerical problem requiring further study. We discuss possible implications of our results for numerical convergence of fragmentation criteria in disk simulations.

  9. Dynamic Universe Model predicts frequency shifting in electromagnetic radiation near gravitating masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, Dynamic Universe Model studies the light rays and other electromagnetic radiation passing grazingly near any gravitating mass. This change in frequency will depend on relative direction of movement between mass and radiation. Change in frequency depends on relative direction between ray and the Gravitating mass. Here in this paper we will mathematically derive the results and show these predictions. Dynamic Universe Model uses a new type of Tensor. There are no differential or integral equations here. No singularities and body to body collisions in this model. Many papers were published in USA and CANADA. See Dynamic Universe Model Blog for further details and papers Dynamic Universe Model never reduces to General relativity on any condition. It uses a different type of mathematics based on Newtonian physics. This mathematics used here is simple and straightforward. As there are no differential equations present in Dynamic Universe Model, the set of equations give single solution in x y z Cartesian coordinates for every point mass for every time step Keywords: Dynamic Universe Model, Hubble Space telescope (HST), SITA simulations , singularity-free cosmology,

  10. Collapsing objects with the same gravitational trajectory can radiate away different amount of energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, De-Chang; Stojkovic, Dejan

    2016-07-01

    We study radiation emitted during the gravitational collapse from two different types of shells. We assume that one shell is made of dark matter and is completely transparent to the test scalar (for simplicity) field which belongs to the standard model, while the other shell is made of the standard model particles and is totally reflecting to the scalar field. These two shells have exactly the same mass, charge and angular momentum (though we set the charge and angular momentum to zero), and therefore follow the same geodesic trajectory. However, we demonstrate that they radiate away different amount of energy during the collapse. This difference can in principle be used by an asymptotic observer to reconstruct the physical properties of the initial collapsing object other than mass, charge and angular momentum. This result has implications for the information paradox and expands the list of the type of information which can be released from a collapsing object.

  11. Reaction of runaway electron distributions to radiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Adam; Embréus, Ola; Hirvijoki, Eero; Pusztai, István; Decker, Joan; Newton, Sarah L.; Fülöp, Tünde

    2015-11-01

    The emission of electromagnetic radiation by a charged particle in accelerated motion is associated with a reduction in its energy, accounted for by the inclusion of a radiation reaction force in the kinetic equation. For runaway electrons in plasmas, the dominant radiative processes are the emission of bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation. In this contribution, we investigate the impact of the associated radiation reaction forces on the runaway electron distribution, using both analytical and numerical studies, and discuss the corresponding change to the runaway electron growth rate, which can be substantial. We also report on the formation of non-monotonic features in the runaway electron tail as a consequence of the more complicated momentum-space dynamics in the presence of radiation reaction.

  12. Simulating radiative feedback and star cluster formation in GMCs - I. Dependence on gravitational boundedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey S.; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Harris, William E.

    2016-09-01

    Radiative feedback is an important consequence of cluster formation in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in which newly formed clusters heat and ionize their surrounding gas. The process of cluster formation, and the role of radiative feedback, has not been fully explored in different GMC environments. We present a suite of simulations which explore how the initial gravitational boundedness, and radiative feedback, affect cluster formation. We model the early evolution (<5 Myr) of turbulent, 106 M⊙ clouds with virial parameters ranging from 0.5 to 5. To model cluster formation, we use cluster sink particles, coupled to a raytracing scheme, and a custom subgrid model which populates a cluster via sampling an initial mass function (IMF) with an efficiency of 20 per cent per free-fall time. We find that radiative feedback only decreases the cluster particle formation efficiency by a few per cent. The initial virial parameter plays a much stronger role in limiting cluster formation, with a spread of cluster formation efficiencies of 37-71 per cent for the most unbound to the most bound model. The total number of clusters increases while the maximum mass cluster decreases with an increasing initial virial parameter, resulting in steeper mass distributions. The star formation rates in our cluster particles are initially consistent with observations but rise to higher values at late times. This suggests that radiative feedback alone is not responsible for dispersing a GMC over the first 5 Myr of cluster formation.

  13. On the quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling self-gravitating gas clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Meerson, B.; Megged, E.; Tajima, T.

    1995-03-01

    Two model problems are considered, illustrating the dynamics of quasihydrostatic flows of radiatively cooling, optically thin self-gravitating gas clouds. In the first problem, spherically symmetric flows in an unmagnetized plasma are considered. For a power-law dependence of the radiative loss function on the temperature, a one-parameter family of self-similar solutions is found. The authors concentrate on a constant-mass cloud, one of the cases, when the self-similarity indices are uniquely selected. In this case, the self-similar flow problem can be formally reduced to the classical Lane-Emden equation and therefore solved analytically. The cloud is shown to undergo radiative condensation, if the gas specific heat ratio {gamma} > 4/3. The condensation proceeds either gradually, or in the form of (quasihydrostatic) collapse. For {gamma} < 4/3, the cloud is shown to expand. The second problem addresses a magnetized plasma slab that undergoes quasihydrostatic radiative cooling and condensation. The problem is solved analytically, employing the Lagrangian mass coordinate.

  14. Mergers of Non-spinning Black-hole Binaries: Gravitational Radiation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; McWilliams, Sean T.; vanMeter, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed descriptive analysis of the gravitational radiation from black-hole binary mergers of non-spinning black holes, based on numerical simulations of systems varying from equal-mass to a 6:1 mass ratio. Our primary goal is to present relatively complete information about the waveforms, including all the leading multipolar components, to interested researchers. In our analysis, we pursue the simplest physical description of the dominant features in the radiation, providing an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This interpretation applies uniformly to the full wavetrain, from inspiral through ringdown. We emphasize strong relationships among the l = m modes that persist through the full wavetrain. Exploring the structure of the waveforms in more detail, we conduct detailed analytic fitting of the late-time frequency evolution, identifying a key quantitative feature shared by the l = m modes among all mass-ratios. We identify relationships, with a simple interpretation in terms of the implicit rotating source, among the evolution of frequency and amplitude, which hold for the late-time radiation. These detailed relationships provide sufficient information about the late-time radiation to yield a predictive model for the late-time waveforms, an alternative to the common practice of modeling by a sum of quasinormal mode overtones. We demonstrate an application of this in a new effective-one-body-based analytic waveform model.

  15. Acute and Chronic Cutaneous Reactions to Ionizing Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bray, Fleta N; Simmons, Brian J; Wolfson, Aaron H; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is an important treatment modality for a variety of malignant conditions. However, development of radiation-induced skin changes is a significant adverse effect of radiation therapy (RT). Cutaneous repercussions of RT vary considerably in severity, course, and prognosis. When they do occur, cutaneous changes to RT are commonly graded as acute, consequential-late, or chronic. Acute reactions can have severe sequelae that impact quality of life as well as cancer treatment. Thus, dermatologists should be informed about these adverse reactions, know how to assess their severity and be able to determine course of management. The majority of measures currently available to prevent these acute reactions are proper skin hygiene and topical steroids, which limit the severity and decrease symptoms. Once acute cutaneous reactions develop, they are treated according to their severity. Treatments are similar to those used in prevention, but incorporate wound care management that maintains a moist environment to hasten recovery. Chronic changes are a unique subset of adverse reactions to RT that may develop months to years following treatment. Chronic radiation dermatitis is often permanent, progressive, and potentially irreversible with substantial impact on quality of life. Here, we also review the etiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, prevention, and management of late-stage cutaneous reactions to radiotherapy, including chronic radiation dermatitis and radiation-induced fibrosis. PMID:27250839

  16. Classical radiation reaction in particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-07-01

    Under the presence of ultra high intensity lasers or other intense electromagnetic fields the motion of particles in the ultrarelativistic regime can be severely affected by radiation reaction. The standard particle-in-cell (PIC) algorithms do not include radiation reaction effects. Even though this is a well known mechanism, there is not yet a definite algorithm nor a standard technique to include radiation reaction in PIC codes. We have compared several models for the calculation of the radiation reaction force, with the goal of implementing an algorithm for classical radiation reaction in the Osiris framework, a state-of-the-art PIC code. The results of the different models are compared with standard analytical results, and the relevance/advantages of each model are discussed. Numerical issues relevant to PIC codes such as resolution requirements, application of radiation reaction to macro particles and computational cost are also addressed. For parameters of interest where the classical description of the electron motion is applicable, all the models considered are shown to give comparable results. The Landau and Lifshitz reduced model is chosen for implementation as one of the candidates with the minimal overhead and no additional memory requirements.

  17. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  18. Ultra--Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Massive Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, Mohan; Romani, Roger W.

    1995-06-01

    For massive black hole binaries produced in galactic mergers, we examine the possibility of inspiral induced by interaction with field stars. We model the evolution of such binaries for a range of galaxy core and binary parameters, using numerical results from the literature to compute the binary's energy and angular momentum loss rates due to stellar encounters and including the effect of back-action on the field stars. We find that only a small fraction of binary systems can merge within a Hubble time via unassisted stellar dynamics. External perturbations may, however, cause efficient inspiral. Averaging over a population of central black holes and galaxy mergers, we computed the expected background of gravitational radiation with periods Pw ˜ 1-10 yr. Comparison with sensitivities from millisecond pulsar timing suggests that the strongest sources may be detectable with modest improvements to present experiments.

  19. Radiation and radiation reaction in continuous focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    We show that the radiation damping rate of the transverse action of a particle in a straight, continuous focusing system is independent of the particle energy, and that no quantum excitation is induced. This absolute damping effect leads to the existence of a transverse ground state which the particle inevitably decays to, and yields the minimum beam emittance that one can ever attain, {gamma}{epsilon}{sub min} = {Dirac_h}/2mc, limited only by the uncertainty principle. Due to adiabatic invariance, the particle can be accelerated along the focusing channel in its ground state without any radiation energy loss. These findings may apply to bent systems provided that the focusing field dominates over the bending field.

  20. Radiation reaction as a non-conservative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aashish, Sandeep; Haque, Asrarul

    2016-09-01

    We study a system of a finite size charged particle interacting with a radiation field by exploiting Hamilton’s principle for a non-conservative system recently introduced by Galley [1]. This formulation leads to the equation of motion of the charged particle that turns out to be the same as that obtained by Jackson [2]. We show that the radiation reaction stems from the non-conservative part of the effective action for a charged particle. We notice that a charge interacting with a radiation field modeled as a heat bath affords a way to justify that the radiation reaction is a non-conservative force. The topic is suitable for graduate courses on advanced electrodynamics and classical theory of fields.

  1. Energy straggling and radiation reaction for magnetic bremsstrahlung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, C. S.; White, D.

    1972-01-01

    Using the method of quantum electrodynamics, the energy distribution of particles and emitted photons is calculated for the case when increases in the average energy of the photon emitted by synchrotron radiation to values appreciable compared to the energy of the particle give rise to particle energy straggling and radiation spectrum broadening. The classical radiative reaction effects which may be tested in this type of experiment are outlined, and a detailed quantum mechanical calculation is presented. The significance of energy straggling in astrophysics is discussed briefly.

  2. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  3. Effects of radiation reaction in relativistic laser acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hadad, Y.; Labun, L.; Rafelski, J.; Elkina, N.; Klier, C.; Ruhl, H.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this paper is twofold: to explore the response of classical charges to electromagnetic force at the level of unity in natural units and to establish a criterion that determines physical parameters for which the related radiation-reaction effects are detectable. In pursuit of this goal, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is solved analytically for an arbitrary (transverse) electromagnetic pulse. A comparative study of the radiation emission of an electron in a linearly polarized pulse for the Landau-Lifshitz equation and for the Lorentz force equation reveals the radiation-reaction-dominated regime, in which radiation-reaction effects overcome the influence of the external fields. The case of a relativistic electron that is slowed down by a counterpropagating electromagnetic wave is studied in detail. We further show that when the electron experiences acceleration of order unity, the dynamics of the Lorentz force equation, the Landau-Lifshitz equation and the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation all result in different radiation emission that could be distinguished in experiment. Finally, our analytic and numerical results are compared with those appearing in the literature.

  4. Observable signatures of a black hole ejected by gravitational-radiation recoil in a galaxy merger.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Abraham

    2007-07-27

    According to recent simulations, the coalescence of two spinning black holes (BHs) could lead to a BH remnant with recoil speeds of up to thousands of km s(-1). Here we examine the circumstances resulting from a gas-rich galaxy merger under which the ejected BH would carry an accretion disk and be observable. As the initial BH binary emits gravitational radiation and its orbit tightens, a hole is opened in the disk which delays the consumption of gas prior to the eventual BH ejection. The punctured disk remains bound to the ejected BH within the region where the gas orbital velocity is larger than the ejection speed. For a approximately 10(7) M[middle dot in circle] BH the ejected disk has a characteristic size of tens of thousands of Schwarzschild radii and an accretion lifetime of approximately 10(7) yr. During that time, the ejected BH could traverse a considerable distance and appear as an off-center quasar with a feedback trail along the path it left behind. PMID:17678347

  5. Radiation-Reaction Trapping of Electrons in Extreme Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, L. L.; Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Shen, B. F.; Akli, K.

