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Sample records for grb follow-up observations

  1. Strategy and results of East Asian GRB FOllow-up Network (EAFON) follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Eafon Team

    We have established Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration on GRBs study in the East-Asian region since 2004 This serves as valuable additions to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network because the East-Asia region is otherwise blank for the network We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations by Lulin Taiwan Kiso Japan WIDGET Japan and Xinglong China Using Xinglong and Kiso we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra of afterglows While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves will be obtained by Lulin With the data from these sites we will obtain detailed information of light curve and redshift of GRBs which are important to understand the mechanism of afterglows Utilizing East Asian GRB Follow-up Observation Network EAFON we have observed 56 GRB optical afterglows and detected 15 early optical afterglow behavior including two short GRBs in multi-bands Based on these observations we have obtained 3 major results 1 first long term monitoring of short GRB afterglow from sim 0 1 days after the burst 2 two components in early optical afterglow 3 catch about 30 high redshift GRB candidates In this meeting we will present mainly report early a common feature of long GRB early afterglow We have found a common feature in long GRB early afterglow light curves These early light curves show re-brightening and or plateau phase around 0 1 days 2 4hours after bursts Combined with other prompt

  2. GRB 151205C: Optical follow-up observations at Kiso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Ohsawa, Ryou; Ichiki, Makoto; Sako, Shigeyuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Tominaga, Nozomu; Serino, Motoko; Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-12-01

    We performed optical non-filter imaging observations for the MAXI-detected burst GRB 151205C (Nakajima et al. GCN Circ. 18666) with a prototype model camera of Tomo-e Gozen (Tomo-e PM). Tomo-e Gozen is a wide-field optical imaging camera with 84 1kx2k CMOS sensors on the focal plane of the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope (Sako et al. in preparation, http://www.ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp/tomoe/).

  3. Exploring Exotic Stellar Deaths with Standard TOO GRB Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Fox, Derek; Berger, Edo; Chornock, Ryan; Fong, Wen-Fai; Cobb, Bethany; Cenko, Brad; Perley, Daniel; Bloom, Joshua; Prochaska, Jason Xavier; Morgan, Adam; Levan, Andrew; Tanvir, Nial; Fruchter, Andrew; Lopez, Sebastian; Wiersema, Klaas; Roth, Kathy

    2014-08-01

    The study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, host galaxies, and associated supernovae (SNe) sheds light on a wide range of open questions in astrophysics, ranging from the deaths of massive stars to cosmic chemical enrichment and the reionization epoch, and soon, the electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources. Over the past decade, Gemini has played a leading role in all aspects of GRB science through its combination of rapid-response spectroscopy and imaging coupled with deep late-time host galaxy, afterglow, and GRB-SN follow-up. Here, we propose to step forward in our long-standing program of ToO observations, with this proposal focusing on "Standard ToO" science, enabled by observations at t >1 day. In conjunction with an array of multi-wavelength EM facilities, we focus on three key science topics: (1) Aggressive imaging and spectroscopic campaigns to discover and characterize the associated supernovae of the lowest-redshift (z < 0.5) GRBs; (2) Characterizing host galaxy environments and gathering extended light curves for short GRBs, as candidate compact binary merger events, for connection with forthcoming GW facilities; and (3) Gathering extended light curves of exceptionally energetic bursts detected by the Fermi-LAT instrument, to measure the degree of collimation and total energy release of these events. We also submitted a long-term proposal which will supersede this single-semester request in case of approval.

  4. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  5. Radio and Optical Follow-Up Observations and Improved IPN Position of GRB 970111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; Groot, P. J.; Strom, R. G.; vanParadijs, J.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Heise, J.; intZand, J. J. M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 840 MHz, 1.4 and 5 GHz radio observations of the improved IPN-WFC error box of the gamma ray burst GRB 970111, between 26.4 hours and 120 days after the event onset. In the approximately 16 sq arcmin area defined by the IPN (BATSE and Ulysses) annulus and the published refined BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera (WFC) error box we detected no steady sources brighter than 0.56 mJy (4sigma), and no varying radio emission, down to 1.0 mJy (4sigma). We also report on B, V, R and I band observations of the error box with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma. Subject headings: gamma rays: bursts - gamma rays: individual (GRB 9701 1 1)

  6. Exploring the first stars with rapid GRB follow-up observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Cenko, Stephen; Schmidt, Brian; Perley, Daniel; Berger, Edo; Fox, Derek; Fruchter, Andrew; Bloom, Joshua; Prochaska, Jason X.; Lopez, Sebastian; Cobb, Bethany; Roth, Kathy; Levan, Andrew; Tanvir, Nial; Rapoport, Sharon; Yuan, Fang; Chornock, Ryan; Wen-Fai, Fong; Morgan, Adam; Wiersema, Klaas

    2013-02-01

    GRBs provide a unique window on exotic, highly relativistic physics. Our discovery of cosmic explosions like GRB090423 at z=8.2, breaking the record for the most distant known object, also demonstrates the power of using GRBs as lighthouses visible into the epoch of re-ionization, pinpointing the earliest stars and galaxies. Therefore, we intend (i) to observe GRBs at very high-z, in order to explore the IGM during reionization and place fundamental constraints on the early epochs of star-formation; (ii) to study in detail the class of short-duration bursts, especially their electromagnetic signatures in relation to gravitational-wave sources; (iii) to observe exceptionally energetic bursts, such as detected by the Fermi-LAT satellite in order to test theories of quantum gravity; (iv) continue our quest for low-z GRBs associated with supernovae, which, in conjunction with a larger sample of GRB afterglow spectra will provide unique insights into the stellar progenitors and explosion sites of these intriguing phenomena. Gemini, with its flexible schedule and instrumentation suite, represents a cornerstone facility of global GRB research and we will continue to use it in combination with a large network of other facilities.

  7. GRB follow-up with BOOTES Optical Chapter 5: The Swift Era

    SciTech Connect

    Jelinek, Martin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Vitek, Stanislav; Ugarte Postigo, Antonio de; Kubanek, Petr; Hudec, Rene

    2006-05-19

    BOOTES is a robotic system, whose primary aim is to observe gamma-ray burst prompt emission. Since 1998 BOOTES has provided follow-up observations for more than 70 GRBs; the most important results obtained so far are the detection of an OT in the short/hard GRB 000313 error box, the detection of several optical after-glow for long/soft GRBs and the non-detection of optical emission simultaneous to the high energy emission for several GRBs (both long/soft and short/hard events). During the time of operation we have got triggers from CGRO/BATSE, BeppoSAX, HETE-2, INTEGRAL and Swift. Here we present our early detections of GRB optical emission using the 30 cm Bootes-1B telescope in the R.V and I-bands since the launch of Swift.

  8. Predictions for Swift Follow-up Observations of Advanced LIGO/Virgo Gravitational Wave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, Judith; Evans, Phil; Connaughton, Valerie

    2015-04-01

    The likely detection of gravitational waves associated with the inspiral of neutron star binaries by the upcoming advanced LIGO/Virgo observatories will be complemented by searches for electromagnetic counterparts over large areas of the sky by Swift and other observatories. As short gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are the most likely electromagnetic counterpart candidates to these sources, we can make predictions based upon the last decade of GRB observations by Swift and Fermi. Swift is uniquely capable of accurately localizing new transients rapidly over large areas of the sky in single and tiled pointings, enabling ground-based follow-up. We describe simulations of the detectability of short GRB afterglows by Swift given existing and hypothetical tiling schemes with realistic observing conditions and delays, which guide the optimal observing strategy and improvements provided by coincident detection with observatories such as Fermi-GBM.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 8 Fermi GRB afterglows follow-up (Singer+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, L. P.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; Perley, D. A.; Anderson, G. E.; Anupama, G. C.; Arcavi, I.; Bhalerao, V.; Bue, B. D.; Cao, Y.; Connaughton, V.; Corsi, A.; Cucchiara, A.; Fender, R. P.; Fox, D. B.; Gehrels, N.; Goldstein, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Horesh, A.; Hurley, K.; Johansson, J.; Kann, D. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Huang, K.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Masci, F.; Nugent, P.; Rau, A.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Staley, T. D.; Svinkin, D.; Thone, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Urata, Y.; Weinstein, A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present the GBM-iPTF (intermediate Palomar Transient Factory) afterglows from the first 13 months of this project. Follow-up observations include R-band photometry from the P48, multicolor photometry from the P60, spectroscopy (acquired with the P200, Keck, Gemini, APO, Magellan, Very Large Telescope (VLT), and GTC), and radio observations with the Very Large Array (VLA), the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA), the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), and the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI). (3 data files).

  10. The Discovery and Broadband Follow-Up of the Transient Afterglow of GRB 980703

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, J. S.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Halpern, J. P.; Marzke, R. O.; Patton, D. R.; Oke, J. B.; Horne, K. D.; Gomer, R.; Goodrich, R.; Campbell, R.; Moriarity-Schieven, G. H.; Redman, R. O.; Feldman, P. A.; Costa, E.; Masetti, N.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the discovery of the radio, infrared, and optical transient coincident with an X-ray transient proposed to be the afterglow of GRB 980703. At later times when the transient has faded below detection, we see an underlying galaxy with R = 22.6; this galaxy is the brightest host galaxy (by nearly 2 mag) of any cosmological gamma-ray burst (GRB) thus far. In keeping with an established trend, the GRB is not significantly offset from the host galaxy. Interpreting the multiwavelength data in the framework of the popular fireball model requires that the synchrotron cooling break was between the optical and X-ray bands on 1998 July 8.5 UT and that the intrinsic extinction of the transient is A(sub v) = 0.9. This is somewhat higher than the extinction for the galaxy as a whole, as estimated from spectroscopy.

  11. XMM follow-up observations of two unidentified INTEGRAL sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Fiocchi, M.; Bird, A. J.; Drave, S. P.

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of X-ray follow-up observations performed with XMM-Newton of two unidentified hard X-ray sources, AX J1753.5-2745 and IGR J17348-2045 listed in the INTEGRAL/IBIS 9-year Galactic Hard X-ray Survey (Krivonos et al. 2012, arXiv:1205.3941) and in 4th IBIS Survey Catalogue (Bird et al. 2010, ApJS, 186, 1) respectively. We assume a conservative XMM positional uncertainty of 5".

  12. GLAST GRB Observations and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is schedule to launch on May 16, 2008. GLAST consists of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), which will detect gamma rays above 20 MeV with unprecedented sensitivity, and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM), which will provide all-sky monitoring of GRBS in the 10 kev to 30 MeV range. Predicted GRB capabilities of GLAST will be described. The on-orbit performance of the instruments and preliminary GRB observations will be presented.

  13. Goddard Robotic Telescope - Optical Follow-up of GRBs and Coordinated Observations of AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Wallace, C. A.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Okajima, T.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2010-01-01

    Since it is not possible to predict when a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) will occur or when Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) flaring activity starts, follow-up/monitoring ground telescopes must be located as uniformly as possible all over the world in order to collect data simultaneously with Fermi and Swift detections. However, there is a distinct gap in follow-up coverage of telescopes in the eastern U.S. region based on the operations of Swift. Motivated by this fact, we have constructed a 14" fully automated optical robotic telescope, Goddard Robotic Telescope (GRT), at the Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory. The aims of our robotic telescope are 1) to follow-up Swift/Fermi GRBs and 2) to perform the coordinated optical observations of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) AGN. Our telescope system consists of off-the-shelf hardware. With the focal reducer, we are able to match the field of view of Swift narrow instruments (20' x 20'). We started scientific observations in mid-November 2008 and GRT has been fully remotely operated since August 2009. The 3(sigma) upper limit in a 30-second exposure in the R filter is approx.15.4 mag; however, we can reach to approx.18 mag in a 600-second exposures. Due to the weather condition at the telescope site. our observing efficiency is 30-40%, on average.

  14. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  15. Prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts: GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunova, G. V.; Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V. G.; Belinski, A. A.; Shatskiy, N. I.; Tyurina, N. V.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Chazov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D. S.; Kornilov, M. V.; Sankovich, A. V.; Krylov, A.; Ivanov, K. I.; Chvalaev, O.; Poleschuk, V. A.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Gress, O. A.; Yazev, S. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Krushinski, V. V.; Zalozhnich, I. S.; Popov, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Varda, D.; Kudelina, I. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before the cessation of γ-ray emission, at 113 and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. A more detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, supplemented by Swift data, provides the following results and indicates different origins for the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light-curve patterns and spectral distributions suggest that there is a common production site for the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB 100901A. The results of the spectral fits for GRB 100901A in the range from optical to X-ray favour power-law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB 100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve, suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis. We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB 100906A. We obtain an upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB 100906A.

  16. Swift follow-up observation of the optical transient PS16ccm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a Swift follow-up observation of the optical transient PS16ccm (= Gaia16ara; ATel #9226). The field of this source was observed with Swift on 2016-07-13 04:36 UT for a total exposure of about 3 ks. No X-ray source was found at the optical position.

  17. Photometric follow-up observation of some SuperWASP transiting planet candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Sheng-hong; Collier Cameron, Andrew; Wang, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Li-yun; Fang, Xiang-song; Li, Xue-jing

    2008-05-01

    Three SuperWASP transiting planet candidates were observed through R or I filters using the 1-meter telescope and CCD camera of Yunnan Observatory from 2006 to 2007. The relative photometric data were corrected for the systematic errors by means of Tamuz et al. (2005) and Collier Cameron et al. (2006)'s algorithms. The resulting light curves demonstrate that one of three targets is a potential exoplanet candidate, which is worthy to perform further follow-up observation to clarify.

  18. Swift Follow-up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-wave Transient Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eikenberry, S.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McDaniel, P.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  19. Swift Follow-Up Observations of Candidate Gravitational-Wave Transient Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Fridriksson, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Homan, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Siegel, M.; Beardmore, A.; Handbauer, P.; Gelbord, J.; Kennea, J. A.; Smith, M.; Zhu, Q.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, J. K.; Camp, J. B.; Kanner, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first multi-wavelength follow-up observations of two candidate gravitational-wave (GW) transient events recorded by LIGO and Virgo in their 2009-2010 science run. The events were selected with low latency by the network of GW detectors (within less than 10 minutes) and their candidate sky locations were observed by the Swift observatory (within 12 hr). Image transient detection was used to analyze the collected electromagnetic data, which were found to be consistent with background. Off-line analysis of the GW data alone has also established that the selected GW events show no evidence of an astrophysical origin; one of them is consistent with background and the other one was a test, part of a "blind injection challenge." With this work we demonstrate the feasibility of rapid follow-ups of GW transients and establish the sensitivity improvement joint electromagnetic and GW observations could bring. This is a first step toward an electromagnetic follow-up program in the regime of routine detections with the advanced GW instruments expected within this decade. In that regime, multi-wavelength observations will play a significant role in completing the astrophysical identification of GW sources. We present the methods and results from this first combined analysis and discuss its implications in terms of sensitivity for the present and future instruments.

  20. GRB Prompt Optical Observations by Master and Lomonosov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before the cessation of γ-ray emission, at 113 and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. A more detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, supplemented by Swift data, provides the following results and indicates different origins for the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light-curve patterns and spectral distributions suggest that there is a common production site for the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB 100901A. The results of the spectral fits for GRB 100901A in the range from optical to X-ray favour power-law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB 100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve, suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis. We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB 100906A. We obtain an upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB 100906A. Also we consider prompt observation of dark gamma ray bursts for which on very widefield cameras MASTER-VWF and MASTER-II telescopes upper limits were received. We represent SHOCK experiment onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov.

  1. XMM FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF THREE SWIFT BAT-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Koss, M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Winter, L. M.

    2011-08-01

    We present XMM-Newton observations of three active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken as part of a hunt to find very heavily obscured Compton-thick AGNs. For obscuring columns greater than 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, AGNs are only visible at energies below 10 keV via reflected/scattered radiation, characterized by a flat power law. We therefore selected three objects (ESO 417-G006, IRAS 05218-1212, and MCG -01-05-047) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray survey catalog with Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) 0.5-10 keV spectra with flat power-law indices as candidate Compton-thick sources for follow-up observations with the more sensitive instruments on XMM-Newton. The XMM spectra, however, rule out reflection-dominated models based on the weakness of the observed Fe K{alpha} lines. Instead, the spectra are well fit by a model of a power-law continuum obscured by a Compton-thin absorber plus a soft excess. This result is consistent with previous follow-up observations of two other flat-spectrum BAT-detected AGNs. Thus, out of the six AGNs in the 22 month BAT catalog with apparently flat Swift XRT spectra, all five that have had follow-up observations are not likely Compton thick. We also present new optical spectra of two of these objects, IRAS 05218-1212 and MCG -01-05-047. Interestingly, though both the AGNs have similar X-ray spectra, their optical spectra are completely different, adding evidence against the simplest form of the geometric unified model of AGNs. IRAS 05218-1212 appears in the optical as a Seyfert 1, despite the {approx}8.5 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} line-of-sight absorbing column indicated by its X-ray spectrum. MCG -01-05-047's optical spectrum shows no sign of AGN activity; it appears as a normal galaxy.

  2. Fermi Observation of GRB 080916C

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, F.

    2009-05-25

    We present the observations of the long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 080916C by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT). This event was observed from 8 keV to a photon with an energy of 13.2 GeV. It develops over a 1400 s interval during which the highest number of photons with energy above 100 MeV are detected from a burst. The onset of the high-energy (>100 MeV) emission is delayed by {approx}4.5 s with respect to the low-energy (<1 MeV) emission, which is not detected past 200 s. The broad-band spectrum of the burst is consistent with a single spectral form.

  3. Swift/XRT follow-up observations of unidentified INTEGRAL sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorano, E.; Landi, R.; Parisi, P.; Masetti, N.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.; Bird, A. J.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Chavushyan, V.; Galaz, G.; Minniti, D.; Morelli, L.

    2010-10-01

    We report on X-ray follow-up observations performed with Swift/XRT of 3 unidentified INTEGRAL sources listed in the fourth IBIS Survey Catalogue (Bird et al. 2010, ApJS, 186, 1). IGR J08190-3835 Within the IBIS uncertainty XRT detects one source with a statistical significance of 5.8 sigma in the energy range 0.3-10 keV and 5.6 sigma above 3 keV. This object, located at RA(J2000) = 08h 19m 11.3s and Dec(J2000) = -38d 33m 09s (5 arcsec uncertainty), is associated with a 2MASS extended object (2MASX J08191136-3833104) classified as a galaxy in the NED archive and is positionally coincident with radio source NVSS J081910-383307.

  4. Loss to follow-up in the Australian HIV Observational Database

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Hamish; Petoumenos, Kathy; Brown, Katherine; Baker, David; Russell, Darren; Read, Tim; Smith, Don; Wray, Lynne; Giles, Michelle; Hoy, Jennifer; Carr, Andrew; Law, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up (LTFU) in HIV-positive cohorts is an important surrogate for interrupted clinical care which can potentially influence the assessment of HIV disease status and outcomes. After preliminary evaluation of LTFU rates and patient characteristics, we evaluated the risk of mortality by LTFU status in a high resource setting. Methods Rates of LTFU were measured in the Australian HIV Observational Database for a range of patient characteristics. Multivariate repeated measures regression methods were used to identify determinants of LTFU. Mortality by LTFU status was ascertained using linkage to the National Death Index. Survival following combination antiretroviral therapy initiation was investigated using the Kaplan-Meier (KM) method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of 3,413 patients included in this analysis, 1,632 (47.8%) had at least one episode of LTFU after enrolment. Multivariate predictors of LTFU included viral load (VL)>10,000 copies/ml (Rate ratio (RR) 1.63 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.45–1.84) (ref ≤400)), time under follow-up (per year) (RR 1.03 (95% CI: 1.02–1.04)) and prior LTFU (per episode) (RR 1.15 (95% CI: 1.06–1.24)). KM curves for survival were similar by LTFU status (p=0.484). LTFU was not associated with mortality in Cox proportional hazards models (univariate hazard ratio (HR) 0.93 (95% CI: 0.69–1.26) and multivariate HR 1.04 (95% CI: 0.77–1.43)). Conclusions Increased risk of LTFU was identified amongst patients with potentially higher infectiousness. We did not find significant mortality risk associated with LTFU. This is consistent with timely re-engagement with treatment, possibly via high levels of unreported linkage to other health care providers. PMID:25377928

  5. SPECKLE CAMERA OBSERVATIONS FOR THE NASA KEPLER MISSION FOLLOW-UP PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Sherry, William; Horch, Elliott; Ciardi, David R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the first results from a speckle imaging survey of stars classified as candidate exoplanet host stars discovered by the Kepler mission. We use speckle imaging to search for faint companions or closely aligned background stars that could contribute flux to the Kepler light curves of their brighter neighbors. Background stars are expected to contribute significantly to the pool of false positive candidate transiting exoplanets discovered by the Kepler mission, especially in the case that the faint neighbors are eclipsing binary stars. Here, we describe our Kepler follow-up observing program, the speckle imaging camera used, our data reduction, and astrometric and photometric performance. Kepler stars range from R = 8 to 16 and our observations attempt to provide background non-detection limits 5-6 mag fainter and binary separations of {approx}0.05-2.0 arcsec. We present data describing the relative brightness, separation, and position angles for secondary sources, as well as relative plate limits for non-detection of faint nearby stars around each of 156 target stars. Faint neighbors were found near 10 of the stars.

  6. Multi-observation PET image analysis for patient follow-up quantitation and therapy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S.; Visvikis, D.; Roux, C.; Hatt, M.

    2011-09-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, an early therapeutic response is usually characterized by variations of semi-quantitative parameters restricted to maximum SUV measured in PET scans during the treatment. Such measurements do not reflect overall tumor volume and radiotracer uptake variations. The proposed approach is based on multi-observation image analysis for merging several PET acquisitions to assess tumor metabolic volume and uptake variations. The fusion algorithm is based on iterative estimation using a stochastic expectation maximization (SEM) algorithm. The proposed method was applied to simulated and clinical follow-up PET images. We compared the multi-observation fusion performance to threshold-based methods, proposed for the assessment of the therapeutic response based on functional volumes. On simulated datasets the adaptive threshold applied independently on both images led to higher errors than the ASEM fusion and on clinical datasets it failed to provide coherent measurements for four patients out of seven due to aberrant delineations. The ASEM method demonstrated improved and more robust estimation of the evaluation leading to more pertinent measurements. Future work will consist in extending the methodology and applying it to clinical multi-tracer datasets in order to evaluate its potential impact on the biological tumor volume definition for radiotherapy applications.

  7. X-ray follow-up observations of unidentified VHE {gamma}-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Puehlhofer, Gerd

    2008-12-24

    A large fraction of the recently discovered Galactic Very High Energy (VHE) source population remains unidentified to date. VHE {gamma}-ray emission traces high energy particles in these sources, but for example in case of hadronic processes also the gas density at the emission site. Moreover, the particles have sufficiently long lifetimes to be able to escape from their acceleration sites. Therefore, the {gamma}-ray sources or at least the areas of maximum surface brightness are in many cases spatially offset from the actual accelerators. A promising way to identify the objects in which the particles are accelerated seems to be to search for emission signatures of the acceleration process (like emission from shock-heated plasma). Also the particles themselves (through primary or secondary synchrotron emission) can be traced in lower wavebands. Those signatures are best visible in the X-ray band, and current X-ray observatories are well suited to conduct such follow-up observations. Some aspects of the current status of these investigations are reviewed.

  8. Systematic Errors in Low-latency Gravitational Wave Parameter Estimation Impact Electromagnetic Follow-up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littenberg, Tyson B.; Farr, Ben; Coughlin, Scott; Kalogera, Vicky

    2016-03-01

    Among the most eagerly anticipated opportunities made possible by Advanced LIGO/Virgo are multimessenger observations of compact mergers. Optical counterparts may be short-lived so rapid characterization of gravitational wave (GW) events is paramount for discovering electromagnetic signatures. One way to meet the demand for rapid GW parameter estimation is to trade off accuracy for speed, using waveform models with simplified treatment of the compact objects’ spin. We report on the systematic errors in GW parameter estimation suffered when using different spin approximations to recover generic signals. Component mass measurements can be biased by \\gt 5σ using simple-precession waveforms and in excess of 20σ when non-spinning templates are employed. This suggests that electromagnetic observing campaigns should not take a strict approach to selecting which LIGO/Virgo candidates warrant follow-up observations based on low-latency mass estimates. For sky localization, we find that searched areas are up to a factor of ∼ 2 larger for non-spinning analyses, and are systematically larger for any of the simplified waveforms considered in our analysis. Distance biases for the non-precessing waveforms can be in excess of 100% and are largest when the spin angular momenta are in the orbital plane of the binary. We confirm that spin-aligned waveforms should be used for low-latency parameter estimation at the minimum. Including simple precession, though more computationally costly, mitigates biases except for signals with extreme precession effects. Our results shine a spotlight on the critical need for development of computationally inexpensive precessing waveforms and/or massively parallel algorithms for parameter estimation.

  9. Optical Follow-Up Observations of PTF10qts, a Luminous Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Found by the Palomar Transient Factory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Hurley, K.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Poznanski, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Barthelmy, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude r = 21.1 at a redshift z = 0.0907.We find that the R-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is Mbol = -18.51 +/- 0.2 mag, comparable to that of SN1998bw (Mbol = -18.7 mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SN Ic-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a approximately 20 solar mass star.

  10. Recent Results from Follow-up Astrometric Observations of KBOs and NEOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, D. J.; Connelley, M. S.

    2001-11-01

    As of the abstract deadline, 481 Kuiper belt objects have been discovered, but only 50 have four-opposition or greater orbits. Historically, some of the three-opposition orbits still had assumed eccentricities, indicating the relative level of inaccuracy in the orbit determination. Meanwhile, several authors have published eccentricity versus semimajor axis plots for Kuiper belt objects without attaching error bars to the symbols. Caution should therefore be exercised when looking at the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects, or when reaching conclusions about mechanisms at work that shape the Kuiper belt. We have been working to ameliorate this situation by securing follow-up astrometric observations of Kuiper belt objects with shorter arc orbit solutions, thereby extending the arcs and improving the accuracy of their semimajor axis and eccentricity determinations. Approximately 30 objects have been recovered to date, including a serendipitous observation of the satellite of 1998 WW31. We will be presenting improved estimates of the relative populations of resonant, classical, and scattered objects at the DPS meeting. Emphasis has also been given to astrometric observations of faint near-Earth objects to prevent their ephemeris uncertainties from growing large enough to warrant being tagged as "lost". In some cases, arcs have been extended by a factor of more than sixty. Virtually all of our observations are the last available for these objects. The number one reason for failure to recover an object has been low galactic latitude, where the field star density is so high that after non-sidereal tracking is taken into account, the field of view is nearly completely covered by star trails. Notable recoveries include 2000 SG344 at magnitude 26 in 2001 August using the CFHT (this object had been identified as having a 1 in 1000 chance of colliding with the Earth in 2071), 2000 GD147 at magnitude 24.5 in 2001 September using the UH 2.24-m

  11. Follow-up observations of extremely metal-poor stars identified from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, D. S.; Allende Prieto, C.; González Hernández, J. I.; Carrera, R.; Rebolo, R.; Shetrone, M.; Lambert, D. L.; Fernández-Alvar, E.

    2016-08-01

    Context. The most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way witnessed the early phases of formation of the Galaxy, and have chemical compositions that are close to the pristine mixture from Big Bang nucleosynthesis, polluted by one or few supernovae. Aims: Only two dozen stars with ([Fe/H] < -4) are known, and they show a wide range of abundance patterns. It is therefore important to enlarge this sample. We present the first results of an effort to identify new extremely metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo. Methods: Our targets have been selected from low-resolution spectra obtained as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and followed-up with medium resolution spectroscopy on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope and, in a few cases, at high resolution on the 9.2 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Stellar parameters and the abundances of magnesium, calcium, iron, and strontium have been inferred from the spectra using classical model atmospheres. We have also derived carbon abundances from the G band. Results: We find consistency between the metallicities estimated from SDSS and those from new data at the level of 0.3 dex. The analysis of medium resolution data obtained with ISIS on the WHT allows us to refine the metallicities and in some cases measure other elemental abundances. Our sample contains 11 new metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3.0, one of them with an estimated metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -4.0. We also discuss metallicity discrepancies of some stars in common with previous works in the literature. Only one of these stars is found to be C-enhanced at about [C/Fe] ~ + 1, whereas the other metal-poor stars show C abundances at the level of [C/Fe] ~ + 0.45. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.The reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at

  12. [Results from the X-ray and Optical Follow-up Observations of the Swift BAT AGN Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift BAT ACN survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type and how they will influence the design of XO.

  13. Optical and NIR observations of the afterglow of GRB 020813

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, S.; Malesani, D.; Tavecchio, F.; Antonelli, L. A.; Arkharov, A.; Di Paola, A.; Fugazza, D.; Ghisellini, G.; Larionov, V.; Lazzati, D.; Mannucci, F.; Masetti, N.; Barrena, R.; Benetti, S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Di Serego Alighieri, S.; Fiore, F.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A.; Ghinassi, F.; Gladders, M.; Hall, P. B.; Israel, G. L.; Klose, S.; Magazzù, A.; Palazzi, E.; Pedani, M.; Pian, E.; Romano, P.; Stefanon, M.; Stella, L.

    2003-06-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry of the bright afterglow of GRB 020813. Our data span from 3 hours to 4 days after the GRB event. A rather sharp achromatic break is present in the light curve, 14 hours after the trigger. In the framework of jetted fireballs, this break corresponds to a jet half-opening angle of 1.9degr +/-0.2degr , the smallest value ever inferred for a GRB. We discuss our results in the framework of currently available models, and find that they have problems in explaining the joint temporal and spectral properties, and in particular the slow decay before the break. Based on observations partly made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under programme Id 69.D-0461 and with the Italian TNG telescope under programme TAC 8_01(47).

  14. Swift follow-up observations of iPTF16abc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Cenk, S. Bradley

    2016-04-01

    We triggered Swift to observe the young type Ia supernova iPTF16abc (ATel#8907, ATel#8909) under our ToO program (PI: Kasliwal; program ID: 1215232). The first visit was undertaken around UT April 5.4, about 12 hours after our trigger.

  15. Target Charaterization and Follow-Up Observations in Support of the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, David W.

    2004-01-01

    This report covers work carried out at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory during the period 1 December 2003 to 30 November 2004 to support efforts to prepare the Kepler Input Catalog. The Catalog will be used to select the targets observed for planetary transits by Kepler.

  16. MASTER follow up observation of IceCube 160731A event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kuvshinov, D.; Gorbunov, I.; Tlatov, A.; Senik, V.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Dormidontov, D.; Buckley, D.; Potter, S.; Kniazev, A.; Kotze, M.; Rebolo, R.; Serra, M.; Lodieu, N.; Israelian, G.; Podesta, R.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Gres, O.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Poleshchuk, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Yu.; Gabovich, A.

    2016-08-01

    MASTER Global robotic Net (MASTER-Net: http://observ.pereplet.ru , Lipunov et al., Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) received IceCube HESE event IceCube-160731A (AMON ICECUBE HESE 128290 6888376) at 2016-07-31 01:55:34.5 UT (30s after the EHE_event_time).

  17. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Follow-up Observations of Known Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Christen; Turner, J.; Cates, I.; Cook, K.; Crawford, B.; Guvenen, B.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; McGraw, A. M.; Nguyen, C.; Pearson, K.; Robertson, A.; Sanford, B.; Small, L.; Smith, C.; Teske, J.; Tombleson, R.; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Richardson, L.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Arizona Astronomy Club observed the transits of a series of extrasolar planets using the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper Telescope. Observations of WASP-35b, WASP-43b, WASP-44b, WASP-48b, HAT-P-20b, and HAT-P-36b were taken in the Harris-R or Bessell-U filter. All of the selected planets are previously discovered hot Jupiters or hot Neptunes, but have not been studied extensively. Several have incomplete data and only partial light curves. We intend to confirm or improve upon published values for each planet's mass, radius, density, surface gravity, Safronov number, equilibrium temperature, orbital distance, and orbital inclination. Another goal is to obtain more complete light curves to look for transit timing variations. This project is also a way to familiarize undergraduate students with data reduction through the use of IRAF beyond in-class instruction.

  18. X-Shooter slit observations of GRB host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piranomonte, Silvia; Vergani, Susanna D.

    Considering that Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) are supposed to explode in faint star forming galaxies they represent a very powerful way to investigate these kind of galaxies which seemed to be the bulk of galaxies at high redshift and to obtain a better estimate of the star formation density value. Currently observational estimates could underpredict ther real value of cosmic star formation density, because of their inability to observe this population of galaxies. The Italian-French X-shooter GRB host galaxies program which started at the end of 2009 allowed us to collect the spectra of about 30 GRB host galaxies in the 300-2400nm range from a redshift of about z=0.1 to z=2.7. We are using these spectra to retrieve information on the host metallicities, star formation rates and extinctions. In this talk I will show the state of the art of this work and which is the information on GRB hosts that we are collecting from the slit observations.

  19. Spitzer Follow-up of HST Observations of Star Formation in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, Jeff; Bally, John; Desch, Steve; Healy, Kevin; Snider, Keely

    2005-06-01

    Images of regions of star formation taken with HST have given us an extraordinary view of young stellar objects and their natal environments. These views differ tremendously between low-mass YSOs seen in regions of isolated low-mass star formation such as Taurus-Auriga, and the proplyds, EGGs, and other structures seen in regions of massive star formation. While YSOs in Taurus spend their adolescence buried in the dark interiors of molecular clouds, YSOs near massive stars quickly find themselves overrun by ionization fronts and exposed to the intense UV radiation from nearby massive stars. This difference in environment has a profound effect on the way in which the protoplanetary disk around a star evolves -- a fact that is of great importance to us, given the strength of the evidence suggesting that the Sun formed near a massive star. But HST while HST can inform us about the evolution of YSOs in HII region environments once they are overrun by ionization fronts, it cannot show us the birth of the stars themselves. These remain hidden in the dense molecular material beyond the ionized volumes of these regions. Only Spitzer can show us the properties of the YSOs that lie hidden in the dark shadows of HST images of HII regions, and only Spitzer can provide us with information about PDRs, warm dust, and other tracers of the interaction of massive stars with their surroundings. The combination of HST and Spitzer observations of star forming regions is far greater than the sum of its parts. If we are to build a complete picture of low-mass star formation and the evolution of disks near massive stars, we need to combine HST and Spitzer observations of the same regions. In this proposal we request time to obtain both IRAC and MIPS 24 micron images of each HII region that has been observed by HST, but has yet to be observed with Spitzer. Together with previous images obtained from the archives, this will comprise an indispensible data set for testing hypotheses about

  20. Follow-up observations of Planck cold clumps with ground-based telescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tie

    2015-08-01

    Stars form in dense regions within molecular clouds, called pre-stellar cores (PSCs), which provide information on the initial conditions in the process of star formation. The low dust temperature (<14 K) of Planck cold clumps/cores makes them likely to be pre-stellar objects or at the very initial stage of protostellar collapse. We are conducting a legacy survey of Planck cold clumps with the JCMT, the TRAO 14-m, the KVN and TianMa 65-m telescopes. We aim to statistically study the initial conditions of star formation and cloud evolution in various kinds of environments. We have conducted some pilot observations with ground-based telescopes (JCMT, IRAM, PMO 14m, APEX, Mopra, Effelsberg 100 m, CSO and SMA). I will discuss the progress and the plans of this internationally collaborating project.

  1. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummitt, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Culter, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, N.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Marandi, A.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohanty, S. D.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Podkaminer, J.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C. R.; Rankins, B.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Raymond, V.; Redwine, K.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Salit, M.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schlamminger, S.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shihan Weerathunga, T.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, R.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Soto, J.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stefszky, M.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A. S.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A. E.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Collaboration; Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed γ-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30°, we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  2. Results of optical follow-up observations of advanced LIGO triggers from O1 in the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beroiz, Martin; Colazo, Carlos; Diaz, Mario; Dominguez, Mariano; Garcia Lambas, Diego; Gurovich, Sebastian; Lares, Marcelo; Macri, Lucas; Penuela, Tania; Rodriguez, Horacio; Sanchez, Bruno; Toros Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report on observations related to the follow-up of LIGO VIRGO collaboration triggers released to participating astronomers during the First Observation Run 1 (O1) from September 18, 2015 to January 12, 2016, performed by the TOROS collaboration. The Transient Optical Robotic Observatory of the South (TOROS) collaboration operated telescopes located in two different sites in Argentina: one at the Estación Astrofísica Bosque Alegre in Cordoba, and the other one located in Cordón Macón, Salta. In this communication we describe the main characteristics of the campaign sustained during O1 and the plans for continuing observation in the future.

  3. High-Energy Observation of GRB 090217 with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Cutini, S.; Piron, F.

    2010-03-26

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more then 7 decades of energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here we report on the observation of long GRB 090217 which triggered the GBM and as been independently detected by the on-ground blind search LAT algorithm. We present the GBM and LAT observations, including a temporal profile and time-resolved spectral analysis from 8 keV up to approx1 GeV. The time-averaged and time-resolved spectra are well reproduced by a Band model, with no substantial spectral evolution. We compare these observations to the other LAT detections of long bursts, and discuss some theoretical implications on GRB high-energy emission.

  4. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110625A

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, P. H. T.; Kong, A. K. H.; Fan Yizhong

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that emit photons at GeV energies form a small but significant population of GRBs. However, the number of GRBs whose GeV-emitting period is simultaneously observed in X-rays remains small. We report {gamma}-ray observations of GRB 110625A using Fermi's Large Area Telescope in the energy range 100 MeV-20 GeV. Gamma-ray emission at these energies was clearly detected using data taken between 180 s and 580 s after the burst, an epoch after the prompt emission phase. The GeV light curve differs from a simple power-law decay, and probably consists of two emission periods. Simultaneous Swift X-Ray Telescope observations did not show flaring behaviors as in the case of GRB 100728A. We discuss the possibility that the GeV emission is the synchrotron self-Compton radiation of underlying ultraviolet flares.

  5. The XXL Survey. I. Scientific motivations - XMM-Newton observing plan - Follow-up observations and simulation programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Brusa, M.; Butler, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Coupon, J.; De Breuck, C.; Democles, J.; Desai, S.; Delhaize, J.; Devriendt, J.; Dubois, Y.; Eckert, D.; Elyiv, A.; Ettori, S.; Evrard, A.; Faccioli, L.; Farahi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Finet, F.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fourmanoit, N.; Gandhi, P.; Gastaldello, F.; Gastaud, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Giles, P.; Guennou, L.; Guglielmo, V.; Horellou, C.; Husband, K.; Huynh, M.; Iovino, A.; Kilbinger, M.; Koulouridis, E.; Lavoie, S.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Le Fevre, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Lieu, M.; Lin, C. A.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B. J.; Maurogordato, S.; McCarthy, I. G.; McGee, S.; Melin, J. B.; Melnyk, O.; Menanteau, F.; Novak, M.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Pomarede, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Ramos-Ceja, M. E.; Ranalli, P.; Rapetti, D.; Raychaudury, S.; Reiprich, T. H.; Rottgering, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Santos, J.; Sauvageot, J. L.; Schimd, C.; Sereno, M.; Smith, G. P.; Smolčić, V.; Snowden, S.; Spergel, D.; Stanford, S.; Surdej, J.; Valageas, P.; Valotti, A.; Valtchanov, I.; Vignali, C.; Willis, J.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalised. Aims: We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. Methods: We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-λ and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results: The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-λ associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions: The XXL multi-λ data set will have a unique lasting legacy

  6. [Diagnosis and follow-up observation of granulosa cell tumor of the ovary are becoming more precise].

    PubMed

    Färkkilä, Anniina; Unkila-Kallio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumor of the ovary is a rare, hormonally active ovarian cancer, typical symptoms of which include various gynecological bleeding disorders. Adult granulosa cell tumor is most commonly detected at stage I, whereupon the prognosis is good. The disease, however, recurs in one third of stage I patients and leads to death in half of these. Conventional cytotoxic agents may be ineffective in the treatment of relapsed tumors. Inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone have proven to be sensitive and accurate markers. Knowledge about the disease mechanisms has improved the diagnostics and follow-up observation of the patients. PMID:27400589

  7. The Detection of a Type IIn Supernova in Optical Follow-up Observations of IceCube Neutrino Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fuchs, T.; Glagla, M.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Gretskov, P.; Groh, J. C.; Gross, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hellwig, D.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfe, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Koob, A.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O’Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stössl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Santen, J.; Vanheule, S.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wichary, C.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration; Ofek, Eran O.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Perley, Daniel A.; Barlow, Tom; Horesh, Assaf; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, Ben; for the PTF Collaboration; Evans, Phil A.; Kennea, Jamie A.; for the Swift Collaboration; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.; Flewelling, H.; Tonry, J. L.; Rest, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Pan-STARRS1 Science Consortium, for the

    2015-09-01

    The IceCube neutrino observatory pursues a follow-up program selecting interesting neutrino events in real-time and issuing alerts for electromagnetic follow-up observations. In 2012 March, the most significant neutrino alert during the first three years of operation was issued by IceCube. In the follow-up observations performed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) PTF12csy was found 0.°2 away from the neutrino alert direction, with an error radius of 0.°54. It has a redshift of z = 0.0684, corresponding to a luminosity distance of about 300 Mpc and the Pan-STARRS1 survey shows that its explosion time was at least 158 days (in host galaxy rest frame) before the neutrino alert, so that a causal connection is unlikely. The a posteriori significance of the chance detection of both the neutrinos and the SN at any epoch is 2.2σ within IceCube's 2011/12 data acquisition season. Also, a complementary neutrino analysis reveals no long-term signal over the course of one year. Therefore, we consider the SN detection coincidental and the neutrinos uncorrelated to the SN. However, the SN is unusual and interesting by itself: it is luminous and energetic, bearing strong resemblance to the SN IIn 2010jl, and shows signs of interaction of the SN ejecta with a dense circumstellar medium. High-energy neutrino emission is expected in models of diffusive shock acceleration, but at a low, non-detectable level for this specific SN. In this paper, we describe the SN PTF12csy and present both the neutrino and electromagnetic data, as well as their analysis.

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew; Cinabro, David; DeJongh, Don Frederic; Depoy, D.L.; Doi, Mamoru; Garnavich, Peter M.; Craig, Hogan, J.; Holtzman, Jon; Jha, Saurabh; Konishi, Kohki; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Nichol, Robert C.; Prieto, Jose Luis; Richmond, Michael W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo U. /Apache Point Observ. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U. /Seoul Natl. U. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Apache Point Observ.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  9. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst: Radio and X-ray Follow-up Observations of FRB 121102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Paul; Spitler, Laura; Hessels, Jason; Bogdanov, Slavko; Brazier, Adam; Camilo, Fernando; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, James M.; Crawford, Fronefield; Deneva, Julia S.; Ferdman, Robert; Freire, Paulo; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Lynch, Ryan; Madsen, Erik; McLaughlin, Maura; Patel, Chitrang; Ransom, Scott M.; Seymour, Andrew; Stairs, Ingrid H.; Stappers, Benjamin; van Leeuwen, Joeri; Zhu, Weiwei

    2016-04-01

    A new phenomenon has emerged in high-energy astronomy in the past few years: the Fast Radio Burst. Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio bursts whose dispersion measures imply that they originate from far outside of the Galaxy. Their origin is as yet unknown; their durations and energetics imply that they involve compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes. Due to their extreme luminosities implied by their distances and the previous absence of any repeat burst in follow-up observations, many potential explanations involve one-time cataclysmic events. However, in our Arecibo telescope follow-up observations of FRB 121102 (discovered in the PALFA survey; Spitler et al. 2014), we find additional bursts at the same location and dispersion measure as the original burst. We also present the results of Swift and Chandra X-ray observations of the field. This result shows that, for at least a sub-set of the FRB population, the source can repeat and thus cannot be explained by a cataclysmic origin.

  10. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.; Blackburn, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30. we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extragalactic magnetar observed to date.

  11. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  12. Optical Follow-Up Observations for the High-z COBRA (Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden-Marx, Emmet; Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Wing, Joshua; Ashby, Matthew; Brodwin, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are unique laboratories for exploring galaxy formation and evolution. Relatively few galaxy clusters have been spectroscopically confirmed beyond a redshift of 1. Different methods of searching for galaxy clusters are adding to these numbers, including detecting regions with a high-density of galaxies in the optical and IR regimes, detecting the hot intracluster medium in the X-ray, and measuring the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. Another promising method for discovering high-redshift galaxy clusters uses radio observations of AGN. In particular, we use bent-double lobed radio sources, known often to reside in nearby clusters, as markers for distant galaxy clusters. We present initial results from the high-redshift COBRA (Clusters Occupied by Bent Radio AGN) survey. We have Spitzer IRAC observations of 653 bent-double radio sources with hosts too faint to be detected in the SDSS. Since the host galaxies for these radio sources are usually giant ellipticals, lack of detection in the SDSS means they are likely at z > 0.7. We have begun deep follow-up optical observations using the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope and have determined from these initial optical observations that ~50% of the observed fields are overdense and thus good cluster candidates. Additionally, we have created optical-IR color magnitude diagrams to estimate the redshifts of our cluster candidates by identifying the red sequence. The distribution of galaxies on the red sequence can be used to limit galaxy formation models.

  13. Radio observations of GRB 100418a: Test of an energy injection model explaining long-lasting GRB afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Moin, A.; Wang, Z.; Chandra, P.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Tingay, S. J.; Reynolds, C.; Taylor, G. B.; Frail, D. A.; Phillips, C. J.

    2013-12-20

    We present the results of our radio observational campaign of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100418a, for which we used the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Very Large Array, and the Very Long Baseline Array. GRB 100418a was a peculiar GRB with unusual X-ray and optical afterglow profiles featuring a plateau phase with a very shallow rise. This observed plateau phase was believed to be due to a continued energy injection mechanism that powered the forward shock, giving rise to an unusual and long-lasting afterglow. The radio afterglow of GRB 100418a was detectable several weeks after the prompt emission. We conducted long-term monitoring observations of the afterglow and attempted to test the energy injection model advocating that the continuous energy injection is due to shells of material moving at a wide range of Lorentz factors. We obtained an upper limit of γ < 7 for the expansion rate of the GRB 100418a radio afterglow, indicating that the range-of-Lorentz factor model could only be applicable for relatively slow-moving ejecta. A preferred explanation could be that continued activity of the central engine may have powered the long-lasting afterglow.

  14. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_ȯ, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_ȯ, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  15. GRB 050117: Simultaneous Gamma-ray and X-ray Observations with the Swift Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Morris, D. C.; Sakamoto, T.; Sato, G.; Burrows, D. N.; Angelini, L.; Pagani, C.; Moretti, A.; Abbey, A. F.; Barthelmy, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer performed its first autonomous, X-ray follow-up to a newly detected GRB on 2005 January 17, within 193 seconds of the burst trigger by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. While the burst was still in progress, the X-ray Telescope obtained a position and an image for an un-catalogued X-ray source; simultaneous with the gamma-ray observation. The XRT observed flux during the prompt emission was 1.1 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s in the 0.5-10 keV energy band. The emission in the X-ray band decreased by three orders of magnitude within 700 seconds, following the prompt emission. This is found to be consistent with the gamma-ray decay when extrapolated into the XRT energy band. During the following 6.3 hours, the XRT observed the afterglow in an automated sequence for an additional 947 seconds, until the burst became fully obscured by the Earth limb. A faint, extremely slowly decaying afterglow, alpha=-0.21, was detected. Finally, a break in the lightcurve occurred and the flux decayed with alpha<-1.2. The X-ray position triggered many follow-up observations: no optical afterglow could be confirmed, although a candidate was identified 3 arcsecs from the XRT position.

  16. Total hip arthroplasty in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip. Follow-up observations on cementless and cemented operations.

    PubMed

    Katz, R L; Bourne, R B; Rorabeck, C H; McGee, H

    1992-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with avascular necrosis of the hip were treated by 34 total hip arthroplasties (THAs). All patients were observed prospectively with a minimum two-year follow-up evaluation (average, 46 months; range, 24-84 months). Twenty had cemented arthroplasties using contemporary cementing techniques. This included insertion of a medullary plug, cleansing of the canal with a medullary brush, pulsatile lavage irrigation, and insertion of the cement with a cement gun. In 14 hips, a cementless prosthesis was used. Patients were rated using a modified Harris hip score. Sequential postoperative roentgenograms were analyzed in each patient. The overall Harris hip score ratings were 88 in the cemented and 84 in the noncemented groups. Mechanical failure with loosening of the femoral component occurred in one patient who developed deep sepsis. Significant thigh pain occurred in four patients in the noncemented group. Previous studies in the literature have generally reported unfavorable results in patients with avascular necrosis of the hip treated with THA. Using cementless and cemented fixation with contemporary cementing techniques, improved results can be expected. A high incidence of thigh pain (29%) in the cementless group remains a problem. PMID:1499201

  17. Trypanosoma-Cruzi Cross-Reactive Antibodies Longitudinal Follow-Up: A Prospective Observational Study in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Esber S.; Gueyffier, Lucie; Danjoy, Marie-Laure; Vanhems, Philippe; Pozzetto, Bruno; Sobh, Mohamad; Pottel, Hans; Michallet, Mauricette; Zrein, Maan A.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies named TcCRA “Trypanosoma cruzi Cross Reactive Antibodies” were detected in 47% of blood donors from French population unexposed to the parasite. In order to evaluate the passive or active transmissibility of TcCRA and further characterize its role and etiology, we have conducted a study in a cohort of 47 patients who underwent allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantations (allo-HSCT). Donors and recipients were tested for TcCRA prior to transplantation. Recipients were further tested during follow-up after transplantation. Demographical, clinical and biological data were collected. Our primary end-point was to assess the risk of TcCRA acquisition after transplantation. During this initial analysis, we observed no seroconversion in patients receiving cells from TcCRA negative donors (n = 23) but detected seroconversion in 4 out of 24 patients who received hematopoietic stem cells from positive donors. Here, we are discussing possible scenarios to explain TcCRA-immune status in recipient after transplantation. PMID:26351849

  18. Gaia-FUN-SSO: a network for ground-based follow-up observations of Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillot, W.; Carry, B.; Berthier, J.; David, P.; Hestroffer, D.; Rocher, P.

    2014-12-01

    Gaia-FUN-SSO (shortly described at https://www.imcce.fr/gaia-fun-sso/) is a ground-based network of observatories set up in the framework of the Gaia consortium (DPAC-CU4) for the follow-up of critical Solar System objects to be discovered from space by the Gaia satellite. Its goal is to retrieve from the ground a newly detected object and to complement the astrometry measurements carried out by Gaia to determine its heliocentric orbit. Data from both Gaia and the ground-based network will be sent to the Minor Planet Center, used to determine the orbit and thus to update the database of minor planet orbits, which is subsequently used by Gaia for the identification of moving objects. We are expecting the detection of many asteroids, mainly from the main belt, and also new near-Earth objects (NEO) at low solar elongation. Owing to the specific conditions of Gaia observations, we even expect the detection of objects whose orbit is fully contained within Earth's orbit (called inner-Earth or Atira asteroids). Several training campaigns have already been organized with the network and it is now able to enter in an operating mode when alerts will be triggered. We describe here the expected number of discoveries, the network, its activity, and the data processing of the central node of the network set in place for the operating mode.

