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Sample records for green algae diatoms

  1. Impairment of benthic diatom adhesion and photosynthetic activity by allelopathic compounds from a green alga: involvement of free fatty acids?

    PubMed

    Allen, Joey L; Ten-Hage, Loďc; Leflaive, Joséphine

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical interactions in shaping microbial communities has raised increasing interest over the last decade. Many benthic microorganisms are known to develop chemical strategies to overcome competitors, but the real importance of chemical interactions within freshwater biofilm remains unknown. This study focused on the biological and chemical mechanisms of an interaction involving two benthic microorganisms, an allelopathic filamentous green alga, Uronema confervicolum, and a common diatom, Fistulifera saprophila. Our results showed that functions critical for benthic phototrophic microorganisms were inhibited by U. confervicolum extracts. Growth, cell motility, adhesion, and photosynthetic activity were impaired at extract concentrations ranging between 5 and 20 ?g ml(-1). The adhesion inhibition was mediated by intracellular nitric oxide (NO) induction. A bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract with HPLC helped to identify two C18 fatty acids present in the growth-inhibiting fractions: linoleic (LA) and ?-linolenic (LNA) acids. These compounds represented 77% of the total free fatty acids of U. confervicolum and were present in the culture medium (1.45 ?g l(-1) in total). Both could inhibit the diatom growth at concentrations higher than 0.25 ?g ml(-1), but had no effect on cell adhesion. The discrepancy between the effective concentrations of fatty acids and the concentration found in culture medium may be explained by the presence of high-concentration microenvironments. The compounds involved in adhesion inhibition remain to be identified. Though further experiments with complex biofilms are needed, our results suggest that U. confervicolum may participate to the control of biofilm composition by inhibiting diatom adhesion. PMID:25430012

  2. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePLUS

    ... increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL or “good”) cholesterol. Malnutrition. Early research on the use of blue-green algae in combination with other dietary treatments for malnutrition in infants and children has been mixed. Weight ...

  3. Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) during chlorination of two algae species--Blue-green Microcystis aeruginosa and diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaobin; Liu, Jinjin; Yang, Mingli; Ma, Hongfang; Yuan, Baoling; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-11-01

    Microcystis aeruginosa (blue-green alga) commonly blooms in summer and Cyclotella meneghiniana (diatom) outbreaks in fall in the reservoirs that serve as drinking water sources in Southeast China. Herein, an evaluation of disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP) from them during chlorination should be conducted. Five DBPs including trichloromethane (TCM), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN), 1,1-dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP) and 1,1,1-trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) were monitored. The formation potential of TCM and TCNM was enhanced with the increase of reaction time and chlorine dosage, whereas that of DCAN, 1,1-DCP and 1,1,1-TCP increased first and then fell with continuing reaction time. M. aeruginosa showed higher DBPFP than C. meneghiniana, the yield of DBPs varied with components of algal cells. The DBPFP order from components of M. aeruginosa was cell suspension (CS) ? intracellular organic matter (IOM) > extracellular organic matter (EOM) > cell debris (CD), which indicated that IOM was the main DBP precursors for M. aeruginosa. The yields of DBPs from components of C. meneghiniana were in the order of CS>IOM? CD ? EOM, suggesting that three components made similar contributions to the total DBP formation. The amount of IOM with higher DBPFP leaked from both algae species increased with the chlorine dosage, indicating that chlorine dosage should be considered carefully in the treatment of eutrophic water for less destroying of the cell integrity. Though fluorescence substances contained in both algae species varied significantly, the soluble microbial products (SMPs) and aromatic protein-like substances were the main cellular components that contributed to DBP formation for both algae. PMID:26100733

  4. Diatoms

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Diatoms are algae that reflect the biotic condition of streams, lakes and estuaries. Diatoms are important indicator organisms because they are sensitive to natural and human impacts, and monitoring their condition provides information about ecosystem health....

  5. Biomimetic Photonic Crystals based on Diatom Algae Frustules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishler, Jonathan; Alverson, Andrew; Herzog, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Diatom algae are unicellular, photosynthetic microorganisms with a unique external shell known as a frustule. Frustules, which are composed of amorphous silica, exhibit a unique periodic nano-patterning, distinguishing diatoms from other types of phytoplankton. Diatoms have been studied for their distinctive optical properties due to their resemblance of photonic crystals. In this regard, diatoms are not only considered for their applications as photonic crystals, but also for their use as biomimetic templates for artificially fabricated photonic crystals. Through the examination and measurement of the physical characteristics of many scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of diatom frustules, a biomimetic photonic crystal derived from diatom frustules can be recreated and modeled with the finite element method. In this approach, the average geometries of the diatom frustules are used to recreate a 2-dimensional photonic crystal, after which the electric field distribution and optical transmission through the photonic crystal are both measured. The optical transmission is then compared to the transmission spectra of a regular hexagonal photonic crystal, revealing the effects of diatom geometry on their optical properties. Finally, the dimensions of the photonic crystal are parametrically swept, allowing for further control over the transmission of light through the photonic crystal.

  6. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics Raymond E. Goldstein Department, multicellularity, synchronization Abstract In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 m to sev

  7. Red and green algal origin of diatom membrane transporters: insights into environmental adaptation and cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2011-01-01

    Membrane transporters (MTs) facilitate the movement of molecules between cellular compartments. The evolutionary history of these key components of eukaryote genomes remains unclear. Many photosynthetic microbial eukaryotes (e.g., diatoms, haptophytes, and dinoflagellates) appear to have undergone serial endosymbiosis and thereby recruited foreign genes through endosymbiotic/horizontal gene transfer (E/HGT). Here we used the diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum as models to examine the evolutionary origin of MTs in this important group of marine primary producers. Using phylogenomics, we used 1,014 diatom MTs as query against a broadly sampled protein sequence database that includes novel genome data from the mesophilic red algae Porphyridium cruentum and Calliarthron tuberculosum, and the stramenopile Ectocarpus siliculosus. Our conservative approach resulted in 879 maximum likelihood trees of which 399 genes show a non-lineal history between diatoms and other eukaryotes and prokaryotes (at the bootstrap value ?70%). Of the eukaryote-derived MTs, 172 (ca. 25% of 697 examined phylogenies) have members of both red/green algae as sister groups, with 103 putatively arising from green algae, 19 from red algae, and 50 have an unresolved affiliation to red and/or green algae. We used topology tests to analyze the most convincing cases of non-lineal gene history in which red and/or green algae were nested within stramenopiles. This analysis showed that ca. 6% of all trees (our most conservative estimate) support an algal origin of MTs in stramenopiles with the majority derived from green algae. Our findings demonstrate the complex evolutionary history of photosynthetic eukaryotes and indicate a reticulate origin of MT genes in diatoms. We postulate that the algal-derived MTs acquired via E/HGT provided diatoms and other related microbial eukaryotes the ability to persist under conditions of fluctuating ocean chemistry, likely contributing to their great success in marine environments. PMID:22195008

  8. Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness, and Strength

    E-print Network

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Hierarchical Silica Nanostructures Inspired by Diatom Algae Yield Superior Deformability, Toughness algae that is mainly composed of amorphous silica, which features a hierarchical structure that ranges in diatom algae as a basis to study a bioinspired nanoporous material implemented in crystalline silica. We

  9. Diatoms

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Diatoms are algae that reflect the biotic condition of streams, lakes and estuaries. Diatoms are important indicator organisms because they are sensitive to natural and human impacts, and monitoring their condition provides information about ecosystem health. Diatoms can live in permanently ice-cove...

  10. Use of biofuel by-product from the green algae Desmochloris sp. and diatom Nanofrustulum sp. meal in diets for nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Algal by-product meals from the Hawaiian biofuels industry were evaluated as protein ingredients in diets for juveniles of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Four experimental diets were formulated to contain 40% protein and were made with fish meal, soybean meal, whole diatom (Nanofrustulum sp.)...

  11. 7 Systematics of the green algae: conflict of classic

    E-print Network

    123 7 Systematics of the green algae: conflict of classic and modern approaches Thomas Pröschold ....................................................................................................................................124 How are green algae classified ....................................................................................................................................144 Biodiversity of green algae based on taxonomic revision using polyphasic approaches

  12. How-to-Do-It: Diatoms: The Ignored Alga in High School Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford, James J.

    1988-01-01

    Provides historical background, descriptions, uses and basis for identification of diatoms. Explains collection, dry-mount cleaning, and preparation procedures of the algae. Cites additional resources. (RT)

  13. Hierarchical and size dependent mechanical properties of silica and silicon nanostructures inspired by diatom algae

    E-print Network

    García, Andre Phillipé

    2010-01-01

    Biology implements fundamental principles that allow for attractive mechanical properties, as observed in biomineralized structures. For example, diatom algae contain nanoporous hierarchical silicified shells that provide ...

  14. Diatoms

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Diatoms are algae that reflect the biotic condition of streams, lakes and estuaries. Diatoms are important indicator organisms because they are sensitive to natural and human impacts, and monitoring their condition provides information about ecosystem health. A scanning electron micrograph (SEM) sho...