    2014-04-01

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  6. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  7. Direct measurements of radiative capture reactions with DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Direct measurements of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions are crucial for understanding nucleosynthesis in a variety of astrophysical environments, including classical novae, supernovae, X-Ray bursts, and quiescent stellar burning. Often the most important reactions have very low cross sections or involve unstable targets, making laboratory measurements extremely challenging. The detector of recoils and gammas of nuclear reactions (DRAGON) at TRIUMF is a recoil mass separator designed to measure radiative capture reactions in inverse kinematics, with beam suppression factors as high as 1016. When combined with the intense radioactive beams available at the ISAC-I facility, DRAGON's capabilities are unique and world-leading. In this talk, I will give a brief technical overview of DRAGON before presenting results from recent experiments. Some highlights include the first-ever direct measurement of 38K(p , γ) 39Ca, a crucial reaction for determining the endpoint of nova nucleosynthesis, and measurements of 76Se(α , γ) 80Kr. The latter measurements determine the rate of the reverse reaction, 80Kr(γ , α) 76Se, an important waiting point in the synthesis of the p-nuclei. I will also discuss future (and ongoing) developments at DRAGON, including the commissioning of a new chamber for high-precision elastic scattering measurements and plans to determine the 330 keV resonance strength in 18F(p , γ) 19Ne via measurements of 15O(α , γ) 19Ne and 15O + α elastic scattering.

  8. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post) sup 5/2 -Newtonian order: Late-time evolution and gravitational radiation emission

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The late-time evolution of binary systems of compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) is studied using the Damour-Derueele (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian equations of motion with relativistic corrections of all orders up to and including radiation reaction. Using the method of close orbital elements from celestial mechanics, the author evolves the orbits to separations of r {approx} 2 m, where m is the total mass, at which point the (post){sup 5/2}-Newtonian approximation breaks down. With the orbits as input, he calculates the gravitational waveform and luminosity using a post-Newtonian formalism of Wagoner and Will. Results are obtained for systems containing various combinations of compact objects, for various values of the mass ratio m{sub 1}/m{sub 2}, and forg various initial values of the orbital eccentricity.

  9. Detectors of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, G.

    Gravitational waves Motion of test bodies in a g.w. field Energy carried by gravitational waves Gravitational-wave sources Spinning star Double-star systems Fall into a Schwarzschild black hole Radiation from gravitational collapse Gravitational-wave detectors The nonresonant detectors The resonant detectors Electromechnical transducers Piezoelectric ceramic The capacitor The inductor Data analysis The Brownian noise The back-action The wide-band noise, data analysis and optimization The resonant transducer The Wiener-Kolmogoroff filter The cross-section and the effective temperature The antenna bandwidth The gravitational-wave experiments in the world The laser interferometers The resonant detectors

  10. Gravitational radiation detection with spacecraft Doppler tracking - Limiting sensitivities and prospective missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Hellings, R. W.; Wahlquist, H. D.; Wolff, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    The prospects of using spacecraft Doppler tracking, in NASA missions, for the detection of gravitational waves are examined. The sensitivity limits of such detection are characterized in terms of plasma scintillation, troposphere scintillation, receiver noise, MDA and ODA quantization error, and clock jitter. Current and possible future NASA missions that will involve gravitational wave experiments are briefly reviewed, including the Galileo, solar polar, Halley/Tempel-2, and solar probe missions.

  11. Analysis of spatial mode sensitivity of a gravitational wave interferometer and a targeted search for gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzwieser, Joseph

    Over the last several years the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has been making steady progress in improving the sensitivities of its three interferometers, two in Hanford, Washington, and one in Livingston, Louisiana. These interferometers have reached their target design sensitivities and have since been collecting data in their fifth science run for well over a year. On the way to increasing the sensitivities of the interferometers, difficulties with increasing the input laser power, due to unexpectedly high optical absorption, required the installation of a thermal compensation system. We describe a frequency resolving wave-front sensor, called the phase camera, which was used on the interferometer to examine the heating effects and corrections of the thermal compensation system. The phase camera was also used to help understand an output mode cleaner which was temporarily installed on the Hanford 4km interferometer. Data from the operational detectors was used to carry out two continuous gravitational wave searches directed at isolated neutron stars. The first, targeted RX J1856.5-3754, now known to be outside the LIGO detection band, was used as a test of a new multi-interferometer search code, and compared it to a well tested single interferometer search pulsar, over a physically motivated parameter space, to complement existing narrow time domain searches. The parameter space was chosen based on computational constraints, expected final sensitivity, and possible frequency differences due to free precession and a simple two component model. An upper limit on the strain of gravitational radiation from the Crab pulsar of 1.6 × 10^-24 was found with 95% confidence over a frequency band of 6 × 10^-3 Hz centered on twice the Crab pulsar's electromagnetic pulse frequency of 29.78 Hz. At the edges of the parameter space, this search is approximately 10^5 times more sensitive than the time domain searches. This is a preliminary result

  12. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs. PMID:25846952

  13. Newton’s second law, radiation reaction and type II Einstein-Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2011-12-01

    Considering perturbations of the Reissner-Nordström metric while keeping the perturbations in the class of type II Einstein-Maxwell metrics, we perform a spherical harmonic expansion of all the variables up to the quadrupole term. This leads to rather surprising results. Referring to the source of the metric as a type II particle (analogous to referring to a Schwarzschild-Reissner-Nordström or Kerr-Newman particle), we see immediately that the Bondi momentum of the particle takes the classical form of mass times velocity plus an electromagnetic radiation reaction term, while the Bondi mass loss equation becomes the classical gravitational and electromagnetic (electric and magnetic) dipole and quadrupole radiation. The Bondi momentum loss equation turns into Newton’s second law of motion containing the Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac radiation reaction force plus a momentum recoil (rocket) force, while the reality condition on the Bondi mass aspect yields the conservation of angular momentum. Two things must be pointed out: (1) these results, (equations of motion, etc) take place, not in the spacetime of the type II metric but in an auxiliary space referred to as {H}-space, whose physical meaning is rather obscure and (2) this analysis of the type II field equations is a very special case of a similar analysis of the general asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell equations. Although the final results are similar (though not the same), the analysis uses different equations (specifically, the type II field equations) and is vastly simpler than the general case. Without a great deal of the technical structures needed in the general case, one can see rather easily where the basic results reside in the type II field equations.

  14. Gravitational Wave (GW) Radiation Pattern at the Focus of a High-Frequency GW (HFGW) Generator and Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Davis, Eric W.; Woods, R. C.

    2005-02-01

    The Gravitational Wave (GW) radiation pattern is derived that results from a rod rotating about a pivot, a dumbbell rotating about its central axis, a pair of stars rotating about their orbital focus, or a stationary circular asymmetrical-array of tangentially jerking elements. The three-dimensional shape of the GW radiation pattern is like a dumbbell cross-section having its long axis perpendicular to the plane of motion or along the central axis of the stationary ring of sequentially jerking elements. The center of the radiation pattern is situated at the pivot, orbital-focus, or center of the stationary array. Knowledge of the GW radiation pattern allows for optimum placement of a detector. In the case of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs), in which the diffraction of the GW radiation is less than the dimensions of the ring of jerking elements, the radiation pattern is situated at the center of the ring and represents a focus or concentration point of the HFGWs, The concentration point extends over a diffraction-limited spot having a radius of λGW/π, where λGW is the wavelength of the HFGW. In the case of a superconductor, prior research, although speculative has shown that the GW wavelength is foreshortened by a factor of about 300. Thus there could be a much more concentrated diffraction-limited flux of HFGW at the focus. It is shown that the efficiency of a HFGW communications link could be approximately proportional to the sixth power of the HFGW frequency. Applications to space technology, involving aerospace communications, and Astronomy are discussed.

  15. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  16. Simulating Gravitational Radiation from Binary Black Holes Mergers as LISA Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the simulation of gravitational waves from Binary Massive Black Holes with LISA observations is shown. The topics include: 1) Massive Black Holes (MBHs); 2) MBH Binaries; 3) Gravitational Wavws from MBH Binaries; 4) Observing with LISA; 5) How LISA sees MBH binary mergers; 6) MBH binary inspirals to LISA; 7) Numerical Relativity Simulations; 8) Numerical Relativity Challenges; 9) Recent Successes; 10) Goddard Team; 11) Binary Black Hole Simulations at Goddard; 12) Goddard Recent Advances; 13) Baker, et al.:GSFC; 13) Starting Farther Out; 14) Comparing Initial Separation; 15) Now with AMR; and 16) Conclusion.

  17. Effect of first-order chemical reaction on gravitational instability in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Chan; Choi, Chang Kyun

    2014-11-01

    To understand the CO_{2} sequestration in the saline aquifer, the effect of a first-order chemical reaction on the onset of the buoyancy-driven instability in an isotropic reactive porous medium is analyzed theoretically. Under the linear stability theory, the stability equations are derived in the semi-infinite domain and they are solved with and without the quasi-steady-state approximation. We also considered the stability of the reactive system at a steady-state limit. The analysis for the steady-state case proposed that the onset of instability motion can occur during the transient period even if the system is stable at the steady state. Through the initial growth rate analysis the most unstable initial disturbance is determined, and it is found that initially the system is unconditionally stable regardless of the Damköhler number D_{a} and the Darcy-Rayleigh number Ra. Based on the results of the initial growth rate analysis, the direct numerical simulation is also conducted by using the Fourier pseudospectral method. The present theoretical and numerical analyses suggest that the chemical reaction makes the system stable and no convective motion can be expected for D_{a}/Ra^{2}>2.5×10^{-3}. PMID:25493890

  18. An infrared radiation based thermal biosensor for enzymatic biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan; Yang, Zhaochu; Pires, Nuno M M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal biosensor based on the infrared radiation energy is proposed for calorimetric measurement of biochemical reactions. Having a good structure design combined with MEMS technology as well as employing the Si /SiGe quantum well sensing material with a high TCR and low 1/f noise, the sensor shows potentials to be high sensitive and real-time. The urea enzymatic reaction was tested to verify the performance of sensor, which demonstrates a linear detection range from 0.5mM to 150mM and a relative standard deviation less than 1%. For the sensor fabrication, wafer-level transfer bonding is a key process, which makes the integration of quantum well material and a free standing structure possible. It reduces the heat loss from the sensor to the surrounding environment. PMID:23365944

  19. Covariant worldline numerics for charge motion with radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Chris; Heinzl, Thomas; Iji, Nicola; Langfeld, Kurt

    2011-04-01

    We develop a numerical formulation to calculate the classical motion of charges in strong electromagnetic fields, such as those occurring in high-intensity laser beams. By reformulating the dynamics in terms of SL(2,C) matrices representing the Lorentz group, our formulation maintains explicit covariance, in particular, the mass-shell condition. Considering an electromagnetic plane wave field where the analytic solution is known as a test case, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the method for solving both the Lorentz force and the Landau-Lifshitz equations. The latter, a second order reduction of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation, describes radiation reaction without the usual pathologies.

  20. Bianchi VI cosmological models representing perfect fluid and radiation with electric-type free gravitational fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Banerjee, S. K.

    1992-11-01

    A homogeneous Bianchi type VIh cosmological model filled with perfect fluid, null electromagnetic field and streaming neutrinos is obtained for which the free gravitational field is of the electric type. The barotropic equation of statep = (γ-1)ɛ is imposed in the particular case of Bianchi VI0 string models. Various physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed.

  1. The effect of radiation pressure on planar, self-gravitating H II regions and its neutral environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C.

    2016-08-01

    We study the hydrostatic configuration of an isothermal gas layer surrounding a planar distribution of stars, in which the gravitational effects (due to the stars and the self-gravity of the gas) and the radiation pressure due to dust absorption and photoionization of H are important. We consider an infinite planar distribution, and derive a model for the vertical stratification. We obtain the density profiles of a photoionized gas layer, which is covered by a neutral region. We find that the solutions range between cases in which the photoionized layer extends to infinity, to cases in which the vertical extent of the photoionized layer is negligible in comparison with the characteristic height of the enclosing, neutral layer. We find that in cases with a significant dust content, the effect of the radiation pressure together with the self-gravity generates dense, narrow neutral layers in which further star formation might occur.