  19. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  20. Fermi-LAT observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Bonamente, E; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Burgess, J Michael; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Cecchi, C; Chaplin, V; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Chiaro, G; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cleveland, W; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Collazzi, A; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Angelis, A; DeKlotz, M; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Desiante, R; Diekmann, A; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Finke, J; Fitzpatrick, G; Focke, W B; Franckowiak, A; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Gibby, M; Giglietto, N; Giles, M; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Godfrey, G; Granot, J; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Gruber, D; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Horan, D; Hughes, R E; Inoue, Y; Jogler, T; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, W N; Kawano, T; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Mayer, M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nemmen, R; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Paneque, D; Pelassa, V; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Racusin, J L; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Ritz, S; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sartori, A; Parkinson, P M Saz; Scargle, J D; Schulz, A; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Sonbas, E; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yamazaki, R; Younes, G; Yu, H-F; Zhu, S J; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Byrne, D; Foley, S; Goldstein, A; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; McBreen, S; Meegan, C; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R; Rau, A; Tierney, D; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Xiong, S; Cusumano, G; La Parola, V; Cummings, J R

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock. PMID:24263133

  1. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cleveland, W.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Collazzi, A.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Diekmann, A.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, M.; Giglietto, N.; Giles, M.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Paneque, D.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sartori, A.; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yamazaki, R.; Younes, G.; Yu, H.-F.; Zhu, S. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Byrne, D.; Foley, S.; Goldstein, A.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; Tierney, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Xiong, S.; Cusumano, G.; La Parola, V.; Cummings, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest γ-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  2. Low False Positive Rate of Kepler Candidates Estimated From A Combination Of Spitzer And Follow-Up Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désert, Jean-Michel; Charbonneau, David; Torres, Guillermo; Fressin, François; Ballard, Sarah; Bryson, Stephen T.; Knutson, Heather A.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Brown, Timothy M.; Deming, Drake; Ford, Eric B.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Seager, Sara

    2015-05-01

    NASA’s Kepler mission has provided several thousand transiting planet candidates during the 4 yr of its nominal mission, yet only a small subset of these candidates have been confirmed as true planets. Therefore, the most fundamental question about these candidates is the fraction of bona fide planets. Estimating the rate of false positives of the overall Kepler sample is necessary to derive the planet occurrence rate. We present the results from two large observational campaigns that were conducted with the Spitzer Space Telescope during the the Kepler mission. These observations are dedicated to estimating the false positive rate (FPR) among the Kepler candidates. We select a sub-sample of 51 candidates, spanning wide ranges in stellar, orbital, and planetary parameter space, and we observe their transits with Spitzer at 4.5 μm. We use these observations to measures the candidate’s transit depths and infrared magnitudes. An authentic planet produces an achromatic transit depth (neglecting the modest effect of limb darkening). Conversely a bandpass-dependent depth alerts us to the potential presence of a blending star that could be the source of the observed eclipse: a false positive scenario. For most of the candidates (85%), the transit depths measured with Kepler are consistent with the transit depths measured with Spitzer as expected for planetary objects, while we find that the most discrepant measurements are due to the presence of unresolved stars that dilute the photometry. The Spitzer constraints on their own yield FPRs between 5% and depending on the Kepler Objects of Interest. By considering the population of the Kepler field stars, and by combining follow-up observations (imaging) when available, we find that the overall FPR of our sample is low. The measured upper limit on the FPR of our sample is 8.8% at a confidence level of 3σ. This observational result, which uses the achromatic property of planetary transit signals that is not investigated

  3. VI-Band Follow-Up Observations of Ultra-Long-Period Cepheid Candidates in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Ting-Chang Yang, Michael; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I.-Ling; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈ 80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ˜ 1 to ˜ 3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color-magnitude diagram and the Period-Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be {{μ }M31,ULPC}=24.30+/- 0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period-Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  4. VI-band follow-up observations of ultra-long-period Cepheid candidates in M31

    SciTech Connect

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Yang, Michael Ting-Chang; Lin, Chi-Sheng; Hsiao, Hsiang-Yao; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Lin, Zhong-Yi; Lin, I-Ling; Ip, Wing-Huen; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Kanbur, Shashi M.

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-long-period Cepheids (ULPCs) are classical Cepheids with pulsation periods exceeding ≈80 days. The intrinsic brightness of ULPCs are ∼1 to ∼3 mag brighter than their shorter period counterparts. This makes them attractive in future distance scale work to derive distances beyond the limit set by the shorter period Cepheids. We have initiated a program to search for ULPCs in M31, using the single-band data taken from the Palomar Transient Factory, and identified eight possible candidates. In this work, we presented the VI-band follow-up observations of these eight candidates. Based on our VI-band light curves of these candidates and their locations in the color–magnitude diagram and the Period–Wesenheit diagram, we verify two candidates as being truly ULPCs. The six other candidates are most likely other kinds of long-period variables. With the two confirmed M31 ULPCs, we tested the applicability of ULPCs in distance scale work by deriving the distance modulus of M31. It was found to be μ{sub M31,ULPC}=24.30±0.76 mag. The large error in the derived distance modulus, together with the large intrinsic dispersion of the Period–Wesenheit (PW) relation and the small number of ULPCs in a given host galaxy, means that the question of the suitability of ULPCs as standard candles is still open. Further work is needed to enlarge the sample of calibrating ULPCs and reduce the intrinsic dispersion of the PW relation before re-considering ULPCs as suitable distance indicators.

  5. ROSAT Imaging of GRB920525 and GRB930118

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Bernie

    1997-01-01

    For this effort we requested ROSAT images of two small gamma-ray burst (GRB) error boxes. Our goal was to search for sources that might be associated with the quiescent site of a GRB. More than 1000 GRBs have been detected in the twenty five years since their discovery, yet their origin remains a mystery. No real-time or quiescent counterparts at any wavelength have been identified as sources of GRBs despite considerable follow-up efforts. Ground based campaigns to examine GRB error boxes shortly after the bursts have revealed no transient, or highly variable objects at optical and radio wavelengths in the time period of more than 7 hours after the burst. Due to the heavy demand on X-ray satellite time, and the difficulty of re-scheduling observations, rapid follow-up observations at high energies have not been obtained as quickly as the ground based-efforts. In fact, X-ray images of GRB error boxes are normally obtained months-years after burst detection. The current fastest X-ray response time is over two weeks. Deep imaging of GRB error boxes at X-ray wavelengths is an additional observational approach that can be used to constrain models of the origin of GRBs. We combined the results of our investigation of the GRB920525 error box with that of a prior ROSAT PSPC observation of GRB910814 and submitted them for publication. We conclude that based upon our efforts and those of others, deep X-ray observations obtained long after the GRB are not likely to yield further productive results until smaller GRB error boxes become available. It may be possible to obtain such small error boxes in the near future from XTE, HETE and an augmented IPN.

  6. Homeopathic treatment of patients with chronic sinusitis: A prospective observational study with 8 years follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Claudia M; Lüdtke, Rainer; Willich, Stefan N

    2009-01-01

    Background An evaluation of homeopathic treatment and the outcomes in patients suffering from sinusitis for ≥12 weeks in a usual care situation. Methods Subgroup analysis including all patients with chronic sinusitis (ICD-9: 473.9; ≥12 weeks duration) of a large prospective multicentre observational study population. Consecutive patients presenting for homeopathic treatment were followed-up for 2 years, and complaint severity, health-related quality of life (QoL), and medication use were regularly recorded. We also present here patient-reported health status 8 years post initial treatment. Results The study included 134 adults (mean age 39.8 ± 10.4 years, 76.1% women), treated by 62 physicians. Patients had suffered from chronic sinusitis for 10.7 ± 9.8 years. Almost all patients (97.0%) had previously been treated with conventional medicine. For sinusitis, effect size (effect divided by standard deviation at baseline) of complaint severity was 1.58 (95% CI 1.77; 1.40), 2.15 (2.38; 1.92), and 2.43 (2.68; 2.18) at 3, 12, and 24 months respectively. QoL improved accordingly, with SF-36 changes in physical component score 0.27 (0.15; 0.39), 0.35 (0.19; 0.52), 0.44 (0.23; 0.65) and mental component score 0.66 (0.49; 0.84), 0.71 (0.50; 0.92), 0.65 (0.39; 0.92), 0.74 (0.49; 1.00) at these points. The effects were still present after 8 years with SF-36 physical component score 0.38 (0.10; 0.65) and mental component score 0.74 (0.49; 1.00). Conclusion This observational study showed relevant improvements that persisted for 8 years in patients seeking homeopathic treatment because of sinusitis. The extent to which the observed effects are due to the life-style regulation and placebo or context effects associated with the treatment needs clarification in future explanatory studies. PMID:19635154

  7. Swift Observations of the X-Ray-Bright GRB 050315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, S.; Goad, M. R.; Beardmore, A. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Hill, J. E.; Kobayashi, S.; Kumar, P.; La Parola, V.; Levan, A.; Mangano, V.; Mészáros, P.; Moretti, A.; Morris, D. C.; Nousek, J. A.; Pagani, C.; Palmer, D. M.; Racusin, J. L.; Romano, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zhang, B.; Gehrels, N.

    2006-02-01

    This paper discusses Swift observations of the γ-ray burst GRB 050315 (z=1.949) from 80 s to 10 days after the onset of the burst. The X-ray light curve displayed a steep early decay (t-5) for ~200 s and several breaks. However, both the prompt hard X-ray/γ-ray emission (observed by the BAT) and the first ~300 s of X-ray emission (observed by the XRT) can be explained by exponential decays, with similar decay constants. Extrapolating the BAT light curve into the XRT band suggests that the rapidly decaying, early X-ray emission was simply a continuation of the fading prompt emission; this strong similarity between the prompt γ-ray and early X-ray emission may be related to the simple temporal and spectral character of this X-ray-rich GRB. The prompt (BAT) spectrum was steep down to ~15 keV and appeared to continue through the XRT bandpass, implying a low peak energy, inconsistent with the Amati relation. Following the initial steep decline, the X-ray afterglow did not fade for ~1.2×104 s, after which time it decayed with a temporal index of α~0.7, followed by a second break at ~2.5×105 s to a slope of α~2. The apparent ``plateau'' in the X-ray light curve, after the early rapid decay, makes this one of the most extreme examples of the steep-flat-steep X-ray light curves revealed by Swift. If the second afterglow break is identified with a jet break, then the jet opening angle was θ0~5deg, implying Eγ>~1050 ergs.

  8. Early-time VLA Observations and Broadband Afterglow Analysis of the Fermi/LAT Detected GRB 130907A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, Péter; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the hyper-energetic gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130907A, a Swift-discovered burst with early radio observations starting at ≈4 hr after the γ-ray trigger. GRB 130907A was also detected by the Fermi/LAT instrument and at late times showed a strong spectral evolution in X-rays. We focus on the early-time radio observations, especially at >10 GHz, to attempt to identify reverse shock signatures. While our radio follow-up of GRB 130907A ranks among the earliest observations of a GRB with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, we did not see an unambiguous signature of a reverse shock. While a model with both reverse and forward shock can correctly describe the observations, the data is not constraining enough to decide upon the presence of the reverse-shock component. We model the broadband data using a simple forward-shock synchrotron scenario with a transition from a wind environment to a constant density interstellar medium (ISM) in order to account for the observed features. Within the confines of this model, we also derive the underlying physical parameters of the fireball, which are within typical ranges except for the wind density parameter (A*), which is higher than those for bursts with wind-ISM transition, but typical for the general population of bursts. We note the importance of early-time radio observations of the afterglow (and of well-sampled light curves) for unambiguously identifying the potential contribution of the reverse shock.

  9. Search for neutrinos from transient sources with the ANTARES telescope and optical follow-up observations (TAToO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornic, Damien; Brunner, Jurgen; Basa, Stéphane; Al Samarai, Imen; Bertin, Vincent; Boer, Michel; Busto, José; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Klotz, Alain; Mazure, Alain; Vallage, Bertrand; ANTARES Collaboration; TAROT Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ANTARES telescope has the opportunity to detect transient neutrino sources, such as gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae, flares of active galactic nuclei. In order to enhance the sensitivity to these sources, we have developed a new detection method based on the follow-up by optical telescopes of “golden” neutrino events, such as neutrino doublets coincident in time and space or single neutrinos of very high energy. The ANTARES collaboration has therefore implemented a very fast on-line reconstruction with a good angular resolution. These characteristics allow us to trigger an optical telescope network. Since February 2009, ANTARES is sending alert triggers once or twice per month to the two 25 cm robotic telescope of TAROT. This optical follow-up of such special events would not only give access to the nature of the sources, but also would improve the sensitivity to transient neutrino sources.

  10. Observational Follow-up Study on a Cohort of Children with Severe Pneumonia after Discharge from a Day-care Clinic in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nur H.; Chisti, Mohammod J.; Salam, Mohammed A.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Gyr, Niklaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Compliance, morbidity, mortality, and hospitalization during fortnightly follow-up were evaluated by an observational study on a cohort of children with severe and very severe pneumonia after day-care treatment at an urban clinic. The primary outcome measures were proportions of success (compliance) and failure (non-compliance) of follow-up visits at the day-care clinic. In total, 251 children were followed up, with median (IQR) age of 5.0 (3.0-9.0) months, and their compliance dropped from 92% at the first to 85% at the sixth visit. Cough (28%), fever (20%), and rapid breathing (13%) were common morbidities. Successful follow-up visits were possible in 180 (95.2%) and 56 (90.3%) of the children with severe and very severe pneumonia respectively. Eleven (4.4%) needed hospitalization, and four (1.6%) died. Majority (≈90%) of the children could be successfully followed up; some failed to attend their scheduled follow-up visits due to hospitalization and death. The common morbidities indicate the importance of follow-up for detecting medical problems and early treatment, thus reducing risk of death. PMID:25076656

  11. Spectral lag features of GRB 060814 from swift bat and Suzaku observations

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Arundhati; Sarkar, Samir K.; Bhadra, Arunava E-mail: samirksarkar@rediffmail.com

    2014-02-20

    This work reports a study on the spectral lag of the prompt emission spectrum of a multi-pulse gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 060814 (z = 0.84) using the observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and the Suzaku Wide Area Monitor. We found that the spectral lag for GRB 060814 is positive for the first two and the fourth pulses, while the third pulse exhibits negative lag. However, the time variation of the E {sub peak} of all the stated pulses shows a similar trend. The leading models for spectral lags in GRBs are thus found inadequate to explain the observed spectral lag features of GRB 060814. Probable causes of the spectral lag characteristics of GRB 060814 are discussed.

  12. Swift observations of GRB 050904: the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusumano, G.; Mangano, V.; Chincarini, G.; Panaitescu, A.; Burrows, D. N.; La Parola, V.; Sakamoto, T.; Campana, S.; Mineo, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; Angelini, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Beardmore, A. P.; Boyd, P. T.; Cominsky, L. R.; Gronwall, C.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Goad, M.; Hurley, K.; Immler, S.; Kennea, J. A.; Mason, K. O.; Marshal, F.; Mészáros, P.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D. M.; Roming, P. W. A.; Wells, A.; White, N. E.; Zhang, B.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB 050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and began observing with its narrow field instruments 161 s after the burst onset. This gamma-ray burst is the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed. Because of its high redshift, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and BAT simultaneous observations provide 4 orders of magnitude of spectral coverage (0.2-150 keV; 1.4-1090 keV in the source rest frame) at a very early source-frame time (22 s). The X-ray emission was monitored by the XRT up to 10 days after the burst. Aims: We present the analysis of BAT and XRT observations of GRB 050904 and a complete description of its high energy phenomenology. Methods: We performed time resolved spectral analysis and light curve modeling. Results: GRB 050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with strong variability during its entire evolution. The light curve observed by the XRT is characterized by the presence of a long flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 h after the burst onset in the burst rest frame, with no evidence of a smooth power-law decay following the prompt emission as seen in other GRBs. However, the BAT tail extrapolated to the XRT band joins the XRT early light curve and the overall behavior resembles that of a very long GRB prompt. The spectral energy distribution softens with time, with the photon index decreasing from -1.2 during the BAT observation to -1.9 at the end of the XRT observation. The dips of the late X-ray flares may be consistent with an underlying X-ray emission arising from the forward shock and with the properties of the optical afterglow reported by Tagliaferri et al. (2005b, A&A, 443, L1). Conclusions: . We interpret the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of the prompt emission from a very long GRB. The peculiarities observed in GRB 050904 could be due to its origin within one of the first star-forming regions in the Universe; very low metallicities of the progenitor at these

  13. Risk factors for long-term posttraumatic stress reactions in unarmed UN military observers: a four-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Mehlum, Lars; Koldsland, Bjorn O; Loeb, Mitchell E

    2006-10-01

    Follow-up data from 187 male Norwegian veteran officers from unarmed UN military observer missions were compared with follow-up data from 211 male veteran officers from Norwegian contingents of the UNIFIL peacekeeping mission in South Lebanon on stress exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, level of alcohol consumption, and problems with social adaptation after redeployment from the mission. Observer mission veterans reported exposure to significantly higher levels of war zone stressors than veterans from peacekeeping units did. Observer veterans also reported significantly more posttraumatic stress symptoms at follow-up, higher alcohol consumption levels during service and at follow-up, and more problems with social adaptation to their lives at home in the years after their UN military service. All of these difficulties were most prominent in observers having served in missions with high-intensity stress exposure. Multivariate analyses demonstrated stress exposure during the mission and problems with social adaptation after homecoming to predict posttraumatic stress symptoms at follow-up. PMID:17041295

  14. The Wasilewski sample of emission-line galaxies - Follow-up CCD imaging and spectroscopic and IRAS observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Schmitz, Mark; Halpern, Jules P.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Impey, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The results of an extensive imaging and spectroscopic follow-up of the objective prism-selected emission line galaxy (ELG) sample of Wasilewski (1982) are presented. Fluxes at 12, 25, 60, and 100 microns were also obtained from the coadded IRAS survey data. ELGs found by objective prism surveys are found to be generally small and underluminous galaxies which usually have higher than average optical surface brightness. The Seyfert detection rate in objective prism surveys is roughly 10 percent and the ratio of the space densities of Seyfert 2 to Seyfert 1 galaxies is significantly larger than unity. Most of the galaxies selected by objective prism surveys are star-forming, late-type spirals which often show disturbed morphology. About 25 percent of the galaxies detected by the surveys are faint, high-excitation metal-poor compact H II regions.

  15. Loss to Follow-Up as a Competing Risk in an Observational Study of HIV-1 Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan M.; Raboud, Janet; McClelland, R. Scott; Jaoko, Walter; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah; Mandaliya, Kishor; Overbaugh, Julie; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Conventional survival estimates may be biased if loss to follow-up (LTF) is associated with the outcome of interest. Our goal was to assess whether the association between sexual risk behavior and HIV-1 acquisition changed after accounting for LTF with competing risks regression. Methods HIV-1-seronegative women who enrolled in a Kenyan sex worker cohort from 1993–2007 were followed prospectively and tested for HIV at monthly clinic visits. Our primary predictor was self-reported sexual risk behavior in the past week, analyzed as a time-dependent covariate. Outcomes included HIV-1 acquisition and LTF. We analyzed the data using Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risks regression, in which LTF was treated as a competing event. Results A total of 1,513 women contributed 4,150 person-years (py), during which 198 (13.1%) acquired HIV-1 infection (incidence, 4.5 per 100 py) and 969 (64.0%) were LTF (incidence, 23.4 per 100 py). After adjusting for potential confounders, women reporting unprotected sex with multiple partners were less likely to be lost to follow-up (adjusted sub-hazard ratio (aSHR) 0.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32–0.76, relative to no sexual activity). The risk of HIV-1 acquisition after reporting unprotected sex with multiple partners was similar with Cox regression (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 2.41, 95% CI 1.36–4.27) and competing risks regression (aSHR 2.47, 95% CI 1.33–4.58). Conclusions Unprotected sex with multiple partners was associated with higher HIV-1 acquisition risk, but lower attrition. This differential attrition did not substantially bias Cox regression estimates when compared to competing risks regression results. PMID:23555041

  16. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  17. Late-time Observations of GRB 080319B: Jet Break, Host Galaxy, and Accompanying Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, N. R.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Racusin, J. L.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at ~11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E jet >~ 1052 erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) ≈ 27.0, rest frame MB ≈ -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event—a small host and bright SN—are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  18. Synchronous, alert-based and follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts and other transient phenomena with MASTER system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, I.; Master Team

    MASTER (Mobile Astronomical System of Robotic TElescopes, http://observ.pereplet.ru/) is a robotic system including the following instruments: 1) 0.35m Slefogt-Richter telescope equipped with 4k by 4k AP16E CCD, providing very wide field of view of 6 square degrees with a mag.limit of unfiltered 18.5 for 1.5 minutes of exposure. 2) 0.28m Flughe system equipped with Pictor TX416E CCD providing 36'x24' field of view with a mag.limit of 17.0 in R for 1.5 minutes of exposure 3) 0.20m Slefogt-Richter system equipped with Pictor TX416E CCD providing 45'x33' field of view with a mag.limit of 16.0 in V for 1.5 minutes of exposure 4) TV-mode (up-to 15 frames per second) extra wide field TV-camera with 1/1.2 lens providing 45x30 degrees field of view with mag.limit of 9 for 1 seconds of integration. Being located in the suburbs of Moscow the system has fast Internet connection. The remote control is possible. The primary goal of the project is synchronous optical observations of GRB and other fast transient phenomena. The usual state of the system is alert-based mode. When the system gets alert via Internet (presently those alerts come only from HETE and INTEGRAL spacecrafts, in the future SWIFT system will produce such alerts), it automatically points to the given position and begins to obtain the images with 3 telescopes described before. Automatic data processing pipeline has been created for the CCD images taken by MASTER system. It automatically finds moving objects (minor planets), new objects compared to USNO A2.0 and previous images of this area, if present. Very wide field of view (6 sq.deg.) allows to look effectively for GRB afterglows in large error-boxes produced by IPN triangulation events. The sky survey covering the sky from Dec=-15 to the North Pole has been started to have comparison data for possible GRB error boxes for future observations. It is possible to cover up-to 700 square degrees of the sky during one night with 3 minutes of exposure per field

  19. Probing a Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitor at a Redshift of z = 2: A Comprehensive Observing Campaign Campaign of the Afterglow of GRB 030226

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Ries, C.; Masetti, N.; Malesani, D.; Guenther, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a comprehensive follow-up observing campaign of the afterglow of GRB 030226 including VLT spectroscopy, VLT polarimetry, and Chandra X-ray observations. In addition, we present BOOTES-1 wide-field observations at the time of the occurrence of the burst. First observations at ESO started 0.2 days after the event when the gamma ray burst (GRB) afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately 19 and continued until the afterglow had faded below the detection threshold (R greater than 26). No underlying host galaxy was found. The optical light curve shows a break around 0.8 days after the burst, which is achromatic within the observational errors, supporting the view that it was due to a jetted explosion. Close to the break time the degree of linear polarization of the afterglow light was less than 1.1%, which favors a uniform-jet model rather than a structured one. VLT spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 plus or minus 0.001 and 1.986 plus or minus 0.001, placing the lower limit for the redshift of the GRB close to 2. We emphasize that the kinematics and the composition of the absorbing clouds responsible for these line systems are very similar to those observed in the afterglow of GRB 021004. This corroborates the picture in which at least some GRBs are physically related to the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star.

  20. Implications for the Origin of GRB 070201 from LIGO Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bantilan, H.

    2008-07-10

    We analyzed the available LIGO data coincident with GRB 070201, a short-duration, hard-spectrum {gamma}-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral arms of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Possible progenitors of such short, hard GRBs include mergers of neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, or soft {gamma}-ray repeater (SGR) flares. These events can be accompanied by gravitational-wave emission. No plausible gravitational-wave candidates were found within a 180 s long window around the time of GRB 070201. This result implies that a compact binary progenitor of GRB 070201, with masses in the range 1 M{sub sun} < m{sub 1} < 3 M{sub sun} and 1 M{sub sun} < m{sub 2} < 40 M{sub sun}, located in M31 is excluded at >99% confidence. If the GRB 070201 progenitor was not in M31, then we can exclude a binary neutron star merger progenitor with distance D < 3.5 Mpc, assuming random inclination, at 90% confidence. The result also implies that an unmodeled gravitational-wave burst from GRB 070201 most probably emitted less than 4.4 x 10{sup -4} M{sub sun}c{sup 2} (7.9 x 10{sup 50} ergs) in any 100 ms long period within the signal region if the source was in M31 and radiated isotropically at the same frequency as LIGO's peak sensitivity (f {approx} 150 Hz). This upper limit does not exclude current models of SGRs at the M31 distance.

  1. Follow-up Observations and Analysis of V530 Andromedae: A Totally Eclipsing Shallow Contact Solar Type Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Heather; Samec, Ronald G.; Caton, Daniel B.; Faulkner, Danny R.; Clark, Jeremy; Shebs, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We follow up on early, single coverage, UBVRcIc light curves (2013) and analyses. These early curves were taken in September 27 and 29 2011. Our present, BVRcIc, but full coverage light curves were taken on 6 nights: October 1,2,9, November 4,5, 2013 and January 4, 2014 by RGS, DBC, JDC, TS with the Dark Sky Observatory 0.81-m reflector of Appalachian State University and a (-40ºC) 2KX2K Apogee Alta CCD. Our present curves reveal V530 Andromedae as a totally eclipsing, shallow contact solar type binary rather than semidetached, near contact one. The newly determined times of minima include:HJD MinI = 2456566.84275 ±0.00007HJD MinII = 2456598.881995±0.0004, 24556600.6111±0.0002, 2456601.76665±0.00046.Using a new method of obtaining minima from earlier patrol light curves, in this case, NSVS, nine low weight timings of minimum light were added to the period study. Including these additional timings, we uncovered a period change. In our now, extended, period study over 9000 epochs, a 14.25 year interval, we find that the period is decreasing. This fits the scenario of magnetic breaking for solar type binaries. The temperatures of the primary and secondary components are estimated at 7000 and 6300 K, respectively, a large temperature difference for a contact binary. The fill-out, however, is a mere 4%. (Our earlier scant light curves modeled very nearly in contact.) The mass ratio, M2/M1, was found to be 0.385, almost identical with our first curves solution. The two star spots, probably magnetic in origin, were determined. A hot spot was modeled by the iterative process on the polar region of the smaller star. A cool spot is on the larger star facing the smaller star. The spot parameters have changed appreciably over the course of the two intervening years. We believe the binary has recently come into contact and thermal contact has not yet been achieved.

  2. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 080825C

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: j.granot@herts.ac.u

    2009-12-10

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  3. Fermi Observations of High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 080825C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D. L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Chaplin, V.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Gibby, L.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Komin, N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuehn, F.; Kuss, M.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has opened a new high-energy window in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Here we present a thorough analysis of GRB 080825C, which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and was the first firm detection of a GRB by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We discuss the LAT event selections, background estimation, significance calculations, and localization for Fermi GRBs in general and GRB 080825C in particular. We show the results of temporal and time-resolved spectral analysis of the GBM and LAT data. We also present some theoretical interpretation of GRB 080825C observations as well as some common features observed in other LAT GRBs.

  4. Optical Spectroscopic Observations of Gamma-ray Blazar Candidates. IV. Results of the 2014 Follow-up Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, F.; Massaro, F.; Landoni, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Stern, D.; Masetti, N.; Paggi, A.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2015-05-01

    The extragalactic γ-ray sky is dominated by the emission arising from blazars, one of the most peculiar classes of radio-loud active galaxies. Since the launch of Fermi several methods were developed to search for blazars as potential counterparts of unidentified γ-ray sources (UGSs). To confirm the nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic observations are necessary. In 2013 we started a spectroscopic campaign to investigate γ-ray blazar candidates selected according to different procedures. The main goals of our campaign are: (1) to confirm the nature of these candidates, and (2) whenever possible, determine their redshifts. Optical spectroscopic observations will also permit us to verify the robustness of the proposed associations and check for the presence of possible source class contaminants to our counterpart selection. This paper reports the results of observations carried out in 2014 in the northern hemisphere with Kitt Peak National Observatory and in the southern hemisphere with the Southern Astrophysical Research telescopes. We also report three sources observed with the Magellan and Palomar telescopes. Our selection of blazar-like sources that could be potential counterparts of UGSs is based on their peculiar infrared colors and on their combination with radio observations both at high and low frequencies (i.e., above and below ˜1 GHz) in publicly available large radio surveys. We present the optical spectra of 27 objects. We confirm the blazar-like nature of nine sources that appear to be potential low-energy counterparts of UGSs. Then we present new spectroscopic observations of 10 active galaxies of uncertain type associated with Fermi sources, classifying all of them as blazars. In addition, we present the spectra for five known γ-ray blazars with uncertain redshift estimates and three BL Lac candidates that were observed during our campaign. We also report the case for WISE J173052.85-035247.2, candidate counterpart of the

  5. Swift Follow up observation of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    On February 25, 2016, Swift carried out a 2ks target of opportunity observation of the transient Fermi J1654-1055 (see ATel #8721). Only one source is clearly detected, within the LAT error circle, by the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) at RA, Dec= 16h 32m 49.9s, -10d 52' 30.1" (J2000) with a 90 % uncertainty radius of 6.3 arcsec.

  6. Ground-Based BVRI Time-Series Follow-Up Observations for the RR Lyrae stars in Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Young-Beom; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Nemec, James M.

    2015-09-01

    Time series observations for the 41 RR Lyrae stars in Kepler's fields were carried out in 2010 to 2013 using a number of meter class (or smaller) telescopes. These telescopes include the 1-m and 41-cm telescopes of Lulin Observatory (LOT and SLT respectively, Taiwan), the 81-cm telescope of Tenagra-II Observatory (TNG, Arizona, USA), the 1-m telescope at the Mt. Lemmon Optical Astronomy Observatory (LOAO, Arizona, USA), the 1.8-m and 15-cm telescopes at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO, Korea), and the 61-cm telescope at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO, Korea). All of these telescopes were equipped with commercial available CCD imagers, and the observations were done in standard BVRI filters. Photometric calibration of the RR Lyrae light curves was done with standard stars listed in Landolt standard stars [1]. Observations of selected Landolt standard stars (centered on SA 107-456 & SA 110-232) in Johnson-Kron-Cousins BVRI filters, spanning three distinct airmasses, were done with the 81-cm Tenagra II telescope on 25 June 2011. Raw imaging data were reduced with IRAF in the same manner as in the case of the RR Lyrae, and astrometric calibrated with astrometry.net [2]. We calibrated BVRI magnitudes for 40 RR Lyrae stars.

  7. Astrometric follow-up observations of directly imaged sub-stellar companions to young stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Mugrauer, M.; Neuhäuser, R.; Vogt, N.; Errmann, R.; Berndt, A.

    2014-11-01

    The formation of massive planetary or brown dwarf companions at large projected separations from their host star is not yet well understood. In order to put constraints on formation scenarios, we search for signatures in the orbit dynamics of the systems. We are specifically interested in the eccentricities and inclinations since those parameters might tell us about the dynamic history of the systems and where to look for additional low-mass sub-stellar companions. For this purpose, we utilized VLT/NACO to take several well-calibrated high-resolution images of six target systems and analyse them together with available literature data points of those systems as well as Hubble Space Telescope archival data. We used a statistical least-squares Monte Carlo approach to constrain the orbit elements of all systems that showed significant differential motion of the primary star and companion. We show for the first time that the GQ Lup system shows significant change in both separation and position angle. Our analysis yields best-fitting orbits for this system, which are eccentric (e between 0.21 and 0.69), but cannot rule out circular orbits at high inclinations. Given our astrometry, we discuss formation scenarios of the GQ Lup system. In addition, we detected an even fainter new companion candidate to GQ Lup, which is most likely a background object. We also updated the orbit constraints of the PZ Tel system, confirming that the companion is on a highly eccentric orbit with e > 0.62. Finally, we show with a high significance, that there is no orbital motion observed in the cases of the DH Tau, HD 203030 and 1RXS J160929.1-210524 systems, and give the most precise relative astrometric measurement of the UScoCTIO 108 system to date.

  8. Automated rapid follow-up of Swift gamma-ray burst alerts at 15 GHz with the AMI Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, T. D.; Titterington, D. J.; Fender, R. P.; Swinbank, J. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Pooley, G. G.

    2013-02-01

    We present 15-GHz follow-up radio observations of 11 Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) sources, obtained with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array (AMI-LA). The initial follow-up observation for each source was made in a fully automated fashion; as a result four observations were initiated within 5 min of the GRB alert time stamp. These observations provide the first millijansky-level constraints on prolonged radio emission from GRBs within the first hour post-burst. While no radio emission within the first six hours after the GRB is detected in this preliminary analysis, radio afterglow is detected from one of the GRBs (GRB 120326A) on a time-scale of days. The observations were made as part of an ongoing programme to use AMI-LA as a systematic follow-up tool for transients at radio frequencies. In addition to the preliminary results, we explain how we have created an easily extensible automated follow-up system, describing new software tools developed for astronomical transient alert distribution, automatic requesting of target-of-opportunity observations and robotic control of the observatory.

  9. Optical polarimetric observations of GRB prompt emissions by MASTER robots-telescopes net.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Lipunov, Vladimir; Kornilov, Victor; Shatskij, Nikolaj; Kuvshi-Nov, Dmitry; Tyurina, Nataly; Belinski, Alexander; Krylov, Alexander; Balanutsa, Pavel; Chazov, Vadim; Kuznetsov, Artem; Zimnuhov, Dmitry; Balanutsa, Pavel; Kortunov, Petr; Sankovich, Anatoly; Tlatov, An-Drey; Parkhomenko, A.; Krushinsky, Vadim; Zalozhnyh, Ivan; Popov, A.; Kopytova, Taisia; Ivanov, Kirill; Yazev, Sergey; Yurkov, Vladimir

    The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19 -20mag. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovas (including SNIa), search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes. Observations on telescopes capable to observ polarisation of GRB prompt emission have been begun in the summer of 2009. Since summer of 2009 an observations of several GRB have been made. In particular for GRB0910 and GRB091127 optical polarisation has been measured. So, for GRB091127 which supervision have begun all through 91 sec polarisation at level of several tens percent has been registered. (GCN 10231, GCN 10052, GCN 10203)

  10. Constraining GRB as Source for UHE Cosmic Rays through Neutrino Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.

    2013-07-01

    The origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) has been widely regarded as one of the major questions in the frontiers of particle astrophysics. Gamma ray bursts (GRB), the most violent explosions in the universe second only to the Big Bang, have been a popular candidate site for UHECR productions. The recent IceCube report on the non-observation of GRB induced neutrinos therefore attracts wide attention. This dilemma requires a resolution: either the assumption of GRB as UHECR accelerator is to be abandoned or the expected GRB induced neutrino yield was wrong. It has been pointed out that IceCube has overestimated the neutrino flux at GRB site by a factor of ~5. In this paper we point out that, in addition to the issue of neutrino production at source, the neutrino oscillation and the possible neutrino decay during their flight from GRB to Earth should further reduce the detectability of IceCube, which is most sensitive to the muon-neutrino flavor as far as point-source identification is concerned. Specifically, neutrino oscillation will reduce the muon-neutrino flavor ratio from 2/3 per neutrino at GRB source to 1/3 on Earth, while neutrino decay, if exists and under the assumption of normal hierarchy of mass eigenstates, would result in a further reduction of muon-neutrino ratio to 1/8. With these in mind, we note that there have been efforts in recent years in pursuing other type of neutrino telescopes based on Askaryan effect, which can in principle observe and distinguish all three flavors with comparable sensitivities. Such new approach may therefore be complementary to IceCube in shedding more lights on this cosmic accelerator question.

  11. GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602: Second epoch Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Hjorth, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    We obtained a second epoch of observations of the very short GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602 (Cummings et al. GCN 17267) with Chandra. Observations began on 10 Feb 2015, 39 days after the burst, and 32 days after the first epoch of observations.

  12. J-GEM follow-up observations to search for an optical counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05 m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61 cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5 σ depths are i ˜ 18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g ˜ 18.9 mag, r ˜ 18.7 mag, and i ˜ 18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. The probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in the final skymap. We do not find any transient source associated to an external galaxy with spatial offset from its center, which is consistent with the local supernova rate.

  13. J-GEM follow-up observations to search for an optical counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Asakura, Yuichiro; Abe, Fumio; Tristram, Paul J.; Utsumi, Yousuke; Doi, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Kenta; Itoh, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yoichi; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Matsubayashi, Kazuya; Motohara, Kentaro; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Ohta, Kouji; Saito, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yoichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Uemura, Makoto; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-06-01

    We present our optical follow-up observations to search for an electromagnetic counterpart of the first gravitational wave source GW150914 in the framework of the Japanese collaboration for Gravitational wave ElectroMagnetic follow-up (J-GEM), which is an observing group utilizing optical and radio telescopes in Japan, as well as in New Zealand, China, South Africa, Chile, and Hawaii. We carried out a wide-field imaging survey with the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC) on the 1.05 m Kiso Schmidt telescope in Japan and a galaxy-targeted survey with Tripole5 on the B&C 61 cm telescope in New Zealand. Approximately 24 deg2 regions in total were surveyed in i-band with KWFC and 18 nearby galaxies were observed with Tripole5 in g-, r-, and i-bands 4-12 days after the gravitational wave detection. Median 5 σ depths are i ˜ 18.9 mag for the KWFC data and g ˜ 18.9 mag, r ˜ 18.7 mag, and i ˜ 18.3 mag for the Tripole5 data. The probability for a counterpart to be in the observed area is 1.2% in the initial skymap and 0.1% in the final skymap. We do not find any transient source associated to an external galaxy with spatial offset from its center, which is consistent with the local supernova rate.

  14. Continuous evidence of fast HIV disease progression related to class-wide resistance to antiretroviral drugs: a 6 year follow-up analysis of a large observational database.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Zaccarelli; Federica, Forbici; Patrizia, Lorenzini; Francesca, Ceccherini-Silberstein; Valerio, Tozzi; Paola, Trotta Maria; Patrizia, Marconi; Pasquale, Narciso; Federico, Perno Carlo; Andrea, Antinori

    2007-08-20

    Class-wide resistance (CWR) was increasingly associated with a higher risk of HIV progression after 72 months of follow-up among 1392 patients genotypic-tested after failure (AIDS risk 13% for no CWR to 34% for three CWR; AIDS/death risk 21-54%). At multivariate analysis, the detection of two and three CWR was significantly associated with a two and threefold increased risk, respectively, of death and AIDS/death, suggesting that extended resistance is a marker of disease progression in long-term observation. PMID:17690586

  15. Independent iPTF detection and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the Type II SN 2013am = iPTF13aaz in M65

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Fox, O. D.; Kelly, P.; Zheng, W.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Silverman, J. M.; Walker, E. S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Nugent, P. E.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.

    2013-03-01

    The iPTF (ATel #4807) announces its independent detection, spectroscopic classification, and follow-up observations of the Type II SN in the nearby galaxy M65 (d = 12.6 Mpc; NED), at RA = 11:18:56.9, Dec = +13:03:50.0 (J2000). The object was discovered on 2013-03-21.637 by M. Sugano, Kakogawa, Hyogo-ken, Japan and posted on the CBAT TOCP page, http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J11185695+1303494.html , where it was designated PSN J11185695+1303494 and later renamed SN 2013am (CBET #3440).

  16. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Environs of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S. E.; Patel, S. K.; Levan, A.; Blandford, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tennant, A.; Pian, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the gamma-ray burst (GRB). Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and five each in the original error boxes, S1 and S2, assigned for variable X-ray counteparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by Chandra on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S 1, S 1 a, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning approx. 1400 days, is obtained by assuming that the burst and supernova were coincident at 35.6 Mpc. When this X-ray light curve is compared with those of the X-ray af "erglows" of ordinary GRBs, X-ray flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of light curves, perhaps bounding a continuum. By 3-10 yr, all these phenomena seem to converge on a common X-ray luminosity, possibly indicative of the supernova underlying them all. This convergence strengthens the conclusion that SN 1998 bw aid GRB 980425 took place in the same object.One possible explanation for the two classes is that a (nearly) standard GRB was observed at different angles, in which case X-ray afterglows with intermediate luminosities should eventually be discovered. Finally, we comment on the contribution of GRB afterglows to the ultraluminous X-ray source population.

  17. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM GRB 090217A

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M. E-mail: piron@lpta.in2p3.f

    2010-07-10

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9{sigma}. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to {approx}1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  18. Fermi Observations of High-energy Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 090217A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Dermer, C. D.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ripken, J.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi GBM Collaboration

    2010-07-01

    The Fermi observatory is advancing our knowledge of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) through pioneering observations at high energies, covering more than seven decades in energy with the two on-board detectors, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Here, we report on the observation of the long GRB 090217A which triggered the GBM and has been detected by the LAT with a significance greater than 9σ. We present the GBM and LAT observations and on-ground analyses, including the time-resolved spectra and the study of the temporal profile from 8 keV up to ~1 GeV. All spectra are well reproduced by a Band model. We compare these observations to the first two LAT-detected, long bursts GRB 080825C and GRB 080916C. These bursts were found to have time-dependent spectra and exhibited a delayed onset of the high-energy emission, which are not observed in the case of GRB 090217A. We discuss some theoretical implications for the high-energy emission of GRBs.

  19. GROND observations of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schady, P.; Kann, D. A.; Greiner, J.

    2016-06-01

    We observed the field of GRB 160622A/SNR RCW 103/SGR 1617-5103 (Swift trigger 700791; D'Ai et al., GCN #19547. ATel #9180) simultaneously in g'r'i'z'JHK with GROND (Greiner et al. 2008, PASP 120, 405) mounted at the 2.2 m MPG telescope at ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile).

  20. REAL-TIME DETECTION AND RAPID MULTIWAVELENGTH FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF A HIGHLY SUBLUMINOUS TYPE II-P SUPERNOVA FROM THE PALOMAR TRANSIENT FACTORY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Green, Yoav; Yaron, Ofer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu Dong; Sternberg, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Quimby, Robert M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Walters, Richard; Nugent, Peter E.; Poznanski, Dovi; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Emma S.

    2011-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is an optical wide-field variability survey carried out using a camera with a 7.8 deg{sup 2} field of view mounted on the 48 inch Oschin Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory. One of the key goals of this survey is to conduct high-cadence monitoring of the sky in order to detect optical transient sources shortly after they occur. Here, we describe the real-time capabilities of the PTF and our related rapid multiwavelength follow-up programs, extending from the radio to the {gamma}-ray bands. We present as a case study observations of the optical transient PTF10vdl (SN 2010id), revealed to be a very young core-collapse (Type II-P) supernova having a remarkably low luminosity. Our results demonstrate that the PTF now provides for optical transients the real-time discovery and rapid-response follow-up capabilities previously reserved only for high-energy transients like gamma-ray bursts.

  1. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    I introduce the Swift Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a comprehensive multiwavelength program to characterize the demographics of the GRB host population across its entire redshift range. Using unbiased selection criteria we have designated a subset of 130 Swift gamma-ray bursts which are now being targeted with intensive observational follow-up. Deep Spitzer imaging of every field has already been obtained and analyzed, with major programs ongoing at Keck, GTC, and Gemini to obtain complementary optical/NIR photometry to enable full SED modeling and derivation of fundamental physical parameters such as mass, extinction, and star-formation rate. Using these data I will present an unbiased measurement of the GRB host-galaxy luminosity and mass functions and their evolution with redshift between z=0 and z=5, compare GRB hosts to other star-forming galaxy populations, and discuss implications for the nature of the GRB progenitor and the ability of GRBs to probe cosmic star-formation.

  2. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Short GRB Host Galaxies: Morphologies, Offsets and Local Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Wen-fai; Berger, E.; Fox, D.

    2010-01-01

    The morphological properties of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies are not well understood. Here, we present optical observations of eight short GRB hosts obtained with ACS and WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These observations allow us to characterize the galactic and local environments of short GRBs as a powerful constraint on the nature of their progenitors. Using a variety of techniques, we determine the hosts' morphological properties, measure the physical and host-normalized offsets relative to the galaxy centers, and study the locations of short GRBs relative to their host light distributions. We also compare our results to those for long GRBs. Overall, we find that the majority of short GRB hosts have exponential disk profiles, and are on average twice as large as long GRB hosts. We also find that the distribution of projected physical offsets for short GRBs has a median of 5 kpc, a factor of five larger than the median for long GRBs. However, when normalized by the size of the hosts, the offset distributions for the two populations become nearly identical. Finally, unlike long GRBs which are concentrated in the brightest regions of their hosts, short GRBs are found to uniformly trace their host light distribution. These results are consistent with a progenitor population of NS-NS binaries, but do not rule out other potential progenitor models. This research is supported by Harvard University, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, and HST - Grant Number GO-10917.01.

  3. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Environs of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S. E.; Patel, S. K.; Levan, A.; Blandford, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Tennant, A.; Pian, E.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the GRB. Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and five each in the original error boxes - S1 and S2 - assigned for variable X-ray counterparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by CXO on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared, and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S1, Sla, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw, and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning approximately 1300 days, is obtained by assuming the burst and supernova were coincident at 35.6 Mpc. When this X-ray iight curve is compared with those of the X-ray afterglows of ordinary GRBs, X-ray Flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of lightcurves, perhaps bounding a continuum. By three to ten years, all these phenomena seem to converge on a common X-ray luminosity, possibly indicative of the supernova underlying them all. This convergence strengthens the conclusion that SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 took place in the same object. One possible explanation for the two classes is a (nearly) standard GRB observed at different angles, in which case X-ray afterglows with intermediate luminosities should eventually be discovered. Finally, we comment on the contribution of GRBs to the ULX source population.

  4. Evaluating integrated headache care: a one-year follow-up observational study in patients treated at the Essen headache centre

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Outpatient integrated headache care was established in 2005 at the Essen Headache Centre in Germany. This paper reports outcome data for this approach. Methods Patients were seen by a neurologist for headache diagnosis and recommendation for drug treatment. Depending on clinical needs, patients were seen by a psychologist and/or physical therapist. A 5-day headache-specific multidisciplinary treatment programme (MTP) was provided for patients with frequent or chronic migraine, tension type headache (TTH) and medication overuse headache (MOH). Subsequent outpatient treatment was provided by neurologists in private practice. Results Follow-up data on headache frequency and burden of disease were prospectively obtained in 841 patients (mean age 41.5 years) after 3, 6 and 12 months. At baseline mean headache frequency was 18.1 (SD = 1.6) days per month, compared to measurement at 1 year follow-up a mean reduction of 5.8 (SD = 11.9) headache days per month was observed in 486 patients (57.8%) after one year (TTH patients mean: -8.5 days per month; migraine mean: -3.2 days per month, patients with migraine and TTH mean: -5.9 days per month). A reduction in headache days ≥ 50% was observed in 306 patients (36.4%) independent of diagnosis, while headache frequency remains unchanged in 20.9% and increase in 21.3% of the patient. Conclusion Multidisciplinary outpatient headache centres offer an effective way to establish a three-tier treatment offer for difficult headache patients depending on clinical needs. PMID:21985562

  5. RAPID, MACHINE-LEARNED RESOURCE ALLOCATION: APPLICATION TO HIGH-REDSHIFT GAMMA-RAY BURST FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A. N.; Richards, Joseph W.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Long, James; Broderick, Tamara

    2012-02-20

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation-based on the available telescope time-of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that {approx}56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and {approx}84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top {approx}40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  6. Rapid, Machine-learned Resource Allocation: Application to High-redshift Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, A. N.; Long, James; Richards, Joseph W.; Broderick, Tamara; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Joshua S.

    2012-02-01

    As the number of observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here, we present our Random Forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z ) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation—based on the available telescope time—of whether the event warrants additional follow-up resources. We train RATE GRB-z using a set consisting of 135 Swift bursts with known redshifts, only 18 of which are z > 4. Cross-validated performance metrics on these training data suggest that ~56% of high-z bursts can be captured from following up the top 20% of the ranked candidates, and ~84% of high-z bursts are identified after following up the top ~40% of candidates. We further use the method to rank 200 + Swift bursts with unknown redshifts according to their likelihood of being high-z.

  7. Chandra Observations of the X-ray Environs of SN 1998 bw/GRB 980425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S. E.; Patel, S. K.; Levan, A.; Blanford, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report X-ray studies of the environs of SN 1998bw and GRB 980425 using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory 1281 days after the GRB. Eight X-ray point sources were localized, three and five each in the original error boxes--S1 and S2--assigned for variable X-ray counterparts to the GRB by BeppoSAX. The sum of the discrete X-ray sources plus continuous emission in S2 observed by CXO on day 1281 is within a factor of 1.5 of the maximum and the upper limits seen by BeppoSAX. We conclude that S2 is the sum of several variable sources that have not disappeared, and therefore is not associated with the GRB. Within S1, clear evidence is seen for a decline of approximately a factor of 12 between day 200 and day 1281. One of the sources in S1, S1a, is coincident with the well-determined radio location of SN 1998bw, and is certainly the remnant of that explosion. The nature of the other sources is also discussed. Combining our observation of the supernova with others of the GRB afterglow, a smooth X-ray light curve, spanning (approx) 1300 days, is obtained by assuming the burst and supernova were coincident at 35. 6 Mpc. When this X-ray light curve is compared with those of the X-ray 'afterglows' of ordinary GRBs, X-ray Flashes, and ordinary supernovae, evidence emerges for at least two classes of lightcurves, perhaps bounding a continuum.

  8. Pain, disability and health-related quality of life in osteoarthritis-joint matters: an observational, multi-specialty trans-national follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Montero, Antonio; Mulero, Juan-Francisco; Tornero, Carlos; Guitart, Jordi; Serrano, Mar

    2016-09-01

    The authors aimed to test potential relations between osteoarthritis (OA) features, disability and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) at different body locations. Outpatients consulting for pain associated to self-reported OA at varied healthcare settings were evaluated in a 3-month observational non-controlled follow-up study. Socio-demographic/anthropometric and medical data were collected at three time points. Lequesne's indices, quick-disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and Oswestry questionnaires provided measures of physical function and disability. HR-QoL measures were obtained with EuroQol-5 Dimensions. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the differences of pain severity across body regions and the correlates of disability and HR-QoL. Six thousand patients were evaluated. Pain lasted 2 years or more in 3995 patients. The mean pain severity at baseline was moderate (6.4 points). On average, patients had pain in 1.9 joints/areas. The pain was more severe when OA involved the spine or all body regions. Pain severity explained much of the variance in disability and HR-QoL; this association was less relevant in patients with OA in the upper limbs. There were considerable improvements at follow up. Pain severity improved as did disability, which showed particularly strong associations with HR-QoL improvements. Pain severity is associated with functional limitations, disability and poor HR-QoL in patients with self-reported OA. Functional limitations might have particular relevance when OA affects the upper limbs. Improvements are feasible in many patients who consult because of their pain. PMID:27068737

  9. Optical and near-infrared observations of the GRB020405 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, N.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Simoncelli, A.; Hunt, L. K.; Maiorano, E.; Levan, A.; Christensen, L.; Rol, E.; Savaglio, S.; Falomo, R.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Hjorth, J.; Delsanti, A.; Pannella, M.; Mohan, V.; Pandey, S. B.; Sagar, R.; Amati, L.; Burud, I.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Kaper, L.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Nicastro, L.; Pedersen, H.; Rhoads, J.; Salamanca, I.; Tanvir, N.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van den Heuvel, E. P. J.

    2003-06-01

    We report on photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric monitoring of the optical and near-infrared (NIR) afterglow of GRB020405. Ground-based optical observations, performed with 8 different telescopes, started about 1 day after the high-energy prompt event and spanned a period of ~ 10 days; the addition of archival HST data extended the coverage up to ~ 150 days after the GRB. We report the first detection of the afterglow in NIR bands. The detection of Balmer and oxygen emission lines in the optical spectrum of the host galaxy indicates that the GRB is located at redshift z =0.691. Fe II and Mg II absorption systems are detected at z= 0.691 and at z = 0.472 in the afterglow optical spectrum. The latter system is likely caused by absorbing clouds in the galaxy complex located ~ 2'' southwest of the GRB020405 host. Hence, for the first time, the galaxy responsible for an intervening absorption line system in the spectrum of a GRB afterglow is spectroscopically identified. Optical and NIR photometry of the afterglow indicates that, between 1 and 10 days after the GRB, the decay in all bands is consistent with a single power law of index alpha = 1.54+/- 0.06. The late-epoch VLT J-band and HST optical points lie above the extrapolation of this power law, so that a plateau (or ``bump") is apparent in the VRIJ light curves at 10-20 days after the GRB. The light curves at epochs later than day ~ 20 after the GRB are consistent with a power-law decay with index alpha ' = 1.85+/- 0.15. While other authors have proposed to reproduce the bump with the template of the supernova (SN) 1998bw, considered the prototypical ``hypernova'', we suggest that it can also be modeled with a SN having the same temporal profile as the other proposed hypernova SN2002ap, but 1.3 mag brighter at peak, and located at the GRB redshift. Alternatively, a shock re-energization may be responsible for the rebrightening. A single polarimetric R-band measurement shows that the afterglow is polarized

  10. Swift Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Pulse Shapes: GRB Pulse Spectral Evolution Clarified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon; Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Morris, David; Neff, James E.; Giblin, Timothy W.

    2015-12-01

    Isolated Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulses, like their higher-energy BATSE counterparts, emit the bulk of their pulsed emission as a hard-to-soft component that can be fitted by the Norris et al. empirical pulse model. This signal is overlaid by a fainter, three-peaked signal that can be modeled by the residual fit of Hakkila & Preece: the two fits combine to reproduce GRB pulses with distinctive three-peaked shapes. The precursor peak appears on or before the pulse rise and is often the hardest component, the central peak is the brightest, and the decay peak converts exponentially decaying emission into a long, soft, power-law tail. Accounting for systematic instrumental differences, the general characteristics of the fitted pulses are remarkably similar. Isolated GRB pulses are dominated by hard-to-soft evolution; this is more pronounced for asymmetric pulses than for symmetric ones. Isolated GRB pulses can also exhibit intensity tracking behaviors that, when observed, are tied to the timing of the three peaks: pulses with the largest maximum hardnesses are hardest during the precursor, those with smaller maximum hardnesses are hardest during the central peak, and all pulses can re-harden during the central peak and/or during the decay peak. Since these behaviors are essentially seen in all isolated pulses, the distinction between “hard-to-soft and “intensity-tracking” pulses really no longer applies. Additionally, the triple-peaked nature of isolated GRB pulses seems to indicate that energy is injected on three separate occasions during the pulse duration: theoretical pulse models need to account for this.