  15. Diatoms

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Diatoms are algae that reflect the biotic condition of streams, lakes and estuaries. Diatoms are important indicator organisms because they are sensitive to natural and human impacts, and monitoring their condition provides information about ecosystem health. A large, living Pleurosira laevis cell h...

  16. Diatoms

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Diatoms are algae that reflect the biotic condition of streams, lakes and estuaries. Diatoms are important indicator organisms because they are sensitive to natural and human impacts, and monitoring their condition provides information about ecosystem health. Shown here is a live cell of Didymosphen...

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga

    E-print Network

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga Micromonas: implications for Arctic, is well established for most photosynthetic lineages. However, green algae, including prasinophytes, were of Micromonas suggest that these green algae may have significant impact on prokaryote populations in several

  18. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    E-print Network

    Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host Ryan Kerneya,1 , Eunsoo Kimb , Roger P) and green algae ("Oophila amblystomatis" Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutu- alism tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next

  19. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1–1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  20. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial corticolous biofilms

    E-print Network

    Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae. Parachloroidium gen. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel genus of coccoid green algae from subaerial the Parachloroidium strains from other similar green algae. However, ultrastructural characteristics and molecular

  1. Photosystem I reduction in diatoms: as complex as the green lineage systems but less efficient.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P; Hervás, Manuel; Navarro, José A

    2013-12-01

    Diatoms occupy a key branch in the evolutionary tree of oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Here, the electron transfer reaction mechanism from cytochrome c? to photosystem I from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has been analyzed by laser-flash absorption spectroscopy. Kinetic traces of photosystem I reduction fit to biphasic curves, the analysis of the observed rate constants indicating that electron transfer occurs in a cytochrome c?/photosystem I transient complex, which undergoes a reorganization process from the initial encounter complex to the optimized final configuration. The mild ionic strength dependence of the rate constants makes evident the relatively weak electrostatically attractive nature of the interaction. Taken together, these results indicate that the "red" Phaeodactylum system is less efficient than "green" systems, both in the formation of the properly arranged (cytochrome c?/photosystem I) complex and in the electron transfer itself. The results obtained from cross-reactions with cytochrome c? and photosystem I from cyanobacteria, green algae, and plants shed light on the different evolutionary pathway of the electron transfer to photosystem I in diatoms with regard to the way that it evolved in higher plants. PMID:24180741

  2. Devonian Fungi: Interactions with the Green Alga Palaeonitella

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Thomas N.; Hass, Hagen; Remy, Winfried

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes three new taxa of fossil aquatic fungi preserved in 400-million-year-old Lower Devonian Rhynie Chert. All of the fungal morphotypes are attached to cells of the green alga Palaeonitella cranii. Milleromyces rhyniensis...

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Origin of land plants: Do conjugating green algae hold the key? Sabina (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte algae, also referred to as charophycean algae. The streptophyte algae are a paraphyletic group of green algae, ranging from unicellular flagellates to morphologically complex forms

  4. Plastid proteome prediction for diatoms and other algae with secondary plastids of the red lineage

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Ansgar; Rocap, Gabrielle; Kroth, Peter G; Armbrust, E Virginia; Mock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The plastids of ecologically and economically important algae from phyla such as stramenopiles, dinoflagellates and cryptophytes were acquired via a secondary endosymbiosis and are surrounded by three or four membranes. Nuclear-encoded plastid-localized proteins contain N-terminal bipartite targeting peptides with the conserved amino acid sequence motif ‘ASAFAP’. Here we identify the plastid proteomes of two diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using a customized prediction tool (ASAFind) that identifies nuclear-encoded plastid proteins in algae with secondary plastids of the red lineage based on the output of SignalP and the identification of conserved ‘ASAFAP’ motifs and transit peptides. We tested ASAFind against a large reference dataset of diatom proteins with experimentally confirmed subcellular localization and found that the tool accurately identified plastid-localized proteins with both high sensitivity and high specificity. To identify nucleus-encoded plastid proteins of T. pseudonana and P. tricornutum we generated optimized sets of gene models for both whole genomes, to increase the percentage of full-length proteins compared with previous assembly model sets. ASAFind applied to these optimized sets revealed that about 8% of the proteins encoded in their nuclear genomes were predicted to be plastid localized and therefore represent the putative plastid proteomes of these algae. PMID:25438865

  5. Plastid proteome prediction for diatoms and other algae with secondary plastids of the red lineage.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ansgar; Rocap, Gabrielle; Kroth, Peter G; Armbrust, E Virginia; Mock, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The plastids of ecologically and economically important algae from phyla such as stramenopiles, dinoflagellates and cryptophytes were acquired via a secondary endosymbiosis and are surrounded by three or four membranes. Nuclear-encoded plastid-localized proteins contain N-terminal bipartite targeting peptides with the conserved amino acid sequence motif 'ASAFAP'. Here we identify the plastid proteomes of two diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using a customized prediction tool (ASAFind) that identifies nuclear-encoded plastid proteins in algae with secondary plastids of the red lineage based on the output of SignalP and the identification of conserved 'ASAFAP' motifs and transit peptides. We tested ASAFind against a large reference dataset of diatom proteins with experimentally confirmed subcellular localization and found that the tool accurately identified plastid-localized proteins with both high sensitivity and high specificity. To identify nucleus-encoded plastid proteins of T. pseudonana and P. tricornutum we generated optimized sets of gene models for both whole genomes, to increase the percentage of full-length proteins compared with previous assembly model sets. ASAFind applied to these optimized sets revealed that about 8% of the proteins encoded in their nuclear genomes were predicted to be plastid localized and therefore represent the putative plastid proteomes of these algae. PMID:25438865

  6. Green Autofluorescence in Dinoflagellates, Diatoms, and Other Microalgae and Its Implications for Vital Staining and Morphological Studies? †

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ying Zhong; Dobbs, Fred C.

    2007-01-01

    Green autofluorescence (GAF) has been described in the short flagellum of golden and brown algae, the stigma of Euglenophyceae, and cytoplasm of different life stages of dinoflagellates and is considered by some researchers a valuable taxonomic feature for dinoflagellates. In addition, green fluorescence staining has been widely proposed or adopted to measure cell viability (or physiological state) in areas such as apoptosis of phytoplankton, pollutant stresses on algae, metabolic activity of algae, and testing treatment technologies for ships' ballast water. This paper reports our epifluorescence microscopic observations and quantitative spectrometric measurements of GAF in a broad phylogenetic range of microalgae. Our results demonstrate GAF is a common feature of dinoflagellates, diatoms, green algae, cyanobacteria, and raphidophytes, occurs in the cytoplasm and particularly in eyespots, accumulation bodies, spines, and aerotopes, and is caused by molecules other than chlorophyll. GAF intensity increased with time after cell death or fixation and with excitation by blue or UV light and was affected by pH. GAF of microalgae may be only of limited value in taxonomy. It can be strong enough to interfere with the results of green fluorescence staining, particularly when stained samples are observed microscopically. GAF is useful, however, for microscopic study of algal morphology, especially to visualize cellular components such as eyespots, nucleus, aerotopes, spines, and chloroplasts. Furthermore, GAF can be used to visualize and enumerate dinoflagellate cysts in marine and estuarine sediments in the context of anticipating and monitoring harmful algal blooms and in tracking potentially harmful dinoflagellates transported in ships' ballast tanks. PMID:17277199

  7. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    Zebra/Quagga mussels MollusksChironomids Amphipods Opossum Shrimp Lake Whitefish Invasive waterflea in the late 1990's. Opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta). An omnivore that feeds on algae and small cladocerans

  8. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    Zebra/Quagga mussels MollusksChironomids Amphipods Opossum Shrimp Lake Whitefish Invasive waterflea that began declining in the late 1990's. Opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta). An omnivore that feeds on algae

  9. Complex Patterns of Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Evolution in Nonphotosynthetic Green Algae

    E-print Network

    Nedelcu, Aurora M.