  2. Angular velocity of gravitational radiation from precessing binaries and the corotating frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Michael

    2013-05-01

    This paper defines an angular velocity for time-dependent functions on the sphere and applies it to gravitational waveforms from compact binaries. Because it is geometrically meaningful and has a clear physical motivation, the angular velocity is uniquely useful in helping to solve an important—and largely ignored—problem in models of compact binaries: the inverse problem of deducing the physical parameters of a system from the gravitational waves alone. It is also used to define the corotating frame of the waveform. When decomposed in this frame, the waveform has no rotational dynamics and is therefore as slowly evolving as possible. The resulting simplifications lead to straightforward methods for accurately comparing waveforms and constructing hybrids. As formulated in this paper, the methods can be applied robustly to both precessing and nonprecessing waveforms, providing a clear, comprehensive, and consistent framework for waveform analysis. Explicit implementations of all these methods are provided in accompanying computer code.

  3. Gravitational Radiation - a New Window Onto the Universe. (Karl Schwarzschild Lecture 1996)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, K. S.

    A summary is given of the current status and plans for gravitational-wave searches at all plausible wavelengths, from the size of the observable universe to a few kilometers. The anticipated scientific payoff from these searches is described, including expectations for detailed studies of black holes and neutron stars, high-accuracy tests of general relativity, and hopes for the discovery of exotic new kinds of objects.

  4. Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Coalescing Massive Black Hole Binaries in Hierarchical Cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, Alberto; Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero; Volonteri, Marta

    2004-08-01

    We compute the expected low-frequency gravitational wave signal from coalescing massive black hole (MBH) binaries at the center of galaxies in a hierarchical structure formation scenario in which seed holes of intermediate mass form far up in the dark halo ``merger tree.'' The merger history of dark matter halos and associated MBHs is followed via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from redshift z=20 to the present in a ΛCDM cosmology. MBHs get incorporated through halo mergers into larger and larger structures, sink to the center because of dynamical friction against the dark matter background, accrete cold material in the merger remnant, and form MBH binary systems. Stellar dynamical (three-body) interactions cause the hardening of the binary at large separations, while gravitational wave emission takes over at small radii and leads to the final coalescence of the pair. A simple scheme is applied in which the ``loss cone'' is constantly refilled and a constant stellar density core forms because of the ejection of stars by the shrinking binary. The integrated emission from inspiraling MBH binaries at all redshifts is computed in the quadrupole approximation and results in a gravitational wave background (GWB) with a well-defined shape that reflects the different mechanisms driving the late orbital evolution. The characteristic strain spectrum has the standard hc(f)~f-2/3 behavior only in the range f=10-9to10-6 Hz. At lower frequencies the orbital decay of MBH binaries is driven by the ejection of background stars (``gravitational slingshot''), and the strain amplitude increases with frequency, hc(f)~f. In this range the GWB is dominated by 109-1010 Msolar MBH pairs coalescing at 0<~z<~2. At higher frequencies, f>10-6Hz, the strain amplitude, as steep as hc(f)~f-1.3, is shaped by the convolution of last stable circular orbit emission by lighter binaries (102-107 Msolar) populating galaxy halos at all redshifts. We discuss the

  5. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, R. P.; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant.

  6. COEXISTENCE OF GRAVITATIONALLY-BOUND AND RADIATION-DRIVEN C IV EMISSION LINE REGIONS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huiyuan; Wang Tinggui; Zhou Hongyan; Liu Bo; Dong Xiaobo; Wang Jianguo

    2011-09-01

    There are mutually contradictory views in the literature of the kinematics and structure of high-ionization line (e.g., C IV) emitting regions in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Two kinds of broad emission line region (BELR) models have been proposed, outflow and gravitationally-bound BELR, which are supported, respectively, by blueshift of the C IV line and reverberation mapping observations. To reconcile these two apparently different models, we present a detailed comparison study between the C IV and Mg II lines using a sample of AGNs selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that the kinematics of the C IV region is different from that of Mg II, which is thought to be controlled by gravity. A strong correlation is found between the blueshift and asymmetry of the C IV profile and the Eddington ratio. This provides strong observational support for the postulation that the outflow is driven by radiation pressure. In particular, we find robust evidence that the C IV line region is largely dominated by outflow at high Eddington ratios, while it is primarily gravitationally-bounded at low Eddington ratios. Our results indicate that these two emitting regions coexist in most AGNs. The emission strength from these two gases varies smoothly with Eddington ratio in opposite ways. This explanation naturally reconciles the apparently contradictory views proposed in previous studies. Finally, candidate models are discussed which can account for both the enhancement of outflow emission and suppression of normal BEL in AGNs with high Eddington ratios.

  7. Impact of phonon coupling on the radiative nuclear reaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achakovskiy, Oleg; Avdeenkov, Alexander; Kamerdzhiev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    The pygmy dipole resonance and photon strength functions (PSF) in stable and unstable Ni and Sn isotopes are calculated within the microscopic self-consistent version of the extended theory of finite Fermi systems in the quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The approach includes phonon coupling (PC) effects in addition to the standard QRPA approach. The Skyrme force SLy4 is used. A pygmy dipole resonance in 72Ni is predicted at the mean energy of 12.4 MeV exhausting 25.7% of the total energy-weighted sum rule. With our microscopic E1 PSFs in the EMPIRE 3.1 code, the following radiative nuclear reaction characteristics have been calculated for several stable and unstable even-even Sn and Ni isotopes: 1) neutron capture cross sections, 2) corresponding neutron capture gamma-spectra, 3) average radiative widths of neutron resonances. Here, three variants of the microscopic nuclear level density models have been used and a comparison with the phenomenological generalized superfluid model has been performed. In all the considered properties, including the recent experimental data for PSF in Sn isotopes, the PC contributions turned out to be significant, as compared with the QRPA one, and necessary to explain the available experimental data.

  8. Nearly scale invariant spectrum of gravitational radiation from global phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Jones-Smith, Katherine; Krauss, Lawrence M; Mathur, Harsh

    2008-04-01

    Using a large N sigma model approximation we explicitly calculate the power spectrum of gravitational waves arising from a global phase transition in the early Universe and we confirm that it is scale invariant, implying an observation of such a spectrum may not be a unique feature of inflation. Moreover, the predicted amplitude can be over 3 orders of magnitude larger than the naive dimensional estimate, implying that even a transition that occurs after inflation may dominate in cosmic microwave background polarization or other gravity wave signals. PMID:18517931

  9. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0 - 1.1~M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. (2014) recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of nonrotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. (2014) to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  10. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  11. Interplanetary phase scintillation and the search for very low frequency gravitational radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Woo, R.; Estabrook, F. B.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of radio-wave phase scintillation are reported which used the Viking spacecraft having an earth-spacecraft link very similar to that which will be used in very low-frequency (VLF) gravitational-wave searches. The phase power-spectrum level varies by seven orders of magnitude as the sun-earth-spacecraft (elongation) angle changes from 1 to 175 deg. It is noteworthy that a broad minimum in the S-band (2.3 GHz) phase fluctuation occurs in the antisolar direction; the corresponding fractional frequency stability (square root Allan variance) is about 3 x 10 to the -14th for 1000-s integration times. A simultaneous two-frequency two-station observation indicates that the contribution to the phase fluctuation from the ionosphere is significant but dominated by the contribution from the interplanetary medium. Nondispersive tropospheric scintillation was not detected (upper limit to fractional frequency stability about 5 x 10 to the -14th). Evidently, even observations in the antisolar direction will require higher radio frequencies, phase scintillation calibration, and correlation techniques in the data processing, for detection of gravitational bursts at the anticipated strain amplitude levels of no more than 10 to the -15th.

  12. Gravitational radiation and angular momentum flux from a slowly rotating dynamical black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Huei; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2011-04-15

    A four-dimensional asymptotic expansion scheme is used to study the next-order effects of the nonlinearity near a spinning dynamical black hole. The angular-momentum flux and energy flux formula are then obtained by constructing the reference frame in terms of the compatible constant spinors and the compatibility of the coupling leading-order Newman-Penrose equations. By using the slow rotation and small-tide approximation for a spinning black hole, the horizon cross-section we chose is spherical symmetric. It turns out the flux formula is rather simple and can be compared with the known results. Directly from the energy flux formula of the slow-rotating dynamical horizon, we find that the physically reasonable condition on requiring the positivity of the gravitational energy flux yields that the shear will monotonically decrease with time. Thus a slow-rotating dynamical horizon will asymptotically approach an isolated horizon during late time.

  13. THE BENEFITS OF VLBI ASTROMETRY TO PULSAR TIMING ARRAY SEARCHES FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, D. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2013-11-10

    Precision astrometry is an integral component of successful pulsar timing campaigns. Astrometric parameters are commonly derived by fitting them as parameters of a timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over spans of several years can yield position measurements with sub-milliarcsecond precision. However, timing-based astrometry can become biased if a pulsar displays any red spin noise or a red signal produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models, leading to significant estimation biases in the astrometric parameters. We find that commonly used techniques for fitting timing models in the presence of red noise (Cholesky whitening) prevent the absorption of noise into the timing model remarkably well if the time baseline of observations exceeds several years, but are inadequate for dealing with shorter pulsar data sets. Independent of timing, pulsar-optimized very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing position estimates precise to the sub-milliarcsecond levels needed for high-precision timing. In order to make VLBI astrometric parameters useful in pulsar timing models, the transformation between the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the dynamical solar system ephemeris used for pulsar timing must be constrained to within a few microarcseconds. We compute a transformation between the ICRF and pulsar timing frames and quantitatively discuss how the transformation will improve in coming years. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometry into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of years of timing data exist will lead to more realistic assessments of red spin noise and could enhance the amplitude of gravitational wave signatures in post-fit timing residuals by factors of 20 or more.

  14. Delayed gamma radiation from lightning induced nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, M. B.; Sakuma, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Kubo, K.

    2004-03-01

    An increase in atmospheric gamma radiation observed with NaI and Ge detectors positioned about 15 m above ground was observed following natural lightning near Tokyo, Japan [1]. Background subtracted gamma ray rates GRR following numerous lightning strokes observed since 2001 persisted for a few hours and subsequently decayed with a half-life of about 50 minutes. Using a 3x3 Ge detector, with 2 KeV resolution, positioned about 2 m from one of the NaI detectors increases in GRR were observed minutes after the onset of lightning with a delayed 50 min exponential decay. Although most of the increase in activity occured at less than a few 100 KeV, on July 11, 2003 a 1267 +/-2 KeV line was observed. Although the statistics of this event were poor, the appearance of this line with an exponential decay of 50 min half-life suggests the possibility that it may be due to 39Cl (1267 MeV; half-life = 55.5 min) via the 40Ar(gamma,p)39Cl, 40Ar(p,2p)39Cl and/or 40Ar(n,d)39Cl reactions. Observations of > 10 MeV gamma rays observed in NaI detectors within 10s of meters from and coincident with rocket-triggered lightning at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing suggest that charged particles accelerated in intense electric fields associated with lightning give rise to photons with sufficient energy to initiate nuclear reactions [2]. Further work to explain the cause of this anomalous activity is underway using natural and triggered lightning. 1. M. B. Greenfield et al., Journal of Applied Physics 93 no. 3 (2003) pp 1839-184. 2. J. R. Dwyer et al., Science 299, (2003), pp 694-697 and recent communications

  15. Recent developments in the measurement of space time curvature. [resonant capacitor displacement sensor and multistage suspension system for gravitational radiation antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, J.-P.

    1978-01-01

    Development of a highly sensitive resonant capacitor displacement sensor and a multistage suspension system for a low-temperature gravitational radiation antenna is discussed; the antenna is suitable for studying gravitational collapses. The sensitivity limit of the device is assessed as a function of preamplifier noise. Experiments indicate that an electric field of about 160,000 v/cm may be applied to the resonator surface without a significant increase in Brownian noise. Use of the resonant capacitor sensor with very high Q antennae is also considered.

  16. Gravitational lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, E.L.

    1988-07-01

    For several years astronomers have devoted considerable effort to finding and studying a class of celestial phenomena whose very existence depends on rare cosmic accidents. These are gravitational-lens events, which occur when two or more objects at different distances from the earth happen to lie along the same line of sight and so coincide in the sky. The radiation from the more distant object, typically a quasar, is bent by the gravitational field of the foreground object. The bending creates a cosmic mirage: distorted or multiple images of the background object. Such phenomena may reveal many otherwise undetectable features of the image source, of the foreground object and of the space lying between them. Such observations could help to resolve several fundamental questions in cosmology. In the past decade theoretical and observational research on gravitational lenses has grown rapidly and steadily. At this writing at least 17 candidate lens systems have been discussed in the literature. Of the 17 lens candidates reported so far in professional literature, only five are considered to have been reliably established by subsequent observations. Another three are generally regarded as weak or speculative cases with less than 50 percent chance of actually being lens systems. In the remaining nine cases the evidence is mixed or is sparse enough so that the final judgment could swing either way. As might be concluded, little of the scientific promise of gravitational lenses has yet been realized. The work has not yielded a clear value for the proportionality constant or any of the other fundamental cosmological parameter. 7 figs.