  11. Swift X-ray follow-up observations of two INTEGRAL sources: IGRJ12470-5407 and IGRJ18532+0416

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiocchi, M.; Landi, R.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Gehrels; Kennea, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    We report the results of X-ray follow-up observations performed with Swift/XRT of two unidentified INTEGRAL sources, IGRJ12470-5407 and IGRJ18532+0416, listed in the 4th IBIS Survey Catalogue (Bird et al. 2010, ApJS, 186, 1). IGRJ12470-5407 This source is a very weak IBIS unidentified object with a flux < 0.3 mCrab in the 20-40 keV energy band ( Bird et al. 2010, ApJS, 186, 1). The field of this source was observed with Swift-XRT on 2011-02-17 03:33:01 and 2011-02-19 18:06:01, for a total exposure time of 4312 s. Within the 99% IBIS positional uncertainty we found only one XRT source above 3 sigma c.l., located at R.A.(J2000) = 12h 47m 50.80s and Dec.(J2000) = -54d 06m 30.80s with an uncertainty of 5 arcsec.

  12. Remission in schizophrenia: results of cross-sectional with 6-month follow-up period and 1-year observational therapeutic studies in an outpatient population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A standardized definition of remission criteria in schizophrenia was proposed by the International group of NC Andreasen in 2005 (low symptom threshold for the eight core Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) symptoms for at least 6 consecutive months). Methods A cross-sectional study of remission rate, using a 6-month follow-up to assess symptomatic stability, was conducted in two healthcare districts (first and second) of an outpatient psychiatric service in Moscow. The key inclusion criteria were outpatients with an International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10) diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Remission was assessed using modern criteria (severity and time criteria), PANSS and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Patients who were stable but did not satisfied the symptomatic criteria were included in a further 1-year observational study, with the first group (first district) receiving risperidone (long-acting, injectable) (RLAI) and the second group (second district) continuing to receiving routine treatment. Symptoms were assessed with PANSS, social functioning with the personal and social performance scale, compliance with rating of medication influences scale, and extrapyramidal side effects with the Simpson-Angus scale. Results Only 64 (31.5%) of 203 outpatients met the criteria for symptomatic remission in the cross-sectional study, but at the end of the 6-month follow-up period, 158 (77.8%) were stable (irrespective of remission status). Among these only 53 (26.1%) patients fulfilled the remission criteria. The observational study had 42 stable patients in the RLAI group and 35 in the routine treatment group: 19.0% in the RLAI group and 5.7% in the control group met remission criteria after 12 months of therapy. Furthermore, reduction of PANSS total and subscale scores, as well as improvement in social functioning, was more significant in the first group. Conclusions Only around one-quarter of

  13. Fermi observations of high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080916C.

    PubMed

    Abdo, A A; Ackermann, M; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, T H; Burrows, D; Busetto, G; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, A; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Cominsky, L R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; Deklotz, M; Dermer, C D; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, J; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M-H; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hays, E; Hernando Morat, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knödlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, F; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S-H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, S; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Mészáros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, V; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, T A; Preece, R; Rainò, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Reyes, L C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Saz Parkinson, P M; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgrò, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, J-L; Stecker, F W; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, D J; Tagliaferri, G; Tajima, H; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-03-27

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass. PMID:19228997

  14. Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation using integral/IBIS observations of GRB041219A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, P.; Götz, D.; Binétruy, P.; Covino, S.; Fernandez-Soto, A.

    2011-06-01

    One of the experimental tests of Lorentz invariance violation is to measure the helicity dependence of the propagation velocity of photons originating in distant cosmological obejcts. Using a recent determination of the distance of the gamma-ray burst GRB 041219A, for which a high degree of polarization is observed in the prompt emission, we are able to improve by four orders of magnitude the existing constraint on Lorentz invariance violation, arising from the phenomenon of vacuum birefringence.

  15. Asiago observation of the OT of GRB150413A detected by MASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasella, L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Ochner, P.; Pastorello, A.; Tartaglia, L.; Terreran, G.; Turatto, M.

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of the Asiago Transient Classification Program (Tomasella et al. 2014, AN, 335, 841), we have spectroscopically observed the OT of GRB150413A detected by MASTER (Atel #7381) with the Asiago 1.82 m Copernico Telescope (+AFOSC; range 340-820 nm; resolution 1.4 nm), on 20150413.87 UT, that is about 7.0h after detection.

  16. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ≥80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of GRB 110731A: GeV Emission from Onset to Afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Greiner, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sanchez, D. A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Connaughton, V.; Foley, S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.; Rau, A.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kann, D. A.; Filgas, R.; Klose, S.; Krühler, T.; Fukui, A.; Sako, T.; Tristram, P. J.; Oates, S. R.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Littlejohns, O.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet Γ ~ 500-550.

  18. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 110731A: GeV EMISSION FROM ONSET TO AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Asano, K.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: srazzaque@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil E-mail: dgruber@mpe.mpg.de; and others

    2013-02-15

    We report on the multiwavelength observations of the bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 110731A, by the Fermi and Swift observatories, and by the MOA and GROND optical telescopes. The analysis of the prompt phase reveals that GRB 110731A shares many features with bright Large Area Telescope bursts observed by Fermi during the first three years on-orbit: a light curve with short time variability across the whole energy range during the prompt phase, delayed onset of the emission above 100 MeV, extra power-law component and temporally extended high-energy emission. In addition, this is the first GRB for which simultaneous GeV, X-ray, and optical data are available over multiple epochs beginning just after the trigger time and extending for more than 800 s, allowing temporal and spectral analysis in different epochs that favor emission from the forward shock in a wind-type medium. The observed temporally extended GeV emission is most likely part of the high-energy end of the afterglow emission. Both the single-zone pair transparency constraint for the prompt signal and the spectral and temporal analysis of the forward-shock afterglow emission independently lead to an estimate of the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet {Gamma} {approx} 500-550.

  19. Optical and Near-infrared Observations of SN 2013dx Associated with GRB 130702A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toy, V. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Bersier, D.; Perley, D. A.; Margutti, R.; Bellm, E.; Bloom, J. S.; Cao, Y.; Capone, J. I.; Clubb, K.; Corsi, A.; De Cia, A.; de Diego, J. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fox, O. D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L.; González, J. J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Kelly, P. L.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Lee, W. H.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Singer, L.; Stern, D.; Troja, E.; Veilleux, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be {E}γ ,{iso}={6.4}-1.0+1.3× {10}50 erg (1 keV to 10 MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed {g}\\prime {r}\\prime {i}\\prime {z}\\prime light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves ˜20% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined SNe Ic, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of ˜ 21,000 km s-1. We construct a quasi-bolometric ({g}\\prime {r}\\prime {i}\\prime {z}\\prime {yJ}) light curve for SN 2013dx, only the fifth GRB-associated SN with extensive NIR coverage and the third with a bolometric light curve extending beyond {{Δ }}t\\gt 40 {{days}}. Together with the measured photospheric velocity, we derive basic explosion parameters using simple analytic models. We infer a 56Ni mass of {M}{Ni}=0.37+/- 0.01 {M}⊙ , an ejecta mass of {M}{ej}=3.1+/- 0.1 {M}⊙ , and a kinetic energy of {E}{{K}}=(8.2+/- 0.43)× {10}51 erg (statistical uncertainties only), consistent with previous GRB-associated supernovae. When considering the ensemble population of GRB-associated supernovae, we find no correlation between the mass of synthesized 56Ni and high-energy properties, despite clear predictions from numerical simulations that {M}{Ni} should correlate with the degree of asymmetry. On the other hand, {M}{Ni} clearly correlates with the kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta across a wide range of core-collapse events.

  20. The GRB luminosity function: prediction of the internal shock model and comparison to observations

    SciTech Connect

    Zitouni, H.; Daigne, F.; Mochkovitch, R.

    2008-05-22

    We compute the expected GRB luminosity function in the internal shock model. We find that if the population of GRB central engines produces all kind of relativistic outflows, from very smooth to highly variable, the luminosity function has to branchs: at low luminosity, the distribution is dominated by low efficiency GRBs and is close to a power law of slope -0.5, whereas at high luminosity, the luminosity function follows the distribution of injected kinetic power. Using Monte Carlo simulations and several observational constrains (BATSE logN-logP diagram, peak energy distribution of bright BATSE bursts, fraction of XRFs in the HETE2 sample), we show that it is currently impossible to distinguish between a single power law or a broken power law luminosity function. However, when the second case is considered, the low-luminosity slope is found to be -0.6{+-}0.2, which is compatible with the prediction of the internal shock model.

  1. VLBI AND ARCHIVAL VLA AND WSRT OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRB 030329 RADIO AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.; Taylor, Greg B.; Granot, Johnathan

    2012-11-01

    We present VLBI and archival Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations of the radio afterglow from the gamma-ray burst (GRB) of 2003 March 29 (GRB 030329) taken between 672 and 2032 days after the burst. The VLA and WSRT data suggest a simple power-law decay in the flux at 5 GHz, with no clear signature of any rebrightening from the counterjet. We report an unresolved source at day 2032 of size 1.18 {+-} 0.13 mas, which we use in conjunction with the expansion rate of the burst to argue for the presence of a uniform, interstellar-medium-like circumburst medium. A limit of <0.067 mas yr{sup -1} is placed on the proper motion, supporting the standard afterglow model for gamma-ray bursts.

  2. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    SciTech Connect

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Pal'shin, V.; Golenetskii, S.; Norris, J. P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A. M.; Zhang, B.; Burrows, D. N.; Perri, M.

    2006-05-19

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at {approx} 45 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 {+-} 2.6 ms, consistent with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). GRB 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  3. Radio and X-ray observations of the Ultra-long GRB 150518A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Louis; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; Supernova Forensics

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 150518A, discovered on 2015 May 18 by the MAXI and KONUS-Wind satellites, lasted for about 1000s, making it an important addition to the recently established class of very long duration GRBs. We report on the JVLA radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 150518A. Additionally, we report the analysis of Xray afterglow observations by Swift-XRT. Multi-band light curves of the radio afterglow display an unusual, conspicuous rise around 10 days after the burst, possibly due to enhanced mass-loss from the progenitor in the final stages of evolution before the GRB. The X-ray afterglow spectrum is significantly soft (photon index Γx > 3) and heavily absorbed (NHx,i > 8 × 10^{21}/cm^2). These properties suggest peculiar behavior that is different from the predictions of the standard fireball model of GRBs. In the light of these properties, we compare different models of progenitors for very long duration GRBs. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 090902B: A DISTINCT SPECTRAL COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT AND DELAYED EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.

    2009-11-20

    We report on the observation of the bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 090902B, by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on-board the Fermi observatory. This was one of the brightest GRBs to have been observed by the LAT, which detected several hundred photons during the prompt phase. With a redshift of z = 1.822, this burst is among the most luminous detected by Fermi. Time-resolved spectral analysis reveals a significant power-law component in the LAT data that is distinct from the usual Band model emission that is seen in the sub-MeV energy range. This power-law component appears to extrapolate from the GeV range to the lowest energies and is more intense than the Band component, both below approx50 keV and above 100 MeV. The Band component undergoes substantial spectral evolution over the entire course of the burst, while the photon index of the power-law component remains constant for most of the prompt phase, then hardens significantly toward the end. After the prompt phase, power-law emission persists in the LAT data as late as 1 ks post-trigger, with its flux declining as t {sup -1.5}. The LAT detected a photon with the highest energy so far measured from a GRB, 33.4{sup +2.7}{sub -3.5} GeV. This event arrived 82 s after the GBM trigger and approx50 s after the prompt phase emission had ended in the GBM band. We discuss the implications of these results for models of GRB emission and for constraints on models of the extragalactic background light.

  5. The Sub-Energetic GRB 031203 as a Cosmic Analogue to GRB 980425

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, A

    2004-08-27

    Over the six years since the discovery of the {gamma}-ray burst GRB 980425, associated with the nearby (distance {approx}40 Mpc) supernova 1998bw, astronomers have fiercely debated the nature of this event. Relative to bursts located at cosmological distances, (redshift, z {approx} 1), GRB 980425 was under-luminous in {gamma}-rays by three orders of magnitude. Radio calorimetry showed the explosion was sub-energetic by a factor of 10. Here, the authors report observations of the radio and X-ray afterglow of the recent z = 0.105 GRB031203 and demonstrate that it too is sub-energetic. The result, when taken together with the low {gamma}-ray luminosity, suggest that GRB031203 is the first cosmic analogue to GRB980425. They find no evidence that this event was a highly collimated explosion viewed off-axis. Like GRB980425, GRB031203 appears to be an intrinsically sub-energetic {gamma}-burst. Such sub-energetic events have faint afterglows. Intensive follow-up of faint bursts with smooth {gamma}-ray light curves (common to both GRBs 031203 and 980425) may enable the authors to reveal their expected large population.

  6. HAT-P-56b: An Inflated Massive Hot Jupiter Transiting a Bright F Star Followed Up with K2 Campaign 0 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. X.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; Bieryla, A.; de Val-Borro, M.; Latham, D. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Csubry, Z.; Kovács, G.; Béky, B.; Falco, E.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M. L.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-56b by the HATNet survey, an inflated hot Jupiter transiting a bright F-type star in Field 0 of NASA's K2 mission. We combine ground-based discovery and follow-up light curves with high precision photometry from K2, as well as ground-based radial velocities from the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph on the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5 m telescope to determine the physical properties of this system. HAT-P-56b has a mass of 2.18 {M}{{J}}, radius of 1.47 {R}{{J}}, and transits its host star on a near-grazing orbit with a period of 2.7908 day. The radius of HAT-P-56b is among the largest known for a planet with {M}p\\gt 2 {M}{{J}}. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 10.9, mass of 1.30 {M}⊙ , and radius of 1.43 {R}⊙ . The periodogram of the K2 light curve suggests that the star is a γ Dor variable. HAT-P-56b is an example of a ground-based discovery of a transiting planet, where space-based observations greatly improve the confidence in the confirmation of its planetary nature, and also improve the accuracy of the planetary parameters. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations obtained with the Tillinghast Reflector 1.5 m telescope and the 1.2 m telescope, both operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. Based in part on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. Based in part on observations obtained with the Kepler Space Craft in the K2 Campaign 0 Mission.

  7. Follow-up observations at 16 and 33GHz of extragalactic sources from WMAP 3-yr data: II - Flux density variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Thomas M. O.; Davies, Matthew L.; Davies, Rod D.; Davis, Richard J.; Feroz, Farhan; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; Grainge, Keith J. B.; Green, David A.; Hobson, Michael P.; Hurley-Walker, Natasha; Lasenby, Anthony N.; López-Caniego, Marcos; Olamaie, Malak; Padilla-Torres, Carmen P.; Pooley, Guy G.; Rebolo, Rafael; Rodríguez-Gonzálvez, Carmen; Saunders, Richard D. E.; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Scott, Paul F.; Shimwell, Timothy W.; Titterington, David J.; Waldram, Elizabeth M.; Watson, Robert A.; Zwart, Jonathan T. L.

    2009-12-01

    Using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) at 16GHz and the Very Small Array (VSA) at 33GHz to make follow-up observations of sources in the New Extragalactic WMAP Point Source catalogue, we have investigated the flux density variability in a complete sample of 97 sources over time-scales of a few months to ~1.5yr. We find that 53 per cent of the 93 sources, for which we have multiple observations, are variable, at the 99 per cent confidence level, above the flux density calibration uncertainties of ~4 per cent at 16GHz the fraction of sources having varied by more than 20 per cent is 15 per cent at 16GHz and 20 per cent at 33GHz. Not only is this common occurrence of variability at high frequency of interest for source physics, but also strategies for coping with source contamination in cosmic microwave background work must take this variability into account. There is no strong evidence of a correlation between variability and flux density for the sample as a whole. For those sources classified as variable, the mean fractional rms variation in flux density increases significantly with the length of time separating observation pairs. Using a maximum likelihood method, we calculate the correlation in the variability at the two frequencies in a subset of sources classified as variable from both the AMI and VSA data and find the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient to be very high (0.955 +/- 0.034). We also find the degree of variability at 16GHz (0.202 +/- 0.028) to be very similar to that at 33GHz (0.224 +/- 0.039). Finally, we have investigated the relationship between variability and spectral index, α33.7513.9 (where S ~ ν-α), and find a significant difference in the spectral indices of the variable sources (-0.06 +/- 0.05) and non-variable sources (0.13 +/- 0.04). We kindly request that any reference to this paper cites `AMI Consortium: Franzen et al. 2009'. Issuing author - email: t.franzen@mrao.cam.ac.uk ‡ E-mail: m.davies@mrao.cam.ac.uk

  8. X-RAY AND RADIO FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT BLAZAR CANDIDATES IN THE FERMI-LAT UNASSOCIATED SOURCE POPULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Nakamori, T.; Maeda, K.; Niinuma, K.; Honma, M.; Inoue, Y.; Totani, T.; Inoue, S.

    2013-08-10

    We report on the results of X-ray and radio follow-up observations of two GeV gamma-ray sources 2FGL J0923.5+1508 and 2FGL J1502.1+5548, selected as candidates for high-redshift blazars from unassociated sources in the Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog. We utilize the Suzaku satellite and the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA) telescopes for X-ray and radio observations, respectively. For 2FGL J0923.5+1508, a possible radio counterpart NVSS J092357+150518 is found at 1.4 GHz from an existing catalog, but we do not detect any X-ray emission from it and derive a flux upper limit F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} < 1.37 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Radio observations at 6.7 GHz also result in an upper limit of S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} < 19 mJy, implying a steep radio spectrum that is not expected for a blazar. On the other hand, we detect X-rays from NVSS J150229+555204, the potential 1.4 GHz radio counterpart of 2FGL J1502.1+5548. The X-ray spectrum can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model with a photon index {gamma} = 1.8{sup +0.3}{sub -0.2} and the unabsorbed flux is F{sub 2-8{sub keV}} = 4.3{sup +1.1}{sub -1.0} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Moreover, we detect unresolved radio emission at 6.7 GHz with flux S{sub 6.7{sub GHz}} = 30.1 mJy, indicating a compact, flat-spectrum radio source. If NVSS J150229+555204 is indeed associated with 2FGL J1502.1+5548, then we find that its multiwavelength spectrum is consistent with a blazar at redshift z {approx} 3-4.

  9. Effects of arthroscopic-assisted surgery on irreducible developmental dislocation of hip by mid-term follow-up: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Fa; Yan, Ya-Bo; Xu, Chao; Li, Tian-Qing; Zhao, Tian-Feng; Liu, Ning; Huang, Lu-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Li; Lei, Wei

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications, surgical technique, and the clinical effects of arthroscopic-assisted treatment of irreducible developmental dislocation of the hip by mid-term follow-up. Arthroscopic-assisted surgeries were performed on 40 children (52 hips) between January 2005 and December 2009. Anterior and antero-superior greater trochanter portals were used in these treatments. Spica cast and abduction splint were applied for 3 months postoperatively. The follow-up was conducted on every 3 months postoperatively. During 12-month follow-up, a secondary treatment such as acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy (shortening, varus, and derotation) was applied if the acetabular angle was greater than 25°. The pelvic acetabular angle, Mckay and Severin score were evaluated every 6 months in all children. With 36 to 96 months (average 71 months) follow-up, 35 children (44 hips) were successfully followed up with complete case data while 5 children unsuccessfully. According to Tönnis classification, there were 5 grade 1 hips, 14 grade 2 hips, 14 grade 3 hips, 11 grade 4 hips, in which 3 children (4 hips) were failed in arthroscopic reduction and femoral head avascular necrosis occurred in 2 children (4 hips). According to Mckay standard, the good rate is 100%. According to Severin standard, the good rate is 84.1%. Arthroscopic assisted treatment is an effective way of reduction of the irreducible hip. Compared with the open reduction, arthroscopic treatment combined with acetabuloplasty and/or femoral osteotomy has advantages of less trauma and better function preservation. PMID:27537595

  10. Rapid GRB Afterglow Response With SARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, K. V.; Homewood, A. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Riddle, C.; Fuller, S.; Manning, A.; McIntyre, T.; Henson, G.

    2006-05-01

    The Clemson GRB Follow-Up program utilizes the SARA 0.9-m telescope to observe optical afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts. SARA is not yet robotic; it operates under direct and Target-of-Opportunity (ToO) interrupt modes. To facilitate rapid response and timely reporting of data analysis results, we developed a software suite that operates in two phases: first, to notify observers of a burst and assist in data collection, and second, to quickly analyze the images.

  11. Classification, Follow-up, and Analysis of GRBs and their Early-time NIR/Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Adam; Bloom, J. S.; Perley, D. A.; Christian, P.; Richards, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Klein, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    In the study of astronomical transients, achieving knowledge from discovery is a multifaceted process which includes real-time classification to identify new events of interest, deep, multi-wavelength follow-up of individual events, and the global analysis of multi-event catalogs. Here we present a body of work encompassing each of these steps as applied to the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). First, we present our work on utilizing machine-learning algorithms on early-time metrics from the Swift satellite to inform the resource allocation of follow-up telescopes in order to optimize time spent on high-redshift GRB candidates. Next, we show broadband observations and analysis of the early-time afterglow of GRB 120119A, which exhibits extreme red-to-blue color change in the first few minutes after the trigger. Model fits of this color change reveal among the best support yet for the direct detection of dust destruction in the local environment of a GRB. Finally, we present results from the PAIRITEL early-time near-infrared (NIR) afterglow catalog. The 1.3 meter PAIRITEL has autonomously observed 15 GRBs in under 4 minutes after the trigger, yielding a homogenous sample of early-time JHKs light curves. Our analysis of these events provides constraints on the NIR GRB luminosity function, direct measurements of early-time NIR color change, and constraints on burst energetics.

  12. Use of Implant-Derived Minimally Invasive Sinus Floor Elevation: A Multicenter Clinical Observational Study With 12- to 65-Month Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan; Barbu, Horia; Lorean, Adi; Shohat, Izhar; Danza, Matteo; Levin, Liran

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of implant-derived minimally invasive sinus floor elevation. A multicenter retrospective study was performed in 5 dental clinics. Patients requiring sinus augmentation for single implant placement were recorded and followed up. The dental implant used in this trial was a self-tapping endosseous dental implant that contains an internal channel to allow the introduction of liquids through the implant body into the maxillary sinus; those liquids include saline and a flowable bone grafting material. Overall, 37 implants were installed in 37 patients. The age range of the patients was 37-75 years (mean: 51.2 years). The average residual bone height prior to the procedure was 5.24 ± 1 mm. Of all cases, 25 implants replaced the maxillary first molar and 12 replaced the maxillary second premolar. All surgeries were uneventful with no apparent perforation of the sinus membrane. The mean follow-up time was 24.81 ± 13 months ranging from 12 to 65 months. All implants integrated and showed stable marginal bone level. No adverse events were recorded during the follow-up period. The presented method for transcrestal sinus floor elevation procedure can be accomplished using a specially designed dental implant. Further long-term studies are warranted to reaffirm the results of this study. PMID:26960006

  13. PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEXTBOOK GRB 110205A: CONSTRAINING PHYSICAL MECHANISMS OF PROMPT EMISSION AND AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Zhang, B.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Pozanenko, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E. E-mail: rfshen@astro.utoronto.ca; and others

    2012-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long-duration (T{sub 90} {approx} 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb, and BOOTES telescopes when the gamma-ray burst (GRB) was still radiating in the {gamma}-ray band, with optical light curve showing correlation with {gamma}-ray data. Nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray, to {gamma}-ray (1 eV to 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution during the prompt emission phase. In particular, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Shortly after prompt emission ({approx}1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ({alpha} {approx} 5.5) was observed, which we interpret as the reverse shock (RS) emission. It is the first time that the rising phase of an RS component has been closely observed. The full optical and X-ray afterglow light curves can be interpreted within the standard reverse shock (RS) + forward shock (FS) model. In general, the high-quality prompt and afterglow data allow us to apply the standard fireball model to extract valuable information, including the radiation mechanism (synchrotron), radius of prompt emission (R{sub GRB} {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm), initial Lorentz factor of the outflow ({Gamma}{sub 0} {approx} 250), the composition of the ejecta (mildly magnetized), the collimation angle, and the total energy budget.

  14. Panchromatic Observations of the Textbook GRB 110205A: Constraining Physical Mechanisms of Prompt Emission and Afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Shen, R. F.; Sakamoto, T.; Beardmore, A. P.; De Pasquale, M.; Wu, X. F.; Gorosabel, J.; Urata, Y.; Sugita, S.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Nissinen, M.; Sahu, D. K.; Im, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Andreev, M.; Klunko, E.; Volnova, A.; Akerlof, C. W.; Anto, P.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Breeveld, A.; Carsenty, U.; Gehrels, N.; Sonbas, E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of a bright, long duration (T(sub 90) approx. 257 s) GRB 110205A at redshift z = 2.22. The optical prompt emission was detected by Swift/UVOT, ROTSE-IIIb and BOOTES telescopes when the GRB was still radiating in the gamma-ray band. Thanks to its long duration, nearly 200 s of observations were obtained simultaneously from optical, X-ray to gamma-ray (1 eV - 5 MeV), which makes it one of the exceptional cases to study the broadband spectral energy distribution across 6 orders of magnitude in energy during the prompt emission phase. In particular, by fitting the time resolved prompt spectra, we clearly identify, for the first time, an interesting two-break energy spectrum, roughly consistent with the standard GRB synchrotron emission model in the fast cooling regime. Although the prompt optical emission is brighter than the extrapolation of the best fit X/ -ray spectra, it traces the -ray light curve shape, suggesting a relation to the prompt high energy emission. The synchrotron + synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario is disfavored by the data, but the models invoking a pair of internal shocks or having two emission regions can interpret the data well. Shortly after prompt emission (approx. 1100 s), a bright (R = 14.0) optical emission hump with very steep rise ( alpha approx. 5.5) was observed which we interpret as the emission from the reverse shock. It is the first time that the rising phase of a reverse shock component has been closely observed.

  15. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Design Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Setting Single center study in Costa Rica. Participants 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Intervention Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Main outcome measure Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Results Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at

  16. Sw J1644+57 (GRB 110328A): Continued VLBA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, G.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Metzg, B. D.

    2011-07-01

    We have obtained a second epoch of long-baseline interferometry with the VLBA of the unusual high-energy transient Sw J1644+57 (GRB 110328A; Levan et al, Science, 333, 199, 2011; Bloom et al, Science, 333, 203, 2011; Burrows et al., astro-ph/1104.4787; Zauderer et al., astro-ph/1106.3568). Observations were obtained on 2011 July 17 at 8.4 and 22 GHz with recording bandwidth of 512 Mbps. Preliminary analysis of images at both frequencies reveals a compact (i.e., unresolved) source with flux densities of 15 and 12 mJy, respectively.

  17. MASTERS-D Study: A Prospective, Multicenter, Pragmatic, Observational, Data-Monitored Trial of Minimally Invasive Fusion to Treat Degenerative Lumbar Disorders, One-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil; Buzek, David; Kosmala, Arkadiusz; Hubbe, Ulrich; Rosenberg, Wout; Pereira, Paulo; Assietti, Roberto; Martens, Frederic; Lam, Khai; Barbanti Brodano, Giovanni; Durny, Peter; Lidar, Zvi; Scheufler, Kai; Senker, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess effectiveness and safety of minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion (MILIF) for degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) in daily surgical practice and follow up with patients for one year after surgery. A prospective, multicenter, pragmatic, monitored, international outcome study in patients with DLD causing back/leg pain was conducted (19 centers). Two hundred fifty-two patients received standard of care available in the centers. Patients were included if they were aged >18 years, required one- or two-level lumbar fusion for DLD, and met the criteria for approved device indications. Primary endpoints: time to first ambulation (TFA) and time to surgery recovery (TSR). Secondary endpoints: patient-reported outcomes (PROs)--back and leg pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index (ODI)), health status (EQ-5D), fusion rates, reoperation rates, change in pain medication, rehabilitation, return to work, patient satisfaction, and adverse events (AEs). Experienced surgeons (≥30 surgeries pre-study) treated patients with DLD by one- or two-level MILIF and patients were evaluated for one year (NCT01143324). At one year, 92% (233/252) of patients remained in the study. Primary outcomes: TFA, 1.3 ±0.5 days and TSR, 3.2 ±2.0 days. Secondary outcomes: Most patients (83.3%) received one level MILIF; one (two-level) MILIF mean surgery duration, 128 (182) min; fluoroscopy time, 115 (154) sec; blood loss, 164 (233) mL; at one year statistically significant (P<.0001) and clinically meaningful changes from baseline were reported in all PROs--reduced back pain (2.9 ±2.5 vs. 6.2 ±2.3 at intake), reduced leg pain (2.2 ±2.6 vs. 5.9 ±2.8), and ODI (22.4% ± 18.6 vs. 45.3% ± 15.3), as well as health-related quality of life (EQ-5D index: 0.71 ±0.28 vs. 0.34 ±0.32). More of the professional workers were working at one year than those prior to surgery (70.3% vs. 55.2%). Three AEs and one serious AE were considered

  18. Stirring the Embers: High-Sensitivity VLBI Observations of GRB 030329

    SciTech Connect

    Pihlstrom, Y.M.; Taylor, G.B.; Granot, J.; Doeleman, S.; /MIT, Haystack Observ.

    2007-09-24

    We present high-sensitivity Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations 806 days after the {gamma}-ray burst of 2003 March 29 (GRB 030329). The angular diameter of the radio afterglow is measured to be 0:347 {+-} 0:09 mas, corresponding to 0:99 {+-} 0:26 pc at the redshift of GRB 030329 (z = 0:1685). The evolution of the image size favors a uniform external density over an R{sup -2} windlike density profile (at distances of R {approx}> 10{sup 18} cm from the source), although the latter cannot be ruled out yet. The current apparent expansion velocity of the image size is only mildly relativistic, suggesting a nonrelativistic transition time of tNR {approx} 1 yr. A rebrightening, or at least a significant flattening in the flux decay, is expected within the next several years as the counterjet becomes visible (this has not yet been observed). An upper limit of <1.9c is set on the proper motion of the flux centroid.

  19. GRB 050717: A Long, Short-Lag Burst Observed by Swift and Konus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Hurkett, C.; Pal'shin, V.; Norris, J. P.; Zhang, B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Gehrels, N.; Golenetskii, S.; Osborne, J. P.; Parsons, A. M.; Perri, M.; Willingale, R.

    2005-01-01

    The long burst GRB 050717 was observed simultaneously by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift and the Konus instrument on Wind. Significant hard to soft spectral evolution was seen. Early gamma-ray and X-ray emission was detected by both BAT and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on Swift. The XRT continued to observe the burst for 7.1 days and detect it for 1.4 days. The X-ray light curve showed a classic decay pattern including evidence of the onset of the external shock emission at approx. 50 s after the trigger; the afterglow was too faint for a jet break to be detected. No optical, infrared or ultraviolet counterpart was discovered despite deep searches within 14 hours of the burst. The spectral lag for GRB 050717 was determined to be 2.5 +/- 2.6 ms, consistent, with zero and unusually short for a long burst. This lag measurement suggests that this burst has a high intrinsic luminosity and hence is at high redshift (z > 2.7). 050717 provides a good example of classic prompt and afterglow behavior for a gamma-ray burst.

  20. Broadband observations of the naked-eye gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B.

    PubMed

    Racusin, J L; Karpov, S V; Sokolowski, M; Granot, J; Wu, X F; Pal'shin, V; Covino, S; van der Horst, A J; Oates, S R; Schady, P; Smith, R J; Cummings, J; Starling, R L C; Piotrowski, L W; Zhang, B; Evans, P A; Holland, S T; Malek, K; Page, M T; Vetere, L; Margutti, R; Guidorzi, C; Kamble, A P; Curran, P A; Beardmore, A; Kouveliotou, C; Mankiewicz, L; Melandri, A; O'Brien, P T; Page, K L; Piran, T; Tanvir, N R; Wrochna, G; Aptekar, R L; Barthelmy, S; Bartolini, C; Beskin, G M; Bondar, S; Bremer, M; Campana, S; Castro-Tirado, A; Cucchiara, A; Cwiok, M; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Valle, M Della; de Ugarte Postigo, A; Dominik, W; Falcone, A; Fiore, F; Fox, D B; Frederiks, D D; Fruchter, A S; Fugazza, D; Garrett, M A; Gehrels, N; Golenetskii, S; Gomboc, A; Gorosabel, J; Greco, G; Guarnieri, A; Immler, S; Jelinek, M; Kasprowicz, G; La Parola, V; Levan, A J; Mangano, V; Mazets, E P; Molinari, E; Moretti, A; Nawrocki, K; Oleynik, P P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Pandey, S B; Paragi, Z; Perri, M; Piccioni, A; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Roming, P W A; Steele, I A; Strom, R G; Testa, V; Tosti, G; Ulanov, M V; Wiersema, K; Wijers, R A M J; Winters, J M; Zarnecki, A F; Zerbi, F; Mészáros, P; Chincarini, G; Burrows, D N

    2008-09-11

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) release copious amounts of energy across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and so provide a window into the process of black hole formation from the collapse of massive stars. Previous early optical observations of even the most exceptional GRBs (990123 and 030329) lacked both the temporal resolution to probe the optical flash in detail and the accuracy needed to trace the transition from the prompt emission within the outflow to external shocks caused by interaction with the progenitor environment. Here we report observations of the extraordinarily bright prompt optical and gamma-ray emission of GRB 080319B that provide diagnostics within seconds of its formation, followed by broadband observations of the afterglow decay that continued for weeks. We show that the prompt emission stems from a single physical region, implying an extremely relativistic outflow that propagates within the narrow inner core of a two-component jet. PMID:18784718

  1. Theoretical Implications of Optical and X-ray Observations of Swift GRB Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Panaitescu, A.

    2007-08-21

    The Swift satellite has measured the X-ray emission of GRB afterglows starting from the burst epoch, filling thus a gap of about 2 decades in the temporal coverage of X-ray afterglows previously achieved. At the same time, the accurate localizations provided by Swift and their rapid dissemination has allowed ground-based telescopes to monitor the optical afterglow emission at comparably early epochs. Such optical and X-ray observations allows us to test more thoroughly the basic predictions of the relativistic blast-wave. Perhaps it is not an understatement to say that there were more surprises than anyone expected. A majority of Swift X-ray afterglows exhibit a slow-decay phase from 500 s to about 1 h after trigger, which indicates a long-lived process of energy injection into the blast-wave. At around 1 h, the X-ray decay steepens, indicating the end of significant energy addition to the forward shock. This steeper decay is consistent with the blast-wave model expectations but the 1 h break is, generally, not accompanied by a steepening of the optical light-curve, which indicates that forward-shock microphysical parameters are not constant, as was previously assumed and allowed by afterglow observations. A subsequent steepening of the X-ray light-curve decay, at about 1 d, was observed by Swift for only a few afterglows. This second break appears consistent with originating from the blast-wave collimation (a jet), but a better optical coverage is required to test that it is, indeed, a jet-break. Although the jet model has been the subject of many tens of papers, pre-Swift optical and X-ray observations of GRB afterglows have provided little proof that the 1 d optical breaks observed in a dozen afterglows are consistent with the expectations for a collimated outflow.

  2. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  3. Soft X-ray observation of the prompt emission of GRB 100418A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imatani, Ritsuko; Tomida, Hiroshi; Nakahira, Satoshi; Kimura, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takanori; Arimoto, Makoto; Morooka, Yoshitaka; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    We have observed the prompt emission of GRB 100418A from its beginning captured by the MAXI SSC (0.7-7 keV) on board the International Space Station followed by the Swift XRT (0.3-10 keV) observation. The light curve can be fitted by a combination of a power-law component and an exponential component (the decay constant is 31.6 ± 1.6 s). The X-ray spectrum is well expressed by the Band function with Ep ≤ 8.3 keV. This is the brightest gamma-ray burst showing a very low value of Ep. It satisfies the Yonetoku relation (Ep-Lp). It is also consistent with the Amati relation (Ep-Eiso) within a 2.5σ level.

  4. Upper Limb Evaluation and One-Year Follow Up of Non-Ambulant Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy: An Observational Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Aurélie; Decostre, Valérie; Diebate, Oumar; Le Moing, Anne Gaëlle; Gidaro, Teresa; Deconinck, Nicolas; Van Parys, Frauke; Vereecke, Wendy; Wittevrongel, Sylvia; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Mayer, Michèle; Maincent, Kim; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Tiffreau, Vincent; Denis, Severine; Jousten, Virginie; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Voit, Thomas; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the upper limb strength in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients remains challenging. Although potential outcome measures have been reported, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution in spinal muscular atrophy patients are critically lacking. Our study recruited 23 non-ambulant patients, 16 patients (males/females = 6/10; median age 15.4 years with a range from 10.7 to 31.1 years) with spinal muscular atrophy type II and 7 patients (males/females = 2/5; median age 19.9 years with a range from 8.3 to 29.9 years) with type III. The Brooke functional score was on median 3 with a range from 2 to 6. The average total vital capacity was 46%, and seven patients required non-invasive ventilation at night. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate, which assess handgrip strength, key pinch strength, and hand/finger extension-flexion function, respectively. The study demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of these measures for all patients, and sensitivity to negative changes after the age of 14 years. The younger patients showed an increase of the distal force in the follow-up period. The distal force measurements and function were correlated to different functional scales. These data represent an important step in the process of validating these devices as potential outcome measures for future clinical trials. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00993161 PMID:25861036

  5. Multi-wavelength Observations of GRB 111228A and Implications for the Fireball and its Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Li-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Lin, Ting-Ting; Liang, En-Wei; Lü, Hou-Jun; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Urata, Yuji; Zhao, Xiao-Hong; Wu, Chao; Wei, Jian-Yan; Huang, Kui-Yun; Qiu, Yu-Lei; Deng, Jin-Song

    2016-02-01

    Observations of very early multi-wavelength afterglows are critical to reveal the properties of the radiating fireball and its environment as well as the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report our optical observations of GRB 111228A from 95 s to about 50 hr after the burst trigger and investigate its properties of the prompt gamma-rays and the ambient medium using our data and the data from the Swift and Fermi missions. Our joint optical and X-ray spectral fits to the afterglow data show that the ambient medium features a low dust-to-gas ratio. Incorporating the energy injection effect, our best fit to the afterglow light curves with the standard afterglow model via the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique shows that {ɛ }e=(6.9+/- 0.3)× {10}-2, {ɛ }B=(7.73+/- 0.62)× {10}-6,{E}K=(6.32+/- 0.86)× {10}53 {erg}, n=0.100+/- 0.014 cm-3. The low medium density likely implies that the afterglow jet may be in a halo or in a hot ISM. A chromatic shallow decay segment observed in the optical and X-ray bands is well explained with the long-lasting energy injection from the central engine, which would be a magnetar with a period of about 1.92 ms inferred from the data. The Ep of its time-integrated prompt gamma-ray spectrum is ˜26 KeV. Using the initial Lorentz factor ({{{Γ }}}0={476}-237+225) derived from our afterglow model fit, it is found that GRB 111228A satisfies the {L}{{iso}}-{E}p,z-{{{Γ }}}0 relation and bridges the typical GRBs and low luminosity GRBs in this relation.

  6. Multi-wavelength follow-up of ANTARES neutrino alerts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2015-10-01

    Transient sources are often associated with the most violent phenomena in the Universe, where the acceleration of hadrons may occur. Such sources include gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGN) or core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), and are promising candidates for the production of high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos. The ANTARES telescope, located in the Mediterranean sea, aims at detecting these high energy neutrinos, which could reveal the presence of a cosmic ray accelerator. However, to enhance the sensitivity to transient sources, a method based on multi-wavelength follow-up of neutrino alerts has been developed within the ANTARES collaboration. This program, denoted as TAToO, triggers a network of robotic optical telescopes and the Swift-XRT with a delay of only a few seconds after a neutrino detection. The telescopes start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect a possible electromagnetic counterpart to the neutrino event. The work presented in this thesis covers the development and implementation of an optical image analysis pipeline, as well as the analysis of optical and X-ray data to search for fast transient sources, such as GRB afterglows, and slowly varying transient sources, such as CCSNe.

  7. Hyper Cold Systems follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, Jean Claude; Beltrando, Gerard; Cacault, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The follow up of intense precipitation system is a key information for climate studies. Whereas some rainfall measurement series cover more than one century they cannot retrieve these phenomena in their spatial and temporal continuity. The geostationary satellite data offer a good trade-off between the length of data series and the retrieval accuracy. However a difficulty arise from ambiguous interpretation of the lone infrared signal in nephanalysis. Hence the tropopause temperature is used as a proxy to characterize extreme precipitation event. That does not mean that the more intense rain-rate will be always collocated with the coldest temperature but that most of these intense events is produced by systems whose a part is colder than tropopause. Computations have been carried out on 38 months of MSG and Meteosat/IODC. System follow up is achieved by a simple 3D connexity algorithm, the time being considered as the third dimension. This algorithm produce three dimension clusters from where the main system parameters can be easily extracted. Thus the systems can be classified trajectory characteristic (duration, speed ans size variation). A drawback of this simple threshold method relies is some over-segmentation. In most of case the bias is minor as unconnected clusters are small and short-lived. However an aggregating algorithm have been developed to retrieve the most complex system trajectories. To assess the efficiency of this method three regional studies are displayed: the North African Maghreb, the West African Sahel and the Indian Ocean. On Maghreb, the location of system initialization shows a dramatic difference between the eastern and western parts. Whereas in Tunisia a significant part of these systems are generated on sea and most have no clear relation with relief, the Morocco is mainly characterized with land initiated system with a strong orographic effect on system triggering. Another difference relies on the low level wind shear impact which

  8. Follow-up Observations of PTFO 8-8695: A 3 Myr Old T-Tauri Star Hosting a Jupiter-mass Planetary Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardi, David R.; van Eyken, Julian C.; Barnes, Jason W.; Beichman, Charles A.; Carey, Sean J.; Crockett, Christopher J.; Eastman, Jason; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Howell, Steve B.; Kane, Stephen R.; . Mclane, Jacob N.; Plavchan, Peter; Prato, L.; Stauffer, John; van Belle, Gerard T.; von Braun, Kaspar

    2015-08-01

    We present Spitzer 4.5 μm light curve observations, Keck NIRSPEC radial velocity observations, and LCOGT optical light curve observations of PTFO 8-8695, which may host a Jupiter-sized planet in a very short orbital period (0.45 days). Previous work by van Eyken et al. and Barnes et al. predicts that the stellar rotation axis and the planetary orbital plane should precess with a period of 300-600 days. As a consequence, the observed transits should change shape and depth, disappear, and reappear with the precession. Our observations indicate the long-term presence of the transit events (\\gt 3 years), and that the transits indeed do change depth, disappear and reappear. The Spitzer observations and the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations (with contemporaneous LCOGT optical light curve data) are consistent with the predicted transit times and depths for the {M}\\star =0.34 {M}⊙ precession model and demonstrate the disappearance of the transits. An LCOGT optical light curve shows that the transits do reappear approximately 1 year later. The observed transits occur at the times predicted by a straight-forward propagation of the transit ephemeris. The precession model correctly predicts the depth and time of the Spitzer transit and the lack of a transit at the time of the NIRSPEC radial velocity observations. However, the precession model predicts the return of the transits approximately 1 month later than observed by LCOGT. Overall, the data are suggestive that the planetary interpretation of the observed transit events may indeed be correct, but the precession model and data are currently insufficient to confirm firmly the planetary status of PTFO 8-8695b.

  9. Infrared and Optical Observations of GRB 030115 and its Extremely Red Host Galaxy: Implications for Dark Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Rhoads, James; Mobasher, Bahram; Tanvir, Nial; Gorosabel, Javier; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; DellAntonio, Ian; Merrill, Javier

    2004-01-01

    We present near-infrared (a) and optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 030115. Discovered in an infrared search at Kitt Peak 5 hours after the burst trigger, this afterglow is the faintest ever observed in the R-band at such an early epoch, and exhibits very red colors, with R-K approximately equal to 6. The magnitude of the optical afterglow of GRB 030115 is fainter than many upper limits for other bursts, suggesting that without early nIR observations it would have been classified as a "dark" burst. Both the color and optical magnitude of the afterglow are likely due to dust extinction and indicate that at least some optical afterglows are observations were also taken of the host galaxy and the surrounding field. Photometric redshifts imply that the host, and a substantial number of faint galaxies in the field are at z approximately 2.5. The overdensity of galaxies is sufficiently great that GRB 030115 may have occurred in a rich high-redshift cluster. The host galaxy shows extremely red colors (R-K=5) and is the first GRB host to be classified as an Extreme Red Object (ERO). Some of the galaxies surrounding the host also show very red colors, while the majority of the cluster are much bluer, indicating ongoing unobscured star formation. As it is thought that much of high redshift star formation occurs in highly obscured environments it may well be that GRB 030115 represents a transition object, between the relatively unobscured afterglows seen to date and a population which are very heavily extinguished, even in the nIR.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova, and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-09-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E iso > 1054 erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ~17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v ph ~ 15, 000 km s-1). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v ph ~ 30, 000 km s-1), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ~4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M ⊙ yr-1), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  11. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Cenko, S. B.; Kouveliotou, C.; Misra, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  12. Observed Communication in Couples Two Years after Integrative and Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy: Outcome and Link with Five-Year Follow-up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baucom, Katherine J. W.; Sevier, Mia; Eldridge, Kathleen A.; Doss, Brian D.; Christensen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine changes in observed communication after therapy termination in distressed couples from a randomized clinical trial. Method: A total of 134 distressed couples were randomly assigned to either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative behavioral couple therapy (IBCT; Jacobson &…

  13. Constraining properties of GRB magnetar central engines using the observed plateau luminosity and duration correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlinson, A.; Gompertz, B. P.; Dainotti, M.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2014-09-01

    An intrinsic correlation has been identified between the luminosity and duration of plateaus in the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; Dainotti et al. 2008), suggesting a central engine origin. The magnetar central engine model predicts an observable plateau phase, with plateau durations and luminosities being determined by the magnetic fields and spin periods of the newly formed magnetar. This paper analytically shows that the magnetar central engine model can explain, within the 1σ uncertainties, the correlation between plateau luminosity and duration. The observed scatter in the correlation most likely originates in the spread of initial spin periods of the newly formed magnetar and provides an estimate of the maximum spin period of ˜35 ms (assuming a constant mass, efficiency and beaming across the GRB sample). Additionally, by combining the observed data and simulations, we show that the magnetar emission is most likely narrowly beamed and has ≲20 per cent efficiency in conversion of rotational energy from the magnetar into the observed plateau luminosity. The beaming angles and efficiencies obtained by this method are fully consistent with both predicted and observed values. We find that short GRBs and short GRBs with extended emission lie on the same correlation but are statistically inconsistent with being drawn from the same distribution as long GRBs, this is consistent with them having a wider beaming angle than long GRBs.

  14. CONSTRAINTS ON VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Aune, T.; Barnacka, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M.; Berger, K.; Biteau, J.; Byrum, K.; Cardenzana, J. V; Dickinson, H. J.; Eisch, J. D.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connaughton, V.; Cui, W.; Falcone, A. E-mail: sjzhu@umd.edu; and others

    2014-11-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z = 0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for ∼70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ∼71 ks (∼20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redshift of the GRB, make VERITAS a very sensitive probe of the emission from GRB 130427A for E > 100 GeV. The non-detection and consequent upper limit derived place constraints on the synchrotron self-Compton model of high-energy gamma-ray emission from this burst.

  15. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Follow-up Observations of Transiting Extra-solar Planet HAT-P-36b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Robert; Turner, J.; Jones, C.; Pearson, K.; Biddle, L. I.; Berube, M.

    2013-06-01

    We observed 5 primary transits of exoplanet HAT-P-36b with the Steward Observatory 1.55 meter Kuiper Telescope in the U and R photometric bands. With our results, we have been able to produce a more complete light curve and refine previously published values for the planet’s mass, radius, density, surface gravity, Safronov number, equilibrium temperature, orbital distance, orbital inclination. We developed a modeling package that uses the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm to find the least-squares best fit to the light curve. The errors were generated using a bootstrap Monte Carlo method. The red noise of the transit was determined by using the permutation “rosary bead” method, which constrains the red noise in our transits better than the publicly available modeling package, TAP.

  16. Observations related to the Salmonella EU layer baseline survey in the United Kingdom: follow-up of positive flocks and sensitivity issues

    PubMed Central

    CARRIQUE-MAS, J. J.; BRESLIN, M.; SNOW, L.; ARNOLD, M. E.; WALES, A.; McLAREN, I.; DAVIES, R. H.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A follow-on study was carried out on 23 holdings identified as Salmonella positive in the 2004/2005 European Union (EU) baseline survey of Salmonella in laying hens. Eleven of 13 cage and 4/7 floor houses remained positive for Salmonella when the new flock was tested, and from 10/13 cage and 3/7 floor houses a Salmonella of the same serovar/phage type as found in the EU survey was isolated. There was a high correlation between the level of contamination in the houses at the time of the EU survey and in the follow-on flock. On seven occasions the house identified as positive in the EU survey was sampled after cleaning and disinfection but before a new flock was placed, and in all of them Salmonella could be isolated from the houses. The observed number of infected houses in infected holdings suggests that the holding-level prevalence in the United Kingdom would be about 21% higher than the results obtained in the EU survey. PMID:18177519

  17. [A follow-up study on pulmonary functions of workers exposed to various forms of dust. Observation on the workers of pneumoconiosis in Kitakyushu].

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Iwao, S; Kodama, Y

    1983-09-01

    Serial spirograms of 121 dust workers whose chest X-rays were found to be "class 1" of the diagnostic criteria for pneumoconiosis were obtained during 1978-80. Yearly changes of pulmonary function variables (%VC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC%,V25/H, and V50/V25) by age, smoking habit, total years of exposure to dust, and work history were evaluated. The average age of the dust workers was 48.0 +/- 5.5 years, and the average years of exposure to dust was 21.6 +/- 6.8 years in 1978. Eighty-two dust workers smoked with the mean smoking history of 24.7 pack-years. No significant differences of spirograms were found between the smoking and non-smoking groups. Among the smokers, however, linear regression of FEV1/FVC% by age gradually decreased during 1978-80. All the pulmonary function variables showed no correlation with smoking history as well as total years of dust exposure. All the dust workers were classified into eight types of work by their histories; crushing and quarrying operators, brick mason, foundry and grinding operators, asbestos workers, underground miners, refractory material workers, pyrites roasters, and welders. The underground miners showed lower FEV1/FVC% and V25 than the average. However, the difference of such pulmonary function variables by eight types of work was not significant by analysis of variance. Since aging is the most dominant factor for pulmonary dysfunction, a longer observation on this group will be needed. PMID:6679643

  18. Upper Limb Strength and Function Changes during a One-Year Follow-Up in Non-Ambulant Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Observational Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Seferian, Andreea Mihaela; Moraux, Amélie; Annoussamy, Mélanie; Canal, Aurélie; Decostre, Valérie; Diebate, Oumar; Le Moing, Anne-Gaëlle; Gidaro, Teresa; Deconinck, Nicolas; Van Parys, Frauke; Vereecke, Wendy; Wittevrongel, Sylvia; Mayer, Michèle; Maincent, Kim; Desguerre, Isabelle; Thémar-Noël, Christine; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Tiffreau, Vincent; Denis, Severine; Jousten, Virginie; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Voit, Thomas; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Upper limb evaluation of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is crucially important to evaluations of efficacy of new treatments in non-ambulant patients. In patients who have lost ambulation, there are few validated and informative outcome measures. In addition, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution of outcome measures over short-term periods are lacking. Patients and Methods We report here the results of a one-year multicenter study using specifically designed tools to assess grip, pinch strength, and hand function in wheelchair-bound patients. Our study assessed 53 non-ambulant patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 17.1 ± 4.8 years (range: 9 – 28.1 years). The average Brooke functional score of these patients was 4.6 ± 1.1. The average forced vital capacity was 44.5% predicted and 19 patients used non-invasive ventilation. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and one year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices (namely the MyoSet composed of MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate). Results Our study confirmed preliminary data previously reported regarding feasibility of use and of reliability of the MyoSet and the correlation at baseline between distal strength and clinical outcomes such as FVC, Brooke score, age, and duration since loss of ambulation. A significant correlation was observed between the distal upper limb strength and clinical variables. The sensitive dynamometers (MyoGrip and MyoPinch) and MoviPlate captured a 12-month change in non-ambulant Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients of all ages. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00993161 NCT00993161 PMID:25643053

  19. The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) Survey. VI. Radio Observations at z <~ 1 and Consistency with Typical Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Kamble, A.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Ibar, E.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaplan, D. L.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of ~825 M ⊙ yr-1, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least ~63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M ⊙ yr-1 and at most ~8% can have SFR > 500 M ⊙ yr-1. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 μJy 3σ) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M ⊙ yr-1. Moreover, >~ 88% of the z <~ 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A UV < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation AV < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A UV of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, Hα emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z <~ 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Large Programme 177.A-0591), the Australian Telescope Compact Array, the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array, and the Westerbork

  20. GRB 011121: A Collimated Outflow into Wind-Blown Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, J.; Klose, S.; Salvato, M.; Zeh, A.; Schwarz, R.; Hartmann, D. H.; Masetti, N.; Stecklum, B.; Lamer, G.; Lodieu, N.; Burud, I.; Rhoads, J.; Fruchter, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report optical and near-infrared follow-up observations of GRB 011121 collected predominantly at ESO telescopes in Chile. We discover a break in the afterglow light curve after 1.3 days, which implies an initial jet opening angle of about 9 deg. The jet origin of this break is supported by the fact that the spectral energy distribution is achromatic during the first four days. During later phases, GRB 011121 shows significant excess emission above the flux predicted by a power law, which we interpret as additional light from an underlying supernova. In particular, the spectral energy distribution of the optical transient approximately 2 weeks after the burst is clearly not of power-law type, but can be presented by a black body with a temperature of approx. 6000 K. The deduced parameters for the decay slope as well as the spectral index favor a wind scenario, i.e. an outflow into a circum-burst environment shaped by the stellar wind of a massive GRB progenitor. Due to its low redshift of z=0.36, GRB 011121 has been the best example for the GRB-supernova connection until GRB 030329, and provides compelling evidence for a circum-burster wind region expected to exist if the progenitor was a massive star.