    Complex Patterns of Plastid 16S rRNA Gene Evolution in Nonphotosynthetic Green Algae Aurora M AT values are increased in nonphotosynthetic green algae compared to their closest photosynthetic relatives "green plants," both land plants and green algae, are known. Among such lineages are the parasitic

  10. Chemical composition of the green alga Codium Divaricatum Holmes.

    PubMed

    He, Zhizhou; Zhang, Anjiang; Ding, Lisheng; Lei, Xinxiang; Sun, Jianzhang; Zhang, Lixue

    2010-12-01

    A new sterol, 24-R-stigmasta-4,25-diene-3?,6?-diol (1), along with three known compounds (2-3), was isolated from the green alga Codium divaricatum Holmes, a traditional Chinese medicine, which is efficacious against cancer. All structures were determined by spectroscopic methods and comparison with related known compounds. Single-crystal X-ray crystallography allowed us to confirm the structure of 1. To our knowledge, the compound 1 is reported as the first from natural source, and compounds 2, 4 have not been isolated from green algae before. PMID:20655992

  11. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on â??green fuelsâ?ť which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PIâ??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  12. The central role of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in revealing the mechanism of state transitions

    E-print Network

    The central role of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in revealing the mechanism of state Abstract This review focuses on the essential role played by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii of the two photo- systems with changes in the spectral composition of light. In plants and green algae, state

  13. Xylochloris irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga

    E-print Network

    green alga JIR I´ NEUSTUPA 1 *, MAREK ELIA´ S1 , PAVEL SKALOUD 1 , YVONNE NE MCOVA´ 1 AND LENKA irregularis gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel subaerial coccoid green alga. Phycologia 50: 57­66. DOI: 10.2216/08-64.1 The phylogenetic diversity of subaerial coccoid green algae remains

  14. A green Paramecium strain with abnormal growth of symbiotic algae.

    PubMed

    Irie, Kanami; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Kadono, Takashi; Kawano, Tomonori

    2010-01-01

    Some hundred cells of Chlorella-like green algae are naturally enclosed within the cytoplasm of a single cell of green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria). Therefore, P. bursaria serves as an experimental model for studying the nature of endo-symbiosis made up through chemical communication between the symbiotic partners. For studying the mechanism of symbiotic regulations, the materials showing successful symbiosis are widely used. Apart from such successful model materials, some models for symbiotic distortion would be of great interest in order to understand the nature of successful symbiosis. Here, we describe a case of unsuccessful symbiosis causing unregulated growth of algae inside the hosting ciliates. Recently, we have screened some cell lines, from the mass of P. bursaria cells survived after paraquat treatment. The resultant cell lines (designated as KMZ series) show novel and unusual morphological features with heavily darker green colour distinguishable from the original pale green-coloured paramecia. In this type of isolates, endo-symbiotic algae are restricted within one or two dense spherical structures located at the center of the host cells' cytoplasm. Interestingly, this isolate maintains the host cells' circadian mating response which is known as an alga-dependent behaviour in the host cells. In contrast, we discuss that KMZ lacks the host-dependent regulation of algal growth, thus the algal complex often over-grows obviously exceeding the original size of the normal hosting ciliates. Additionally, possible use of this isolate as a novel model for symbiotic cell-to-cell communication is discussed. PMID:21319710

  15. Fatty acid amides from freshwater green alga Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, V M; Shkrob, I; Rozentsvet, O A

    2000-08-01

    Freshwater green algae Rhizoclonium hieroglyphicum growing in the Ural Mountains were examined for their fatty acid amides using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Eight fatty acid amides were identified by GC-MS. (Z)-9-octadecenamide was found to be the major component (2.26%). PMID:11014298

  16. Oleosin of subcellular lipid droplets evolved in green algae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L; Huang, Anthony H C

    2013-04-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  17. Mass Spawning by Green Algae on Coral Reefs Kenneth E. Clifton*

    E-print Network

    Clifton, Ken

    - persal. In contrast to the better studied red and brown algae of temperate waters (11), field studiesMass Spawning by Green Algae on Coral Reefs Kenneth E. Clifton* Predawn episodes of mass spawning by green algae (up to nine species in five genera on a single morning) intermittently cloud Caribbean

  18. Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae,

    E-print Network

    Hylodesmus singaporensis gen. et sp. nov., a new autosporic subaerial green alga (Scenedesmaceae characterization of an autosporic coccoid green alga isolated from decaying wood in a natural forest in Singapore. Depending on culture conditions, this alga formed globular to irregularly oval solitary cells

  19. GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE LIBRARY CONSTRUCTION1

    E-print Network

    Borges, Rita

    NOTE GENOMIC DNA ISOLATION FROM GREEN AND BROWN ALGAE (CAULERPALES AND FUCALES) FOR MICROSATELLITE A method for isolating high-quality DNA is pre- sented for the green algae Caulerpa sp. (C. racemosa, C. prolifera, and C. taxifolia) and the brown alga Sargassum muticum. These are introduced, and in- vasive

  20. [Toxicity of Coptis chinensis Rhizome Extracts to Green Algae].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-nan; Yuan, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Coptis chinensis contains antiseptic alkaloids and thus its rhizomes and preparations are widely used for the treatment of.fish diseases. In order to realize the risk of water ecosystems produced by this medical herb and preparations used in aquaculture, the present experiment was carried out to study the toxicity of Coptis chinensis rhizome extract (CRE) to Scenedesmus oblique and Chlorella pyrenoidosa grown in culture solution with 0.00 (CK), 0.088 (Tl), 0.44 (T2) and 1.76 mg · L(-1) (T3) of CRE, respectively. The results show that low concentration of CRE (T1) inhibited the growth rate of the alga and high CRE (T2 and T3) ceased growth and reproductions. CRE also decreased the chlorophyll and proteins in alga cells, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis and protein biosynthesis, which could be direct reasons for the low growth rate and death of green alga. The efflux of protons and substances from alga cells led to pH reduction and conductivity increment in culture solution with CRE. Furthermore, the activity of superoxide dismutase in alga increased at the beginning of CRE in T1 and T2 treatments but decreased as time prolonged which was in contrast to high CRE treatment. And the long exposure to low CRE treatment behaved otherwise. This suggests that the low concentration of CRE could induce the resistant reactions in alga at initial time but high CRE concentration or long exposure even at low CRE concentration could inhibit the enzyme synthesis. Similarly, malondialdehyde in alga increased as CRE concentrations increased in culture solutions, implying the damage and high permeability of cell membrane. In general, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more sensitive to CRE. The abuse of rhizomes and preparations in aquaculture and intensive cultivation of Coptis chinensis plants in a large scale might produce ecological risks to primary productivity of water ecosystems. PMID:26314112

  1. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 ?m to several millimeters), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured, and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  2. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  3. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  4. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 ?m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms. PMID:26594068

  5. The problems of Prochloron. [evolution of green algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Prokaryotic green algae (prochlorophytes), which contain chlorophylls a and b but no bilin pigments, may be phylogenetically related to ancestral chloroplasts if symbiogenesis occurred. They may be otherwise related to eukaryotic chlorophytes. They could have evolved from cyanophytes by loss of phycobilin and gain of chlorophyll b synthesis. These possibilities are briefly discussed. Relevant evidence from biochemical studies in many collaborative laboratories is now becoming available for the resolution of such questions.

  6. Phytotoxicity, bioaccumulation and degradation of isoproturon in green algae.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yan Fang; Miao, Shan Shan; Lu, Yi Chen; Qiu, Chong Bin; Zhou, You; Yang, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Isoproturon (IPU) is a pesticide used for protection of land crops from weed or pathogen attack. Recent survey shows that IPU has been detected as a contaminant in aquatic systems and may have negative impact on aquatic organisms. To understand the phytotoxicity and potential accumulation and degradation of IPU in algae, a comprehensive study was performed with the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Algae exposed to 5-50 ?g L(-1) IPU for 3d displayed progressive inhibition of cell growth and reduced chlorophyll fluorescence. Time-course experiments with 25 ?g L(-1) IPU for 6d showed similar growth responses. The 72 h EC50 value for IPU was 43.25 ?g L(-1), NOEC was 5 ?g L(-1) and LOEC was 15 ?g L(-1). Treatment with IPU induced oxidative stress. This was validated by a group of antioxidant enzymes, whose activities were promoted by IPU exposure. The up-regulation of several genes coding for the enzymes confirmed the observation. IPU was shown to be readily accumulated by C. reinhardtii. However, the alga showed a weak ability to degrade IPU accumulated in its cells, which was best presented at the lower concentration (5 ?g L(-1)) of IPU in the medium. The imbalance of accumulation and degradation of IPU may be the cause that resulted in the detrimental growth and cellular damage. PMID:23131497

  7. Intracellular invasion of green algae in a salamander host

    PubMed Central

    Kerney, Ryan; Kim, Eunsoo; Hangarter, Roger P.; Heiss, Aaron A.; Bishop, Cory D.; Hall, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The association between embryos of the spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) and green algae (“Oophila amblystomatis” Lamber ex Printz) has been considered an ectosymbiotic mutualism. We show here, however, that this symbiosis is more intimate than previously reported. A combination of imaging and algal 18S rDNA amplification reveals algal invasion of embryonic salamander tissues and cells during development. Algal cells are detectable from embryonic and larval Stages 26–44 through chlorophyll autofluorescence and algal 18S rDNA amplification. Algal cell ultrastructure indicates both degradation and putative encystment during the process of tissue and cellular invasion. Fewer algal cells were detected in later-stage larvae through FISH, suggesting that the decline in autofluorescent cells is primarily due to algal cell death within the host. However, early embryonic egg capsules also contained encysted algal cells on the inner capsule wall, and algal 18S rDNA was amplified from adult reproductive tracts, consistent with oviductal transmission of algae from one salamander generation to the next. The invasion of algae into salamander host tissues and cells represents a unique association between a vertebrate and a eukaryotic alga, with implications for research into cell–cell recognition, possible exchange of metabolites or DNA, and potential congruence between host and symbiont population structures. PMID:21464324

