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Sample records for great meteor seamount

  1. Evidence for age and evolution of Corner seamounts and Great Meteor seamount chain from multibeam bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1990-10-01

    The morphology of the Corner and Cruiser seamounts is discussed and the apparent age of seamount geomorphic features that are thought to have formed at sea level is derived. High-resolution, multibeam bathymetry of the seamounts shows geomorphic features such as guyots and terraces. The pattern of volcanism is consistent with the sequential formation of the New England, Corner, and Great Meteor chain seamounts above the New England hotspot. However, Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic absolute motion of the African plate over the hotspot differs significantly from predictions of the existing models. The derived age pattern of volcanism indicates formation of the Corner seamounts at ca. 80 Ma to 76 Ma.

  2. Evidence for age and evolution of Corner seamounts and Great Meteor seamount chain from multibeam bathymetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Smoot, N. Christian

    1990-01-01

    The morphology of the Corner and Cruiser seamounts is discussed and the apparent age of seamount geomorphic features that are thought to have formed at sea level is derived. High-resolution, multibeam bathymetry of the seamounts shows geomorphic features such as guyots and terraces. The pattern of volcanism is consistent with the sequential formation of the New England, Corner, and Great Meteor chain seamounts above the New England hotspot. However, Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic absolute motion of the African plate over the hotspot differs significantly from predictions of the existing models. The derived age pattern of volcanism indicates formation of the Corner seamounts at ca. 80 Ma to 76 Ma.

  3. Crowdsourcing, the great meteor storm of 1833, and the founding of meteor science.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Mark; Suomela, Todd

    2014-06-01

    Yale science professor Denison Olmsted used crowdsourcing to gather observations from across the United States of the unexpected deluge of meteors on 13 November 1833--more than 72,000/h. He used these observations (and newspaper accounts and correspondence from scientists) to make a commendably accurate interpretation of the meteor storm, overturning 2100 years of erroneous teachings about shooting stars and establishing meteor science as a new branch of astronomy. Olmsted's success was substantially based on his use of newspapers and their practice of news pooling to solicit observations from throughout the country by lay and expert observers professionally unaffiliated with Yale College and him. In today's parlance, Olmsted was a remarkably successful early practitioner of scientific crowdsourcing, also known as citizen science. He may have been the first to use mass media for crowdsourcing in science. He pioneered many of the citizen-science crowdsourcing practices that are still in use today: an open call for citizen participation, a clearly defined task, a large geographical distribution for gathering data and a rapid response to opportunistic events. Olmsted's achievement is not just that he used crowdsourcing in 1833 but that crowdsourcing helped him to advance science significantly. PMID:24917173

  4. Subducting Seamounts and the Rupturing Process of Great Subduction Zone Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.

    2009-05-01

    It was suggested in the 1970's that subducting ocean floor features may delimit the along-strike rupture lengths of large subduction zone earthquakes. With the dramatic improvement in data quality, both for seismic and ocean floor bathmetry data, we can now see how the actual rupturing process of great earthquakes is also influenced by such subducting features. Here we present three great (Mw > 8) subduction zone earthquakes, in very different parts of the world, for which a relation between the ocean floor and the earthquake source process is seen. These include the 1986 Andreanof Islands, Alaska and the 1996 Biak, Indonesia earthquakes, in which the regions of large slip concentrate in patches, reminiscent of the "asperity model" of earthquakes, and appear to be related to subducted seamounts. For the 2001 Peru earthquake, a subducting fracture zone, with its associated bathymetric peak and trough, seems to have been the cause of the rupture being stalled for ~30s, before producing an earthquake of Mw 8.4, the third largest earthquake worldwide since 1965. Similarities and differences in the earthquake rupturing properties for these two different types of subducting features will be discussed. An outstanding question is what controls whether a seamount obducts or subducts.

  5. Spionidae (Polychaeta: Canalipalpata: Spionida) from seamounts in the NE Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Meißner, Karin; Bick, Andreas; Guggolz, Theresa; Götting, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Spionidae (Polychaeta) collected from seamounts in the Atlantic Ocean were studied. Altogether six species were found of which two are new to science and one belongs to a new genus. Aonidella cf. dayi Maciolek in López-Jamar, 1989 and Glandulospio orestes gen. et sp. nov. were the most common species and occurred on both the Great and Little Meteor Seamount, the Irving Seamount and the Hyeres Seamount. Laonice norgensis Sikorski, 2003 and Malacoceros jirkovi Sikorski, 1992 have a wider distribution in the North Atlantic, including the Mediterranean Sea in case of L. norgensis. Aonides selvagensis Brito, Núñez and Riera, 2006 is only known from the Macaronesian Region. Dipolydora paracaulleryi sp. nov. has been collected from both the Great and Little Meteor Seamounts. All species are compared with morphological similar species and their taxonomy is discussed. Detailed descriptions are provided for the species new to science and descriptions of the previously known species are amended. Accompanying histological studies revealed the presence of very strong dorsoventral musculature in A. cf. dayi and for G. orestes gen. et sp. nov. the presence of glandular organs in the middle body region. Laonice maciolekae Aguirrezabalaga & Ceberio, 2005 was found to be a junior synonym of L. appellöfi Söderström, 1920 and is formally synonymised. Molecular data suggest gene flow between seamounts and autochthonous as well as allochthonous larval recruitment for different species. The results of previous studies by other authors, that polychaete communities of the North Atlantic Seamounts are characterized by low diversity, low rates of endemism, and the predominance of widely distributed (and cosmopolitan) species is not corroborated by our results.  PMID:24869536

  6. Meteor Showers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronk, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the history, formation, and observing techniques of meteors and comets. Provided are several pictures, diagrams, meteor organizations and publications, and meteor shower observation tables. (YP)

  7. Practical Meteor Stream Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by the recent Leonid meteor storms, researchers have made great strides in our ability to predict enhanced meteor activity. However, the necessary calibration of the meteor stream models with Earth-based ZHRs (Zenith Hourly Rates) has placed emphasis on the terran observer and meteor activity predictions are published in such a manner to reflect this emphasis. As a consequence, many predictions are often unusable by the satellite community, which has the most at stake and the greatest interest in meteor forecasting. This paper suggests that stream modelers need to pay more attention to the needs of this community and publish not just durations and times of maxima for Earth, but everything needed to characterize the meteor stream in and out of the plane of the ecliptic, which, at a minimum, consists of the location of maximum stream density (ZHR) and the functional form of the density decay with distance from this point. It is also suggested that some of the terminology associated with meteor showers may need to be more strictly defined in order to eliminate the perception of crying wolf by meteor scientists. An outburst is especially problematic, as it usually denotes an enhancement by a factor of 2 or more to researchers, but conveys the notion of a sky filled with meteors to satellite operators and the public. Experience has also taught that predicted ZHRs often lead to public disappointment, as these values vastly overestimate what is seen.

  8. Introduction to Seamount Special Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, A. B.

    1984-12-01

    This special section is the outcome of a symposium held at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory November 17-19, 1982, on the origin and evolution of seamounts. The topic for the symposium arose from the realization that although there is now a wealth of new ideas on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the ocean floor, the study of seamounts has been relatively neglected despite their great importance to plate tectonics. One of the most interesting features of the ocean floor is the large number of small volcanoes or seamounts. Usually, these features are circular in plan view and have a sharp summit. There has been extensive debate in the literature about the significance of the different morphological types of seamounts. A traditional view has been that flattopped seamounts (e.g., guyots) formed as a result of subaerial erosion when the volcanoes were above sea level. Seamounts covered by fringing reefs or sediments (e.g., atolls), on the other hand, are believed to have formed when the original volcanic foundation subsided below sea level.

  9. Meteor myths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.

    1989-11-01

    The falling stars or meteors have long inspired folkloric imagery and superstition. All cultures, it seems, have produced their meteor myths and stories. In this article the reasoning behind the many strange ideas inspired by the meteor images is expanded and explored.

  10. Major and minor element geochemistry of deep-sea sediments in the Azores Platform and southern seamount region.

    PubMed

    Palma, Carla; Oliveira, Anabela; Valença, Manuela; Cascalho, João; Pereira, Eduarda; Lillebø, Ana I; Duarte, Armando C; Pinto de Abreu, Manuel

    2013-10-15

    The Azores Platform and the Irving and Great Meteor seamounts south of the archipelago (38°N-29°N) have rarely been studied geochemically, a fact which is surprising given that they represent the south-eastern limit of region V outlined in the Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR Convention). The main aim of the present work was therefore to characterise the spatial variability of major and minor elements in deep-sea sediment cores from these two regions. XRD and geochemical analyses revealed that whereas the Azores Platform sediments are composed of a mixture of biogenic and detrital volcanic material, those at the seamounts are characterised by carbonated biogenic remains. The latter sediments were found to contain very low amounts of volcanic or hydrothermal detrital material, being almost entirely comprised of CaCO3 (more than 80%). PMID:23896401

  11. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  12. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image s plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length "streak" meteor photome&y and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001.2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  13. Eocene and Miocene extension, meteoric fluid infiltration, and core complex formation in the Great Basin (Raft River Mountains, Utah)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Methner, Katharina; Mulch, Andreas; Teyssier, Christian; Wells, Michael L.; Cosca, Michael A.; Gottardi, Raphaël.; Gébelin, Aude; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic core complexes (MCCs) in the North American Cordillera reflect the effects of lithospheric extension and contribute to crustal adjustments both during and after a protracted subduction history along the Pacific plate margin. While the Miocene-to-recent history of most MCCs in the Great Basin, including the Raft River-Albion-Grouse Creek MCC, is well documented, early Cenozoic tectonic fabrics are commonly severely overprinted. We present stable isotope, geochronological (40Ar/39Ar), and microstructural data from the Raft River detachment shear zone. Hydrogen isotope ratios of syntectonic white mica (δ2Hms) from mylonitic quartzite within the shear zone are very low (-90‰ to -154‰, Vienna SMOW) and result from multiphase synkinematic interaction with surface-derived fluids. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology reveals Eocene (re)crystallization of white mica with δ2Hms ≥ -154‰ in quartzite mylonite of the western segment of the detachment system. These δ2Hms values are distinctively lower than in localities farther east (δ2Hms ≥ -125‰), where 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data indicate Miocene (18-15 Ma) extensional shearing and mylonitic fabric formation. These data indicate that very low δ2H surface-derived fluids penetrated the brittle-ductile transition as early as the mid-Eocene during a first phase of exhumation along a detachment rooted to the east. In the eastern part of the core complex, prominent top-to-the-east ductile shearing, mid-Miocene 40Ar/39Ar ages, and higher δ2H values of recrystallized white mica, indicate Miocene structural and isotopic overprinting of Eocene fabrics.

  14. Limitations on lowstand meteoric diagenesis in the Pliocene-Pleistocene of Florida and Great Bahama Bank: Implications for eustatic sea-level models

    SciTech Connect

    Melim, L.A.

    1996-10-01

    Data from three Bahamian and South Floridan cores with deeper water facies show that, contrary to current models, there is no phreatic meteoric diagenesis that can be attributed to large-scale sea-level lowstands. Models of meteoric diagenesis in carbonate sediments commonly assume major phreatic alteration during glacio-eustatic sea-level lowstands. However, the diagenesis previously attributed to large-scale (> 80 m) lowstands is found in shallow-water facies that have been repetitively exposed. In order to document diagenesis from large-scale lowstands, an interval is needed that was deposited in deeper water and not immediately exposed to meteoric fluids. Three cores with such deeper-water facies indicate that the majority of phreatic meteoric diagenesis in Florida and the Bahamas happened during glacio-eustatic highstands, not during lowstands. The data also suggest that diagenetically active meteoric lenses in Florida and the Bahamas are restricted to within 60 m, and perhaps less, of the land surface. The most likely reasons deeper lenses are chemically inactive are (1) the greater percolation distance allows the water to reach saturation prior to entering the lens, and (2) the large distance exceeds the reach of soil-derived organic matter, known to drive diagenesis in meteorite lenses. Models that currently assume a constant rate for alteration in meteoric fluids need to accommodate this variation with thickness of the vadose zone. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Can seamounts provide a good habitat for polychaete annelids? Example of the northeastern Atlantic seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surugiu, Victor; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Gillet, Patrick; Ruellet, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    Two seamount groups in the northeastern Atlantic were investigated during the 1980s and 1990s: the first was located along the Iberian and African coasts (Galicia, to the north of Portugal; and the Ampere, Gorringe, Josephine and Seine banks near the Madeira-Canary Islands) and the second was located offshore of the southern part of the Azores Islands, included the Atlantis, Hyeres, Irving, Meteor and Plato banks. Among the invertebrates, Annelida, specifically Polychaeta, were studied as surrogates for the biogeographical relationship between coastal and mid-oceanic seamounts in the northeastern Atlantic and the fauna in these areas. The dominant families were Onuphidae (27.46%), Syllidae (18.23%), Eunicidae (15.65%), Amphinomidae (11.45%) and Nereididae (5.61%), representing 78.4% of the total fauna. Data analyses clearly distinguished two seamount groups, one for coastal seamounts and the other offshore. Although the species distinguished and the family composition at the sampled sites were different (i.e., most diversified at the Josephine site and most impoverished at the Irving site), no coastal/offshore faunal impoverishment gradient could be identified. Thus, it seems that seamount environments do not favour any relationship between planktotrophic development and the direct development of polychaetes. Though the number of apparent endemic species was low (<7%), it remained in keeping with other invertebrate groups. Still, while seamounts may well encourage oceanic biodiversity in some zoological groups, this was clearly not the case for the polychaetes. We offer two explanations for this paradox: pelagic productivity and local environmental conditions.

  16. Advanced meteor wind observations using meteor and MST radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, M.; Aso, T.; Hall, C.; Nakamura, T.; Sato, K.; Sato, T.

    A few topics from recent developments of radio meteor observation techniques are presented The Nippon Norway Tromsoe Meteor Radar NTMR has been in continuous operation since November 2003 in Tromsoe 69N One of the major advantages of the present meteor radar is its high echo rate 6000-20000 echoes a day despite the relatively small transmitting power 7 5kW peak From ambipolar diffusion coefficients we have successfully extracted atmospheric temperature fluctuations due to gravity waves assuming the Boussinesq approximation The time and height resolutions of horizontal winds and temperature fluctuations at the altitude of 90 km are 1 hour and 2km high enough for the study of gravity waves with a period longer than a few hours Horizontal propagation characteristics of gravity waves are further studied using a theoretical phase relation between the wind and temperature fluctuations MST radars in the VHF band have a great potential in meteor echo observations due to their high transmitting power The meteor measurement can be conducted throughout a day and complement the turbulent echo measurement in the mesosphere which is limited to daylight hours only The MU radar of Kyoto University is one of those radars and has been successfully applied to meteor studies by utilizing its very high versatility The MU radar was recently renewed Its signal processing unit is up-graded from a 4 analog receiver system to a 25 digital receiver system In the present study we try to improve the MU radar meteor measurement

  17. Meteor trajectory estimation from radio meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kákona, J.

    2016-01-01

    Radio meteor observation techniques are generally accepted as meteor counting methods useful mainly for meteor flux detection. Due to the technical progress in radio engineering and electronics a construction of a radio meteor detection network with software defined receivers has become possible. These receivers could be precisely time synchronized and could obtain data which provide us with more information than just the meteor count. We present a technique which is able to compute a meteor trajectory from the data recorded by multiple radio stations.

  18. The history of meteors and meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    The history of meteors and meteor showers can effectively start with the work of Edmond Halley who overcome the Aristotelean view of meteors as being an upper atmospheric phenomenon and introduced their extraterrestrial nature. Halley also estimated their height and velocity. The observations of the Leonids in 1799, 1833 and 1866 established meteoroids as cometary debris. Two red herrings were caught — fixed radiants and hyperbolic velocities. But the 1890 to 1950 period with two-station meteor photography, meteor spectroscopy and the radar detection of meteors saw the subject well established.

  19. Abundance of litter on Condor seamount (Azores, Portugal, Northeast Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, C. K.; Gomes-Pereira, J. N.; Isidro, E. J.; Santos, R. S.; Morato, T.

    2013-12-01

    Marine litter is an emerging problem for the world's ocean health but little is known on its distribution and abundance on seamounts and how it affects deep-sea ecosystems. The scientific underwater laboratory set up on Condor seamount offered an ideal case study for the first documentation of litter distribution on a shallow seamount with historical fishing. A total of 48 video transects deployed on the summit (n=45) and the northern flank (n=3) covered an area of 0.031 and 0.025km2, respectively, revealing 55 litter items. Litter density on the summit was 1439 litter items km-2, whilst on the deeper northern flank, estimates indicate densities of 397 litter items km-2. Lost fishing line was the dominant litter item encountered on both areas (73% of total litter on the summit and 50% on northern flank), all being entirely or partly entangled in the locally abundant gorgonians Dentomuricea cf. meteor and Viminella flagellum. Other items included lost weights, anchors and glass bottles. The predominance of lost fishing gear identifies the source of litter on Condor seamount as exclusively ocean-based and related to fishing activities. Abundance of litter on the Condor seamount was much lower than that reported from other locations closer to populated areas.

  20. Meteor Beliefs Project: ``Year of Meteors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair; Drobnock, George J.; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2011-10-01

    We present a discussion linking ideas from a modern music album by Laura Veirs back to a turbulent time in American history 150 years ago, which inspired poet Walt Whitman to compose his poem "Year of Meteors", and the meteor beliefs of the period around 1859-1860, when collection of facts was giving way to analyses and theoretical explanations in meteor science.

  1. The Meteor Meter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggensperger, Martin B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Meteor Scatter Project (MSP) in which high school students build an automated meteor observatory and learn to monitor meteor activity. Involves students in activities such as radio frequency survey, antenna design, antenna construction, manual meteor counts, and computer board configuration and installation. (YDS)

  2. Seamount acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehlert, George W.

    The cover of the March 1 issue of Eos showed a time series of acoustic scattering above Southeast Hancock Seamount (29°48‧N, 178°05‧E) on July 17-18, 1984. In a comment on that cover Martin Hovland (Eos, August 2, p. 760) argued that gas or “other far reaching causes” may be involved in the observed acoustic signals. He favors a hypothesis that acoustic scattering observed above a seeping pockmark in the North Sea is a combination of bubbles, stable microbubbles, and pelagic organisms and infers that this may be a more general phenomenon and indeed plays a role in the attraction of organisms to seamounts

  3. Quadrantid Meteor, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    An allsky camera in New Mexico captured a brief video of this Quadrantid fireball meteor on Jan. 3, 2013 at 2:04 a.m. EST. The Quadrantid meteor shower occurs each January and derives its name from...

  4. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to ‑3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  5. The Eratosthenes Seamount - Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, A.; Schnabel, M.; Damm, V.

    2012-04-01

    The Eratosthenes Seamount forms a prominent landmark in the Eastern Mediterranean. It is located south of Cyprus with the Levantine Basin on its eastern side, the Herodotus Basin on its western side and the Nile Cone south of the seamount. The Eratosthenes Seamount rises up to 750 m below sea surface and is about 1200 m higher than the surrounding seafloor of the Levantine Basin and the Nile Cone sediments. The Eratosthenes Seamount is considered as a continental fragment of the former African-Nubian Plate that was rifted to its present position relative to Africa during the formation of the Tethyan Ocean. In 2010 a detailed geophysical survey was carried out in the area of the Eratosthenes Seamount by the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources of Germany including multichannel seismic (MCS), refraction seismics, magnetic, gravity and magnetotelluric data acquisition. First results show a highly deformed seamount, with a plateau-like top that is impacted by west-east trending graben formation. The slopes of the seamount are eroded showing deep incised ripple patterns and recent submarine landslides. The Eratosthenes Seamount produces also a prominent magnetic and gravity anomaly, both supporting its uniqueness in the area of the Eastern Mediterranean. Velocity information by refraction seismic modeling, as well as the models of the magnetic and gravity data show evidence for a volcanic core of the seamount with carbonate layers on top of the volcanic core. The slopes of the seamount terminate against a conspicuous rim-like escarpment that forms in addition the northern and western termination of the Messinian Evaporites in the study area. The MCS and refraction seismic data show a very deep Levantine Basin with maximum acoustic basement depths of 12 to 14 km very close to the slope of the Eratosthenes Seamount. The deepest sediments resolved by the MCS data are of Lower Cretaceous to Jurassic age. The refraction seismic model shows a 14 km thick

  6. Global distribution of seamounts from Seasat profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Claire H.; Sandwell, David T.

    1988-01-01

    A new measurement techique based on a model of a Gaussian seamount loading a thin elastic lithosphere was developed to analyze seamounts that, until then, were not surveyed or seamounts with poor bathymetric coverage. The model predicts that the seamount diameter is equal to the peak-to-trough distance along the vertical deflection profile and that the flexural diameter of a seamount is related to the age of the lithosphere when the seamount formed. This model also suggests that these two measurements are relatively insensitive to the cross-track location from the seamount. These model predictions were confirmed using Seasat altimeter profiles crossing 14 surveyed seamounts in the Pacific. The analysis of the seamount distribution indicated considerable variations in population density and type across the oceans. Most notable among them are the absence of seamounts in the Atlantic, variations in population density across large fracture zones in the Pacific, and the prevalence of small signatures in the Indian Ocean.

  7. Apparatus for photographing meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Apparatus for photographing meteors in a selected area of the sky is described. A photomultiplier is pointed in the direction of the area. When a meteor passes through the area the signal output of the photomultiplier increases. Means are provided that activate a camera, pointed at the area, in response to an increased signal from the photomultiplier. Hence, the camera photographs the selected are only while meteors are likely to be passing through the area.

  8. Atmospheric heating of meteors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwell, K. E.; Mccay, T. D.; Best, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical model of the radiating metallic gas produced about an iron meteor entering the earth's atmosphere is discussed. Numerical results are presented for a 0.1 cm diameter iron meteor traveling at 15 km/sec at an altitude of 100 km above the earth. It is shown that collisions between the expanding iron gas and the air molecules produce a radiating gas shell a few meters thick which is located many meters ahead of the meteor core. Temperature, pressure, and density distributions are presented as functions of radial distance and angle for several initial meteor conditions.

  9. Rare Double Quadrantid Meteor Sighting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The wide-field meteor camera at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center recorded these two simultaneous Quadrantid meteors on Jan. 4 at approximately 5 a.m. EST. Moving at 92,000 mph, the meteors flash...

  10. The Newcastle meteor radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1987-01-01

    A brief history and development of the Newcastle Meteor Radar system is given. Also described are its geographical coordinates and its method of operation. The initial objective when the project was commenced was to develop an entirely digital analyzer capable of recognizing meteor echo signals and recording as many of their parameters as possible. This objective was achieved.

  11. Meteor Beliefs Project: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2003-05-01

    A new project to investigate beliefs in meteors and meteoric phenomena in past and present times using chiefly folklore, mythology, prose and poetic literature, is described. Some initial examples are given, along with a bibliography of relevant items already in print in IMO publications.