  17. Joint approach for reducing eccentricity and spurious gravitational radiation in binary black hole initial data construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Szilágyi, Béla

    2013-10-01

    At the beginning of binary black hole simulations, there is a pulse of spurious radiation (or junk radiation) resulting from the initial data not matching astrophysical quasi-equilibrium inspiral exactly. One traditionally waits for the junk radiation to exit the computational domain before taking physical readings, at the expense of throwing away a segment of the evolution, and with the hope that junk radiation exits cleanly. We argue that this hope does not necessarily pan out, as junk radiation could excite long-lived constraint violation. Another complication with the initial data is that they contain orbital eccentricity that needs to be removed, usually by evolving the early part of the inspiral multiple times with gradually improved input parameters. We show that this procedure is also adversely impacted by junk radiation. In this paper, we do not attempt to eliminate junk radiation directly, but instead tackle the much simpler problem of ameliorating its long-lasting effects. We report on the success of a method that achieves this goal by combining the removal of junk radiation and eccentricity into a single procedure. Namely, we periodically stop a low resolution simulation; take the numerically evolved metric data and overlay it with eccentricity adjustments; run it through an initial data solver (i.e. the solver receives as free data the numerical output of the previous iteration); restart the simulation; repeat until eccentricity becomes sufficiently low; and then launch the high resolution “production run” simulation. This approach has the following benefits: (1) We do not have to contend with the influence of junk radiation on eccentricity measurements for later iterations of the eccentricity reduction procedure. (2) We reenforce constraints every time the initial data solver is invoked, removing the constraint violation excited by junk radiation previously. (3) The wasted simulation segment associated with the junk radiation’s evolution is

  18. Laboratory simulation of Euclid-like sky images to study the impact of CCD radiation damage on weak gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prod'homme, T.; Verhoeve, P.; Oosterbroek, T.; Boudin, N.; Short, A.; Kohley, R.

    2014-07-01

    Euclid is the ESA mission to map the geometry of the dark universe. It uses weak gravitational lensing, which requires the accurate measurement of galaxy shapes over a large area in the sky. Radiation damage in the 36 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) composing the Euclid visible imager focal plane has already been identified as a major contributor to the weak-lensing error budget; radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) distorts the galaxy images and introduces a bias in the galaxy shape measurement. We designed a laboratory experiment to project Euclid-like sky images onto an irradiated Euclid CCD. In this way - and for the first time - we are able to directly assess the effect of CTI on the Euclid weak-lensing measurement free of modelling uncertainties. We present here the experiment concept, setup, and first results. The results of such an experiment provide test data critical to refine models, design and test the Euclid data processing CTI mitigation scheme, and further optimize the Euclid CCD operation.

  19. Convergence of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs: sensitivity to the implementation of radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, W. K. M.; Forgan, D. H.; Armitage, P. J.

    2012-02-01

    Recent simulations of self-gravitating accretion discs, carried out using a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code by Meru & Bate, have been interpreted as implying that three-dimensional global discs fragment much more easily than would be expected from a two-dimensional local model. Subsequently, global and local two-dimensional models have been shown to display similar fragmentation properties, leaving it unclear whether the three-dimensional results reflect a physical effect or a numerical problem associated with the treatment of cooling or artificial viscosity in SPH. Here, we study how fragmentation of self-gravitating disc flows in SPH depends upon the implementation of cooling. We run disc simulations that compare a simple cooling scheme, in which each particle loses energy based upon its internal energy per unit mass, with a method in which the cooling is derived from a smoothed internal energy density field. For the simple per particle cooling scheme, we find a significant increase in the minimum cooling time-scale for fragmentation with increasing resolution, matching previous results. Switching to smoothed cooling, however, results in lower critical cooling time-scales, and tentative evidence for convergence at the highest spatial resolution tested. We conclude that precision studies of fragmentation using SPH require careful consideration of how cooling (and, probably, artificial viscosity) is implemented, and that the apparent non-convergence of the fragmentation boundary seen in prior simulations is likely a numerical effect. In real discs, where cooling is physically smoothed by radiative transfer effects, the fragmentation boundary is probably displaced from the two-dimensional value by a factor that is only of the order of unity.

  20. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  1. Effects of radiation reaction in the interaction between cluster media and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Natsumi; Nagatomo, Hideo; Fukuda, Yuji; Matsui, Ryutaro; Kishimoto, Yasuaki

    2016-06-01

    Interaction between media composed of clusters and high intensity lasers in the radiation dominant regime, i.e., intensity of 10 22 - 23 W / cm 2 , is studied based on the particle-in-cell simulation that includes the radiation reaction. By introducing target materials that have the same total mass but different internal structures, i.e., uniform plasma and cluster media with different cluster radii, we investigate the effect of the internal structure on the interaction dynamics, high energy radiation emission, and its reaction. Intense radiation emission is found in the cluster media where electrons exhibit non-ballistic motions suffering from strong accelerations by both the penetrated laser field and charge separation field of clusters. As a result, the clustered structure increases the energy conversion into high energy radiations significantly at the expense of the conversion into particles, while the total absorption rate into radiation and particles remains unchanged from the absorption rate into particles in the case without radiation reaction. The maximum ion energy achieved in the interaction with cluster media is found to be decreased through the radiation reaction to electrons into the same level with that achieved in the interaction with the uniform plasma. The clustered structure thus enhances high energy radiation emission rather than the ion acceleration in the considered intensity regime.

  2. The role of MRI in the diagnosis of acute radiation reaction in breast cancer patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Startseva, Zh A.; Musabaeva, L. I.; Usova, AV; Frolova, I. G.; Simonov, K. A.; Velikaya, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A clinical case with acute radiation reaction of the left breast after organ-preserving surgery with 10 Gy IORT (24.8 Gy) conventional radiation therapy has been presented. Comprehensive MRI examination showed signs of radiation- induced damage to skin, soft tissues and vessels of the residual breast.

  3. Evidence for Orbital Decay of RX J1914.4+2456: Gravitational Radiation and the Nature of the X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    RX J1914.4+2456 is a candidate double-degenerate binary (AM CVn) with a putative 569 s orbital period. If this identification is correct, then it has one of the shortest binary orbital periods known, and gravitational radiation should drive the orbital evolution and mass transfer if the binary is semi-detached. Here we report the results of a coherent timing study of the archival ROSAT data for RX J1914.4+2456. We performed a phase coherent timing analysis using all five ROSAT observations spanning a four-year period. We demonstrate that all the data can be phase connected, and we show that the 1.756 mHz orbital frequency is increasing at a rate of 1.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(exp -17) Hz/s consistent with the expected loss of angular momentum from the binary system via gravitational radiation. In addition to providing evidence for the emission of gravitational waves, our measurement of the orbital v(dot) constrains models for the X-ray emission and the nature of the secondary. If stable mass accretion drives the X-ray flux, then a positive v(dot) is inconsistent with a degenerate donor. A helium burning dwarf is compatible if indeed such systems can have periods as short as that of RX J1914.4+2456, an open theoretical question. Our measurement of a positive v(dot) is consistent with the unipolar induction model of Wu et al. which does not require accretion to drive the X-ray flux. We discuss how future timing measurements of RX J1914.4+2456 (and systems like it) with for example, Chandra and XMM-Newton, can provide a unique probe of the interaction between mass loss and gravitational radiation. We also discuss the importance of such measurements in the context of gravitational wave detection from space, such as is expected in the future with the LISA mission.

  4. Study the Effects of Charged Particle Radiation on Gravitational Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipa, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Space-flight charging of free floating masses poses an unusual problem-- how can one control charge on the object without exerting a significant force on it? One approach is to make contact to the object with a fine wire. However, for many precision applications no physical contact is permissible, so charge must be conveyed in, a more sophisticated manner. One method has already been developed: Gravitational Probe B (GP-B) uses an ultraviolet photo-emission system described in ref 1. This system meets the experiment requirements, yet poses a number of constraints, including high power dissipation (approximately 10 W peak, approximately 1 W average), low current output (approximately 10(exp -13) A), and potential reliability problems associated with fiber optics system and the UV source. The aim of the current research is to improve this situation and, if possible, develop a more rugged and lower power alternative, usable in a wide range of situations. An potential alternative to the UV electron source is a Spindt-type field emission cathode. These consist of an array of extremely sharp silicon tips mounted in a standard IC package with provision for biasing them relative to the case potential. They are attractive as electron sources for space applications due to their low power consumption (10(exp -5) W), high current levels (10(exp -9) to 10(exp -5) A), and the absence of mechanical switching. Unfortunately, existing cathodes require special handling to avoid contamination and gas absorption. These contaminants can cause severe current fluctuations and eventual destruction of the cathode tips. Another potential drawback is the absence of any data indicating the possibility of bipolar current flow. This capability is needed because of the large uncertainties in the net charge transfer from cosmic rays to a free floating mass in space. More recent devices reduce the current fluctuations and destructive arcing by mounting the tips on a resistive substrate rather than

  5. Precision X-ray Timing of RX J0806.3+1527 with CHANDRA: Evidence for Gravitational Radiation from an Ultracompact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2005-01-01

    RX J0806.3+1527 is a candidate double degenerate binary with possibly the shortest known orbital period. The source shows an $\\approx 100 \\%$ X-ray intensity modulation at the putative orbital frequency of 3.11 mHz (321.5 s). If the system is a detached, ultracompact binary gravitational radiation should drive spin-up with a magnitude of $\\dot\

  6. Hawking fluxes, back reaction and covariant anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2008-11-01

    Starting from the chiral covariant effective action approach of Banerjee and Kulkarni (2008 Phys. Lett. B 659 827), we provide a derivation of the Hawking radiation from a charged black hole in the presence of gravitational back reaction. The modified expressions for charge and energy flux, due to the effect of one-loop back reaction are obtained.

  7. Gravitational and radiative effects on the escape of helium from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    On the moon, and probably on Mercury and other similar regolith-covered bodies with tenuous atmosphere, the dominant gas is He-4. It arises as the radiogenic product of the decay of uranium and thorium within any planet, but its major source appears to be the alpha particle flux of the solar wind. The moon intercepts solar wind helium at an average rate of 1.1 times 10 to the 24th atom/sec, and loses it at the same rate. Some helium may escape directly as the result of the process of solar wind soil bombardment which may release previously trapped helium at superthermal speeds. Atmospheric models have been calculated with the total helium influx as source. Subsequent comparison of model and measured helium concentrations indicates that the fraction of helium escaping via the atmosphere may range from 20% to 100% of the solar wind influx. Of the escaping atmosphere, most of the helium (about 93%) becomes trapped in earth orbit, while about 5% gets trapped in satellite orbits about the moon. Owing to a 6 month lifetime for helium in solar radiation, the satellite atoms form a lunar corona that exceeds the lunar atmosphere in total abundance by a factor of 4 to 5.