  8. The presence of diatom algae in a tracheal wash from a German Wirehaired Pointer with aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Benson, Catherine J; Edlund, Mark B; Gray, Sarah; Powell, Lisa; Paulin-Curlee, Geisa; Armien, Anibal; Overmann, Jed A

    2013-06-01

    A 7-year-old spayed female German Wirehaired Pointer was presented with difficulty breathing after being found seizing in a water-filled drainage ditch while out hunting. Aspirates from a tracheal wash contained numerous degenerate neutrophils, fewer macrophages, some of which contained basophilic debris, low numbers of extracellular diatoms, and a single intracellular short bacterial rod. As the dog continued to clinically decline and could not be weaned from oxygen support, the owners chose euthanasia. The major necropsy finding was a severe granulomatous bronchopneumonia that was likely due to aspiration of foreign material based on the microscopic presence of plant-like material, bi-refringent crystalline material, non-cellular debris, and occasional fungal structures. Diatoms are a class of algae that live primarily in water. Diatom analysis has been used, with some controversy, in human forensics to assist in documenting drowning as the cause of death. In this case, given the clinical history, the presence of diatoms and inflammation in the tracheal wash were interpreted as a likely result of the aspiration of surface water. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of diatoms observed in a cytologic specimen in a nonhuman mammal with aspiration pneumonia. PMID:23647227

  9. Green algae as a platform to express therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Oyler, George A

    2009-06-01

    Proteins produced by DNA recombinant technology have been playing important roles in modern medicine ever since the first such protein drug was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about three decades ago. However the inherent high cost of producing recombinant proteins, particularly those produced from mammalian cells, has hampered their broad application. Other protein expression systems that can reduce the cost yet still maintain the high-level therapeutic activities of the recombinant proteins are a top R&D priority. Eukaryotic unicellular green algae cells may provide a good solution to this long-standing challenge. PMID:19772839

  10. Photometrical analysis with photosensory domains of photoreceptors in green algae.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Suetsugu, Noriyuki

    2007-02-01

    Chloroplast photoorientation in the green alga Mougeotia scalaris is controlled by blue and red light. The properties of the LOV domains of phototropin A and B were consistent with previous data of action spectra and photoreceptor lifetime for blue light-mediated photoorientation. The LOV domains of the neochromes did not bind flavin, while the domains of neochrome 2 contributed to multimer formation. The absorption spectra of the neochrome phytochrome photosensory domain with phytochromobilin were very similar to the action spectra for red light-induced photoorientation. These results indicate that phototropin and neochrome work as the blue and red photoreceptors involved in photoorientation. PMID:17222409

  11. Photosynthetic Hydrogen and Oxygen Production by Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1999-08-22

    Photosynthesis research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is focused on hydrogen and oxygen production by green algae in the context of its potential as a renewable fuel and chemical feed stock. Beginning with its discovery by Gaffron and Rubin in 1942, motivated by curiosity-driven laboratory research, studies were initiated in the early 1970s that focused on photosynthetic hydrogen production from an applied perspective. From a scientific and technical point of view, current research is focused on optimizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiencies represented by the Gibbs Free Energy of molecular hydrogen. The key research questions of maximizing hydrogen and oxygen production by light-activated water splitting in green algae are: (1) removing the oxygen sensitivity of algal hydrogenases; (2) linearizing the light saturation curves of hotosynthesis throughout the entire range of terrestrial solar irradiance-including the role of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide in optimization of photosynthetic electron transpor;t and (3) constructing real-world bioreactors, including the generation of hydrogen and oxygen against workable back pressures of the photoproduced gases.

  12. Toxicity of arsenic and PCB to a green alga (Chlamydomonas)

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.R.; Zielski, P.A.

    1980-07-01

    High arsenic and PCB concentrations have recently been reported for Green Bay, Lake Michigan. The source of arsenic has been localized to a chemical company producing arsenic herbicides in Marinette, Wisconsin. While the production ceased several years ago, the arsenic pollution persists because of ground water infiltration of leachates from storage piles of arsenic-containing wastes. The sources of PCBs are less well known. The sources are probably non-point in nature, and originate in part from local dumpings of PCBs previously used as dielectrics and hydraulic fluids. The levels of these contaminants, e.g., up to 10 ..mu..g As/L and 0.45 ..mu..g PCB/L could present a hazard to the biota. The effect of arsenic and PCB on algae have been studied for each of these toxicants acting separately, but not in combination. PCB at 10 to 100 ..mu..g/L inhibit chlorophyll production and RNA synthesis. On the other hand, arsenate at 1 ..mu..M behaves as an antimetabolite occupying sites for phosphate. Based on the different toxic mechanisms for the two compounds, it is hypothesized that they will show independent joint action, i.e., that they will not form a particular toxic combination. The purpose of this study was to establish toxic thresholds and possible interactive effects of arsenic and a PCB (Aroclor 1248) for the green alga Chlamydomonas isolated from Lake Michigan.

  13. Solar-driven hydrogen production in green algae.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tamburic, Bojan; Zemichael, Fessehaye; Hellgardt, Klaus; Nixon, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    The twin problems of energy security and global warming make hydrogen an attractive alternative to traditional fossil fuels with its combustion resulting only in the release of water vapor. Biological hydrogen production represents a renewable source of the gas and can be performed by a diverse range of microorganisms from strict anaerobic bacteria to eukaryotic green algae. Compared to conventional methods for generating H(2), biological systems can operate at ambient temperatures and pressures without the need for rare metals and could potentially be coupled to a variety of biotechnological processes ranging from desalination and waste water treatment to pharmaceutical production. Photobiological hydrogen production by microalgae is particularly attractive as the main inputs for the process (water and solar energy) are plentiful. This chapter focuses on recent developments in solar-driven H(2) production in green algae with emphasis on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We review the current methods used to achieve sustained H(2) evolution and discuss possible approaches to improve H(2) yields, including the optimization of culturing conditions, reducing light-harvesting antennae and targeting auxiliary electron transport and fermentative pathways that compete with the hydrogenase for reductant. Finally, industrial scale-up is discussed in the context of photobioreactor design and the future prospects of the field are considered within the broader context of a biorefinery concept. PMID:21807246

  14. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ASSIMILATORY NITRATE REDUCTASE GENE AND ITS EXPRESSION IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    IN THE MARINE GREEN ALGA DUNALIELLA TERTIOLECTA (CHLOROPHYCEAE)1 Bongkeun Song2 and Bess B. Ward Department from a marine phytoplankton, the green alga Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher. Its sequence is very similar to that of the other green algae, but its intron structure and transcriptional regulation differ

  15. Enhanced Genetic Tools for Engineering Multigene Traits into Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Rasala, Beth A.; Chao, Syh-Shiuan; Pier, Matthew; Barrera, Daniel J.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic microalgae have the potential to impact many diverse biotechnological industries including energy, human and animal nutrition, pharmaceuticals, health and beauty, and specialty chemicals. However, major obstacles to sophisticated genetic and metabolic engineering in algae have been the lack of well-characterized transformation vectors to direct engineered gene products to specific subcellular locations, and the inability to robustly express multiple nuclear-encoded transgenes within a single cell. Here we validate a set of genetic tools that enable protein targeting to distinct subcellular locations, and present two complementary methods for multigene engineering in the eukaryotic green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The tools described here will enable advanced metabolic and genetic engineering to promote microalgae biotechnology and product commercialization. PMID:24710110

  16. J. Phycol. 39, 259267 (2003) THE MESOZOIC RADIATION OF EUKARYOTIC ALGAE

    E-print Network

    Falkowski, Paul G.

    2003-01-01

    in the evolution of eukaryotic algae that gave rise to red and green photoautotrophic lin- eages. In Paleozoic and chlorarachniophytes), but both contain relatively few species. In the red lineage, the red algae per se (Rhodophyta, and heterokonts (including diatoms, brown algae, and raphidophytes). In Paleozoic and earlier eras, the fossil

  17. Green algae and the origins of multicellularity in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Umen, James G

    2014-11-01

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity. PMID:25324214

  18. Isolation and properties of fungi that lyse blue-green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Redhead, K; Wright, S J

    1978-01-01

    Of 70 pure microbial cultures isolated from aquatic habitats, soil, and air according to the ability to lyse live blue-green algae, 62 were fungi representing the genera Acremonium, Emericellopsis, and Verticillium. Algal-lysing fungi were isolated from all habitat types sampled. The remaining isolates comprised four bacteria and four streptomycetes. All isolates lysed Anabaena flos-aquae and, in most cases, several other filamentous and unicellular blue-green algae. The fungi generally showed greater activity than most other isolates towards a wider range of susceptible algae, including green algae in some cases. Acremonium and Emericellopsis isolates, but not Verticillium, also inhibited the growth of blue-green algae and gram-positive bacteria, but did not lyse the latter. Lysis of blue green algae by Acremonium and Emericellopsis spp. was associated with the formation of diffusible heat-stable extracellular factors which, evidence suggests, could be cephalosporin antibiotic(s). Blue-green algae were also lysed by pure cephalosporin C. The frequent isolation of lytic fungi from algal habitats suggests a possible natural algal-destroying role for such fungi, which might be exploitable for algal bloom control. Images PMID:418740

  19. Organelle Genome Complexity Scales Positively with Organism Size in Volvocine Green Algae

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    Letter Organelle Genome Complexity Scales Positively with Organism Size in Volvocine Green Algae sequenced mitochondrial and plastid genomes, we explore the relationship between organelle DNA noncoding, and differentiated multicellular algae, we show that organelle DNA complexity scales positively with species size

  20. JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY RECORDED BY ENVIRONMENTAL SEQUENCING1

    E-print Network

    JENUFA GEN. NOV.: A NEW GENUS OF COCCOID GREEN ALGAE (CHLOROPHYCEAE, INCERTAE SEDIS) PREVIOUSLY of unicellular green algae from algal biofilms growing on tree bark in a Southeast Asian tropical rainforest: AU, approximately unbiased; BBM, Bold basal medium; CAUP, Culture Collection of algae at Charles

  1. Toxic Waterblooms of Blue-Green Algae 1

    PubMed Central

    Gorham, Paul R.