  12. Resolving Seamounts in Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H.

    2006-12-01

    We have examined three factors influencing the use of satellite altimeter data to map seamounts and guyots in the deep ocean: (1) the resolution of seamount and guyot gravity anomalies by altimetry; (2) the non-linearity of the relationship between gravity and bathymetry; and (3) the homogeneity of the mass density within the seamount or guyot. When altimeter data are used to model the marine gravity anomaly field the result may have limited resolution due to noise levels in the altimeter data, track spacing of the satellite profiles, inclination angles of the orbits, and filters used to combine and interpolate the data (Sandwell and Smith, JGR, 1997). We compared the peak-to-trough amplitude of gravity anomalies in Sandwell and Smith`'s version 15.1 field to peak-to-trough amplitudes measured by gravimeters on board ships. The satellite gravity field amplitudes match ship measurements well over seamounts and guyots having volumes exceeding ~2000 km3. Over smaller volume seamounts, where the anomalies have most of their power at quite short wavelengths, the satellite field under-estimates the anomaly amplitude. If less filtering could be done, or a new mission with a lower noise level were flown, more of the anomalies associated with small seamounts might be resolved. Smith and Sandwell (Science, 1997) predicted seafloor topography from altimetric gravity assuming that the density of seafloor topography is nearly constant over ~100 km distances, and that the relationship between gravity and topography may be approximated by a liner filter over those distances. In fact, the true theoretical relationship is non-linear (Parker, Geophys. J. R. astr. Soc, 1972); it can be expressed as an N-th order expansion, with the N=1 term representing a linear filter and the N>1 terms accounting for higher-order corrections. We find that N=2 is a sufficient approximation at both seamounts and guyots. Constant density models of large volume guyots do not fit the observed gravity

  13. Age of Kōko Seamount, Emperor Seamount chain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, David A.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1973-01-01

    KAr ages obtained by the conventional isotope-dilution and the 40Ar/39Ar techniques on two sanidine trachytes, four basalts, and a phonolite dredged from the top of Ko¯ko Seamount, 300 km north of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend, show that the seamount is 46.4 ± 1.1 my old. These data indicate that the volcanoes in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain continue to increase in age to the west and north beyond Midway Atoll, as predicted by the melting-spot hypothesis for the origin of the chain, and that the rate of volcanic migration along the chain was nonlinear between the time of formation of the island of Hawaii and Ko¯ko Seamount.

  14. Meteors, comets, and millennialism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.

    1999-12-01

    An overview of meteoric and cometary activity between circa 250 BC and circa 1600 AD is discussed with especial regard to the inclusion of meteoric imagery in Christian religious texts. Evidence is presented to suggest meteorite images played a leading role in the creation of millennial fears among adherents of the early medieval Church in Europe, which fears still persist into modern times, but which may have their origins in Mesopotamia circa 2200 BC. An extended discussion of meteoric imagery in Christian writings is also presented.

  15. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  16. Dynamics of meteor streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babadjanov, P. B.; Obrubov, Yu. U.

    1987-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of meteor streams are generally assumed to be formed due to the decay of comets. The most effective process of the release of solid particles from a cometary nucleus is their ejection by sublimating gases when the comet approaches the Sun. The results of investigation of the Geminids and Quadrantids meteor stream evolution show that under the influence of planetary perturbations, the stream may originally be flat but then thicken depending on the variation range of orbital inclinations. Eventually, due to planetary perturbations, a meteor stream may take such a shape as to cause the start of several active showers at different solar longitudes.

  17. Optical electronics for meteor observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Atamas, I. A.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral observations of meteors have been carried out for several years using an optical electronics facility. Interest has centered on faint meteors and their trails in the period of intensive meteor showers. Over 800 meteors were registered during the observation period, with spectrograms obtained for 170 of these. A total of 86 meteors were photographed from two sites and for 25 of these spectrograms of the meteors as well as their trails were obtained. All meteors have undergone routine processing in order to determine atmospheric characteristics. Results are discussed.

  18. Current trends in meteor spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The history of progress over more than a century in meteor spectroscopy is summarized. The observational data were originally visual records, but in the beginning of the 20th century photography of meteor spectra was undertaken. In the forties, 60 meteor spectra were photographed. Interest in the upper atmosphere led to the development of more efficient meteor cameras which employ replica gratings, and electronic image intensification systems recordings on video tape which resulted in the availability of several thousand meteor spectra.

  19. Meteor Beliefs Project: Musical Meteors, meteoric imagery as used in near-contemporary song lyrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2010-01-01

    Items collected from contemporary song lyrics featuring meteoric imagery, or inspired by meteors, are given, with some discussion. While not a major part of the Meteor Beliefs Project, there are points of interest in how such usage may become passed into popular beliefs about meteors.

  20. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  1. Meteor project --- AMOS Cam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, J.; Kornoš, L.; Zigo, P.; Gajdoš, Š.; Kalmančok, D.; Šimon, J.; Buček, M.; Galád, A.; Ďuriš, F.

    2014-07-01

    Slovak Video Meteor Network (SVMN) is a project of Comenius University in Bratislava for continuous monitoring of meteor activity [1] over Slovakia. The network is based on AMOS (All-sky Meteor Orbit System) Cameras [2], which astrometric precision was calibrated using several commonly observed fireballs within European Fireball Network [3]. The field of view of the AMOS is 180° × 140° and the output digital resolution 1280 × 960 px with the frame rate of 15 f/s. Limiting sensitivity is +5.5 mag for stellar objects and about +4 mag for moving objects. The whole system is protected by outer and inner housing and monitoring by detectors of temperature, rain and illumination of the sky. The system is portable and suitable for expeditions from the ground or research planes. The AMOS cameras are working at four locations (SVMN) at present: AGO Modra, Arboretum T. Mlyňany, Kysucké Nové Mesto Obs. and Važec stations. The operation of cameras is semi-automatic and needs electric power and internet connection. The standard astrometric error is within an interval of 0.03--0.05 deg resulting in several tens or hundreds of meters for meteor atmospheric trajectory determination. The internal precision of the AMOS cameras is even better, especially when the precise all-sky reduction described in [4] is used. The first prototype has been working at the AGO Modra Observatory since 2007. Each AMOS camera records about 10 000 meteors per year as well as about 50 transient luminous events (sprites, elves) in Central Europe sky conditions. The results from the observational expedition on Tenerife and La Palma (Canary Islands 2014) showed higher efficiency of AMOS cameras at high altitudes and dark sites. The analyses of selected meteor streams (SPE, ACO, Lyrids and others) from AMOS cameras will be presented.

  2. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  3. Television meteor observations in INASAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The results of TV observations of meteors during the period 18 July-19 August (activity period of the Perseid meteor shower) in 2011 and 2012 are presented. The wide field-of-view cameras "PatrolCa" were used for the observations. Observations were carried out by the single-station as well as the double-station method. The double-station observations were aimed at determining the individual orbits of the observed meteors. The principle of Index Meteor Activity (IMA) calculations can be used for all meteor showers active during the observing period. We can use the IMA parameter to estimate the influx of meteor particles to the Earth per hour, both for shower and sporadic meteors. The distribution of the influx rate (IMA) for the Perseids to the Earth for the observing periods in 2011 and 2012 is given. Distributions of Perseid meteors by stellar magnitude are also presented.

  4. Oceanographic aspects of the Emperor Seamounts region

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, G.I.; Taft, B.A.; Ebbesmeyer, C.C.

    1982-11-20

    Effects of the Emperor Seamount Chain on the thermohaline structure and baroclinic flow are investigated on the basis of historical hydrographic data. The amplitudes of dynamic height perturbations are 3 to 5 times larger west than east of the chain. The intensity of the thermal fronts is stronger west than east of the seamounts; near the crest of the southern seamounts, strong east-west thermohaline fronts and a strong northward baroclinic flow are observed. The Kuroshio Extension west of the seamount chain is a well-defined meandering current, the axis of which generally lies between 33/sup 0/ and 36/sup 0/N. The available data indicate that the Kuroshio Extension turns northward and then flows eastward through the gaps of the seamount chain. East of the seamounts, the Kuroshio Extension widens threefold and appears to be poorly defined.

  5. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  6. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Alan W. (Editor); Bowell, Edward (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented and cover the following topics with respect to asteroids, comets, and/or meteors: interplanetary dust, cometary atmospheres, atmospheric composition, comet tails, astronomical photometry, chemical composition, meteoroid showers, cometary nuclei, orbital resonance, orbital mechanics, emission spectra, radio astronomy, astronomical spectroscopy, photodissociation, micrometeoroids, cosmochemistry, and interstellar chemistry.

  7. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  8. Studies of Transient Meteor Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter M. M.

    2002-01-01

    Meteoroids bombard Earth's atmosphere daily, but occasionally meteor rates increase to unusual high levels when Earth crosses the relatively fresh ejecta of comets. These transient events in meteor activity provide clues about the whereabouts of Earth-threatening long-period comets, the mechanisms of large-grain dust ejection from comets, and the particle composition and size distribution of the cometary ejecta. Observations of these transient events provide important insight in natural processes that determine the large grain dust environment of comets, in natural phenomena that were prevalent during the time of the origin of life, and in processes that determine the hazard of civilizations to large impacts and of man-made satellites to the periodic blizzard of small meteoroids. In this proposal, three tasks form a coherent program aimed at elucidating various aspects of meteor outbursts, with special reference to planetary astronomy and astrobiology. Task 1 was a ground-based effort to observe periods of transient meteor activity. This includes: (1) stereoscopic imaging of meteors during transient meteor events for measurements of particle size distribution, meteoroid orbital dispersions and fluxes; and (2) technical support for Global-MS-Net, a network of amateur-operated automatic counting stations for meteor reflections from commercial VHF radio and TV broadcasting stations, keeping a 24h vigil on the level of meteor activity for the detection of new meteor streams. Task 2 consisted of ground-based and satellite born spectroscopic observations of meteors and meteor trains during transient meteor events for measurements of elemental composition, the presence of organic matter in the meteoroids, and products generated by the interaction of the meteoroid with the atmosphere. Task 3 was an airborne effort to explore the 2000 Leonid meteor outbursts, which are anticipated to be the most significant of transient meteor activity events in the remainder of the

  9. Co-rich Mn crusts from the Magellan Seamount cluster: the long journey through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasby, Geoffrey P.; Ren, Xiangwen; Shi, Xuefa; Pulyaeva, Irina A.

    2007-10-01

    The Magellan seamounts began forming as large submarine shield volcanoes south of the equator during the Cretaceous. These volcanoes formed as a cluster on the small Pacific plate in a period when tectonic stress was absent. Thermal subsidence of the seafloor led to sinking of these volcanoes and the formation of guyots as the seamounts crossed the equatorial South Pacific (10-0°S) sequentially and ocean surface temperatures became too high for calcareous organisms to survive. Guyot formation was completed between about 59 and 45 Ma and the guyots became phosphatized at about 39-34 and 27-21 Ma. Ferromanganese crusts began formation as proto-crusts on the seamounts and guyots of the Magellan Seamount cluster towards the end of the Cretaceous up to 55 Ma after the formation of the seamounts themselves. The chemical composition of these crusts evolved over time in a series of steps in response to changes in global climate and ocean circulation. The great thickness of these crusts (up to 15-20 cm) reflects their very long period of growth. The high Co contents of the outer parts of the crusts are a consequence of the increasing deep circulation of the ocean and the resulting deepening of the oxygen minimum zone with time. Growth of the Co-rich Mn crusts in the Magellan Seamount cluster can be considered to be the culmination of a long journey through time.

  10. Elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Relative elemental abundance determinations for meteors by spectroscopy are discussed. Relative abundances of spectroscopically accessible elements of four major shower meteors and one sporadic meteor are presented. A sporadic meteor with dominant sodium radiation and an iron-deficient sporadic meteor are analyzed. Empirical and theoretical tests for self-absorption in optical meteor plasmas have been conducted. Both ionization and incomplete dissociation are found to severely deplete certain neutral atoms from meteor plasmas.

  11. Electrophonic sounds in meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangjie

    2003-06-01

    Recordings about the sounds of meteors existed in ancient Chinese literature before Christ. During recent two hundreds years, especially, recent twenty years, reports and investigations about Electrophonic meteors and Electrophonic sounds have been developed largely. Electrophonic sounds are defined as sounds produced by direct conversion of electromagnetic radiation into audible sounds. It is thought that Electrophonic sounds may be induced in events of bolide, very bright auroral display, nearby strong lightning, earthquake and nuclear explosion. However, on account of its unusually rare chance and its particular physical course, no matter in observations or in theoretical study, there are many difficult and unresolved problems. The historical and present situations about Electrophonic sounds are summarized in this paper.

  12. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  13. Zhamanshin meteor crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, P. V.; Dabizha, A. I.

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey and geographic, geologic and geophysical characteristics, the results of many years of study of the Zhamanshin meteor crater in the Northern Aral region, are reported. From this data the likely initial configuration and cause of formation of the crater are reconstructed. Petrographic and mineralogical analyses are given of the brecciated and remelted rocks, of the zhamanshinites and irgizite tektites in particular. The impact melting, dispersion and quenching processes resulting in tektite formation are discussed.

  14. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  15. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  16. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium on Hancock Seamount. Fishing for Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS on the Hancock Seamount is prohibited through August 31, 2010....

  17. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  18. 50 CFR 665.209 - Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts... Hawaii Fisheries § 665.209 Fishing moratorium at Hancock Seamounts. Fishing for, and possession of, Hawaii bottomfish and seamount groundfish MUS in the Hancock Seamounts Ecosystem Management Area...

  19. Deep-sea fish distribution varies between seamounts: results from a seamount complex off New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Dianne M; Clark, Malcolm R; Anderson, Owen F; Kim, Susan W

    2012-01-01

    Fish species data from a complex of seamounts off New Zealand termed the "Graveyard Seamount Complex' were analysed to investigate whether fish species composition varied between seamounts. Five seamount features were included in the study, with summit depths ranging from 748-891 m and elevation from 189-352 m. Measures of fish species dominance, rarity, richness, diversity, and similarity were examined. A number of factors were explored to explain variation in species composition, including latitude, water temperature, summit depth, depth at base, elevation, area, slope, and fishing effort. Depth at base and slope relationships were significant with shallow seamounts having high total species richness, and seamounts with a more gradual slope had high mean species richness. Species similarity was modelled and showed that the explanatory variables were driven primarily by summit depth, as well as by the intensity of fishing effort and elevation. The study showed that fish assemblages on seamounts can vary over very small spatial scales, in the order of several km. However, patterns of species similarity and abundance were inconsistent across the seamounts examined, and these results add to a growing literature suggesting that faunal communities on seamounts may be populated from a broad regional species pool, yet show considerable variation on individual seamounts. PMID:22745656

  20. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  1. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric references in Ovid's Metamorphoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, A. D.; McBeath, A.

    2003-10-01

    Three sections of Ovid's Metamorphoses are examined, providing further information on meteoric beliefs in ancient Roman times. These include meteoric imagery among the portents associated with the death of Julius Caesar, which we mentioned previously from the works of William Shakespeare (McBeath and Gheorghe, 2003b).

  2. James Joule and meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    1989 was the hundredth anniversary of the death of James Prescott Joule, the Prescott being his mother's family name and the Joule, rhyming with cool, originating from the Derbyshire village of Youlgreave. Joule is rightly famous for his experimental efforts to establish the law of conservation of energy, and for the fact that J, the symbol known as the mechanical equivalent of heat, is named after him. Astronomically his "light has been hidden under a bushel". James Joule had a major influence on the physics of meteors.

  3. High geocentric velocity meteor ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. A.; Rogers, L. A.; Hawkes, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Interstellar origin meteoroids have now been detected using radar, image intensified video, large aperture radar and space dust impact techniques. Dynamical and radiation production mechanisms will eject some meteoroids from other planetary systems into orbits which will impact Earth with high geocentric velocities. In this paper we numerically model the ablation of high geocentric velocity (71 to 500~km s-1) meteors in order to predict the heights, light curves and trail lengths to be expected. We modeled three compositions and structures: asteroidal, cometary and porous cometary. Meteoroid masses ranging from 10-6 to 10-13~kg were used in the model. As expected, these high geocentric velocity meteors, when compared to other meteors, ablate higher in the atmosphere. For example a 300~km s-1 cometary structure meteor of mass 10-9~kg will have a peak luminosity at about 190 km. They will also have significantly longer trail lengths. The same 300~km s-1, 10-9~kg cometary meteor would be within 2 mag of its peak brightness for a vertical displacement of 60 km if incident at a zenith angle of 45°. The peak light intensity of these high geocentric velocity meteors changes only slowly with velocity. Although the incident kinetic energy per unit time increases dramatically, this is largely offset by a decrease in the optical luminous efficiency in this velocity regime according to our luminous efficiency model. The 300~km s-1, 10-9~kg cometary meteor would have an absolute meteor magnitude at peak luminosity of about +8.5 mag. Our results suggest that at least those high geocentric velocity meteors larger than about 10-8~kg should be observable with current meteor electro-optical technology although there may be observational biases against their detection. The results of this paper can be used to help optimize a search strategy for these very high geocentric velocity meteors.

  4. Meteor detections at the Metsähovi Fundamental Geodetic Research Station (Finland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja-Halli, A.; Gritsevich, M.; Näränen, J.; Moreno-Ibáñez, M.; Lyytinen, E.; Virtanen, J.; Zubko, N.; Peltoniemi, J.; Poutanen, M.

    2016-01-01

    We provide an overview and present some spectacular examples of the recent meteor observations at the Metsähovi Geodetic Research Station. In conjunction with the Finnish Fireball Network the all-sky images are used to reconstruct atmospheric trajectories and to calculate the pre-impact meteor orbits in the Solar System. In addition, intensive collaborative work is pursued with the meteor research groups worldwide. We foresee great potential of this activity also for educational and outreach purposes.

  5. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.; Granvik, M.; Virkki, A.; Fedorets, G.; Wilkman, O.; Kohout, T.

    2014-08-01

    Asteroids, Comets, Meteors focuses on the research of small Solar System bodies. Small bodies are the key to understanding the formation and evolution of the Solar System, carrying signals from pre-solar times. Understanding the evolution of the Solar System helps unveil the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems. Societally, small bodies will be important future resources of minerals. The near-Earth population of small bodies continues to pose an impact hazard, whether it be small pieces of falling meteorites or larger asteroids or cometary nuclei capable of causing global environmental effects. The conference series entitled ''Asteroids, Comets, Meteors'' constitutes the leading international series in the field of small Solar System bodies. The first three conferences took place in Uppsala, Sweden in 1983, 1985, and 1989. The conference is now returning to Nordic countries after a quarter of a century. After the Uppsala conferences, the conference has taken place in Flagstaff, Arizona, U.S.A. in 1991, Belgirate, Italy in 1993, Paris, France in 1996, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A. in 1999, in Berlin, Germany in 2002, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2005, in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. in 2008, and in Niigata, Japan in 2012. ACM in Helsinki, Finland in 2014 will be the 12th conference in the series.

  6. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  7. Detection of uncharted seamounts using satellite altimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarewicz, A.P.; Schwank, D.C.

    1982-04-01

    The topography of the marine geoid (and corresponding sea surface) contains characteristic local features caused by sediments. These features can be successfully detected and located using matched filters to process single tracks of satellite altimeter data. Comparison of detected seamount features with the SNYBAPS and Scripps bathymetric data bases can reveal uncharted seamounts. This technique has been applied to 33 Seasat tracks in a region of the western Pacific bounded by 0 to 15 degrees North and 160 and 165 degrees East. From this analysis, we find three uncharted seamounts in this region. In all three cases, a detailed examination of the bathymetry shows no known bathymetric feature consistent with the detected signature. The method used to estimate the size and location of these uncharted seamounts is discussed.

  8. Kodiak seamount not flat-topped.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, E L; von Huene, R E

    1966-12-01

    Earlier surveys in the Aleutian Trench southeast of Kodiak Island, Alaska, indicated that Kodiak Seamount had a flat top and was a tablemount or guyot. This seamount is of special significance because it has been supposed that its surface was eroded at the same time as those of a line of guyots to the southeast. If so, its present position in the axis of the Aleutian Trench indicates that the line of guyots was formed before the trench. A two-part survey in 1965 showed that Kodiak Seamount is not flat-topped, and should be eliminated from the category of guyots. Reflection profiling records indicate that the seamount was formed before the adjacent sediments were deposited, and that the small trough, or moat, on the south side is a depositional feature probably formed by a scouring effect or by the acceleration of turbidity currents around the base of the mount. PMID:17770303

  9. The Chelyabinsk meteor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, O.; Jenniskens, P.; Shuvalov, V.; Emel'yanenko, V.; Rybnov, Y.; Kharlamov, V.; Kartashova, A.; Biryukov, E.; Khaibrakhmanov, S.

    2014-07-01

    A review is given about what was learned about the 0.5-Mt Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013 by field studies, the analysis of recovered meteorites, and numerical models of meteoroid fragmentation and airburst propagation. Previous events with comparable or larger energy in recent times include only the 0.5-Mt -sized 3 August 1963 meteor over the south Atlantic, for which only an infrasound signal was recorded, and the famous Tunguska impact of 1908. Estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the Tunguska impact range from 3 to 50 Mt, due to the lack of good observations at the time. The Chelyabinsk event is much better documented than both, and provides a unique opportunity to calibrate the different approaches used to model meteoroid entry and calculate the damaging effects of a shock wave from a large meteoroid impact. A better understanding of what happened might help future impact hazard mitigation efforts by calibrating models of what might happen under somewhat different circumstances. The initial kinetic energy is estimated from infrasonic signals and the fireball's lightcurve, as well as the extent of the glass damage on the ground. Analysis of video observations of the fireball and the shadow movements provided an impact trajectory and a record of the meteor lightcurve, which describes how that energy was deposited in the atmosphere. Ablation and fragmentation scenarios determine the success of attempts to reproduce the observed meteor lightcurve and deceleration profile by numerical modeling. There was almost no deceleration until peak brightness. Meteoroid fragmentation occurred in different forms, some part of the initial mass broke in well separated fragments, the surviving fragments falling on the ground as meteorites. The specific conditions during energy deposition determined the fraction of surviving mass. The extent of the glass damage was mapped by visiting over 50 villages in the area. A number of numerical simulations were conducted that

  10. JEM-EUSO: Meteor and nuclearite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Meteor and fireball observations are key to the derivation of both the inventory and physical characterization of small solar system bodies orbiting in the vicinity of the Earth. For several decades, observation of these phenomena has only been possible via ground-based instruments. The proposed JEM-EUSO mission has the potential to become the first operational space-based platform to share this capability. In comparison to the observation of extremely energetic cosmic ray events, which is the primary objective of JEM-EUSO, meteor phenomena are very slow, since their typical speeds are of the order of a few tens of km/sec (whereas cosmic rays travel at light speed). The observing strategy developed to detect meteors may also be applied to the detection of nuclearites, which have higher velocities, a wider range of possible trajectories, but move well below the speed of light and can therefore be considered as slow events for JEM-EUSO. The possible detection of nuclearites greatly enhances the scientific rationale behind the JEM-EUSO mission.

  11. Radar observations of the Volantids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younger, J.; Reid, I.; Murphy, D.

    2016-01-01

    A new meteor shower occurring for the first time on 31 December 2015 in the constellation Volans was identified by the CAMS meteor video network in New Zealand. Data from two VHF meteor radars located in Australia and Antarctica have been analyzed using the great circle method to search for Volantids activity. The new shower was found to be active for at least three days over the period 31 December 2015 - 2 January 2016, peaking at an apparent radiant of R.A. = 119.3 ± 3.7, dec. = -74.5 ± 1.9 on January 1st. Measurements of meteoroid velocity were made using the Fresnel transform technique, yielding a geocentric shower velocity of 28.1 ± 1.8 km s-1. The orbital parameters for the parent stream are estimated to be a = 2.11 AU, e = 0.568, i = 47.2°, with a perihelion distance of q = 0.970 AU.