  1. The Optical Counterpart to Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 970228 Observed Using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahu, K. C.; Livio, M.; Petro, L.; Macchetto, F. D.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Groot, P. J.; Galama, T.

    1997-01-01

    Although more than 2,000 astronomical gamma-ray bursts (GRBS) have been detected, and numerous models proposed to explain their occurrence, they have remained enigmatic owing to the lack of an obvious counterpart at other wavelengths. The recent ground-based detection of a transient optical source in the vicinity of GRB970228 may therefore have provided a breakthrough. The optical counterpart appears to be embedded in an extended source which, if a galaxy, as has been suggested would lend weight to those models that place GRBs at cosmological distances. Here we report, observations using the Hubble Space Telescope of the transient counterpart and extended source 26 and 39 days after the initial gamma-ray outburst. We find that the counterpart has faded since the initial detection (and continues to fade), but the extended source exhibits no significant change in brightness between the two dates of the observations reported here. The size and apparent constancy of the extended source imply that it is extragalactic, but its faintness makes a definitive statement about its nature difficult. Nevertheless, the decay profile of the transient source is consistent with a popular impulsive-fireball model13, which assumes a merger between two neutron stars in a distant galaxy.

  2. Does the number of tissue fragments removed from the cervix with excisional treatment for CIN pathology affect the completeness of excision and cytology recurrence at follow-up? An observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Papoutsis, D; Panikkar, J; Gornall, A; Blundell, S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether removing multiple pieces of cervical tissue during large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) reduced the margin positivity of excision and cytology recurrence rates at follow-up. We conducted an observational cohort study and identified 462 women having had a single LLETZ treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) over a two-year period. Women with previous cervical treatment, cervical cancer on the excised tissue or missing follow-up data were excluded. Multiple regression analysis showed that removal of cervical tissue in multiple pieces did not offer any benefit in removing more disease and less recurrence rates. When multiple pieces were taken there was a four-fold increased risk for inconclusive excision margins as reported by the histopathologist. Removal of multiple pieces led to significantly more tissue being removed which may expose the patient to an increased risk of preterm delivery in a future pregnancy. PMID:26457444

  3. The Swift GRB Host Galaxy Legacy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perley, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    I will describe the Swift Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a comprehensive multiwavelength program to characterize the demographics of the GRB host population and its redshift evolution from z=0 to z=7. Using unbiased selection criteria we have designated a subset of 119 Swift gamma-ray bursts which are now being targeted with intensive observational follow-up. Deep Spitzer imaging of every field has already been obtained and analyzed, with major programs ongoing at Keck, GTC, Gemini, VLT, and Magellan to obtain complementary optical/NIR photometry and spectroscopy to enable full SED modeling and derivation of fundamental physical parameters such as mass, extinction, and star-formation rate. Using these data I will present an unbiased measurement of the GRB host-galaxy luminosity and mass distributions and their evolution with redshift, compare GRB hosts to other star-forming galaxy populations, and discuss implications for the nature of the GRB progenitor and the ability of GRBs to serve as tools for measuring and studying cosmic star-formation in the distant universe.

  4. X-Ray Spectral Components Observed in the Afterglow of GRB 130925A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellm, Eric C.; Barriere, Nicolas M.; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steven E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Horesh, Assaf; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Madsen, Kristin K.; Miller, Jon M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Perley, Daniel A.; Rana, Vikram R.; Miller, Jon M.; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    We have identified spectral features in the late-time X-ray afterglow of the unusually long, slow-decaying GRB 130925A using NuSTAR, Swift/X-Ray Telescope, and Chandra. A spectral component in addition to an absorbed power law is required at greater than 4 less than 1 significance, and its spectral shape varies between two observation epochs at 2 x 10 (sup 5) and 10 (sup 6) seconds after the burst. Several models can fit this additional component, each with very different physical implications. A broad, resolved Gaussian absorption feature of several kiloelectronvolts width improves the fit, but it is poorly constrained in the second epoch. An additive blackbody or second power-law component provide better fits. Both are challenging to interpret: the blackbody radius is near the scale of a compact remnant (10 (sup 8) centimeters), while the second power-law component requires an unobserved high-energy cutoff in order to be consistent with the non-detection by Fermi/Large Area Telescope.

  5. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim A.; Greenstreet, S.; Gomez, E.; Christensen, E.; Larson, S.

    2016-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network size of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and additionally for the discovery of new objects. We are using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1&2) and several hundred targets are now being followed per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO follow-up portal which will allow professionals, amateurs and Citizen Scientists to plan, schedule and analyze NEO imaging and spectroscopy observations and data using the LCOGT Network and to act as a co-ordination hub for the NEO follow-up efforts.

  6. Fermi/GBM observations of the ultra-long GRB 091024. A burst with an optical flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, D.; Krühler, T.; Foley, S.; Nardini, M.; Burlon, D.; Rau, A.; Bissaldi, E.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; Greiner, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M.; Chaplin, V. L.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lin, L.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Tierney, D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: In this paper we examine gamma-ray and optical data of GRB 091024, a gamma-ray burst (GRB) with an extremely long duration of T90 ≈ 1020 s, as observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Methods: We present spectral analysis of all three distinct emission episodes using data from Fermi/GBM. Because of the long nature of this event, many ground-based optical telescopes slewed to its location within a few minutes and thus were able to observe the GRB during its active period. We compare the optical and gamma-ray light curves. Furthermore, we estimate a lower limit on the bulk Lorentz factor from the variability and spectrum of the GBM light curve and compare it with that obtained from the peak time of the forward shock of the optical afterglow. Results: From the spectral analysis we note that, despite its unusually long duration, this burst is similar to other long GRBs, i.e. there is spectral evolution (both the peak energy and the spectral index vary with time) and spectral lags are measured. We find that the optical light curve is highly anti-correlated to the prompt gamma-ray emission, with the optical emission reaching the maximum during an epoch of quiescence in the prompt emission. We interpret this behavior as the reverse shock (optical flash), expected in the internal-external shock model of GRB emission but observed only in a handful of GRBs so far. The lower limit on the initial Lorentz factor deduced from the variability time scale (Γmin = 195_{-110+90}) is consistent within the error to the one obtained using the peak time of the forward shock (Γ0 = 120) and is also consistent with Lorentz factors of other long GRBs.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  8. Timing Analysis of Unusual GRB 090709A Observed by Suzaku Wide-band All sky Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakiri, W.; Terada, Y.; Tashiro, M. S.; Ohno, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Yoshida, A.; Yamaoka, K.; Makishima, K.

    2010-10-15

    A result of a joint timing analysis is presented for prompt emission of long-duration (T90 = 81 s) GRB 090709A with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT), Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (Suzaku/WAM) and Konus-Wind over an energy range from 15 keV to 5 MeV. It was reported that multi-peaked GRB 090709A exhibited a possible periodic behavior with a period of about 8 s which is comparable to typical time scale of soft gamma-ray repeaters. However, the periodicity is still marginal in detailed analysis with Swift/BAT and GRB090709A exhibited a typical afterglow[1][2]. To investigate significance of the periodicity more quantitatively, we performed a detailed timing analysis on all the lightcurves obtained with Suzaku/WAM, Swift/BAT, and Konus-Wind evaluating their underlying trend, red noise and white noise.

  9. DESAlert: Enabling real-time transient follow-up with Dark Energy Survey data

    SciTech Connect

    Poci, A.

    2015-04-12

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is currently undertaking an observational program imaging 1/4 of the southern hemisphere sky with unprecedented photometric accuracy. In the process of observing millions of faint stars and galaxies to constrain the parameters of the dark energy equation of state, the DES will obtain pre-discovery images of the regions surrounding an estimated 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) over five years. Once GRBs are detected by, e.g., the Swift satellite, the DES data will be extremely useful for follow-up observations by the transient astronomy community. We describe a recently-commissioned suite of software that listens continuously for automated notices of GRB activity, collates useful information from archival DES data, and promulgates relevant data products back to the community in near-real-time. Of particular importance are the opportunities that DES data provide for relative photometry of GRBs or their afterglows, as well as for identifying key characteristics (e.g., photometric redshifts) of potential GRB host galaxies. We provide the functional details of the DESAlert software as it presently operates, as well as the data products that it produces, and we show sample results from the application of DESAlert to several previously-detected GRBs.

  10. Long-term outcomes of anthroposophic treatment for chronic disease: a four-year follow-up analysis of 1510 patients from a prospective observational study in routine outpatient settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthroposophic treatment includes special artistic and physical therapies and special medications. We here report an update to a previously published study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic diseases, including more patients and a longer follow up. The Anthroposophic Medicine Outcomes Study (AMOS) was a prospective observational cohort study of anthroposophic treatment for chronic indications in routine outpatient settings in Germany. Anthroposophic treatment was associated with improvements of symptoms and quality of life. Previous follow-up-analyses have been performed after 24 months or, in subgroups of patients enrolled in the period 1999-2001, after 48 months. We conducted a 48-month follow-up analysis of all patients enrolled in AMOS in the period 1999-2005. Methods 1,510 outpatients aged 1-75 years, starting anthroposophic treatment for chronic conditions in routine German outpatient settings, participated in a prospective cohort study. Main outcomes were Symptom Score (primary outcome, mean symptom severity on numerical rating scales), SF-36 Physical and Mental Component scores in adults, and disease-specific outcomes in the six most common diagnosis groups: asthma, anxiety disorders and migraine (numerical rating scales), depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale), attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms (FBB-HKS Total score), and low back pain (Hanover Functional Ability Questionnaire, Low Back Pain Rating Scale). Results Median disease duration at baseline was 3.5 years. From baseline to 48-month follow-up all ten outcomes improved significantly (p < 0.001 for all pre-post comparisons). Standardised Response Mean effect sizes were large (range 0.84-1.24 standard deviations) for seven comparisons, medium for two comparisons (SF-36 Mental Component: 0.60, Low Back Pain Rating Scale: 0.55), and small for one comparison (SF-36 Physical Component: 0.39). Symptom Score improved significantly with large effect

  11. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  12. Outcomes observed during a 1-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients treated for 1- or 2-level cervical degenerative disease using a biodegradable anterior cervical plate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengcun; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Xu, Weihua; Ye, Shunan; Wang, Jing; Feng, Yong; Yang, Wen; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to present an initial surgical experience in the management of 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine using biodegradable anterior cervical plates (bACPs) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The authors also aimed to provide insight into this critical and controversial clinical issue by clarifying outcomes for patients receiving bACPs and by comparing their outcomes with those achieved using a traditional metallic anterior cervical plate (mACP) implant. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for 2 series of patients who had undergone ACDF using either bACP (31 patients, 38 segments) or mACP (47 patients, 57 segments) instrumentation. The patients were followed up for a mean 13.5 ± 0.9 months (range 12-18 months) in the bACP group and 14.8 ± 1.5 months (range 14-22 months) in the mACP group. Clinical outcomes were determined according to scores on the visual analog scale (VAS), the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring system, and Odom's criteria. Radiological images were used to assess fusion rates, intervertebral height, Cobb's angle, and the width of prevertebral soft tissue. RESULTS Both VAS and mJOA scores were significantly improved at each follow-up in both groups. Excellent or good results according to Odom's criteria were achieved in 93.5% (29/31) of patients in the bACP group and 93.6% (44/47) of patients in the mACP group. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate was 94.7% (36/38) in the bACP group and 96.5% (55/57) in the mACP group, but subsidence of the intervertebral space at the surgical level was more evident in the bACP group. Angulation, as measured by Cobb's angle, demonstrated obvious healing in both groups, while better maintenance was observed in the mACP group. The local inflammatory reaction was uneventful during follow-up. Dysphonia and dysphagia were observed in both groups during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The relatively comparable

  13. The LCOGT NEO Follow-up Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Tim; Gomez, Edward; Greenstreet, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) has deployed a homogeneous telescope network of nine 1-meter telescopes to four locations in the northern and southern hemispheres, with a planned network of twelve 1-meter telescopes at 6 locations. This network is very versatile and is designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to perform long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make LCOGT ideal for follow-up and characterization of Solar System objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper Belt Objects, comets, Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)) and ultimately for the discovery of new objects.LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment with the installation and commissioning of the nine 1-meter telescopes at McDonald Observatory (Texas), Cerro Tololo (Chile), SAAO (South Africa) and Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). The telescope network has been fully operational since 2014 May, and observations are being executed remotely and robotically. Future expansion to sites in the Canary Islands and Tibet is planned for 2016.I am using the LCOGT network to confirm newly detected NEO candidates produced by the major sky surveys such as Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and PanSTARRS (PS1) and several hundred targets are now being followed-up per year. An increasing amount of time is being spent to obtain follow-up astrometry and photometry for radar-targeted objects and those on the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) or Asteroid Retrieval Mission (ARM) lists in order to improve the orbits, determine the light curves and rotation periods and improve the characterization. This will be extended to obtain more light curves of other NEOs which could be targets. Recent results have included the first period determinations for several of the Goldstone-targeted NEOs. We are in the process of building a NEO Portal which will allow

  14. Optical and X-Ray Observations of GRB 060526: A Complex Afterglow Consistent with an Achromatic Jet Break

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, X.; Halpern, J. P.; Morgan, N. D.; Armstrong, E.; Mirabal, N.; Haislip. J. B.; Reichart, D. E.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2007-01-01

    We obtained 98 R-band and 18 B, r', i' images of the optical afterglow of GRB 060526 (z = 3.21) with the MDM 1.3 m, 2.4 m, and the PROMPT telescopes at CTIO over the five nights following the burst trigger. Combining these data with other optical observations reported in GCN and the Swift XRT observations, we compare the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves of GRB 060526. Both the optical and X-ray afterglow light curves show rich features, such as flares and breaks. The densely sampled optical observations provide very good coverage at T > 10(exp 4) s. We observed a break at 2.4 x 10(exp 5) sin the optical afterglow light curve. Compared with the X-ray afterglow light curve, the break is consistent with an achromatic break supporting the beaming models of GRBs. However, the prebreak and postbreak temporal decay slopes are difficult to explain in simple afterglow models. We estimated a jet angle of theta(sub j) approx. 7deg and a prompt emission size of R(sub prompt) approx. 2 x 10(exp 14) cm. In addition, we detected several optical flares with amplitudes of (Delta)m approx. 0.2,0.6, and 0.2 mag. The X-ray afterglows detected by Swift have shown complicated decay patterns. Recently, many well-sampled optical afterglows also show decays with flares and multiple breaks. GRB 060526 provides an additional case of such a complex, well-observed optical afterglow. The accumulated well-sampled afterglows indicate that most of the optical afterglows are complex.

  15. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB 980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, T. W.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Connaughton, V.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Letter, we present the first evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a gamma-ray burst, GRB 980923. The event consists of rapid variability lasting approximately 40 s followed by a smooth power-law emission tail lasting approximately 400 s. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for gamma-ray bursts. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB 990123.

  16. Was the X-ray Afterglow of GRB 970815 Detected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, N.; Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Mukherjee, R.

    2004-09-01

    GRB 970815 was a well-localized gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) for which no afterglow was identified despite follow-up ASCA and ROSAT pointings and optical imaging to limiting magnitude R > 23. While an X-ray source, AX/RX J1606.8+8130, was detected just outside the ASM error box, it was never associated with the GRB because it was not clearly fading and because no optical afterglow was ever discovered. We recently made deep optical observations of the AX/RX J1606.8+8130 position, which is blank to a limit of V > 24.3 and I > 24.0, implying an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio fX/fV > 500. In view of this extreme limit, we analyze and reevaluate the ASCA and ROSAT data and conclude that the X-ray source AX/RX J1606.8+8130 was indeed the afterglow of GRB 970815, which corresponds to an optically ``dark'' GRB. Alternatively, if AX/RX J1608+8130 is discovered to be a persistent source, then it could be associated with EGRET source 3EG J1621+8203, whose error box includes this position.

  17. Evidence for an Early High-Energy Afterglow Observed with BATSE from GRB980923

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giblin, Tim; vanParadijs, Jan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Connaughton, Valerie; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Fishman, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    In this letter, we present for the first time evidence in the BATSE data for a prompt high-energy (25-300 keV) afterglow component from a Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB), GRB980923. The event ranks third highest in fluence (>25 keV) in the BATSE catalog and consists of a period of rapid variability lasting about 40 s followed by a smooth power law emission tail lasting about 400 s beyond the trigger time. An abrupt change in spectral shape is found when the tail becomes noticeable. Our analysis reveals that the spectral evolution in the tail of the burst mimics that of a cooling synchrotron spectrum, similar to the spectral evolution of the low-energy afterglows for GRBS. This evidence for a separate emission component is consistent with the internal-external shock scenario in the relativistic fireball picture. In particular, it illustrates that the external shocks can be generated during the primary gamma-ray emission phase, as in the case of GRB990123.

  18. Graduate Follow-Up Studies: How Useful Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smedley, Rande H.; Olson, George H.

    Follow-up surveys may fall prey to several sources of bias and error, among them lack of control over independent variables, lack of item validity and reliability, sampling biases, and observation bias. Two follow-up studies have been dissected to expose inherent limitations: the Texas Education Product Study (TEPS) and Project TALENT. The…

  19. Fermi-GBM follow-up of the first gravitational-wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, Lindy

    2016-03-01

    The Advanced LIGO detectors made the first direct detection of gravitational-waves (GW) on September 14 2015 by observing the characteristic signal from a merger of two black holes, about 30 solar masses each and at a distance of 410 Mpc. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) covered 75% of the likely sky position of the source, and while no nearby GBM trigger was generated on-board in response to any bright gamma-ray burst (GRB), an automated offline pipeline designed to detect sub-threshold signals identified a weak event of moderate significance beginning 0.4s after the GW coalescence time and lasting for 1s. We discuss the initial detection and follow-up of the GBM event, including its plausibility as an EM counterpart when none is expected for the binary black-hole system observed. More generally, we discuss the ability for Fermi-GBM to find, characterize, and localize high-energy counterparts to GWs in the advanced LIGO era. In the coming years, detections and upper limits by Fermi-GBM for binary coalescence events involving a neutron star should reveal the progenitor behind short GRBs, aid in coordinating other targeted EM follow-up, and provide details about burst energetics and beaming.

  20. Follow-up Cost Study. TEX-SIS FOLLOW-UP SC5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baugh, Ronald C.

    This report presents data on the costs of follow-up studies, based on 29 separate follow-up studies conducted by eight public community/junior colleges in Texas. The purpose of this study, conducted by Navarro College as a subcontractor of Project FOLLOW-UP, was to provide data and information regarding the cost of follow-up studies that would be…

  1. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  2. Francoise, a Fifteen-Year Follow Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondal, J. A.; Elbouz, M.; Ylieff, M.; Docquier, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on a 15-year follow-up of the linguistic and cognitive profile of a woman with standard trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). The follow-up found recent rapid deterioration in receptive and productive language skills. However, basic phonological and morphosyntactic skills are preserved. Her changing profile mirrors that found in aging…

  3. Towards sustainability assessment follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison-Saunders, Angus; Pope, Jenny; Bond, Alan; Retief, Francois

    2014-02-15

    This paper conceptualises what sustainability assessment follow-up might entail for three models of sustainability assessment: EIA-driven integrated assessment, objectives-led integrated assessment and the contribution to sustainability model. The first two are characterised by proponent monitoring and evaluation of individual impacts and indicators while the latter takes a holistic view based around focused sustainability criteria relevant to the context. The implications of three sustainability challenges on follow-up are also examined: contested time horizons and value changes, trade-offs, and interdisciplinarity. We conclude that in order to meet these challenges some form of adaptive follow-up is necessary and that the contribution to sustainability approach is the best approach. -- Highlights: • We explore sustainability follow-up for three different sustainability models. • Long-time frames require adaptive follow-up and are a key follow-up challenge. • Other key challenges include interdisciplinarity, and trade-offs. • Sustainability follow-up should be a direction of travel and not an outcome. • Only the follow-up for contribution to sustainability model addresses sustainability challenges sufficiently.

  4. Observations of the intense and ultra-long burst GRB 041219a with the Germanium spectrometer on INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBreen, S.; Hanlon, L.; McGlynn, S.; McBreen, B.; Foley, S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Williams, O. R.

    2006-08-01

    Context.GRB 041219a is the brightest burst localised by INTEGRAL. The peak flux of 43 ph cm-2 s-1 (1.84 × 10-5 erg cm-2 s-1, 20 keV-8 MeV, 1 s integration) is greater than that for ~98% of all bursts and the T_90 duration of ~186 s (~20 keV-8 MeV) is longer than all but a small number of bursts. The intense burst occurred about ~250 s after the precursor and the long delay enabled optical and near infrared telescopes to observe the prompt emission.Aims.We present comprehensive results of the temporal and spectral analyses, including line and afterglow searches using the spectrometer, SPI, aboard INTEGRAL, BAT on Swift and ASM on Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We avail of multi-wavelength data to generate broadband spectra of GRB 041219a and afterglow. Methods.Spectra for the burst and sub-intervals were fit by the Band model and also by the quasithermal model. The high resolution Germanium spectrometer data were searched for emission and absorption features and for γ-ray afterglow. Results. The overall burst and sub-intervals are well fit by the Band model. The photon index below the break energy shows a marked change after the quiescent time interval. In addition the spectra are well described by a black body component with a power law. The burst was detected by BAT and ASM during the long quiescent interval in SPI indicating the central engine might not be dormant but that the emission occurs in different bands. No significant emission or absorption features were found and limits of 900 eV and 120 eV are set on the most significant features. No γ-ray afterglow was detected from the end of the prompt phase to ~12 h post-burst. Broadband spectra of the prompt emission were generated in 7 time intervals using γ-ray, X-ray, optical and near-infrared data and these were compared to the high-redshift burst GRB 050904. The optical and γ-ray emission are correlated in GRB 041219a. We estimate isotropic radiated energy (E_iso) to be ~5 × 1052 erg. The spectral lag was

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE SYNCHROTRON SHOCK MODEL FOR THE FERMI GRB 090820A OBSERVED BY GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Baring, Matthew G.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Fishman, Gerald J.; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty E-mail: baring@rice.edu

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the {nu}F{sub {nu}} peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  6. Constraints on the Synchrotron Shock Model for the Fermi GRB 090820A Observed by Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, J. Michael; Preece, Robert D.; Baring, Matthew G.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Guiriec, Sylvain; Paciesas, William S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; van der Horst, Alexander J.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-11-01

    Discerning the radiative dissipation mechanism for prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires detailed spectroscopic modeling that straddles the νF ν peak in the 100 keV-1 MeV range. Historically, empirical fits such as the popular Band function have been employed with considerable success in interpreting the observations. While extrapolations of the Band parameters can provide some physical insight into the emission mechanisms responsible for GRBs, these inferences do not provide a unique way of discerning between models. By fitting physical models directly, this degeneracy can be broken, eliminating the need for empirical functions; our analysis here offers a first step in this direction. One of the oldest, and leading, theoretical ideas for the production of the prompt signal is the synchrotron shock model. Here we explore the applicability of this model to a bright Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) burst with a simple temporal structure, GRB 090820A. Our investigation implements, for the first time, thermal and non-thermal synchrotron emissivities in the RMFIT forward-folding spectral analysis software often used in GBM burst studies. We find that these synchrotron emissivities, together with a blackbody shape, provide at least as good a match to the data as the Band GRB spectral fitting function. This success is achieved in both time-integrated and time-resolved spectral fits.

  7. Robotic Follow-Up for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matthew C.; Adams, Byron; Allan, Mark; Altobelli, Martha; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Cohen, Tamar; Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Garber, Joshua; Palmer, Elizabeth; Heggy, Essam; Jurgens, Frank; Kennedy, Tim; Kobayashi, Linda; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Lundy, Mike; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Wheeler, Dawn

    2010-01-01

    We are studying how "robotic follow-up" can improve future planetary exploration. Robotic follow-up, which we define as augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity, is a field exploration technique designed to increase human productivity and science return. To better understand the benefits, requirements, limitations and risks associated with this technique, we are conducting analog field tests with human and robot teams at the Haughton Crater impact structure on Devon Island, Canada. In this paper, we discuss the motivation for robotic follow-up, describe the scientific context and system design for our work, and present results and lessons learned from field testing.

  8. [Follow-up of endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Tristan; Siegerth, François; Monteil, Jacques; Jammet, Isabelle; Saidi, Nadira; Tubiana-Mathieu, Nicole; Aubard, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Available data on appropriate follow-up in endometrial cancer highlight the need of well-conducted studies. Most recurrences tend to occur within three years and involve symptoms. Routine tests are not advocated without symptoms. In case of suspicious recurrence, TEP/CT seems to be the most sensitive and specific method. There is limited evidence to decide whether follow-up schedules with multiple visits result in survival benefits. An appropriate follow-up should be discussed based upon the risk of recurrence. Counselling on the potential symptoms of recurrence should be a major aim. PMID:25025796

  9. SYNCHROTRON SELF-COMPTON EMISSION AS THE ORIGIN OF THE GAMMA-RAY AFTERGLOW OBSERVED IN GRB 980923

    SciTech Connect

    Fraija, N.; Gonzalez, M. M.; Lee, W. H. E-mail: magda@astro.unam.mx

    2012-05-20

    GRB 980923 was one of the brightest bursts observed by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment. Previous studies have detected two distinct components in addition to the main prompt episode, which is well described by a Band function. The first of these is a tail with a duration of {approx_equal} 400 s, while the second is a high-energy component lasting {approx_equal} 2 s. We summarize the observations and argue for a unified model in which the tail can be understood as the early {gamma}-ray afterglow from forward shock synchrotron emission, while the high-energy component arises from synchrotron self-Compton from the reverse shock. Consistency between the main assumption of thick shell emission and agreement between the observed and computed values for fluxes, break energies, starting times, and spectral indices leads to a requirement that the ejecta must be highly magnetized.

  10. Classification, Follow-Up, and Analysis of Gamma-Ray Bursts and their Early-Time Near-Infrared/Optical Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Adam Nolan

    In the study of astronomical transients, deriving knowledge from discovery is a multifaceted process that includes real-time classification to identify new events of interest, deep, multi-wavelength follow-up of individual events, and the global analysis of multi-event catalogs. Here we present a body of work encompassing each of these steps as applied to the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). First, we present our work on utilizing machine-learning algorithms on early-time metrics from the Swift satellite to inform the resource allocation of follow-up telescopes in order to optimize time spent on high-redshift GRB candidates. Next, we show broadband observations and analysis of the early-time afterglow of GRB 120119A, utilizing data obtained with a dozen telescope facilities both in space and on the ground. This event exhibits extreme red-to-blue color change in the first few minutes after the trigger at levels unseen in prior afterglows, and our model fits of this phenomenon reveal the best support yet for the direct detection of dust destruction in the local environment of a GRB. Finally, we present results from the PAIRITEL early-time near-infrared (NIR) afterglow catalog. The 1.3 meter PAIRITEL has autonomously observed 14 GRBs in under 3 minutes after the burst, yielding a homogenous sample of early-time JHKs light curves. Our analysis of these events provides constraints on the early-time NIR GRB afterglow luminosity function and gives insight into the importance of dust extinction in the suppression of some optical afterglows.

  11. Clinical evaluation of 860 anterior and posterior lithium disilicate restorations: retrospective study with a mean follow-up of 3 years and a maximum observational period of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Giacomo; Zarone, Fernando; Dellificorelli, Gianluca; Cannistraro, Giorgio; De Lorenzi, Marco; Mosca, Alberto; Sorrentino, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the clinical performance of lithium disilicate restorations supported by natural teeth or implants. Eight hundred sixty lithium disilicate adhesive restorations, including crowns on natural teeth and implant abutments, veneers, and onlays, were made in 312 patients. Parafunctional patients were included, but subjects with uncontrolled periodontitis and gingival inflammation were excluded. Veneers up to 0.5 mm thick were luted with flowable composite resin or light curing cements, while dual-curing composite systems were used with veneers up to 0.8 mm thick. Onlays up to 2 mm in thickness were luted with flowable composite resins or dual-curing composite cements. Crowns up to 1 mm in thickness were cemented with self-adhesive or dual-curing resin cements. The observational period ranged from 12 to 72 months, with a mean follow-up of 3 years. The mechanical and esthetic outcomes of the restorations were evaluated according to the modified California Dental Association (CDA) criteria. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Twenty-six mechanical complications were observed: 17 porcelain chippings, 5 fractures, and 4 losses of retention. Structural drawbacks occurred mainly in posterior segments, and monolithic restorations showed the lowest number of mechanical complications. The clinical ratings of the successful restorations, both monolithic and layered, were satisfactory according to the modified CDA criteria for color match, porcelain surface, and marginal integrity. The cumulative survival rates of lithium disilicate restorations ranged from 95.46% to 100%, while cumulative success rates ranged from 95.39% to 100%. All restorations recorded very high survival and success rates. The use of lithium disilicate restorations in fixed prosthodontics proved to be effective and reliable in the short- and medium-term. PMID:24600653

  12. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine. PMID:17293338

  13. CALORIMETRY OF GRB 030329: SIMULTANEOUS MODEL FITTING TO THE BROADBAND RADIO AFTERGLOW AND THE OBSERVED IMAGE EXPANSION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.

    2013-09-01

    We perform calorimetry on the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 by fitting simultaneously the broadband radio afterglow and the observed afterglow image size to a semi-analytic MHD and afterglow emission model. Our semi-analytic method is valid in both the relativistic and non-relativistic regimes, and incorporates a model of the interstellar scintillation that substantially effects the broadband afterglow below 10 GHz. The model is fitted to archival measurements of the afterglow flux from 1 day to 8.3 yr after the burst. Values for the initial burst parameters are determined and the nature of the circumburst medium is explored. Additionally, direct measurements of the lateral expansion rate of the radio afterglow image size allow us to estimate the initial Lorentz factor of the jet.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A light curves (Gorbovskoy+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbovskoy, E. S.; Lipunova, G. V.; Lipunov, V. M.; Kornilov, V. G.; Belinski, A. A.; Shatskiy, N. I.; Tyurina, N. V.; Kuvshinov, D. A.; Balanutsa, P. V.; Chazov, V. V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D. S.; Kornilov, M. V.; Sankovich, A. V.; Krylov, A.; Ivanov, K. I.; Chvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V. A.; Konstantinov, E. N.; Gress, O. A.; Yazev, S. A.; Budnev, N. M.; Krushinski, V. V.; Zalozhnich, I. S.; Popov, A. A.; Tlatov, A. G.; Parhomenko, A. V.; Dormidontov, D. V.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V. V.; Sergienko, Yu. P.; Varda, D.; Kudelina, I. P.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R.; Jelinek, M.; Tello, J. C.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. (5 data files).

  15. Diabetic Amyotrophy: A Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Casey, E. B.; Harrison, M. J. G.

    1972-01-01

    A clinical follow-up study of 12 patients with diabetic amyotrophy is reported. Re-examination after an interval indicated that improvement had occurred in all but one instance, and had been maintained over an average follow-up period of four and a half years. Improvement in the neurological syndrome appeared to follow improvement in diabetic control or institution of treatment in those whose diabetes had not previously been diagnosed. Seven patients made a good functional recovery, three no longer having any muscular weakness. Five showed significant residual disability. PMID:5015293

  16. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Holland, S. T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I. A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-11-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in the radio by the Very Large Array. The redshift of z = 3.355 +/- 0.005 was determined by Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) and confirmed by RTT150 and NOT. The prompt gamma/X-ray emission, detected over 0.3-103 keV, systematically softens over time, with Epeak moving from ~600 keV at the start to ~40 keV around 100s after the trigger; alternatively, this spectral evolution could be identified with the blackbody temperature of a quasi-thermal model shifting from ~60 to ~3keV over the same time interval. The first optical detection was made at 38s, but the smooth, featureless profile of the full optical coverage implies that this is originated from the afterglow component, not from the pulsed/flaring prompt emission. Broad-band optical and X-ray coverage of the afterglow at the start of the final X-ray decay (~8ks) reveals a spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands in the range of 1015-2 × 1016Hz. The decay profiles of the X-ray and optical bands show that this break initially migrates blueward to this frequency and then subsequently drifts redward to below the optical band by ~3 × 105s. GRB 080810 was very energetic, with an isotropic energy output for the prompt component of 3 × 1053 and 1.6 × 1052 erg for the afterglow; there is no evidence for a jet break in the afterglow up to 6d following the burst. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Martin Turner, who sadly passed away during its writing. Martin was an influential figure in X-ray Astronomy and an excellent PhD supervisor. He will be greatly missed. E-mail: kpa@star.le.ac.uk ‡ NASA postdoctoral program fellow.

  17. Follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bournaud, C; Raverot, V

    2015-02-01

    The aim of follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (CTD) is the assessment of remission, and, in further steps, the early recognition of patients who develop a recurrence. Tools for the follow-up of CTD include the assessment of thyroglobulin and imaging procedures. Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a strong marker of persistent or recurrent disease, but it must be known that Tg antibodies may give falsely low Tg concentration. TSH stimulation, mainly by the mean of recombinant human TSH, improves the sensitivity of Tg determination. New highly sensitive assays may preclude the need for TSH stimulation, at least in some situations. In the last decades, (131)iodine whole body scan gave place to neck ultrasonography (US) as the most performing imaging procedure in the follow-up of CTD. Criteria to identify cervical lymph node suspect of metastasis have been described, and standardized procedures proposed. Finally, the proof of tumoral invasion is brought by cytological analysis of fine needle biopsies of suspicious lymph nodes. (18)FDG PET is a valuable tool for diagnosis and prognosis in metastatic patients, especially with negative (131)I WBS. Initial response to therapy, assessed by Tg determination and neck US, allows re-stratification of the risk of relapse. According to this "reassessed risk", adapted rhythms and modalities of follow-up have been recently proposed. PMID:26826480

  18. 1984 Graduate Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Tyler Community Coll., Chester, VA. Office of Institutional Research.

    A follow-up study is conducted of each graduating class of John Tyler Community College (JTCC) to document student successes in the job market and in pursuit of advanced studies, provide feedback to administrators and faculty for upgrading educational offerings and services, and provide a summary of student opinions to improve services. A…

  19. WCTC Graduate Follow-Up Report, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waukesha County Technical Coll., Pewaukee, WI.

    This paper reports on a survey of 2001-02 graduates of Waukesha County Technical College (WCTC), Wisconsin. The report indicates 1,257 students were awarded Associate's Degrees, technical diplomas, and apprenticeship certificates by WCTC in 2001-02. Of those graduates, 702 (56%) responded to the Graduate Follow-up Survey. Also, 84% of all…

  20. Follow-Up Research on Agoraphobics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambless, Dianne L.

    In vivo exposure is the most commonly used and generally the most effective behavioral treatment for agoraphobia. Follow-up studies are difficult to interpret because additional treatment does not necessarily indicate relapse and non-treatment does not necessarily indicate non-relapse. Relapse rates are difficult to estimate because of lack of…

  1. Employer Follow-Up Survey Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    In 1998, Trident Technical College conducted the 1997 Employer Follow-Up Survey to collect information from employers of 1997 graduates. A total of 373 employers of graduates were identified, of which 243 were contacted and interviewed. Findings indicate that employers rate graduates average or above average in most technical and personal skills.…

  2. RAPTOR: Closed-Loop monitoring of the night sky and the earliest optical detection of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Borozdin, K.; Casperson, D. J.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P.; Wren, J.

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the RAPTOR (Rapid Telescopes for Optical Response) sky monitoring system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RAPTOR is a fully autonomous robotic system that is designed to identify and make follow-up observations of optical transients with durations as short as one minute. The RAPTOR design is based on Biomimicry of Human Vision. The sky monitor is composed of two identical arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, which stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square-degrees for transients. Both monitoring arrays are carried on rapidly slewing mounts and are composed of an ensemble of wide-field telescopes clustered around a more powerful narrow-field telescope called the ``fovea'' telescope. All telescopes are coupled to real-time analysis pipelines that identify candidate transients and relay the information to a central decision unit that filters the candidates to find real celestial transients and command a response. When a celestial transient is found, the system can point the fovea telescopes to any position on the sky within five seconds and begin follow-up observations. RAPTOR also responds to Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) alerts generated by GRB monitoring spacecraft. Here we present RAPTOR observations of GRB 021211 that constitute the earliest detection of optical emission from that event and are the second fastest achieved for any GRB. The detection of bright optical emission from GRB021211, a burst with modest gamma-ray fluence, indicates that prompt optical emission, detectable with small robotic telescopes, is more common than previously thought. Further, the very fast decline of the optical afterglow from GRB 021211 suggests that some so-called ``optically dark'' GRBs were not detected only because of the slow response of the follow-up telescopes.

  3. Follow-up of eROSITA and Euclid Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiprich, T.

    2016-06-01

    In the near future, eROSITA and Euclid will elevate galaxy cluster and cosmology studies to an unprecedented level. Through large area surveys, they will generate huge galaxy cluster samples. Rich science will be enabled through detailed follow-up observations of systematically selected subsamples. In particular, X-ray follow-up will be crucial and XMM-Newton could play the leading role. In this talk, examples for the science enabled and possible strategies for such XMM-Newton observations will be outlined.

  4. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  5. Follow-up imaging after pediatric pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Arora, Sohrab; Mittal, Varun; Patidar, Nitesh; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar; Ansari, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The duration, methods and frequency of radiographic follow-up after pediatric pyeloplasty is not well-defined. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of children undergoing pyeloplasty to determine the method for follow-up. Methods: Between 2000 and 2008, children undergoing pyeloplasty for unilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction were evaluated for this study. All patients were evaluated preoperatively with protocol ultrasound (USG) and diuretic renal scan (RS). On the basis of preoperative split renal function (SRF), these patients were divided into four groups – Group I: SRF > 40%, Group II: SRF 30–39%, Group III: SRF 20–29%, and Group IV: SRF 10–19%. In follow-up, USG and RS were done at 3 months and repeated at 6 months, 1 year, and then yearly after surgery for a minimum period of 5 years. Improvement, stability, or worsening of hydronephrosis was based on the changes in anteroposterior (AP) diameter of pelvis and caliectasis on USG. Absolute increase in split renal function (SRF) >5% was considered significant. Failure was defined as increase in AP diameter of pelvis and decrease in cortical thickness on 3 consecutive USG, t½ >20 min with obstructive drainage on RS and/or symptomatic patient. Results: 145 children were included in the study. Their mean age was 3.26 years and mean follow-up was 7.5 years. Pre- and post-operative SRF remain unchanged within 5% range in 35 of 41 patients (85%) in Group I. While 9 of 20 patients (45%) in Group II, 23 of 50 patients (46%) in Group III, and 14 of 34 patients (41%) in Group IV exhibited changes >5% after surgery. 5 patients failed, 2 in Group III, and 3 in Group IV. None of the patients deteriorated in Group I and II. Conclusion: After pyeloplasty in children with a baseline split GFR >30%, if a diuretic renogram and USG performed 3 months postoperatively shows nonobstructive drainage with t½ <20 min and decreased hydronephrosis, no further follow-up is required. PMID:27555681

  6. Understanding Grb Physics With Multi-Wavelength Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    The study of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has entered a full multi-wavelength era. A rich trove of data from NASA GRB missions and ground-based follow up observations have been collected. Careful data mining with well-defined scientific objectives holds the key to address open questions in GRB physics, such as jet composition, radiation mechanism, progenitor and central engine physics. We propose to perform data analyses in the following three directions. 1. The time resolved GRB spectra have a dominant component that can be fit with a phenomenological ``Band'' function. The physical meaning of this function remains unclear. Recently we made a breakthrough in theoretical modeling, and showed that fast-cooling synchrotron radiation of electrons in a decreasing magnetic field can mimic the Band function in detector's bandpass, but differs from Band function slightly. We propose to apply this physically-motivated model to systematically fit the GRB prompt emission data collected by Fermi GBM and LAT, and test whether the dominant GRB emission mechanism is fast cooling synchrotron radiation. We will also fit time-dependent spectra with a time-dependent model to investigate whether a quasi- thermal "photosphere'' emission component is indeed needed to fit the observed spectra. This would shed light onto the unknown composition of GRB jets. By fitting the time resolved spectra, we will also constrain important physical parameters of GRB prompt emission, such as the emission site of GRBs, the strength of magnetic fields, as well as their evolution with radius. 2. Recent GRB multi-wavelength observations suggest that it is not straightforward to define the physical category of a GRB based on the traditional classification in the "duration''-"hardness'' domain. Some long-duration GRBs may not have a massive star origin, while some short-duration GRBs may instead have a massive star origin. We propose to systematically study the gamma-ray Swift/BAT, Fermi/GBM- LAT), X-ray (Swift

  7. Five Years of Multi-frequency Monitoring of GRB030329 Afterglow Using the GMRT and WSRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Atish; van der Horst, A. J.; Bhattacharya, D.; Wijers, Ralph; Chandra, C. H. Ishwara; Resmi, L.; Rol, Evert; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Strom, R.

    2009-05-01

    GRB 030329 displayed one of the brightest optical afterglows ever. We have followed the radio afterglow of GRB 030329 for over 5 years using the GMRT and WSRT at low radio frequencies. This is the longest as well as the lowest frequency follow up of any GRB afterglow ever. Radio observations of a GRB afterglow provide a unique probe of the physics of the blast wave at late times, when the expansion of the fireball slows down to non-relativistic speeds. Our GMRT-WSRT observations suggest that the afterglow of GRB030329 entered the non-relativistic phase around 60 days after the burst. The estimate of the fireball energy content, ~1051 erg, in this near-isotropic phase is much less susceptible to the collimation-related uncertainties arising in the relativistic phase. We have also been closely monitoring the evolution of the afterglow to look for possible signatures of emission from a counter jet, but no conclusive evidence has so far been found.

  8. NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This NASA Audit Follow-up Handbook is issued pursuant to the requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-50, Audit Follow-up, dated September 29, 1982. It sets forth policy, uniform performance standards, and procedural guidance to NASA personnel for use when considering reports issued by the Office of Inspector General (OIG), other executive branch audit organizations, the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA), and the General Accounting Office (GAO). It is intended to: specify principal roles; strengthen the procedures for management decisions (resolution) on audit findings and corrective action on audit report recommendations; emphasize the importance of monitoring agreed upon corrective actions to assure actual accomplishment; and foster the use of audit reports as effective tools of management. A flow chart depicting the NASA audit and management decision process is in Appendix A. This handbook is a controlled handbook issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes. Additional copies for internal use may be obtained through normal distribution channels.

  9. The Swift GRB Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Chincarini, Guido

    2004-01-01

    Swift is a MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in October 2004. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. A wide-field gamma-ray camera will detect mare than 100 GRBs per year to -3 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 75 sec by an autonomously controlled spacecraft. Far each burst, aresec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-say spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many burstes. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approx. 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift. The talk vi11 describe the mission statue and give a summary of plans for GRB operations. It is likely that Swift will have just been launched at the time of the conference.

  10. On the Host Galaxy of GRB 150101B and the Associated Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Chen; Fang, Taotao; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Tong; Jiang, Xiaochuan

    2016-06-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the host galaxy of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) 150101B. Follow-up optical and X-ray observations suggested that the host galaxy, 2MASX J12320498-1056010, likely harbors low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our modeling of the spectral energy distribution has confirmed the nature of the AGN, making it the first reported GRB host that contains an AGN. We have also found the host galaxy is a massive elliptical galaxy with stellar population of ∼5.7 Gyr, one of the oldest among the short-duration GRB hosts. Our analysis suggests that the host galaxy can be classified as an X-ray bright, optically normal galaxy, and the central AGN is likely dominated by a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. Our work explores an interesting connection that may exist between GRB and AGN activities of the host galaxy, which can help in understanding the host environment of the GRB events and the roles of AGN feedback.

  11. Continued observation of the natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ reaffirms proclivity for local recurrence even after more than 30 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Melinda E; Schuyler, Peggy A; Simpson, Jean F; Page, David L; Dupont, William D

    2015-05-01

    Opportunities to study the natural history of ductal carcinoma in situ are rare. A few studies of incompletely excised lesions in the premammographic era, retrospectively recognized as ductal carcinoma in situ, have demonstrated a proclivity for local recurrence in the original site. The authors report a follow-up study of 45 women with low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ treated by biopsy only, recognized retrospectively during a larger review of surgical pathology diagnoses and original histological slides for 26 539 consecutive breast biopsies performed at Vanderbilt, Baptist and St Thomas Hospitals in Nashville, TN from 1950 to 1989. Long-term follow-up was previously reported on 28 of these women. Sixteen women (36%) developed invasive breast carcinoma, all in the same breast and quadrant as their incident ductal carcinoma in situ. Eleven invasive breast carcinomas were diagnosed within 10 years of the ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy. Subsequent cases were diagnosed at 12, 23, 25, 29 and 42 years. Seven women, including one who developed invasive breast cancer 29 years after her ductal carcinoma in situ biopsy, developed distant metastasis, resulting in death 1-7 years postdiagnosis of invasive breast carcinoma. The natural history of low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ may extend more than four decades, with invasive breast cancer developing at the same site as the index lesion. This protracted natural history differs markedly from that of patients with high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ or any completely delimited ductal carcinoma in situ excised to negative margins. This study reaffirms the importance of complete margin evaluation in women treated with breast conservation for ductal carcinoma in situ as well as balancing recurrence risk with possible treatment-related morbidity for older women. PMID:25502729

  12. The X-Ray Afterglow of Dark GRB 970815: A Common Origin for Gamma-Ray Bursts and X-Ray Flashes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabal, N.; Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Mukherjee, R.

    2005-02-01

    GRB 970815 is a well-localized gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by the All-Sky Monitor (ASM) on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) for which no afterglow was identified despite follow-up ASCA and ROSAT pointings and optical imaging to limiting magnitude R>23. Although an X-ray source, AX/RX J1606.8+8130, was detected just outside the ASM error box, it was never associated with the GRB because it was not clearly fading and because no optical afterglow was ever found. We recently obtained an upper limit for this source with Chandra that is at least a factor of 100 fainter than the ASCA detection. We also made deep optical observations of the AX/RX J1606.8+8130 position, which is blank to limits V>25.2 and I>24.0. In view of these extreme limits, we conclude that AX/RX J1606.8+8130 is indeed the afterglow of GRB 970815, which corresponds to an optically ``dark'' GRB. AX/RX J1606.8+8130 can therefore be ruled out as the counterpart of the persistent EGRET source 3EG J1621+8203. The early light curves from BATSE and the RXTE ASM show spectral softening between multiple peaks of prompt emission. We propose that GRB 970815 might be a case in which the properties of an X-ray flash and a ``normal'' GRB coincide in a single event.

  13. Assessing Risk in Patients with Stable Coronary Disease: When Should We Intensify Care and Follow-Up? Results from a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the COURAGE and FAME Era

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Umberto; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Nijhoff, Freek; Moretti, Claudio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Mennuni, Marco; Capodanno, Davide; Lococo, Marco; Lipinski, Michael J.; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large number of clinical and laboratory markers have been appraised to predict prognosis in patients with stable angina, but uncertainty remains regarding which variables are the best predictors of prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of studies in patients with stable angina to assess which variables predict prognosis. Methods. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for eligible studies published up to 2015, reporting multivariate predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE, a composite endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization) in patients with stable angina. Study features, patient characteristics, and prevalence and predictors of such events were abstracted and pooled with random-effect methods (95% CIs). Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was the primary endpoint. Results. 42 studies (104,559 patients) were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months, cardiovascular events occurred in 7.8% of patients with MI in 6.2% of patients and need for repeat revascularization (both surgical and percutaneous) in 19.5% of patients. Male sex, reduced EF, diabetes, prior MI, and high C-reactive protein were the most powerful predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusions. We show that simple and low-cost clinical features may help clinicians in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches within the broad range of outpatients presenting with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:27239372

  14. Assessing Risk in Patients with Stable Coronary Disease: When Should We Intensify Care and Follow-Up? Results from a Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies of the COURAGE and FAME Era.

    PubMed

    Barbero, Umberto; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Nijhoff, Freek; Moretti, Claudio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Mennuni, Marco; Capodanno, Davide; Lococo, Marco; Lipinski, Michael J; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background. A large number of clinical and laboratory markers have been appraised to predict prognosis in patients with stable angina, but uncertainty remains regarding which variables are the best predictors of prognosis. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of studies in patients with stable angina to assess which variables predict prognosis. Methods. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched for eligible studies published up to 2015, reporting multivariate predictors of major adverse cardiac events (MACE, a composite endpoint of death, myocardial infarction, and revascularization) in patients with stable angina. Study features, patient characteristics, and prevalence and predictors of such events were abstracted and pooled with random-effect methods (95% CIs). Major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) was the primary endpoint. Results. 42 studies (104,559 patients) were included. After a median follow-up of 57 months, cardiovascular events occurred in 7.8% of patients with MI in 6.2% of patients and need for repeat revascularization (both surgical and percutaneous) in 19.5% of patients. Male sex, reduced EF, diabetes, prior MI, and high C-reactive protein were the most powerful predictors of cardiovascular events. Conclusions. We show that simple and low-cost clinical features may help clinicians in identifying the most appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches within the broad range of outpatients presenting with stable coronary artery disease. PMID:27239372

  15. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Norris, Jay; Ryde, Felix

    2007-05-01

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  16. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Battelino, Milan; Komin, Nukri; Longo, Francesco; McEnery, Julie; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  17. GRB 110709A, 111117A, AND 120107A: FAINT HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY PHOTON EMISSION FROM FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS AND DEMOGRAPHIC IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Weikang; Akerlof, Carl W.; McKay, Timothy A.; Pandey, Shashi B.; Zhang Binbin; Zhang Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 {+-} 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  18. GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A: Faint High-energy Gamma-Ray Photon Emission from Fermi-LAT Observations and Demographic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, WeiKang; Akerlof, Carl W.; Pandey, Shashi B.; McKay, Timothy A.; Zhang, BinBin; Zhang, Bing; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-09-01

    Launched on 2008 June 11, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has provided a rare opportunity to study high-energy photon emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although the majority of such events (27) have been identified by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, four were uncovered by using more sensitive statistical techniques. In this paper, we continue our earlier work by finding three more GRBs associated with high-energy photon emission, GRB 110709A, 111117A, and 120107A. To systematize our matched filter approach, a pipeline has been developed to identify these objects in nearly real time. GRB 120107A is the first product of this analysis procedure. Despite the reduced threshold for identification, the number of GRB events has not increased significantly. This relative dearth of events with low photon number prompted a study of the apparent photon number distribution. We find an extremely good fit to a simple power law with an exponent of -1.8 ± 0.3 for the differential distribution. As might be expected, there is a substantial correlation between the number of lower energy photons detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and the number observed by LAT. Thus, high-energy photon emission is associated with some but not all of the brighter GBM events. Deeper studies of the properties of the small population of high-energy emitting bursts may eventually yield a better understanding of these entire phenomena.