    1960-01-01

    Unialgal cultures of several species and strains of blue-green algae, including those most suspected of causing animal deaths, have been grown and found to vary greatly in toxicity. At least four toxic factors have been recognized. One produces fast deaths and is algal in origin. The others produce slow deaths and are bacterial in origin. The fast-death factor (FDF) is an endotoxin that so far has been encountered only with strains of Microcystis aeruginosa Kütz. emend. Elenkin. Its production is genetically and physiologically controlled. An FDF-producing strain of M. aeruginosa has been cultured on a large scale and the cells shown to be toxic when administered orally to sheep, calves, and smaller animals. FDF isolated from these cells has been identified as a quite stable cyclic polypeptide having an intraperitoneal LD50 for white mice of 0.47 mg. per kg. body weight. The slow-death factors may also contribute to the toxicity of waterblooms. It is concluded that a complex of interdepedent variables determines the degree and kind of toxicity that a waterbloom can develop. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.p245-a PMID:17421184

  2. Phylogenetic and molecular analysis of hydrogen-producing green algae

    PubMed Central

    Timmins, Matthew; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Darling, Aaron; Zhang, Eugene; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C.; Schenk, Peer M.

    2009-01-01

    A select set of microalgae are reported to be able to catalyse photobiological H2 production from water. Based on the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a method was developed for the screening of naturally occurring H2-producing microalgae. By purging algal cultures with N2 in the dark and subsequent illumination, it is possible to rapidly induce photobiological H2 evolution. Using NMR spectroscopy for metabolic profiling in C. reinhardtii, acetate, formate, and ethanol were found to be key compounds contributing to metabolic variance during the assay. This procedure can be used to test algal species existing as axenic or mixed cultures for their ability to produce H2. Using this system, five algal isolates capable of H2 production were identified in various aquatic systems. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using ribosomal sequence data of green unicellular algae to determine if there were taxonomic patterns of H2 production. H2-producing algal species were seen to be dispersed amongst most clades, indicating an H2-producing capacity preceded evolution of the phylum Chlorophyta. PMID:19342428

  3. Production of carbonate sediments by a unicellular green alga

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Robbins, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the unicellular green alga Natmochloris atoimis to precipitate CaCO3, quantifies mineral precipitation rates, estimates sediment production in a N. atomiis bloom, and discusses the implications of microbial calcification for carbonate sediment deposition. A series of N. atomus cultures, isolated from Lake Reeve, Australia, were incubated at various pH and calcium concentrations to determine environmental parameters for calcification. Rates of calcification were calculated from initial and postincubation alkalinity, pH, and calcium measurements. Replicate experiments and controls consisting of non-calcifying cultures, uninoculated media, and dead cell cultures were performed using environmental culture parameters determined in series cultures. Average calcification rates from replicate experiments were used to predict daily sediment production rates in a small bloom of N. atomus. N. atomus precipitates 0.138 g/L of calcite in approximately 4 h when incubated at pH 8.5, 14.24 mM calcium concentration, 33 ??C, 100 ??E/m2/s light intensity, and a cell population density of 107 cells/mL. Assuming continuous precipitation, this corresponds to a maximum estimated sediment production rate of 1.6 ?? 106 kg of CaCO3, per 12 h day in a single bloom of 3.2 ?? 109 L. Our results suggest that microbial calcification contributes significantly to the carbonate sediment budget.

  4. Combined toxicity of pesticide mixtures on green algae and photobacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Shen; Wang, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Wei-Ying

    2013-09-01

    Different organisms have diverse responses to the same chemicals or mixtures. In this paper, we selected the green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa (C. pyrenoidosa) and photobacteria Vibrio qinghaiensis sp.-Q67 (V. qinghaiensis) as target organisms and determined the toxicities of six pesticides, including three herbicides (simetryn, bromacil and hexazinone), two fungicides (dodine and metalaxyl) and one insecticide (propoxur), and their mixtures by using the microplate toxicity analysis. The toxicities of three herbicides to C. pyrenoidosa are much higher than those to V. qinghaiensis, and the toxicities of metalaxyl and propoxur to V. qinghaiensis are higher than those to C. pyrenoidosa, while the toxicity of dodine to C. pyrenoidosa is similar to those to V. qinghaiensis. Using the concentration addition as an additive reference model, the binary pesticide mixtures exhibited different toxicity interactions, i.e., displayed antagonism to C. pyrenoidosa but synergism to V. qinghaiensis. However, the toxicities of the multi-component mixtures of more than two components are additive and can be predicted by the concentration addition model. PMID:23816361

  5. Formation of Carbon Monoxide and Bile Pigment in Red and Blue-Green Algae 1

    PubMed Central

    Troxler, Robert F.; Dokos, Joy M.

    1973-01-01

    Five blue-green and one red algal species produced carbon monoxide during photosynthetic growth. The blue-green algae synthesized CO and phycocyanobilin in equimolar quantities at identical rates. The red alga, Porphyridium cruentum, incorporated ?-aminolevulinic acid-5-14C into phycoerythrobilin and CO. The ratio of the specific radioactivity of phycoerythrobilin to that of CO, and the kinetics and stoichiometry of phycocyanobilin and CO formation suggest that linear tetrapyrroles in plants are derived by the porphyrin pathway via the intermediate formation of heme. The similarity between bile pigment production in algae and in mammalian systems is discussed. PMID:16658300

  6. Algae as Protein Factories: Expression of a Human Antibody and the Respective Antigen in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Franziska; Lau, Julia; Klingl, Andreas; Maier, Uwe G.

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are thought to offer great potential as expression system for various industrial, therapeutic and diagnostic recombinant proteins as they combine high growth rates with all benefits of eukaryotic expression systems. Moreover, microalgae exhibit a phototrophic lifestyle like land plants, hence protein expression is fuelled by photosynthesis, which is CO2-neutral and involves only low production costs. So far, however, research on algal bioreactors for recombinant protein expression is very rare calling for further investigations in this highly promising field. In this study, we present data on the expression of a monoclonal human IgG antibody against the Hepatitis B surface protein and the respective antigen in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Antibodies are fully-assembled and functional and accumulate to 8.7% of total soluble protein, which complies with 21 mg antibody per gram algal dry weight. The Hepatitis B surface protein is functional as well and is recognized by algae-produced and commercial antibodies. PMID:22164289

  7. Carotenoid biosynthesis in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Martine

    2010-11-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and constitute an important group of the phytoplankton community having a major contribution to the total marine primary production. These microalgae exhibit a characteristic golden-brown colour due to a high amount of the xanthophyll fucoxanthin that plays a major role in the light-harvesting complex of photosystems. In the water column, diatoms are exposed to light intensities that vary quickly from lower to higher values. Xanthophyll cycles prevent photodestruction of the cells in excessive light intensities. In diatoms, the diadinoxanthin-diatoxanthin cycle is the most important short-term photoprotective mechanism. If the biosynthetic pathways of chloroplast pigments have been extensively studied in higher plants and green algae, the research on carotenoid biosynthesis in diatoms is still in its infancy. In this study, the data on the biosynthetic pathway of diatom carotenoids are reviewed. The early steps occur through the 2-C-methyl-D: -erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Then a hypothetical pathway is suggested from dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP). Most of the enzymes of the pathway have not been so far isolated from diatoms, but candidate genes for each of them were identified using protein similarity searches of genomic data. PMID:20734232