  8. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  9. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, N.; Barnes, E.; van Draanen, J.; Stacey, E.; Mitera, G.; Breen, D.; Giotis, A.; Czarnota, G.; Pang, J.; De Angelis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance—and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials. For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase ii and phase iii trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho–McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6). In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus

  10. Prophylaxis and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salvo, N; Barnes, E; van Draanen, J; Stacey, E; Mitera, G; Breen, D; Giotis, A; Czarnota, G; Pang, J; De Angelis, C

    2010-08-01

    Radiation therapy is a common treatment for cancer patients. One of the most common side effects of radiation is acute skin reaction (radiation dermatitis) that ranges from a mild rash to severe ulceration. Approximately 85% of patients treated with radiation therapy will experience a moderate-to-severe skin reaction. Acute radiation-induced skin reactions often lead to itching and pain, delays in treatment, and diminished aesthetic appearance-and subsequently to a decrease in quality of life. Surveys have demonstrated that a wide variety of topical, oral, and intravenous agents are used to prevent or to treat radiation-induced skin reactions. We conducted a literature review to identify trials that investigated products for the prophylaxis and management of acute radiation dermatitis. Thirty-nine studies met the pre-defined criteria, with thirty-three being categorized as prophylactic trials and six as management trials.For objective evaluation of skin reactions, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria and the U.S. National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria were the most commonly used tools (65% of the studies). Topical corticosteroid agents were found to significantly reduce the severity of skin reactions; however, the trials of corticosteroids evaluated various agents, and no clear indication about a preferred corticosteroid has emerged. Amifostine and oral enzymes were somewhat effective in preventing radiation-induced skin reactions in phase II and phase III trials respectively; further large randomized controlled trials should be undertaken to better investigate those products. Biafine cream (Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Titusville, NJ, U.S.A.) was found not to be superior to standard regimes in the prevention of radiation-induced skin reactions (n = 6).In conclusion, the evidence is insufficient to support the use of a particular agent for the prevention and management of acute radiation-induced skin reactions. Future trials should focus on

  11. On the Contribution of Density Perturbations and Gravitational Waves to the Lower Order Multipoles of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, A.; Grishchuk, L. P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    The important studies of Peebles, and Bond and Efstathiou have led to the formula Cl=const./[l(l+1)] aimed at describing the lower order multipoles of the CMBR temperature variations caused by density perturbations with the flat spectrum. Clearly, this formula requires amendments, as it predicts an infinitely large monopole C0, and a dipole moment C1 only 6/2 times larger than the quadrupole C2, both predictions in conflict with observations. We restore the terms omitted in the course of the derivation of this formula, and arrive at a new expression. According to the corrected formula, the monopole moment is finite and small, while the dipole moment is sensitive to short-wavelength perturbations, and numerically much larger than the quadrupole, as one would expect on physical grounds. At the same time, the function l(l+1)Cl deviates from a horizontal line and grows with l, for l>=2. We show that the inclusion of the modulating (transfer) function terminates the growth and forms the first peak, recently observed. We fit the theoretical curves to the position and height of the first peak, as well as to the observed dipole, varying three parameters: red-shift at decoupling, red-shift at matter-radiation equality, and slope of the primordial spectrum. It appears that there is always a deficit, as compared with the COBE observations, at small multipoles, l~10. We demonstrate that a reasonable and theoretically expected amount of gravitational waves bridges this gap at small multipoles, leaving the other fits as good as before. We show that the observationally acceptable models permit somewhat ``blue'' primordial spectra. This allows one to avoid the infrared divergence of cosmological perturbations, which is otherwise present.

  12. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of pure gravitational radiation. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Pascual; Ehlers, Jürgen; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2013-12-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Pascual Jordan, Juergen Ehlers and Rainer Sachs, first published in 1961 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was part 2 of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (Parts 1 and 4 of the series have already been reprinted, parts 3 and 5 will be printed as Golden Oldies in near future.) This second paper discusses the geometry of geodesic null congruences, the algebraic classification of the Weyl tensor by spinor methods, and applies these to a study of the propagation of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. It has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for republication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. The republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A. H. MacCallum and Wolfgang Kundt.

  13. Particle beams in ultrastrong laser fields: direct laser acceleration and radiation reaction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamin, Yousef I.; Li, Jian-Xing; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z.; Tamburini, Matteo; Di Piazza, Antonino; Keitel, Christoph H.

    2015-03-01

    Several aspects of the interaction of particle beams with ultrastrong laser fields are discussed. Firstly, we consider regimes when radiation reaction is not essential and it is demonstrated that employing chirped laser pulses, significant improvement of the direct acceleration of particles can be achieved. Results from single- and many-particle calculations of the particle acceleration, in vacuum, by plane-wave fields, as well as in tightly-focused laser beams, show that the mean energies and their spreads qualify them for important applications. Secondly, we investigate the effect of radiation reaction in electron-laser-beam interactions. Signatures of the quantum radiation reaction during the interaction of an electron bunch with a focused superstrong ultrashort laser pulse can be observed in a characteristic behavior of the spectral bandwidth, and the angular spread of the nonlinear Compton radiation on the laser pulse duration. Furthermore, it is shown that the radiation reaction effects can be employed to control the electron dynamics via the nonlinear interplay between the Lorentz and radiation reaction forces. In particular, it is shown that an ultrarelativistic electron bunch colliding head- on with a strong bichromatic laser pulse can be deflected in a controllable way, by changing either the relative phase or the relative amplitude between the two frequency components of the bichromatic field.

  14. Radiative corrections for (e,e{prime}p) reactions at GeV energies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Ent; B. W. Filippone; N. C. R. Makins; R. G. Milner; T. G. O'Neill; D. A. Wasson

    2000-05-01

    A general framework for applying radiative corrections to (e,e{prime}p) coincidence reactions at GeV energies is presented, with special emphasis to higher-order Bremsstrahlung effects, radiation from the scattered hadron, and the validity of peaking approximations. The sensitivity to the assumptions made in practically applying radiative corrections to (e,e{prime}p) data is extensively discussed. The general framework is tested against experimental data of the {sup 1}H(e,e{prime}p) reaction at momentum transfer values larger than 1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2}, where radiative processes become a dominant source of uncertainty. The formulas presented here can easily be modified for any other electron-induced coincidence reaction.

  15. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  16. Energy conservation equation for a radiating pointlike charge in the context of the Abraham-Lorentz versus the Abraham-Becker radiation-reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, U.; Bornatici, M.

    1997-12-01

    With reference to a radiating pointlike charge, the energy conservation equation comprising the effect of the Abraham-Lorentz radiation-reaction force is contrasted with the incorrect energy conservation equation obtained by Hartemann and Luhmann [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1107 (1995)] on considering instead the Abraham-Becker force that accounts only for a part of the instantaneous radiation-reaction force.

  17. Radiation-induced reactions of COH 2 gas mixtures over various solid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, S.; Arai, H.; Hatada, M.

    Studies have been carried out of radiation-induced reactions of COH 2 gas mixtures in the presence of various solid catalysts in order to find possibilities of synthesizing organic raw materials from COH 2 by radiation for the future. The solid catalysts studied include Fischer-Tropsch catalyst (FeCu supported by diatomaceous earth), titania(TiO 2), and silica gel. Analysis of the reaction products over Fischer-Tropsch catalyst or semiconductors such as TiO 2 and ZnOCr 2O 3 reveals that these solid catalysts do not sensitize the radiation chemical reaction of COH 2 but show the secondary effects on the reaction so as to induce the hydrogenation of olefins produced by the catalytic reaction and of aldehydes produced in gas phase by radiation. On the other hand, silica gel and other insulators such as alumina have been found to exhibit high catalytic activity in the formation of hydrocarbons from COH 2 under electron beam irradiation at 300°C. It has been shown experimentally that secondary reactions between H 2 and carbonaceous solid produced from CO make a substantial contribution to the formation of hydrocarbons from COH 2 over silica gel. In an attempt to find the role of silica gel in the reaction to produce hydrocarbons, radiation-induced reactions have been studied of H 2 with the carbonaceous solid that had been produced by irradiation of CO in the absence of solid catalyst, over TiO 2, or over silica gel. The results indicate that silica gel not only enhances the yields of CO 2 and carbonaceous solid from CO but also promotes hydrogenation reactions of the carbonaceous solid under electron beam irradiation.

  18. Radiation reaction and pitch-angle changes for a charge undergoing synchrotron losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    In the derivation of synchrotron radiation formulae, it has been assumed that the pitch angle of a charge remains constant during the radiation process. However, from the radiation reaction formula, while the component of the velocity vector perpendicular to the magnetic field reduces in magnitude due to radiative losses, the parallel component does not undergo any change during radiation. Therefore, there is a change in the ratio of the two components, implying a change in the pitch angle. We derive the exact formula for the change in energy of radiating electrons by taking into account the change of the pitch angle due to radiative losses. From this, we derive the characteristic decay time of synchrotron electrons over which they turn from highly relativistic into mildly relativistic ones.

  19. Physicians' reaction to Chernobyl explosion: lessons in radiation - and cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-08-01

    Although the Soviets originally refused offers of technical assistance from many other nations, they accepted one offer of assistance almost immediately - help in the medical care of those who had been exposed to radiation. The offer to provide medical assistance was initiated by the International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry on April 29 by its chair, Robert Peter Gale, MD, PhD, of the Univ. of California at Los Angeles. It was accepted on May 1. This paper discusses his medical experiences and observations on the Chernobyl accident.

  20. A new theoretical approach to thermonuclear radiative-capture reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Yasuro; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Akahori, Takahiko

    2012-11-12

    We propose a new computational method for astrophysical reaction rate of radiative capture process, which does not require any solution of scattering problem. It is tested for twobody radiative caputure reaction {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne and a comparison is made with an ordinary method solving two-body scattering problem. The method is shown to work well in practice and thus will be useful for problems in which an explicit construction of scattering solution is difficult such as the triple-alpha capture process.

  1. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  2. Photonuclear and radiative capture reaction rates for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Frauendorf, S.; Kaempfer, B.; Scwengner, R.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    The vast majority of nuclei heavier than iron are synthesisized via the capture of neutrons. There are however 35 naturally occurring nuclei, including isotopes of Mo and La, located on the neutron-deficient size of the valley of stability. It has been proposed that these nuclei, referred to as p-nuclei, are produced via sequential photo-dissociation reactions in the oxygen-neon shell burning regions of a pre-supernova star. As such, cross sections for p-nuclei production are particularly sensitive to the gamma-ray strength function, which, though dominated by the giant dipole resonance, may contain extra strength contributions near to the neutron threshold. Recently new (γ, γ') cross section measurements have been performed at the ELBE facility at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the nuclei ^92-100Mo, ^88Sr, ^90Zr and ^139La probing the photo-absorption cross section over an energy range 4.5 - 6 MeV, up to the neutron separation threshold. The use of these measurements as a test of existing gamma-ray strength function models, and the consequent impact on p-nuclei production rates, will be discussed.

  3. Radiative ion beams: hot stellar reactions in the laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Mathews, G.J.; Bauer, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Following our initial production of beams of /sup 7/Be and /sup 13/N, we have improved the purity and intensity of these beams. In addition we have generated beams of /sup 15/O (at 30 MeV) and /sup 8/Li (at 22 MeV). These beams are intended for cross section measurements of proton and alpha-particle capture reactions on unstable species that are important in hot stellar environments. We have begun studies aimed toward measuring the /sup 1/H(/sup 7/Be,/sup 8/B)..gamma.. cross section. As part of the developmental work, we attempted to remeasure the /sup 2/H(/sup 7/Be,/sup 8/B)n cross section with a different technique that pointed out the importance of background /sup 8/Li. We measured the /sup 2/H(/sup 7/Li,/sup 8/Li)/sup 1/H cross section to be 155 +- 20 mb at 12.2 +- 1.3 MeV.

  4. Equation of motion with radiation reaction in ultrarelativistic laser-electron interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Keita; Nagatomo, Hideo; Mima, Kunioki; Koga, James

    2011-12-15

    The intensity of the ultra-short pulse lasers has reached 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} owing to the advancements of laser technology. When the motion of an electron becomes relativistic, bremsstrahlung accompanies it. The energy from this bremsstrahlung corresponds to the energy loss of the electron; therefore, the motion of the electron deviates from the case without radiation. The radiation behaves something like resistance. This effect called ''radiation reaction'' or ''radiation damping'' and the force converted from the radiation is named the ''radiation reaction force'' or the ''damping force''. The equation of motion with the reaction force is known as the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac (LAD) equation, but the solution of this equation is not physical due to the fact that it has a ''run-away'' solution. As one solution of this problem, we have derived a new equation which takes the place of the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac equation. We will show the validity of this equation with a simple theoretical analysis.

  5. The role of radiation reaction in Lienard-Wiechert description of FEL interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    The most common theoretical analysis of the FEL interaction is based on the set of equations consisting of Lorentz and wave equations. This approach explains most of FEL features and, in particular, works well to describe operation in the amplifier mode. In that approach however, there are some difficulties in describing operation in oscillator mode, as well as self amplified spontaneous emission. In particular, it is not possible to describe the start up stage since there is no wave to start with. It is clear that a different approach is required in such situations. That is why we have pursued the study of the FEL interaction in the framework of Lorentz plus Lienard-Wiechert equations. The Lienard-Wiechert Lorentz equation approach however, presents its own set of problems. Variation in energy of the electrons is given exclusively by the Lorentz equation. Thus, the energy lost due to the radiation process is not properly taken into account. This, of course, is a long standing problem in classical electrodynamics. In order to restore energy conservation radiation reaction has to be incorporated into the framework. The first question in that regard has to do with which form of the radiation reaction equations is the most convenient for computations in the FEL process. This has to do with the fact that historically, radiation reaction has been added in an ad hoc manner instead of being derived from the fundamental equations. Another problem discussed is how to take into account the radiation reaction in a collective manner in the interaction among electrons. Also discussed is the radiation reaction vis a vi the coherence properties of the FEL process.