  19. KLENOT Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Milos; Ticha, Jana; Kocer, Michal; Tichy, Milos

    2015-08-01

    Near Earth Object (NEO) research is important not only as a great challenge for science but also as an important challenge for planetary defense. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind.The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of NEOs since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO distribution. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008.The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013.The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation.Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry.The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. More than 8000 of minor planet and comet astrometric positions including NEA measurements were published from September 2013 to February 2015.The 1.06-m KLENOT telescope is still the largest telescope in continental Europe used exclusively for observations of asteroids and comets. Full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. Considering our results and long-time experience obtained at the Klet Observatory, we have the large potential to

  20. Super-solar metallicity at the position of the ultra-long GRB 130925A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schady, P.; Krühler, T.; Greiner, J.; Graham, J. F.; Kann, D. A.; Bolmer, J.; Delvaux, C.; Elliott, J.; Klose, S.; Knust, F.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Savaglio, S.; Schmidl, S.; Schweyer, T.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tanga, M.; Tanvir, N. R.; Varela, K.; Wiseman, P.

    2015-07-01

    Over the last decade there has been immense progress in the follow-up of short and long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), resulting in a significant rise in the detection rate of X-ray and optical afterglows, in the determination of GRB redshifts, and of the identification of the underlying host galaxies. Nevertheless, our theoretical understanding of the progenitors and central engines powering these vast explosions is lagging behind, and a newly identified class of ultra-long GRBs has fuelled speculation on the existence of a new channel of GRB formation. In this paper we present high signal-to-noise X-Shooter observations of the host galaxy of GRB 130925A, which is the fourth unambiguously identified ultra-long GRB, with prompt γ-ray emission detected for ~20 ks. The GRB line of sight was close to the host galaxy nucleus, and our spectroscopic observations cover this region along the bulge/disk of the galaxy and a bright star-forming region within the outskirts of the galaxy. From our broad wavelength coverage, we obtain accurate metallicity and dust-extinction measurements at the galaxy nucleus and at an outer star-forming region, and measure a super-solar metallicity at both locations, placing this galaxy within the 10-20% most metal-rich GRB host galaxies. Such a high metal enrichment has significant implications on the progenitor models of both long and ultra-long GRBs, although the edge-on orientation of the host galaxy does not allow us to rule out a large metallicity variation along our line of sight. The spatially resolved spectroscopic observations presented in this paper offer important insight into variations in the metal and dust abundance within GRB host galaxies. However, they also illustrate the need for integral field unit observations on a larger sample of GRB host galaxies of a variety of metallicities to provide a more quantitative view on the relation between the GRB circumburst environment and the galaxy-whole properties. Based on observations taken

  1. Vibration white finger: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Ekenvall, L; Carlsson, A

    1987-01-01

    To study the course of vibration white finger (VWF) 55 men were re-examined three and a half to six years after the first examination. The patients were interviewed and finger systolic pressure after general body and local finger cooling was measured. The test results at the two examinations were compared. At the follow up examination some patients experienced a subjective improvement of VWF symptoms but not until more than three years had passed after they had stopped working with vibrating tools. To study the effect of diminished cold exposure on subjective symptoms, vibration exposed outdoor workers who changed to unexposed indoor work were studied separately. In this subgroup also improvement was reported only when more than three years has passed after the change of work, indicating that diminished cold exposure is not the primary explanation for the improvement. The cold provocation test, however, showed no tendency towards a diminished reaction of the vessels to cooling. Patients who continue to work with vibrating tools report a subjective increase in symptoms. This subjective impairment was reflected in an increased reaction to cold as measured in the cold provocation test. PMID:3620371

  2. GRB 150101B/Swift J123205.1-105602: continued WSRT radio and VLT optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Levan, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Tanvir, N. R.; Hjorth, J.

    2015-01-01

    We reobserved the field of GRB 150101B/Swift J123205.1-105602 at 4.9 GHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) at January 9 00.25 to 09.00 UT, and January 17 23.75 to January 18 08.50 UT.

  3. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Manson, Neil A; Green, Alana J; Abraham, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m(2), reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk-benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike. PMID:26933611

  4. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil A.; Green, Alana J.; Abraham, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m2, reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk–benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike. PMID:26933611

  5. Improving Lunar Exploration with Robotic Follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, T.; Bualat, M.; Deans, M.; Heggy E.; Helper, M.; Hodges, K.; Lee, P.

    2011-01-01

    We are investigating how augmenting human field work with subsequent robot activity can improve lunar exploration. Robotic "follow-up" might involve: completing geology observations; making tedious or long-duration measurements of a target site or feature; curating samples in-situ; and performing unskilled, labor-intensive work. To study this technique, we have begun conducting a series of lunar analog field tests at Haughton Crater (Canada). Motivation: In most field geology studies on Earth, explorers often find themselves left with a set of observations they would have liked to make, or samples they would have liked to take, if only they had been able to stay longer in the field. For planetary field geology, we can imagine mobile robots - perhaps teleoperated vehicles previously used for manned exploration or dedicated planetary rovers - being deployed to perform such follow-up activities [1].

  6. Course Withdrawal Follow-Up. TEX-SIS Follow-Up, Volume 3, #1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavapai County Community Coll. District, Prescott, AZ.

    In spring 1982, a survey was conducted at Yavapai College to determine reasons for student course withdrawal. A TEX-SIS follow-up questionnaire was mailed to all 525 students who had dropped one or two courses, asking them to indicate their reasons for dropping the course(s) and if they felt discussion with a counselor would have been beneficial,…

  7. Photometric Follow-up of Transients from the PQ Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, C.; Glikman, E.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Steele, I.; Clay, N.; Brown, T.; Allan, A.; Saunders, E.; Naylor, T.; Nugent, P. E.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.; Scalzo, R.; Elman, N.; Jerke, J.

    2007-10-01

    We have obtained photometric follow-up for the three transients discovered by the PQ survey (Drake et al. Atel #1234, Djorgovski et al. Atel #1240) with the Faulkes Telescope North (FTN) in collaboration with the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Liverpool John Moores University and Exeter University. Each transient was observed in two 180 second R-band exposures. The following magnitudes were obtained on 2007-10-11.

  8. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are strong gravitational-wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers and that the x-ray plateau followed by a steep decay as observed in SGRB x-ray light curves marks the collapse of a supramassive neutron star to a black hole (BH), we use the statistical observational properties of Swift SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already impose the following interesting constraints. (1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parametrization of Mmax=2.37 M⊙(1 +1.58 ×10-10P-2.84) is favored. (2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: ˜40 % prompt BHs, ˜30 % supramassive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and ˜30 % stable NSs that never collapse. (3) The initial spin of the newly born supramassive NSs should be near the breakup limit (Pi˜1 ms ), which is consistent with the merger scenario. (4) The surface magnetic field of the merger products is typically ˜1015 G . (5) The ellipticity of the supramassive NSs is ɛ ˜(0.004 -0.007 ), so that strong GW radiation is released after the merger. (6) Even though the initial spin energy of the merger product is similar, the final energy output of the merger product that goes into the electromagnetic channel varies in a wide range from several 1049 to several 1052 erg , since a good fraction of the spin energy is either released in the form of GWs or falls into the black hole as the supramassive NS collapses.

  9. Performance of the GLAST/LAT for the Observation of GRB Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Komin, Nukri; Piron, Frederic

    2007-07-12

    GLAST is a gamma-ray mission which will be launched in autumn 2007. It is equipped with the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) which detects GRBs with high reliability and provides a position and energy spectrum in the range between 10 keV and 25 MeV. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) will observe photons with energies from 20 MeV up to more than 300 GeV.Here we present a systematic study of the performance of the LAT for the reconstruction of the energy spectrum of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), based on the simulation of 1 year of data taking. We focus on deviations from a pure power-law photon spectrum (exponential cut-offs). This feature can provide insight in the particle acceleration mechanisms at work in GRBs; and it can be used to probe the Extra-Galactic Background Light.

  10. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  11. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  12. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  13. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  14. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  15. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  16. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  17. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  18. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  19. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  20. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  1. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor Office... § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  2. 7 CFR 3052.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 3052.315 Section 3052.315....315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  3. 29 CFR 99.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 99.315 Section 99.315 Labor... Auditees § 99.315 Audit findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  4. 38 CFR 41.315 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit findings follow-up... findings follow-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all... currently following up with the auditee on the audit finding; and (iii) A management decision was not...

  5. Discovery and follow up of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowell, E.; Chernykh, N. S.; Marsden, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    After a summary of the increasing activity in steroid discovery during the past few years, the importance of carefully thought out observing strategy is discussed, in particular with regard to target selection, observing frequency, and the time distribution of observations. Problems of cataloging and orbit linkage are outlined, inasmuch as they affect individual observers and orbit computers, as well as the work of the Minor Planet Center. There is some discussion of appropriate two-way communication between observers and the Minor Planet Center.

  6. ALMA observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23: deep limits on obscured star formation 630 million years after the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Chary, R.-R.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Davies, J. E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3σ limits of F {sub ν}(222 GHz) ≲ 33 μJy and F {sub ν}(3.6 μm) ≲ 81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp 220 and comparable to the local starburst M 82. Comparing this with model spectral energy distributions, we place a limit on the infrared (IR) luminosity of L {sub IR}(8-1000 μm) ≲ 3 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR{sub IR}≲5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. For comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) observations is SFR{sub UV} ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of M {sub *} ≲ 5 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z ≳ 4 (Lyman break galaxies, Lyα emitters, and submillimeter galaxies) and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB 090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z ≳ 4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.

  7. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  8. Concluding Remarks: The Current Status and Future Prospects for GRB Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in a remarkable period of discovery in GRB astronomy. The current satellites including Swift, Fermi. AGILE and INTEGRAL are detecting and observing bursts of all varieties. Increasing capabilities for follow-up observations on the ground and in space are leading to rapid and deep coverage across the electromagnetic spectrum, The future will see continued operation of the current experiments and with future missions like SVOM plus possible rni_Ssions like JANUS and EXIST. An exciting expansion of capabilities is occurring in areas of gravitational waves and neutrinos that could open new windows on the GRB phenomenon. Increased IR capabilities on the ground and with missions like JWST will enable further exploration of high redshift bursts. The future is bright.

  9. GRB Discoveries with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This brief presentation presents Swift Observatory recordings of gamma ray burst (GRB) activity. Long and short GRBs and afterglows are highlighted. Recordings of GRB emission, afterglow, optical/IR brightness, and flux density are presented. The time structure and current status of short GRB structures is also included.

  10. Autism and epilepsy: a retrospective follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hitoshi

    2007-09-01

    So-called "idiopathic" autism, which exhibited no major complications before diagnosis is well-known as one of the risk factors for epilepsy. This retrospective follow-up study aimed to clarify the characteristics of epilepsy in the autism; onset of seizure, seizure types, EEG findings and epilepsy outcome and the differences as a group between the autism with epilepsy and those without epilepsy. One hundred thirty individuals with autistic disorder or atypical autism diagnosed in childhood were followed up over 10 years and were evaluated almost every year up to 18-35 years of age. Their medical records related to perinatal conditions, IQ, social maturity scores and several factors of epilepsy were reviewed in October 2005. Thirty-three of the follow-up group (25%) exhibited epileptic seizures. The onset of epilepsy was distributed from 8 to 26 years of age. Two types of seizure were observed; partial seizure with secondarily generalized seizure and generalized seizure. Twenty of the epileptics (61%) showed the partial seizure. Although 18% of the non-epileptic group exhibited epileptic discharges on EEG, 68% of the epileptic group revealed epileptiform EEG findings before the onset of epilepsy. No differences were observed concerning the sex ratio, autistic disorder/atypical autism and past history of febrile seizures between the epileptic and non-epileptic groups. Lower IQ, lower social maturity score and higher frequency of prescribed psychotropics were observed in the epileptic group compared to the non-epileptics. Idiopathic autism was confirmed as the high risk factor for epilepsy. Epileptiform EEG findings predict subsequent onset of epileptic seizures in adolescence. Epilepsy is one of negative factors on cognitive, adaptive and behavioral/emotional outcomes for individuals with autism. PMID:17321709

  11. Longest follow-up of in situ working Bjork Shiley valve: 42-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Muhammad A; Ignaszewski, Maya T; Ashton, Thomas H; Miyagishima, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    The Bjork Shiley valve (BSV) is considered as the pioneer among modern disc valves, and eventually evolved into a reliable prosthesis after considerable research and multiple modifications. Various case reports have been published with follow-up of different types of BSV. We are reporting the longest follow-up ever published of a plano-convex type of BSV. Our patient's valve was implanted in 1973 due to a congenital bicuspid aortic valve with concomitant severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis, discovered at the age of 27. She presented with exertional dyspnoea, syncope and chest pain; however, her cardiovascular status remained stable and these symptoms abated after successful valve replacement at the age of 34. She is now 77 years old with no limitations in her activities and is able to walk a few miles most days of the week. Her echocardiograms throughout the decades have shown acceptable gradients across the aortic prosthesis without evidence of haemolysis. Our case report includes a summary of the patient with a discussion of the evidence that supports the durability of the original plano-convex BSV. PMID:26686528

  12. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  13. Klenot Project - Near Earth Objects Follow-Up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichý, Miloš; Tichá, Jana; Kočer, Michal

    2016-01-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now - for science, for exploration and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements helped to make inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. The fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. The new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation (NG) were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. The modernized KLENOT System was put into full operation in September 2013. This step opens new possibilities for the KLENOT Project, the long-term European Contribution to Monitoring and Cataloging Near Earth Objects. KLENOT Project Goals are confirmatory observations of newly discovered fainter NEO candidates, early follow-up of newly discovered NEOs, long-arc follow-up astrometry of NEOs

  14. Keratoprosthesis: a 12-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Girard, L J; Hawkins, R S; Nieves, R; Borodofsky, T; Grant, C

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective study of our total experience with implantation of four types of keratoprosthesis in 125 cases was reviewed. Diagnoses in the cases treated included chemical burns, derangement of the anterior segment from disease or injury, aphakic bullous keratopathy, ocular pemphigoid, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, anterior cleavage syndrome, Mooren ulcer, and blast injuries. The visual results in some cases have been gratifying and in others heartrending. Thirty percent of the patients attained 20/15 to 20/40 visual acuity, but at the end of 12 years, only 13% still had this visual acuity. Twenty-four percent attained 20/50 to 20/200 visual acuity, but this figure fell to 17% at the end of 12 years. Loss of initial good visual acuity was due to the numerous complications which required close observation and repeated surgery to control. The number of complications has been reduced by the use of a keratoprosthesis with a Dacron skirt and of the addition the Cardona nut and bolt to the shaft. The surgical technique has been improved by the use of a scleral expander, elimination of a scleral graft, and the use of the Tenon graft. The indications for the keratoprosthesis have changed over the years. Many alkali burns and practically all aphakic bullous keratopathy have been eliminated from the indications. Keratoprosthesis should be reserved for desperate cases. The technique of implantation is not complicated and initial results are usually good. The multiple complications, however, make it necessary for these cases to be followed by a surgeon who is familiar with the management of complications. PMID:878136

  15. Employer Follow-up Data Summary--1976-77. Tex-SIS FOLLOW-UP; Postsecondary Student Follow-up Management Information System. Monograph 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Dept. of Occupational Education and Technology.

    The Tex-SIS Follow-up system Employer Follow-up Survey involved four Texas community colleges, providing a statewide composite of employer data on the competency of occupational/technical graduates. The mailing list for prospective survey participants was derived from occupational/technical graduates' responses to a survey conducted in 1975-76. A…

  16. Broadband Electromagnetic Follow-up of Advanced LIGO Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Leo; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Advanced LIGO began observing in September 2015 with over 3 times the distance reach (27 times the sensitive volume) of its previous configuration. Some gravitational-wave sources, particularly neutron star binary mergers, are expected to produce broadband electromagnetic transients which may be crucial to understanding the astrophysical context of these events. We have assembled a consortium of over 60 ground- and space-based gamma-ray, x-ray, optical, infrared, and radio facilities collaborating to search for broadband electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave sources. In this talk, we describe the LIGO/Virgo EM follow-up program and the astronomical facilities that participated during this first LIGO observing run. Then, we survey the multi-wavelength observing campaigns embarked upon for specific gravitational-wave events. Finally, we discuss lessons learned and the way forward for joint GW-EM observations in an era of increasingly sensitive GW detectors.

  17. NHEXAS PHASE I MARYLAND STUDY--FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-up questionnaire data set contains information concerning the activities within the household during the sampling week. The information is from 402 follow-up questionnaires for 80 households across 6 cycles. The Follow-up Questionnaire specifically addressed the time ...

  18. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  19. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  20. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  1. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  2. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  3. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  4. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  5. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  6. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  7. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  8. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  9. 49 CFR 382.311 - Follow-up testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL USE AND TESTING Tests Required § 382.311 Follow-up testing. The requirements for follow-up testing must be performed in accordance with 49 CFR part 40, subpart O. ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Follow-up testing. 382.311 Section...

  10. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  11. 2 CFR 200.511 - Audit findings follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Audit findings follow-up. 200.511 Section...-up. (a) General. The auditee is responsible for follow-up and corrective action on all audit findings... submitted to the FAC; (ii) The Federal agency or pass-through entity is not currently following up with...

  12. 33 CFR 179.15 - Follow-up report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Follow-up report. 179.15 Section...) BOATING SAFETY DEFECT NOTIFICATION § 179.15 Follow-up report. (a) Each manufacturer who makes an initial report required by § 179.13 shall submit a follow-up report to the Commandant by certified mail within...

  13. 49 CFR 577.10 - Follow-up notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Follow-up notification. 577.10 Section 577.10... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFECT AND NONCOMPLIANCE NOTIFICATION § 577.10 Follow-up... manufacturer to send a follow-up notification in accordance with this section. The scope, timing, form,...

  14. Supplement: Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    This Supplement provides supporting material for arXiv:1602.08492 . We briefly summarize past electromagnetic (EM) follow-up efforts as well as the organization and policy of the current EM follow-up program. Here, we compare the four probability sky maps produced for the gravitational-wave transient GW150914, and provide additional details of the EM follow-up observations that were performed in the different bands.

  15. Can JWST Follow Up on Gravitational-Wave Detections?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Bitten by the gravitational-wave bug? While we await Thursdays press conference, heres some food for thought: if LIGO were able to detect gravitational waves from compact-object mergers, how could we follow up on the detections? A new study investigates whether the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to observe electromagnetic signatures of some compact-object mergers.Hunting for MergersStudying compact-object mergers (mergers of black holes and neutron stars) can help us understand a wealth of subjects, like high-energy physics, how matter behaves at nuclear densities, how stars evolve, and how heavy elements in the universe were created.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is searching for the signature ripples in spacetime identifying these mergers, but gravitational waves are squirrelly: LIGO will only be able to localize wave sources to tens of square degrees. If we want to find out more about any mergers LIGO discovers in gravitational waves, well need a follow-up search for electromagnetic counterparts with other observatories.The Kilonova KeyOne possible electromagnetic counterpart is kilonovae, explosions that can be produced during a merger of a binary neutron star or a neutron starblack hole system. If the neutron star is disrupted during the merger, some of the hot mass is flung outward and shines brightly by radioactive decay.Kilonovae are especially promising as electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves for three reasons:They emit isotropically, so the number of observable mergers isnt limited by relativistic beaming.They shine for a week, giving follow-up observatories time to search for them.The source location can beeasily recovered.The only problem? We dont currently have any sensitive survey instruments in the near-infrared band (where kilonova emission peaks) that can provide coverage over tens of square degrees. Luckily, we will soon have just the thing: JWST, launching in 2018!JWSTs

  16. Astrometric Follow-Up of Faint Near Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, T. (Technical Monitor); Spahr, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The observing program at Mt. Hopkins using the 48" reflector and funded by the Near- Earth Object Observation Program continues to excel. As in the past, all requested observing time was granted. Minor improvements continue to be made. For example, the telescope is set up to track and non-sidereal rates. This allows the user to track on the target object, rather than relying exclusively on the shift- and-stack technique. Other improvements made by the staff include automatic focus routines, automatic seeing-measurement routines, and improvement in dome seeing and mirror stabilization. The net result is better focus, better seeing, and the ability to expose longer in order to acquire the faintest and most important objects. During the proposal period, this program ranked again very high worldwide in terms of faint Near Earth Objects observed. During this latest proposal cycle, fewer objects were observed than previous cycles, but this was due to the strict targeting of only the faintest observable objects. The follow-up programs of observatory codes 926 (led by P. Holvorcem) and 291 (led by Dr. B. McMillan) have greatly increased their capacity, and as a result less bright objects are in urgent need of follow-up than in years past. Even with this new object selection and additional competition, code 696 still ranked second to code 291 in terms of objects observed fainter than V = 20. Minimal scripting is now in place to allow the telescope to run autonomously for 30-45 minutes at a time.

  17. Follow up observations of SDSS and CRTS candidate cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Szkody, Paula; Vasquez-Soltero, Stephanie; Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Landolt, Arlo U.; Bond, Howard E. E-mail: dsilva@noao.edu E-mail: landolt@rouge.phys.lsu.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of 11 and 35 potential cataclysmic variables, respectively, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey, and vsnet alerts. The photometry results include quasi-periodic oscillations during the decline of V1363 Cyg, nightly accretion changes in the likely Polar (AM Herculis binary) SDSS J1344+20, eclipses in SDSS J2141+05 with an orbital period of 76 ± 2 minutes, and possible eclipses in SDSS J2158+09 at an orbital period near 100 minutes. Time-resolved spectra reveal short orbital periods near 80 minutes for SDSS J0206+20, 85 minutes for SDSS J1502+33, and near 100 minutes for CSS J0015+26, RXS J0150+37, SDSS J1132+62, SDSS J2154+15, and SDSS J2158+09. The prominent He II line and velocity amplitude of SDSS J2154+15 are consistent with a Polar nature for this object, while the absence of this line and a low velocity amplitude argue against this classification for RXS J0150+37. Single spectra of 10 objects were obtained near outburst and the rest near quiescence, confirming the dwarf novae nature of these objects.

  18. A follow-up campaign for fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Emily; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Bailes, Matthew; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Keane, Evan; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Ng, Cherry; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris; Caleb, Manisha

    2014-04-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are bright, millisecond-duration radio pulses hypothesized to originate at cosmological distances. To date, no counterpart sources have been associated with FRBs and their origins remain a puzzling mystery. Some have proposed FRBs come from Crab-like pulsar giant pulses or rare bursts from main sequence flare stars in our Galaxy. Both mechanisms would generate observable subsequent FRB-like events. In this proposal we directly test this hypothesis by conducting several follow-up observations on the eight FRBs from the High Time Resolution Universe Survey. This sample represents the majority of the dozen or so known FRB sources. With these observations we will set strict limits on any repetition of FRBs while using the 12 off-source beams of the multi-beam receiver as real-time FRB and transient detectors.

  19. Trazodone for Alzheimer's disease: a naturalistic follow-up study.

    PubMed

    López-Pousa, Secundino; Garre-Olmo, Josep; Vilalta-Franch, Joan; Turon-Estrada, Antoni; Pericot-Nierga, Imma

    2008-01-01

    This study intended to provide a patient profile for trazodone (a triazolopyridine-derivative of phenylpiperazine) prescription in everyday clinical practice in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and to describe clinical evaluation and the impact on caregiver burden at a 6-month follow-up. A naturalistic, prospective and observational study was performed, with a 6-month follow-up in 396 patients with probable AD, according to the NINCDS-ARDRA criteria. At the baseline and at the 6-month visit, patients were administered the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to determine their Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), and the Zarit Burden Interview (ZBI) to assess the impact on caregiver burden. Trazodone was prescribed for 6.1% of patients. With respect to the baseline visit, the untreated group showed an increased global NPI score (3.1 points; 95% CI=1.9-4.2; p=0.001) and ZBI score (2.2 points; 95% CI=0.9-3.4; p=0.001). At 6 months, the global NPI and ZBI scores remained unchanged for the treated group. The treated group showed a significant reduction in the NPI irritability subscale score (2.1 points; 95% CI=0.4-3.7; p=0.015). In the clinical practice, trazodone treatment was prescribed for patients with irritability, agitation and disinhibition. After 6 months, patients treated with trazodone exhibited no increase in BPSD frequency or severity, nor was an increase noted in the caregiver burden. PMID:17897735

  20. Long-term follow-up of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-06-01

    The Life Span Study (LSS) is a follow-up study of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors to investigate the radiation effects on human health and has collected data for over 60 years. The LSS cohort consists of 93,741 A-bomb survivors and another 26,580 age and sex-matched subjects who were not in either city at the time of the bombing. Radiation doses have been computed based on individual location and shielding status at the time of the bombings. Age at death and cause of death are gathered through the Japanese national family registry system and cancer incidence data have been collected through the Hiroshima and Nagasaki cancer registries. Noncancer disease incidence and health information are collected through biannual medical examinations among a subset of the LSS. Radiation significantly increases the risks of death (22% at 1 Gy), cancer incidence (47% at 1 Gy), death due to leukemia (310% at 1 Gy), as well as the incidence of several noncancer diseases (e.g. thyroid nodules, chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, uterine myoma, and hypertension). Significant effects on maturity (e.g. growth reduction and early menopause) were also observed. Long-term follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors have provided reliable information on health risks for the survivors and form the basis for radiation protection standards for workers and the public. PMID:22440534

  1. The LCOGT near-Earth-object follow-up network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, T.

    2014-07-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) network is a planned homogeneous network that will eventually consist of over 35 telescopes at 6 locations in the northern and southern hemispheres [1]. This network is versatile and designed to respond rapidly to target of opportunity events and also to do long term monitoring of slowly changing astronomical phenomena. The global coverage of the network and the apertures of telescope available make the LCOGT network ideal for follow-up and characterization of a wide range of solar-system objects (e.g. asteroids, Kuiper-belt objects, comets) and in particular near-Earth objects (NEOs). There are 3 classes to the telescope resources: 2-meter aperture, 1-meter aperture and 0.4-meter aperture. We have been operating our two 2-meter telescopes since 2005 and began a specific program of NEO follow-up for the Pan-STARRS survey in October 2010. The combination of all-sky access, large aperture, rapid response, robotic operation and good site conditions allows us to provide time-critical follow-up astrometry and photometry on newly discovered objects and faint objects as they recede from the Earth, allowing the orbital arc to be extended and preventing loss of objects. These telescope resources have greatly increased as LCOGT has completed the first phase of the deployment, designated as ''Version 1.0'', with the installation, commissioning and ongoing operation of nine 1-meter telescopes. These are distributed among four sites with one 1-meter at McDonald Observatory (Texas), three telescopes at Cerro Tololo (Chile), three telescopes at SAAO (South Africa) and the final two telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (Australia). In addition to the 1-meter network, the scheduling and control system for the two 2-meter telescopes have been upgraded and unified with that of the 1-meter network to provide a coherent robotic telescopic network. The telescope network is now operating and observations are being executed remotely and

  2. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--FOOD FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONNAIRE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set includes responses for 163 food follow-up questionnaires. The food diary follow-up questionnaire was used to identify how the dietary patterns observed for study participants who had submitted duplicate diet samples and completed the associated food diary related to...

  3. SUBMILLIMETER FOLLOW-UP OF WISE-SELECTED HYPERLUMINOUS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jingwen; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Sayers, Jack; Bridge, Carrie; Benford, Dominic; Blain, Andrew; Petty, Sara; Lake, Sean; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; and others

    2012-09-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare ({approx}1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 {mu}m. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 {mu}m, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature. We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10{sup 13} L{sub Sun }. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe. We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  4. Submillimeter Follow-Up of WISE-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam; Weiner, Benjamin; Wright, Edward L.; Yan, Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approx.1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at z = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 microns, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 microns. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (z > 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 microns, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 microns, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60 C120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) Stellar Luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  5. Submillimeter Follow-up of Wise-Selected Hyperluminous Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Sayers, Jack; Benford, Dominic; Bridge, Carrie; Blain, Andrew; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Petty, Sara; Assef, Roberto; Bussmann, Shane; Comerford, Julia M.; Cutri, Roc; Evans, Neal J., II; Griffith, Roger; Jarrett, Thomas; Lake, Sean; Lonsdale, Carol; Rho, Jeonghee; Stanford, S. Adam

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) to follow-up a sample of Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) selected, hyperluminous galaxies, the so-called W1W2-dropout galaxies. This is a rare (approximately 1000 all-sky) population of galaxies at high redshift (peaks at zeta = 2-3), which are faint or undetected by WISE at 3.4 and 4.6 micrometers, yet are clearly detected at 12 and 22 micrometers. The optical spectra of most of these galaxies show significant active galactic nucleus activity. We observed 14 high-redshift (zeta greater than 1.7) W1W2-dropout galaxies with SHARC-II at 350-850 micrometers, with nine detections, and observed 18 with Bolocam at 1.1 mm, with five detections. Warm Spitzer follow-up of 25 targets at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers, as well as optical spectra of 12 targets, are also presented in the paper. Combining WISE data with observations from warm Spitzer and CSO, we constructed their mid-IR to millimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs have a consistent shape, showing significantly higher mid-IR to submillimeter ratios than other galaxy templates, suggesting a hotter dust temperature.We estimate their dust temperatures to be 60-120 K using a single-temperature model. Their infrared luminosities are well over 10(exp 13) solar luminosity. These SEDs are not well fitted with existing galaxy templates, suggesting they are a new population with very high luminosity and hot dust. They are likely among the most luminous galaxies in the universe.We argue that they are extreme cases of luminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), possibly representing a short evolutionary phase during galaxy merging and evolution. A better understanding of their long-wavelength properties needs ALMA as well as Herschel data.

  6. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  7. GRB050525A : Multiband modelling of the afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmi, Lekshmi; Misra, Kuntal; Castro-Tirado, Alberto

    2011-08-01

    The Swift era has posed a challenge to the standard blast-wave model of Gamma Ray Burst afterglows. The achromatic steepening of the afterglow lightcurves (`jet break') considered in the model as the signature of outflow collimation, has become almost rare. Several afterglows exhibited complex lightcurves that did not confirm by the predicted spectral--temporal `closure relations' of the blastwave model. Here we present optical observations and broadband modelling of the afterglow of GRB0505025A, a bright burst detected and followed up by Swift. We find that the overall evolution of the afterglow can not be explained by a single forward shock emission, though the late time evolution is compatible with the predictions of the standard afterglow model, including a jet break. We explain the afterglow evolution based on a two-component jet model and estimate the physical parameters.

  8. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt analysis... the railroad receives notification of the results of the toxicological analysis, any provision...

  9. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  10. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  11. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  12. 49 CFR 219.211 - Analysis and follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Analysis and follow-up. 219.211 Section 219.211 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Analysis and follow-up. (a) The laboratory designated in appendix B to this part undertakes prompt...

  13. High-Quality Early-Time Light Curves of GRB 060206: Implications for Gamma-Ray Burst Environments and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Carter, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Bersier, D. F.; Gomboc, A.; Melandri, A.; Mottram, C. J.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.

    2006-09-01

    The 2 m robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT) reacted promptly to the high-redshift (z=4.048) gamma-ray burst GRB 060206. The afterglow was identified automatically, and the multicolor r'i'z' imaging program was triggered without human intervention. Combining our data with those obtained from later follow-ups provides a well-sampled optical light curve from 5 minutes to more than 2days after the gamma event. The light curve is highly structured, with at least three bumps evident in the first 75 minutes, including a major rebrightening (Δr'~-1.6 at t~3000 s), interpreted as late energy injection. At early time (t~440 s), we find evidence for fast (Δtrest<4 s<GRB (z<1) with similar intrinsic properties would have been interpreted completely differently, due to undersampling of the light curve in the rest frame at early times; the light-curve behavior of GRB 060206 should therefore not be considered peculiar. Finally, although the observed late-time steepening of the optical light curve resembles a jet break if taken in isolation, the lack of a corresponding change in the X-ray slope rules out a jet-break interpretation. Traditionally, GRB jet breaks have been inferred from optical data in the absence of simultaneous X-ray data. We therefore suggest that current estimates of the jet-opening angle distribution might be biased by events like GRB 060206. Consequently, the GRB explosion energy distribution and event rates may have to be revised.

  14. Broadband Electromagnetic Follow-up of Advanced LIGO Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound Singer, Leo

    2016-04-01

    Advanced LIGO began observing in September 2015 with over 3 times the distance reach (27 times the sensitive volume) of its previous configuration. Some gravitational-wave sources, particularly neutron star binary mergers, are expected to produce broadband electromagnetic transients which may be crucial to understanding the astrophysical context of these events. We have assembled a consortium of over 60 ground- and space-based gamma-ray, x-ray, optical, infrared, and radio facilities collaborating to search for broadband electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational-wave sources. In this talk, we describe the LIGO/Virgo EM follow-up program and the astronomical facilities that participated during this first LIGO observing run. Then, we survey the multi-wavelength observing campaigns embarked upon for specific gravitational-wave events. Finally, we discuss lessons learned and the way forward for joint GW-EM observations in an era of increasingly sensitive GW detectors.Submitted with The LIGO Scientific Collaboration and The Virgo Collaboration.

  15. IRS Follow-up of Sources in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, James R.; Roellig, Thomas; Buckalew, Brent; Gehrz, Robert D.; McQuinn, Kristy; Polomski, Elisha; Roellig, Thomas L.; Woodward, Charles

    2006-05-01

    We are currently engaged in a Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) program (PID 5) to obtain MIPS and IRAC maps of M33 that will provide a global perspective on star formation, stellar evolution, and chemical evolution in the interstellar medium in a spiral galaxy. Combined with ground-based observations, these maps will provide a unified set of images that relate the locations of chemical enrichment, gas available to form stars, star formation, and evolved stars. We are proposing here to perform IRS spectroscopy using all of the IRS modules to follow-up on five embedded compact HII clusters which are located at various distances ranging up to 3.5 kpc from the center of M33. The low-resolution data will be particularly useful in identifying broad-band solid-state features, while the high-resolution module observations will be used to measure the strength of fine-structure emission lines, providing a wealth of information on the excitation levels and electron densities in the targets, without the complicating effects of extinction that hampers optical studies of these highly-enshrouded objects. Our proposed observations will allow important new insight into how star formation environments change across the face of the spiral galaxy M33.

  16. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Sakamoto, T.; Serino, M.; Virgili, F.; Zhang, B.-B.; Barthelmy, S.; Beardmore, A.; Bernardini, M. G.; Bersier, D.; Burrows, D.; Calderone, G.; Capalbi, M.; Chiang, J.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; De Pasquale, M.; Fugazza, D.; Gehrels, N.; Gomboc, A.; Harrison, R.; Hanayama, H.; Japelj, J.; Kennea, J.; Kopac, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuroda, D.; Levan, A.; Malesani, D.; Marshall, F.; Nousek, J.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Page, M.; Perri, M.; Pritchard, T.; Romano, P.; Saito, Y.; Sbarufatti, B.; Salvaterra, R.; Steele, I.; Tanvir, N.; Vianello, G.; Weigand, B.; Wiersema, K.; Yatsu, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ˜ 3 × 1053 ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  17. GRB 130427A: A Nearby Ordinary Monster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maselli, A.; Melandri, A.; Nava, L.; Mundell, C. G.; Kawai, N.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Ghirlander, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Guidorzi, C.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuin, P.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Marshall, F.; Wiegand, B.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L approx. 3 x 10(exp 53) ergs/s and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  18. GRB 130427A: a nearby ordinary monster.

    PubMed

    Maselli, A; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Mundell, C G; Kawai, N; Campana, S; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Evans, P A; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Kuin, P; La Parola, V; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Sakamoto, T; Serino, M; Virgili, F; Zhang, B-B; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bernardini, M G; Bersier, D; Burrows, D; Calderone, G; Capalbi, M; Chiang, J; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Fugazza, D; Gehrels, N; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R; Hanayama, H; Japelj, J; Kennea, J; Kopac, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuroda, D; Levan, A; Malesani, D; Marshall, F; Nousek, J; O'Brien, P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Page, K L; Page, M; Perri, M; Pritchard, T; Romano, P; Saito, Y; Sbarufatti, B; Salvaterra, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N; Vianello, G; Wiegand, B; Weigand, B; Wiersema, K; Yatsu, Y; Yoshii, T; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars and are typically found in the distant universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity (L ~ 3 × 10(53) ergs per second) and its relative proximity (z = 0.34), GRB 130427A reached the highest fluence observed in the γ-ray band. Here, we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-meter Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes, and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies. PMID:24263134

  19. Optical/IR Follow-Up of Gamma-Ray Bursts from SMARTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany; Bailyn, Charles; Bloom, Joshua

    2013-02-01

    We request time to continue the successful SMARTS GRB program currently being carried out with the 1.3m SMARTS telescope equipped with the ANDICAM imager. Our request is 4 nights of target of opportunity observing time during semester 2013A. Our primary science goals are: 1) to detect GRB afterglows and analyze their SEDs and temporal behaviors and 2) to search for the supernovae associated with low-redshift GRBs. The 1.3m at CTIO is well- suited for this program because it is equipped with the ANDICAM instrument, a dual-channel optical/IR imager. Our targets of opportunity can be easily accommodated on the telescope because it operates in a queue-based observing mode.

  20. Optical/IR Follow-Up of Gamma-Ray Bursts from SMARTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany; Bailyn, Charles

    2014-02-01

    We request time to continue the successful SMARTS GRB program currently being carried out with the 1.3m SMARTS telescope equipped with the ANDICAM imager. Our request is 4 nights of target of opportunity observing time during semester 2014A. Our primary science goals are: 1) to detect GRB afterglows and analyze their SEDs and temporal behaviors and 2) to search for the supernovae associated with low-redshift GRBs. The 1.3m at CTIO is well- suited for this program because it is equipped with the ANDICAM instrument, a dual-channel optical/IR imager. Our targets of opportunity can be easily accommodated on the telescope because it operates in a queue-based observing mode.

  1. Optical/IR Follow-Up of Gamma-Ray Bursts from SMARTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Bethany; Bailyn, Charles; Bloom, Joshua

    2012-02-01

    We request time to continue the successful SMARTS GRB program currently being carried out with the 1.3m SMARTS telescope equipped with the ANDICAM imager. Our request is 4 nights of target of opportunity observing time during semester 2012A. Our primary science goals are: 1) to detect GRB afterglows and analyze their SEDs and temporal behaviors and 2) to search for the supernovae associated with low-redshift GRBs. The 1.3m at CTIO is well- suited for this program because it is equipped with the ANDICAM instrument, a dual-channel optical/IR imager. Our targets of opportunity can be easily accommodated on the telescope because it operates in a queue-based observing mode.

  2. Early emission of rising optical afterglows: the case of GRB 060904B and GRB 070420

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, A.; Gendre, B.; Stratta, G.; Galli, A.; Corsi, A.; Preger, B.; Cutini, S.; Pélangeon, A.; Atteia, J. L.; Boër, M.; Piro, L.

    2008-06-01

    Aims: We present the time-resolved optical emission of gamma-ray bursts GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 during their prompt and early afterglow phases. Methods: We used time resolved photometry from optical data taken by the TAROT telescope and time resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the Swift spacecraft instrument. Results: The optical emissions of both GRBs are found to increase from the end of the prompt phase, passing to a maximum of brightness at t_peak=9.2 min and 3.3 min for GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 respectively and then decrease. GRB 060904B presents a large optical plateau and a very large X-ray flare. We argue that the very large X-flare occurring near t_peak is produced by an extended internal engine activity and is only a coincidence with the optical emission. GRB 070420 observations would support this idea because there was no X-flare during the optical peak. The nature of the optical plateau of GRB 060904B is less clear and might be related to the late energy injection. Based on observations performed with TAROT at the Calern/OCA and La Silla/ESO observatories, GCN data archive and Swift public data archive.

  3. Strategies to photometric follow-up transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, L.

    2014-03-01

    It is now well ascertained that those extrasolar planets that transit in front to their parent stars deserve extensive follow-up observations because they are the only ones for which we can directly measure all their physical parameters. This information currently provides the best route to constructing the mass-radius diagram of exoplanets, which channels the theoretical formation/evolution models in the right path. However, many of the discovered transiting planets do not have high-quality light curves, so their physical properties are poorly known. In this perspective, we are leading a large program to obtain ultra-high-precision photometry of transit events, which are analyzed to accurately measure the physical properties of know planetary systems. Besides measuring and refining the physical properties of the planets and their parent stars, we also try to obtain additional information from the light curves, by identifying particular features of the systems (e.g. stellar activity) and investigating the composition of the planetary atmospheres by transmission photometry. In this conference-proceedings contribution I present several observational strategies that we adopt to achieve these goals. %

  4. Bilateral sacrospinous fixation without hysterectomy: 18-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Mehmet Baki; Güraslan, Hakan; Çakmak, Yusuf; Ekin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of bilateral sacrospinous fixation (SSF), which was performed with surgical mesh interposition and bilateral vaginal repair. Material and Methods Twenty-two patients underwent SSF between 2010 and 2012, and the results were evaluated retrospectively. The results at preoperative and postoperative 6th, 12th, and 18th months of the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system (POP-Q) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) were compared using Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests. Values of p<0.05 and <0.01 were considered statistically significant. Results According to the POP-Q, significant healing was observed on all vaginal vault points (p=0.001), and no prolapse was observed until the 18-month follow-up stage. There were also prominent patients who felt satisfactory with respect to their sexual life according to PISQ-12 (p=0.001). Conclusion This technique appears to provide an adequate clinical resolution, and it may be the primary surgical option for women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:26097393

  5. Follow-Up and Feed-Back Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripwell, Kenneth R.

    1968-01-01

    Presented and discussed are a series of suggestions and examples concerned with improving ETV and ITV programs through feedback and increasing their effectiveness through the use of follow-up materials in the classroom. (LS)

  6. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  7. Women with abnormal screening mammography lost to follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Guan-Ru; Hung, Shou-Hung; Liu, Yi-Lien; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Cheng, Shao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer has the highest incidence among all cancers for women in Taiwan. The current screening policy in Taiwan suggested a biennial mammography for all women 40 to 69 years of age. A recommendation for additional testing is recommended for women with a BI-RADS result of 0 or 4; a request made via postal mail. Approximately 20% of high-risk patients do not receive additional follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to explore the causes of these patients being lost to follow-up, despite an abnormal mammogram. Two questionnaires were designed separately according to the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model. Study participants, women who received a screening mammography at the National Taiwan University Hospital in 2011 with a BI-RAD of 0 or 4, were interviewed via telephone. The dependent variable was receipt of follow-up or not. The analyses were performed by using χ2 tests and logistic regression models. In total, 528 women were enrolled in the study: 51.2% in BI-RADS 0 group and 56.6% in BI-RADS 4, respectively. In the BI-RADS 0 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the most likely causes to be physician suggestion, health implications, and concerns regarding breast cancer. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited a lack of time and a perception of good personal health as primary reasons. In the BI-RADS 4 group, those patients who received a follow-up examination cited the physician's recommendation and a recognition of the importance of follow-up examinations. Patients who did not receive a follow-up examination cited having received follow-up at another hospital and a desire for a second opinion. In the BI-RADS 0 group, multivariate analysis showed that patients with higher scores in the “perceived benefits” domain were statistically more likely to receive a follow-up examination. There was no significant difference in perceived threats, perceived barriers, action cues, or self-efficacy between

  8. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. PMID:26036205

  9. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanne, S.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Basa, S.; Boer, M.; Casse, F.; Cordier, B.; Daigne, F.; Klotz, A.; Limousin, O.; Manchanda, R.; Mandrou, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Mochkovitch, R.; Paltani, S.; Paul, J.; Petitjean, P.; Pons, R.; Ricker, G.; Skinner, G.

    2006-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)—at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds—are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A “Phase A study” of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the “Myriade” family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4 50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations.

  10. Myxedema madness complicating postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Morosán Allo, Yanina J; Rosmarin, Melanie; Urrutia, Agustina; Faingold, Maria Cristina; Musso, Carla; Brenta, Gabriela

    2015-08-01

    Although hypothyroidism is associated with an increased prevalence of psychiatric manifestations, myxedema madness is rarely observed. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman with no prior history of psychiatric disorders, who presented to the emergency department with psychomotor agitation 6 weeks after total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on admission was 62.9 mIU/L and free T4 was < 0.35 ng/dL, indicating severe hypothyroidism. After ruling out other possible causes, the diagnosis of myxedema madness was considered; hence, antipsychotic drug treatment and intravenous levothyroxine were prescribed. Behavioral symptoms returned to normal within 4 days of presentation, while levels of thyroid hormones attained normal values 1 week after admission. Recombinant TSH (Thyrogen®) was used successfully to prevent new episodes of mania due to thyroid hormone withdrawal in further controls for her thyroid cancer. This case illustrates that myxedema madness can occur in the setting of acute hypothyroidism, completely reverting with levothyroxine and antipsychotic treatment. Recombinant TSH may be a useful tool to prevent myxedema madness or any severe manifestation of levothyroxine withdrawal for the follow-up of thyroid cancer. PMID:26331326

  11. Follow-up skeletal survey use by child abuse pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Harper, Nancy S; Lewis, Terri; Eddleman, Sonja; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal survey is frequently used to identify occult fractures in young children with concern for physical abuse. Because skeletal survey is relatively insensitive for some abusive fractures, a follow-up skeletal survey (FUSS) may be undertaken at least 10-14 days after the initial skeletal survey to improve sensitivity for healing fractures. This was a prospectively planned secondary analysis of a prospective, observational study of 2,890 children who underwent subspecialty evaluation for suspected child physical abuse at 1 of 19 centers. Our objective was to determine variability between sites in rates of FUSS recommendation, completion and fracture identification among the 2,049 participants who had an initial SS. Among children with an initial skeletal survey, the rate of FUSS recommendation for sites ranged from 20% to 97%; the rate of FUSS completion ranged from 10% to 100%. Among sites completing at least 10 FUSS, rates of new fracture identification ranged from 8% to 28%. Among completed FUSS, new fractures were more likely to be identified in younger children, children with higher initial level of concern for abuse, and those with a fracture or cutaneous injury identified in the initial evaluation. The current variability in FUSS utilization is not explained by variability in occult fracture prevalence. Specific guidelines for FUSS utilization are needed. PMID:26342432

  12. Diagnosis, treatment and follow up of neonatal arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Binnetoğlu, Fatih Köksal; Babaoğlu, Kadir; Altun, Gürkan; Türker, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective This study aimed to evaluate the aetiology, spectrum, course and outcomes of neonates with arrhythmias observed in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit from 2007 to 2012. Methods Neonates with rhythm problems were included. The results of electrocardiography (ECG), Holter ECG, echocardiography and biochemical analysis were evaluated. The long-term results of follow up were reviewed. Results Forty-five patients were male (68%) and 21 (32%) were female. Fifty-five patients (83.3%) were term, 11 (16.6%) were preterm, and 34% were diagnosed in the prenatal period. Twenty cases (30.3%) had congenital heart disease. Twenty-three patients (34.8%) were diagnosed during the foetal period. The most common arrhythmias were supraventricular ectopic beats and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) at 39.3 and 22.7%, respectively. SVT recurred in five patients after the neonatal period. Conclusion Supraventricular ectopic beats and SVT were the most common arrhythmias during the neonatal period. Although the prognosis of arrhythmias in the neonatal period is relatively good, regular monitoring is required. PMID:24844549

  13. Follow up study of workers manufacturing chrysotile asbestos cement products.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Winter, P D; Pannett, B; Powell, C A

    1986-01-01

    A cohort study has been carried out of 2167 subjects employed between 1941 and 1983 at an asbestos cement factory in England. The production process incorporated the use of chrysotile asbestos fibre only, except for a small amount of amosite during four months in 1976. Measured airborne fibre concentrations available since 1970 from personal samplers showed mean levels below 1 fibre/ml, although higher levels had probably occurred previously in certain areas of the factory. No excess of lung cancer was observed in the mortality follow up by comparison with either national or local death rates, and analyses of subgroups of the workforce by job, exposure level, duration of employment, duration since entry, or calendar years of employment gave no real suggestion of an asbestos related excess for this cause of death. There was one death from pleural mesothelioma and one with asbestosis mentioned as an associated cause on the death certificate, but neither is thought to be linked to asbestos exposure at this factory. Other suggested asbestos related cancers, such as laryngeal and gastrointestinal, did not show raised risks. Although the durations of exposure were short in this study, the findings are consistent with two other studies of workers exposed to low concentrations of chrysotile fibre in the manufacture of asbestos cement products which reported no excess mortality. PMID:3024695

  14. Surveys, Astrometric Follow-Up, and Population Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedicke, R.; Granvik, M.; Micheli, M.; Ryan, E.; Spahr, T.; Yeomans, D. K.

    Asteroid surveys are the backbone of asteroid science, and with this in mind we begin with a broad review of the impact of asteroid surveys on our field. We then provide a brief history of asteroid discoveries so as to place contemporary and future surveys in perspective. Surveys in the United States (U.S.) have discovered the vast majority of the asteroids, and this dominance has been consolidated since the publication of Asteroids III. Our descriptions of the asteroid surveys that have been operational since that time are focused on those that have contributed the vast majority of asteroid observations and discoveries. We also provide some insight into upcoming next-generation surveys that are sure to alter our understanding of the small bodies in the inner solar system and provide evidence to untangle their complicated dynamical and physical histories. The Minor Planet Center, the nerve center of the asteroid discovery effort, has improved its operations significantly in the past decade so that it can manage the increasing discovery rate, and ensure that it is well-placed to handle the data rates expected in the next decade. We also consider the difficulties associated with astrometric follow-up of newly identified objects. It seems clear that both of these efforts must operate in new modes in order to keep pace with expected discovery rates of next-generation ground- and spacebased surveys.

  15. Asbestos and cancer: a cohort followed up to death.

    PubMed Central

    Enterline, P E; Hartley, J; Henderson, V

    1987-01-01

    The mortality experience of 1074 white men who retired from a United States asbestos company during the period 1941-67 and who were exposed to asbestos working as production and maintenance employees for the company is reported to the end of 1980 when 88% of this cohort was known to be dead. As noted in earlier reports the mortality for respiratory and gastrointestinal cancer was raised. A more detailed examination of causes of death shows that the excess in gastrointestinal cancer was largely due to a statistically significant excess in stomach cancer. A statistically significant excess was also noted for kidney cancer, cancer of the eye, and non-malignant respiratory disease. Eight deaths from malignant mesothelioma were observed, two of which were peritoneal. Asbestos exposures for these mesothelioma cases were low relative to other members of the cohort. Continuing follow up of this cohort shows a dose response relation for respiratory cancer that has become increasingly linear. Standardised mortality ratios peaked 10 to 15 years after retirement and were relatively constant at around 250 in each five year interval starting in 1950. This excess might have been detected as early as 1960 but certainly by 1965. The mortality experience of this cohort reflects the ultimate effects of asbestos since nearly all of the cohort has now died. PMID:3606968

  16. Searching for Soft Relativistic Jets in Core-Collapse Supernovae with the IceCube Optical Follow-up Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. -H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of < or approx.100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in high relativistic jets, core-collapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets, which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star leading to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. Aims. To increase the sensitivity to these neutrinos and identify their sources, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with the IceCube observatory has been implemented. Methods. If a neutrino multiplet, i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s, is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment, ROTSE. The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the corresponding region of the sky in order to detect an optical counterpart to the neutrino events. Results. No statistically significant excess in the rate of neutrino multiplets has been observed and furthermore no coincidence with an optical counterpart was found. Conclusions. The search allows, for the first time, to set stringent limits on current models predicting a high-energy neutrino flux from soft relativistic hadronic jets in core-collapse SNe. We conclude that a sub-population of SNe with typical Lorentz boost factor and jet energy of 10 and 3 x 10(exp 51) erg, respectively, does not exceed 4:2% at 90% confidence.