  8. Hidden genetic diversity in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The unbranched filamentous green alga Spirogyra (Streptophyta, Zygnemataceae) is easily recognizable based on its vegetative morphology, which shows one to several spiral chloroplasts. This simple structure falsely points to a low genetic diversity: Spirogyra is commonly excluded from phylogenetic analyses because the genus is known as a long-branch taxon caused by a high evolutionary rate. Results We focused on this genetic diversity and sequenced 130 Spirogyra small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) strands of different origin. The resulting SSU rDNA sequences were used for phylogenetic analyses using complex evolutionary models (posterior probability, maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, and maximum parsimony methods). The sequences were between 1672 and 1779 nucleotides long. Sequence comparisons revealed 53 individual clones, but our results still support monophyly of the genus. Our data set did not contain a single slow-evolving taxon that would have been placed on a shorter branch compared to the remaining sequences. Out of 130 accessions analyzed, 72 showed a secondary loss of the 1506 group I intron, which formed a long-branched group within the genus. The phylogenetic relationship to the genus Spirotaenia was not resolved satisfactorily. The genetic distance within the genus Spirogyra exceeded the distances measured within any other genus of the remaining Zygnemataceae included in this study. Conclusion Overall, we define eight distinct clades of Spirogyra, one of them including the genus Sirogonium. A large number of non-homoplasious synapomorphies (NHS; 114 NHS in total) was found for Spirogyra (41 NHS) and for each clade (totaling 73 NHS). This emphasizes the high genetic diversity of this genus and the distance to the remaining Zygnematophyceae. PMID:22655677

  9. How the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii keeps time.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Thomas; Prager, Katja; Dathe, Hannes; Kelm, Juliane; Kiessling, Peter; Mittag, Maria

    2010-08-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has two flagella and a primitive visual system, the eyespot apparatus, which allows the cell to phototax. About 40 years ago, it was shown that the circadian clock controls its phototactic movement. Since then, several circadian rhythms such as chemotaxis, cell division, UV sensitivity, adherence to glass, or starch metabolism have been characterized. The availability of its entire genome sequence along with homology studies and the analysis of several sub-proteomes render C. reinhardtii as an excellent eukaryotic model organism to study its circadian clock at different levels of organization. Previous studies point to several potential photoreceptors that may be involved in forwarding light information to entrain its clock. However, experimental data are still missing toward this end. In the past years, several components have been functionally characterized that are likely to be part of the oscillatory machinery of C. reinhardtii since alterations in their expression levels or insertional mutagenesis of the genes resulted in defects in phase, period, or amplitude of at least two independent measured rhythms. These include several RHYTHM OF CHLOROPLAST (ROC) proteins, a CONSTANS protein (CrCO) that is involved in parallel in photoperiodic control, as well as the two subunits of the circadian RNA-binding protein CHLAMY1. The latter is also tightly connected to circadian output processes. Several candidates including a significant number of ROCs, CrCO, and CASEIN KINASE1 whose alterations of expression affect the circadian clock have in parallel severe effects on the release of daughter cells, flagellar formation, and/or movement, indicating that these processes are interconnected in C. reinhardtii. The challenging task for the future will be to get insights into the clock network and to find out how the clock-related factors are functionally connected. In this respect, system biology approaches will certainly contribute in the future to improve our understanding of the C. reinhardtii clock machinery. PMID:20174954

  10. Selenocystamine improves protein accumulation in chloroplasts of eukaryotic green algae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Camargo, Livia S; Tran, Miller; Beld, Joris; Burkart, Michael D; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic green algae have become an increasingly popular platform for recombinant proteins production. In particular, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, has garnered increased attention for having the necessary biochemical machinery to produce vaccines, human antibodies and next generation cancer targeting immunotoxins. While it has been shown that chloroplasts contain chaperones, peptidyl prolylisomerases and protein disulfide isomerases that facilitate these complex proteins folding and assembly, little has been done to determine which processes serve as rate-limiting steps for protein accumulation. In other expression systems, as Escherichia coli, Chinese hamster ovary cells, and insect cells, recombinant protein accumulation can be hampered by cell's inability to fold the target polypeptide into the native state, resulting in aggregation and degradation. To determine if chloroplasts' ability to oxidize proteins that require disulfide bonds into a stable conformation is a rate-limiting step of protein accumulation, three recombinant strains, each expressing a different recombinant protein, were analyzed. These recombinant proteins included fluorescent GFP, a reporter containing no disulfide bonds; Gaussia princeps luciferase, a luminescent reporter containing disulfide bonds; and an immunotoxin, an antibody-fusion protein containing disulfide bonds. Each strain was analyzed for its ability to accumulate proteins when supplemented with selenocystamine, a small molecule capable of catalyzing the formation of disulfide bonds. Selenocystamine supplementation led to an increase in luciferase and immunotoxin but not GFP accumulation. These results demonstrated that selenocystamine can increase the accumulation of proteins containing disulfide bonds and suggests that a rate-limiting step in chloroplast protein accumulation is the disulfide bonds formation in recombinant proteins native structure. PMID:26137911

  11. Dasycladalean green algae and some problematic algae from the Upper Triassic of the Nayband Formation (northeast Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senowbari-Daryan, Baba; Rashidi, Koorosh; Saberzadeh, Behnam

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the dasycladales green algae from two sections of the Rhaetian Howz-e Khan Member of the Nayband Formation, northwest of the Dig-e Rostam motorway service area (south of the type locality of the Formation near the town Naybandan). Both sections are composed of bedded fine-grained limestones containing partly abundant dasycladales algae associated with foraminifers, which are mainly aulotortid types. Additionally scattered samples were collected from several beds of the Howz-e Khan Member in this area. The following dasycladalean taxa are described: Chinianella carpatica (Bystrický), Griphoporella curvata (Gümbel), Griphoporella lutensis nov. sp., some undetermined dasycladacean taxa, problematic algae like Lithocodium aggregatum Elliott, Bacinella irregularis Radoicic, and Thaumatoporella parvovesiculifera (Raineri). While Chinianella carpatica is not numerous and the other described algae are rare, Griphoporella curvata is extremely abundant in the investigated material. This paper describes Ch. carpatica for the first time from the Triassic of Iran and also includes a discussion of the strong variability of G. curvata. Additionally we include an informal description of a problematic fossil (animal: shell fragment?; plant: alga?).

  12. [Conservative motif CMLD in silicic acid transport proteins of diatom algae].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, T A; Masiukova, Iu A; Safonova, T A; Petrova, D P; Vereshchagin, A L; Minaeva, T V; Adel'shin, R V; Tribo?, T I; Stonik, I V; A?zda?cher, N A; Kozlov, M V; Likhoshva?, E V; Grachev, M A

    2005-01-01

    Sequencing of fragments of genes coding for silicic acid transport (SIT) proteins of diatoms of evolutionary distant classes (centric Chaetoceros muelleri Lemmermann, pennate araphid Synedra acus Kützing, pennate raphid Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin, and pennate with keeled raphe system Cylindrotheca fusiformis Reimann et Lewin), revealed the presence in these proteins of a conservative amino acid motif CMLD. Hydropathy profiles suggest that CMLD occupies a position between two transmembrane strands which do not contain lysine and arginine residues. The two strands are good candidates for the role of the channel along which transport of silicic acid occurs. CMLD is a rare motif. Diatoms are known to need Zn2+ for the incorporation of silica. Presumably, CMLD is the site of Zn2+ binding of SITs. We found that the growth of diatoms is inhibited by a negatively charged alkylating reagent 5-(2-iodoacetamidoethyl)aminonaphtalene-1-sulfonic acid which cannot penetrate through the cell membrane. Cysteine of CMLD can be a target of this reagent. Synthetic peptide NCMLDY forms a complex with Zn2+, as revealed by the fact that the ion considerably reduces the rate of alkylation of the peptide. PMID:15856954

  13. Tracing floating green algae blooms in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea using Lagrangian transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Gyu; Son, Young Baek; Choi, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Yong Hoon

    2014-05-01

    Lagrangian particle tracking experiments were conducted to understand the pathway of the floating green algae patches observed in the Yellow Sea (YS) and East China Sea (ECS) in summer 2011. The numerical simulation results indicated that dominant southerly winds during June and July 2011 were related to offshore movement of the floating green algae, especially their eastward extension in the YS/ECS. An infrequent and unusual event occurred in June 2011: a severe Tropical Strom MEARI, caused the green algae to detach from the coast and initiated movement to the east. After the typhoon event, sea surface temperature recovered rapidly enough to grow the floating green algae, and wind and local current controlled the movement of the massive floating algae patches (coastal accumulation or offshore advection in the area). Analysis of the floating green algae movement using satellite images during passage of Typhoon MAON in July 2011 revealed that the floating green algae patches were significantly controlled by both ocean currents and enhanced winds. These findings suggest that the floating green algae bloom off Qingdao, China and in the middle of the YS and ECS in the summer of 2011 occurred due to the combined effects of recent rapid expansion of seaweed aquaculture, strong winds, and the wind patterns in blooming regions. Our combined approach, using satellite data and numerical simulations, provides a robust estimate for tracing and monitoring changes in green algae blooms on a regional scale.