  12. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to 10 mm. Methods: Parallel double-station video observations allowed us to compute heliocentric orbits for all meteors. Most observations were performed during the periods of activity of major meteor showers in the years between 2006 and 2012. Spectra are classified according to relative intensities of the low-temperature emission lines of Mg, Na, and Fe. Results: Shower meteors were found to be of normal composition, except for Southern δ Aquariids and some members of the Geminid shower, neither of which have Na in the meteor spectra. Variations in Na content are typical for the Geminid shower. Three populations of Na-free mereoroids were identified. The first population are iron meteorites, which have an asteroidal-chondritic origin, but one meteoroid with low perihelion (0.11 AU) was found among the iron meteorites. The second population were Sun-approaching meteoroids in which sodium is depleted by thermal desorption. The third population were Na-free meteoroids of cometary origin. Long exposure to cosmic rays on the surface of comets in the Oort cloud and disintegration of this crust might be the origin of this population of meteoroids. Spectra (Figs. 17-30) are only, Tables 4-6 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A67

  13. Artificial meteor test towards: On-demand meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Okajima, L.; Sahara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Nishizono, T.

    2016-01-01

    An arc-heated wind tunnel is widely used for ground-based experiments to simulate environments of the planetary atmospheric entry under hypersonic and high-temperature conditions. In order to understand details of a meteor ablation such as temperature, composition ratio and fragmentation processes, the artificial meteor test was carried out using a JAXA/ISAS arc-heated wind tunnel. High-heating rate around 30 MW/m2 and High-enthalpy conditions, 10000 K arc-heated flow at velocity around 6 km/s were provided. Newly developed artificial metallic meteoroids and real meteorites such as Chelyabinsk were used for the ablation test. The data obtained by near-ultraviolet and visible spectrograph (200 and 1100nm) and high-speed camera (50 μs) have been examined to develop more efficient artificial meteor materials. We will test artificial meteors from a small satellite in 2018.

  14. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER): Platform for comprehensive meteor radar observations and studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J.; Pifko, S.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53^oS) in May 2008 (Janches et al., 2013,2014). SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large numbers of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars (Janches et al., 2014). In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions (Pifko et al., 2014). The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, the SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source (Pifko et al., 2014), of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables to survey (Janches et al., 2013). It can effectively observe radiants from the ecliptic south

  15. Meteor Beliefs Project: Seven years and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Drobnock, G. J.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2010-04-01

    The Meteor Beliefs Project's seventh anniversary is celebrated with an eclectic mixture of meteor beliefs from the 1799 Leonids in Britain, the folkloric link between meteors and wishing in some Anglo-American sources, how a meteoric omen came to feature in Nathaniel Hawthorne's 1850 novel The Scarlet Letter, and a humorous item from the satirical magazine Punch in 1861, all helping to show how meteor beliefs can be transformed by different parts of society.

  16. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  17. Jasper Seamount: Seven million years of volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, M.S. ); Staudigel, H.; Gee, J. )

    1991-04-01

    Jasper Seamount is a young, mid-sized (690 km{sup 3}) oceanic intraplate volcano located about 500 km west-southwest of San Diego, California. Reliable {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age data were obtained for several milligram-sized samples of 4 to 10 Ma plagioclase by using a defocused laser beam to clean the samples before fusion. Gee and Staudigel suggested that Jasper Seamount consists of a transitional to tholeiitic shield volcano formed by flank transitional series lavas, overlain by flank alkalic series lavas and summit alkalic series lavas. Twenty-nine individual {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar laser fusion analyses on nine samples confirm the stratigraphy: 10.3-10.0 Ma for the flank transitonal series, 8.7-7.5 Ma for the flank alkalic series, and 4.8-4.1 Ma for the summit alkalic series. The alkalinity of the lavas clearly increases with time, and there appear to be 1 to 3 m.y. hiatuses between each series. The age data are consistent with the complex magnetic anomaly of Jasper; however the dominant reversed polarity inferred from the anomaly suggests that most of the seamount formed at ca. 11 Ma, prior to the onset of Chron C5N. The duration of volcanism of Jasper Seamount is slightly longer than the duration of volcanism at Hawaiian volcanoes, suggesting that individual age data from seamounts may constrain the age of a seamount only to within about 7 m.y. unless the stage of volcanism can be unambiguously determined. Extrapolating from the results of our study, similar precision in age determinations should be possible on 50 mg of 1 Ma plagioclase from mid-ocean ridge basalt, opening new possibilities in the geochronology of young, low-potassium volcanic rocks.

  18. Some models of the Geminids meteor stream formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belkovich, O. I.; Ryabova, G. O.

    1987-01-01

    Further development of methods of investigations of meteor shower structure and a great deal of observational data have made it possible to obtain a precise flux density profile along the Earth's orbit for the Geminids meteor shower. This curve proved to be adequately described by a exponential law. Examined are: (1) which ejection model will fit the observed shower structure; and (2) to what extent the subsequent process of evolution modifies the formed structure. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) When studying the mechanism of formation of meteor streams, it is necessary to take into consideration the velocity distribution of particles that have been ejected from the parent body; (2) On the basis of the observed density variations, it is possible to determine what kind of ejection takes place (a single ejection or that around an orbital arch); and (3) The original structure of the Geminids cross section persists for no more than 1,500 to 2,000 years.

  19. Database of Properties of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Rob; Anthea, Coster

    2006-01-01

    A database of properties of meteors, and software that provides access to the database, are being developed as a contribution to continuing efforts to model the characteristics of meteors with increasing accuracy. Such modeling is necessary for evaluation of the risk of penetration of spacecraft by meteors. For each meteor in the database, the record will include an identification, date and time, radiant properties, ballistic coefficient, radar cross section, size, density, and orbital elements. The property of primary interest in the present case is density, and one of the primary goals in this case is to derive densities of meteors from their atmospheric decelerations. The database and software are expected to be valid anywhere in the solar system. The database will incorporate new data plus results of meteoroid analyses that, heretofore, have not been readily available to the aerospace community. Taken together, the database and software constitute a model that is expected to provide improved estimates of densities and to result in improved risk analyses for interplanetary spacecraft. It is planned to distribute the database and software on a compact disk.

  20. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, J.; Chau, J. L.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of coded continuous wave meteor radar is introduced. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudo-random waveform, which has several advantages: coding avoids range aliased echoes, which are often seen with commonly used pulsed specular meteor radars (SMRs); continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation with significantly lower peak transmit power; the temporal resolution can be changed after performing a measurement, as it does not depend on pulse spacing; and the low signal to noise ratio allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band without significantly interfering with each other. The latter allows the same receiver antennas to be used to receive multiple transmitters. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. This would, for example, provide higher spatio-temporal resolution for mesospheric wind field measurements.

  1. Petrologic evolution of the Louisville seamount chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, James W.; Lonsdale, Peter F.; Batiza, Rodey

    The Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) extends for 4300 km from Osbourn Seamount, at the junction of the Tonga and Kermadec Trenches, southeasterly towards the Pacific Antarctic Ridge. The chain is formed of 60 or more seamounts and guyots which are aligned along a trend concentric with the Emperor-Hawaii Chain. The Louisville Chain crosses at a low angle several fracture zones which are part of the Eltanin Fracture Zone system, but there is no apparent genetic relation between the two structures. Rocks collected from the Louisville Chain comprise a spectrum of rock types including alkalic basalt, hawaiite, and basanitoid. Some samples have compositions suggesting that they are transitional to tholeiitic basalt, but no true tholeiites have been collected from the seamounts. Osbourn Seamount, at the westernmost end of the chain, is capped with basanitoid; these have been dated as ˜66 Ma. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts in basaltic composition pebbles and detrital grains of clinopyroxene have been recovered from DSDP site 204, north of Osbourn Seamount, at subbottom depths of 112 to 114 meters (Late? Cretaceous age). Some of these pyroxenes have compositions indicating a tholeiitic parental magma, some were derived from alkalic magmas. Osbourn Seamount or an older neighbor were likely sources of the clastic sediments. This is an indication that the early stages of seamount volcanism included tholeiitic magmas, magmatism subsequently evolved through alkalic and basanitic types. Samples dredged from the carapaces of seamounts east of Osbourn are mainly alkalic basalt, or hawaiite, or both. The young, eastern end of the chain near Long. 139°10'W has alkalic basalt lavas. Modeling of trace element and REE data suggest that small amounts (e.g., 4%) melting of garnet Iherzolite could have provided the parental alkalic basalt magmas. Basanitoids represent slightly higher (˜9%) levels of melting. Element ratios of Ti/Zr, Nb/Zr, Y/Zr, Ba/La, La/Ce, La/Sm, Nb/La suggest that the

  2. The Seamount Catalog: Creating a Data Infrastructure for the Seamount Biogeoscience Network (SBN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.; Minett, R.; Staudigel, D.; Konter, J.; Martin, P.

    2006-12-01

    The Seamount Biogeoscience Network (SBN), an international and interdisciplinary association of seamount scientists, argues that seamount research can fundamentally benefit from promoting collaboration and improved data sharing between seamount science disciplines. Seamount scientists cover a wide range of biological sciences, geochemistry, geophysics, geology and physical oceanography. An effective SBN data resource has to be capable of helping access a wide range of disciplinary data relevant to all these fields, but the need for bathymetry data is common to all disciplines. The SBN has used the Seamount Catalog (SC) as its main data portal with a capability of carrying any data, but focusing on bathymetry. Recent SC developments aimed atfacilitating interoperability with other data bases, expanding its contents, and creating an interface that is easy to use on almost any expert level, similarly useful for specialists and interdisciplinary scientists, as well as educational users. Key to interoperability is our choice of giving each seamount an identifier that is made up by an alphanumeric combination of the latitude and longitude values (of the midpoint of the seamount). This identifier serves as a unique name, but it may also be parsed into its geospatial information. Data contents of the SC have now grown to more than 2,500 seamounts worldwide, with a cumulative data inventory of 800 Gb. A variety of search methods are offered by name or location, whereby the latter includes a recent application of "Google Maps" as a particularly promising method of visualizing available information in the user's browser. On the Seamount Catalog website seamounts can be compared or quickly identified through thumbnails and an "index card" with a tabulated description of its size and some vital statistics (size, volume, shape) and a listing of files that can be viewed and/or downloaded from the SC. These files may include any type of data, but the SC focus currently is on

  3. Characteristics of Seamounts Near Hawaii as Viewed by GLORIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, Nathan T.

    1997-01-01

    Using images and data acquired from the GLORIA sonar system, 390 seamounts within the U.S. Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone (HEEZ) off Hawaii have been studied. Their diameters range from 1 to 57 km. with most less than 15 km. Seamount abundance increases exponentially with decreasing size. The areal density of observed seamounts having diameters greater than 1 km is 182/10(exp 6) sq km. The theoretical abundance of seamounts of all sizes normalized to a unit area is (309 +/- 17)/10(exp 6) sq km, about an order of magnitude less than other surveyed areas of the Pacific. This may reflect a lower abundance of Cretaceous seamounts in this region, the covering of small seamounts by sediment, or discrepancies from the use of different data sets to derive the abundance statistics. The seamounts have morphologies ranging from steep-sided, flat-topped structures to cones to more amorphous structures; they are similar to volcanoes found elsewhere on the seafloor. A suite of secondary features associated with the seamounts includes summit craters, summit mounds, coalesced boundaries, landslides, and graben. Several seamount chains are aligned parallel to Cretaceous fracture zones, consistent with an origin close to the ancestral East Pacific Rise. Others are aligned parallel to the Necker Ridge, suggesting that they formed contemporaneously with Necker in the plate interior. This observation, together with high abundances of seamounts where other intraplate igneous processes have occurred, suggests some seamounts formed since leaving the spreading center.

  4. The ecology of seamounts: structure, function, and human impacts.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm R; Rowden, Ashley A; Schlacher, Thomas; Williams, Alan; Consalvey, Mireille; Stocks, Karen I; Rogers, Alex D; O'Hara, Timothy D; White, Martin; Shank, Timothy M; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2010-01-01

    In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and function of benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts are centers of enhanced biological productivity, and whether they have unique trophic architecture. We discuss how vulnerable seamount communities are to fishing and mining, and how we can balance exploitation of resources and conservation of habitat. Despite considerable advances in recent years, there remain many questions about seamount ecosystems that need closer integration of molecular, oceanographic, and ecological research. PMID:21141665

  5. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  6. Science Priorities for Seamounts: Research Links to Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Stocks, Karen I.; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  7. Science priorities for seamounts: research links to conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Clark, Malcolm R; Schlacher, Thomas A; Rowden, Ashley A; Stocks, Karen I; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  8. Wake in faint television meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. C.; Hawkes, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    The two component dustball model was used in numerical lag computation. Detached grain lag is typically less than 2 km, with expected wakes of a few hundred meters. True wake in television meteors is masked by apparent wake due to the combined effects of image persistence and blooming. To partially circumvent this problem, we modified a dual MCP intensified CID video system by addition of a rotating shutter to reduce the effective exposure time to about 2.0 ms. Preliminary observations showed that only 2 of 27 analyzed meteors displayed statistically significant wake.

  9. Non-linear meteor trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Martin

    1988-08-01

    In this essay an attempt is made to not only review but reopen the debate on nonlinear meteor trails. On the basis of data culled from various, now historical, sources it is found that approximately one in every two hundred of the visual meteors is likely to show a nonlinear trail, and that of such trails about 60 percent will be continuously curved and 40 percent sinusoidal. It is suggested that two mechanisms may explain the various trail types: the continuously curved trails being a manifestation of the classical Magnus effect, and the sinusoidal trails resulting from torque-free precession.

  10. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  11. The making of meteor astronomy: part V.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1993-12-01

    The first true comparisons between the observations and the "rising vapors" hypothesis of meteor origins were made in the early eighteenth century. One of the key figures in the new meteoric dialogue was Edmond Halley.

  12. Meteor Shower Identification and Characterization with Python

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea

    2015-01-01

    The short development time associated with Python and the number of astronomical packages available have led to increased usage within NASA. The Meteoroid Environment Office in particular uses the Python language for a number of applications, including daily meteor shower activity reporting, searches for potential parent bodies of meteor showers, and short dynamical simulations. We present our development of a meteor shower identification code that identifies statistically significant groups of meteors on similar orbits. This code overcomes several challenging characteristics of meteor showers such as drastic differences in uncertainties between meteors and between the orbital elements of a single meteor, and the variation of shower characteristics such as duration with age or planetary perturbations. This code has been proven to successfully and quickly identify unusual meteor activity such as the 2014 kappa Cygnid outburst. We present our algorithm along with these successes and discuss our plans for further code development.

  13. Note on the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower was extremely weak with a peak activity of two to three visual meteors per hour. Only two meteor spectra were obtained from the 17 slitless spectrograph systems operated by the Langley Research Center. The largely unexpected, essentially null results of the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower observations are indicative of the present limited understanding and predictability of cosmic dust storms.

  14. The IAU Meteor Shower Nomenclature Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  15. The new July meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoladek, Przemyslaw; Wisniewski, Mariusz

    2012-12-01

    A new meteor stream was found after an activity outburst observed on 2005 July 15. The radiant was located five degrees west of the possible early Perseid radiant, close to the star Zeta Cassiopeiae. Numerous bright meteors and fireballs were observed during this maximum. Analysis of the IMO Video Database and the SonotaCo orbital database revealed an annual stream which is active just before the appearance of the first Perseids, with a clearly visible maximum at solar longitude 113°1. Activity of the stream was estimated as two times higher than activity of the Alpha Capricornids at the same time. The activity period extends from July 12 to 17, during maximum the radiant is visible at coordinates alpha = 5°9, delta = +50°5, and observed meteors are fast, with Vg = 57.4 km/s. The shower was reported to the IAU Meteor Data Center and recognized as a new discovery. According to IAU nomenclature the new stream should be named the Zeta Cassiopeiids (ZCS). %z Arlt R. (1992). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 20:2, 62-69. Drummond J. D. (1981). Icarus, 45, 545-553. Kiraga M. and Olech A. (2001). In Arlt R., Triglav M., and Trayner C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Pucioasa, Romania, 21-24 September 2000, pages 45-51. IMO. Molau S. (2007). In Bettonvil F. and Kac J., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Roden, The Netherlands, 14-17 September 2006, pages 38-55. IMO. Molau S. and Rendtel J. (2009). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 37:4, 98-121. Olech A., Zoladek P., Wisniewski M., Krasnowski M., Kwinta M., Fajfer T., Fietkiewicz K., Dorosz D., Kowalski L., Olejnik J., Mularczyk K., and Zloczewski K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Oostmalle, Belgium, 15-18 September 2005, pages 53-62. IMO. Poleski R. and Szaruga K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor

  16. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  17. Meteor radiant mapping with MU radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakamura, Tsuko; Tsuda, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Miyashita, A.; Yoshikawa, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radiant point mapping of meteor showers with the MU radar by using a modified mapping method originally proposed by Morton and Jones (1982) was carried out. The modification is that each meteor echo was weighted by using the beam pattern of the radar system. A preliminary result of the radiant point mapping of the Geminids meteor shower in 1989 is presented.

  18. New trends in meteor radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses in low cost—but performing—SDR (software defined radio) technology presents a major breakthrough in the domain of meteor radio observations. Their performances are now good enough for meteor work and should therefore encourage newcomers to join the meteor radio community.

  19. Meteor Crater, AZ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Barringer Meteorite Crater (also known as 'Meteor Crater') is a gigantic hole in the middle of the arid sandstone of the Arizona desert. A rim of smashed and jumbled boulders, some of them the size of small houses, rises 50 m above the level of the surrounding plain. The crater itself is nearly a 1500 m wide, and 180 m deep. When Europeans first discovered the crater, the plain around it was covered with chunks of meteoritic iron - over 30 tons of it, scattered over an area 12 to 15 km in diameter. Scientists now believe that the crater was created approximately 50,000 years ago. The meteorite which made it was composed almost entirely of nickel-iron, suggesting that it may have originated in the interior of a small planet. It was 50 m across, weighed roughly 300,000 tons, and was traveling at a speed of 65,000 km per hour. This ASTER 3-D perspective view was created by draping an ASTER bands 3-2-1image over a digital elevation model from the US Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset.

    This image was acquired on May 17, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along

  20. Comparing Eyewitness-Derived Trajectories of Bright Meteors to Ground Truth Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is the only US government agency tasked with analyzing meteors of public interest. When queried about a meteor observed over the United States, the MEO must respond with a characterization of the trajectory, orbit, and size within a few hours. Using observations from meteor networks like the NASA All Sky Fireball Network or the Southern Ontario Meteor Network, such a characterization is often easy. If found, casual recordings from the public and stationary web cameras can be used to roughly analyze a meteor if the camera's location can be identified and its imagery calibrated. This technique was used with great success in the analysis of the Chelyabinsk meteorite fall. But if the event is outside meteor network coverage, if an insufficient number of videos are found, or if the imagery cannot be geolocated or calibrated, a timely assessment can be difficult if not impossible. In this situation, visual reports made by eyewitnesses may be the only resource available. This has led to the development of a tool to quickly calculate crude meteor trajectories from eyewitness reports made to the American Meteor Society. The output is illustrated in Figure 1. A description of the tool, example case studies, and a comparison to ground truth data observed by the NASA All Sky Fireball Network will be presented.

  1. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteors in the Maori astronomical traditions of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Tui R.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-02-01

    We review the literature for perceptions of meteors in the Maori culture of Aotearoa or New Zealand. We examine representations of meteors in religion, story, and ceremony. We find that meteors are sometimes personified as gods or children, or are seen as omens of death and destruction. The stories we found highlight the broad perception of meteors found throughout the Maori culture, and note that some early scholars conflated the terms comet and meteor.

  2. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2013-10-01

    A report based on meteor data analyses from 2008 performed by the SPA Meteor Section is given with some discussion. Items detailed comprise: the Quadrantid peak on January 4 which may have had an unusual dip in activity partway through; the Perseid maximum, which seemed to produce two peaks, by far the strongest-recorded of which was around 02h UT on August 13; a meteor outburst on September 9 probably due to the September epsilon-Perseids, for which the radio results suggested activity was present at a stronger level for longer than previous visual and video findings had supposed, perhaps with more than one maximum; another stronger than expected return from the Orionids during October, part of the sequence of unusual events begun in 2006; a fresh Taurid ``swarm'' return in late October to early November, which probably produced somewhat higher activity than normal, if without the increased bright-meteor component observed at some previous returns; strong Leonid activity later in November, from the radio reports, possibly with two peaks; a Geminid maximum in December which showed some curious discrepancies between the limited visual and radio observations; and the Ursids, which may have provided another moderately-enhanced return, with up to four potential peaks recorded by radio observations in the first twelve hours UT of December 22.

  3. Chasing Meteors With a Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes types of meteors and micrometeorites that enter the Earth's atmosphere. Presents an activity where students collect micrometeorites with a strip of tape in an undisturbed outdoor area. After 24 hours, they examine the tape by sandwiching it between 2 glass slides and view through a microscope at 100X. (PR)

  4. Meteors by radio: Getting started

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonc, William

    1999-02-01

    A system for detecting meteors by radio is described which is simple and reliable, and thought to be suitable as a science fair project. There is a relatively detailed discussion of the various factors involved in such a project, along with some typical results to indicate the kind of data that is possible.

  5. Morphology and distribution of seamounts surrounding Easter Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rappaport, Y.; Naar, D.F.; Barton, C.C.; Liu, Z.-J.; Hey, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the morphology and distribution of a seamount population on a section of seafloor influenced by both superfast seafloor spreading and hotspot volcanism. The population under investigation is part of a broad chain of seamounts extending eastward from the East Pacific Rise, near Easter Island. In order to define the morphological variability of the seamounts, basal shape, cross-sectional area, volume, flatness, and flank slope are plotted against height for 383 seamounts with heights greater than 200 m, based on bathymetry data collected by GLORI-B and SeaBeam 2000, during three cruises onboard the R/V Melville in the spring of 1993. Nearly complete swath mapping coverage of the seamounts is available for the analysis of size and shape distribution. We quantitatively describe the seamount population of this active region, in which seamounts cover ???27% of the seafloor, and account for ???4.2% of the total crustal volume. Over 50% of the total volume (61,000 km3) of seamounts used in this study is made up by the 14 largest seamounts, and the remaining volume is made up by the 369 smaller seamounts (>200 m in height). Our analysis indicates there are at least two seamount populations in the Easter Island-Salas y Gomez Island (25??-29??S, 113??-104??W) study area. One population of seamounts is composed of short seamounts (1200 m), shield-like, pointy cones (flatness ???1200 m) originate exclusively from a hotspot source, but only a portion of the smaller volcanoes (

  6. COBRA meteor radar antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainuddin, Mohamad

    A meteor radar system is one of the effective remote sensing techniques in measuring atmospheric parameters such as wind velocities, temperature, pressure and density which are essential in understanding the atmospheric dynamics in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region. Previous studies of very high frequency (VHF) meteors radar systems suggest that the minimum error for the estimation of the horizontal wind velocity from a radar interferometry algorithm should occur when the main beams of the transmit and receive antennas are pointing to between 30° to 50° elevation angles. Therefore, an ideal antenna design for VHF meteor radar systems would produce a pencil beam radiation pattern at a 45° elevation angle. However, both the transmit and receive antenna of the COBRA meteor radar system have major beams are pointing to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles above a perfect ground plane. Besides transmitting maximum power at low elevation angles, the current antennas of the COBRA meteor radar are highly dependent on the ground plane to radiate maximum gains to between 60° to 65° degree elevation angles. Typically, the earth ground is considered as a common ground plane for many VHF antenna with acceptable performance. However, the earth ground could not effectively reflect most of the power at all time. Because the antennas are dependent on ground to radiate power at certain direction, an artificial ground plane or ground screen has to be built for the COBRA antenna system at the South Pole station, which is located on top of more than 2000 meter thick of ice sheet. This dissertation focuses on the analysis of the performance of the individual current antenna design with four different conditions namely in free space, above an infinite ground, lossy ground and finite ground. In the analysis of finite ground, the effects of varying wire spacing and the size of finite ground to the radiation pattern of a cross folded dipole antenna are investigated

  7. New survey of meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.

    2014-07-01

    In order to confirm the many showers listed in the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers in need of verification, a 60-camera three-station video surveillance of the night sky is being conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area in California (http://cams.seti.org), called the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) project [1]. Now, the first 2.5 years of observations were reduced and analyzed, comprised of 112,024 meteoroid trajectories from mostly +4 to -2 magnitude meteors. The trajectories were calculated with a mean precision of 0.24° in radiant direction and 2 % in speed. An interactive tool was developed to study the distribution of meteoroid radiant and speed after correction for Earth's motion around the Sun. A report was submitted for publication in Icarus [2]. Our team assigned 30,801 meteors to 320 showers (27.5 %). This included 72 established showers and 64 known but now confirmed showers. An additional 24 previously reported showers were tentatively detected, but need further study. This study adds 105 potential new showers and 23 newly identified components of established showers to the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers. Another 32 showers previously reported based all or in part on CAMS data were detected again. The Northern and Southern Taurids, especially, are found to be composed of a series of individual streams. In this presentation, I will summarize statistical aspects of these shower detections and their relation to parent body near-Earth objects to shed light on the role of mostly dormant comets in contributing dust to the inner solar system.