  6. Quantum radiation reaction in head-on laser-electron beam interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the energy spread and the divergence of electron beams while they interact with different laser pulses at intensities where quantum effects and radiation reaction are of relevance. The interaction is modelled with a quantum electrodynamic (QED)-PIC code and the results are compared with those obtained using a standard PIC code with a classical radiation reaction module. In addition, an analytical model is presented that estimates the value of the final electron energy spread after the interaction with the laser has finished. While classical radiation reaction is a continuous process, in QED, radiation emission is stochastic. The two pictures reconcile in the limit when the emitted photons energy is small compared to the energy of the emitting electrons. The energy spread of the electron distribution function always tends to decrease with classical radiation reaction, whereas the stochastic QED emission can also enlarge it. These two tendencies compete in the QED-dominated regime. Our analysis, supported by the QED module, reveals an upper limit to the maximal attainable energy spread due to stochasticity that depends on laser intensity and the electron beam average energy. Beyond this limit, the energy spread decreases. These findings are verified for different laser pulse lengths ranging from short ∼30 fs pulses presently available to the long ∼150 fs pulses expected in the near-future laser facilities, and compared with a theoretical model. Our results also show that near future experiments will be able to probe this transition and to demonstrate the competition between enhanced QED induced energy spread and energy spectrum narrowing from classical radiation reaction.

  7. Near-infrared radiation background, gravitational wave background, and star formation rate of Pop III and Pop II during cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. P.; Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G.

    2015-10-01

    Context. The transition from Population III (Pop III) to Population II (Pop II) stars plays an important role in the history of the Universe. The huge amount of ionizing photons generated by Pop III stars begin to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at the early stage of reionization. Meanwhile, the feedback from reionization and metal enrichment changes the evolution of different populations. The near-infrared radiation background (NIRB) and the stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGWs) from these early stars will provide important information about the transition form Pop III to Pop II stars. Aims: We obtain the NIRB and SBGWs from the early stars, which are constrained by the observation of reionization and star formation rate (SFR). Methods: We studied the transition from Pop III to Pop II stars via the star formation model of different populations, which takes into account the reionization and the metal enrichment evolution. We calculated the two main metal pollution channels arising from the supernova-driven protogalactic outflows and genetic channel. We obtained the SFRs of Pop III and Pop II and their NIRB and SBGWs radiation. Results: We predict that the upper limit of metallicity in metal-enriched IGM (the galaxies that are polluted via the genetic channel) reaches Zcrit = 10-3.5 Z⊙ at z ~ 13 (z ~ 11), which is consistent with our star formation model. We constrain the SFR of Pop III stars from reionization observations. The peak intensity of NIRB is about 0.03 - 0.2 nWm-2 sr-1 at ~1 μm for z> 6. The predicted NIRB signal is consistent with the metallicity evolution. We also obtain the gravitational wave background from the black holes formed by these early stars. The predicted gravitational wave background has a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 8 × 10-9 at ν = 158 Hz for Pop II star remnants. However, the background generated by Pop III.2 stars is much lower than that of Pop II stars, with a peak amplitude of ΩGW ≃ 1.2 × 10-11 at ν = 28

  8. Scalar Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-03-01

    General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at macroscopic distance scales and near event horizons. These arise from the conformal scalar degree of freedom in the extended effective field theory (EFT) of gravity generated by the trace anomaly of massless quantum fields in curved space. Linearized around flat space this quantum scalar degree of freedom combines with the conformal part of the metric and predicts the existence of scalar spin-0 ``breather'' propagating gravitational waves in addition to the transverse tensor spin-2 waves of classical General Relativity. Estimates of the expected strength of scalar gravitational radiation from compact astrophysical sources are given.

  9. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  10. Signatures of quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron-beam collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.

    2015-09-15

    Electron dynamics in the collision of an electron beam with a high-intensity focused ultrashort laser pulse are investigated using three-dimensional QED particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and the results are compared with those calculated by classical Landau and Lifshitz PIC simulations. Significant differences are observed from the angular dependence of the electron energy distribution patterns for the two different approaches, because photon emission is no longer well approximated by a continuous process in the quantum radiation-dominated regime. The stochastic nature of photon emission results in strong signatures of quantum radiation-reaction effects under certain conditions. We show that the laser spot size and duration greatly influence these signatures due to the competition of QED effects and the ponderomotive force, which is well described in the classical approximation. The clearest signatures of quantum radiation reaction are found in the limit of large laser spots and few cycle pulse durations.

  11. Reaction formulation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors and dielectric-coated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N. N.

    1974-01-01

    The reaction concept is employed to formulate an integral equation for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders. The surface-current density on the conducting surface is expanded with subsectional bases. The dielectric layer is modeled with polarization currents radiating in free space. Maxwell's equation and the boundary conditions are employed to express the polarization-current distribution in terms of the surface-current density on the conducting surface. By enforcing reaction tests with an array of electric test sources, the moment method is employed to reduce the integral equation to a matrix equation. Inversion of the matrix equation yields the current distribution, and the scattered field is then obtained by integrating the current distribution. The theory, computer program and numerical results are presented for radiation and scattering from plates, corner reflectors, and dielectric-coated conducting cylinders.

  12. Sources of gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, Bernard F.

    1989-01-01

    Sources of low frequency gravitational radiation are reviewed from an astrophysical point of view. Cosmological sources include the formation of massive black holes in galactic nuclei, the capture by such holes of neutron stars, the coalescence of orbiting pairs of giant black holes, and various means of producing a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the early universe. Sources local to our Galaxy include various kinds of close binaries and coalescing binaries. Gravitational wave astronomy can provide information that no other form of observing can supply; in particular, the positive identification of a cosmological background originating in the early universe would be an event as significant as was the detection of the cosmic microwave background.

  13. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  14. Gravitating Hopfions

    SciTech Connect

    Shnir, Ya. M.

    2015-12-15

    We construct solutions of the 3 + 1 dimensional Faddeev–Skyrme model coupled to Einstein gravity. The solutions are static and asymptotically flat. They are characterized by a topological Hopf number. We investigate the dependence of the ADM masses of gravitating Hopfions on the gravitational coupling. When gravity is coupled to flat space solutions, a branch of gravitating Hopfion solutions arises and merges at a maximal value of the coupling constant with a second branch of solutions. This upper branch has no flat space limit. Instead, in the limit of a vanishing coupling constant, it connects to either the Bartnik–McKinnon or a generalized Bartnik–McKinnon solution. We further find that in the strong-coupling limit, there is no difference between the gravitating solitons of the Skyrme model and the Faddeev–Skyrme model.

  15. Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Lee Samuel

    2012-03-01

    If two black holes collide in a vacuum, can they be observed? Until recently, the answer would have to be "no." After all, how would we observe them? Black holes are "naked" mass: pure mass, simple mass, mass devoid of any matter whose interactions might lead to the emission of photons or neutrinos, or any electromagnetic fields that might accelerate cosmic rays or leave some other signature that we could observe in our most sensitive astronomical instruments. Still, black holes do have mass. As such, they interact—like all mass—gravitationally. And the influence of gravity, like all influences, propagates no faster than that universal speed we first came to know as the speed of light. The effort to detect that propagating influence, which we term as gravitational radiation or gravitational waves, was initiated just over 50 years ago with the pioneering work of Joe Weber [1] and has been the object of increasingly intense experimental effort ever since. Have we, as yet, detected gravitational waves? The answer is still "no." Nevertheless, the accumulation of the experimental efforts begun fifty years ago has brought us to the point where we can confidently say that gravitational waves will soon be detected and, with that first detection, the era of gravitational wave astronomy—the observational use of gravitational waves, emitted by heavenly bodies—will begin. Data analysis for gravitational wave astronomy is, today, in its infancy and its practitioners have much to learn from allied fields, including machine learning. Machine learning tools and techniques have not yet been applied in any extensive or substantial way to the study or analysis of gravitational wave data. It is fair to say that this owes principally to the fields relative youth and not to any intrinsic unsuitability of machine learning tools to the analysis problems the field faces. Indeed, the nature of many of the analysis problems faced by the field today cry-out for the application of

  16. Republication of: Contributions to the theory of gravitational radiation fields. Exact solutions of the field equations of the general theory of relativity V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Trümper, Manfred

    2016-04-01

    This is an English translation of a paper by Wolfgang Kundt and Manfred Trümper, first published in 1962 in the proceedings of the Academy of Sciences and Literature in Mainz (Germany). The original paper was the last of a five-part series of articles containing the first summary of knowledge about exact solutions of Einstein's equations found until then. (All the other parts of the series have already been re-published as Golden Oldies.) This fifth contribution summarizes key points of the earlier papers and applies them, in particular results from papers II and IV in the series, in the context of the propagation of gravitational radiation when matter is present. The paper has been selected by the Editors of General Relativity and Gravitation for re-publication in the Golden Oldies series of the journal. This republication is accompanied by an editorial note written by Malcolm A.H. MacCallum and by a brief autobiography of Manfred Trümper.

  17. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  18. Radiated power and radiation reaction forces of coherently oscillating charged particles in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknejadi, Pardis; Madey, John M. J.; Kowalczyk, Jeremy M. D.

    2015-05-01

    For the foreseeable future, the analysis and design of the complex systems needed to generate intense beams of radiation via the process of coherent emission into free-space will depend on the principles and methods of classical electrodynamics (CED). But the fields and forces predicted by the currently accepted CED theory are manifestly incompatible with Maxwell's equations' energy integral as applied to the process of coherent emission into free-space. It is the purpose of this paper to review the evidence for these limitations of conventional CED, to identify an alternative formulation of CED that does not suffer from these defects, and to describe how the predictions of this more physically realistic formulation of electrodynamics, including the role of the advanced interactions allowed by Maxwell's equations and thermodynamics, might be tested by experiment and applied to enhance the capabilities of devices and systems employing the mechanism of "radiation into free-space."

  19. Theory and detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, G.

    The role of gravitational waves in general relativity is examined. It is found that the gravitational waves are a particular solution of the Einstein equations. The computation of the energy flux emitted by moving bodies as gravitational waves is very similar to that for electromagnetic waves. A description of gravitational wave sources is presented, taking into account a spinning star, double star systems, the fall into a Schwarzschild black hole, and radiation from gravitational collapse. Questions regarding the interaction of gravitational waves with matter are explored, and the interaction of a gravitational wave with oscillators and an elastic cylinder is considered. Electromechanical transducers are discussed, giving attention to the piezoelectric ceramic, the capacitor, the inductor, the Brownian noise of the bar, the backreaction, the wide band noise, and data analysis. The design of a gravitational wave antenna is also described.

  20. Gravitational Wave Astrophysics: Opening the New Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational wave window onto the universe is expected to open in 5 years, when ground-based detectors make the first detections in the high-frequency regime. Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime produced by the motions of massive objects such as black holes and neutron stars. Since the universe is nearly transparent to gravitational waves, these signals carry direct information about their sources such as masses, spins, luminosity distances, and orbital parameters through dense, obscured regions across cosmic time. This article explores gravitational waves as cosmic messengers, highlighting key sources, detection methods, and the astrophysical payoffs across the gravitational wave spectrum. Keywords: Gravitational wave astrophysics; gravitational radiation; gravitational wave detectors; black holes.

  1. Gravitational waves from gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher L; New, Kimberly C

    2008-01-01

    Gravitational wave emission from stellar collapse has been studied for nearly four decades. Current state-of-the-art numerical investigations of collapse include those that use progenitors with more realistic angular momentum profiles, properly treat microphysics issues, account for general relativity, and examine non-axisymmetric effects in three dimensions. Such simulations predict that gravitational waves from various phenomena associated with gravitational collapse could be detectable with ground-based and space-based interferometric observatories. This review covers the entire range of stellar collapse sources of gravitational waves: from the accretion induced collapse of a white dwarf through the collapse down to neutron stars or black holes of massive stars to the collapse of supermassive stars.