  14. Clinical and pathologic findings of blue-green algae (Microcystis aeruginosa) intoxication in a dog.

    PubMed

    DeVries, S E; Galey, F D; Namikoshi, M; Woo, J C

    1993-07-01

    A healthy dog developed signs of lethargy and vomiting after ingesting water from a tide pool containing blue-green algae. Fulminant hepatic failure occurred, and the dog was euthanized 52 hours later. At necropsy, the liver was large, friable, and discolored a dark red. Histopathology showed hepatocyte dissociation, degeneration, and necrosis. The alga was identified as Microcystis aeruginosa, a known hepatotoxin. The intraperitoneal administration of lyophilized cell material from the bloom caused hepatic necrosis in mice. PMID:8373855

  15. Bioelectricity generation and microcystins removal in a blue-green algae powered microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Chen, Qing; Zhou, Shungui; Zhuang, Li; Hu, Pei

    2011-03-15

    Bioelectricity production from blue-green algae was examined in a single chamber tubular microbial fuel cell (MFC). The blue-green algae powered MFC produced a maximum power density of 11 4 mW/m(2) at a current density of 0.55 mA/m(2). Coupled with the bioenergy generation, high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen were also achieved in MFCs. Over 78.9% of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), 80.0% of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), 91.0% of total nitrogen (total-N) and 96.8% ammonium-nitrogen (NH(3)-N) were removed under closed circuit conditions in 12 days, which were much more effective than those under open circuit and anaerobic reactor conditions. Most importantly, the MFC showed great ability to remove microcystins released from blue-green algae. Over 90.7% of MC-RR and 91.1% of MC-LR were removed under closed circuit conditions (500?). This study showed that the MFC could provide a potential means for electricity production from blue-green algae coupling algae toxins removal. PMID:21295401

  16. The rapid quantitation of the filamentous blue-green alga plectonema boryanum by the luciferase assay for ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, V. N.

    1974-01-01

    Plectonema boryanum is a filamentous blue green alga. Blue green algae have a procaryotic cellular organization similar to bacteria, but are usually obligate photoautotrophs, obtaining their carbon and energy from photosynthetic mechanism similar to higher plants. This research deals with a comparison of three methods of quantitating filamentous populations: microscopic cell counts, the luciferase assay for ATP and optical density measurements.

  17. Modeling the Role of Zebra Mussels in the Proliferation of Blue-green Algae in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under model assumptions from Saginaw Bay 1991, selective rejection of blue-green algae by zebra mussels appears to be a necessary factor in the enhancement of blue-green algae production in the presence of zebra mussels. Enhancement also appears to depend on the increased sedime...

  18. Biological importance of marine algae

    PubMed Central

    El Gamal, Ali A.

    2009-01-01

    Marine organisms are potentially prolific sources of highly bioactive secondary metabolites that might represent useful leads in the development of new pharmaceutical agents. Algae can be classified into two main groups; first one is the microalgae, which includes blue green algae, dinoflagellates, bacillariophyta (diatoms)… etc., and second one is macroalgae (seaweeds) which includes green, brown and red algae. The microalgae phyla have been recognized to provide chemical and pharmacological novelty and diversity. Moreover, microalgae are considered as the actual producers of some highly bioactive compounds found in marine resources. Red algae are considered as the most important source of many biologically active metabolites in comparison to other algal classes. Seaweeds are used for great number of application by man. The principal use of seaweeds as a source of human food and as a source of gums (phycocollides). Phycocolloides like agar agar, alginic acid and carrageenan are primarily constituents of brown and red algal cell walls and are widely used in industry. PMID:23960716

  19. Desiccation stress and tolerance in green algae: consequences for ultrastructure, physiological and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Karsten, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although most green algae typically occur in aquatic ecosystems, many species also live partly or permanently under aeroterrestrial conditions, where the cells are exposed to the atmosphere and hence regularly experience dehydration. The ability of algal cells to survive in an air-dried state is termed desiccation tolerance. The mechanisms involved in desiccation tolerance of green algae are still poorly understood, and hence the aim of this review is to summarize recent findings on the effects of desiccation and osmotic water loss. Starting from structural changes, physiological, and biochemical consequences of desiccation will be addressed in different green-algal lineages. The available data clearly indicate a range of strategies, which are rather different in streptophycean and non-streptophycean green algae. While members of the Trebouxiophyceae exhibit effective water loss-prevention mechanisms based on the biosynthesis and accumulation of particular organic osmolytes such as polyols, these compounds are so far not reported in representatives of the Streptophyta. In members of the Streptophyta such as Klebsormidium, the most striking observation is the appearance of cross-walls in desiccated samples, which are strongly undulating, suggesting a high degree of mechanical flexibility. This aids in maintaining structural integrity in the dried state and allows the cell to maintain turgor pressure for a prolonged period of time during the dehydration process. Physiological strategies in aeroterrestrial green algae generally include a rapid reduction of photosynthesis during desiccation, but also a rather quick recovery after rewetting, whereas aquatic species are sensitive to drying. The underlying mechanisms such as the affected molecular components of the photosynthetic machinery are poorly understood in green algae. Therefore, modern approaches based on transcriptomics, proteomics, and/or metabolomics are urgently needed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in desiccation-stress physiology of these organisms. The very limited existing information is described in the present review. PMID:23986769

  20. Extraction and physico-chemical characterization of a versatile biodegradable polysaccharide obtained from green algae.

    PubMed

    Alves, Anabela; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, Joăo F; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui L

    2010-10-13

    During the last years, considerable attention has been given to different marine organisms, like algae, as potential sources of valuable materials. The continuous demand for novel materials and technologies is high and research on the underexploited marine green algae, including its polysaccharidic part-ulvan, has increased accordingly. In this research work, a novel method for extraction of ulvan from green algae is proposed and demonstrated successfully. Different characterization techniques were employed to characterize the isolated algal polysaccharide, namely, on what concerns its thermal trace and crystallinity. Upon heating, ulvan behaves as a non-meltable polysaccharide that is thermally stable before degradation at 220°C. Ulvan is semi-crystalline in nature and possesses high hygroscopic features, as revealed in this research work. Due to its properties, ulvan can be considered, pure or modified, as a versatile biodegradable polymer for different applications, including tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20800225

  1. Harvesting green algae from eutrophic reservoir by electroflocculation and post-use for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Valero, Enrique; Álvarez, Xana; Cancela, Ángeles; Sánchez, Ángel

    2015-07-01

    Each year there are more frequent blooms of green algae and cyanobacteria, representing a serious environmental problem of eutrophication. Electroflocculation (EF) was studied to harvest the algae which are present in reservoirs, as well as different factors which may influence on the effectiveness of the process: the voltage applied to the culture medium, run times, electrodes separation and natural sedimentation. Finally, the viability of its use to obtain biodiesel was studied by direct transesterification. The EF process carried out at 10V for 1min, with an electrode separation of 5.5cm and a height of 4cm in culture vessel, obtained a recovery efficiency greater than 95%, and octadecenoic and palmitic acids were obtained as the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). EF is an effective method to harvest green algae during the blooms, obtaining the greatest amount of biomass for subsequent use as a source of biodiesel. PMID:25863202

  2. Hydrogen production by a thermophilic blue-green alga Mastigocladus laminosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.; Yokoyama, H.; Miyamoto, K.; Okazaki, M.; Komemushi, S.

    Light-driven hydrogen evolution by a thermophilic blue-green alga, Mastigocladus laminosus, was demonstrated and characterized under nitrogen-starved conditions. Air-grown cultures of this alga evolved hydrogen under Ar/CO2 at rates up to 2.2 ml/mg chl/hr. The optimum temperature and pH for the hydrogen evolution were 44-49 C and pH 7.0-7.5, respectively. Evolution in light was depressed by N2 gas and inhibited by salicylaldoxime or 2,4-dinitrophenol, indicating that nitrogenase was mainly responsible for the hydrogen evolution. The evolution rate was improved by adding carbon monoxide and acetylene to the gas phase of Ar/CO2. In addition, photobiological production of hydrogen (biophotolysis) by various blue-green algae is briefly reviewed and discussed.

  3. An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus

    E-print Network

    An original adaptation of photosynthesis in the marine green alga Ostreococcus Pierre Cardol, 2008 (received for review December 15, 2007) Adaptation of photosynthesis in marine environment has is enhanced in OTH95. Further- more, RCC809 has a reduced maximum rate of O2 evolution, which is limited

  4. A STATUS REPORT ON PLANKTONIC CYANOBACTERIA (BLUE-GREEN ALGAE) AND THEIR TOXINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxic blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) continue to be agents of certain waterbased toxicoses. heir presence is now being acknowledged in many of the world's fresh and brackish waters with eutrophication status of meso to hypereutrophic. ense surface scums called waterblooms will ...