  8. Meteors Without Borders: a global campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, T.

    2012-01-01

    "Meteors Without Borders" is a global project, organized by Astronomers Without Borders and launched during the Global Astronomy Month in 2010 for the Lyrid meteor shower. The project focused on encouraging amateur astronomy groups to hold public outreach events for major meteor showers, conduct meteor-related classroom activities, photography, poetry and art work. It also uses social-media platforms to connect groups around the world to share their observations and photography, live during the events. At the International Meteor Conference 2011, the progress of the project was presented along with an extended invitation for collaborations for further improvements of the project.

  9. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  10. Determination of the Meteor Limiting Magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A.; Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The limiting meteor magnitude of a meteor camera system will depend on the camera hardware and software, sky conditions, and the location of the meteor radiant. Some of these factors are constants for a given meteor camera system, but many change between meteor shower or sporadic source and on both long and short timescales. Since the limiting meteor magnitude ultimately gets used to calculate the limiting meteor mass for a given data set, it is important to have an understanding of these factors and to monitor how they change throughout the night, as a 0.5 magnitude uncertainty in limiting magnitude translates to a uncertainty in limiting mass by a factor of two.

  11. The origin of the Canary Island Seamount Province - New ages of old seamounts

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Canary Island Seamount Province forms a scattered hotspot track on the Atlantic ocean floor ~1300 km long and ~350 km wide, perpendicular to lithospheric fractures, and parallel to the NW African continental margin. New 40Ar/39Ar datings show that seamount ages vary from 133 Ma to 0.2 Ma in the central archipelago, and from 142 Ma to 91 Ma in the southwest. Combining 40Ar/39Ar ages with plate tectonic reconstructions, I find that the temporal and spatial distribution of seamounts is irreconcilable with a deep fixed mantle plume origin, or derivation from passive mantle upwelling beneath a mid-ocean ridge. I conclude that shallow mantle upwelling beneath the Atlantic Ocean basin off the NW African continental lithosphere flanks produced recurrent melting anomalies and seamounts from the Late Jurassic to Recent, nominating the Canary Island Seamount Province as oldest hotspot track in the Atlantic Ocean, and most long-lived preserved on earth. PMID:23838703

  12. The NIWA seamount sled: An effective epibenthic sledge for sampling epifauna on seamounts and rough seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Stewart, Rob

    2016-02-01

    Epibenthic sleds, sledges and dredges have been widely used for sampling deep-sea macro and megafaunal communities, providing extensive information on benthic biodiversity and distribution patterns. Different countries and institutes have developed a variety of gear types, but these are often unsuitable for sampling rough seafloor, such as seamount and ridge topography. The NIWA seamount sled, a form of epibenthic sledge, is an inexpensive yet robust and versatile sampling device used to obtain invertebrate and rock samples. It incorporates features from a number of existing designs that have produced a versatile sled that can be used on all habitats from mud through to steep and rocky seamounts. It has been used for many research surveys around New Zealand, where it has proven an efficient sampler of target fauna (large macro- and mega-benthic epifauna). Its design has also been adopted by institutes in France and China for surveying seamounts, and it is suggested it could be used as a simple standardised design for sampling seamounts internationally.

  13. The origin of the Canary Island Seamount Province - new ages of old seamounts.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The Canary Island Seamount Province forms a scattered hotspot track on the Atlantic ocean floor ~1300 km long and ~350 km wide, perpendicular to lithospheric fractures, and parallel to the NW African continental margin. New (40)Ar/(39)Ar datings show that seamount ages vary from 133 Ma to 0.2 Ma in the central archipelago, and from 142 Ma to 91 Ma in the southwest. Combining (40)Ar/(39)Ar ages with plate tectonic reconstructions, I find that the temporal and spatial distribution of seamounts is irreconcilable with a deep fixed mantle plume origin, or derivation from passive mantle upwelling beneath a mid-ocean ridge. I conclude that shallow mantle upwelling beneath the Atlantic Ocean basin off the NW African continental lithosphere flanks produced recurrent melting anomalies and seamounts from the Late Jurassic to Recent, nominating the Canary Island Seamount Province as oldest hotspot track in the Atlantic Ocean, and most long-lived preserved on earth. PMID:23838703

  14. A method for the determination of meteor stream membership based on the results of the single-station television observations used at INASAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.

    2010-04-01

    Massive television observations of meteors aimed at verifying the existing and finding new meteor streams create the task of the reliable preliminary determination of the detected meteor membership in a particular known stream. The mostly widely used method of meteor identification is connected with the estimation of the distance between the great circle of the meteor and the point of the examined radiant. Often observers perform this estimation without checking the possibility that the same meteor belongs to another stream. When several streams occur simultaneously, many meteors can be members of two or more streams. When the determination of the meteor membership is done in a subjective way, it may lead to an overestimation of strong streams’ and an underestimation of weak streams’ activity. In this work, we describe a method and algorithm for the determination of the meteor membership in known streams which were tested using real television observations and were successfully used at INASAN. This algorithm is almost completely automatic and allows for the obtainment of additional information regarding meteor streams. We also show some results of the processing of 2254 meteors observations obtained with the FAVOR camera from July 31, 2006 to October 21, 2006 using the proposed method. The work is part of the program for the creation of the Verified Catalogue of Meteor Streams.

  15. Extraterrestrial meteors: a martian meteor and its parent comet.

    PubMed

    Selsis, Franck; Lemmon, Mark T; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Bell, James F

    2005-06-01

    Regular meteor showers occur when a planet approaches the orbit of a periodic comet--for example, the Leonid shower is evident around 17 November every year as Earth skims past the dusty trail of comet Tempel-Tuttle. Such showers are expected to occur on Mars as well, and on 7 March last year, the panoramic camera of Spirit, the Mars Exploration Rover, revealed a curious streak across the martian sky. Here we show that the timing and orientation of this streak, and the shape of its light curve, are consistent with the existence of a regular meteor shower associated with the comet Wiseman-Skiff, which could be characterized as martian Cepheids. PMID:15931208

  16. Tunguska Genetic Anomaly and Electrophonic Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silagadze, Z. K.

    2005-03-01

    One of great mysteries of the Tunguska event is its genetic impact. Some genetic anomalies were reported in the plants, insects and people of the Tunguska region. Remarkably, the increased rate of biological mutations was found not only within the epicenter area, but also along the trajectory of the Tunguska Space Body (TSB). At that no traces of radioactivity were found, which could be reliably associated with the Tunguska event. The main hypotheses about the nature of the TSB, a stony asteroid, a comet nucleus or a carbonaceous chondrite, readily explain the absence of radioactivity but give no clues how to deal with the genetic anomaly. A choice between these hypotheses, as far as the genetic anomaly is concerned, is like to the choice between ``blue devil, green devil and speckled devil'', to quote late Academician N.V. Vasilyev. However, if another mysterious phenomenon, electrophonic meteors, is evoked, the origin of the Tunguska genetic anomaly becomes less obscure.

  17. NOAA Research Vessel Explores Atlantic Ocean Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-10-01

    Mike Ford, a biological oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sat rapt in front of a bank of high-definition monitors. They provided live video and data feeds from a tethered pair of instrument-laden remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that were descending 4692 meters on their deepest dive ever. Their target: an unnamed and unexplored New England seamount discovered in the North Atlantic last year.

  18. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  19. The ALTAIR Meteor Measurements Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Established in late 2006, the Meteor Measurements Program is in the process of using the ALTAIR radar located on Kwajelein Atoll to obtain radar observations of sporadic and shower meteoroids. The goals are to determine meteoroid masses, orbits, ballistic coefficients and densities, which shall be provided to the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) at Marshall Space Flight Center. These data and analyses shall then be used by the MEO to 1) Add a realistic density distribution to the new Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), which is the specified environment for vehicle design in the NASA Constellation (return to Moon) program. This program is the implementation of President Bush's Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). 2) Investigate the meteoroid velocity distribution at smaller masses. 3) Strive to understand the differences (biases) in meteoroid observations produced by systems like ALTAIR and those of the meteor patrol radars, such as the University of Western Ontario's CMOR system. This paper outlines the program details and its progress.

  20. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  1. High temperature condensates among meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is noted that two meteors which exhibited no lines of iron or sodium in their spectra have been tentatively attributed to aubrites in order to explain their lack of iron. It is shown, however, that no meteorites, including aubrites, have simultaneously low abundances of iron and sodium and that possible parent materials other than aubrites must be considered for the observed meteors. Other possible parent materials considered in this letter include melilite and diopside, two minerals containing both Ca and Mg but neither Fe nor Na. It is suggested that meteoroids rich in Ca and Mg but lacking Fe and Na might form a reservoir for the so-called 'lost' elements (Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, the lanthanides, and other refractory elements) which are depleted in ordinary and enstatite chondrites relative to cosmic abundances.

  2. Meteor observations under the INASAN supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, A. P.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    Meteor observations have the specific property: we do not know in advance neither area on the celestial sphere, not the time when the event occurs. Besides that, a meteor flash in the atmosphere has duration few seconds or less, and it is hard problem to gather enough photons from it to register a faint or fast meteor. There are a number of tasks in meteor astronomy for solution of which not only a simple registration of meteors in the optical range is required, but a high spatial and time resolution as well. Television method is the most acceptable for such a case and is widely used in the practice of meteor observations. Television meteor observations in Russia are carried out under the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INASAN) supervision in different regions of Russia: Moscow region, Irkutsk, Ryazan and North Caucasus. The TV system PatrolCa designed for observations in the wide field of view (the ordinary for most of meteor cameras), consists of the following components: the high resolution cameras Watec LCL-902HS, the wide-angle photograph objectives Canon 6/0.8 (F=6 mm, the aperture 1:0.8). The cameras have fields of view of 50°x40° and have a limiting magnitude (for meteors) of +4 m ÷ +5 m. The FAVOR (FAst Variability Optical Registrator) camera is used for observations of faint meteors at the North Caucasus [1]. The basic components of this camera are the following: the high-aperture lense objective with the aperture 150 mm and the focal length 180mm (the aperture 1:1.2), the image intensifier, the objective reversal, CCD receiver "Videoscan" VS-СTT285 2001. The CCD "Sony" ICX285 has format 1380 х 1024 pixels. The camera has a field of view of 18 ° х 20°, and has a limiting magnitude of above +10m (for meteors). The two cameras similar to FAVOR (named SMAC) were designed for double-station observations of faint meteors. The results of observations at these cameras are presented. The observations were held by both methods

  3. Kharkiv Meteor Radar System (the XX Age)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2012-09-01

    Kharkiv meteor radar research are of historic value (Kolomiyets and Sidorov 2007). Kharkiv radar observations of meteors proved internationally as the best in the world, it was noted at the IAU General Assembly in 1958. In the 1970s Kharkiv meteor automated radar system (MARS) was recommended at the international level as a successful prototype for wide distribution. Until now, this radar system is one of the most sensitive instruments of meteor radars in the world for astronomical observations. In 2004 Kharkiv meteor radar system is included in the list of objects which compose the national property of Ukraine. Kharkiv meteor radar system has acquired the status of the important historical astronomical instrument in world history. Meteor Centre for researching meteors in Kharkiv is a analogue of the observatory and performs the same functions of a generator and a battery of special knowledge and skills (the world-famous studio). Kharkiv and the location of the instrument were brand points on the globe, as the place where the world-class meteor radar studies were carried out. They are inscribed in the history of meteor astronomy, in large letters and should be immortalized on a world-wide level.

  4. Meteor velocity determination with plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Denney, K.; Close, S.; Oppenheim, M.; Chau, J.; Ray, L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the global meteor flux at Earth requires the measurement of meteor velocities. While several radar methods exist for measuring meteor velocity, they may be biased by plasma reflection mechanisms. This paper presents a new method for deriving meteoroid velocity from the altitudinal extent of non-specular trails. This method employs our recent discoveries on meteor trail plasma instability. Dyrud et al. (2002) demonstrated that meteor trails are unstable over a limited altitude range, and that the precise altitudes of instability are dependent on the meteoroid that generated the trail. Since meteor trail instability results in field aligned irregularities (FAI) that allow for radar reflection, non-specular trail observations may be used to derive velocity. We use ALTAIR radar data of combined head echos and non-specular trails to test non-specular trail derived velocity against head echo velocities. Meteor velocities derived from non-specular trail altitudinal width match to within 5 km/s when compared with head echo range rates from the same meteor. We apply this technique to Piura radar observations of hundreds of non-specular trails to produce histograms of occurrence of meteor velocity based solely on this non-specular trails width criterion. The results from this study show that the most probable velocity of meteors seen by the Piura radar is near 50 km/s, which is comparable with modern head echo studies.

  5. Meteor velocity determination with plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Denney, K.; Close, S.; Oppenheim, M.; Ray, L.; Chau, J.

    2004-02-01

    Understanding the global meteor flux at Earth requires the measurement of meteor velocities. While several radar methods exist for measuring meteor velocity, they may be biased by plasma reflection mechanisms. This paper presents a new method for deriving meteoroid velocity from the altitudinal extent of non-specular trails. This method employs our recent discoveries on meteor trail plasma instability. Dyrud et al. (2002) demonstrated that meteor trails are unstable over a limited altitude range, and that the precise altitudes of instability are dependent on the meteoroid velocity that generated the trail. Since meteor trail instability results in field aligned irregularities (FAI) that allow for radar reflection, non-specular trail observations may be used to derive velocity. We use ALTAIR radar data of combined head echos and non-specular trails to test non-specular trail derived velocity against head echo velocities. Meteor velocities derived from non-specular trail altitudinal width match to within 5 km/s when compared with head echo range rates from the same meteor. We apply this technique to Piura radar observations of hundreds of non-specular trails to produce histograms of occurrence of meteor velocity based solely on this non-specular trails width criterion. The results from this study show that the most probable velocity of meteors seen by the Piura radar is near 50 km/s which is comparable with modern head echo studies.

  6. Meteor burst communications improvement study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David

    1993-07-01

    Two identical Meteor Burst Radio Terminals were developed, fabricated, and delivered to the Air Force. Each is controlled by a PC computer in a menu driven manner. The mode of operation is full duplex. The RF frequency range is 40 to 60 MHz with tuning increments of 25 KHz. Data rates are 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 kbps. Modulation is coherent Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and incoherent Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK). Protocol includes Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) with source and destination addressing, message number, start of message, and end of message. Messages are packetized, and Reed Solomon (R-S) coding is an option. The ARQ is under the control of a Cyclic Redundancy Check Code (CRCC) which detects binary errors within each packet. The terminal is intended to increase meteor trail availability and data throughput by several orders of magnitude--by operating with new antennas that provide much higher gains without sacrificing meteor trail acquisition performance.

  7. Effects of subducted seamount on interplate coupling and earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Liu, Y.; Lin, J.

    2011-12-01

    It has been proposed that large seamounts riding on a subducting plate may play a critical role in controlling the characteristics of earthquakes in a subduction zone, including the maximum sizes of the potential mega-earthquakes. However, the specific relationships between subducted seamounts and megathrust earthquakes are still poorly understood. Here we conduct a numerical investigation of the physical interaction of subducted seamounts with a subduction zone by considering the rate and state friction properties of the subducting interface, and complete stressing cycles of earthquake faults. The seamount is incorporated as additional normal stress into the model. The preliminary results from a 2D Cascadia-like subduction fault model show: (1) The subducted seamount acts as a "barrier" if the seamount is sitting up-dip to the earthquake nucleation zone, regardless of the seamount size. When the seamount is subducted adjacent to the nucleation zone, a higher additional effective normal stress is required to impede ruptures. (2) The higher the additional effective normal stress caused by the seamount is, the larger coseismic slip may be released by a large earthquake when rupturing the whole seismogenic zone in different earthquake cycles, suggesting that the "barrier" seamount also enhances the seismic coupling. (3) The seamount could turn into an "asperity" that initiates seismic ruptures if it is preceded by a deeper and smaller rupture. In addition, the seamount may also cause stress transfer on the fault which leads to earthquakes nucleated in the shallow part of the seismogenic zone. (4) If the seamount is subducted to the nucleation zone, megathrust earthquakes can still occur and will release larger coseismic slip, indicating the enhancement of seismic coupling between the overriding and subducting plates. (5) If it is subducted beneath the seismogenic zone, the seamount had little effects on the characteristics of megathrust earthquakes and the coseismic

  8. The Upsilon Pegasid Meteor Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povenmire, H.

    1995-09-01

    On the morning of August 8, 1975, meteors were observed from a previously unrecognized radiant in Pegasus. The rates were approximately seven per hour [1]. The radiant was alpha = 350 degrees, delta = +19 degrees (2000.0). These meteors are characterized as swift, yellow-white and without significant ionization trains [1]. The average magnitude of several hundred meteors from this shower is approximately +3.50, slightly fainter than the Perseids which occur at the same time. A broad maximum seems to occur about August 8. The three active fireball networks (Prairie, MORP and European) were contacted in a search for previously recorded fireballs with negative results. Ceplecha [2] of the European Network computed the orbital elements using the FIRBAL program. On August 19, 1982 at 02:09:57 UT, a magnitude -14.76 f1reball occurred over the White Carpathian Mountains of Austria and Czechoslovakia. It was photographed by five cameras of the European Network. Reduction of this Upsilon Pegasid fireball (EN 190882A) showed it to be a type IIIb fireball [2] - that is, an extremely low density, cometary, snow-like material with a specific gravity of approximately 0.27 g/cm^3. This material ablates at high altitude and cannot produce sonic phenomena or meteorites. It is similar to the material in the Draconid meteor shower. The orbital elements derived from EN 190882A are given in Table I. Table I: Orbital elements for the Upsilon Pegasid stream from EN 190882A. omega = 305.9009 degrees Omega = 145.3431 degrees i = 85.0817 degrees q = 0.2022 e = 1.0 velocity = 51.8608 km/s Using these refined elements, Kronk [3] computed the radiant drift. The radiant drifts from the SSW to NNE at a relatively steep angle and at an average rate of 20 arc-min per day. An intensive literature search [3] revealed four double station Upsilon Pegasids which had previously been listed as sporadics. Institutions providing these data were Yale [4], Stalinabad [5], Tadjikistan [6] and Harvard [7

  9. Big data era in meteor science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinković, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Srećković, V.; Pečnik, B.; Szabó, G.; Debattista, V.; Škoda, P.; Mahabal, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Mönkölä, S.; Mickaelian, A.; Turunen, E.; Kákona, J.; Koskinen, J.; Grokhovsky, V.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last couple of decades technological advancements in observational techniques in meteor science have yielded drastic improvements in the quality, quantity and diversity of meteor data, while even more ambitious instruments are about to become operational. This empowers meteor science to boost its experimental and theoretical horizons and seek more advanced science goals. We review some of the developments that push meteor science into the big data era that requires more complex methodological approaches through interdisciplinary collaborations with other branches of physics and computer science. We argue that meteor science should become an integral part of large surveys in astronomy, aeronomy and space physics, and tackle the complexity of micro-physics of meteor plasma and its interaction with the atmosphere.

  10. Bi-telescopic, deep, simultaneous meteor observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical summary is presented of 10 hours of observing sporadic meteors and two meteor showers using the Experimental Test System of the Lincoln Laboratory. The observatory is briefly described along with the real-time and post-processing hardware, the analysis, and the data reduction. The principal observational results are given for the sporadic meteor zenithal hourly rates. The unique properties of the observatory include twin telescopes to allow the discrimination of meteors by parallax, deep limiting magnitude, good time resolution, and sophisticated real-time and post-observing video processing.

  11. Geochemistry of hydrothermal plume in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitashima, K.; Maeda, Y.

    2002-12-01

    Chemical compounds of the hot basalt origin are discharged into the deep ocean via hydrothermal plume by the deep-sea hydrothermal activity. The hydrothermal plume is widely diffused to the ocean by mixing with ambient seawater. Chemical reactions and interactions with microorganisms in the diffusion process of the hydrothermal plume are important to comprehend the oceanic geochemical cycles. Recently, it has been clarified that the variation of hydrothermal activity is greatly controlled in the tidal current. Not only geochemical observation but also physical observation, such as water current measurement, are necessary for the understanding of the deep-sea hydrothermal systems including the behavior of hydrothermal plume. In order to observe the diffusion process of hydrothermal plumes, sampling and chemical mapping of the hydrothermal plume and measurement of water current were carried out at the Suiyo Seamount Caldera during research cruises under the ?Archaean Park? project funded by MEXT. The three-dimensional acoustic current meters were moored at the height of 13m and 125m above the bottom in the Suiyo Seamount Caldera. At the 13m height, average water current speed and current direction were 10.46 cm/second and 228.1 degrees, respectively, and maximum water current speed was over 40.46 cm/second. On the other hand, average water current speed and current direction at the 125m height were 3.87 cm/second and 57.8 degrees, respectively. The strong water current of the southwest direction in 24 hours periods existed near bottom of the caldera. In addition, downward current and water temperature depreciation were observed, when there was the strong current in 24 hours periods. These results suggest that the low-temperature ocean water around the Suiyo Seamount flows toward the bottom of caldera periodically. The mini CTDT-RMS mounted twelve 1.2L Niskin bottles and the in-situ pH sensor were installed on the ROV or manned submersible. The hydrothermal plume

  12. Emplacement and Growth of Serpentinite Seamounts on the Mariana Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, A. J.; Taylor, B.; Moore, G. F.; Fryer, P.; Morgan, J. K.; Goodliffe, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts comprised primarily of serpentinite muds are found on the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana subduction system. They represent some of the first material outputs of the recycling process that takes place in subduction zones. Therefore, understanding their evolution is necessary to correctly quantify the flux of material through the subduction system. Serpentinite seamounts have been described as mud diapirs, mud volcanoes, uplifted blocks of mantle material, and a composite of the latter two. Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data collected in 2002 from the outer Mariana forearc imaged, for the first time, the large-scale internal structure of these seamounts. These data, combined with new bathymetry, have provided insight into how the seamounts grow and deform with time and have allowed us to evaluate proposed models for their formation. The serpentinite seamounts rest on faulted and sedimented Mariana forearc basement. Flank flows of serpentinite muds downlap existing forearc substrate, leaving the underlying stratigraphy largely undisturbed. Reflections located 3.5-5 km beneath forearc basement may represent Moho, suggesting that the seamounts are built on anomalously thin forearc crust. A strong reflection at the summit of Big Blue, the largest serpentinite seamount in the Mariana Forearc, represents a collapse structure that has been partially in-filled by younger muds, supporting the idea that serpentinite seamount growth is episodic. Basal thrusts that incorporate forearc sediments at the toe of Turquoise Seamount provide evidence for seamount settling and lateral growth. We are conducting numerical simulations of seamount growth and evolution using the discrete element method (DEM), previously used to examine gravity spreading phenomena in magmatic volcanoes. Simulations employing distinctly low basal and internal friction coefficients provide a good match to the overall morphology of the serpentinite seamounts, and offer insight into their internal

  13. Some remarks on resolving seamounts in satellite gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Smith, W. H. F.