  17. Searching for High-energy Neutrinos from Supernovae with IceCube and an Optical Follow-up Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franckowiak, Anna

    2011-08-01

    In violent astrophysical processes high-energy neutrinos of TeV to PeV energies are expected to be produced along with the highest energy cosmic rays. The acceleration of nuclei to very high energies is assumed to takes place in astrophysical shocks and neutrinos are produced in the interaction of these cosmic rays with ambient baryons or photons. The neutrinos then escape the acceleration region and propagate through space without interaction, while the nuclei are deflected in magnetic fields and no longer carry information about their source position. Unlike gamma-rays, neutrinos are solely produced in hadronic processes and can therefore reveal the sources of charged cosmic rays. The IceCube neutrino detector, which is located at the geographical South Pole, has been build to detect these high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. The deep clear Antarctic ice is instrumented with light sensors on a grid, thus forming a Cherenkov particle detector, which is capable of detecting charged particles induced by neutrinos above 100 GeV. Transient neutrino sources such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are hypothesized to emit bursts of high-energy neutrinos on a time-scale of = 100 s. While GRB neutrinos would be produced in the high relativistic jets driven by the central engine, corecollapse SNe might host soft-relativistic jets which become stalled in the outer layers of the progenitor star and lead to an efficient production of high-energy neutrinos. This work aims for an increased sensitivity for these neutrinos and for a possible identification of their sources. Towards this goal, a low-threshold optical follow-up program for neutrino multiplets detected with IceCube has been implemented. If a neutrino multiplet - i.e. two or more neutrinos from the same direction within 100 s - is found by IceCube a trigger is sent to the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE). The 4 ROTSE telescopes immediately start an observation program of the

  18. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Della Valle, Massimo; Ferrero, Patrizia; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens; Pian, Elena; Salvaterra, Ruben; Bersier, David; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Haislip, Joshua B.; and others

    2013-09-10

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  19. GRB090510: a short bright and hard GRB detected by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, F. de

    2010-03-26

    On 2009 May 10, 00:22:59 UT (T{sub 0}) the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) triggered and located the short and very bright GRB090510. For the first time, this hard GRB, with an Epeak of few MeV, also triggered independently the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Swift detected this GRB and the accurate position provided by the Swift/UVOT made possible a spectroscopic redshift measurement of z = 0.903 with VLT/FORS2. This short GRB exhibits new features for this kind of events such an extra component (power-law) at high energies and a long lasting (few minutes) emission observed by the LAT. These observations allow the derivation of very important physical parameters such as the minimum value of the bulk Lorentz factor and they put some unprecedent limits on the dependence of the speed of photons on their energy.

  20. Effect of Health Literacy on Research Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Leak, Cardella; Goggins, Kathryn; Schildcrout, Jonathan S; Theobald, Cecelia; Donato, Katharine M; Bell, Susan P; Schnelle, John; Kripalani, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has not examined the effect of health literacy on research subjects' completion of scheduled research follow-up. This article evaluates patient factors associated with incomplete research follow-up at three time points after enrollment in a large, hospital-based prospective cohort study. Predictor variables included health literacy, age, race, gender, education, employment status, difficulty paying bills, hospital diagnosis, length of stay, self-reported global health status, depression, perceived health competence, medication adherence, and health care system distrust. In a sample of 2,042 patients, multivariable models demonstrated that lower health literacy and younger age were significantly associated with a lower likelihood of completing research follow-up interviews at 2-3 days, 30 days, and 90 days after hospital discharge. In addition, patients who had less education, were currently employed, and had moderate financial stress were less likely to complete 90-day follow-up. This study is the first to demonstrate that lower health literacy is a significant predictor of incomplete research follow-up. PMID:26513035

  1. The role of routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kew, F M; Roberts, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the evidence base for routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy. Only articles with a survival analysis were included. Relevant articles were identified by a comprehensive literature search of the main biomedical databases, hand searching of references of selected articles, and expert spotting of relevant journals and proceedings of international meetings. A two-stage extraction of data was undertaken. No prospective trials were identified. Twenty-nine retrospective case series analyses and one poster presentation met the inclusion criteria. Eight articles and one letter on endometrial cancer, six articles and one poster presentation on cervical cancer, and two articles in vulval cancer were reviewed. Only one article in endometrial cancer showed any survival benefit from routine follow-up, but it was of very poor methodologic quality. Two articles found a survival benefit from routine follow-up after cervical cancer. The two articles on vulval cancer did not find any survival benefit from routine review. There is no prospective research on the benefits of routine follow-up after gynecological cancer. Retrospective evidence calls in to question the benefit of universal follow-up. Prospective research is urgently needed. PMID:15882163

  2. Cohort follow-up: the 21st century procedures.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Debra E; Hughes, Therese; Aldrich, Timothy E; Silver, Kenneth Z; Brion, Gall M

    2009-01-01

    The basic logic of designing an occupational cohort study has changed little since William R. Gaffey outlined the issues of follow-up, measurement of exposure, and analysis of data. However, many new avenues of tracking workers for epidemiological studies have been developed since Gaffey wrote his paper in 1973. Many disease registries also perform follow-up of subjects for vital status determination, so the procedures used with this process are common to the two applications. This article speaks to cohort construction for this occupational research as well as describes the 2007 methods for vital status follow-up. Rises in concern about work-related disease risks and the scientific resources for performing these studies coincided with the computer revolution. Government and private sources of data on vital status have changed in several ways over the 35 years since Gaffey's seminal paper. Some systems make the process of follow-up more rapid and productive, and some barriers have been imposed as societal concerns for privacy have risen. We describe the process of linking 5 sources of data to compile a roster of 6,820 workers employed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant from 1953 to 2003. The record linkage processes achieved a final death cohort of 1672 deaths--the ascertainment of these deaths (by time period) was 1379 (1979-2003) and 293 (1953-1978); follow-up then was 100% for this cohort. PMID:19670694

  3. GRB 030329: 3 years of radio afterglow monitoring.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, A J; Kamble, A; Wijers, R A M J; Resmi, L; Bhattacharya, D; Rol, E; Strom, R; Kouveliotou, C; Oosterloo, T; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2007-05-15

    Radio observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are essential for our understanding of the physics of relativistic blast waves, as they enable us to follow the evolution of GRB explosions much longer than the afterglows in any other wave band. We have performed a 3-year monitoring campaign of GRB 030329 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescopes and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. Our observations, combined with observations at other wavelengths, have allowed us to determine the GRB blast wave physical parameters, such as the total burst energy and the ambient medium density, as well as to investigate the jet nature of the relativistic outflow. Further, by modelling the late-time radio light curve of GRB 030329, we predict that the Low-Frequency Array (30-240 MHz) will be able to observe afterglows of similar GRBs, and constrain the physics of the blast wave during its non-relativistic phase. PMID:17293318

  4. A GRB tool shed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Hakkila, Jon; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Mallozzi, Robert

    2000-09-01

    We describe the design of a suite of software tools to allow users to query Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data and perform data mining expeditions. We call this suite of tools a shed (SHell for Expeditions using Datamining). Our schedule is to have a completed prototype (funded via the NASA AISRP) by February, 2002. Meanwhile, interested users will find a partially functioning tool shed at http:/grb.mankato.msus.edu. .

  5. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  6. Follow-Up of Pulmonary Hypertension With Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Wright, Leah M; Dwyer, Nathan; Celermajer, David; Kritharides, Len; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    Individual patient response to effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension (PAH) is variable and difficult to quantify. Consequently, management decisions regarding initiation and continuation of therapy are highly dependent on the results of investigations. Registry data show that changes in cardiac index, mean right atrial pressure, and mean pulmonary artery pressure have the greatest influence on survival. It is recognized that pulmonary artery pressure (PASP) responses to PAH-specific drugs are heterogeneous. However, follow-up testing is strongly focused on assessing changes in PASP and functional status (6-min walk). The goals of therapy, which should be highlighted in follow-up imaging, include not only reduction of PASP, decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance, and improvements in right ventricular function, cardiac output, and tricuspid regurgitation. This paper reviews the echocardiographic follow-up of pulmonary hypertension, and especially focuses on right ventricular function-a major determinant of outcome, for which reliable echocardiographic assessment has become more feasible. PMID:27282440

  7. Suicide Prevention and Follow-Up Services: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Alavi, Kaveh; Khaleghparast, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Previous suicide attempt is the most important predictor of death by suicide. Thus preventive interventions after attempting to suicide is essential to prevent reattempts. This paper attempts to determine whether phone preventive interventions or other vehicles (postal cards, email and case management) are effective in reattempt prevention and health promotion after discharge by providing an overview of studies on suicide reattempts. The research investigated in this review conducted from 1995 to 2014. A total of 26 cases related to the aim of this research were derived from 36 English articles with the aforementioned keywords Research shows that providing comprehensive aids, social support, and follow-up after discharge can significantly prevent suicide reattempts. Several studies showed that follow-up support (phone calls, crisis cards, mails, postal cards.) after discharge can significantly decrease the risk of suicide. More randomized controlled trials (RCT) are required to determine what factors of follow-up are more effective than other methods. PMID:26652085

  8. Long-term Follow-up of Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in Osteoporotic Compression Fracture: Minimum of 5 Years Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hwan; Yoo, Si Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This was designed as a retrospective study. Purpose We assessed the radiographic and clinical outcome of patients who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) in osteoporotic compression fractures with a minimum of 5 years follow-up. Overview of Literature Percutaneous vertebroplasty is effective surgical method for treating osteoporotic compression fracture. Methods Between January 2000 and August 2005, 159 patients were treated with PVP for osteoporotic compression fracture at our department; 43 patients died during follow-up, and 69 patients (121 vertebras) were available for follow-up for over 5 years. We analyzed the clinical and radiologic outcome including cement feature. Results The mean follow-up period was 5.7 years. Clinical outcome by mean visual analogue scale (VAS) score revealed a decreased 4.9 points perioperatively. A decreased score was maintained over 5 years in 46% of patients. A new adjacent vertebral fracture was documented by 33 vertebral bodies in 22 patients. During the follow-up period, 43 patients (38%) in 112 patients died. Anterior body heig ht in the last follow-up was improved about 0.3 mm compared with the preprocedural value, but was not statistically significant. Also, the focal kyphotic angle was reduced from 12.3° at the preprocedural state to 11.7° at the postprocedural state, but was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions PVP for osteoporotic compression fracture is an efficient procedure for pain relief by long term follow-up. The cement injected vertebrae showed stable radiologic progression without significant changes in vertebral height or kyphotic angle. PMID:22439082

  9. Kepler Data Validation and Follow-up Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    William, Borucki J.

    2009-01-01

    The approach that the Kepler Mission uses to remove false positive events and to validate the discoveries consists of two parts; data validation (DPI) and follow up observations program (FOP). DV consists of several methods of examining the data from the spacecraft observations. First, to rule out statistical fluctuations in the data, accept only signals that show 3 or more transits and that have a total signal-to-noise ratio that exceeds 7 sigma. Second. to identify small stellar companions to the target star, we check for secondary eclipses and determine if the transit characteristics are appropriate for a planetary companion. Third, check for background binaries that are in the target aperture. Here we measure the movement of the image centroid before, during, and after the transit. If the target is producing the signal, a dimming wi11 move the image centroid in a known direction and magnitude. If the signal comes from a nearby star, the amplitude and direction of the motion wi11 be different, This test is expected to rule out the hundreds of binary signals expected from background stars. The precision of the measurement depends on the stellar fluxes and positions but can be better than 0.01 pixel; i.e., 0.04". Those candidates that pass these tests are examined using ground-based telescopes and radial velocity spectrometers. First medium precision RV is used to rule out any remaining stellar companions. Then high spatial resolution imaging is used to check for nearby stars that are in the aperture- (The Kepler apertures depend on magnitude but are of order 36 sq are sec in area.) If no stars are present that quid generate the observed signal, then the candidate goes to a large telescope such as Keck, HET, or Wi1lilam Herschel for high precision observations to get the planet mass or an upper limit to it, if there are some stars in the aperture, then the photometric observations are employed to look for the transit by cane of the confounding stars. If none are

  10. Diabetes after infectious hepatitis: a follow-up study.

    PubMed Central

    Oli, J M; Nwokolo, C

    1979-01-01

    Eleven patients (nine men, one woman, and one girl) aged 11-62 years who developed diabetes mellitus after an attack of infectious hepatitis during the Eastern Nigerian epidemic of 1970-2 were followed up for two to nine years. One patient aged 60 years remained diabetic after the original illness. In the remaining 10 patients the diabetes remitted after three to nine months (mean 6.7 months) but in four it recurred after a remission lasting one and a half to four years (mean 2.6 years). Results of this follow-up study seem to confirm that the pancreas is sometimes permanently damaged during infectious hepatitis. PMID:435884

  11. Partial pneumoencephalography in following-up pituitary tumours 1

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, William W.; Wilson, Gabriel H.; Rand, Robert W.; Gartland, John P.

    1974-01-01

    The `limited' pneumoencephalogram has been used with excellent success at UCLA for the continuing follow-up of pituitary tumours. It is most useful in following nonsecretory adenomas since tumour regrowth can occur in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms. Total serial pneumoencephalography has not been accepted previously for follow-up of pituitary tumours since there is a significant morbidity. The `limited' pneumoencephalogram of the diseased area drastically reduces the morbidity of the procedure so that the patients are willing to undergo serial studies on an outpatient basis. Images PMID:4844132

  12. Group anxiety management: effectiveness, perceived helpfulness and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cadbury, S; Childs-Clark, A; Sandhu, S

    1990-05-01

    An evaluation was conducted on out-patient cognitive-behavioural anxiety management groups. Twenty-nine clients assessed before and after the group and at three-month follow-up showed significant improvement on self-report measures. A further follow-up on 21 clients, conducted by an independent assessor at an average of 11 months, showed greater improvement with time. Clients also rated how helpful they had found non-specific therapeutic factors, and specific anxiety management techniques. 'Universality' was the most helpful non-specific factor, and 'the explanation of anxiety' was the most helpful technique. PMID:2364206

  13. DISCOVERY AND REDSHIFT OF AN OPTICAL AFTERGLOW IN 71 deg{sup 2}: iPTF13bxl AND GRB 130702A

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Leo P.; Brown, Duncan A.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Gehrels, Neil; McEnery, Julie; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Mulchaey, John; Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric; Barlow, Tom; Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A.; Masci, Frank J.; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg{sup 2} surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ∼10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  14. Phylloides tumours of the breast: best practice for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, Senthurun; Toro, Clare; Frank, Lucinda; Vestey, Sarah; Thrush, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Phylloides tumours are rare fibroepithelial breast tumours accounting for 1% of breast cancers. No UK guidance exists on the assessment, treatment and follow-up of these patients. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the clinical core biopsy compared to the gold standard excision biopsy and determine the current follow-up practice and recurrence rate of phylloides tumours across two UK hospital trusts. Multicentre retrospective analysis of all cases of phylloides tumours over 6 years at Worcestershire Acute NHS Trust (WANHST) and Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust (GHNHST). 94 Patients included. Mean age 48 years. Mean clinical and radiological size of lesions 31.7 and 35.4 mm, respectively, preoperative core biopsy sensitivity was 87% for WANHST and 74% for GHNHST with a positive predictive value of 90 and 100%, respectively. 29 Different follow-up regimes were observed from the practice of the 10 surgeons observed following diagnosis and resection of tumours. The follow-up length ranged from discharge following one post-operative clinic attendance to 5-year clinical and/or radiological follow-up. 4 Benign and 2 malignant recurrent phylloides tumours were seen. All benign recurrences were local and found independently of follow-up. The earliest benign phylloides recurrence was at 6 years and the latest at 10 years. There is no standard follow-up of benign or malignant phylloides tumours. This study suggests that in the benign group, the risk of recurrence is small. We advocate no routine follow-up of benign phylloides tumours. PMID:25575495

  15. Extended Follow-Up | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    NCI supports the continued follow-up of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) to strengthen the PLCO as a valuable resource for molecular epidemiologic research as well as provide long-term data on the trial’s primary endpoints. |

  16. Follow-Up Report: 2005 Placements of 2004 NDUS Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Debra; Dunn, Eddie; Hillman, Mike; Morth, Tom; Schepp, Julie; Padilla, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Some of the questions most frequently asked of the North Dakota University System relate to the status of graduates and program completers of state educational institutions. Follow-up Information on North Dakota Education and Training (FINDET) is a consortium of several state agencies formed to provide answers to those questions. This report,…

  17. Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) Follow-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shull, L. E.; Kuyk, T.

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study of an earlier report on the Wide Angle Mobility Light (WAML) was conducted to analyze the various applications of the device and its reliability. Results indicate high client satisfaction with WAML among test subjects (26 blind male veterans with night blindness, age 32 to 68). (Author/PB)

  18. FOUR YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF FIRST EPISODE MANIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Khess, Christoday R.J.; Das, Jnanamay; Akhtar, Sayeed

    1997-01-01

    51 patients who were admitted for their first manic episode were followed up for 4 years after discharge from the hospital. 32 (62.7%) patients came for regular follow-ups whereas 19 (37.3%) patients did not come for any follow up. 19 (59.4%) patients out of the 32 patients had subsequent recurrences. 8 (25.0%) patients had a single recurrence only, whereas 11 (34.4%) patients had multiple recurrences. In total, 31 (74.19%) recurrences occurred in 4 years, out of which 23 (25.81%) recurrences were for mania and only 8 for depression. 46.88% patients had relapsed at the end of the first year and by the third year all 19 (59.4%) patients had relapsed. The chances of having a depressive episode was highest in the first six months after recovery from manic episode. Patients with a family history of bipolar illness had a more deleterious course. Poor drug compliance was a factor associated with greater relapse rates. Amongst the patients receiving regular medication, the patients who were on lithium had the best outcome. 48.8% patients had subsequent admissions in the four year follow up. Patients with late age of onset and substance abuse had required greater number of admissions. PMID:21584064

  19. Sexually Abstinent Adolescents: An 18-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Berger, Thomas J.; Hewett, John; Oleson, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    This study was a longitudinal follow-up of 697 early adolescents from 20 schools in Missouri, investigating students who, in 1997, indicated on a survey of sexual attitudes and behaviors that they had not had sexual intercourse. They completed the Reasons for Abstinence Scale (RAS) by identifying those items that were reasons why they had not had…

  20. Three Year Follow-Up of 1974 Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baratta, Mary Kathryne

    To evaluate the long-term benefits of attendance at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC), a three-year follow-up study was conducted of the 620 1974 graduates (324 transfer and 296 occupational students). Each graduate was sent a questionnaire collecting information on involvement with MVCC after graduation, present educational status,…

  1. Matching Methods for Selection of Participants for Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Lalongo, Nicholas S.

    2010-01-01

    This work examines ways to make the best use of limited resources when selecting individuals to follow up in a longitudinal study estimating causal effects. In the setting under consideration, covariate information is available for all individuals but outcomes have not yet been collected and may be expensive to gather, and thus only a subset of…

  2. Academic Resilience in Retrospect: Following up a Decade Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Erik E.

    2008-01-01

    In a unique follow-up study, Hispanic (Dominican American) students identified as resilient 10 years ago were reinterviewed to assess their interim progress, and explore how their educational and professional achievements have evolved over time. By having the students reflect on their beliefs a decade ago and how those beliefs have evolved in…

  3. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  4. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  5. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  6. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  7. 10 CFR 1022.17 - Follow-up.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.17 Follow-up. For those DOE actions taken in a floodplain or wetland, DOE shall verify that the implementation of the selected alternative,...

  8. A Follow-up Study of Secretarial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gell, Robert L.; Bleil, David F.

    To determine how effectively the Secretarial Studies Department's program was meeting the needs of its students, a follow-up study was conducted of former Montgomery Community College Secretarial Studies students. The survey sought to determine, in particular, if the students had secured employment that was related to their course work at the…

  9. Trident Technical College 1998 Graduate Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1998 graduate follow-up survey report of 915 TTC graduates. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job were obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job…

  10. Trident Technical College 1999 Graduate Follow-Up Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trident Technical Coll., Charleston, SC.

    Presents the results of South Carolina's Trident Technical College's (TTC's) 1999 graduate follow-up survey report. Graduates were surveyed and results were obtained for the following items: graduate goals, employment, placement rates, graduates in related fields, when job obtained, job finding methods, job locations, job satisfaction, job…

  11. Factors Associated with Adherence to Follow-up Colposcopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Laura J.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Wordlaw-Stintson, Lashawn; Vidal, Adriana; Smith, Jennifer S.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the gaps in knowledge about human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, transmission, and health consequences and factors associated with the knowledge gap is an essential first step for the development of interventions to improve adherence to follow-up among women with abnormal Pap smears. Purpose: To examine the relationship…

  12. Loss to Follow-Up: Issues and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.; Nelson, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Related to how EHDI programs address loss to follow-up, 47 coordinators responded with 277 items, and themes were identified in each…

  13. Clouston Syndrome: 25-year follow-up of a patient.

    PubMed

    Trídico, Lívia Arroyo; Antonio, João Roberto; Pozetti, Eurides Maria de Oliveira; Rosa, Ana Maria Mendes; Antonio, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Clouston syndrome is a rare genodermatosis that affects skin and annexes. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by generalized hypotrichosis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and nail dystrophy. This paper reports a 25-year follow-up of a patient with Clouston syndrome, from childhood to adulthood, monitoring diagnosis and clinical course of the disease. PMID:26734875

  14. Clouston Syndrome: 25-year follow-up of a patient*

    PubMed Central

    Trídico, Lívia Arroyo; Antonio, João Roberto; Pozetti, Eurides Maria de Oliveira; Rosa, Ana Maria Mendes; Antonio, Carlos Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Clouston syndrome is a rare genodermatosis that affects skin and annexes. It is a form of ectodermal dysplasia characterized by generalized hypotrichosis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and nail dystrophy. This paper reports a 25-year follow-up of a patient with Clouston syndrome, from childhood to adulthood, monitoring diagnosis and clinical course of the disease. PMID:26734875

  15. Follow-Up Study of Pupils with Differing Preschool Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Robert V.; DeFord, Edward F.

    A follow-up study of the Early Childhood Education Project (ECEP) was conducted in Richmond, Virginia to determine the effects of preschool experiences on selected aspects of pupil performance at the beginning and completion of grade 1. EPEC is a Head Start type program organized for the regular school year. The sample was divided into three…

  16. Career Counseling and Follow-up Study, Spring 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Heights Adult School, San Francisco, CA.

    This follow-up study of participants in the Career Workshop of the Pacific Heights Adult School is based on 117 responses to 453 questionnaires mailed in the Spring of 1971. Responses were analyzed by categories and numerical responses to the questions asked. The categories were: age, education, employment, occupations, occupations and education,…

  17. South Dakota Vocational Education Follow-Up. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawley, Malcolm J.

    As the third phase of a project designed to develop a system for statewide follow-up of postsecondary vocational education, a study was conducted to develop instruments that would provide data for the employability assessment of the graduates from vocational programs. The instruments were designed to answer two questions: Are the students prepared…

  18. FOLLOW UP STUDY OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Follow-Up Study involves locating and interviewing a group of young adults who, as 10-year-old children, were included in the Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study, an investigation of the prevalence and risk factors for developmental disabilities that was con...

  19. Brevard District Plan for Placement and Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Olive W.

    The Brevard District Plan for placement and follow-up is intended for all secondary students, including dropouts, disadvantaged, adult students, and graduates. The areas of placement may be in gainful employment, educational institutions, or a combination of both. The plan specifies procedures for implementing placement and stipulates the type of…

  20. Follow-Up of the Fall 1990 FTIC Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Patricia

    Drawing from data provided by the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this series of reports provides follow-up information on FTIC students entering Tallahassee Community College (TCC) in fall 1990. The four reports compare students based on race, entry level test pass rates, full-/part-time status, and grade…

  1. Follow-Up of 1984 Entrants. Research Report Number 60.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seboda, Barbara L.

    In 1988, a follow-up mail survey was conducted of 1984 entrants at Howard Community College (HCC) in Maryland to determine their educational and career achievements subsequent to their community college experience and to assess the effectiveness of the college from the students' perspective. Questionnaires were sent to all 1,160 student who…

  2. Rationale and design of the health economics evaluation registry for remote follow-up: TARIFF

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Renato P.; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Padeletti, Luigi; Sagone, Antonio; Vicentini, Alfredo; Vincenti, Antonio; Morichelli, Loredana; Cavallaro, Ciro; Ricciardi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Leonida; Fusco, Antonio; Rovaris, Giovanni; Silvestri, Paolo; Guidotto, Tiziana; Pollastrelli, Annalisa; Santini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Aims The aims of the study are to develop a cost-minimization analysis from the hospital perspective and a cost-effectiveness analysis from the third payer standpoint, based on direct estimates of costs and QOL associated with remote follow-ups, using Merlin@home and Merlin.net, compared with standard ambulatory follow-ups, in the management of ICD and CRT-D recipients. Methods and results Remote monitoring systems can replace ambulatory follow-ups, sparing human and economic resources, and increasing patient safety. TARIFF is a prospective, controlled, observational study aimed at measuring the direct and indirect costs and quality of life (QOL) of all participants by a 1-year economic evaluation. A detailed set of hospitalized and ambulatory healthcare costs and losses of productivity that could be directly influenced by the different means of follow-ups will be collected. The study consists of two phases, each including 100 patients, to measure the economic resources consumed during the first phase, associated with standard ambulatory follow-ups, vs. the second phase, associated with remote follow-ups. Conclusion Remote monitoring systems enable caregivers to better ensure patient safety and the healthcare to limit costs. TARIFF will allow defining the economic value of remote ICD follow-ups for Italian hospitals, third payers, and patients. The TARIFF study, based on a cost-minimization analysis, directly comparing remote follow-up with standard ambulatory visits, will validate the cost effectiveness of the Merlin.net technology, and define a proper reimbursement schedule applicable for the Italian healthcare system. Trial registration: NCT01075516. PMID:22544910

  3. FERMI OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 090510: A SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST WITH AN ADDITIONAL, HARD POWER-LAW COMPONENT FROM 10 keV TO GeV ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E. E-mail: sylvain.guiriec@lpta.in2p3.f E-mail: ohno@astro.isas.jaxa.j

    2010-06-20

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E{sub peak} = 3.9 {+-} 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 {+-} 0.03 that dominates the emission below {approx}20 keV and above {approx}100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by {approx}0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5{sup +5.8}{sub -2.6} GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, {Gamma}{approx_gt} 1200, using simple {gamma}{gamma} opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the {approx}100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply {Gamma} {approx_gt} 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  4. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  5. Search for VHE emission from GRB with Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Saz Parkinson, P.M.

    2005-02-21

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high-energy particles impacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for very high-energy emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRB) during the prompt emission phase because of its wide field of view and high duty cycle, monitoring the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. 33 satellite-triggered GRB have occurred within the field of view of Milagro between January 2000 and December 2003. We have searched for counterparts to these GRB and found no significant emission from any of these burst positions. In the case of GRB 010921, the redshift is low enough (0.45) that our upper limit on the fluence places an observational constraint on potential GRB models.

  6. Nurse led follow up and conventional medical follow up in management of patients with lung cancer: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally; Corner, Jessica; Haviland, Jo; Wells, Mary; Salmon, Emma; Normand, Charles; Brada, Mike; O'Brien, Mary; Smith, Ian

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of nurse led follow up in the management of patients with lung cancer. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Specialist cancer hospital and three cancer units in southeastern England. Participants 203 patients with lung cancer who had completed their initial treatment and were expected to survive for at least 3 months. Intervention Nurse led follow up of outpatients compared with conventional medical follow up. Outcome measures Quality of life, patients' satisfaction, general practitioners' satisfaction, survival, symptom-free survival, progression-free survival, use of resources, and comparison of costs. Results Patient acceptability of nurse led follow up was high: 75% (203/271) of eligible patients consented to participate. Patients who received the intervention had less severe dyspnoea at 3 months (P=0.03) and had better scores for emotional functioning (P=0.03) and less peripheral neuropathy (P=0.05) at 12 months. Intervention group patients scored significantly better in most satisfaction subscales at 3, 6, and 12 months (P<0.01 for all subscales at 3 months). No significant differences in general practitioners' overall satisfaction were seen between the two groups. No differences were seen in survival or rates of objective progression, although nurses recorded progression of symptoms sooner than doctors (P=0.01). Intervention patients were more likely to die at home rather than in a hospital or hospice (P=0.04), attended fewer consultations with a hospital doctor during the first 3 months (P=0.004), had fewer radiographs during the first 6 months (P=0.04), and had more radiotherapy within the first 3 months (P=0.01). No other differences were seen between the two groups in terms of the use of resources. Conclusion Nurse led follow up was acceptable to lung cancer patients and general practitioners and led to positive outcomes. What is already known on this topicMost patients with cancer are routinely seen in

  7. Curiosity and Exploratory Behavior in Disadvantaged Children: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minuchin, Patricia P.

    In a follow-up study of curiosity and exploratory behavior, subjects were 18 disadvantaged inner-city black children who had been observed at age four in their first year of a Head Start program, and who were now finishing first grade. Data were obtained from teachers, observations in the classrooms, and an individual session with each child. Each…

  8. [Densitometric follow-up of algodystrophy using computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Lindecken, K D; Krawzak, H W; Strosche, H; Kukulies, R; Schmidt, W G

    1987-01-01

    Clinical and radiological findings obtained from diagnosis and follow-up examination of post-traumatic algodystrophy (Morbus Sudeck) are very much open to subjective interpretation. Decisive importance is attributed not only to alteration of soft tissue but also to typical distribution patterns and severity of bone demineralisation. No objectifiable and quantifiable have so far become available for proper assessment but are urgently desirable in view of the great number of therapeutic approaches. Densitometry integrated with computed tomography was applied to nine patients with algodystrophy of hand or foot in the region of spongy bones to determine absorption values which were then compared with those on the clinically intact side. Significant differences between sides proved to be objectifiable and were quantifiable measures by which demineralisation of the effected extremity could be assessed. Repeated examinations were undertaken for follow-up through a period up to nine months. PMID:3630448

  9. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. PMID:24290154

  10. Is follow-up capacity the current NHS bottleneck?

    PubMed

    Allder, Steven; Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate

    2011-02-01

    Capacity and demand theory suggests that the presence of a queue is not necessarily an indication of a shortage of capacity in a system. It is much more likely that either there is a demand and capacity variation that creates queues or there is a delay designed into the system. A shortage of capacity is only really indicated where a backlog is not stable and continues to grow. In this article, data are taken from one NHS trust that provides evidence for a continually growing backlog for follow-up outpatient services. It is believed that these data are representative of most locations within the NHS in England and therefore suggest an immediate shortage in effective follow-up capacity. To avoid compromise to patient care, the problem will have to be addressed before the situation becomes unmanageable. The paper highlights options to reduce or deflect demand or to increase effective capacity. PMID:21404781

  11. A Follow-up Study: The Registered Nurses Program, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondwros, Jerry M.

    Twenty-seven (77.1%) of the thirty-five 1977 graduates of the South Georgia Colleges' Division of Nursing responded to a follow-up survey, producing the following information: (1) 17 were employed full-time, two were employed part-time, and eight were unemployed; (2) 88.9% agreed they were prepared adequately for the state board examination; (3)…

  12. The Doctorate in Education. Volume IV, Follow-UP Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludlow, H. Glenn; And Others

    A study was conducted (follow-up to SP 004 600) of the 1,186 recipients of the Ed.D. and Ph.D. degrees in education in the United States in 1958. Questionnaire data was collected to investigate 5-year career development and job satisfaction plus ability and achievement (as measured by high school graduating class rank, intelligence test scores,…

  13. A GP's duty to follow up test results.

    PubMed

    Bird, Sara

    2003-01-01

    Medical negligence claims alleging 'failure to diagnose' are a common cause of claims against general practitioners. In these claims there is often an underlying weakness in the GP's test result and patient tracking systems. This article discusses the duty of care of a GP to follow up patients and their test results. Guidance is provided on how to establish an effective test result tracking system in order to minimise the possibility of a claim arising from 'failure to diagnose'. PMID:12647659

  14. Benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis--25 years of follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Putterman, C.; Keidar, S.; Brook, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Only 70 cases of recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis have been reported in the literature since the original description of this entity in 1959. The benign nature of the disease has been questioned, some authors suggesting progression to biliary cirrhosis. We report our follow-up of one such patient for over 25 years with no adverse physical consequences or histological deterioration. Sequential liver biopsies were obtained during this period. A conservative approach to diagnosis and treatment is therefore indicated. PMID:3684838

  15. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  16. The Ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederiks, D. D.; Hurley, K.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Mangano, V.; Oates, S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Kokomov, A. A.; Cline, T. L.; Burrows, D. N.; Krimm, H. A.; Pagani, C.; Sbarufatti, B.; Siegel, M. H.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Enos, H.; Starr, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Goldstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Konus-WIND during its almost 19 yr of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final Interplanetary Network localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderate peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z = 0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release E iso = (2.1 ± 0.1) × 1054 erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity L iso = (4.7 ± 0.2) × 1054 erg s-1. A tail of the soft γ-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. The Swift/X-Ray Telescope and the Swift/Ultraviolet Optical Telescope observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and interstellar-medium-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among the multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.°7-3.°4 results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of z ~ 7.5 for Konus-WIND and z ~ 12 for the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early Universe.

  17. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    SciTech Connect

    Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Kokomov, A. A.; Hurley, K.; Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Siegel, M. H.; Oates, S.; Cline, T. L.; Krimm, H. A.; Pagani, C.; Mitrofanov, I. G. [Space Research Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84 and others

    2013-12-20

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Konus-WIND during its almost 19 yr of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final Interplanetary Network localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderate peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z = 0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release E {sub iso} = (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 54} erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity L {sub iso} = (4.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}. A tail of the soft γ-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. The Swift/X-Ray Telescope and the Swift/Ultraviolet Optical Telescope observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and interstellar-medium-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among the multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.°7-3.°4 results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of z ∼ 7.5 for Konus-WIND and z ∼ 12 for the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early

  18. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E.; Anton, G.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Bissaldi, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brucker, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Cheesebrough, A.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Dalton, M.; Daniel, M. K.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Dickinson, H. J.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; O'C. Drury, L.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kneiske, T.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lennarz, D.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; Naumann, C. L.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P. T.; Ohm, S.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perez, J.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Raue, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Rob, L.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Szostek, A.; Tam, P. H. T.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zajczyk, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.

    2014-05-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the 0.3-10 keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of z ~ 0.5, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time (<700 s after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above ~380 GeV of 4.2 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 (95% confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been observed in the other bright X-ray GRB 130427A. A comparison between the H.E.S.S. upper limit and the contemporaneous energy output in X-rays constrains the ratio between the X-ray and VHE gamma-ray fluxes to be greater than 0.4. This value is an important quantity for modelling the afterglow and can constrain leptonic emission scenarios, where leptons are responsible for the X-ray emission and might produce VHE gamma rays.

  19. Neonatal follow-up program: Where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    H. Sobaih, Badr

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal follow-up program (NFP) is becoming the corner stone of standard, high quality care provided to newborns at risk of future neuorodevelopmental delay. Most of the recognized neonatal intensive care units in the developed countries are adopting NFP as part of their mandatory care for the best long term outcome of high risk infants, especially very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Unfortunately, in the developing and in underdeveloped countries, such early detection and intervention programs are rarely existing, mainly because of the lack of awareness of and exposure to such programs in spite of the increasing numbers of surviving sick newborns due to advancement in neonatal care in these countries. This is a review article to explore the Neonatal follow-up programs looking at historical development, benefts and aims, and standard requirements for successful program development that can be adopted in our countries. In conclusion, proper Neonatal follow-up programs are needed to improve neonatal outcome. Therefore all professionals working in the feld of neonatal care in developing countries should cooperate to create such programs for early detection and hence early intervention for any adverse long term outcome in high-risk newborn infants

  20. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  1. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    PubMed

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. PMID:27054392

  2. [Guidelines for the follow up of patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Tarazona, S; Rueda Esteban, S; Alfonso Diego, J; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Callejón Callejón, A; Cortell Aznar, I; de la Serna Blázquez, O; Domingo Miró, X; García García, M L; García Hernández, G; Luna Paredes, C; Mesa Medina, O; Moreno Galdó, A; Moreno Requena, L; Pérez Pérez, G; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sánchez Solís de Querol, M; Torrent Vernetta, A; Valdesoiro Navarrete, L; Vilella Sabaté, M

    2016-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most common complication of preterm birth, and remains a major problem in pediatric pulmonology units. The decision of discharging from the Neonatal Unit should be based on a thorough assessment of the condition of the patient and compliance with certain requirements, including respiratory and nutritional stability, and caregiver education on disease management. For proper control of the disease, a schedule of visits and complementary tests should be established prior to discharge, and guidelines for prevention of exacerbations and appropriate treatment should be applied. In this paper, the Working Group in Perinatal Respiratory Diseases of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology proposes a protocol to serve as a reference for the follow up of patients with BPD among different centers and health care settings. Key factors to consider when planning discharge from the Neonatal Unit and during follow up are reviewed. Recommendations on treatment and prevention of complications are then discussed. The final section of this guide aims to provide a specific schedule for follow-up and diagnostic interventions to be performed in patients with BPD. PMID:26089228

  3. A follow-up study of attempted railway suicides.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, I; Arthur, A J; Farmer, R D

    1994-02-01

    This paper reports the subsequent mortality of 94 persons who attempted suicide by jumping in front of London Underground trains between 1977 and 1979. The follow-up period was 10 yr. Despite the apparent seriousness of the method, completion of suicide was not found to be higher than in previous studies of attempted suicide by other methods. By the end of the follow-up period 18 persons had died, nine of natural causes. Coroners' inquests were held for the unnatural deaths. Seven verdicts of suicide and two of accidental death were recorded. Of the nine unnatural deaths four were from multiple injuries, three from drowning, one from asphyxia and one from acute narcotic poisoning. All four multiple injury deaths were women, three of these were from repeated incidents involving London Underground trains. The time interval between the index attempt and eventual death for the suicide/accident group ranged from 1 day to 43 months. For ethical reasons it was not possible to follow-up attempted suicides who were presumed to have remained alive. PMID:8153748

  4. GRB 091127: The Cooling Break Race on Magnetic Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgas, R.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Kruhler, T.; Updike, A. C.; Klose, S.; Nardini, M.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Olivares, F.; Rau, A.

    2011-01-01

    Using high-quality, broad-band afterglow data for GRB 091127, we investigate the validity of the synchrotron fireball model for gamma-ray bursts, and infer physical parameters of the ultra-relativistic outflow. Methods. We used multi-wavelength (NIR to X-ray) follow-up observations obtained with GROND simultaneously in the g' r' t' i' z' JH filters and the XRT onboard the Swift satellite in the 0.3 to 10 keY energy range. The resulting afterglow light curve is of excellent accuracy with relative photometric errors as low as 1 %, and the spectral energy distribution (SED) is well-sampled over 5 decades in energy. These data present one of the most comprehensive observing campaigns for a single GRB afterglow and allow us to test several proposed emission models and outflow characteristics in unprecedented detail. Results. Both the multi-color light curve and the broad-band SED of the afterglow of GRB 091127 show evidence of a cooling break moving from high to lower energies. The early light curve is well described by a broken power-law, where the initial decay in the optical/NlR wavelength range is considerably flatter than at X-rays. Detailed fitting of the time-resolved SED shows that the break is very smooth with a sharpness index of 2.2 +/- 0.2, and evolves towards lower frequencies as a power-law with index -1.23 +/- 0.06. These are the first accurate and contemporaneous measurements of both the sharpness of the spectral break and its time evolution. Conclusions. The measured evolution of the cooling break (V(sub c) varies as t(sup -1.2) is not consistent with the predictions of the standard model, wherein V(sub c) varies as t(sup -05) is expected. A possible explanation for the observed behavior is a time dependence of the microphysical parameters, in particular the fraction of the total energy in the magnetic field epsilon(sub Beta). This conclusion provides further evidence that the standard fireball model is too simplistic, and time-dependent micro

  5. Appraising the value of independent EIA follow-up verifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, Jan-Albert

    2015-01-15

    Independent Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) follow-up verifiers such as monitoring agencies, checkers, supervisors and control officers are active on various construction sites across the world. There are, however, differing views on the value that these verifiers add and very limited learning in EIA has been drawn from independent verifiers. This paper aims to appraise how and to what extent independent EIA follow-up verifiers add value in major construction projects in the developing country context of South Africa. A framework for appraising the role of independent verifiers was established and four South African case studies were examined through a mixture of site visits, project document analysis, and interviews. Appraisal results were documented in the performance areas of: planning, doing, checking, acting, public participating and integration with other programs. The results indicate that independent verifiers add most value to major construction projects when involved with screening EIA requirements of new projects, allocation of financial and human resources, checking legal compliance, influencing implementation, reporting conformance results, community and stakeholder engagement, integration with self-responsibility programs such as environmental management systems (EMS), and controlling records. It was apparent that verifiers could be more creatively utilized in pre-construction preparation, providing feedback of knowledge into assessment of new projects, giving input to the planning and design phase of projects, and performance evaluation. The study confirms the benefits of proponent and regulator follow-up, specifically in having independent verifiers that disclose information, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, are adaptable and proactive, aid in the integration of EIA with other programs, and instill trust in EIA enforcement by conformance evaluation. Overall, the study provides insight on how to harness the learning opportunities

  6. Why Are Spine Surgery Patients Lost to Follow-up?

    PubMed Central

    Daffner, Scott D.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Long-term outcome studies are frequently hindered by a decreasing frequency of patient follow-up with the treating surgeon over time. Whether this attrition represents a “loss of faith” in their index surgeon or the realities of a geographically mobile society has never been assessed in a population of patients undergoing spinal surgery. The purpose of this article is to determine the frequency with which patients who have undergone prior surgery and develop new problems attempt to follow-up with their index spine surgeon. The study design was a population survey. All patients seen at two university-based spine centers over a 3-month period were surveyed regarding prior spine surgery. The questionnaire asked details of the previous operation, whether the patient had sought follow-up with their index surgeon, why the patient did not continue treatment with that surgeon, and whether the patient was satisfied with their prior treatment. Sixty-nine patients completed the survey. Prior operations were lumbar (53 patients) and cervical (16). When asked the reason for not seeing their prior surgeon, 10 patients (15%) stated that they (the patient) had moved and 16 (23%) responded that their surgeon no longer practiced in the area. Thirteen (19%) were unhappy with their previous care, 22 (32%) were seeking a second opinion, and 7 (10%) were told they needed more complex surgery. Thirty-seven (54%) discussed their symptoms with their original surgeon before seeking another surgeon. Although 32 patients (46%) had not discussed their new complaints with their index surgeon, only 3 patients (4%) chose not to return to their prior surgeon despite having the opportunity to do so. Forty-nine patients (71%) were satisfied with their prior surgical care, and 42 patients (61%) would undergo the index operation again. Most of the patients seen at the authors' practices after undergoing prior spine surgery elsewhere failed to follow up with their prior spine surgeon for

  7. GRB Studies with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the studies of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. Included are pictures of the observatory, with illustrations of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) including information about both their capabilities. Graphs showing the GBM count rate over time after the GBM trigger for three GRBs, preliminary charts showing the multiple detector light curves the spectroscopy of the main LAT peak and the spectral evolution of GRB 080916C Burst Temporally-extended LAT emission.

  8. Automated Telecommunication to Obtain Longitudinal Follow-up in a Multicenter Cross-sectional COPD Study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jeffrey I.; Moyle, Sarah; Criner, Gerard J.; Wilson, Carla; Tanner, Ron; Bowler, Russell P.; Crapo, James D.; Zeldin, Robert K.; Make, Barry J.; Regan, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Background It can be challenging to maintain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in clinical studies. COPDGene is a multicenter, observational study designed to identify genetic factors associated with COPD and to characterize COPD-related phenotypes. To obtain follow-up data on patient's vital status and outcomes, the COPDGene Longitudinal Follow-up (LFU) Program was developed to supplement its parent study. Methods/Results We used a telecommunication system that employed automated telephone contact or web-based questions to obtain longitudinal follow-up data in our subjects. A branching questionnaire asked about exacerbations, new therapies, smoking status, development of co-morbid conditions, and general health status. Study coordinators contacted subjects who did not respond to one of the automated methods. We enrolled 10,383 subjects in the COPDGene study. As of August 29, 2011, 7,959 subjects completed 19,955 surveys. On the first survey, 68.8% of subjects who completed their survey did so by electronic means, while 31.3% required coordinator phone follow-up. On each subsequent survey the number of subjects who completed their survey by electronic means increased, while the number of subjects who required coordinator follow-up decreased. Despite many of the patients in the cohort being chronically ill and elderly, there was broad acceptance of the system with over half the cohort using electronic response methods. Conclusions The COPDGene LFU Study demonstrated that telecommunications was an effective way to obtain longitudinal follow-up of subjects in a large multicenter study. Web-based and automated phone contacts are accepted by research subjects and could serve as a model for LFU in future studies. PMID:22676387

  9. Gamma-ray burst observations above 100 GeV with STACEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Alexander Charles

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful known explosions in the universe. Forty years after their discovery, they are still some of the most enigmatic phenomena in the universe. Sensitive measurements of the high-energy spectra of GRBs can place important constraints on the burst environments, particle acceleration mechanisms and radiation mechanisms. Until the past few years, there were no observations of the early minutes of GRB afterglows in the energy range between 30 GeV and 1 TeV. With the launch of the Swift GRB Explorer in late 2004, GRB alerts and localizations within seconds of the bursts became available. The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) was a ground-based, gamma-ray telescope sensitive to gamma rays with energies above 50 GeV. At the time of Swift's launch, STACEE was in a rare position to provide rapid, low-energy-threshold follow-up observations of GRBs. In addition, STACEE performed follow-up observations of several GRBs that were localized by other satellites. Between the end of major modifications to the experiment in 2002 and the decommissioning of the experiment in 2007, STACEE obtained follow-up observations of 23 GRBs. In this thesis, STACEE's GRB observations are described and limits are placed on the high-energy, gamma-ray fluxes that reached Earth from these bursts.

  10. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  11. DISCOVERY OF SN 2009nz ASSOCIATED WITH GRB 091127

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, B. E.; Bloom, J. S.; Perley, D. A.; Morgan, A. N.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2010-08-01

    We report SMARTS, Gemini, and Swift-UVOT observations of the optical transient (OT) associated with gamma-ray burst (GRB) 091127, at redshift 0.49, taken between 0.9 hr and 102 days following the Swift trigger. In our early-time observations, the OT fades in a manner consistent with previously observed GRB afterglows. However, after nine days post-burst, the OT is observed to brighten for a period of {approx}two weeks, after which the source resumes fading. A comparison of this late-time 'bump' to SN 1998bw (the broad-lined Type Ic supernova associated with GRB 980425), and several other GRB supernovae (SNe), indicates that the most straightforward explanation is that GRB 091127 was accompanied by a contemporaneous SN (SN 2009nz) that peaked at a magnitude of M{sub V} = -19.0 {+-} 0.2. SN 2009nz is globally similar to other GRB SNe, but evolves slightly faster than SN 1998bw and reaches a slightly dimmer peak magnitude. We also analyze the early-time UV-optical-IR spectral energy distribution of the afterglow of GRB 091127 and find that there is little to no reddening in the host galaxy along the line of sight to this burst.

  12. A follow-up study of neurobehavioral functions in welders exposed to manganese.

    PubMed

    Ellingsen, Dag G; Chashchin, Maxim; Bast-Pettersen, Rita; Zibarev, Evgenij; Thomassen, Yngvar; Chashchin, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Welders may be exposed to high amounts of manganese (Mn). In this study 63 welders and 65 referents were followed up with neurobehavioral tests approximately 6 years after the initial examination at baseline. The welders were exposed to the geometric mean (GM) Mn concentration of 116μg/m(3) at baseline and 148μg/m(3) at follow-up. Their mean duration of employments as welders was 19.5 years at follow-up. Being exposed as a welder was associated with a decline between baseline and follow-up in the performance on the Static Steadiness Test, Finger Tapping Test and Grooved Pegboard Test. However, the decline was also associated with having high concentrations of carbohydrate deficient transferrin in serum (sCDT), indicating high alcohol consumption. When subjects with sCDT above the upper reference limit of the laboratory (≥1.7%) were excluded from the analyses, no difference in the decline in performance was observed between welders and referents for any of the applied neurobehavioral tests. Three welders had developed bradykinesia at follow-up, as assessed by a substantial decline in their Finger Tapping Test performance. They had also experienced a severe decline in Foot Tapping, Grooved Pegboard and Postural Sway Test scores (while blindfolded), while postural tremor as assessed with the CATSYS Tremor 7.0 was normal. Their neurobehavioral test performance at baseline 6 years previously had been normal. PMID:25579701

  13. Five-Year Follow-Up of Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic or Open Groin Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wright, David; Paterson, Caron; Scott, Neil; Hair, Alan; O’Dwyer, Patrick J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare laparoscopic with open hernia repair in a randomized clinical trial at a median follow-up of 5 years. Summary Background Data Follow-up of patients in clinical trials evaluating laparoscopic hernia repair has been short. Methods Of 379 consecutive patients admitted for surgery under the care of one surgeon, 300 were randomized to totally extraperitoneal hernia repair or open repair, with the open operation individualized to the patient’s age and hernia type. All patients, both randomized and nonrandomized, were followed up by clinical examination annually by an independent observer. Results Recurrence rates were similar for both randomized groups. In 1 of the 79 nonrandomized patients, a recurrent hernia developed. Groin or testicular pain was the most common symptom on follow-up of randomized patients. The most common reason for reoperation was development of a contralateral hernia, which was noted in 9% of patients; 11% of all patients died on follow-up, mainly as a result of cardiovascular disease or cancer. Conclusions These data show a similar outcome for laparoscopic and open hernia repair, and both procedures have a place in managing this common problem. PMID:11882754

  14. An Imaging and Spectroscopic Study of Four Strong Mg II Absorbers Revealed by GRB 060418

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, L. K.; Chen, H.-W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-01

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) gsim 1 Å revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z GRB = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z GRB, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Lyα systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at Δ θ lsim 3farcs5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity ≈0.1 - 1 L * at impact parameter of ρ lsim 10 h -1 kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of ρ = 2 - 12 h -1 kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2σ upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M sun yr-1 kpc-2. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

  15. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Follow-up: Role of Remote Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Linde, Cecilia; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in heart failure treatment and management of these patients imposes significant challenges. Remote monitoring is becoming essential for CRT follow-up and allows close surveillance of device function and patient condition. It is helpful to reduce clinic visits, increase device longevity and provide early detection of device failure. Clinical effects include prevention of appropriate and inappropriate shocks and early detection of arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation. For modification of heart failure the addition of monitoring to CRT by means of device-based multiparameters may help to modify disease progression and improve survival. PMID:26596821

  16. Shillapoo Wildlife Area 2007 Follow-up HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-03-01

    In April and May 2007 the Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted a follow-up HEP analysis on the Egger (612 acres) and Herzog (210 acres) parcels located at the north end of the Shillapoo Wildlife Area. The Egger and Herzog parcels have been managed with Bonneville Power Administration funds since acquired in 1998 and 2001 respectively. Slightly more than 936 habitat units (936.47) or 1.14 HUs per acre was generated as an outcome of the 2007 follow-up HEP surveys. Results included 1.65 black-capped chickadee HUs, 280.57 great blue heron HUs, 581.45 Canada goose HUs, 40 mallard HUs, and 32.80 mink HUs. Introduction A follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980) analysis was conducted by the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) during April and May 2007 to document changes in habitat quality and to determine the number of habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing operation and maintenance (O&M) funds since WDFW acquired the parcels. The 2007 follow-up HEP evaluation was limited to Shillapoo Wildlife Area (SWA) parcels purchased with Bonneville Power Administration funds. D. Budd (pers. comm.) reported WDFW purchased the 612 acre Egger Farms parcel on November 2, 1998 for $1,737,0001 and the 210 acre Herzog acquisition on June 21, 2001 for $500,000 with Memorandum of Agreement funds (BPA and WDFW 1996) as partial fulfillment of BPA's wildlife mitigation obligation for construction of Bonneville and John Day Dams (Rasmussen and Wright 1989). Anticipating the eventual acquisition of the Egger and Herzog properties, WDFW conducted HEP surveys on these lands in 1994 to determine the potential number of habitat units to be credited to BPA. As a result, HEP surveys and habitat unit calculations were completed as much as seven years prior to acquiring the sites. The term 'Shillapoo Wildlife Area' will be used to describe only the Herzog and Egger parcels in this document. Details and

  17. Follow-up of 13 children after ureterosigmoidostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, N J; van Damme, K J; de Voogt, H J

    1976-01-01

    Follow-up of 13 children who had had a ureterosigmoid anastomosis 3 1/2 to 10 years previously and whose initial urogram had been satisfactory, showed that growth was normal and that there was no serious metabolic disorder. In particular whole-body potassium did not differ significantly from normal values (as given by Langham, 1961). Asymptomatic urinary infection is the chief hazard in these cases but is difficult to diagnose and may lead to progressive dilatation of the ureters. PMID:962364

  18. Root Resorption a 6-Year Follow-up Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Caroline; Closs, Luciane; Barletta, Fernando; Reston, Eduardo; Tovo, Maximiano F; Lambert, Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical course of a pediatric patient developing cervical external root resorption (CERR). An 11-year old male patient had sustained dental trauma and was diagnosed with crown fracture affecting the incisal and middle thirds of the maxillary right permanent central incisor and the maxillary right permanent lateral incisor with pulp exposure and CERR after 24 months. Diagnosis and treatment of CERR are a challenge for dental practitioners. In this case, preservation of natural dentition is shown as a successful treatment in a 6-year follow-up. PMID:25870717

  19. Follow-up problems with fixed appliances in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Ari, Timucin

    2015-03-01

    Fixed appliances are commonly used in managing early orthodontic problems. Despite their widespread use, they have the potential to impinge on the soft tissues, interfere with the eruption of adjacent teeth and become dislodged or broken. These two case reports present the poor outcomes of fixed appliance treatments if the patient fails to attend follow-up appointments. A successful outcome of treatment with fixed appliances depends upon proper patient selection and the communication skills of the dentist to help patients/parents understand the importance of regular checkups. PMID:25928968

  20. Long term follow up of neurovascular island flaps.

    PubMed

    Henderson, H P; Reid, D A

    1980-06-01

    The results of a ten year mean follow up of twenty Neurovascular Island Flaps and two Radial Nerve Innervated Cross Finger Flaps are presented. Sensory acuity sufficient for tactile gnosis was achieved in nineteen cases. In only one case had sensory acuity deteriorated since operation. Use of the flap was hampered in one patient by a pre-existing neuroma. Complete sensory reorientation occurred in five patients. Sensory misreference persisted more commonly on dominant hands. It was our impression that Porter's Letter Test revealed the patients making most use of their neurovascular island flaps. The place of neurovascular island flaps in the management of the mutilated hand is discussed. PMID:7409615

  1. [Fortuitously discovered neutropenia in children: diagnosis and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Gaudichon, J; Cornet, E; Minckes, O; Bodet, D

    2015-08-01

    Neutropenia seems to be quite frequent in current pediatric practice and can confuse the clinician since it may result from a severe cause. The aim of this study was to provide a prospective description of episodes of neutropenia in children to assess its clinical relevance in a general pediatric cohort consulting and/or hospitalized in a French university hospital. In this prospective observational and monocentric study conducted from April 2012 to April 2013, we included all the patients under 18 years of age who presented neutropenia (defined as an absolute neutrophil count [ANC] below 1×10(9)/L before 1 year of age and below 1.5×10(9)/L beyond) on a whole blood count (WBC) performed in our hospital. Patients treated with chemotherapy were not included. Medical records were regularly checked for at least 1 year after inclusion, and clinical and biological data were collected prospectively to compare transient episodes of neutropenia (<3 months) with persistent episodes of neutropenia (>3months). Of 55,018 consultations and 13,967 hospitalizations (chemotherapy excluded), 8966 blood counts were performed and 250 episodes of neutropenia were found in 238 patients. Data concerning clinical progression were available in 195 cases of which 136 had at least one subsequent WBC. Two hundred thirty-one episodes corresponded to new episodes, while neutropenia preexisted before inclusion in the others. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Most episodes of neutropenia occurred in children <2 years of age (52%), with a median age of 22.2 months. Mean ANC was 0.943×10(9)/L (±0.340) and a few episodes of neutropenia were below 0.5×10(9)/L (9.2%). Neutropenia persisted more than 3 months in only 13.2% of cases. When neutropenia was below 0.5×10(9)/L, it significantly persisted (RR=3.08; 95% CI [1.31-7.22]). Other factors associated with persistent neutropenia were thrombocytopenia, monocytopenia, a CRP more than 70mg/L, significant abnormality on the clinical exam, and

  2. Discovery and Follow-up of a Nearby Galaxy from the Arecibo Zone of Avoidance Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, T. P.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Henning, P. A.; Kaur, A.; Parton, B.