  2. Observation of the 3He(n, tp) Reaction by Detection of Far-Ultraviolet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Alan K.; Coplan, Michael A.; Cooper, John W.; Hughes, Patrick P.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles

    2008-01-01

    We have detected Lyman alpha radiation, 121.6 nm light produced from the n = 2 to n = 1 transition in atomic hydrogen, as a product of the 3He(n, tp) nuclear reaction occurring in a cell of 3He gas. The predominant source of this radiation appears to be decay of the 2p state of tritium produced by charge transfer and excitation collisions with the background 3He gas. Under the experimental conditions reported here we find yields of tens of Lyman alpha photons for every neutron reaction. These results suggest a method of cold neutron detection that is complementary to existing technologies that use proportional counters. In particular, this approach may provide single neutron sensitivity with wide dynamic range capability, and a class of neutron detectors that are compact and operate at relatively low voltages. PMID:27096112

  3. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  4. A New Multi-energy Neutrino Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code in Full General Relativity and Its Application to the Gravitational Collapse of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei

    2016-02-01

    We present a new multi-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics code for massive stellar core-collapse in full general relativity (GR). Employing an M1 analytical closure scheme, we solve spectral neutrino transport of the radiation energy and momentum based on a truncated moment formalism. Regarding neutrino opacities, we take into account a baseline set in state-of-the-art simulations, in which inelastic neutrino-electron scattering, thermal neutrino production via pair annihilation, and nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung are included. While the Einstein field equations and the spatial advection terms in the radiation-hydrodynamics equations are evolved explicitly, the source terms due to neutrino-matter interactions and energy shift in the radiation moment equations are integrated implicitly by an iteration method. To verify our code, we first perform a series of standard radiation tests with analytical solutions that include the check of gravitational redshift and Doppler shift. A good agreement in these tests supports the reliability of the GR multi-energy neutrino transport scheme. We then conduct several test simulations of core-collapse, bounce, and shock stall of a 15{M}⊙ star in the Cartesian coordinates and make a detailed comparison with published results. Our code performs quite well to reproduce the results of full Boltzmann neutrino transport especially before bounce. In the postbounce phase, our code basically performs well, however, there are several differences that are most likely to come from the insufficient spatial resolution in our current 3D-GR models. For clarifying the resolution dependence and extending the code comparison in the late postbounce phase, we discuss that next-generation Exaflops class supercomputers are needed at least.

  5. Consistency of a causal theory of radiative reaction with the optical theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R.; Milonni, P. W.; Ford, G. W.; O'Connell, R. F.

    2011-09-01

    The (nonrelativistic) Abraham-Lorentz equation of motion for a point electron, while suffering from runaway solutions and an acausal response to external forces, is compatible with the optical theorem. We show that a nonrelativistic theory of radiative reaction that allows for a finite charge distribution is not only causal and free of runaway solutions but also consistent with the optical theorem and the standard formulas for the Rayleigh and Thomson scattering cross sections.

  6. Compatibility of Larmor's Formula with Radiation Reaction for an Accelerated Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that the well-known disparity in classical electrodynamics between the power losses calculated from the radiation reaction and that from Larmor's formula, is succinctly understood when a proper distinction is made between quantities expressed in terms of a "real time" and those expressed in terms of a retarded time. It is explicitly shown that an accelerated charge, taken to be a sphere of vanishingly small radius r_o , experiences at any time a self-force proportional to the acceleration it had at a time r_o /c earlier, while the rate of work done on the charge is obtained by a scalar product of the self-force with the instantaneous (present) value of its velocity. Now if the retarded value of acceleration is expressed in terms of the present values of acceleration, then we get the rate of work done according to the radiation reaction equation, however if we instead express the present value of velocity in terms of its time-retarded value, then we get back the familiar Larmor's radiation formula. From this simple relation between the two we show that they differ because Larmor's formula, in contrast with the radiation reaction, is written not in terms of the real-time values of quantities specifying the charge motion but is instead expressed in terms of the time-retarded values. Moreover, it is explicitly shown that the difference in the two formulas for radiative power loss exactly matches the difference in the temporal rate of the change of energy in the self-fields between the retarded and real times. From this it becomes obvious that the ad hoc introduction of an acceleration-dependent energy term, usually referred to in the prevalent literature as Schott-term, in order to make the two formulas comply with each other, is redundant.

  7. Radiation reaction effect on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of radiation reaction force on laser driven auto-resonant particle acceleration scheme are studied using Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion. These studies are carried out for both linear and circularly polarized laser fields in the presence of static axial magnetic field. From the parametric study, a radiation reaction dominated region has been identified in which the particle dynamics is greatly effected by this force. In the radiation reaction dominated region, the two significant effects on particle dynamics are seen, viz., (1) saturation in energy gain by the initially resonant particle and (2) net energy gain by an initially non-resonant particle which is caused due to resonance broadening. It has been further shown that with the relaxation of resonance condition and with optimum choice of parameters, this scheme may become competitive with the other present-day laser driven particle acceleration schemes. The quantum corrections to the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion have also been taken into account. The difference in the energy gain estimates of the particle by the quantum corrected and classical Landau-Lifshitz equation is found to be insignificant for the present day as well as upcoming laser facilities.

  8. Gravitational Waves from Neutron Stars: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasky, Paul D.

    2015-09-01

    Neutron stars are excellent emitters of gravitational waves. Squeezing matter beyond nuclear densities invites exotic physical processes, many of which violently transfer large amounts of mass at relativistic velocities, disrupting spacetime and generating copious quantities of gravitational radiation. I review mechanisms for generating gravitational waves with neutron stars. This includes gravitational waves from radio and millisecond pulsars, magnetars, accreting systems, and newly born neutron stars, with mechanisms including magnetic and thermoelastic deformations, various stellar oscillation modes, and core superfluid turbulence. I also focus on what physics can be learnt from a gravitational wave detection, and where additional research is required to fully understand the dominant physical processes at play.

  9. Description of the proton and neutron radiative capture reactions in the Gamow shell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Michel, N.; Płoszajczak, M.; Jaganathen, Y.; Id Betan, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    We formulate the Gamow shell model (GSM) in coupled-channel (CC) representation for the description of proton/neutron radiative capture reactions and present the first application of this new formalism for the calculation of cross sections in mirror reactions 7Be(p ,γ ) 8B and 7Li(n,γ ) 8Li . The GSM-CC formalism is applied to a translationally invariant Hamiltonian with an effective finite-range two-body interaction. Reactions channels are built by GSM wave functions for the ground state 3 /2- and the first excited state 1 /2- of 7Be /7Li and the proton/neutron wave function expanded in different partial waves.

  10. On the effect of different reactions of the ozone cycle on its stability in the absence of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gordov, E.P.; Rodimova, O.B.; Sennikov, V.A.

    1993-04-01

    Several variants of reaction sets forming the ozone cycle in the absence of radiation are treated. Their phase portraits in the reaction triangle are drawn. The variations in the simplest phase portrait due to incorporating the additional reactions are described. It is shown that the system including all the considered reaction has a steady state with the zero ozone concentration. However, this steady state is not really reached because of the extremely large characteristic time of the process.

  11. Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Observations as Tools for Testing General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2004-01-01

    We continued a project, to analyse the ways in which detection and study of gravitational waves could provide quantitative tests of general relativity, with particular emphasis on waves that would be detectable by space-based observatories, such as LISA. This work had three foci: 1) Tests of scalar-tensor theories of gravity that, could be done by analyzing gravitational waves from neutron stars inspiralling into massive black holes, as detectable by LISA; 2) Study of alternative theories of gravity in which the graviton could be massive, and of how gravitational-wave observations by space-based detectors, solar-system tests, and cosmological observations could constrain such theories; and 3) Study of gravitational-radiation back reaction of particles orbiting black holes in general relativity, with emphasis on the effects of spin.

  12. FIRST INVESTIGATION OF THE COMBINED IMPACT OF IONIZING RADIATION AND MOMENTUM WINDS FROM A MASSIVE STAR ON A SELF-GRAVITATING CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoumou, Judith; Hubber, David; Dale, James E.; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape the surrounding interstellar matter (ISM) by emitting ionizing photons and ejecting material through stellar winds. To study the impact of the momentum from the wind of a massive star on the surrounding neutral or ionized material, we implemented a new HEALPix-based momentum-conserving wind scheme in the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code SEREN. A qualitative study of the impact of the feedback from an O7.5-like star on a self-gravitating sphere shows that on its own, the transfer of momentum from a wind onto cold surrounding gas has both a compressing and dispersing effect. It mostly affects gas at low and intermediate densities. When combined with a stellar source's ionizing ultraviolet (UV) radiation, we find the momentum-driven wind to have little direct effect on the gas. We conclude that during a massive star's main sequence, the UV ionizing radiation is the main feedback mechanism shaping and compressing the cold gas. Overall, the wind's effects on the dense gas dynamics and on the triggering of star formation are very modest. The structures formed in the ionization-only simulation and in the combined feedback simulation are remarkably similar. However, in the combined feedback case, different SPH particles end up being compressed. This indicates that the microphysics of gas mixing differ between the two feedback simulations and that the winds can contribute to the localized redistribution and reshuffling of gas.

  13. New Perspectives on Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yikun

    2003-04-01

    Based on radiation mechanics, a new rational mechanics proposed by the author, we can prove Newton's gravitational law and its conditions of validity. The gravitational coefficient is not a universal constant, but affected by many factors and can be both positive and negative. It is further shown how the gravitational coefficients are different for the planets in the solar system. The new rational mechanics expounds that the force causing an apple falling from a tree is not the same force causing the Earth revolving about the Sun. The gravitational force is the combining effect of shielding and shooting of gravitons between the Sun and Earth, whereas a dropped apple falling from a tree is due to the surface adsorption of Earth, called the blowing force. From this, we can rigorously prove that all electrically neutral bodies must fall with the same acceleration. However, any electrically charged bodies fall with different accelerations. It is also deduced that the weight of a magnet and its acceleration of falling depend on its orientation. So we have to distinguish weight and gravity. Moreover, the weight of a body may not be a conservative force on a planet.

  14. Reaction Rate Theory of Radiation Exposure and Scaling Hypothesis in Mutation Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Issei; Bando, Masako

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a kinetic reaction model for cells with irradiated DNA molecules due to ionizing radiation exposure. Our theory simultaneously accounts for the time-dependent reactions of DNA damage, DNA mutation and DNA repair, and the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in a tissue with a minimal set of model parameters. In contrast to existing theories of radiation exposition, we do not assume the relationships between the total dose and the induced mutation frequency. Our theory provides a universal scaling function that reasonably explains the mega-mouse experiments by Russell and Kelly [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 542 (1982)] with different dose rates. Furthermore, we have estimated the effective dose rate, which is biologically equivalent to the ionizing effects other than those caused by artificial irradiation. This value is 1.11 × 10-3 Gy/h, which is significantly larger than the effect caused by natural background radiation.

  15. A reinvestigation of the rate of the C/+/ + H2 radiative association reaction. [interstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that new experimental results and statistical theories have prompted a reinvestigation of the rate coefficient of the interstellar reaction in which C(+) + H2 yields CH2(+) + h(nu) in the 10-100 K temperature range. The results presented here indicate a rate coefficient between 10 to the -16 and 10 to the -15 cu cm/s at all temperatures studied. In applying the modified thermal and phase space theories, it is expected that they will be as accurate as for radiative association as for three-body association, provided the ab initio value for the radiative decay rate is correct. It is expected that the calculated values of the rate coefficient will be accurate to within an order of magnitude and will have the correct temperature dependence.

  16. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets. PMID:26066270

  17. Efficiency of ETV diagrams as diagnostic tools for long-term period variations. II. Non-conservative mass transfer, and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanouris, N.; Kalimeris, A.; Antonopoulou, E.; Rovithis-Livaniou, H.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The credibility of an eclipse timing variation (ETV) diagram analysis is investigated for various manifestations of the mass transfer and gravitational radiation processes in binary systems. The monotonicity of the period variations and the morphology of the respective ETV diagrams are thoroughly explored in both the direct impact and the accretion disk mode of mass transfer, accompanied by different types of mass and angular momentum losses (through a hot-spot emission from the gainer and via the L2/L3 points). Aims: Our primary objective concerns the traceability of each physical mechanism by means of an ETV diagram analysis. Also, possible critical mass ratio values are sought for those transfer modes that involve orbital angular momentum losses strong enough to dictate the secular period changes even when highly competitive mechanisms with the opposite direction act simultaneously. Methods: The dot{J-dot{P}} relation that governs the orbital evolution of a binary system is set to provide the exact solution for the period and the function expected to represent the subsequent eclipse timing variations. The angular momentum transport is parameterized through appropriate empirical relations, which are inferred from semi-analytical ballistic models. Then, we numerically determine the minimum temporal range over which a particular mechanism is rendered measurable, as well as the critical mass ratio values that signify monotonicity inversion in the period modulations. Results: Mass transfer rates comparable to or greater than 10-8 M⊙ yr-1 are measurable for typical noise levels of the ETV diagrams, regardless of whether the process is conservative. However, the presence of a transient disk around the more massive component defines a critical mass ratio (qcr ≈ 0.83) above which the period turns out to decrease when still in the conservative regime, rendering the measurability of the anticipated variations a much more complicated task. The effects of

  18. Precision X-ray Timing of RX J0806.3+1527 with CHANDRA: Evidence for Gravitational Radiation from an Ultracompact Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohymayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    RX J0806.3+1527 is a candidate double degenerate binary with possibly the shortest known orbital period. The source shows an approximately equal to 100% X-ray intensity modulation at the putative orbital frequency of 3.11 mHz (321.5 s). If the system is a detached, ultracompact binary gravitational radiation should drive spin-up with a magnitude of nu(sup dot) approximately 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Efforts to constrain the X-ray frequency evolution to date have met with mixed success, principally due to the sparseness of earlier observations. Here we describe the results of the first phase coherent X-ray monitoring campaign on RX J0806.3+1527 with Chandra. We obtained a total of 70 ksec of exposure in 6 epochs logarithmically spaced over 320 days. With these data we conclusively show that the X-ray frequency is increasing at a rate of 3.77 plus or minus 0.8 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second. Using the ephemeris derived from the new data we are able to phase up all the earlier Chandra and ROSAT data and show they are consistent with a constant nu(sup dot) = 3.63 plus or minus 0.06 x 10(exp -16) Hz per second over the past decade. This value appears consistent with that recently derived by Israel et al. largely from monitoring of the optical modulation, and is in rough agreement with the solutions reported initially by Hakala et al., based on ground-based optical observations. The large and stable nu(sup dot) over a decade is consistent with gravitational radiation losses driving the evolution. An intermediate polar (IP) scenario where the observed X-ray period is the spin period of an accreting white dwarf appears less tenable because the observed nu(sup dot) requires an m(sup dot) approximately equal to 4 x 10 (exp -8) solar mass yr(sup -l), that is much larger than that inferred from the observed X-ray luminosity (although this depends on the uncertain distance and bolometric corrections), and it is difficult to drive such a high m(sup dot) in a binary system with

  19. Radiation and chemical reaction effects on MHD flow along a moving vertical porous plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana Reddy, G. V.; Bhaskar Reddy, N.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effects of magnetohydrodynamic force and buoyancy on convective heat and mass transfer flow past a moving vertical porous plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of self-similar equations using the similarity transformations. The resultant equations are then solved numerically using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method along with the shooting technique. The results are obtained for the velocity, temperature, concentration, skin-friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number. The effects of various parameters on flow variables are illustrated graphically, and the physical aspects of the problem are discussed.