    2007-02-01

    We examine peak-to-trough gravity anomaly amplitudes over seamounts, comparing gravity derived from satellite altimetry with gravity measured by ships. We also compare amplitudes from linear and higher-order (non-linear) computations, and conclude that two-term forward modeling of seamounts should be adequate. Altimetric amplitudes are within 90% of ship amplitudes at seamounts greater than 14 km in characteristic radius. At smaller seamounts, altimetric amplitude is reduced, probably due to smoothing filters used to process the altimeter data. Perhaps fortuitously, this amplitude loss nearly matches the amplitude under-estimate that occurs if one assumes the forward model should contain only a linear term. Thus bathymetric prediction by linear filtering may do a fairly good job of resolving seamounts much smaller than 14 km in characteristic radius.

  14. Diversity of microbial communities in ocean crust below ancient hotspot seamounts along the Louisville Seamount Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvan, J. B.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of Integrated Ocean Drilling Expedition 330, Louisville Seamount Trail, was to understand the motion of the Louisville hotspot during 50-80 Ma. As such, >1 km of volcanic basement was collected from five sites on four seamounts, providing an excellent chance to study how microbial populations are effected by different lithologies, different seamounts and age of basement rock along the Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC). Analysis of bacteria growing in enrichment incubations that targeted oligotrophs (with 1% or 10% Marine Broth 2216 diluted with 3% NaCl) and sulfur oxidizers reveals the presence of a diverse array of bacteria, including ɛ-proteobacteria closely related to Sulfurimonas autotrophica, β-proteobacterial methylotrophs, ζ-proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes most closely related to organisms cultured from sediments. Many of these sequences are <97% similar to the closest cultured relatives, indicating the subsurface LSC may be home to unique new species. One isolate recently obtained in pure culture from the original enrichments is 99% similar to Halomonas sulfidaeris str. Esulfude1, a bacterium originally isolated from a hydrothermal sulfide chimney. A second isolate may be a new species of Bacillus. Initial molecular analysis of bacterial communities by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene as part of the Census of Deep Life (CoDL) supports the data from the culturing work; in one sample collected 174 meters below seafloor, the most abundant bacteria detected include species from the genera Pseudomonas, Sulfurimonas, Methyloversatilis and Desulfocapsa. More CoDL samples will be analyzed in the near future. We will describe results to date on subsurface microbial diversity along the Louisville Seamount Chain from the culturing work and CoDL project and draw comparisons to data derived from younger crustal sites to try to understand how the LSC ecosystem fits into our global picture of life in ocean crust.

  15. Quantitative Study of Seismogenic Potential Along Manila Trench: Effects of Scaborough Seamount Chain Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Liu, Y.; Li, D.; Ning, J.; Matsuzawa, T.; Shibazaki, B.; Hsu, Y. J.

    2014-12-01

    Modern seismicity record along the Manila Trench shows only infrequent Mw7 earthquakes, the lack of great earthquakes may indicate the subduction fault is either aseismically slipping or is accumulating strain energy toward rapid release in a megathrust earthquake. We conduct numerical simulations of the plate coupling, earthquake nucleation and dynamic rupture propagation processes along the Manila subduction fault (15-19.5ºN), taking into consideration the effects of plate geometry (including subducted seamounts), fault strength, rate-state frictional properties and pore pressure variations. Specifically, we use the bathymetry to depict the outline of Manila trench along its strike, 2681 background seismicity (1970/02/13 to 2013/09/06) from Chinese Earthquake Network Center and 540 focal mechanism solutions (1976/01/01 to 2013/01/27) from Global CMT project to constrain the geometry of the subducting Sunda/Eurasian slab. The compilation of seismicity and focal mechanism indicates the plate dipping angle gradually changes from 28º (south of the Scaborough Seamount Chain) to 12º (north of it). This geometric anomaly may due to the subducted part of the seamount chain. Preliminary modeling results using gabbro gouge friction data show that the Scaborough Seamount Chain could be a barrier to earthquake rupture propagation. Only earthquakes larger than Mw7 can overcome the barrier to rupture the entire Manila trench. Smaller earthquakes would cease rupturing when it encounters the seamount chain. Moreover, we propose that Manila trench subduction zone has the potential of rupturing in a Mw8 megathrust earthquake, if the simulation period is long enough for an Mw8 earthquake cycle and dynamic rupture overcomes the subducted Scaborough Seamount Chain. Our model parameters will be further constrained by laboratory rock mechanics experiments conducted on IODP Expedition 349, South China Sea (SCS), drilling samples (work in progress at China Earthquake Administration

  16. Oceanic sharks clean at coastal seamount.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Simon P; Hussey, Nigel E; Turner, John R; Beckett, Alison J

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus) and cleaner wrasse were investigated at a seamount in the Philippines. Cleaning associations between sharks and teleosts are poorly understood, but the observable interactions seen at this site may explain why these mainly oceanic sharks regularly venture into shallow coastal waters where they are vulnerable to disturbance from human activity. From 1,230 hours of observations recorded by remote video camera between July 2005 and December 2009, 97 cleaner-thresher shark events were analyzed, 19 of which were interrupted. Observations of pelagic thresher sharks interacting with cleaners at the seamount were recorded at all times of day but their frequency declined gradually from morning until evening. Cleaners showed preferences for foraging on specific areas of a thresher shark's body. For all events combined, cleaners were observed to conduct 2,757 inspections, of which 33.9% took place on the shark's pelvis, 23.3% on the pectoral fins, 22.3% on the caudal fin, 8.6% on the body, 8.3% on the head, 2.1% on the dorsal fin, and 1.5% on the gills respectively. Cleaners did not preferentially inspect thresher sharks by time of day or by shark sex, but there was a direct correlation between the amount of time a thresher shark spent at a cleaning station and the number of inspections it received. Thresher shark clients modified their behavior by "circular-stance-swimming," presumably to facilitate cleaner inspections. The cleaner-thresher shark association reflected some of the known behavioral trends in the cleaner-reef teleost system since cleaners appeared to forage selectively on shark clients. Evidence is mounting that in addition to acting as social refuges and foraging grounds for large visiting marine predators, seamounts may also support pelagic ecology by functioning as cleaning stations for oceanic sharks and rays. PMID:21423796

  17. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotberg, N. K.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Perez, J.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts are important to research and education in many scientific fields, providing a wide range of data on physical, chemical, biological and geological processes. In order to make a diverse set of seamount data accessible we have developed the Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org, available through the http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The primary goal of the Seamount Catalog is to provide access to digital data files on a large assortment of interdisciplinary seamount research. The catalog can be searched at a variety of ability or expert levels allowing it to be used from basic education to advanced research. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, height, volume, elongation, azimuth, irregularity, rifts, morphological classification and relation to other features. GEBCO (General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean) gazetteer data (2002; 2003) is included in the database in order to provide information on the history, discovery and names of the seamounts. Screen-optimized bathymetry maps, grid files and the original multibeam data files are available for online viewing with higher resolution downloadable versions (AI, PS, PDF) also offered. The data files for each seamount include a map made from the multibeam data only, a map made from Smith and Sandwell's (1996) predicted bathymetry, a merged map incorporating both data sets, and a map showing the differences between the two data sets. We are working towards expanding the Seamount Catalog by integrating bathymetry data from various sources, developing and linking disciplinary reference models, and integrating information from multiple disciplines and from the literature. We hope to create a data integrative environment that provides access to seamount data and the tools needed for working with that data.

  18. The Makings of Meteor Astronomy: Part XIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1996-10-01

    In 1848, Sir John Lubbock advanced the hypothesis that meteors shine by reflected sunlight. He developed a set of equations describing the geometry of meteor encounters, and for a decade or so, his idea was at least marginally supported by other observers.

  19. Croatian Meteor Network: ongoing work 2014 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Andreić, Ž.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing work mainly between 2014-2015 International Meteor Conferences (IMC) has been presented. Current sky coverage, software updates, orbit catalogues updates, shower search updates, international collaboration as well as new fields of research and educational efforts made by the Croatian Meteor Network are described.

  20. Meteor Terminology poster translated into different languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlerin, Vincent; Hankey, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) has created an educational poster that defines the major terms of the meteor terminology. This poster is an educational tool made available for free on the AMS website. We offer this poster to be translated and shared among the IMO members.

  1. Meteor spectra in the EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Gorková, S.; Srba, J.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; di Pietro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of five interesting meteor spectra obtained in the years 2014 and 2015 via CCTV video systems with a holographic grating, working in CEMENT and BRAMON meteor observation networks. Based on the EDMOND multi stations video meteor trajectory data an orbital classification of these meteors was performed. Selected meteors are members of the LYR, SPE, DSA and LVI meteor streams, one meteor is classified as sporadic background (SPO). In calibrated spectra the main chemical components were identified. Meteors are chemically classified based on relative intensities of the main spectral lines (or multiplets): Mg I (2), Na I (1), and Fe I (15). Bolide EN091214 is linked with the 23rd meteorite with known orbit (informally known as "Žďár"), two fragments of the parent body were found in the Czech Republic so far (August, 2015). For this particular event a time resolved spectral observation and comparison with laboratory spectra of LL3.2 chondritic meteorite are presented.

  2. Jasper Seamount: seven million years of volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pringle, M.S.; Staudigel, H.; Gee, J.

    1991-01-01

    Jasper Seamount is a young, mid-sized (690 km3) oceanic intraplate volcano located about 500 km west-southwest of San Diego, California. Reliable 40Ar/39Ar age data were obtained for several milligram-sized samples of 4 to 10 Ma plagioclase by using a defocused laser beam to clean the samples before fusion. Gee and Staudigel suggested that Jasper Seamount consists of a transitional to tholeiitic shield volcano formed by flank transitional series lavas, overlain by flank alkalic series lavas and summit alkalic series lavas. Twenty-nine individual 40Ar/39Ar laser fusion analyses on nine samples confirm the stratigraphy: 10.3-10.0 Ma for the flank transitional series, 8.7-7.5 Ma for the flank alkalic series, and 4.8-4.1 Ma for the summit alkalic series. The alkalinity of the lavas clearly increases with time, and there appear to be 1 to 3 m.y. hiatuses between each series. -from Authors

  3. Tectonic and volcanic implications of a cratered seamount off Nicobar Island, Andaman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamesh Raju, K. A.; Ray, Durbar; Mudholkar, Abhay; Murty, G. P. S.; Gahalaut, V. K.; Samudrala, Kiranmai; Paropkari, A. L.; Ramachandran, Ratheesh; Surya Prakash, L.

    2012-08-01

    The region of the Nicobar earthquake swarm of January 2005 has been explored during a recent cruise using multibeam swath bathymetry, seafloor imaging and TV-guided sampling to decipher the seafloor morphology, nature and tectonic frame work. A seamount with well-developed crater at the summit was discovered near to the center of the Nicobar swarm. Rock samples collected by TV-guided grab from the seamount crater are dacite, rhyolite and andesite type with a veneer of ferromanganese oxide coating. The aggregates recovered from the slope consisted of manganese globules. The geochemistry of the globules suggests 66-97% Mn-oxide indicative of hydrothermal origin. The morphology of the seamount, seafloor video footage and geochemistry of the seabed samples suggest that the cratered seamount has erupted in the recent geological past and is dormant at present. This is the first documented report of submarine arc-volcanism in the Andaman Sea. This finding substantiates the prediction of a submarine volcano east of Nicobar Island. Study of the seismicity and the stress pattern in the region suggest that the earthquake swarm in the region occurred due to 2004 Sumatra-Andaman megathrust earthquake. The derived stress pattern suggests that the 2004 earthquake greatly reduced the normal stress in the region of West Andaman fault from the planes or unclamped them. Thus unclamping of the region by the 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake led to the initiation of the swarm through predominantly strike slip faulting. The newly discovered dormant submarine volcano indicates the volcanic nature of the region. We suggest that this submarine volcano is a link between sub-aerial volcanoes of Barren-Narcondam Islands of the Andaman Sea and the volcanoes of Sumatra.

  4. On Short-Perihelion Meteor Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentjeva, Alexandra; Bakanas, Elena; Barabanov, Sergey

    2013-02-01

    Research was conducted concerning the relation of short-perihelion meteor streams with comets and asteroids. But the origin of meteor streams with small perihelion distance (of the Arietid and Geminid types) has always represented a special problem for obvious reasons. Over four hundred meteor and fireball streams (by optical and TV-observations) contained 20 streams of perihelion distance q ≤ 0.26 AU. The research shows that 8 of 20 streams displayed a relation with small bodies. No relation was found either with comets or asteroids for the remaining 12 streams. Short-period streams may be formed on quasiparabolic comet orbits with small q in the perihelion area as well. In particular, SOHO comets may be a rich source both of small and large meteor bodies, forming short-perihelion meteor streams among others.

  5. Meteoric activities during the 11th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sang-Hyeon

    2005-04-01

    We have analysed the meteor records in the chronicles that describe the era of the Song dynasty (AD 960-1279). The data are complementary to the record-vacant 10th century of the Koryo dynasty (AD 918-1392). The annual activity of sporadic meteors analysed shows a generic sinusoidal behaviour as in modern observations. In addition, we have also found that there are two prominent meteor showers, one in August and the other in November, appearing on the fluctuating sporadic meteors. The date of occurrence of the August shower indicates it to be the Perseids. By comparing the date of occurrence of the November shower with those of the Leonid showers of the Koryo dynasty, recent visual observations and the world-wide historical meteor storms, we conclude that the November shower is the Leonids. The regression rate of the Leonids is obtained to be days per century, which agrees with recent observations.

  6. Activity of the Lyrid meteor stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblad, Bertil A.; Porubcan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the Lyrid meteor stream is in most years fairly low with a visual rate at maximum (21-22 April) of 5-10 meteors per hour. Short bursts of very high Lyrid activity, with visual hourly rates of 100 or more, have sometimes been reported. These observations generally refer to faint visual meteors. The reported bursts of high activity have occurred in a very narrow interval of solar longitudes (deg 31.24 to 31.38 equinox 1950.0), while the recurrent or 'normal' maximum for bright meteors occurs at solar longitude deg 31.6, or slightly later. A mass separation of the meteors in the shower is thus indicated.

  7. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean

    PubMed Central

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D.; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30–40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators. PMID:20448197

  8. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J

    2010-05-25

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30-40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators. PMID:20448197

  9. Sporadic E-Layers and Meteor Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid

    2016-07-01

    In average width it is difficult to explain variety of particularities of the behavior sporadic layer Es ionospheres without attraction long-lived metallic ion of the meteoric origin. Mass spectrometric measurements of ion composition using rockets indicate the presence of metal ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, Na+, Ca+, K+, Al+ and others in the E-region of the ionosphere. The most common are the ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, which are primarily concentrated in the narrow sporadic layers of the ionosphere at altitudes of 90-130 km. The entry of meteoric matter into the Earth's atmosphere is a source of meteor atoms (M) and ions (M +) that later, together with wind shear, produce midlatitude sporadic Es layer of the ionosphere. To establish the link between sporadic Es layer and meteoroid streams, we proceeded from the dependence of the ionization coefficient of meteors b on the velocity of meteor particles in different meteoroid streams. We investigated the dependence of the critical frequency f0Es of sporadic E on the particle velocity V of meteor streams and associations. It was established that the average values of f0Es are directly proportional to the velocity V of meteor streams and associations, with the correlation coefficient of 0.53 < R < 0.74. Thus, the critical frequency of the sporadic layer Es increases with the increase of particle velocity V in meteor streams, which indicates the direct influence of meteor particles on ionization of the lower ionosphere and formation of long-lived metal atoms M and ions M+ of meteoric origin.

  10. An ecosystem evaluation framework for global seamount conservation and management.

    PubMed

    Taranto, Gerald H; Kvile, Kristina Ø; Pitcher, Tony J; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  11. An Ecosystem Evaluation Framework for Global Seamount Conservation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Taranto, Gerald H.; Kvile, Kristina Ø.; Pitcher, Tony J.; Morato, Telmo

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years, several global targets for protection of marine biodiversity have been adopted but have failed. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) aims at preserving 10% of all the marine biomes by 2020. For achieving this goal, ecologically or biologically significant areas (EBSA) have to be identified in all biogeographic regions. However, the methodologies for identifying the best suitable areas are still to be agreed. Here, we propose a framework for applying the CBD criteria to locate potential ecologically or biologically significant seamount areas based on the best information currently available. The framework combines the likelihood of a seamount constituting an EBSA and its level of human impact and can be used at global, regional and local scales. This methodology allows the classification of individual seamounts into four major portfolio conservation categories which can help optimize management efforts toward the protection of the most suitable areas. The framework was tested against 1000 dummy seamounts and satisfactorily assigned seamounts to proper EBSA and threats categories. Additionally, the framework was applied to eight case study seamounts that were included in three out of four portfolio categories: areas highly likely to be identified as EBSA with high degree of threat; areas highly likely to be EBSA with low degree of threat; and areas with a low likelihood of being EBSA with high degree of threat. This framework will allow managers to identify seamount EBSAs and to prioritize their policies in terms of protecting undisturbed areas, disturbed areas for recovery of habitats and species, or both based on their management objectives. It also identifies seamount EBSAs and threats considering different ecological groups in both pelagic and benthic communities. Therefore, this framework may represent an important tool to mitigate seamount biodiversity loss and to achieve the 2020 CBD goals. PMID:22905190

  12. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2013-08-01

    Information extracted from analyses carried out by the SPA Meteor Section from 2007 is presented and discussed. Events covered include: the radio Quadrantid maximum on January 4; a bright fireball seen from parts of England and imaged from the Netherlands at 19h56m UT on February 6, for which an approximate trajectory was established; radio results from the Lyrids in late April; the Perseid near-peak activity from August and a note on some daylight Perseid observing from Britain using thermal imagers; the radio α-Aurigid maximum on September 1; the Orionid return, which again provided enhanced activity over several consecutive dates in October for visual and radio observers; the radio Leonids, although the probably main peak found visually on November 19 was not recorded thus due to its timing; the typically protracted Geminid maximum period around December 13-15 as observed visually and by radio; and the Ursid outburst, primarily as detected by radio on December 22.

  13. The 2014 May Camelopardalid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Bill; Moser, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    On May 24, 2014 Earth will encounter multiple streams of debris laid down by Comet 209P LINEAR. This will likely produce a new meteor shower, never before seen. Rates predicted to be from 100 to 1000 meteors per hour between 2 and 4 AM EDT, so we are dealing with a meteor outburst, potentially a storm. Peak rate of 200 per hour best current estimate. Difficult to calibrate models due to lack of past observations. Models indicate mm size particles in stream, so potential risk to Earth orbiting spacecraft.

  14. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  15. Search for seamounts in the southern Cook and Austral region

    SciTech Connect

    Lambeck, K.; Coleman, R.

    1982-04-01

    The existence of uncharted seamounts in the Cook-Austral region of the South Pacific has been investigated using GEOS 3 and SEASAT radar altimeter observations. Three previously uncharted submarine seamounts, provisionally named GEOS A to GEOS C, have been located between Mauke and Rimatara and a fourth, GEOS D, has been located east of Rurutu. This confirms that the Aitutaki-Mauke islands of the Southern Cooks are a continuation of the Austral chain. A second group of uncharted seamounts has been provisionally located some 200 km south of Rimatara and Maria and this is suggestive of a second seamount chain, south of the first, that includes Raratonga and Mangaia. Fabert Bank, to the south of Mangaia, appears to be mislocated by about 2/sup 0/ in longitude.

  16. Lagrangian observations of surface circulation at the Emperor Seamount chain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vastano, A. C.; Hagan, D. E.; Mcnally, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    In a Kuroshio tracking experiment initiated in February 1977, two satellite-reporting buoys, drogued to 100-m depth, were released southeast of Kuyshu Island, Japan. These drifters crossed the Shatskiy Rise in the Kuroshio extension during May and October and then traversed the Emperor Seamount Chain. Although they reached the chain 117 days apart, their movements near the seamounts display remarkably similar patterns, demonstrating upstream meanders in the surface flow; cyclonic eddy activity immediately west of the chain; passage through the same gap associated with the Jingu and Nintoku seamounts; and a wavelike pattern present over the Hess Rise east of the chain. One drifter exhibited cyclonic eddy motion east of the chain in the lee of the Kinmei Seamount.

  17. The First Confirmed Videorecordings of Lunar Meteor Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Cudnik, B.; Palmer, D. M.; Sada, P. V.; Melosh, J.; Beech, M.; Pellerin, L.; Asher, D.; Frankenberger R.; Venable R.

    2000-01-01

    North American observers recorded at least six meteors striking the Moon's surface during the Leonid meteor shower on 1999 Nov. 18. Each meteor produced a flash that was recorded from at least two separate locations, marking the first confirmed lunar meteor impacts.

  18. Visual data of minor meteor showers limits of the method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendtel, Jurgen; Koschack, R.

    1992-01-01

    Visual meteor observations are carried out on a regular basis by many experienced observers worldwide, thus supplying information about activity of meteor showers. The limits of the method are determined by the accuracy of the detection of the meteor trail. This study shows that visual meteor observations provide reliable data for an observable hourly rate of greater than or equal to 3.