    2011-09-01

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Survey has discovered a nearby galaxy, ALFA ZOA J1952+1428, at a heliocentric velocity of +279 km s-1. The galaxy was discovered at low Galactic latitude by 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen (H I). We have obtained follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array and the 0.9 m Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy optical telescope. The H I distribution overlaps an uncataloged, potential optical counterpart. The H I linear size is 1.4 kpc at our adopted distance of D = 7 Mpc, but the distance estimate is uncertain as Hubble's law is unreliable at low recessional velocities. The optical counterpart has mB = 16.9 mag and B - R = 0.1 mag. These characteristics, including M_H I = 107.0 M sun and LB = 107.5 L sun, if at 7 Mpc, indicate that this galaxy is a blue compact dwarf, but this remains uncertain until further follow-up observations are complete. Optical follow-up observations are ongoing and near-infrared follow-up observations have been scheduled.

  3. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OF A NEARBY GALAXY FROM THE ARECIBO ZONE OF AVOIDANCE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, T. P.; Henning, P. A.; Minchin, R. F.; Momjian, E.; Kaur, A.; Parton, B.

    2011-09-20

    The Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Zone of Avoidance (ALFA ZOA) Survey has discovered a nearby galaxy, ALFA ZOA J1952+1428, at a heliocentric velocity of +279 km s{sup -1}. The galaxy was discovered at low Galactic latitude by 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen (H I). We have obtained follow-up observations with the Expanded Very Large Array and the 0.9 m Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy optical telescope. The H I distribution overlaps an uncataloged, potential optical counterpart. The H I linear size is 1.4 kpc at our adopted distance of D = 7 Mpc, but the distance estimate is uncertain as Hubble's law is unreliable at low recessional velocities. The optical counterpart has m{sub B} = 16.9 mag and B - R = 0.1 mag. These characteristics, including M{sub H} {sub i} = 10{sup 7.0} M{sub sun} and L{sub B} = 10{sup 7.5} L{sub sun}, if at 7 Mpc, indicate that this galaxy is a blue compact dwarf, but this remains uncertain until further follow-up observations are complete. Optical follow-up observations are ongoing and near-infrared follow-up observations have been scheduled.

  4. The 'Supercritical Pile' GRB Model: Afterglows and GRB, XRR, XRF Unification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present the general notions and observational consequences of the "Supercritical Pile" GRB model; the fundamental feature of this model is a detailed process for the conversion of the energy stored in relativistic protons in the GRB Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) into relativistic electrons and then into radiation. The conversion is effected through the $p \\, \\gamma \\rightarrow p \\, e circumflex + e circumflex -$ reaction, whose kinematic threshold is imprinted on the GRB spectra to provide a peak of their emitted luminosity at energy \\Ep $\\sim 1$ MeV in the lab frame. We extend this model to include, in addition to the (quasi--)thermal relativistic post-shock protons an accelerated component of power law form. This component guarantees the production of $e circumflex +e circumflex- - $pairs even after the RBW has slowed down to the point that its (quasi-) thermal protons cannot fulfill the threshold of the above reaction. We suggest that this last condition marks the transition from the prompt to the afterglow GRB phase. We also discuss conditions under which this transition is accompanied by a significant drop in the flux and could thus account for several puzzling, recent observations. Finally, we indicate that the same mechanism applied to the late stages of the GRB evolution leads to a decrease in \\Ep $\\propto \\Gamma circumflex 2(t)\\propto t circumflex {-3/4}$, a feature amenable to future observational tests.

  5. What Happens in Classrooms after Earth Science Fieldwork? Supporting Student Learning Processes during Follow-Up Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up activities after fieldwork are recommended, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study investigates six cases of follow-up work carried out by three teachers and their students in three upper secondary schools in Norway. The data comprises video observations of teachers and students, instructional artifacts,…

  6. [The follow up of patients with bronchial carcinoma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Wilde, J

    1980-01-01

    The aims of follow up of patients with bronchial carcinoma are: 1. Complete use of all therapeutical possibilities. 2. Avoidance of preventable complications of therapeutical prescriptions. 3. Prevention of sicknesses beside the basic complaint. 4. The rehabilitation of the patient. The medical structure for realizing these aims, we suppose in the cooperation of the doctor of the family or the factory, who will see the patient in intervals of four weeks, and the ambulant working pulmologist, who will see the patient in intervals of 3 months, and the thorax-centre, what the patient will consult once or twice the year, and the centre for rehabilitation, where patients with limited cardiorespiratoric function will get an appropriated training of condition. Two cure-places with this special direction will satisfy the require in the GDR. The oncologist of the district where the patient lives will be the coordinator of all parts of this system and the controller to keep its function. The effectivity of follow up will be realised by clear and proofed recommendations by the therapeutical centres and the continued consultations on actual problem cases with the shared doctors. The data processing can do an useful help in this cooperation. PMID:6261467

  7. Five year follow-up of epikeratophakia in children.

    PubMed

    Morgan, K S; Arffa, R C; Marvelli, T L; Verity, S M

    1986-04-01

    Epikeratophakia alters the anterior curvature of the cornea by the addition of a machine-carved donor lenticule. Since March 1980, 88 patients under eight years of age have had epikeratophakia, with at least six months of follow-up. Eighty percent of the original surgeries were successful; some failed grafts were replaced successfully, so that in all, 89% of the patients had successful grafts. The average increase in curvature of the cornea was 14.7 diopters, and the average spectacle overcorrection was +0.56 diopters. In these growing eyes, we documented a myopic shift of 1.5 diopters per year. Visual acuity results varied with the timing of refractive surgery, density of the amblyopia, and the parents' ability to maintain the patching schedule. The largest group of children were those who had unilateral traumatic cataracts. In this group, 7 of 15 patients who had surgery under 4 years of age had final verbal acuities of 20/40 or better. Long-term follow-up has demonstrated that epikeratophakia safely and successfully corrects refractive errors in aphakic children either as a primary procedure, or as a secondary procedure after cataract extraction. PMID:3517741

  8. Endometrial cancer. Prevention, detection, management, and follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Elit, L.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review risk factors for uterine cancer; to discuss strategies for detecting uterine cancer; to outline prognostic factors and treatment; and to review the role of follow up for patients who have completed primary therapy. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE was searched from January 1996 to June 1998 using the terms endometrial neoplasms, estrogen replacement therapy, hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen, and screening. Only English language articles were reviewed. Study types included reviews. Bibliographies of articles found were searched for further relevant titles. Causation literature is available from well conducted cohort trials. Treatment recommendations are based in part on prognostic information and a few randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Risk factors, both intrinsic and extrinsic, are associated with uterine cancer. Family physicians have a role in preventing disease by ensuring that all women with uteri in situ using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) have progesterone therapy as part of the HRT regimen. Detection is crucial; abnormal uterine bleeding or undiagnosed postmenopausal bleeding warrants investigation with endometrial biopsy. The goal of surgery is to remove the uterus and ovaries and identify factors that make the disease at high risk of recurrence. Although adjuvant radiation therapy does not prolong survival, it does alter the pattern of disease recurrence. The goal of follow up after primary therapy is to identify recurrent disease while it is still curable. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians play an important role in preventing uterine cancer, initiating early diagnosis of disease, and in the future, might be more actively involved in caring for patients following primary therapy. PMID:10790821

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of Iliac Wallstents

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Ricardo; Carreira, Jose Martin Gude, Francisco; Gorriz, Elias; Gallardo, Laura; Pardo, Maria Dolores; Hermida, Maria

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated the long-term results of the iliac artery stent placement for the treatment of patients with intermittent claudication. From November 1988 to December 1998, 303 legs were treated with metal stents in 259 patients with iliac occlusive arterial disease in a follow-up study approved by the institutional review board. Stenoses (n = 162) were treated after failed angioplasty and occlusions (n = 141) were treated with primary stent placement. According to Fontaine's clinical classification of chronic ischemia, 266 (88%) legs presented stage IIB, 14 (5%) stage III, and 23 (7%) stage IV. In all legs, self-expandable stents (Wallstent) were implanted. The patients were followed up with clinical examination, ankle brachial- index examination measurement and intravenous angiography. The data were analyzed using the univariate analysis (Kaplan-Meier method) and multivariate analysis (Cox proportional model). The primary endpoint of the study was the identification of restenosis or reoclusion of the stenting arterial segment and a secondary endpoint that was an identification of the risk factors of restenosis and reoclusion. The mean {+-} SD ankle-brachial index pre-, post-procedure, and in the last control was 0.58 {+-} 0.18, 0.90 {+-} 0.23, and 0.86 {+-} 0.24, respectively. Primary cumulative patency rates were 70% {+-} 4 after 5 years, and 65% {+-} 5 after 7 years, and secondary patency rates were 92% {+-} 2 after 5 years, and 87% {+-} 4 after 9 years. Immediate complications in the first 24 hours appeared in 12 (4%) legs, thrombosis in 5 legs, 3 legs presented with distal embolism, 2 thrombi at the access site and pseudo aneurysm and artery rupture in 1 leg. A patient died in the first 24 hours. Within 30 days after the procedure seven complications, 3 thromboses and 4 stenosis appeared. During follow-up, 42 (16%) patients died of other causes. The main causes of death were cardiac disease (39%), cerebrovascular disease (15%), cancer (7%), respiratory diseases

  10. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  11. Improving pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dykes, Dana; Williams, Elizabeth; Margolis, Peter; Ruschman, Jennifer; Bick, Julianne; Saeed, Shehzad; Opipari, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Standardization of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) care through participation in the ImproveCareNow (ICN) Network has improved outcomes for pediatric patients with IBD, but under the current care model, our improvements have plateaued. Current ICN model care guidelines recommend health supervision visits every six months. We identified a gap in our practice's ability to ensure either a routine six month follow-up or a rapid follow-up after a disease flare, and a significant number of patients with active disease status during a six month period lacked timely reassessment after interventions or medication changes. Telemedicine provides an alternative method of care delivery to address these gaps, but has had limited use in patients with IBD. A multi-step approach to offer alternative follow-up care options via telemedicine was developed with potential impact on remission rates and quality of life. Short term goals of the pilot were to improve telemedicine access for patients with IBD were to 1) increase the percent of patients with active disease with a follow-up completed within two months of a visit from 40% to 70%, 2) increase the percent of patients with a visit scheduled within two months of their last sick visit from 20% to 70% (interim measure), 3) increase the number of eVisits from zero visits per month to two visits per month during pilot phase, 4) increase electronic communication with patients from zero messages per month to 200 messages per month, 5) no change in complications or adverse events (defined as an unplanned visit or ED (emergency department) encounter within 30 days of an eVisit. The expected outcomes of the e-visit model were to: maintain baseline care standards and health screening capabilities, improve access to care, and provide equivalent care delivery (no increase in the number of unplanned clinical encounters). Using the IHI model for improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act) we have seen a progressive increase in the rate of patient signups

  12. GRB 030329 with SARA and TLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, K.; Zeh, A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Klose, S.; Shaw, S.; Leake, M.; Webb, J.; Stecklum, B.; Williams, M.; Howard, E.

    2004-09-01

    We present B band observations performed with the SARA 0.9m telescope at KPNO and the Tautenburg 1.34m Schmidt telescope in Tautenburg, Germany, for the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329. Observations were carried out from March 30.12 to April 8.29 (UT) with SARA, and from March 30.80 to April 7.00 (UT) with the Tautenburg Schmidt. This burst provides the best covered GRB afterglow light curve to date. The afterglow exhibits a complicated ``fine structure'' with several episodes of significant re-brightening. These episodes inevitably demand a more detailed numerical fit which introduces a larger number of free parameters. It is difficult to separate the light from the re-brightening phases and the light from the underlying supernova. The photometric data show an average temporal regression in the flux of the optical afterglow, that is typical for GRB afterglow. However, ``bumps and wiggles'' clearly suggest a degree of complexity resulting from the re-brightening phases that is not easily fitted with standard models. At late time the light curve receives a significant contribution from an underlying supernova component (SN 2002dh). We argue that in cases such as GRB 030329 single site observations are inadequate to properly sample the evolving flux. Consequently, simple broken power law fits of data obtained with just one telescope may lead to rather poor descriptions of the afterglow charcateristics.

  13. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  14. CONSTRAINING GAMMA-RAY BURST EMISSION PHYSICS WITH EXTENSIVE EARLY-TIME, MULTIBAND FOLLOW-UP

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Morgan, A.; Perley, D. A.; Li, W.; Butler, N. R.; Filippenko, A. V.; Melandri, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Smith, R. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Steele, I. A.; Hora, J. L.; Da Silva, R. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Worseck, G.; Fumagalli, M.; Cobb, B.; and others

    2011-12-20

    Understanding the origin and diversity of emission processes responsible for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains a pressing challenge. While prompt and contemporaneous panchromatic observations have the potential to test predictions of the internal-external shock model, extensive multiband imaging has been conducted for only a few GRBs. We present rich, early-time, multiband data sets for two Swift events, GRB 110205A and GRB 110213A. The former shows optical emission since the early stages of the prompt phase, followed by the steep rising in flux up to {approx}1000 s after the burst (t{sup -{alpha}} with {alpha} = -6.13 {+-} 0.75). We discuss this feature in the context of the reverse-shock scenario and interpret the following single power-law decay as being forward-shock dominated. Polarization measurements, obtained with the RINGO2 instrument mounted on the Liverpool Telescope, also provide hints on the nature of the emitting ejecta. The latter event, instead, displays a very peculiar optical to near-infrared light curve, with two achromatic peaks. In this case, while the first peak is probably due to the onset of the afterglow, we interpret the second peak to be produced by newly injected material, signifying a late-time activity of the central engine.

  15. Factors Associated with Follow-Up Attendance among Rape Victims Seen in Acute Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Doyanne; Peterson, Roselyn; Berliner, Lucy; Stewart, Terri; Russo, Joan; Whiteside, Lauren; Zatzick, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rape is associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and related comorbidities. Most victims do not obtain treatment for these conditions. Acute care medical settings are well-positioned to link patients to services; however, difficulty engaging victims and low attendance at provided follow-up appointments is well documented. Identifying factors associated with follow-up can inform engagement and linkage strategies. Method Administrative, patient self-report, and provider observational data from Harborview Medical Center were combined for the analysis. Using logistic regression, we examined factors associated with follow-up health service utilization after seeking services for rape in the emergency department. Results Of the 521 diverse female (n=476) and male (n=45) rape victims, 28% attended the recommended medical/counseling follow-up appointment. In the final (adjusted) logistic regression model, having a developmental or other disability (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.21-0.77), having a current mental illness (OR=0.25, 95% CI=0.13-0.49), and being assaulted in public (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.28-0.87) were uniquely associated with reduced odds of attending the follow-up. Having a prior mental health condition (OR= 3.02 95% CI=1.86-4.91), a completed SANE examination (OR=2.97, 95% CI=1.84-4.81), and social support available to help cope with the assault (OR=3.54, 95% CI=1.76-7.11) were associated with an increased odds of attending the follow-up. Conclusions Findings point to relevant characteristics ascertained at the acute care medical visit for rape that may be used to identify victims less likely to obtain posttraumatic medical and mental health services. Efforts to improve service linkage among these patients is warranted and may require alternative models to engage these patients to support posttraumatic recovery. PMID:26168030

  16. Follow-up and Survivorship in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Simcock, R; Simo, R

    2016-07-01

    Treatments for head and neck cancer are improving, yet they remain toxic and challenging. The incidence of some forms of head and neck cancer (e.g. oropharyngeal) is rising. This creates an enlarging cohort of survivors with complex needs. These needs may be overlooked and undertreated. This overview presents evidence for the unmet survivorship needs of head and neck cancer patients and identifies strategies for the recognition and remedy of these needs in the clinic. There is sufficient evidence to challenge services to redesign follow-up strategies around unmet need using the full multidisciplinary team and to widen focus away from a sole aim of recognition and treatment of recurrent disease. Problems presented include depression, comorbid disease, second malignancy, alcohol and nicotine dependence, eating and drinking difficulties (including dysphagia, dental problems, trismus and sense disturbance) and hypothyroidism. PMID:27094976

  17. Electro-clinical follow-up of shunted hydrocephalic children.

    PubMed

    Varfis, G; Berney, J; Beaumanoir, A

    1977-01-01

    In a survey of 29 hydrocephalic children treated by ventriculoatrial shunt (Holter valve) with a follow-up of 4 years, EEG records before the operation and at least once a year thereafter, the authors can support the view that an epileptogenic focus has developed around the place of insertion of the ventricular catheter in 19 cases, leading to epileptic seizures in 17 up to now. Thus the incidence of convulsions in this particular group of patients is 0.59 (17/29), the limits of confidence 95% being 0.39-0.76. The irritative abnormalities occur usually during the second year after the operation and the delay for the onset of clinical seizures is variable. The age at operation seems to influence the occurrence of the epileptogenic scar. The type of hydrocephalus and especially the presence of an associated cerebral focal lesion can be of importance in the development of clinical seizures. PMID:405183

  18. [Neuromuscular disease: respiratory clinical assessment and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Martínez Carrasco, C; Villa Asensi, J R; Luna Paredes, M C; Osona Rodríguez de Torres, F B; Peña Zarza, J A; Larramona Carrera, H; Costa Colomer, J

    2014-10-01

    Patients with neuromuscular disease are an important group at risk of frequently suffering acute or chronic respiratory failure, which is their main cause of death. They require follow-up by a pediatric respiratory medicine specialist from birth or diagnosis in order to confirm the diagnosis and treat any respiratory complications within a multidisciplinary context. The ventilatory support and the cough assistance have improved the quality of life and long-term survival for many of these patients. In this paper, the authors review the pathophysiology, respiratory function evaluation, sleep disorders, and the most frequent respiratory complications in neuromuscular diseases. The various treatments used, from a respiratory medicine point of view, will be analyzed in a next paper. PMID:24709048

  19. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  20. Follow up of premature babies treated with artificial surfactant (ALEC).

    PubMed Central

    Morley, C J; Morley, R

    1990-01-01

    Of 235 survivors who had taken part in a randomised trial of artificial surfactant and who were born in Cambridge, follow up information was available for 231 (98%) infants. In 12 cases information came from local doctors; all others were assessed at 9 and 18 months (n = 212) or 9 months only (n = 7). There was no difference between those who had been treated with surfactant and control babies in the incidence of neurological impairment, mental impairment, respiratory infections, allergies, or hospital admissions up to 18 months after full term. In those born before 30 weeks' gestation (where surfactant most improves survival) the number of surviving randomised children who were normal was 35 of 61 in the treated group (57%) compared with 25 of 61 in the control group (41%). Improved neonatal survival after prophylactic surfactant treatment is not associated with an increased incidence of neurodevelopmental impairment. PMID:2201266

  1. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  2. The Achromatic Light Curve of the Optical Afterglow of GRB 030226 at a Redshift of z Approximately 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.; Henden, A. A.; Hartmann, D. H.; Zeh, A.; Masetti, N.; Guenther, E.; Stecklum, B.; Lindsay, K.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract. We report on optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up observations of the afterglow of GRB 030226, mainly performed with the telescopes at ESO La Silla and Paranal, with additional data obtained at other places. Our first observations started 0.2 days after the burst when the afterglow was at a magnitude of R approximately equal to 19 . One week later the magnitude of the afterglow had fallen to R=25, and at two weeks after the burst it could no longer be detected (R > 26). Our VLT blueband spectra show two absorption line systems at redshifts z = 1.962 +/- 0.001 and at z = 1.986 +/- 0.001, placing the redshift of the burster close to 2. Within our measurement errors no evidence for variations in the line strengths has been found between 0.2 and 1.2 days after the burst. An overabundance of alpha-group elements might indicate that the burst occurred in a chemically young interstellar region shaped by the nucleosynthesis from type II supernovae. The spectral slope of the afterglow shows no signs for cosmic dust along the line of sight in the GRB host galaxy, which itself remained undetected (R > 26.2). At the given redshift no supernova component affected the light from the GRB afterglow, so that the optical transient was essentially only powered by the radiation from the GRB fireball, allowing for a detailed investigation of the color evolution of the afterglow light. In our data set no obvious evidence for color changes has been found before, during, or after the smooth break in the light curve approximately 1 day after the burst. In comparison with investigations by others, our data favor the interpretation that the afterglow began to develop into a homogeneous interstellar medium before the break in the light curve became apparent.

  3. Clinical outcome and follow-up of prenatal hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Asl, Afshin Safaei; Maleknejad, Shohreh

    2012-05-01

    Hydronephrosis is probably the most common congenital abnormality detected prenatally by ultrasonography This study was performed to determine the cause and outcome of prenatal hydronephrosis in our hospital. A total of 45 infants, with 57 prenatally hydronephrotic renal units, were enrolled into this study. For the purpose of this study, the degree of hydronephrosis was defined as mild, moderate or severe. Postnatal ultrasonography was performed as soon as possible in those with bilateral hyronephrosis and 3-7 days after birth in those with unilateral hydronephrosis. Voiding cystourethrogram was performed in 6-8 weeks time. In the absence of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), diethylenetriamene penta acetate scan was performed to exclude obstructive uropathy. There were 29 males and 16 females (male:female ratio 1.8:1), and unilateral and bilateral hydronephrosis were seen in 33 (73%) and 12 (27%) of the cases, respectively. Hydronephrosis was caused by ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) in 20 (44.5%), VUR in 10 (22.2%), ureterovesical junction obstruction in four (8.9 %), posteriorurethral valves in four (8.9 %), UPJO with VUR in two (4.4%) and non-VUR non-obstructive in one (2.2%). During follow-up, 16 patients (35.5%) required operative intervention while seven (15.5%) improved spontaneously. Fetal hydronephrosis needs close follow-up during both ante-natal and postnatal periods. In this study, the most common cause for hydronephrosis were UPJO and VUR. Also seen in this study is the noteworthy point that mild fetal hydronephrosis is relatively benign and does not require surgical intervention in most cases and surgery should be performed only if there is renal function compromise. Prenatal consultation with a pediatric nephrologist and urologist is useful in decreasing parental anxiety and facilitating postnatal management. PMID:22569439

  4. Digital dermoscopic follow-up of 1544 melanocytic nevi.

    PubMed

    Rotaru, Maria; Nati, Angelica-Elena; Avrămoiu, Ioan; Grosu, Florin; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan

    2015-01-01

    The use of dermatoscopy increases melanocytic nevi diagnostic accuracy, and is important for dermoscopic monitoring of atypical lesions, allowing to find significant changes in the earliest stage. Dermoscopic diagnosis of melanocytic nevi type in a group of patients and their follow-up with the assessment of changes occurred during dermoscopic monitoring. Dermoscopically, we followed the nevic size and pattern, the color and pigment distribution. Follow-up visits were scheduled depending on the type of the melanocytic lesions and the patient's compliance. The nevi that have shown significant dermoscopic changes were excised and histopathologically examined. The study was performed on a group of 92 patients, mostly females (56.5%), mean age of 29.1 years. Of the total of 1544 melanocytic nevi examined, 27.4% were atypical and 72.6% common nevi. The average dermoscopic examination interval was 14.1 months. During monitoring, 35.5% atypical nevi and 22.5% common nevi have modified, especially changes in pigmentation and color (31% atypical nevi and 9.9% common nevi) and the appearance of new dermoscopic structures (12.7% atypical nevi and common nevi 8.5%). Of the total nevi monitored, 3% showed significant changes and were excised and examined pathologically, without diagnose of any malignant transformation. In our study, dermoscopic changes appeared in atypical as well as in common nevi. The dermoscopic monitoring of melanocytic-pigmented lesions remains an accessible method of assessment the evolution of nevi and can reduce the risk of appearance of malignant melanoma in the general population. PMID:26743296

  5. Asthma after childhood pneumonia: six year follow up study

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christopher E; Coote, Jacqueline M; Silver, David A T; Halpin, David M G

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish the long term cumulative prevalence of asthma in children admitted to hospital with pneumonia and to examine the hypothesis that some children admitted to hospital with pneumonia may be presenting with undiagnosed asthma. Design Prospective study of a cohort of children previously admitted to hospital with pneumonia, followed up by postal questionnaires to their general practitioners and the children or their parents. Setting General practices in southwest England. Participants 78 children admitted to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital between 1989 and 1991 with a diagnosis of pneumonia confirmed on independent review of x ray films. Main outcome measures Any diagnosis of asthma, use of any treatment for asthma, and asthma symptom scores. Results On the basis of a 100% response rate from general practitioners and 86% from patients or parents, the cumulative prevalence of asthma was 45%. A diagnosis of asthma was associated with a family history of asthma (odds ratio 11.23; 95% confidence interval 2.57 to 56.36; P=0.0002). Mean symptom scores were higher for all children with asthma (mean score 2.4; χ2=14.88; P=0.0001) and for children with asthma not being treated (mean 1.4; χ2=6.2; P=0.01) than for those without asthma (mean 0.2) . Conclusions A considerable proportion of children presenting to a district general hospital with pneumonia either already have unrecognised asthma or subsequently develop asthma. The high cumulative prevalence of asthma suggests that careful follow up of such children is worth while. Asthma is undertreated in these children; a structured symptom questionnaire may help to identify and reduce morbidity due to undertreatment. PMID:10834897

  6. KLENOT Project 2002-2008 contribution to NEO astrometric follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticha, J.; Tichy, M.; Kocer, M.; Honkova, M.

    2009-01-01

    Near-Earth object (NEO) research plays an increasingly important role not only in solar system science but also in protecting our planetary environment as well as human society from the asteroid and comet hazard. Consequently, interest in detecting, tracking, cataloguing, and the physical characterizing of these bodies has steadily grown. The discovery rate of current NEO surveys reflects progressive improvement in a number of technical areas. An integral part of NEO discovery is astrometric follow-up crucial for precise orbit computation and for the reasonable judging of future close encounters with the Earth, including possible impact solutions. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory (South Bohemia, Czech Republic) is aimed especially at the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up, and recovery of near-Earth objects. It ranks among the world’s most prolific professional NEO follow-up programs. The 1.06 m KLENOT telescope, put into regular operation in 2002, is the largest telescope in Europe used exclusively for observations of minor planets and comets, and full observing time is dedicated to the KLENOT team. In this paper, we present the equipment, technology, software, observing strategy, and results of the KLENOT Project obtained during its first phase from March 2002 to September 2008. The results consist of thousands of precise astrometric measurements of NEOs and also three newly discovered near-Earth asteroids. Finally, we also discuss future plans reflecting also the role of astrometric follow-up in connection with the modus operandi of the next generation surveys.

  7. How Can The SN-GRB Time Delay Be Measured?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    The connection between SNe and GRBs, launched by SN 1998bw / GRB 980425 and clinched by SN 2003dh / GRB 030329-with the two GRBs differing by a factor of approximately 50000 in luminosity-so far suggests a rough upper limit of approximately 1-2 days for the delay between SN and GRB. Only four SNe have had nonnegligible coverage in close coincidence with the initial explosion, near the W shock breakout: two Qpe II, and two Type IC, SN 1999ex and SN 1998bw. For the latter, only a hint of the minimum between the UV maximum and the radioactivity bump served to help constrain the interval between SN and GRB. Swift GRB alerts may provide the opportunity to study many SNe through the UV breakout phase: GRB 980425 look dikes -apparently nearby, low- luminosity, soft-spectrum, long-lag GRBs-accounted for half of BATSE bursts near threshold, and may dominate the Swift yield near threshold, since it has sensitivity to lower energies than did BATSE. The SN to GRB delay timescale should be better constrained by prompt UV/optical observations alerted by these bursts. Definitive delay measurements may be obtained if long-lag bursters are truly nearby: The SNe/GRBs could emit gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II if robust non-axisymmetric bar instabilities develop during core collapse, and/or neutrino emission may be detectable as suggested by Meszaros et al.

  8. GRB 110709B in the induced gravitational collapse paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penacchioni, A. V.; Ruffini, R.; Bianco, C. L.; Izzo, L.; Muccino, M.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.

    2013-03-01

    Context. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) 110709B is the first source for which Swift-BAT was triggered twice, with a time separation of ~10 min. The first emission (called here episode 1) lasted from 40 s before the first trigger time until 60 s after it. The second emission (hereafter episode 2) lasted from 35 s before the second trigger time until 100 s after it. These features reproduce those of GRB 090618, which has recently been interpreted within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm. In line with this paradigm, we assume the progenitor to be a close binary system composed of the core of an evolved star and a neutron star (NS). The evolved star explodes as a supernova (SN) and ejects material that is partially accreted by the NS. We identify this process with episode 1. The accretion process accumulates more than the critical mass of the NS, which gravitationally collapses into a black hole (BH). This process leads to the GRB emission, episode 2. The two trigger episodes have for the first time provided the possibility to cover the X-ray emission observed by XRT both prior to and during the prompt phase of GRB 110709B. Aims: We analyze the spectra and time variability of episodes 1 and 2 and compute the relevant parameters of the binary progenitor, as well as the astrophysical parameters both in the SN and the GRB phase in the IGC paradigm. Methods: We performed a time-resolved spectral analysis of episode 1 by fitting the spectrum with a blackbody (BB) plus a power-law (PL) spectral model. From the BB fluxes and temperatures of episode 1 and the luminosity distance dL, we evaluated the evolution with time of the radius of the BB emitter, associated here to the evolution of the SN ejecta. We analyzed episode 2 within the fireshell model, identifying the proper GRB (P-GRB) and simulating the light curve and spectrum. We established the redshift to be z = 0.75, following the phenomenological methods described in the literature, and our analysis of the late X

  9. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  10. Messages from GRB 060218.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Liang, Enwei; Gupta, Nayantara; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Virgili, Francisco; Dai, Z G

    2007-05-15

    GRB 060218 is a watershed event. Statistically, its detection suggests that there is likely a distinct low-luminosity (LL) population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) whose event rate is much higher than that of conventional high-luminosity GRBs. This LL population may give significant contribution to the diffuse neutrino background flux at energies higher than 1016eV. The spectral lag of this burst is very long, and roughly follows the luminosity-lag relation of normal GRBs. This, along with the fact that it follows the Ep-Eiso relation as well, suggests that X-ray flashes (XRFs) are natural extension of GRBs in the softer regime and that GRBs and XRFs share the same radiation physics. We discuss how the broadband data pose strong constraints on possible models of the prompt emission of this GRB. PMID:17293314

  11. ALMA SUBMILLIMETER CONTINUUM IMAGING OF THE HOST GALAXIES OF GRB 021004 AND GRB 080607

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Hao; Huang, Kui-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2012-12-20

    We report 345 GHz continuum observations of the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 021004 and 080607 at z > 2 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Cycle 0. Of the two bursts, GRB 021004 is one of the few GRBs that originate in a Lyman limit host, while GRB 080607 is classified as a 'dark burst' and its host galaxy is a candidate of dusty star-forming galaxy at z {approx} 3. With an order of magnitude improvement in the sensitivities of the new imaging searches, we detect the host galaxy of GRB 080607 with a flux of S{sub 345} = 0.31 {+-} 0.09 mJy and a corresponding infrared luminosity of L{sub IR} = (2.4-4.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }. However, the host galaxy of GRB 021004 remains undetected and the ALMA observations allow us to place a 3{sigma} upper limit of L{sub IR} < 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun} for the host galaxy. The continuum imaging observations show that the two galaxies are not ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but are at the faintest end of the dusty galaxy population that gives rise to the submillimeter extragalactic background light. The derived star formation rates of the two GRB host galaxies are less than 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which are broadly consistent with optical measurements. The result suggests that the large extinction (A{sub V} {approx} 3) in the afterglow of GRB 080607 is confined along its particularly dusty sight line, and not representative of the global properties of the host galaxy.

  12. Initial Follow-up of Pulsar Discoveries from the HTRU Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Keane, Evan; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-10-01

    This is a request for observing time for the initial follow-up of pulsar discoveries from the low-latitude Galactic plane section of the HTRU survey (P630). We have already discovered (50 pulsars from just 40% of processed data. Extrapolation and population synthesis show that the Galactic plane survey will result in at least a further 100 discoveries. Currently, with data processing on-going employing all available computing resources, we expect about 20 new discoveries per semester. The discovery of pulsars is just a first step and interesting science can usually only be revealed when a follow-up timing campaign is carried out. One year of initial timing is the minimal timespan required to fully-characterise any newly-discovered pulsars, essential for deriving pulsar parameters such as the characteristic age, magnetic field strength, spin-down rate, as well as to detect any unexpected behaviour of the pulsar which might result from emission instabilities. This follow-up timing project is necessary for identifying any individual interesting pulsar systems discovered from the HTRU Galactic plane survey. Since all of the pulsars on the observing list here are followed-up for the first time, they will produce completely new and exciting results. In addition, this timing project will enable a large-scale examination of the Galactic plane pulsar population, exploring the true boundaries of pulsar phase space. Given the large number of discoveries expected and the long integration length required, this dedicated follow-up timing campaign is vital for achieving our science goals.

  13. Initial Follow-up of Pulsar Discoveries from the HTRU Galactic Plane Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Cherry; Possenti, Andrea; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Burgay, Marta; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, Ramesh; Keith, Michael; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; van Straten, Willem; Stappers, Benjamin; Bates, Samuel; Keane, Evan; Levin, Lina; Champion, David; Jameson, Andrew; Tiburzi, Caterina; Petroff, Emily; Barr, Ewan; Flynn, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This is a request for observing time for the initial follow-up of pulsar discoveries from the low-latitude Galactic plane section of the HTRU survey (P630). We have already discovered 40 pulsars from just 30% of processed data. Extrapolation and population synthesis show that the Galactic plane survey will result in at least a further 120 discoveries. Currently, with data processing on-going employing all available computing resources, we expect about 20 new discoveries per semester. The discovery of pulsars is just a first step and interesting science can usually only be revealed when a follow-up timing campaign is carried out. One year of initial timing is the minimal timespan required to fully-characterise any newly-discovered pulsars, essential for deriving pulsar parameters such as the characteristic age, magnetic field strength, spin-down rate, as well as to detect any unexpected behaviour of the pulsar which might result from emission instabilities. This follow-up timing project is necessary for identifying any individual interesting pulsar systems discovered from the HTRU Galactic plane survey. Since all of the pulsars on the observing list here are followed-up for the first time, they will produce completely new and exciting results. In addition, this timing project will enable a large-scale examination of the Galactic plane pulsar population, exploring the true boundaries of pulsar phase space. Given the large number of discoveries expected and the long integration length required, this dedicated follow-up timing campaign is vital for achieving our science goals.

  14. Fast response electromagnetic follow-ups from low latency GW triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, E. J.; Chu, Q.; Rowlinson, A.; Gao, H.; Zhang, B.; Tingay, S. J.; Boër, M.; Wen, L.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming that BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of extreme low-latency search pipelines, we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs and use these to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. Using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors, we determine what EM observations could be achieved from low-frequency radio up to high energy γ-ray. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multi-messenger science is possible through low latency pipelines.

  15. Detection of GRB 060927 at zeta = 5.47: Implications for the Use of Gamma-Ray Bursts as Probes of the End of the Dark Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Swan, H.; Troja, E.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Sterling, R. L. C.; Xu, D.; Aharonian, F.; Akerlof, C.; Andersen, M. I.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bersier, D.; CastroCeron, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Gogus, E.; Gorosabel, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Guver, T.; Hjorth, J.; Horns, D.; Huang, K. Y.; Jakobsson, P.; Jensen, B. L.

    2007-01-01

    We report on follow-up observations of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060927 using the robotic ROTSE-IIIa telescope and a suite of larger aperture groundbased telescopes. An optical afterglow was detected 20 s after the burst, the earliest rest-frame detection of optical emission from any GRB. Spectroscopy performed with the VLT about 13 hours after the trigger shows a continuum break at lambda approx. equals 8070 A, produced by neutral hydrogen absorption at zeta = 5.6. We also detect an absorption line at 8158 A which we interpret as Si II lambda 1260 at zeta = 5.467. Hence, GRB 060927 is the second most distant GRB with a spectroscopically measured redshift. The shape of the red wing of the spectral break can be fitted by a damped Ly(alpha) profile with a column density with log(N(sub HI)/sq cm) = 22.50 +/- 0.15. We discuss the implications of this work for the use of GRBs as probes of the end of the dark ages and draw three main conclusions: i) GRB afterglows originating from zeta greater than or approx. equal to 6 should be relatively easy to detect from the ground, but rapid near-infrared monitoring is necessary to ensure that they are found; ii) The presence of large H I column densities in some GRBs host galaxies at zeta > 5 makes the use of GRBs to probe the reionization epoch via spectroscopy of the red damping wing challenging; iii) GRBs appear crucial to locate typical star-forming galaxies at zeta > 5 and therefore the type of galaxies responsible for the reionization of the universe.

  16. GRB 070724B: the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by SuperAGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Rapisarda, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Basset, M.; Foggetta, L.; Vallazza, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.

    2008-05-22

    GRB070724B is the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by the SuperAGILE instrument aboard the AGILE space mission. The SuperAGILE localization has been confirmed after the after-glow observation by the XRT aboard the Swift satellite. No significant gamma ray emission above 50 MeV has been detected for this GRB. In this paper we describe the SuperAGILE capabilities in detecting Gamma Ray Burst and the AGILE observation of GRB 070724B.

  17. Benzene-induced chromosome aberrations: a follow-up study.

    PubMed Central

    Forni, A

    1996-01-01

    To study the evolution of cytogenetic damage from past exposure to high concentrations of benzene and its health significance, chromosome aberrations (CA) in lymphocytes were reinvestigated after approximately 20 years in four subjects with past severe hemopathy and in seven controls studied in the late 1960s. Increased chromosome-type aberrations were still present up to 30 years after benzene toxicity, but blood counts were normal. The vital status at the end of 1993 was ascertained for 32 subjects with a history of benzene toxicity and for 31 controls studied for CA from 1965 to 1970, who differed significantly for CA rates. Of the 32 benzene-exposed subjects, 1 was lost to follow-up, 20 were still alive, and 11 had died at ages 36 to 83, between 1 and 20 years after the last CA study. Five deaths were from neoplasia (acute erythroleukemia, brain tumor, cancer of lung, paranasal cavity, esophagus). The decreased subjects had significantly higher rates of chromosome-type aberrations than those alive, and those who died of neoplasia had the highest rates of these aberrations in the last study before death or diagnosis of cancer. Out of the 31 controls, 12 had died from 4 to 23 years after the CA study. Three deaths were from neoplasia (two lung cancer, one brain tumor). Even if this is a small sample, the results suggest a higher risk of cancer for the benzene-exposed cohort, who had persistently high CA rates in lymphocytes. PMID:9118911

  18. Intracranial idiopathic hypertension: 1-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, D; Curone, M; Erbetta, A; Farago', G; Bianchi-Marzoli, S; Ciasca, P; Bussone, G; Chiapparini, L

    2014-05-01

    Standard guidelines for ongoing management, as well as definitive data about the long-term course of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) are not available. The aim of this study was to compare several clinical and instrumental variables as assessed at the time of diagnosis and then after 1 year in a sample of IIH patients. A total of 21 patients were studied. Our results confirmed that headache and TVO are the most frequent symptoms in IIH patients, and that overweight is a very common feature. A trend towards a favorable outcome in patients followed for 1 year and treated by usual medical therapy was found: intracranial pressure was lower at follow-up; improvement of headache and transient visual obscurations, as well as of papilledema, was reported in most patients. On the other hand, neuroradiological findings (such as empty sella, perioptic subarachnoid space distension, narrowing of the transverse sinuses) were substantially stable at follow. These findings may be relevant for future research as far as understanding the role of different clinical and instrumental findings as diagnostic items as well as predictors of outcome in IIH. PMID:24867861

  19. Follow-up of children of diabetic mothers.

    PubMed

    Cummins, M; Norrish, M

    1980-04-01

    The results of a follow-up study of infants of diabetic mothers are presented. The antenatal care of all such mothers was supervised in a combined clinic by obstetricians and physicians, and good diabetic control was achieved in most of them. 51 mothers delivered 73 infants, all liveborn, between the years 1964 and 1972 inclusive at Hammersmith Hospital. There were no fetal deaths. 66 infants survived the neonatal period, and 63 the first 2 years of life. 51 children, including all those seriously ill in the neonatal period, could be traced. Detailed neurological and general examinations including skinfold measurements were made, and the IQ measured. Four children were found to have major handicaps. These were severe deafness, epilepsy, low IQ, and myopia. No other neurological abnormalities were detected, and the distribution of full-scale IQs was normal. The distribution of height and head circumference centiles was near normal, but an increased number of children had weights above the 90th centile. No significant congenital malformations were found in these 51 survivors, and none has so far developed diabetes. PMID:7416774

  20. A 22-year follow-up of an endodontic implant.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jan; Sándor, George K; Forouzanfar, Tim; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Oikarinen, Kyösti S

    2015-10-01

    Root fractures in the middle and apical thirds of the root are treated by repositioning and for approximately 6 weeks of immobilization while those in the cervical third are immobilized for 3 months. Even though the results are good, some root-fractured teeth are lost and replaced by dental implants or fixed partial dentures. One historic but effective treatment option for those root fractures with unfavorable crown to root ratios is an endodontic implant in middle and apical third root fractures. This method offers immediate stable fixation of a crown and its coronal root segment to the underlying alveolar bone. This report documents the long-term survival of a tooth treated with an endodontic implant. A 25-year-old male patient presented following a bicycle accident with a dislocated unfavorable root fracture in the middle third. The crown with the coronal root segment was secured to the bone using a commercially available endodontic implant. The apical part of the root was removed. Although the clinical and radiological follow-up results of the endodontic implant demonstrated a good clinical function and little bone loss, the implant ultimately had to be removed after 22 years of service due to pain and increasing mobility. PMID:25865147

  1. Takayasu's arteritis on steroid therapy. Seven years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Del Corso, L; Moruzzo, D; Agelli, M; Pentimone, F

    1999-12-01

    The authors report a 7 year follow-up of Takayasu's arteritis (TA) type III, group 1, in a young Italian woman. At diagnosis, at the age of 25, the echotomographic and angiographic studies showed narrow subclavian arteries, narrow abdominal aorta (diameter of 0.6-0.8 cm) below the renal arteries, stenotic left common carotid and renal arteries, and occluded upper mesenteric artery. With steroid therapy, (prednisone 50 mg/day per os), the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) normalized within 12 days. With a maintenance dosage of 7.5 mg/day per os, the patient achieved remission as documented by the absence of symptoms, the persistent normalization of ESR, and the improving of the diameter of the abdominal aorta (1.3-1.4 cm). On steroid therapy, the patient had a normal pregnancy and delivered a healthy baby girl. The disease has been stable for seven years. Recently, diabetes mellitus occurred and it has been treated with insulin therapy. The rising of ESR after tapering of steroid therapy (prednisone 5 mg per os on alternate days) suggests an alternative treatment with a cytotoxic agent. PMID:10705719

  2. Cohort Profile: The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS).

    PubMed

    Tate, Robert B; Cuddy, T Edward; Mathewson, Francis A L

    2015-10-01

    The Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) is Canada's longest running study of cardiovascular disease and ageing. The MFUS cohort consists of 3983 men recruited from the Royal Canadian Air Force at the end of World War II. At entry to the study, 1 July 1948, their mean age was 31 years, with 90% between ages 20 and 39 years. All study members were free of clinical evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The protocol of MFUS was to obtain routine medical examinations from these men at regular intervals over time. The research goal of the study was to examine the role that any abnormalities detected on routine electrocardiograms from apparently healthy men might play in the prediction of subsequent diagnoses of cardiovascular disease. Over the course of 65 years, about 35% of the cohort has documented evidence of ischaemic heart disease. The research focus was expanded in 1996 to explore the roles of physical, mental and social functioning in support of healthy and successful ageing. On 1 July 2013, 429 original cohort members were alive with a mean age of 92 years. Collaborative research with others outside the in-house team is welcomed. PMID:25064641

  3. The West Point Study: 40 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Clark, D A; Tolan, G D; Johnson, R; Hickman, J R; Jackson, W G; McGranahan, G M

    1994-05-01

    Completion of cardiovascular evaluations of 387 members marked the end of 40 years of follow-up in the West Point Study. Coronary artery disease (CAD) caused 4 cases of sudden death, 14 cases of myocardial infarction (MI), 13 cases of angina, and 17 cases of silent CAD. Using risk factors (serum cholesterol, estimated HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, and smoking status) measured before age 28, we derived a multivariate regression formula for predicting which members of the study, had they been pilots, would have been grounded for CAD before age 55. This derivation used data from only those subjects with CAD or with no evidence of CAD. We then used the formula to compute a risk-related score for each member of the study. In the tertile group with the highest risk-related scores, 17% manifested CAD by age 55 and the first event occurred at age 39. In the tertile group of lowest scores, 2% experienced CAD by age 55 and the first event occurred at age 51. We conclude that it is possible to select pilot candidates with the lowest risk for CAD. PMID:8018084

  4. Infantile eczema: A long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, K; Morgan, J K

    1976-10-01

    A 15-17 year follow-up study was conducted on ninety-nine patients who had suffered from infantile eczema. The persistance of the eczema and the occurrence of related conditions were noted. The persistence of eczema was shown to be greater in those patients with a positive family history of eczema and in those who had developed asthma or hay-fever. An attempt was made to see if the persistence of eczema was affected by the position of the child in the family, and some factors provoking relapses were noted. The patients were also questioned with regard to their achievements in academic examinations, and to their social, artistic and sporting activities. The results showed a success rate in examinations not significantly higher than average. It was not possible to show if there is a particular type of atopic personality. There was no constant characteristic in social or artistic patterns. The group as a whole were normal at the milestones of early development, i.e. walking, talking and reading, and also normal with regard to weight and height. PMID:974022

  5. Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-Up of Borderline Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zikan, Michal; Dundr, Pavel; Cibula, David

    2012-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors represent a heterogeneous group of noninvasive tumors of uncertain malignant potential with characteristic histology. They occur in younger women, are present at an early stage, and have a favorable prognosis, but symptomatic recurrence and death may be found as long as 20 years after therapy in some patients. The molecular changes in borderline ovarian tumors indicate linkage of this disease to type I ovarian tumors (low-grade ovarian carcinomas). The pathological stage of disease and subclassification of extraovarian disease into invasive and noninvasive implants, together with the presence of postoperative macroscopic residual disease, appear to be the major predictor of recurrence and survival. However, it should be emphasized that the most important negative prognostic factor for recurrence is just the use of conservative surgery, but without any impact on patient survival because most recurrent diseases are of the borderline type—easily curable and with an excellent prognosis. Borderline tumors are difficult masses to correctly preoperatively diagnose using imaging methods because their macroscopic features may overlap with invasive and benign ovarian tumors. Over the past several decades, surgical therapy has shifted from a radical approach to more conservative treatment; however, oncologic safety must always be balanced. Follow-up is essential using routine ultrasound imaging, with special attention paid to the remaining ovary in conservatively treated patients. Current literature on this topic leads to a number of controversies that will be discussed thoroughly in this article, with the aim to provide recommendations for the clinical management of these patients. PMID:23024155

  6. Treatment Response Evaluation and Follow-up in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Kumar, Ashish

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. The management of HCC is evolving because of recently introduced novel therapeutic approaches. Optimal outcome requires an early and accurate assessment of tumor response to therapy. Current imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; provide reliable and reproducible anatomical data in order to demonstrate tumor burden changes. However, in the setting of novel targeted therapies and liver directed treatments, simple tumor anatomical changes can be less informative and usually appear later than biological changes. There has been a growing interest to monitor the therapeutic response, at an early phase of treatment, by measuring tumor viability and/or perfusion. Therefore the importance of tumor viability assessment is increasingly being recognized. The tumor viability measurement guidelines have recently been amended to include the measurement of only the longest diameter of the enhancing tumors to formally amend RECIST to modified RECIST (mRECIST). Viable tumor should be defined as uptake of contrast agent in the arterial phase. In this review, we discuss criteria of response evaluation in HCC and further follow-up of patients receiving curative and palliative treatment. PMID:25755604

  7. Six month-follow up of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Keleidari, Behrouz; Mahmoudie, Mohsen; Anaraki, Amin Ghanei; Shahraki, Masoud Sayadi; Jamalouee, Samira Dvashi; Gharzi, Mahsa; Mohtashampour, Farnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rising prevalence of obesity in today populations has led obese individuals to seek medical interventions. Aside from special diets, routine exercise and in some cases, medical treatment, most of the obese patients, favoring those with morbid or super obesity can benefit from bariatric surgery to lose weight. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is relatively new method to limit the compliance of stomach. The consequent quick satiety during each meal results in gradual weight loss in patients. We investigated the efficacy and safety of this method among a group of our patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Isfahan, Iran, from January 2012 to January 2013. Thirty-five cases of obesity that had undergone LSG were enrolled and their baseline data of weight, body mass index (BMI), blood sugar, lipid profile, liver function indexes and blood pressure were collected. The patients were followed up for 6 months. The 6-month results were analyzed. Results: There was significant reduction in BMI, weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, liver enzymes and lipid profile components (P < 0.05), except for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P = 0.3). The average of excess weight loss percentage after 6 months was 69.2 ± 20.9%. No mortality occurred. Two of the patients had micro anastomotic leaks that were treated with nonoperative management. A case of gross leakage was treated with tube jejunostomy. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the efficacy and safety of LSG as a single surgical intervention for body weight reduction in morbidly and super obese patients. PMID:27110546

  8. Follow up on the crystal growth experiments of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, K. F.; Lind, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the 4 solution growth experiments on the LDEF have been published elsewhere. Both the crystals of CaCO3, which were large and well shaped, and the much smaller TTF-TCNQ crystals showed unusual morphological behavior. The follow up on these experiments was begun in 1981, when ESA initiated a 'Concept Definition Study' on a large, 150 kg, Solution Growth Facility (SGF) to be included in the payload of EURECA-1, the European Retrievable Carrier. This carrier was a continuation of the European Spacelab and at that time planned for launch in 1987. The long delay of the LDEF retrieval and of subsequent missions brought about reflections both on the concept of crystal growth in space and on the choice of crystallization materials that had been made for the LDEF. Already before the LDEF retrieval, research on TTF-TCNQ had been stopped, and a planned growth experiment with TTF-TCNQ on the SGF/EURECA had been cancelled. The target of the SGF investigation is now more fundamental in nature. None of the crystals to be grown here are, like TTF-TCNQ, in particular demand by science or industry, and the crystals only serve the purpose of model crystals. The real purpose of the investigation is to study the growth behavior. One of the experiments, the Soret Coefficient Measurement experiment is not growing crystals at all, but has it as its sole purpose to obtain accurate information on thermal diffusion, a process of importance in crystal growth from solution.