  20. Radiation reaction and renormalization in classical electrodynamics of a point particle in any dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazinski, P. O.; Lyakhovich, S. L.; Sharapov, A. A.

    2002-07-01

    The effective equations of motion for a point charged particle taking into account the radiation reaction are considered in various space-time dimensions. The divergences stemming from the pointness of the particle are studied and an effective renormalization procedure is proposed encompassing uniformly the cases of all even dimensions. It is shown that in any dimension the classical electrodynamics is a renormalizable theory if not multiplicatively beyond d=4. For the cases of three and six dimensions the covariant analogues of the Lorentz-Dirac equation are explicitly derived.

  1. Conservative, gravitational self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole in a radiation gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Abhay G.; Friedman, John L.; Price, Larry R.; Keidl, Tobias S.; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2011-03-15

    This is the second of two companion papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge; more precisely, the method uses a radiation gauge for the radiative part of the metric perturbation, together with an arbitrarily chosen gauge for the parts of the perturbation associated with changes in black-hole mass and spin and with a shift in the center of mass. In a test of the method delineated in the first paper, we compute the conservative part of the self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. The gauge vector relating our radiation gauge to a Lorenz gauge is helically symmetric, implying that the quantity h{sub {alpha}{beta}u}{sup {alpha}u{beta}} must have the same value for our radiation gauge as for a Lorenz gauge; and we confirm this numerically to one part in 10{sup 14}. As outlined in the first paper, the perturbed metric is constructed from a Hertz potential that is in a term obtained algebraically from the retarded perturbed spin-2 Weyl scalar, {psi}{sub 0}{sup ret}. We use a mode-sum renormalization and find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=l+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for the self-force in terms of the retarded field h{sub {alpha}{beta}}{sup ret}; we similarly find the leading renormalization coefficients of h{sub {alpha}{beta}u}{sup {alpha}u{beta}} and the related change in the angular velocity of the particle due to its self-force. We show numerically that the singular part of the self-force has the form f{sub {alpha}}{sup S}=<{nabla}{sub {alpha}{rho}}{sup -1}>, the part of {nabla}{sub {alpha}{rho}}{sup -1} that is axisymmetric about a radial line through the particle. This differs only by a constant from its form for a Lorenz gauge. It is because we do not use a radiation gauge to describe the change in black-hole mass that the singular part of the self-force has no singularity along a radial line through the particle and, at least in this example, is spherically

  2. Conservative, gravitational self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole in a radiation gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Keidl, Tobias S.; Friedman, John L.; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Price, Larry R.

    2011-03-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge; more precisely, the method uses a radiation gauge for the radiative part of the metric perturbation, together with an arbitrarily chosen gauge for the parts of the perturbation associated with changes in black-hole mass and spin and with a shift in the center of mass. In a test of the method delineated in the first paper, we compute the conservative part of the self-force for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. The gauge vector relating our radiation gauge to a Lorenz gauge is helically symmetric, implying that the quantity hαβuαuβ must have the same value for our radiation gauge as for a Lorenz gauge; and we confirm this numerically to one part in 1014. As outlined in the first paper, the perturbed metric is constructed from a Hertz potential that is in a term obtained algebraically from the retarded perturbed spin-2 Weyl scalar, ψ0ret. We use a mode-sum renormalization and find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=ℓ+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for the self-force in terms of the retarded field hαβret; we similarly find the leading renormalization coefficients of hαβuαuβ and the related change in the angular velocity of the particle due to its self-force. We show numerically that the singular part of the self-force has the form fαS=⟨∇αρ-1⟩, the part of ∇αρ-1 that is axisymmetric about a radial line through the particle. This differs only by a constant from its form for a Lorenz gauge. It is because we do not use a radiation gauge to describe the change in black-hole mass that the singular part of the self-force has no singularity along a radial line through the particle and, at least in this example, is spherically symmetric to subleading order in ρ.

  3. Risk of severe allergic reactions from the use of potassium iodide for radiation emergencies.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H

    2004-12-01

    Potassium iodide (KI) may be prescribed for widespread use in the event of a radiation emergency to prevent the uptake of radioactive iodide by the thyroid gland. The available literature was reviewed and expert opinion sought among members of the Adverse Reactions to Foods and the Adverse Reactions to Drugs and Biologicals Committees of the Academy to assemble evidenced-based conclusions regarding the risks of an allergic reaction to this therapy. This article describes the information leading to the following conclusions: (1) anaphylactoid reactions to radiocontrast media should not be considered evidence of KI allergy, (2) allergic contact dermatitis from iodine-containing antibacterial preparations should not be considered evidence of IgE antibody-mediated KI allergy or sensitivity, (3) IgE antibody-mediated allergy to seafood should not be considered evidence of KI allergy or sensitivity, and (4) physicians should ensure that persons are not allergic to inactive ingredients or components of the KI formulation prescribed. PMID:15577843

  4. Gravitational Lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-06-24

    In a long line of intellectual triumphs, Einstein’s theory of general relativity was his greatest and most imaginative. It tells us that what we experience as gravity can be most accurately described as the bending of space itself. This idea leads to consequences, including gravitational lensing, which is caused by light traveling in this curved space. This is works in a way analogous to a lens (and hence the name). In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains a little general relativity, a little gravitational lensing, and tells us how this phenomenon allows us to map out the matter of the entire universe, including the otherwise-invisible dark matter.

  5. Towers of Gravitational Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    In this essay, we introduce a theoretical framework designed to describe black hole dynamics. The difficulties in understanding such dynamics stems from the proliferation of scales involved when one attempts to simultaneously describe all of the relevant dynamical degrees of freedom. These range from the modes that describe the black hole horizon, which are responsible for dissipative effects, to the long wavelength gravitational radiation that drains mechanical energy from macroscopic black hole bound states. We approach the problem from a Wilsonian point of view, by building a tower of theories of gravity each of which is valid at different scales. The methodology leads to multiple new results in diverse topics including phase transitions of Kaluza-Klein black holes and the interactions of spinning black hole in non-relativistic orbits. Moreover, our methods tie together speculative ideas regarding dualities for black hole horizons to real physical measurements in gravitational wave detectors.

  6. Towers of gravitational theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2006-11-01

    In this essay we introduce a theoretical framework designed to describe black hole dynamics. The difficulties in understanding such dynamics stems from the proliferation of scales involved when one attempts to simultaneously describe all of the relevant dynamical degrees of freedom. These range from the modes that describe the black hole horizon, which are responsible for dissipative effects, to the long wavelength gravitational radiation that drains mechanical energy from macroscopic black hole bound states. We approach the problem from a Wilsonian point of view, by building a tower of theories of gravity each of which is valid at different scales. The methodology leads to multiple new results in diverse topics including phase transitions of Kaluza-Klein black holes and the interactions of spinning black hole in non-relativistic orbits. Moreover, our methods tie together speculative ideas regarding dualities for black hole horizons to real physical measurements in gravitational wave detectors.

  7. Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Gravity bends light rays in a way analogous to, but quantitatively different from, the way it bends trajectories of passing particles. If light from some bright object passes close enough to some foreground mass, that object's image will be altered. The effect is more like a piece of bathroom glass in the sky than a precision-ground and well-focused lens, but the terms `gravitational lensing' or ...

  8. Experimental gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; di Virgilio, Angela

    2016-06-01

    100 years after the invention of General Relativity (GR) and 110 years after the development of Special Relativity (SR) we have to state that until now no single experiment or observation allows any doubt about the validity of these theories within the accuracy of the available data. Tests of GR can be divided into three categories: (i) test of the foundations of GR, (ii) tests of the consequences of GR, and (iii) test of the interplay between GR and quantum mechanics. In the first category, we have tests of the Einstein Equivalence Principle and the structure of the Newton axioms, in the second category we have effects like the gravitational redshift, light defection, gravitational time delay, the perihelion shift, the gravitomagnetic effects as the Lense-Thirring and Schiff effect, and gravitational waves. Tests of the effects of gravity on quantum systems are a first step towards experiments searching for a quantum gravity theory. In this paper, we also highlight practical applications in positioning, geodesy, and the International Atomic Time. After 100 years, GR can now definitely be regarded also as practical and applied science.

  9. Momentum accumulation due to solar radiation torque, and reaction wheel sizing, with configuration optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hablani, Hari B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper has a two-fold objective: determination of yearly momentum accumulation due to solar radiation pressure, and optimum reaction wheel sizing. The first objective is confronted while determining propellant consumption by the attitude control system over a spacecraft's lifetime. This, however, cannot be obtained from the daily momentum accumulation and treating that constant throughout the year, because the orientation of the solar arrays relative to the spacecraft changes over a wide range in a year, particularly if the spacecraft has two arrays, one normal and the other off-normal to different extent at different times to the sun rays. The paper first develops commands for the arrays for tracking the sun, the arrays articulated to earth-pointing spacecraft with two rotational degrees of freedom, and spacecraft in an arbitrary circular orbit. After developing expressions for solar radiation torque due to one or both arrays, arranged symmetrically or asymmetrically relative to the spacecraft bus, momentum accumulation over an orbit and then over a year are determined. The remainder of the paper is concerned with designing reaction wheel configurations. Four-, six-, and three-wheel configurations are considered, and for given torque and momentum requirements, their cant angles with the roll/yaw plane are optimized for minimum power consumption. Finally, their momentum and torque capacities are determined for one-wheel failure scenario, and six configurations are compared and contrasted.

  10. Weak Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Sandrine; Starck, Jean-Luc; Leonard, Adrienne; Réfrégier, Alexandre

    2012-03-01

    This chapter reviews the data mining methods recently developed to solve standard data problems in weak gravitational lensing. We detail the different steps of the weak lensing data analysis along with the different techniques dedicated to these applications. An overview of the different techniques currently used will be given along with future prospects. Until about 30 years ago, astronomers thought that the Universe was composed almost entirely of ordinary matter: protons, neutrons, electrons, and atoms. The field of weak lensing has been motivated by the observations made in the last decades showing that visible matter represents only about 4-5% of the Universe (see Figure 14.1). Currently, the majority of the Universe is thought to be dark, that is, does not emit electromagnetic radiation. The Universe is thought to be mostly composed of an invisible, pressure less matter - potentially relic from higher energy theories - called "dark matter" (20-21%) and by an even more mysterious term, described in Einstein equations as a vacuum energy density, called "dark energy" (70%). This "dark" Universe is not well described or even understood; its presence is inferred indirectly from its gravitational effects, both on the motions of astronomical objects and on light propagation. So this point could be the next breakthrough in cosmology. Today's cosmology is based on a cosmological model that contains various parameters that need to be determined precisely, such as the matter density parameter Omega_m or the dark energy density parameter Omega_lambda. Weak gravitational lensing is believed to be the most promising tool to understand the nature of dark matter and to constrain the cosmological parameters used to describe the Universe because it provides a method to directly map the distribution of dark matter (see [1,6,60,63,70]). From this dark matter distribution, the nature of dark matter can be better understood and better constraints can be placed on dark energy