  19. Microbial community on oceanic ferro-manganese crusts from Takuyo-Daigo Seamount and Ryusei Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitahara, S.; Kato, S.; Yamagishi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Background and Purpose Iron and manganese oxide deposits are often found on deep seafloor. Rocks covered with these oxides are called ferro-manganese crusts (Mn crusts), and are ubiquitously distributed on deep seafloor (Rona 2003). Because Mn crusts contain rare metals such as Co, Pt and rare earth element, it can be resources in the future. Mn crusts and microbes on Mn crusts may contribute to material, especially carbon and nitrogen circulation between hydrosphere and lithosphere. Mechanism of Mn crust formation is not completely understood. Wang et al. propose a model that microorganisms associate with initial Mn mineral deposition (Wang et al., 2011). There is a possibility that microbes may contribute to formation of Mn crust relying on their ability to oxidize Fe and Mn. However, there is limited information about diversity, spatial distribution and abundance of microbes on Mn crust surface. Our purpose is to clarify microbial community composition, spatial distribution, diversity and abundance of microbes on Mn crusts collected from Takuyo-Daigo seamount and Ryusei seamount. Method We collected Mn crusts, sediments and ambient seawater from Takuyo-Daigo seamount at the depth of 1200 m, 1419 m, 2209 m and 2991 m during NT09-02 cruise in Feb 2009 and Ryusei seamount at the depth of 1194 m, 2079 m during KY11-02 in Feb 2011 with remotely operated vehicle Hyper-Dolphin (JAMSTEC). Genomic DNA was extracted from each sample using Fast DNA kit for soil (Qbiogene). Partial 16S rRNA gene and amoA gene were amplified by PCR with prokaryote-universal primer set (Uni516F-Uni1407R) and bacterial and archaeal amoA specific primer sets. PCR products were cloned. The nucleotide sequences of randomly selected clones were determined. We performed phylogenetic and statistical analysis to determine microbial community compositions, and estimated diversity indices. We also estimated the copy numbers of 16S rRNA and amoA genes of Bacteria and Archaea by quantitative PCR. Results

  20. New Application of Finite Element Method to Seamount Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HA, G.; Kim, S. S.; So, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic method can be utilized in a wide range of applications, including investigation of small-scale near-surface targets and characterization of large-scale geologic structures. In particular, marine magnetic studies involve with various interpretation approaches to constrain geophysical information regarding the depth of a particular seamount, its size and shape, and the orientation and magnitude of its magnetization. The accuracy of the estimated information is normally governed by the quality and amount of available data and by the sophistication of the employed modeling techniques. Here we aim to advance geomagnetic modeling approaches using the interactive finite element solver, COMSOL Multiphysics, and improve the degree of detail that can be obtained from the measured magnetic field. First, we carried out benchmark tests by comparing the computed results using the analytic solutions for simple bodies. We built two types of synthetic models with rectangular and sphere shaped ore bodies having high intensity of magnetization and we changed magnetized direction in each calculation. Comparisons of FEM-based results with the analytic ones exhibited good agreement in general. Second, marine magnetic data obtained at seamounts can be very crucial to determine the age and location of seamount formation. Traditional magnetic methods often assume the uniformly magnetized seamounts to simplify computational efforts. However, the inner structures of seamounts constrained by seismic data show a clear distinction between the dense core and edifice layers. Here we divide the seamount into the dense core and edifice layers in a synthetic model, assign different magnetization direction and intensity to them, and optimize these parameters by minimizing differences between the observed and numerical computed data. These examined results will be valuable to understand seamount formation processes in detail. In addition, we discuss FEM-based magnetic models to mimic the

  1. Trophodynamic studies on the Condor seamount (Azores, Portugal, North Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, A.; Giacomello, E.; Porteiro, F.; Menezes, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Compared to the surrounding ocean waters, seamounts are commonly considered habitats where biological productivity is higher and consumers proliferate. Despite their high productivity, studies of seamount trophic webs are still scarce and fragmentary, and little is known about the connections between the different compartments. What are the trophic interactions of seamount fauna? How do the pelagic and benthic environment couple? In order to answer these questions, stable isotopes δ15N and δ13C were measured in the organisms collected during the course of numerous campaigns at the Condor seamount in the North Atlantic. The Condor seamount food chain is composed of five trophic levels. Mesopelagic organisms are the link between the epipelagic environment and the benthic and benthopelagic organisms, bridging the gap between primary consumers and the 4th and 5th trophic chain levels. Our results demonstrate, through stable isotope analysis, the important role of mesopelagic organisms in the transfer of energy within the seamount food web, as modeling/theoretical studies have previously suggested.

  2. Meteor radar response function: Application to the interpretation of meteor backscatter at medium frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervera, M. A.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Reid, I. M.; Tsutsumi, M.

    2004-11-01

    Recently, Cervera and Elford (2004) extended earlier work on the development of the meteor radar response function (Elford, 1964; Thomas et al., 1988) to include a nonuniform meteor ionization profile. This approach has the advantage that the height distribution of meteors expected to be observed by a radar meteor system is able to be accurately modeled and insights into the meteoroid chemistry to be gained. The meteor radar response function is also an important tool with regard to the interpretation of meteor backscatter in other areas, e.g., modeling the expected diurnal variation of sporadic meteors, investigating the expected echo distribution over the sky, and the calculation of the expected rate curves of meteor showers. We exemplify each of these techniques from the analysis of meteor data collected by the Buckland Park 2 MHz system during October 1997. In addition, we show that the response function may be used to quantify the echo rate of a given shower relative to the sporadic background and thus determine if that shower is able to be detected by the radar.

  3. The KUT meteor radar: An educational low cost meteor observation system by radio forward scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madkour, W.; Yamamoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kochi University of Technology (KUT) meteor radar is an educational low cost observation system built at Kochi, Japan by successive graduate students since 2004. The system takes advantage of the continuous VHF- band beacon signal emitted from Fukui National College of Technology (FNCT) for scientific usage all over Japan by receiving the forward scattered signals. The system uses the classical forward scattering setup similar to the setup described by the international meteor organization (IMO), gradually developed from the most basic single antenna setup to the multi-site meteor path determination setup. The primary objective is to automate the observation of the meteor parameters continuously to provide amounts of data sufficient for statistical analysis. The developed software system automates the observation of the astronomical meteor parameters such as meteor direction, velocity and trajectory. Also, automated counting of meteor echoes and their durations are used to observe mesospheric ozone concentration by analyzing the duration distribution of different meteor showers. The meteor parameters observed and the methodology used for each are briefly summarized.

  4. Large Meteor Tracked over Northeast Alabama

    NASA Video Gallery

    On the evening of May 18, NASA all-sky meteor cameras located at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and at the Walker County Science Center near Chickamauga, Ga. tracked the entry of a large meteo...

  5. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-08-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  6. Man-Sized Meteor Over Macon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center have recorded the brightest meteor ever seen by their network. On May 20, 2011, six-foot diameter fragment of an unknown comet entered the atmosph...

  7. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-01-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  9. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  10. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left to right: Richard Rawls, Chip Holloway, and Art Hayhurst standing next to the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  11. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  12. A Meteor Shower Origin for Martian Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.; Steele, A.; Treiman, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present and discuss the hypothesis that martian methane arises from a meteor shower source. Infall material produces methane by UV photolysis, generating localized plumes that occur after Mars/comet orbit interactions. This hypothesis is testable.

  13. Meteor showers associated with 2003EH1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzhanov, P. B.; Williams, I. P.; Kokhirova, G. I.

    2008-06-01

    Using the Everhart RADAU19 numerical integration method, the orbital evolution of the near-Earth asteroid 2003EH1 is investigated. This asteroid belongs to the Amor group and is moving on a comet-like orbit. The integrations are performed over one cycle of variation of the perihelion argument ω. Over such a cycle, the orbit intersect that of the Earth at eight different values of ω. The orbital parameters are different at each of these intersections and so a meteoroid stream surrounding such an orbit can produce eight different meteor showers, one at each crossing. The geocentric radiants and velocities of the eight theoretical meteor showers associated with these crossing points are determined. Using published data, observed meteor showers are identified with each of the theoretically predicted showers. The character of the orbit and the existence of observed meteor showers associated with 2003EH1 confirm the supposition that this object is an extinct comet.

  14. Analysis of ALTAIR 1998 Meteor Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, J.; Close, S.; Colestock, P. L.; MacDonell, A.; Loveland, R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new analysis of a set of 32 UHF meteor radar traces recorded with the 422 MHz ALTAIR radar facility in November 1998. Emphasis is on the velocity measurements, and on inferences that can be drawn from them regarding the meteor masses and mass densities. We find that the velocity vs altitude data can be fitted as quadratic functions of the path integrals of the atmospheric densities vs distance, and deceleration rates derived from those fits all show the expected behavior of increasing with decreasing altitude. We also describe a computer model of the coupled processes of collisional heating, radiative cooling, evaporative cooling and ablation, and deceleration - for meteors composed of defined mixtures of mineral constituents. For each of the cases in the data set we ran the model starting with the measured initial velocity and trajectory inclination, and with various trial values of the quantity mPs 2 (the initial mass times the mass density squared), and then compared the computed deceleration vs altitude curves vs the measured ones. In this way we arrived at the best-fit values of the mPs 2 for each of the measured meteor traces. Then further, assuming various trial values of the density Ps, we compared the computed mass vs altitude curves with similar curves for the same set of meteors determined previously from the measured radar cross sections and an electrostatic scattering model. In this way we arrived at estimates of the best-fit mass densities Ps for each of the cases. Keywords meteor ALTAIR radar analysis 1 Introduction This paper describes a new analysis of a set of 422 MHz meteor scatter radar data recorded with the ALTAIR High-Power-Large-Aperture radar facility at Kwajalein Atoll on 18 November 1998. The exceptional accuracy/precision of the ALTAIR tracking data allow us to determine quite accurate meteor trajectories, velocities and deceleration rates. The measurements and velocity/deceleration data analysis are described in Sections

  15. Error control coding for meteor burst channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, T. J.; Belkerdid, M. A.; Georgiopoulos, M.

    The performance of several error control coding schemes for a meteor burst channel is studied via analysis and simulation. These coding strategies are compared using the probability of successful transmission of a fixed size packet through a single burst as a performance measure. The coding methods are compared via simulation for several realizations of meteor burst. It is found that, based on complexity and probability of success, fixed-rate convolutional codes with soft decision Viterbi decoding provide better performance.

  16. SEC Vidicon spectra of Geminid meteors, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millman, P. M.; Clifton, K. S.

    1975-01-01

    The SEC Vidicon, a low light level closed circuit television system, was used to obtain 137 spectrographic records of meteors at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, during the Geminid meteor shower in December 1972. Seven of the best Geminid meteor spectra are studied here in detail. The near infrared, out to wavelengths near 9000 A, is recorded for the first time for Geminids. The spectra, in general, exhibit the elements previously found in photographic records of this shower but show a surprising frequency of occurrence of the forbidden green line of O I at 5577 A. This line is normally absent from meteors moving as slowly as the Geminids (36 km/sec) and its presence in these records may be due to the added sensitivity available with the SEC Vidicon. The average green line duration in Geminid meteors with a luminosity near zero absolute visual magnitude is 0.73 sec at a mean height of 95 km, 11 km lower than the green line peak in Perseid meteors of the same luminosity.

  17. Patterns of Macro-invertebrate Biodiversity on Seamounts in the New Zealand Region: are Seamounts What we Think They are?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowden, A. A.; Clark, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Seamounts are prominent and widely distributed features of the New Zealand marine environment, and also the focus of important commercial fisheries and some exploratory mineral mining. Ten seamount-specific voyages were conducted between 1999 and 2004 to sample and characterize the macro-invertebrate assemblages, and their habitat, of forty seamounts throughout the New Zealand region. Samples were taken with the same type of gear at over 200 stations in water depths of ~200 to 3000 m. Over a 1000 benthic macro- invertebrate taxa were recorded. The preliminary results of an analysis of data from this regional sampling will be presented and discussed with respect to ecological theory and the observed patterns of biodiversity. These patterns include those observed for assemblage composition within and between seamounts (including between isolated, clusters and chains of seamounts); measures of taxonomic distinctness for taxon groups with different life history characteristics; and estimated species richness and environmental heterogeneity. Some of these patterns do not appear to conform to ecological theory as currently applied to seamount habitats.

  18. Vigorous venting and biology at Pito Seamount, Easter microplate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naar, D. F.; Hekinian, R.; Segonzac, M.; Francheteau, J.; Armijo, R.; Cogne, J.-P.; Constantin, M.; Girardeau, J.; Hey, R. N.; Searle, R. C.

    A Nautile submersible investigation of Pito Seamount documents vigorous hydrothermal venting at 23°19.65'S, 111°38.41'W and at a depth of 2270 m. The data indicate the volcano is young and recently active, as predicted from analyses of SeaMARC II side-scan and swath bathymetry, and geophysical data. Pito Seamount lies near Pito Deep (5980 m), which marks the tip of the northwestward propagating East rift of the Easter microplate. Bathymetry surrounding Pito Seamount consists of a series of ridges and valleys with relief up to ˜4 km. The 4-km submersible-transect to the summit of Pito Seamount crossed areas of very glassy basalt with little or no sediment cover, suggesting the lava flows are very young. Most of the lava samples from Pito Seamount are depleted normal MORB (mid-ocean ridge basalt). Lava samples associated with active and dead hydrothermal vents consist of phyric and aphyric transitional and enriched MORB. Sulfides consist primarily of sphalerite and pyrite, with traces of chalcopyrite. The active hydrothermal chimney on Pito Seamount has a small, undiversified biological community similar to northern East Pacific Rise vent sites (alvinellid worms, bythograeid crabs and bythitid fishes) and western Pacific back-arc basin sites (alvinocaridid shrimps). No vestimentiferan worms were observed. Previous geophysical data, and new geochemical data and visual observations, suggest that the vigorous black smoker is a result of deep, extensive crosscutting faults formed by extensive tectonic thinning of Pito Deep, and a very robust magmatic supply being supplied from upwelling asthenosphere. Although no biological or vent fluid samples were obtained, geological and biological observations, such as the large number of inactive chimneys, old hydrothermal deposits, and starfish, as well as the occurrence of dead mollusks (gastropod and mussels), suggest a recent waning of hydrothermal activity near the summit. The speculative interpretation that Pito Seamount

  19. Meteoric Ions in Planetary Ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar system debris, in the form of meteoroids, impacts every planet. The flux, relative composition and speed of the debris at each planet depends on the planet's size and location in the solar system. Ablation in the atmosphere evaporates the meteoric material and leaves behind metal atoms. During the ablation process metallic ions are formed by impact ionization. For small inner solar system planets, including Earth, this source of ionization is typically small compared to either photoionization or charge exchange with ambient molecular ions. For Earth, the atmosphere above the main deposition region absorbs the spectral lines capable of ionizing the major metallic atoms (Fe and Mg) so that charge exchange with ambient ions is the dominant source. Within the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars (and possibly Venus), photoionization is important in determining the ion density. For a heavy planet like Jupiter, far from the sun, impact ionization of ablated neutral atoms by impacts with molecules becomes a prominent source of ionization due to the gravitational acceleration to high incident speeds. We will describe the processes and location and extent of metal ion layers for Mars, Earth and Jupiter, concentrating on flagging the uncertainties in the models at the present time. This is an important problem, because low altitude ionosphere layers for the planets, particularly at night, probably consist predominantly of metallic ions. Comparisons with Earth will be used to illustrate the differing processes in the three planetary atmospheres.

  20. January and February Meteor Showers Detected by CAMS: the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Beth; Jenniskens, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Many meteor showers are in need of validation. Of 493 meteor showers listed in the IAU Working List of Mete-or Showers, only 95 are established. Of the rest, it is uncertain whether they exist or not. The goal of the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) project in California is to validate or remove the remaining 325 showers. CAMS scales up the use of low-light-level video for meteor triangulation, by deploying 60 video cameras spread over three sites. Once the video data has been analyzed, showers can be confirmed by comparing arrival time, direc-tion of the radiant, and speed of the individual meteors. Once established, showers can be linked to their parent bod-ies and meteoroid streams. The CAMS stations are located in Sunnyvale, at Fremont Peak Observatory, and at Lick Observatory, to the south and east of Sunnyvale, respectively. Each station contains 20 low-light-level security cameras arrayed to view the entire sky above 30°. During the night, the video data from the cameras is written to disk and analysed in day-time with the MeteorScan software package to find moving objects. Eight-second video sequences are saved for all detections. The video sequences are combined at the SETI Institute, where astrometric calibration files are generated and meteors detected from at least two stations simultaneously are found interactively using the Coincidence program. Coincidence also calculates the radiant and velocity of each meteor. Here, we discuss results obtained in January and February 2013. Over 7,500 meteor orbits were cataloged in this period. This outcome doubled the detection rate from the previous two years of CAMS data.We will present graphs of the detected meteor showers and discuss their parent body sources.

  1. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  2. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times during Geminids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lukianova, Renata; Shalimov, Sergey; Lester, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Meteor radar observations at the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (67° 22'N, 26° 38'E, Finland) indicate that the mesospheric temperature derived from meteor decay times is systematically underestimated by 20-50 K during the Geminids meteor shower which has peak on 13 December. A very good coincidence of the minimum of routinely calculated temperature and maximum of meteor flux (the number of meteors detected per day) was observed regularly on that day in December 2008-2014. These observations are for a specific height-lifetime distribution of the Geminids meteor trails and indicate a larger percentage of overdense trails compared to that for sporadic meteors. A consequence of this is that the routine estimates of mesospheric temperature during the Geminids are in fact underestimates. The observations do, however, indicate unusual properties (e.g., mass, speed, or chemical composition) of the Geminids meteoroids. Similar properties were found also for Quadrantids in January 2009-2015, which like the Geminids has as a parent body an asteroid, but not for other meteor showers.

  3. Meteor Beliefs Project: an introduction to the meteor-dragon special

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.

    2003-12-01

    By way of introduction to three Meteor Beliefs Project articles on the connection between dragons and meteors in East European folk-belief in this issue of WGN, some notes are given on the possible origins of this largely western Euroasian belief, together with some short comments leading in to the three articles.

  4. Seismic detections of the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor from the dense ChinArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Wang, Baoshan; Peng, Zhigang; Wang, Weitao

    2016-07-01

    ChinArray is a dense portable broadband seismic network to cover the entire continental China, and the Phase I is deployed along the north-south seismic belt in southwest China. In this study, we analyze seismic data recorded on the ChinArray following the February 15, 2013 Chelyabinsk (Russia) meteor. This was the largest known object entering the Earth's atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska meteor. The seismic energy radiated from this event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide including the dense ChinArray that are more than 4000 km away. The weak signal from the meteor event was contaminated by a magnitude 5.8 Tonga earthquake occurred ~20 min earlier. To test the feasibility of detecting the weak seismic signals from the meteor event, we compute vespagram and perform F-K analysis to the surface-wave data. We identify a seismic phase with back azimuth (BAZ) of 329.7° and slowness of 34.73 s/deg, corresponding to the surface wave from the Russian meteor event (BAZ ~325.97°). The surface magnitude (M S) of the meteor event is 3.94 ± 0.18. We also perform similar analysis on the data from the broadband array F-net in Japan, and find the BAZ of the surface waves to be 316.61°. With the different BAZs of ChinArray and F-net, we locate the Russian meteor event at 58.80°N, 58.72°E. The relatively large mislocation (~438 km as compared with 55.15°N, 61.41°E by others) may be a result of the bending propagation path of surface waves, which deviates from the great circle path. Our results suggest that the dense ChinArray and its subarrays could be used to detect weak signals at teleseismic distances.

  5. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  6. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport. PMID:26617343

  7. Observed deep energetic eddies by seamount wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gengxin; Wang, Dongxiao; Dong, Changming; Zu, Tingting; Xue, Huijie; Shu, Yeqiang; Chu, Xiaoqing; Qi, Yiquan; Chen, Hui

    2015-11-01

    Despite numerous surface eddies are observed in the ocean, deep eddies (a type of eddies which have no footprints at the sea surface) are much less reported in the literature due to the scarcity of their observation. In this letter, from recently collected current and temperature data by mooring arrays, a deep energetic and baroclinic eddy is detected in the northwestern South China Sea (SCS) with its intensity, size, polarity and structure being characterized. It remarkably deepens isotherm at deep layers by the amplitude of ~120 m and induces a maximal velocity amplitude about 0.18 m/s, which is far larger than the median velocity (0.02 m/s). The deep eddy is generated in a wake when a steering flow in the upper layer passes a seamount, induced by a surface cyclonic eddy. More observations suggest that the deep eddy should not be an episode in the area. Deep eddies significantly increase the velocity intensity and enhance the mixing in the deep ocean, also have potential implication for deep-sea sediments transport.

  8. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts: results from a global science program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocks, K.; Clark, M.; Rowden, A.; Consalvey, M.

    2010-12-01

    CenSeam (a Global Census of Marine Life on Seamounts) is a network of more than 500 scientists, policy makers and conservationists around the world. These participants are collaborating to increase our understanding of the factors driving seamount community composition and diversity, such that we can better understand and manage the effects of human activities. The major scientific outcomes of the CenSeam community include the findings that 1) Seamount community composition is often similar to surrounding habitats; however, community structure can be different. 2) Contrary to conventional wisdom, few seamounts follow island biogeography predictions. 3) Seamounts can support a higher benthic biomass than surrounding habitats. 4) Seamounts can support species and communities new to science, and represent range extensions for known species, which are being described from CenSeam voyages. 5) For the first time, the extent of the vulnerability and risk to seamount benthic communities from fishing has been quantified. 6) Whilst long assumed, CenSeam researchers have demonstrated that seamount communities are disturbed by fishing and are slow to recover. And 7) Seamounts might act as repositories of biodiversity during future periods of extreme environmental change, as they have likely done in the past. The major products of Censeam include 1) a book synthesizing seamount knowledge: Seamounts: Ecology, Fisheries and Conservation (from Blackwell Publishing); 2) a recent review of the structure and function of seamount benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation (Ann Rev Mar Sci); 3) hundreds of scientific publications, including Special Issues in Marine Ecology and Oceanography (in collaboration with the Seamount Biogeogsciences Network), and a Special Collection in PLoSONE; 4) guidance documents and formal advising for seamount management communities, including the United Nations Environment Program, International Seabed Authority

  9. Time-Dependent Flexural Deformation Beneath the Emperor Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, P.; Watts, A. B.; Kim, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor seamount chain stretches over 6000 km from the Big Island of Hawaii to the subduction cusp off Kamchatka and represents a near-continuous record of hotspot volcanism since the Late Cretaceous. The load of these seamounts and islands has caused the underlying lithosphere to deform, developing a flexural flanking moat that is now largely filled with volcanoclastic sediments. Because the age differences between the seafloor and the seamounts vary by an order of magnitude or more along the chain, the Hawaii-Emperor chain and surrounding area is considered a natural laboratory for lithospheric flexure and has been studied extensively in order to infer the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere. While most investigations have focused on the Hawaiian Islands and proximal seamounts (where data sets are more complete, including seismic reflection and refraction, swath bathymetry and even mapping and dating of drowned reef terraces), far fewer studies have examined the flexural deformation beneath the remote Emperor chain. Preliminary analysis of satellite altimetry data shows the flexural moats to be associated with very large negative gravity anomalies relative to the magnitudes of the positive anomalies over the loads, suggesting considerable viscous or viscoelastic relaxation since the loads were emplaced 50-80 Myr ago. In our study, we will attempt to model the Emperor seamount chain load as a superposition of individual elliptical Gaussian seamounts with separate loading histories. We use Optimal Robust Separation (ORS) techniques to extract the seamount load from the regional background bathymetry and partition the residual load into a set of individual volcanoes. The crustal age grid and available seamount dates are used to construct a temporal loading model and evaluate the flexural response of the lithosphere beneath the Emperor seamounts. We explore a variety of rheological models and loading scenarios that are compatible with the inferred load

  10. CAMS confirmation of previously reported meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Holman, D.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    Leading up to the 2015 IAU General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union's Working List of Meteor Showers included 486 unconfirmed showers, showers that are not certain to exist. If confirmed, each shower would provide a record of past comet or asteroid activity. Now, we report that 41 of these are detected in the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteor shower survey. They manifest as meteoroids arriving at Earth from a similar direction and orbit, after removing the daily radiant drift due to Earth's motion around the Sun. These showers do exist and, therefore, can be moved to the IAU List of Established Meteor Showers. This adds to 31 previously confirmed showers from CAMS data. For each shower, finding charts are presented based on 230,000 meteors observed up to March of 2015, calculated by re-projecting the drift-corrected Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates into more familiar equatorial coordinates. Showers that are not detected, but should have, and duplicate showers that project to the same Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates, are recommended for removal from the Working List.