  9. Causative factors, epidemiology, and follow-up of bilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Zingler, Vera Carina; Weintz, Eva; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Cnyrim, Christian; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) is characterized by impaired or lost function of both peripheral labyrinths or of the eighth nerves. In a review of 255 patients (mean age +/- SD, 62 +/- 16 years) with BV diagnosed in the authors' dizziness unit between 1988 and 2005, 62% of the patients were male. Previous vertigo attacks had occurred in 36%, indicating a sequential manifestation. The definite cause of BV was determined in 24% and the probable cause in 25%. The most common causes were ototoxic aminoglycosides (13%), Ménière's disease (7%), and meningitis (5%). Strikingly, 25% exhibited cerebellar signs. Cerebellar dysfunction was associated with peripheral polyneuropathy in 32% compared with 18% in BV patients without cerebellar signs. In a follow-up study on 82 BV-patients (mean age at the time of diagnosis 56.3 +/- 17.6 years), the frequency and degree of recovery or worsening of vestibular function over time were determined. The patients were reexamined 51 +/- 6 months after the first examination. Electronystagmography with bithermal caloric irrigation was analyzed by measurement of the mean peak slow-phase velocity (SPV) of the induced nystagmus. Statistical analysis of the mean peak SPV revealed a nonsignificant worsening over time (initial mean peak SPV 3.0 +/- 3.5 degrees/s vs. 2.1 +/- 2.8 degrees/s). Only patients with BV due to meningitis exhibited an increasing, but nonsignificant SPV (1.0 +/- 1.4 degrees/s vs. 1.9 +/- 1.6 degrees/s). Forty-three percent of patients subjectively rated the course of their disease as stable, 28% as worsened, and 29% as improved. PMID:19645958

  10. Adult onset asynchronous multifocal eosinophilic granuloma of bone: an 11-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Dallaudière, Benjamin; Kerger, Joseph; Malghem, Jacques; Galant, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal eosinophilic granuloma (EG) is a rare observation within the spectrum of histiocytosis X, generally described in children. We report the case of a 33-year-old man with multifocal EG showing an asynchronous evolution of bone lesions during a follow-up of 11 years. We also present the therapeutic approach chosen for this patient and the repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations used to monitor the disease with a final favorable outcome. PMID:25793108

  11. H.E.S.S. follow-up of IceCube-160731A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Naurois, Mathieu; H.E.S.S. Collaborarion

    2016-08-01

    The H.E.S.S. instrument was used to carry out follow-up observations of a high energy neutrino detected by IceCube on the 31st July 2016 at 01:55:04 UTC. The IceCube best fit position is Ra = 214.54, Dec = -0.33 with a radius of 0.75 deg at 90% confidence.

  12. A Broader Perspective on the GRB-SN Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2006-05-01

    Over the last few years our understanding of local Type Ibc supernovae and their connection to long-duration gamma-ray bursts has been revolutionized. Recent discoveries have shown that the emerging picture for core-collapse explosions is one of diversity. Compiling data from our dedicated radio survey of SNe Ibc and our comprehensive HST survey of GRB-SNe together with ground-based follow-up campaigns, I review our current understanding of the GRB-SN connection. In particular, I compare local SNe Ibc with GRB-SNe based on the following criteria: (1) the distribution of optical peak magnitudes which serve as a proxy for the mass of 56Ni produced in the explosion, (2) radio luminosity at early time (few days to weeks) which provides a measure of the energy coupled to on-axis relativistic ejecta, and (3) radio luminosity at late time (several years) which constrains the emission from GRB jets initially directed away from our line-of-sight. By focusing on these three points, I will describe the complex picture of stellar death that is emerging.

  13. The impact of breathing on HRV measurements: implications for the longitudinal follow-up of athletes.

    PubMed

    Saboul, Damien; Pialoux, Vincent; Hautier, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to compare daily variations of heart rate variability (HRV) parameters between controlled breathing (CB) and spontaneous breathing (SB) sessions during a longitudinal follow-up of athletes. HRV measurements were performed daily on 10 healthy male runners for 21 consecutive days. The signals were recorded during two successive randomised 5-minutes sessions. One session was performed in CB and the other in SB. The results showed significant differences between the two respiration methods in the temporal, nonlinear and frequency domains. However, significant correlations were observed between CB and SB (higher than 0.70 for RMSSD and SD1), demonstrating that during a longitudinal follow-up, these markers provide the same HRV variations regardless of breathing pattern. By contrast, independent day-to-day variations were observed with HF and LF/HF frequency markers, indicating no significant relationship between SB and CB data over time. Therefore, we consider that SB and CB may be used for HRV longitudinal follow-ups only for temporal and nonlinear markers. Indeed, the same daily increases and decreases were observed whatever the breathing method employed. Conversely, frequency markers did not provide the same variations between SB and CB and we propose that these indicators are not reliable enough to be used for day-to-day HRV monitoring. PMID:24050471

  14. Follow-up of high energy neutrinos detected by the ANTARES telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Aurore

    2016-04-01

    The ANTARES telescope is well-suited to detect high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical transient sources as it can observe a full hemisphere of the sky with a high duty cycle. Potential neutrino sources are gamma-ray bursts, core-collapse supernovae and flaring active galactic nuclei. To enhance the sensitivity of ANTARES to such sources, a detection method based on follow-up observations from the neutrino direction has been developed. This program, denoted as TAToO, includes a network of robotic optical telescopes (TAROT, Zadko and MASTER) and the Swift-XRT telescope, which are triggered when an "interesting" neutrino is detected by ANTARES. A follow-up of special events, such as neutrino doublets in time/space coincidence or a single neutrino having a very high energy or in the specific direction of a local galaxy, significantly improves the perspective for the detection of transient sources. The analysis of early and long term follow-up observations to search for fast and slowly varying transient sources, respectively, has been performed and the results covering optical and X-ray data are presented in this contribution.

  15. Discovery of the nearby long, soft GRB 100316D with an associated supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, R. L. C.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Sakamoto, T.; Bersier, D.; Goldoni, P.; Oates, S. R.; Rowlinson, A.; Campana, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Page, K. L.; Osborne, J. P.; Vergani, S. D.; Barthelmy, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Cano, Z.; Curran, P. A.; de Pasquale, M.; D'Elia, V.; Evans, P. A.; Flores, H.; Fruchter, A. S.; Garnavich, P.; Gehrels, N.; Gorosabel, J.; Hjorth, J.; Holland, S. T.; van der Horst, A. J.; Hurkett, C. P.; Jakobsson, P.; Kamble, A. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Kaper, L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Pian, E.; Stamatikos, M.; Thöne, C. C.; Woosley, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    We report the Swift discovery of the nearby long, soft gamma-ray burst GRB 100316D, and the subsequent unveiling of its low-redshift host galaxy and associated supernova. We derive the redshift of the event to be z= 0.0591 ± 0.0001 and provide accurate astrometry for the gamma-ray burst (GRB) supernova (SN). We study the extremely unusual prompt emission with time-resolved γ-ray to X-ray spectroscopy and find that the spectrum is best modelled with a thermal component in addition to a synchrotron emission component with a low peak energy. The X-ray light curve has a remarkably shallow decay out to at least 800 s. The host is a bright, blue galaxy with a highly disturbed morphology and we use Gemini-South, Very Large Telescope and Hubble Space Telescope observations to measure some of the basic host galaxy properties. We compare and contrast the X-ray emission and host galaxy of GRB 100316D to a subsample of GRB-SNe. GRB 100316D is unlike the majority of GRB-SNe in its X-ray evolution, but resembles rather GRB 060218, and we find that these two events have remarkably similar high energy prompt emission properties. Comparison of the host galaxies of GRB-SNe demonstrates, however, that there is a great diversity in the environments in which GRB-SNe can be found. GRB 100316D is an important addition to the currently sparse sample of spectroscopically confirmed GRB-SNe, from which a better understanding of long GRB progenitors and the GRB-SN connection can be gleaned.

  16. Two Early Gamma-ray Bursts Optical Afterglow Detections with TAOS Telescopes--GRB 071010B and GRB 071112C

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K. Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Urata, Y.

    2009-05-25

    We present on two early detections of GRB afterglows with the Taiwanese-American Occltation Sruvey (TAOS) telescopes. The robotic TAOS system has been devised so that the routine Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) survey is interrupted when a GRB alert is triggered. Our first detection, GRB 071010B was detected by TAOS 62 s after the burst and showed a weak early brightening during the observations. No significant correction with the prompt gamma-ray emission indicated that our optical emission detected is afterglow emission. The second detection of TAOS, GRB 071112C was detected 96 s after the burst, also showed a possible initial raising then followed a steep decay in the R-band light curve.

  17. Two Early Gamma-ray Bursts Optical Afterglow Detections with TAOS Telescopes-GRB 071010B and GRB 071112C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K. Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Urata, Y.

    2009-05-01

    We present on two early detections of GRB afterglows with the Taiwanese-American Occltation Sruvey (TAOS) telescopes. The robotic TAOS system has been devised so that the routine Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) survey is interrupted when a GRB alert is triggered. Our first detection, GRB 071010B was detected by TAOS 62 s after the burst and showed a weak early brightening during the observations. No significant correction with the prompt gamma-ray emission indicated that our optical emission detected is afterglow emission. The second detection of TAOS, GRB 071112C was detected 96 s after the burst, also showed a possible initial raising then followed a steep decay in the R-band light curve.

  18. THE HIGHLY ENERGETIC EXPANSION OF SN 2010bh ASSOCIATED WITH GRB 100316D

    SciTech Connect

    Bufano, Filomena; Pian, Elena; Turatto, Massimo; Sollerman, Jesper; Benetti, Stefano; Valenti, Stefano; Cappellaro, Enrico; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Pignata, Giuliano; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Vergani, Susanna D.; Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan; Hjorth, Jens; Della Valle, Massimo; Reichart, Daniel E.; Starling, Rhaana L. C.; Wiersema, Klass; Amati, Lorenzo; and others

    2012-07-01

    We present the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the nearby (z = 0.059) spectroscopically confirmed Type Ic supernova, SN 2010bh, associated with the soft, long-duration gamma-ray burst (X-ray flash) GRB 100316D. Intensive follow-up observations of SN 2010bh were performed at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the X-shooter and FORS2 instruments. Thanks to the detailed temporal coverage and the extended wavelength range (3000-24800 A), we obtained an unprecedentedly rich spectral sequence among the hypernovae, making SN 2010bh one of the best studied representatives of this SN class. We find that SN 2010bh has a more rapid rise to maximum brightness (8.0 {+-} 1.0 rest-frame days) and a fainter absolute peak luminosity (L{sub bol} Almost-Equal-To 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}) than previously observed SN events associated with GRBs. Our estimate of the ejected {sup 56}Ni mass is 0.12 {+-} 0.02 M{sub Sun }. From the broad spectral features, we measure expansion velocities up to 47,000 km s{sup -1}, higher than those of SNe 1998bw (GRB 980425) and 2006aj (GRB 060218). Helium absorption lines He I {lambda}5876 and He I 1.083 {mu}m, blueshifted by {approx}20,000-30,000 km s{sup -1} and {approx}28,000-38,000 km s{sup -1}, respectively, may be present in the optical spectra. However, the lack of coverage of the He I 2.058 {mu}m line prevents us from confirming such identifications. The nebular spectrum, taken at {approx}186 days after the explosion, shows a broad but faint [O I] emission at 6340 A. The light curve shape and photospheric expansion velocities of SN 2010bh suggest that we witnessed a highly energetic explosion with a small ejected mass (E{sub k} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 52} erg and M{sub ej} Almost-Equal-To 3 M{sub Sun }). The observed properties of SN 2010bh further extend the heterogeneity of the class of GRB SNe.

  19. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, M.; Prouza, M.; Kubánek, P.; Hudec, R.; Nekola, M.; Řídký, J.; Grygar, J.; Boháčová, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hrabovský, M.; Mandát, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Palatka, M.; Pandey, S. B.; Pech, M.; Schovánek, P.; Šmída, R.; Trávníček, P.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Vítek, S.

    2006-08-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 min after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of α = -1.7 ± 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ≃ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  20. HARPS-N and SOPHIE joint follow-up of Kepler close-in planetary candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebrard, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Radial velocity follow-up is mandatory to establish the nature of most of the transiting planet candidates detected with Kepler, then to characterize them and in particular to measure their mass and eccentricity. We started follow-up programs with the spectrograph HARPS-N that benefit from our SOPHIE observations on Kepler Objects of Interest. Our HARPS-N programs mainly aim at extending the SOPHIE results toward Kepler planetary candidates having lower masses, smaller radii, and/or fainter host stars. Up to now, they allowed the identification of several false positives and the characterization of 7 new planets, i.e. about half the number of transiting planets characterized with HARPS-N since its installation. Most of them are in parameters domain with a sparse number of known objects.

  1. Treatment and follow-up of malignant struma ovarii: Regarding two cases.

    PubMed

    Aurore, Oudoux; Eric, Leblanc; Juliette, Beaujot; Hélène, Kolesnikov-Gauthier

    2016-08-01

    Malignant struma ovarii (SO) is a rare tumor, and as a consequence, treatments and follow-up procedures are not clearly established. Presented in this study are two cases of suspicious ovarian masses, resected and corresponding to malignant SO on histopathology. Similar to thyroid cancer, we proposed complementary radioiodine therapy ((131)I) after total thyroidectomy (no malignancy was observed at this level in our two patients). Patients underwent treatment with 3.7 GBq (131)I followed by post-therapy whole-body scintigraphy, which can detect residual disease or occult metastases. Thyroid remnant ablation increases the sensitivity and specificity of follow-up testing using serum thyroglobulin levels as a tumor marker. Our two patients remained disease-free for 3 and 5 years, respectively, after treatment. PMID:27355004

  2. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator clinic casualties: inadvertent reprogramming during routine implantable cardioverter defibrillator follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ozahowski, T P; Greenberg, M L; Mock, P; Holzberger, P T; Gerling, B; Zalinger, C; Perry, C

    1996-10-01

    On one occasion during a busy ICD follow-up clinic, the preceding patient's parameters for rate, PDF, and delay were inadvertently programmed into the subsequent patient's generator using the CPI Programmer Model 2035. This occurred after capacitor reformation, without pressing the "Program" button. The source of this reprogramming error was failure to clear the programmer memory of the previous patient's data, usually achieved by turning the programmer off between patients (or selecting "New Patient" from the menu). At our next ICD follow-up clinic, we purposely did not turn off the programmer between two sets of patients. On both occasions the above finding was repeated and confirmed. These observations indicate the potential for serious reprogramming errors that can occur simply by not clearing the programmer's memory between clinic patients. PMID:8904549

  3. Diastematomyelia: A Surgical Case with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Bekki, Hirofumi; Kawano, Osamu; Shiba, Keiichiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-01-01

    Few reports have described the involvement of syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia in the etiology of neurological deficits. We reported a case with syringomyelia associated with diastematomyelia. A female patient with diastematomyelia was followed up clinically over 14 years. At the age of 8, she developed clubfoot deformity with neurological deterioration. Motor function of the right peroneus demonstrated grade 2 in manual muscle tests. Continuous intracanial bony septum and double cords with independent double dura were observed at upper thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tethering of the spinal cord and syringomyelia distal to the level of diastematomyelia. Extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty were performed surgically. She grew without neurological deterioration during 7 years postoperatively. A long-term followed up case with syringomyelia that was possibly secondary to the tethering of the spinal cord associated with diastematomyelia, and effective treatment with extirpation of the osseum septum and duralplasty was described. PMID:25705341

  4. Annealing a Follow-up Program: Improvement of the Dark Energy Figure of Merit for Optical Galaxy Cluster Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao-Yi; Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CCAPP, Columbus /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2010-06-02

    The precision of cosmological parameters derived from galaxy cluster surveys is limited by uncertainty in relating observable signals to cluster mass. We demonstrate that a small mass-calibration follow-up program can significantly reduce this uncertainty and improve parameter constraints, particularly when the follow-up targets are judiciously chosen. To this end, we apply a simulated annealing algorithm to maximize the dark energy information at fixed observational cost, and find that optimal follow-up strategies can reduce the observational cost required to achieve a specified precision by up to an order of magnitude. Considering clusters selected from optical imaging in the Dark Energy Survey, we find that approximately 200 low-redshift X-ray clusters or massive Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters can improve the dark energy figure of merit by 50%, provided that the follow-up mass measurements involve no systematic error. In practice, the actual improvement depends on (1) the uncertainty in the systematic error in follow-up mass measurements, which needs to be controlled at the 5% level to avoid severe degradation of the results; and (2) the scatter in the optical richness-mass distribution, which needs to be made as tight as possible to improve the efficacy of follow-up observations.

  5. Free gingival grafting procedure after excisional biopsy, 12-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Keskiner, Ilker; Alkan, B. Arzu; Tasdemir, Zekeriya

    2016-01-01

    The total removal of a lesion via excisional biopsy causes gingival recession, resulting in dentin hypersensitivity and esthetical problems. In this case report, a gingival recession defect resulting from an excisional biopsy was treated with a free gingival grafting procedure performed during the same appointment, and its 12-year follow-up was presented. A 44-year-old female patient was presented to our clinic with a firm, pedunculated, red gingival enlargement located on the labial surface of lower incisors. The exposed root surface, after the excisional biopsy, was covered with a free gingival graft. The lesion was pathologically diagnosed as pyogenic granuloma, and in the early postoperative phase, no recurrence was observed, but partial root coverage was determined. At 6-month follow-up, root coverage resulting from “creeping attachment” was observed, and this situation was maintained throughout the 12-year follow-up period. Repetitious postoperative discomfort and emotional stress for the patient may be avoided with a timesaving single appointment performing excisional biopsy and free gingival graft. Free gingival grafting procedure was used for this purpose not only to cover exposed root surfaces but also to eliminate dentin hypersensitivity and make oral hygiene procedures more effective. PMID:27403067

  6. Development of de novo major involvement during follow-up in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; d'Ascanio, Anna; Figus, Michele; Favati, Benedetta; Baldini, Chiara; Tani, Chiara; Neri, R; Bombardieri, Stefano; Mosca, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of de novo major involvement during follow-up in a cohort of patients with Behçet's syndrome (BS); the secondary aim was to analyse the epidemiological profile and the long-term outcome of those patients who developed new major involvement. Among our cohort of 120 BS patients, we evaluated all subjects who had no major organ involvement during the early years of their disease; specifically, at disease onset, the 52% of the cohort presented a prevalent mucocutaneous involvement. The primary outcomes were represented by the following: Hatemi et al. (Rheum Dis Clin North Am 39(2):245-61, 2013) the incidence of de novo major involvement during the follow-up and Hatemi et al. (Clin Exp Rheumatol 32(4 Suppl 84):S112-22, 2014) the use of immunosuppressive drugs during the follow-up. We have defined the development of de novo major involvement during the follow-up as the occurrence of severe ocular, vascular or CNS involvement after a latency period from the diagnosis of at least 3 years. Among 62 patients characterized by a mild onset of disease, we observed that after at least 3 years from the diagnosis, 21 BS patients (34%) still developed serious morbidities. Specifically, three patients developed ocular involvement, nine patients developed neurological involvement and nine patients presented vascular involvement. Comparing main epidemiological and clinical findings of the two groups, we observed that patients who developed de novo major involvement were more frequently males and younger; furthermore, 95% of these patients were characterized by a young onset of disease (p < 0.001). Being free of major organ complication in the first years of BS is not necessary a sign of a favourable outcome. Globally, the development of de novo major involvement during the coursfce of BS suggests that a tight control is strongly recommended during the course of the disease. PMID:25750177

  7. A trio of gamma-ray burst supernovae:. GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A/SN 2013ez, and GRB 130831A/SN 2013fu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, Z.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Pozanenko, A.; Butler, N.; Thöne, C. C.; Guidorzi, C.; Krühler, T.; Gorosabel, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; Hjorth, J.; Melandri, A.; Mundell, C.; Wiersema, K.; D'Avanzo, P.; Schulze, S.; Gomboc, A.; Johansson, A.; Zheng, W.; Kann, D. A.; Knust, F.; Varela, K.; Akerlof, C. W.; Bloom, J.; Burkhonov, O.; Cooke, E.; de Diego, J. A.; Dhungana, G.; Farina, C.; Ferrante, F. V.; Flewelling, H. A.; Fox, O. D.; Fynbo, J.; Gehrels, N.; Georgiev, L.; González, J. J.; Greiner, J.; Güver, T.; Hartoog, O.; Hatch, N.; Jelinek, M.; Kehoe, R.; Klose, S.; Klunko, E.; Kopač, D.; Kutyrev, A.; Krugly, Y.; Lee, W. H.; Levan, A.; Linkov, V.; Matkin, A.; Minikulov, N.; Molotov, I.; Prochaska, J. X.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Rumyantsev, V.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Steele, I.; Tanvir, N. R.; Volnova, A.; Watson, A. M.; Xu, D.; Yuan, F.

    2014-08-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A/SN 2013ez, and GRB 130831A/SN 2013fu. For GRB 130215A/SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t - t0 = 16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Å. Based on Fe ii λ5169 and Si ii λ6355, our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of ~4000-6350 km s-1, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A/SN 2013fu, we used our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-SNe. For GRB 130215A, we took advantage of contemporaneous optical/NIR observations to construct an optical/NIR bolometric LC of the afterglow. We fit the bolometric LC with the millisecond magnetar model of Zhang & Mészáros (2001, ApJ, 552, L35), which considers dipole radiation as a source of energy injection to the forward shock powering the optical/NIR afterglow. Using this model we derive an initial spin period of P = 12 ms and a magnetic field of B = 1.1 × 1015 G, which are commensurate with those found for proposed magnetar central engines of other long-duration GRBs. Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A19

  8. Klenot near-Earth-object follow-up program --- next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticha, J.; Tichy, M.; Kocer, M.; Honkova, M.

    2014-07-01

    NEO research is a great challenge just now --- for science, for exploration, and for planetary defence. Therefore NEO discoveries, astrometric follow-up, orbit computations as well as physical studies are of high interest both to science community and humankind. The KLENOT Project of the Klet Observatory, South Bohemia, Czech Republic, has pursued the confirmation, early follow-up, long-arc follow-up and recovery of Near Earth Objects since 2002. Tens of thousands astrometric measurements has helped to improve the inventory of NEOs as well as to understand the NEO population. It was ranked among the world most prolific professional NEO follow-up programmes during its first phase from 2002 to 2008. A fundamental improvement of the 1.06-m KLENOT Telescope was started in autumn 2008. A new computer controlled paralactic mount was built to substantially increase telescope-time efficiency, the number of observations, their accuracy and limiting magnitude. The testing observations of the KLENOT Telescope Next Generation were started in October 2011. The new more efficient CCD camera FLI ProLine 230 was installed in summer 2013. The original Klet Software Package has been continually upgraded over the past two decades of operation. Along with huge hardware changes we have decided for essential changes in software and the whole KLENOT work-flow. Using the current higher computing power available, enhancing and updating our databases and astrometry program, the core of our software package, will prove highly beneficial. Moreover, the UCAC4 as the more precise astrometric star catalog was implemented. Both the system and strategy for the NEO follow-up observation used in the framework of the KLENOT Project are described here, including methods for selecting useful and important targets for NEO follow-up astrometry. Methods and techniques used for the KLENOT Project are also discussed. Sources of particular inaccuracies of astrometric measurements as input data for orbit

  9. Medulloblastoma in infants and children: computed tomographic follow-up after treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y Y; Glass, J P; van Eys, J; Wallace, S

    1985-03-01

    Thirty-six proven cases of medulloblastoma were reviewed by serial CT follow-up examinations from 4 months to 10 years, 2 months after the initial diagnosis, with a mean follow-up time of 3 years, 9 months. The children ranged in age from 10 months to 16 years, 7 months at the time of follow-up. The tumor recurred at the primary site in 20 cases (56%). Leptomeningeal metastasis was demonstrated on CT in 14 cases (39%); seven of these patients also presented with solid subarachnoid metastases. Thirteen patients (36%) showed evidence of severe brain atrophy, which was confined to the posterior fossa in seven of the 13. Calcification resulting from mineralizing microangiopathy developed in five cases (14%), including three patients who had extensive dystrophic calcification in the corticomedullary junction and the deep-seated nuclei of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Only one case of leukoencephalopathy was observed. The patterns of tumor recurrence in the posterior fossa that is severely deformed by surgery and other treatment modalities and leptomeningeal spread of tumor are discussed. PMID:3969470

  10. Follow-up results of isoniazid chemoprophylaxis during biological therapy in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cataño, Juan Carlos; Morales, Milena

    2015-09-01

    The use of biological therapy has been linked with an increased risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation. The aim of this study was to present the follow-up results for isoniazid (INH) chemoprophylaxis in patients receiving different biological therapies. In this prospective observational study, patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were given INH chemoprophylaxis between 2 and 9 months prior to the beginning of biological therapy. All patients were followed up monthly for any signs or symptoms of active TB or INH toxicity. A total of 221 patients, 122 females (55.2 %), with a mean age of 46.8 ± 11.3 years (16-74) were enrolled. LTBI was identified in 218 patients (98.7 %), all of whom received INH chemoprophylaxis. Seven patients (3.2 %) developed active tuberculosis, and 32 (17.2 %) patients developed intolerance or toxicity related to INH. Chemoprophylaxis with INH seems to be effective and safe for the prevention of most TB reactivation in individuals with LTBI, but toxicity must be monitored during follow-up. PMID:25763992

  11. Australian Participation in the Gaia Follow-up Network for Solar System Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, M.; Coward, D. M.; Tanga, P.; Thuillot, W.

    2013-01-01

    The Gaia satellite, planned for launch by the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2013, is the next-generation astrometry mission following Hipparcos. Gaia's primary science goal is to determine the kinematics, chemical structure, and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy. In addition to this core science goal, the Gaia space mission is expected to discover thousands of Solar System objects. Because of orbital constraints, Gaia will only have a limited opportunity for astrometric follow-up of these discoveries. In 2010, the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) initiated a program to identify ground-based optical telescopes for a Gaia follow-up network for Solar System Objects to perform the following critical tasks: confirmation of discovery, identification of body, object tracking to constrain orbits. To date, this network comprises 37 observing sites (representing 53 instruments). The Zadko Telescope, located in Western Australia, was highlighted as an important network node because of its southern location, longitude, and automated scheduling system. We describe the first follow-up tests using the fast moving Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2005 YU55 as the target.

  12. Microperimetric Assessment after Epiretinal Membrane Surgery: 4-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Dal Vecchio, Marco; Lavia, Carlo; Nassisi, Marco; Grignolo, Federico M.; Fea, Antonio M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate retinal function using microperimetry in patients affected by idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) and cataract who underwent combined surgery: 4-year follow-up. Design. Prospective, interventional case series. Methods. 30 eyes of 30 consecutive patients with iERM and age-related cataract underwent 25-gauge vitrectomy and cataract surgery. At baseline, 90 and 180 days, and 1 and 4 years, we examined retinal mean sensitivity (MS), retinal mean defect (MD), fixation stability, and frequency of microscotomas using MP1 microperimetry. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and central retinal thickness (CRT) using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) were also performed. Results. All patients completed 1-year follow-up, while 23 patients reached last follow-up. Baseline MS and MD (10.48 ± 4.17 and −9.18 ± 4.40 dB) significantly changed at one year (12.33 ± 3.66 and −7.49 ± 3.31 dB, p < 0.01), at four years (14.18 ± 3.46 and −4.66 ± 2.85, p < 0.01), and between one and four years (p < 0.01) after surgery. Compared to baseline, CRT and BCVA significantly changed at one year and remained stable at four years. No variations were observed in fixation stability and frequency of microscotomas compared to baseline. Conclusions. Long-term follow-up using microperimetry seems useful to evaluate patients after iERM surgery: retinal sensitivity changes even when BCVA and CRT remain stable. PMID:27088008

  13. Relapse After Methylprednisolone Oral Minipulse Therapy in Childhood Vitiligo: A 12-Month Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Imran, Saher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oral minipulse (OMP) therapy with methylprednisolone is presently one of the most common oral treatments used for progressive vitiligo in children. The treatment is usually given for a period of 6 months during which majority of patients are reported to go into remission. However, there are no follow-up studies to comment upon what happens to the disease after OMP therapy is withdrawn. Aim of the study: To document the incidence of relapse over a period of 1 year after OMP therapy is stopped in children with vitiligo. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in 180 patients of childhood vitiligo (<15 years of age) who had been on OMP therapy with oral methylprednisolone for at least 6 months and who had achieved a complete remission of their disease during the treatment period. The enrolled patients were followed up for a period of 1 year and examined clinically for any sign of reactivation of their disease over either the old lesions or at any new area of the body. Results: Forty-two patients were lost and could not complete the follow-up period of 1 year. Out of the 138 patients available at the end of 1 year, relapse was observed in 48 patients (34.8%). Rest of 90 patients remained in remission over the follow-up period of 1 year. Relapse was more common in patients below 10 years of age (47.4%) as compared with older children (25.9%). Conclusion: Relapse after using methylprednisolone OMP therapy in children with vitiligo is quite common especially in younger age groups. Studies are needed to see whether these relapses could be avoided by giving the treatment for a period longer than 6 months. PMID:23716799

  14. Follow-up design of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joo-Yeon; Moon, Jin Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to analyze the characteristics and long-term follow-up results of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of breast cancer patients. METHODS From August 2007 through February 2010, second-look ultrasound (SLUS) was recommended for 84 of 312 breast cancer patients having unexpected enhancing lesions on MRI. SLUS was performed for 85 unexpected enhancing lesions in 72 patients. We performed a retrospective review to determine the size, lesion type, enhancement kinetic curve, and location in relation to the index cancer. We obtained the pathologic outcome of the detected lesions and in case of a negative finding on SLUS, we performed follow-up examinations for at least two years. RESULTS Of 85 unexpected lesions, 72 (85%) were detected on SLUS. In total, 41 lesions (56.9%) were confirmed as malignant and 31 lesions (43.6%) as benign. Cancer rate was statistically higher in lesions having type III enhancement pattern, located at the same quadrant as the index cancer. However, no significant association was observed between the cancer rate and the lesion size and type. None of the 13 negative cases on SLUS developed cancer on follow-up. CONCLUSION In case of unexpected enhancing lesions on preoperative MRI of breast cancer patients, SLUS can be useful to find out the matched lesion. Lesions with type III enhancement pattern or those located at the same quadrant as the index cancer should be considered as a separate cancer. In the absence of any suspicious findings on SLUS, patient may be followed up with confidence. PMID:25430525

  15. Lung Tumors Treated With Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation: Computed Tomography Imaging Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Palussiere, Jean Marcet, Benjamin; Descat, Edouard; Deschamps, Frederic; Rao, Pramod; Ravaud, Alain; Brouste, Veronique; Baere, Thierry de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the morphologic evolution of lung tumors treated with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) by way of computed tomography (CT) images and to investigate patterns of incomplete RFA at the site of ablation. Materials and Methods: One hundred eighty-nine patients with 350 lung tumors treated with RFA underwent CT imaging at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. CT findings were interpreted separately by two reviewers with consensus. Five different radiologic patterns were predefined: fibrosis, cavitation, nodule, atelectasis, and disappearance. The appearance of the treated area was evaluated at each follow-up CT using the predefined patterns. Results: At 1 year after treatment, the most common evolutions were fibrosis (50.5%) or nodules (44.8%). Differences were noted depending on the initial size of the tumor, with fibrosis occurring more frequently for tumors <2 cm (58.6% vs. 22.9%, P = 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}). Cavitation and atelectasis were less frequent patterns (2.4% and 1.4%, respectively, at 1 year). Tumor location (intraparenchymatous, with pleural contact <50% or >50%) was not significantly correlated with follow-up image pattern. Local tumor progressions were observed with each type of evolution. At 1 year, 12 local recurrences were noted: 2 cavitations, which represented 40% of the cavitations noted at 1 year; 2 fibroses (1.9%); 7 nodules (7.4%); and 1 atelectasis (33.3%). Conclusion: After RFA of lung tumors, follow-up CT scans show that the shape of the treatment zone can evolve in five different patterns. None of these patterns, however, can confirm the absence of further local tumor progression at subsequent follow-up.

  16. Involution patterns of retinopathy of prematurity after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab: implications for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Isaac, M; Tehrani, N; Mireskandari, K

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo describe involution patterns following monotherapy with intravitreal bevacizumab injection (IVB) for type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in zone I or zone II posterior.MethodsA retrospective chart review of infants treated with IVB from January 2010-April 2014. Infants with minimum of 82 weeks postmenstrual age at last follow-up were included. Primary outcome was timing of involution of type 1 ROP for the first 12 weeks post treatment. Secondary outcomes were development of any recurrence and structural outcome at last follow-up. Retinal examination records, fundus, and flourescein angiography images were reviewed.ResultsTwenty-eight eyes were included. Average follow-up post treatment was 33.9±9.7 months (range 21.4-61.9). Cumulative frequency of regression of plus disease was seen in 73.3, 86.7, and 100% of eyes by days 3, 5, and 8, respectively. Regression of both stage 3 and plus disease was observed in 29, 82, 88, and 100% by weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Within the first 3 months, 17/28 eyes developed recurrence to stage 1 or 2 after regression. None developed recurrence of plus disease. By the end of 3 months 18% of eyes vascularized into zone III. At a mean of 24±17.3 months, 39% of eyes were not vascularized into zone III as seen on flourescein angiography with scleral indentation.ConclusionOur experience suggests regression of plus disease and stage 3 are expected within the first 4 weeks after bevacizumab treatment. Recurrence may occur despite initial regression and requires careful follow-up. PMID:26869159

  17. The effect of ulipristal acetate treatment on symptomatic uterine fibroids within 12-months follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Sławomir; Szkodziak, Piotr; Czuczwar, Piotr; Woźniakowska, Ewa; Paszkowski, Maciej; Milart, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study The purpose of the study was to monitor the effect of ulipristal acetate treatment on symptomatic uterine fibroids within 12-months follow-up. Material and methods Fifty six patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids qualified for surgical treatment were included in the prospective observational study. All patients received preoperative oral UPA treatment for 3 months (1 × 5 mg). Patients that refused surgical treatment after UPA therapy were followed-up for the next 9 months. The volume of the intramural fibroid was estimated by TV-US using and integrated VOCAL 3D imaging program at baseline, after 3 months of UPA treatment and further at 3-months intervals. Results Before UPA mean dominant fibroid volume was estimated to be 216.0 cm3 (38.4-768.2 cm3) and decreased to 117.6 cm3 (12.6-668.0 cm3) after 3 months of UPA therapy. Mean percentage volume reduction was 45.6%. Mean hemoglobin level increased from an initial 10.1 g/dL (6.8-12.9 g/dL) to 12.6 g/dL (10.1-14.8) after 3 months of UPA therapy. At 12 months after initiating UPA treatment mean dominant fibroid volume decreased by 43.9%. In one third of followed-up patients the effect of 3 month UPA therapy persisted for the next 9 months. Conclusions Three month UPA therapy decreases fibroid volume and improves hemoglobin level before planned surgical treatment. In one third of followed-up patients the effect of 3 month UPA therapy persisted for the next 9 months. PMID:26327823

  18. Profile and follow-up of patients with tuberculosis in a priority city in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jisleny da Cruz; Silva, Marcio Roberto; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Leite, Isabel Cristina Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the cases of tuberculosis and the impact of direct follow-up on the assessment of treatment outcomes. METHODS This open prospective cohort study evaluated 504 cases of tuberculosis reported in the Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN – Notifiable Diseases Information System) in Juiz de Fora, MG, Southeastern Brazil, between 2008 and 2009. The incidence of treatment outcomes was compared between a group of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and directly followed up by monthly consultations during return visits (287) and a patient group for which the information was indirectly collected (217) through the city’s surveillance system. The Chi-square test was used to compare the percentages, with a significance level of 0.05. The relative risk (RR) was used to evaluate the differences in the incidence rate of each type of treatment outcome between the two groups. RESULTS Of the outcomes directly and indirectly evaluated, 18.5% and 3.2% corresponded to treatment default and 3.8% and 0.5% corresponded to treatment failure, respectively. The incidence of treatment default and failure was higher in the group with direct follow-up (p < 0.05) (RR = 5.72, 95%CI 2.65;12.34, and RR = 8.31, 95%CI 1.08;63.92, respectively). CONCLUSIONS A higher incidence of treatment default and failure was observed in the directly followed up group, and most of these cases were neglected by the disease reporting system. Therefore, effective measures are needed to improve the control of tuberculosis and data quality. PMID:25741659

  19. Potential follow-up increases private contributions to public goods.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Todd; Ternovski, John; Yoeli, Erez

    2016-05-10

    People contribute more to public goods when their contributions are made more observable to others. We report an intervention that subtly increases the observability of public goods contributions when people are solicited privately and impersonally (e.g., mail, email, social media). This intervention is tested in a large-scale field experiment (n = 770,946) in which people are encouraged to vote through get-out-the-vote letters. We vary whether the letters include the message, "We may call you after the election to ask about your voting experience." Increasing the perceived observability of whether people vote by including that message increased the impact of the get-out-the-vote letters by more than the entire effect of a typical get-out-the-vote letter. This technique for increasing perceived observability can be replicated whenever public goods solicitations are made in private. PMID:27114553

  20. Swift follow up of IceCube-160731A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Keivani, A.; Fox, D. B.; Tesic, G.; Cowen, D. F.; Osborne, J. P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    2016-08-01

    Swift has observed the field of the IceCube HESE event IceCube-160731A, "AMON ICECUBE HESE 128290 6888376" (revision 0), utilising the on-board 19-point tiling pattern to cover a region centred on RA,Dec (J2000) = (215.109, -0.458), with a radius of approximately 0.8 & deg;.

  1. Swift follow-up of SPIRITS16tn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S. M.; Jencson, J. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report Swift UVOT observations of SPIRITS16tn, a possible supernova in M108 (Jencson et al. ATel #9434). No source is detected in V, B, and U images taken on 2016-08-29.08 UT (14.0 days since SST discovery images) with exposure times of 540, 580, and 540s respectively.

  2. Localization and broadband follow-up of the gravitational-wave transient GW150914

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abbott, B. P.

    2016-07-20

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize themore » follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Furthermore, detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.« less

  3. Localization and Broadband Follow-up of the Gravitational-wave Transient GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. C.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. C.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavagliá, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. C.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D’Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. 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D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. 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V.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Salvetti, D.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sgrò, C.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Venters, T. M.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zhu, S.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Brocato, E.; Cappellaro, E.; Covino, S.; Grado, A.; Nicastro, L.; Palazzi, E.; Pian, E.; Amati, L.; Antonelli, L. A.; Capaccioli, M.; D’Avanzo, P.; D’Elia, V.; Getman, F.; Giuffrida, G.; Iannicola, G.; Limatola, L.; Lisi, M.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Melandri, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Possenti, A.; Pulone, L.; Rossi, A.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Testa, V.; Tomasella, L.; Yang, S.; GRAvitational Wave Inaf TeAm (GRAWITA); Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.; Brandt, S.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Ferrigno, C.; Hanlon, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Laurent, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Roques, J. P.; Savchenko, V.; Ubertini, P.; INTEGRAL Collaboration; Kasliwal, M. M.; Singer, L. P.; Cao, Y.; Duggan, G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bhalerao, V.; Miller, A. A.; Barlow, T.; Bellm, E.; Manulis, I.; Rana, J.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Surace, J.; Rebbapragada, U.; Cook, D.; Van Sistine, A.; Sesar, B.; Perley, D.; Ferreti, R.; Prince, T.; Kendrick, R.; Horesh, A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) Collaboration; Hurley, K.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Aptekar, R. L.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Smith, D. M.; Cline, T.; Krimm, H.; InterPlanetary Network; Abe, F.; Doi, M.; Fujisawa, K.; Kawabata, K. S.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.; Tanaka, M.; Ohta, K.; Yanagisawa, K.; Yoshida, M.; J-GEM Collaboration; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Ellman, N.; Rostami, S.; La Silla–QUEST Survey; Bersier, D. F.; Bode, M. F.; Collins, C. A.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Darnley, M. J.; Galloway, D. K.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mazzali, P.; Mundell, C. G.; Piascik, A. S.; Pollacco, Don; Steele, I. A.; Ulaczyk, K.; Liverpool Telescope Collaboration; Broderick, J. W.; Fender, R. P.; Jonker, P. G.; Rowlinson, A.; Stappers, B. W.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Collaboration; Lipunov, V.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tyurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Kuznetsov, A.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Israelian, G.; Budnev, N. M.; Gress, O.; Ivanov, K.; Poleshuk, V.; Tlatov, A.; Yurkov, V.; MASTER Collaboration; Kawai, N.; Serino, M.; Negoro, H.; Nakahira, S.; Mihara, T.; Tomida, H.; Ueno, S.; Tsunemi, H.; Matsuoka, M.; MAXI Collaboration; Croft, S.; Feng, L.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Morales, M. F.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Williams, A.; Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) Collaboration; Smartt, S. J.; Chambers, K. C.; Smith, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Young, D. R.; Wright, D. E.; Schultz, A.; Denneau, L.; Flewelling, H.; Magnier, E. A.; Primak, N.; Rest, A.; Sherstyuk, A.; Stalder, B.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.; Pan-STARRS Collaboration; Olivares E., F.; Campbell, H.; Kotak, R.; Sollerman, J.; Smith, M.; Dennefeld, M.; Anderson, J. P.; Botticella, M. T.; Chen, T.-W.; Valle, M. D.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Fraser, M.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kupfer, T.; Harmanen, J.; Galbany, L.; Le Guillou, L.; Lyman, J. D.; Maguire, K.; Mitra, A.; Nicholl, M.; Razza, A.; Terreran, G.; Valenti, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; PESSTO Collaboration; Ćwiek, A.; Ćwiok, M.; Mankiewicz, L.; Opiela, R.; Zaremba, M.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Pi of the Sky Collaboration; Onken, C. A.; Scalzo, R. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Wolf, C.; Yuan, F.; SkyMapper Collaboration; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Giommi, P.; Marshall, F. E.; Nousek, J.; O’Brien, P.; Osborne, J. P.; Palmer, D.; Perri, M.; Siegel, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Swift Collaboration; Klotz, A.; Turpin, D.; Laugier, R.; TAROT, Zadko, Algerian National Observatory, C2PU Collaboration; Beroiz, M.; Peñuela, T.; Macri, L. M.; Oelkers, R. J.; Lambas, D. G.; Vrech, R.; Cabral, J.; Colazo, C.; Dominguez, M.; Sanchez, B.; Gurovich, S.; Lares, M.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Padilla, N.; Pereyra, N. A.; Benacquista, M.; TOROS Collaboration; Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K.; Levan, A. J.; Steeghs, D.; Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Watson, D.; Irwin, M.; Fernandez, C. G.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Thoene, C. C.; Cano, Z.; Rosswog, S.; VISTA Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A gravitational-wave (GW) transient was identified in data recorded by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors on 2015 September 14. The event, initially designated G184098 and later given the name GW150914, is described in detail elsewhere. By prior arrangement, preliminary estimates of the time, significance, and sky location of the event were shared with 63 teams of observers covering radio, optical, near-infrared, X-ray, and gamma-ray wavelengths with ground- and space-based facilities. In this Letter we describe the low-latency analysis of the GW data and present the sky localization of the first observed compact binary merger. We summarize the follow-up observations reported by 25 teams via private Gamma-ray Coordinates Network circulars, giving an overview of the participating facilities, the GW sky localization coverage, the timeline, and depth of the observations. As this event turned out to be a binary black hole merger, there is little expectation of a detectable electromagnetic (EM) signature. Nevertheless, this first broadband campaign to search for a counterpart of an Advanced LIGO source represents a milestone and highlights the broad capabilities of the transient astronomy community and the observing strategies that have been developed to pursue neutron star binary merger events. Detailed investigations of the EM data and results of the EM follow-up campaign are being disseminated in papers by the individual teams.

  4. Swift and GRB's: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Francis E.

    2006-01-01

    We report Swift observations of GRB 051109A, a bright, long burst detected with BAT. A bright afterglow was quickly detected with the X-Ray Telescope and Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope, and observations continued for more than 10 days. The X-ray light is complex with a rapid initial decay followed by a more gradual decay. There is evidence for a jet break with an indicated opening angle of a few degrees. UVOT observations with the V filter are consistent with a power-law day for the first 10 ks. We discuss the observations in light of current models.

  5. Time-resolved GRB spectra in the complex radiation of synchrotron and Compton processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y. G.; Hu, S. M.; Chen, X.; Li, K.; Guo, D. F.; Li, Y. T.; Li, H. Z.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Lin, H. N.; Chang, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Under the steady-state condition, the spectrum of electrons is investigated by solving the continuity equation under the complex radiation of both the synchrotron and Compton processes. The resulted gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectrum is a broken power law in both the fast and slow cooling phases. On the basis of this electron spectrum, the spectral indices of the Band function in four different phases are presented. In the complex radiation frame, the detail investigation on physical parameters reveals that three models can answer the α ˜ -1 problem, which are the synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton in the internal and the external shock models, and the synchrotron plus the external Compton processes in the external shock model. A possible marginal to fast cooling phase transition in GRB 080916C is discussed. The time-resolved spectra in different main pulses of GRB 100724B, GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B are investigated. We found that the flux is proportional to the peak energy in almost all main pulses. A significant (5σ) correlation for Fp ˜ Ep is evident the first main pulse of GRB 100826A, and three marginally significant (3σ) correlations Fp ˜ Ep are found in main pulses of GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B. The correlation between spectral index and Ep at 3 ˜ 4σ level are observed in the first main pulse of GRB 100826A. Such correlations are possible explained in the complex radiation scenario.

  6. Follow-up of K2 planet candiates with the LCOGT network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Bayliss, Daniel; Colón, Knicole; Cochran, William; Zhou, George; Brown, Timothy; Shporer, Avi; Espinoza, Nestor; Fulton, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    K2 has proven to be an outstanding successor to the Kepler mission. It has already revealed dozens of new planet candidates, and unlike those found by the primary mission, many of these systems’ host stars are sufficiently bright to allow extensive follow-up observations. This is especially important since each of the K2 observing campaigns are only ~80 days long, leaving the community with the discovery of exciting new systems but often not enough time coverage to enable a thorough characterization of these systems.We are leading a large effort to observe K2 transiting planet candidates with the LCOGT telescope network. LCOGT’s longitudinal coverage, multiple identical telescopes per site and automated queue observing make it an ideal facility for fast, high-precision and multi-color follow-up. Our program focuses on specific aspects of K2 follow-up for which the network is especially powerful: period determination for candidates with fewer than three K2 transits; transit timing variation monitoring to measure planetary masses, orbital parameters and to search for additional planets in multiple systems; and multi-color photometry to vet planet candidates and carry-out preliminary atmospheric spectroscopy.We will present new results for a selection of systems observed so far through this program. These include K2-19, a multi-planet system extremely close to 3:2 resonance and experiencing transit timing variations with amplitudes as large as one hour; EPIC201702477, a long-period planet with only two K2 transits; WASP-47, a system hosting a hot Jupiter and two K2-discovered small planets; and EPIC201637175b, a disintegrating rocky planet.Our program demonstrates that LCOGT is uniquely positioned to be the primary ground-based photometric follow-up resource for K2 exoplanet discoveries, but also for the numerous bright systems that will result from the TESS mission. LCOGT photometry complements ongoing radial velocity and atmospheric spectroscopy efforts to

  7. Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation: Post Trial Follow-Up of Randomized Groups

    PubMed Central

    Jafar, Tazeen H.; Jehan, Imtiaz; Liang, Feng; Barbier, Sylvaine; Islam, Muhammad; Bux, Rasool; Khan, Aamir Hameed; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Poulter, Neil; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ebrahim, Shah

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence on long term effectiveness of public health strategies for lowering blood pressure (BP) is scarce. In the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) Trial, a 2 x 2 factorial, cluster randomized controlled trial, the combined home health education (HHE) and trained general practitioner (GP) intervention delivered over 2 years was more effective than no intervention (usual care) in lowering systolic BP among adults with hypertension in urban Pakistan. However, it was not clear whether the effect would be sustained after the cessation of intervention. We conducted 7 years follow-up inclusive of 5 years of post intervention period of COBRA trial participants to assess the effectiveness of the interventions on BP during extended follow-up. Methods A total of 1341 individuals 40 years or older with hypertension (systolic BP 140 mm Hg or greater, diastolic BP 90 mm Hg or greater, or already receiving treatment) were followed by trained research staff masked to randomization status. BP was measured thrice with a calibrated automated device (Omron HEM-737 IntelliSense) in the sitting position after 5 minutes of rest. BP measurements were repeated after two weeks. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to analyze the primary outcome of change in systolic BP from baseline to 7- year follow-up. The multivariable model was adjusted for clustering, age at baseline, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, and presence of diabetes. Findings After 7 years of follow-up, systolic BP levels among those randomised to combined HHE plus trained GP intervention were significantly lower (2.1 [4.1–0.1] mm Hg) compared to those randomised to usual care, (P = 0.04). Participants receiving the combined intervention compared to usual care had a greater reduction in LDL-cholesterol (2.7 [4.8 to 0.6] mg/dl. Conclusions The benefit in systolic BP reduction observed in the original cohort assigned to the combined intervention was attenuated but still

  8. A real-time fast radio burst: polarization detection and multiwavelength follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Barsdell, B. R.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bian, F.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Caleb, M.; Champion, D.; Chandra, P.; Da Costa, G.; Delvaux, C.; Flynn, C.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jameson, A.; Johnston, S.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Keane, E. F.; Keller, S.; Kocz, J.; Kramer, M.; Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Ng, C.; Ofek, E. O.; Perley, D. A.; Possenti, A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Shen, Yue; Stappers, B.; Tisserand, P.; van Straten, W.; Wolf, C.

    2015-02-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are one of the most tantalizing mysteries of the radio sky; their progenitors and origins remain unknown and until now no rapid multiwavelength follow-up of an FRB has been possible. New instrumentation has decreased the time between observation and discovery from years to seconds, and enables polarimetry to be performed on FRBs for the first time. We have discovered an FRB (FRB 140514) in real-time on 2014 May 14 at 17:14:11.06 UTC at the Parkes radio telescope and triggered follow-up at other wavelengths within hours of the event. FRB 140514 was found with a dispersion measure (DM) of 562.7(6) cm-3 pc, giving an upper limit on source redshift of z ≲ 0.5. FRB 140514 was found to be 21 ± 7 per cent (3σ) circularly polarized on the leading edge with a 1σ upper limit on linear polarization <10 per cent. We conclude that this polarization is intrinsic to the FRB. If there was any intrinsic linear polarization, as might be expected from coherent emission, then it may have been depolarized by Faraday rotation caused by passing through strong magnetic fields and/or high-density