  11. Asteroid 1620 Geographos: II. Associated Meteor Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, G. O.

    2002-05-01

    This study attempts to answer the following questions. Are there meteor streams genetically related to asteroid 1620 Geographos? When and how were they generated? Can we find any of them in the catalogs of orbits of meteors that have been observed? Numerous model streams, varying in particle-ejection scheme and in the moment of generation, have been considered. It has been found that the meteor streams observed from the Earth were most likely produced as a result of a collision with a small body. However, the generation of the meteor stream under the combined effect of rotation and tidal forces during the asteroid's close approach to the Earth cannot also be ruled out. Meteoroid streams formed at high ejection velocities (up to 1 km/s) can approach the Earth's orbit twice per orbital period: once before perihelion (in February-March) and once after perihelion (in August). The 44 orbits close to the model ones were found in the catalogs of meteoroid orbits. A taxonomic structure has been built for them. The distribution of ejection velocities for the models of Earth-approaching meteoroids points to the impact of an overtaking body, but the moment of collision remains unknown. Thus, it is quite possible that asteroid Geographos is the parent body for twin meteor showers observed at the Earth: Spring and Autumn Geographids.

  12. BRAMS: The Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamy, H.; Ranvier, S.; De Keyser, J.; Calders, S.; Gamby, E.; Verbeeck, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the last months, the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy has been developing a Belgian network for observing radio meteors using forward scattering technique. This network is called BRAMS for Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations. Two beacons emitting a circularly polarized pure sine wave toward the zenith act as the transmitters at frequencies of 49.97 and 49.99 MHz. The first one located in Dourbes (Southern Belgium) emits a constant power of 150 Watts while the one located in Ieper (Western Belgium) emits a constant power of 50 Watts. The receiving network consists of about 20 stations hosted mainly by radio amateurs. Two stations have crossed-Yagi antennas measuring horizontal and vertical polarizations of the waves reflected off meteor trails. This will enable a detailed analysis of the meteor power profiles from which physical parameters of the meteoroids can be obtained. An interferometer consisting of 5 Yagi-antennas will be installed at the site of Humain in order to determine the angular detection of one reflection point, allowing us to determine meteoroid trajectories. We describe this new meteor observing facility and present the goals we expect to achieve with the network.

  13. Residency and Spatial Use by Reef Sharks of an Isolated Seamount and Its Implications for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Adam; Abrantes, Kátya G.; Seymour, Jamie; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although marine protected areas (MPAs) are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia) are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (∼14 km away) and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ∼250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef. PMID:22615782

  14. Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Adam; Abrantes, Kátya G; Seymour, Jamie; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although marine protected areas (MPAs) are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia) are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (~14 km away) and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ~250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef. PMID:22615782

  15. Seamount physiography and biology in North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morato, T.; Kvile, K. Ø.; Taranto, G. H.; Tempera, F.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Hebbeln, D.; Menezes, G.; Wienberg, C.; Santos, R. S.; Pitcher, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in-situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (North-East Atlantic) and in Mediterranean Sea is large with around 1061 and 202 seamount-like features, respectively. Similarly, seamounts occupy large areas of about 1 116 000 km2 in the OSPAR region and of about 184 000 km2 in the Mediterranean Sea, which is much larger than previously thought. The presence of seamounts in the North-East Atlantic has been known since the late 19th Century but overall knowledge regarding seamount ecology and geology is still relatively poor. Only 37 seamounts in the OSPAR area (3.5% of all seamounts in the region), 22 in the Mediterranean Sea (9.2% of all seamounts in the region) and 25 in the North-East Atlantic south of the OSPAR have in-situ information. Seamounts mapped in both areas are in general very heterogeneous, showing diverse geophysical characteristics. These differences will likely affect the biological diversity and production of resident and associated organisms.

  16. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6) "Watering"; (7) "Soil Erosion by Water"; (8) "Soil…

  17. Optical Meteor Systems Used by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A. M.; Blaauw, R. C.; Cooke, W. J.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) uses two main meteor camera networks to characterize the meteoroid environment: an all sky system and a wide field system to study cm and mm size meteors respectively. The NASA All Sky Fireball Network consists of fifteen meteor video cameras in the United States, with plans to expand to eighteen cameras by the end of 2015. The camera design and All-Sky Guided and Real-time Detection (ASGARD) meteor detection software [1, 2] were adopted from the University of Western Ontario's Southern Ontario Meteor Network (SOMN). After seven years of operation, the network has detected over 12,000 multi-station meteors, including meteors from at least 53 different meteor showers. The network is used for speed distribution determination, characterization of meteor showers and sporadic sources, and for informing the public on bright meteor events. The NASA Wide Field Meteor Network was established in December of 2012 with two cameras and expanded to eight cameras in December of 2014. The two camera configuration saw 5470 meteors over two years of operation with two cameras, and has detected 3423 meteors in the first five months of operation (Dec 12, 2014 - May 12, 2015) with eight cameras. We expect to see over 10,000 meteors per year with the expanded system. The cameras have a 20 degree field of view and an approximate limiting meteor magnitude of +5. The network's primary goal is determining the nightly shower and sporadic meteor fluxes. Both camera networks function almost fully autonomously with little human interaction required for upkeep and analysis. The cameras send their data to a central server for storage and automatic analysis. Every morning the servers automatically generates an e-mail and web page containing an analysis of the previous night's events. The current status of the networks will be described, alongside with preliminary results. In addition, future projects, CCD photometry and broadband meteor color camera

  18. Internal tidal currents over the summit of cross seamount

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.; Mullineaux, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 46 days of record from a current meter deployed above the summit of Cross Seamount (approximately 300 km west of the Hawaiian Islands) indicates that the strongest current fluctuations were driven by the semidiurnal tide. The tides accounted for 28% of the variance in the current spectrum, were mainly baroclinic in character, and were propagated towards the west-northwest. The amplitude of the S2 current flowing parallel to the major axis of the current ellipse ranged between 4 and 9 cm-1 s. The S2 current was 1.5 times larger than the M2 current. This ratio is 4 times larger than is expected for this region of the Pacific and is not a general characteristics of flows over seamounts. Instantaneous current speeds over the seamount often exceeded 20 cm s-1 and were probably responsible for the small ripples observed on the sediment-covered regions of the summit. ?? 1990.

  19. Geophysical exploration of the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy): Seamounts batimetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passaro, Salvatore; Milano, Girolamo

    2010-05-01

    The Tyrrhenian Sea is a young extensional basin in the Central Mediterranean that formed within a complex convergent boundary between Africa and Eurasian Plates. Its opening, associated to the west dipping subduction of the Ionian lithosphere, started about 11 My ago and was marked first by an EW and successively by an ESE directed extension. This last mainly affected the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea and led to the formation of the Marsili ocean-like basin. This large-scale extension produced the onset of volcanism throughout the Tyrrhenian Sea and the formation of several seamounts. High values of heat flow (>150 mW m-2) and the thin crust (7 km on average) and lithosphere (30 km on average) testify the young age of formation of oceanic crust in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea. On November 2007, a multidisciplinary oceanographic survey was carried out in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea by a group of researchers of the IAMC-CNR (Naples), Osservatorio Vesuviano (INGV, Naples), NOAA (Seattle) and GNS (New Zealand) on board of the R/V Urania. The main aim of the survey was the identification and the exploration of potential active volcanic and/or hydrothermal vents on the seamounts located in the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea. Twelve Tyrrhenian seamounts have been explored with a modified CTD system, in order to acquire "tow-yo" profiles in dynamic mode (real time monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of seawater along vertical/horizontal profiles). In addiction, Multibeam swath bathymetry was carried out over fifteen seamounts. The strategy for the achieving of the aim consisted in two phases: i) row multibeam acquisition of the sea floor morphology to verify, confirm or review all available data, ii) tow-yo activity and seawater sampling. Here, we show the main results of bathymetric data acquisition carried out over fifteen seamounts with the use of the Reson Seabat 8160 multibeam sonar system mounted on keel of the R/V Urania. The most interesting morphostructural

  20. SOFIE observations of PMCs and meteoric smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervig, M. E.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, J.; Bailey, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) has operated onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite since May 2007. SOFIE uses solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of limb path atmospheric transmission within 16 spectral bands between 0.29 and 5.32 microns wavelength. SOFIE measurements are used to retrieve PMC extinction at ultraviolet (UV) through infrared (IR) wavelengths, meteoric smoke extinction at UV - near-IR wavelengths, temperature, and the abundance of five gaseous species (O3, H2O, CO2, CH4, and NO). Recent developments in understanding PMCs and meteoric smoke have been possible using SOFIE observations at 330 nm wavelength. These measurements provide information concerning PMC particle size, and also have provided observational evidence for the composition of meteoric smoke.

  1. SOFIE observations of PMCs and meteoric smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervig, Mark; Gordley, Larry; Russell, J. M., III; Bailey, Scott

    The Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment (SOFIE) has operated onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite from May 2007 to present. SOFIE uses the technique of satel-lite solar occultation to measure vertical profiles of limb path atmospheric transmission within 16 spectral bands between 0.29 and 5.32 microns wavelength. SOFIE measurements are used to retrieve vertical profiles of polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) extinction at eleven wavelengths, temperature, meteoric smoke extinction, and the abundance of five gaseous species (O3, H2O, CO2, CH4, and NO). Recent developments in understanding PMCs and meteoric smoke have been possible using SOFIE observations at 0.330 microns wavelength. These measurements provide information concerning PMC particle size, and also have provided a new assessment of meteoric smoke in the northern hemisphere.

  2. SPA Meteor Section Results: Radio Draconids 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2012-08-01

    Information determined from an analysis by the SPA Meteor Section of radio meteor data collected during the 2011 Draconid epoch is presented and discussed. A strong single maximum for the shower was found on October 8, with a mean time of 20 h05 m ± 5 m UT, and that activity was above half the maximum flux level between ˜ 19 h20 m to 20 h45 m UT. A comparison is given too with the IMO's preliminary visual and video findings, which suggested a quite close correlation between all three observing techniques in what was detected. A possibility that more somewhat larger particles/brighter meteors may have been present between ˜ 19 h40 m to 20 h20 m UT is noted too.

  3. Atmosphere dynamics in the equatorial meteor zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascheev, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the atmospheric circulation of the Earth from its surface to the altitudes of 100 to 110 km is essential for establishing atmospheric motion regularities with a view toward perfecting weather forecasting. The main results of the Soviet equatorial meteor expedition (SEME) are presented. A continuous cycle of measurements was carried out. Considerable interdiurnal variation of the zonal component was observed. Importantly, in the meridional component, the prevalence of a two day component was established in the equatorial meteor zone for the first time. The pronounced westward motion of the atmosphere over the equator is noted. The SEME data analysis has shown that the meteor zone is characterized by flashes of intensity of the internal gravity waves and turbulence at highest instability moments of atmosphere due to tidal motion.

  4. ROAN Remote radio meteor detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesanu, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Only few meteor enthusiasts across the world today, approaches systematically the radio meteor detection technique, one of the reasons being the difficulty to build and install proper permanent antennas, especially when low-VHF frequency opportunity transmitters are used as illuminators. Other reasons were in the past the relatively high cost of the entire system, receivers and computers, and not ultimately the high power consumption of the system in a 24/7 operation, when using regular personal computers. The situation changed in the recent years with the advent of the low cost software defined radio SDR receivers and low consumption/cost single board computers SBC. A commercial off-the-shelf hardware based remote radio meteor detection sensor is presented.

  5. Observation of meteors by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William; Kingsley, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The observation of meteor trails by a vertical mesosphere - stratosphere - troposphere (MST) radar beam has the advantage of good height resolution and an approximate knowledge of the zenith angle since the trails are horizontal or near-horizontal. An extension of the ablation theory of meteors was developed for near horizontal trails which takes into account the curvature of the earth. Observations of the Geminid meteor shower by MST radar reveal the 'diffusion heights' to be in fair agreement with the true height, but with some discrepancies that can amount to 4 km. The true heights are almost entirely confined to the range 87-91 km, although the upper limit is attributed to the coherent integration time of the existing MST radar processing.

  6. Non-specular meteor trail diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrud, L.; Oppenheim, M.; Close, S.; Ray, L.; McMillion, K.

    2003-12-01

    Plasma simulations demonstrate that meteor trails are unstable to growth of gradient-drift Farley-Buneman (GDFB) waves that become turbulent and generate large B-field aligned irregularities (FAI). These simulations and our analysis indicate that the non-specular echos, that can extend between 5-10 km in altitude range, are reflections from plasma instability generated FAI. We present models showing that the specific altitude range of trail instability depends on meteor and atmospheric properties. This variability will allow researchers to infer neutral temperature, neutral wind velocity, and meteoric velocity and composition in completely new ways. We demonstrate some of these non-specular trail diagnostic techniques using radar observations from the ALTAIR and Piura radar facilities. Finally, we present examples of a low altitude variety of non-specular echos that may be related to PMSE.

  7. Various meteor scenes I: the perception and the conception of a 'meteor shower'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    Not all 'established showers' are recognisable by every method. Some might be lost ('dead') or have recurrent (periodic) nature and are not observable annually. Some are dominated by faint meteors and not observable visually but by radar systems. Other showers are rich in fireballs and their low meteor rates make them a good target for video and photographic observations, while visual observers may not notice their activity because of the low rates. The perception limit in magnitude differs between the observing methods on the one hand, but depends on the magnitude ratios of shower meteors on the other hand. Differences in the definition of a 'meteor shower'/'meteoroid stream' work important roles composing the shower list and we need to know how much various researchers' definitions differ. Depending whether we use observational raw data of the visible meteor shower or orbital elements of the meteoroid stream this may lead to either an obvious meteor showers or an undetectable stream. This paper (paper I) describes the reasons why we can see a meteor shower and why not, Paper II proves the condition by the example of Cygnid-Draconid complex, especially for the κ-Cygnids, and Paper III looks at the different views of several minor showers from the different kind observations.

  8. All-sky Meteor Orbit System AMOS and preliminary analysis of three unusual meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Juraj; Kornoš, Leonard; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Kalmančok, Dušan; Világi, Jozef; Šimon, Jaroslav; Vereš, Peter; Šilha, Jiří; Buček, Marek; Galád, Adrián; Rusňák, Patrik; Hrábek, Peter; Ďuriš, František; Rudawska, Regina

    2015-12-01

    All-sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) is a semi-autonomous video observatory for detection of transient events on the sky, mostly the meteors. Its hardware and software development and permanent placement on several locations in Slovakia allowed the establishment of Slovak Video Meteor Network (SVMN) monitoring meteor activity above the Central Europe. The data reduction, orbital determination and additional results from AMOS cameras - the SVMN database - as well as from observational expeditions on Canary Islands and in Canada provided dynamical and physical data for better understanding of mutual connections between parent bodies of asteroids and comets and their meteoroid streams. We present preliminary results on exceptional and rare meteor streams such as September ɛ Perseids (SPE) originated from unknown long periodic comet on a retrograde orbit, suspected asteroidal meteor stream of April α Comae Berenicids (ACO) in the orbit of meteorites Příbram and Neuschwanstein and newly observed meteor stream Camelopardalids (CAM) originated from Jupiter family comet 209P/Linear.

  9. Knut Lundmark, meteors and an early Swedish crowdsourcing experiment.

    PubMed

    Kärnfelt, Johan

    2014-10-01

    Mid twentieth century meteor astronomy demanded the long-term compilation of observations made by numerous individuals over an extensive geographical area. Such a massive undertaking obviously required the participation of more than just professional astronomers, who often sought to expand their ranks through the use of amateurs that had a basic grasp of astronomy as well as the night sky, and were thus capable of generating first-rate astronomical reports. When, in the 1920s, renowned Swedish astronomer Knut Lundmark turned his attention to meteor astronomy, he was unable to rely even upon this solution. In contrast to many other countries at the time, Sweden lacked an organized amateur astronomy and thus contained only a handful of competent amateurs. Given this situation, Lundmark had to develop ways of engaging the general public in assisting his efforts. To his advantage, he was already a well-established public figure who had published numerous popular science articles and held talks from time to time on the radio. During the 1930s, this prominence greatly facilitated his launching of a crowdsourcing initiative for the gathering of meteor observations. This paper consists of a detailed discussion concerning the means by which Lundmark's initiative disseminated astronomical knowledge to the general public and encouraged a response that might directly contribute to the advancement of science. More precisely, the article explores the manner in which he approached the Swedish public, the degree to which that public responded and the extent to which his efforts were successful. The primary aim of this exercise is to show that the apparently recent Internet phenomenon of 'crowdsourcing', especially as it relates to scientific research, actually has a pre-Internet history that is worth studying. Apart from the fact that this history is interesting in its own right, knowing it can provide us with a fresh vantage point from which to better comprehend and appreciate

  10. Knut Lundmark, meteors and an early Swedish crowdsourcing experiment.

    PubMed

    Kärnfelt, Johan

    2014-10-01

    Mid twentieth century meteor astronomy demanded the long-term compilation of observations made by numerous individuals over an extensive geographical area. Such a massive undertaking obviously required the participation of more than just professional astronomers, who often sought to expand their ranks through the use of amateurs that had a basic grasp of astronomy as well as the night sky, and were thus capable of generating first-rate astronomical reports. When, in the 1920s, renowned Swedish astronomer Knut Lundmark turned his attention to meteor astronomy, he was unable to rely even upon this solution. In contrast to many other countries at the time, Sweden lacked an organized amateur astronomy and thus contained only a handful of competent amateurs. Given this situation, Lundmark had to develop ways of engaging the general public in assisting his efforts. To his advantage, he was already a well-established public figure who had published numerous popular science articles and held talks from time to time on the radio. During the 1930s, this prominence greatly facilitated his launching of a crowdsourcing initiative for the gathering of meteor observations. This paper consists of a detailed discussion concerning the means by which Lundmark's initiative disseminated astronomical knowledge to the general public and encouraged a response that might directly contribute to the advancement of science. More precisely, the article explores the manner in which he approached the Swedish public, the degree to which that public responded and the extent to which his efforts were successful. The primary aim of this exercise is to show that the apparently recent Internet phenomenon of 'crowdsourcing', especially as it relates to scientific research, actually has a pre-Internet history that is worth studying. Apart from the fact that this history is interesting in its own right, knowing it can provide us with a fresh vantage point from which to better comprehend and appreciate

  11. Caldera Formation on the Vance Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D.; Paduan, J.; Cousens, B.; Cornejo, L.; Perfit, M.; Wendt, R.; Stix, J.; Helo, C.

    2006-12-01

    The Vance Seamounts are a chain of near-ridge volcanoes located just west of the southern Juan de Fuca Ridge. The six volcanoes are built on ocean crust ranging from 0.78 Ma at the southeastern end to 2.55 Ma in the northwest. Morphologic analysis indicates that the volcanoes were constructed sequentially and get younger to the southeast towards the ridge axis. Like many near-ridge volcanoes, some of the Vance Seamounts have large offset calderas that presumably formed above evacuated shallow magma chambers within the upper ocean crust. In summer 2006, we completed 6 dives using MBARI's ROV Tiburon to study the formation of these calderas. The floor of each caldera consists of flat-lying volcaniclastite, under about 25 cm of pelagic sediment. Some caldera floors have mounds of post-caldera pillow flows. The caldera walls have a lower section covered by talus and an upper section of interbedded massive flows with columnar joints (to 11 m thick) and pillow basalts. The top of each caldera wall has a unit of volcanic mudstone to sandstone ranging from 20 cm to 2 m thick. The fine matrix of many of these samples is green hydrothermal clay. The finest siltstone to mudstone samples appear to be layers of massive tan hydrothermal clays. Talus fragments, lava and volcaniclastite outcrops are universally coated and cemented by 1 to 4 cm-thick deposits of hydrothermal Mn-oxide crusts, even on the youngest of the volcanoes. Volcanic particles in the sandstones are mostly dense angular glass, but bubble-wall fragments (limu o Pele) are present and indicate formation during low-energy pyroclastic eruptions. Without the few percent limu o Pele fragments, the glass fragments would resemble those inferred to form by quench granulation. We suggest that quench granulation is actually pyroclastic fragmentation that occurs as coalesced magmatic gas bubbles disrupt the molten lava surface at the vents. Our observations confirm that the more southeasterly offset calderas truncated thick

  12. Meteor spectra from AMOS video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, Regina; Tóth, Juraj; Kalmančok, Dušan; Zigo, Pavol; Matlovič, Pavol

    2016-04-01

    Here we demonstrate the capability of the updated All-Sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) (called AMOS-Spec) to measure the main element abundances of meteors. The AMOS-Spec program has been created with the intention of carrying out regular systematic spectroscopic observations. At the same time, the meteoroid trajectory and pre-atmospheric orbit are independently measured from data collected by the AMOS camera network. This, together with spectral information, allows us to find the link between the meteoroid and its parent body, from both dynamical and physical consideration. Here we report results for 35 selected cases.

  13. The First Year of Croatian Meteor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreic, Zeljko; Segon, Damir

    2010-08-01

    The idea and a short history of Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) is described. Based on use of cheap surveillance cameras, standard PC-TV cards and old PCs, the Network allows schools, amateur societies and individuals to participate in photographic meteor patrol program. The network has a strong educational component and many cameras are located at or around teaching facilities. Data obtained by these cameras are collected and processed by the scientific team of the network. Currently 14 cameras are operable, covering a large part of the croatian sky, data gathering is fully functional, and data reduction software is in testing phase.

  14. CCTV lenses for video meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewski, M.; Olech, A.; Krasnowski, M.; Zloczewski, K.; Mularczyk, K.; Kedzierski, P.; Jonderko, W.

    2005-02-01

    We present the results of CCTV lens tests made last year at the Ostrowik Observatory by observers of the Comets and Meteors Workshop. A total of 13 lenses with different parameters were tested. The limiting magnitudes, size of field of view, distortion and off-axis aberrations were measured. The Computar f/1.2, f=4 mm appeared to be the best lens tested. We also note the good marks of both Ernitecs which were finally chosen as the lenses which will be used in our projects. Surprisingly, the very fast lenses which are popular in video meteor astronomy seem to be much worse that their f/1.2 rivals.

  15. Meteor spectra from AMOS video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdoš, Š.; Tóth, J.; Kornoš, L.

    2015-01-01

    We present a report on the observation of enhanced activity from the Ursids meteor shower using the all-sky camera, at the AGO Modra, on Dec. 22-23, 2014. The time of maximum is in good accordance with the predictions of some authors. We derived a single-station meteor radiant, RA = 217.9° ± 0.1°, DEC = +76.4° ± 0.1° at solar longitude S.L. = 270.9°, along with the activity profile of the Ursid outburst with the maximum occurring at Dec. 23th, 00h40m UT ± 30 min.

  16. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  17. The global distribution of seamounts based on 30 arc seconds bathymetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesson, Chris; Clark, Malcolm R.; Taylor, Michelle L.; Rogers, Alex D.

    2011-04-01

    Seamounts and knolls are 'undersea mountains', the former rising more than 1000 m from the seafloor. These features provide important habitats for aquatic predators, demersal deep-sea fish and benthic invertebrates. However most seamounts have not been surveyed and their numbers and locations are not well known. Previous efforts to locate and quantify seamounts have used relatively coarse bathymetry grids. Here we use global bathymetric data at 30 arc-sec resolution to identify seamounts and knolls. We identify 33,452 seamounts and 138,412 knolls, representing the largest global set of identified seamounts and knolls to date. We compare estimated seamount numbers, locations, and depths with validation sets of seamount data from New Zealand and Azores. This comparison indicates the method we apply finds 94% of seamounts, but may overestimate seamount numbers along ridges and in areas where faulting and seafloor spreading creates highly complex topography. The seamounts and knolls identified herein are significantly geographically biased towards areas surveyed with ship-based soundings. As only 6.5% of the ocean floor has been surveyed with soundings it is likely that new seamounts will be uncovered as surveying improves. Seamount habitats constitute approximately 4.7% of the ocean floor, whilst knolls cover 16.3%. Regional distribution of these features is examined, and we find a disproportionate number of productive knolls, with a summit depth of <1.5 km, located in the Southern Ocean. Less than 2% of seamounts are within marine protected areas and the majority of these are located within exclusive economic zones with few on the High Seas. The database of seamounts and knolls resulting from this study will be a useful resource for researchers and conservation planners.

  18. Exploring the relationship between meteor parameters based on photographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancheva, Y.; Hristova, S.; Bojurova, E.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an attempt to investigate the relationship between the luminosity and the linear length of the meteors, based on photographic observations of the Geminid meteor shower during the night of maximum in December 2015.

  19. Independent identification of meteor showers in EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, R.; Matlovič, P.; Tóth, J.; Kornoš, L.

    2015-12-01

    Cooperation and data sharing among national networks and International Meteor Organization Video Meteor Database (IMO VMDB) resulted in European viDeo MeteOr Network Database (EDMOND). The current version of the database (EDMOND 5.0) contains 144 749 orbits collected from 2001 to 2014. This paper presents the results obtained by a proposed new independent method of meteor showers identification, which is applied to the current version of the database (EDMOND 5.0). In the first step of the survey we used the DSH criterion to find groups around each meteor within the similarity threshold. Mean parameters of the groups were calculated and compared using a new function DX based on geocentric parameters (λ⊙, α, δ, and Vg). Similar groups were merged into final clusters (representing meteor showers), and compared with the IAU Meteor Data Center list of meteor showers.

  20. The Radio Meteor Zoo: a citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calders, S.; Verbeeck, C.; Lamy, H.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists from the BRAMS radio meteor network have started a citizen science project called Radio Meteor Zoo in collaboration with Zooniverse in order to identify meteor reflections in BRAMS spectrograms. First, a small-scale version of the Radio Meteor Zoo was carried out with a sample of meteor identifications in 12 spectrograms by 35 volunteers. Results are presented here and allowed us to define a method that reliably detects meteor reflections based on the identifications by the volunteers. It turns out that, if each spectrogram is inspected by 10 volunteers, hit and false detection percentages of 95% respectively 6% are expected. The Radio Meteor Zoo is online at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/radio-meteor-zoo. Citizen scientists are kindly invited to inspect spectrograms.

  1. Optical studies of meteors at Mount Hopkins Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, T. C.; Williams, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    The 10-m optical reflector and an array of phototubes are used to extend the optical measurements beyond the present limit achieved by the Vidicon system. The first detection of optical meteors with M sub v = + 12 is reported. It is hoped that this system can be used to determine intermediate points in the meteor frequency mass curve for sporadic meteors and to study in detail the faint components of meteor showers. Preliminary observations made on three nights in September 1974 are presented.

  2. The I.A.U. meteor shower nomenclature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The International Astronomical Union at its 2006 General Assembly in Prague has adopted a set of rules for meteor shower nomenclature, a working list with designated names (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), and established a Task Group for Meteor Shower Nomenclature in Commission 22 (Meteors and Interplanetary Dust) to help define which meteor showers exist from well defined groups of meteoroids from a single parent body.

  3. Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    The panoramic cameras on NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers are about as sensitive as the human eye at night. The cameras can see the same bright stars that we can see from Earth, and the same patterns of constellations dot the night sky. Scientists on the rover team have been taking images of some of these bright stars as part of several different projects. One project is designed to try to capture 'shooting stars,' or meteors, in the martian night sky. 'Meteoroids' are small pieces of comets and asteroids that travel through space and eventually run into a planet. On Earth, we can sometimes see meteoroids become brilliant, long 'meteors' streaking across the night sky as they burn up from the friction in our atmosphere. Some of these meteors survive their fiery flight and land on the surface (or in the ocean) where, if found, they are called 'meteorites.' The same thing happens in the martian atmosphere, and Spirit even accidentally discovered a meteor while attempting to obtain images of Earth in the pre-dawn sky back in March, 2004 (see http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a.html, and Selsis et al. (2005) Nature, vol 435, p. 581). On Earth, some meteors come in 'storms' or 'showers' at predictable times of the year, like the famous Perseid meteor shower in August or the Leonid meteor shower in November. These 'storms' happen when Earth passes through the same parts of space where comets sometimes pass. The meteors we see at these times are from leftover debris that was shed off of these comets.

    The same kind of thing is predicted for Mars, as well. Inspired by calculations about Martian meteor storms by meteor scientists from the University of Western Ontario in Canada and the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique de Lyon in France, and also aided by other meteor research colleagues from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, scientists on

  4. The activity of autumn meteor showers in 2006-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of meteor observations in INASAN is the study of meteor showers, as the elements of the migrant substance of the Solar System, and estimation of risk of hazardous collisions of spacecrafts with the particles of streams. Therefore we need to analyze the meteor events with brightness of up to 8 m, which stay in meteoroid streams for a long time and can be a hazardous for the spacecraft. The results of our single station TV observations of autumn meteor showers for the period from 2006 to 2008 are presented. The high-sensitive hybrid camera (the system with coupled of the Image Intensifier) FAVOR with limiting magnitude for meteors about 9m. . .10m in the field of view 20 × 18 was used for observations. In 2006-2008 from October to November more than 3 thousand of meteors were detected, 65% from them have the brightness from 6m to 9m. The identification with autumn meteor showers (Orionids, Taurids, Draconids, Leonids) was carried out. In order to estimate the density of the influx of meteor matter to the Earth for these meteor showers the Index of meteor activity (IMA) was calculated. The IMA distribution for the period 2006 - 2008 is given. The distributions of autumn meteor showers (the meteors with brightness of up to 8 m) by stellar magnitude from 2006 to 2008 are also presented.

  5. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  6. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  7. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  8. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  9. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  10. Easy way to estimate meteor brightness on TV frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional method of the meteor brightness measurements claims that the meteor brightness is equal to the stellar magnitude of a star that looks like a meteor in the brightest point of its track. This rule was convenient for the comparison of meteor observations by different observers and for the analysis of the brightness distributions of meteors from observed showers. This traditional method suffers from systematic errors, particularly those that arise from using stellar brightness measured in specific spectral wave bands different from the observer's ones, but mainly due to neglecting the influence of the meteor angular velocity on the real meteor brightness. To get a proper estimate of the meteor brightness that is a measure of the ground meteor illumination in the non-systematic units, an observer must take into account that the effective exposition of a meteor image in any resolution element of its track is a few times shorter than the corresponding exposition of a star image in the same frame. We propose a very simple method for improved estimations of meteor brightness by applying a correction to the meteor stellar magnitude obtained within the traditional framework.

  11. Results of the IMO Video Meteor Network - June 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molau, Sirko; Kac, Javor; Crivello, Stefano; Stomeo, Enrico; Barentsen, Geert; Goncalves, Rui; Saraiva, Carlos; Maciejewski, Maciej; Maslov, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Observations of the IMO Video Meteor Network are presented for 2015 June. Activity profile is presented for the Daytime Arietids, based on 28 shower meteors. The meteor rate of the Daytime Arietids between June 5 and 11, normalized for the limiting magnitude and angular velocity, is found to be about one quarter of that of the eta-Aquariids during their maximum.

  12. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  13. A parent body search across several video meteor data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Gural, P.; Andreić, Ž.; Skokić, I.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.; Novoselnik, F.

    2014-07-01

    A meteor stream search that uses all the known near-Earth objects (NEOs) as parent bodies, with their individual orbital elements as the starting point, has found statistically significant associations when applied to video meteor data bases. By using the combined CMN-SonotaCo data sets containing 133,652 video meteor orbits, 30 comets were associated with meteor showers of which only 23 were previously listed in the IAU MDC data base. Additionally, 43 asteroids with inclinations over 15 degrees may be associated to streams containing ten or more meteor orbits, each possibly representing a new meteor shower. Lastly, by using a modified search that compared the orbital similarity of each meteor to all other video meteors in the data base, 1093 groupings with more than ten meteors were found that may be indicative of several new minor showers. Of those groups, 6 new showers were found to be potentially associated to a parent body. Several dozen additional groups are planned for publication and submittal to the IAU for their consideration as newly discovered streams. Altogether 56,486 (42%) of the meteors in the combined video meteor data base are in one of the meteor stream groupings found, while the rest are likely sporadics. Further analysis is needed to prove that the groupings found are indeed minor showers.

  14. Results of the IMO Video Meteor Network - October 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molau, Sirko; Kac, Javor; Crivello, Stefano; Stomeo, Enrico; Barentsen, Geert; Goncalves, Rui; Saraiva, Carlos; Maciewski, Maciej; Maslov, Mikhail

    2015-02-01

    A record number of 86 cameras of the IMO Video Meteor Network collected over 11 000 hours worth of data in 2014 October, recording almost 52 000 meteors. Yearly flux density profiles are presented for the Orionids, Leonis Minorids, October Camelopardalids, and October Ursae Majorids, covering the period from 2011 to 2014. Population indexes are calculated for all four meteor showers.

  15. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  16. Subducting seamounts control interplate coupling and seismic rupture in the 2014 Iquique earthquake area

    PubMed Central

    Geersen, Jacob; Ranero, César R.; Barckhausen, Udo; Reichert, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To date, the parameters that determine the rupture area of great subduction zone earthquakes remain contentious. On 1 April 2014, the Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake ruptured a portion of the well-recognized northern Chile seismic gap but left large highly coupled areas un-ruptured. Marine seismic reflection and swath bathymetric data indicate that structural variations in the subducting Nazca Plate control regional-scale plate-coupling variations, and the limited extent of the 2014 earthquake. Several under-thrusting seamounts correlate to the southward and up-dip arrest of seismic rupture during the 2014 Iquique earthquake, thus supporting a causal link. By fracturing of the overriding plate, the subducting seamounts are likely further responsible for reduced plate-coupling in the shallow subduction zone and in a lowly coupled region around 20.5°S. Our data support that structural variations in the lower plate influence coupling and seismic rupture offshore Northern Chile, whereas the structure of the upper plate plays a minor role. PMID:26419949

  17. Subducting seamounts control interplate coupling and seismic rupture in the 2014 Iquique earthquake area.

    PubMed

    Geersen, Jacob; Ranero, César R; Barckhausen, Udo; Reichert, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To date, the parameters that determine the rupture area of great subduction zone earthquakes remain contentious. On 1 April 2014, the Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake ruptured a portion of the well-recognized northern Chile seismic gap but left large highly coupled areas un-ruptured. Marine seismic reflection and swath bathymetric data indicate that structural variations in the subducting Nazca Plate control regional-scale plate-coupling variations, and the limited extent of the 2014 earthquake. Several under-thrusting seamounts correlate to the southward and up-dip arrest of seismic rupture during the 2014 Iquique earthquake, thus supporting a causal link. By fracturing of the overriding plate, the subducting seamounts are likely further responsible for reduced plate-coupling in the shallow subduction zone and in a lowly coupled region around 20.5°S. Our data support that structural variations in the lower plate influence coupling and seismic rupture offshore Northern Chile, whereas the structure of the upper plate plays a minor role. PMID:26419949

  18. Subducting seamounts control interplate coupling and seismic rupture in the 2014 Iquique earthquake area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geersen, Jacob; Ranero, César R.; Barckhausen, Udo; Reichert, Christian

    2015-09-01

    To date, the parameters that determine the rupture area of great subduction zone earthquakes remain contentious. On 1 April 2014, the Mw 8.1 Iquique earthquake ruptured a portion of the well-recognized northern Chile seismic gap but left large highly coupled areas un-ruptured. Marine seismic reflection and swath bathymetric data indicate that structural variations in the subducting Nazca Plate control regional-scale plate-coupling variations, and the limited extent of the 2014 earthquake. Several under-thrusting seamounts correlate to the southward and up-dip arrest of seismic rupture during the 2014 Iquique earthquake, thus supporting a causal link. By fracturing of the overriding plate, the subducting seamounts are likely further responsible for reduced plate-coupling in the shallow subduction zone and in a lowly coupled region around 20.5°S. Our data support that structural variations in the lower plate influence coupling and seismic rupture offshore Northern Chile, whereas the structure of the upper plate plays a minor role.

  19. Deep subsurface microbiology of 64-71 million year old inactive seamounts along the Louisville Seamount Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvan, J. B.; Morono, Y.; Grim, S.; Inagaki, F.; Edwards, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the objectives of IODP Expedition 330, Louisville Seamount Trail, was to sample and learn about the subsurface biosphere in the Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC). Seamounts are volcanic constructs that are ubiquitous along the seafloor - models suggest there are >100,000 seamounts of >1 km in height globally (Wessel et al., 2010). Therefore, knowledge about microbiology in the LSC subsurface can broadly be interpreted as representative of much the seafloor. In addition, despite the fact that the vast majority of the sea floor is comprised of crust >10 Ma, the majority of work to date has focused on young sites with active hydrology. Our presentation summarizes work focusing on subsurface microbiology from two different LSC seamounts: holes U1374A (65-71 Ma) and U1376A (64 Ma). We here present data for microbial biomass in the LSC subsurface using a method we developed to quantify microbial biomass in subseafloor ocean crust. We also present results from pyrotag analysis of 15 samples from holes U1374A and holes U1376A, representing several different lithologies from 40-491 meters below seafloor (mbsf) in hole U1374A and from 29-174 mbsf in hole U1376A. Finally, we present preliminary analysis of metagenomic sequencing from three of the samples from Hole U1376A. Biomass was low in the subsurface of both seamounts, ranging from below detection to ~104 cells cm-3. Bacteria comprised >99% of the prokaryotic community in LSC subsurface samples, therefore, bacterial diversity was assessed through 454 pyrosequencing of the V4V6 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Rarefaction analysis indicates that bacterial communities from the LSC subsurface are low diversity, on the order of a few hundred operational taxonomic units per sample. The phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and the classes α-, β- and γ-Proteobacteria are most abundant in the LSC subsurface. Within these, the orders Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Bacillales and Burkholderiales are the most

  20. Endemicity, biogeograhy, composition, and community structure on a northeast pacific seamount.

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig R; Lundsten, Lonny; Ream, Micki; Barry, James; DeVogelaere, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The deep ocean greater than 1 km covers the majority of the earth's surface. Interspersed on the abyssal plains and continental slope are an estimated 14000 seamounts, topographic features extending 1000 m off the seafloor. A variety of hypotheses are posited that suggest the ecological, evolutionary, and oceanographic processes on seamounts differ from those governing the surrounding deep sea. The most prominent and oldest of these hypotheses, the seamount endemicity hypothesis (SMEH), states that seamounts possess a set of isolating mechanisms that produce highly endemic faunas. Here, we constructed a faunal inventory for Davidson Seamount, the first bathymetric feature to be characterized as a 'seamount', residing 120 km off the central California coast in approximately 3600 m of water (Fig 1). We find little support for the SMEH among megafauna of a Northeast Pacific seamount; instead, finding an assemblage of species that also occurs on adjacent continental margins. A large percentage of these species are also cosmopolitan with ranges extending over much of the Pacific Ocean Basin. Despite the similarity in composition between the seamount and non-seamount communities, we provide preliminary evidence that seamount communities may be structured differently and potentially serve as source of larvae for suboptimal, non-seamount habitats. PMID:19127302

  1. Diversity and endemism of the benthic seamount fauna in the southwest Pacific.

    PubMed

    de Forges, B R; Koslow, J A; Poore, G C

    2000-06-22

    Seamounts comprise a unique deep-sea environment, characterized by substantially enhanced currents and a fauna that is dominated by suspension feeders, such as corals. The potential importance of these steep-sided undersea mountains, which are generally of volcanic origin, to ocean biogeography and diversity was recognized over 40 years ago, but this environment has remained very poorly explored. A review of seamount biota and biogeography reported a total of 597 invertebrate species recorded from seamounts worldwide since the Challenger expedition of 1872. Most reports, based on a single taxonomic group, were extremely limited: 5 seamounts of the estimated more than 30,000 seamounts in the world's oceans accounted for 72% of the species recorded. Only 15% of the species occurring on seamounts were considered potential seamount endemics. Here we report the discovery of more than 850 macro- and megafaunal species from seamounts in the Tasman Sea and southeast Coral Sea, of which 29-34% are new to science and potential seamount endemics. Low species overlap between seamounts in different portions of the region indicates that the seamounts in clusters or along ridge systems function as 'island groups' or 'chains' leading to highly localized species distributions and apparent speciation between groups or ridge systems that is exceptional for the deep sea. These results have substantial implications for the conservation of this fauna, which is threatened by fishing activity. PMID:10879534

  2. Weak interplate coupling by seamounts and repeating M approximately 7 earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Shinohara, Masanao; Yamanaka, Yoshiko; Kanazawa, Toshihiko

    2008-08-29

    Subducting seamounts are thought to increase the normal stress between subducting and overriding plates. However, recent seismic surveys and laboratory experiments suggest that interplate coupling is weak. A seismic survey in the Japan Trench shows that a large seamount is being subducted near a region of repeating earthquakes of magnitude M approximately 7. Both observed seismicity and the pattern of rupture propagation during the 1982 M 7.0 event imply that interplate coupling was weak over the seamount. A large rupture area with small slip occurred in front of the seamount. Its northern bound could be determined by a trace of multiple subducted seamounts. Whereas a subducted seamount itself may not define the rupture area, its width may be influenced by that of the seamount. PMID:18755973

  3. Meteor Shower Activity Derived from "Meteor Watching Public-Campaign" in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tried to analyze activities of meteor showers from accumulated data collected by public campaigns for meteor showers which were performed as outreach programs. The analyzed campaigns are Geminids (in 2007 and 2009), Perseids (in 2008 and 2009), Quadrantids (in 2009) and Orionids (in 2009). Thanks to the huge number of reports, the derived time variations of the activities of meteor showers is very similar to those obtained by skilled visual observers. The values of hourly rates are about one-fifth (Geminids 2007) or about one-fourth (Perseids 2008) compared with the data of skilled observers, mainly due to poor observational sites such as large cities and urban areas, together with the immature skill of participants in the campaign. It was shown to be highly possible to estimate time variation in the meteor shower activity from our campaign.

  4. Perseid meteor shower in 2012--2013 by TV meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, A.; Bolgova, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present results of TV observations that were obtained during the Perseid meteor shower activity (18 July -- 19 August) in 2012 and 2013. The observations were carried out in Moscow region using the TV system PatrolCa with FOV of 50°×40° and a limiting magnitude (for meteors) of 4^m--5^m [1]. The individual radiants of Perseid meteors and the radiant drift (for 2012--2013) are given. The Perseids orbits obtained by double-station observations are shown. The brightness distributions of the Perseids are also presented. The maximum activity occurs at 12 August with the Index of Meteor Activity (particles to the Earth per 1 hour [2,3]) of 7×10^4 in 2012 and 1×10^4 in 2013. An additional peak was detected in 10 August 2013. The distributions of IMA for 2012--2013 Perseids are presented.

  5. Automated Meteor Fluxes with a Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R. C.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Cooke, W.; Weryk, R. J.; Gill, J.; Musci, R.

    2013-01-01

    Within NASA, the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is charged to monitor the meteoroid environment in near ]earth space for the protection of satellites and spacecraft. The MEO has recently established a two ]station system to calculate automated meteor fluxes in the millimeter ]size ]range. The cameras each consist of a 17 mm focal length Schneider lens on a Watec 902H2 Ultimate CCD video camera, producing a 21.7 x 16.3 degree field of view. This configuration has a red ]sensitive limiting meteor magnitude of about +5. The stations are located in the South Eastern USA, 31.8 kilometers apart, and are aimed at a location 90 km above a point 50 km equidistant from each station, which optimizes the common volume. Both single station and double station fluxes are found, each having benefits; more meteors will be detected in a single camera than will be seen in both cameras, producing a better determined flux, but double station detections allow for non ]ambiguous shower associations and permit speed/orbit determinations. Video from the cameras are fed into Linux computers running the ASGARD (All Sky and Guided Automatic Real ]time Detection) software, created by Rob Weryk of the University of Western Ontario Meteor Physics Group. ASGARD performs the meteor detection/photometry, and invokes the MILIG and MORB codes to determine the trajectory, speed, and orbit of the meteor. A subroutine in ASGARD allows for the approximate shower identification in single station meteors. The ASGARD output is used in routines to calculate the flux in units of #/sq km/hour. The flux algorithm employed here differs from others currently in use in that it does not assume a single height for all meteors observed in the common camera volume. In the MEO system, the volume is broken up into a set of height intervals, with the collecting areas determined by the radiant of active shower or sporadic source. The flux per height interval is summed to obtain the total meteor flux. As ASGARD also

  6. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  7. Meteor Observation and the Light Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin

    2010-01-01

    This paper propose some concrete ways and procedures made by "no light pollution" militants (astronomers, ecologists, scientific, educational and cultural institutions) to combat this type of pollution. Meteor observations is the most important field of astronomy affected by the light pollution.

  8. Meteor spectroscopy during the 2015 Quadrantids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Bill

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic video observations during the Quadrantid meteor shower 2015 were made with Watec low light level video cameras fitted with 12 mm f/0.8 lenses carrying 50 mm square diffraction gratings. Four spectra with adequate signal to noise ratios were captured and the results analysed and discussed.

  9. BRAMS --- the Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, H.; Ranvier, S.; Martinez Picar, A.; Gamby, E.; Calders, S.; Anciaux, M.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-07-01

    BRAMS is a new radio observing facility developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BISA) to detect and characterize meteors using forward scattering. It consists of a dedicated beacon located in the south-east of Belgium and in 25 identical receiving stations spread over the Belgian territory. The beacon transmits a pure sinusoidal wave at a frequency of 49.97 MHz with a power of 150 watts. A complete description of the BRAMS network and the data produced will be provided. The main scientific goals of the project are to compute fluxes, retrieve trajectories of individual objects, and determine physical parameters (speed, ionization, mass) for some of the observed meteor echoes. All these goals require a good knowledge of the radiation patterns of the transmitting and receiving antennas. Simulations have been made and will be validated with in-situ measurements using a UAV/drone equipped with a transmitter flying in the far-field region. The results will be provided. Each receiving station generates around 1 GB of data per day with typical numbers of sporadic meteor echoes of 1500--2000. An automatic detection method of these meteor echoes is therefore mandatory but is complicated by spurious echoes mostly due to airplanes. The latest developments of this automatic detection method will be presented and compared to manual counts for validation. Strong and weak points of the method will be presented as well as a possible alternative method using neural networks.

  10. Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    The panoramic cameras on NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers are about as sensitive as the human eye at night. The cameras can see the same bright stars that we can see from Earth, and the same patterns of constellations dot the night sky. Scientists on the rover team have been taking images of some of these bright stars as part of several different projects. One project is designed to try to capture 'shooting stars,' or meteors, in the martian night sky. 'Meteoroids' are small pieces of comets and asteroids that travel through space and eventually run into a planet. On Earth, we can sometimes see meteoroids become brilliant, long 'meteors' streaking across the night sky as they burn up from the friction in our atmosphere. Some of these meteors survive their fiery flight and land on the surface (or in the ocean) where, if found, they are called 'meteorites.' The same thing happens in the martian atmosphere, and Spirit even accidentally discovered a meteor while attempting to obtain images of Earth in the pre-dawn sky back in March, 2004 (see http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a.html, and Selsis et al. (2005) Nature, vol 435, p. 581). On Earth, some meteors come in 'storms' or 'showers' at predictable times of the year, like the famous Perseid meteor shower in August or the Leonid meteor shower in November. These 'storms' happen when Earth passes through the same parts of space where comets sometimes pass. The meteors we see at these times are from leftover debris that was shed off of these comets.

    The same kind of thing is predicted for Mars, as well. Inspired by calculations about Martian meteor storms by meteor scientists from the University of Western Ontario in Canada and the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique de Lyon in France, and also aided by other meteor research colleagues from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, scientists on