  5. Effects of p-Cresol on photosynthetic and respiration rates of a filamentous green alga (spirogyra)

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, J.; Kilham, S.S.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of spilled phenols and cresols from coal gasification plants on the green alga SPIROYRA was investigated in experimental streams built by the US EPA near Monticello, Minnesota. P-Cresol at low concentrations inhibited photosynthesis and increased algal respiration rates. (JMT)

  6. Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    E-print Network

    Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Xenie JohnsonL gene transcript in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by stabilising the mRNA via its 50 UTR. An absence of MRL1 potentially regulate chloroplast function (Barkan and Goldschmidt-Clermont 2000). Gene families

  7. Cryptic Sex in the Smallest Eukaryotic Marine Green Alga Nigel Grimsley,1,2

    E-print Network

    Cryptic Sex in the Smallest Eukaryotic Marine Green Alga Nigel Grimsley,1,2 Be´range`re Pe´quin,1 pairs in two different species of Ostreococcus. Analyses of such DNA regions from eight marker loci meiotic genes (Derelle et al. 2006) and similarities to homeodomain proteins known to be impor- tant

  8. Oleosin of Subcellular Lipid Droplets Evolved in Green Algae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan-Lan; Huang, Ming-Der; Chen, Tung-Ling L.; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2013-01-01

    In primitive and higher plants, intracellular storage lipid droplets (LDs) of triacylglycerols are stabilized with a surface layer of phospholipids and oleosin. In chlorophytes (green algae), a protein termed major lipid-droplet protein (MLDP) rather than oleosin on LDs was recently reported. We explored whether MLDP was present directly on algal LDs and whether algae had oleosin genes and oleosins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MLDP in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was associated with endoplasmic reticulum subdomains adjacent to but not directly on LDs. In C. reinhardtii, low levels of a transcript encoding an oleosin-like protein (oleolike) in zygotes-tetrads and a transcript encoding oleosin in vegetative cells transferred to an acetate-enriched medium were found in transcriptomes and by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The C. reinhardtii LD fraction contained minimal proteins with no detectable oleolike or oleosin. Several charophytes (advanced green algae) possessed low levels of transcripts encoding oleosin but not oleolike. In the charophyte Spirogyra grevilleana, levels of oleosin transcripts increased greatly in cells undergoing conjugation for zygote formation, and the LD fraction from these cells contained minimal proteins, two of which were oleosins identified via proteomics. Because the minimal oleolike and oleosins in algae were difficult to detect, we tested their subcellular locations in Physcomitrella patens transformed with the respective algal genes tagged with a Green Fluorescent Protein gene and localized the algal proteins on P. patens LDs. Overall, oleosin genes having weak and cell/development-specific expression were present in green algae. We present a hypothesis for the evolution of oleosins from algae to plants. PMID:23391579

  9. Algae.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Algae frequently get a bad press. Pond slime is a problem in garden pools, algal blooms can produce toxins that incapacitate or kill animals and humans and even the term seaweed is pejorative - a weed being a plant growing in what humans consider to be the wrong place. Positive aspects of algae are generally less newsworthy - they are the basis of marine food webs, supporting fisheries and charismatic marine megafauna from albatrosses to whales, as well as consuming carbon dioxide and producing oxygen. Here we consider what algae are, their diversity in terms of evolutionary origin, size, shape and life cycles, and their role in the natural environment and in human affairs. PMID:25004359

  10. A novel ether-linked phytol-containing digalactosylglycerolipid in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Nagamatsu, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Matsunaga, Naoyuki; Okino, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Kuniko; Ito, Makoto

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Alkaline-resistant galactolipid, AEGL, was found in marine algae. • The sugar moiety of AEGL is identical to that of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. • AEGL is the first identified glycolipid that possesses an ether-linked phytol. • AEGL is ubiquitously distributed in green, red and brown marine algae. - Abstract: Galactosylglycerolipids (GGLs) and chlorophyll are characteristic components of chloroplast in photosynthetic organisms. Although chlorophyll is anchored to the thylakoid membrane by phytol (tetramethylhexadecenol), this isoprenoid alcohol has never been found as a constituent of GGLs. We here described a novel GGL, in which phytol was linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether linkage. This unique GGL was identified as an Alkaline-resistant and Endogalactosylceramidase (EGALC)-sensitive GlycoLipid (AEGL) in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa. EGALC is an enzyme that is specific to the R-Gal?/?1-6Gal?1-structure of galactolipids. The structure of U. pertusa AEGL was determined following its purification to 1-O-phytyl-3-O-Gal?1-6Gal?1-sn-glycerol by mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. AEGLs were ubiquitously distributed in not only green, but also red and brown marine algae; however, they were rarely detected in terrestrial plants, eukaryotic phytoplankton, or cyanobacteria.

  11. [Evolutional relationships of endemic green algae Draparnaldioides simplex from Lake Baikal with nonbaicalian taxa of family Chaetoforaceae (Chlorophyta)].

    PubMed

    Mincheva, E V; Peretolchina, T E; Izhboldina, L A; Kravtsova, L S; Shcherbakov, D Iu

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetic relationships between the endemic baicalian green algae Draparnaldioides simplex C. meyer et Skabitsch, 1976 and holarctic taxa of green algae were studied using the fragment of 18S rDNA and internal transcribed spacers ITS1 and ITS2 of nuclear DNA. We showed that the baicalian genus Draparnaldioides is a separate taxon. The genetic difference between Draparnaldioides and nonbaicalian taxa of the sister groups of the green algae are small enough to indicate relative youth of the genus Draparnaldioides and its recent radiation from a common ancestor with Draparnaldia and Chaetophora. PMID:23705507

  12. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequences of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. Two radically different evolutionary patterns within green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Turmel, M; Lemieux, C; Burger, G; Lang, B F; Otis, C; Plante, I; Gray, M W

    1999-01-01

    Green plants appear to comprise two sister lineages, Chlorophyta (classes Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, and Prasinophyceae) and Streptophyta (Charophyceae and Embryophyta, or land plants). To gain insight into the nature of the ancestral green plant mitochondrial genome, we have sequenced the mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Nephroselmis olivacea and Pedinomonas minor. These two green algae are presumptive members of the Prasinophyceae. This class is thought to include descendants of the earliest diverging green algae. We find that Nephroselmis and Pedinomonas mtDNAs differ markedly in size, gene content, and gene organization. Of the green algal mtDNAs sequenced so far, that of Nephroselmis (45,223 bp) is the most ancestral (minimally diverged) and occupies the phylogenetically most basal position within the Chlorophyta. Its repertoire of 69 genes closely resembles that in the mtDNA of Prototheca wickerhamii, a later diverging trebouxiophycean green alga. Three of the Nephroselmis genes (nad10, rpl14, and rnpB) have not been identified in previously sequenced mtDNAs of green algae and land plants. In contrast, the 25,137-bp Pedinomonas mtDNA contains only 22 genes and retains few recognizably ancestral features. In several respects, including gene content and rate of sequence divergence, Pedinomonas mtDNA resembles the reduced mtDNAs of chlamydomonad algae, with which it is robustly affiliated in phylogenetic analyses. Our results confirm the existence of two radically different patterns of mitochondrial genome evolution within the green algae. PMID:10488238

  13. Phylogenetic and morphological characterisation of the green algae infesting blue mussel Mytilus edulis in the North and South Atlantic oceans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francisco; Feist, Stephen W; Guillou, Laure; Harkestad, Lisbeth S; Bateman, Kelly; Renault, Tristan; Mortensen, Stein

    2008-09-24

    Blue mussels Mytilus edulis with shell deformations and green pustules containing parasitic algae were collected at 3 coastal sites (Burřy, Norway; Bockholm, Denmark; Goose Green, Falkland Islands). A comparative study, including mussel histopathology, algal morphology, ultrastructure and phylogenetic position was performed. Green pustules were mainly located in the posterior portion of the mantle and gonad tissues and the posterior adductor muscle. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of algal cells with similar morphology to Coccomyxa parasitica. Algae were oval shaped with a single nucleus and chloroplast, 1 or 2 mitochondria and a dense granular cytoplasm with a lipid inclusion body, Golgi apparatus and small vesicles. Partial small subunit (SSU) rRNA phylogeny confirmed the inclusion of parasitic algae into the Coccomyxa clade. However, the sequence identity between almost full SSU rRNA sequences of parasitic algae and others in this clade yielded an unexpected result. Green algae from mussels were distant from C. parasitica Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa (CCAP) strain 216/18 (94% identity), but very similar (99% identity) to C. glaronensis (a lichen endosymbiont) and green endophytes from the tree Ginkgo biloba. The CCAP strain 216/18 was a sister sequence to Nannochloris algae, far from the Coccomyxa clade. These results suggest a misidentification or outgrowth of the original CCAP strain 216/18 by a different 'Nannochloris-like' trebouxiophycean organism. In contrast, our sequences directly obtained from infested mussels could represent the true C. parasitica responsible for the green pustules in blue mussels. PMID:18998587

  14. The effect of low temperature on Antarctic endolithic green algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. A.; Morris, G. J.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory experiments show that undercooling to about -5 degrees C occurs in colonized Beacon sandstones of the Ross Desert, Antarctica. High-frequency temperature oscillations between 5 degrees C and -5 degrees C or -10 degrees C (which occur in nature on the rock surface) did not damage Hemichloris antarctica. In a cryomicroscope, H. antarctica appeared to be undamaged after slow or rapid cooling to -50 degrees C. 14CO2 incorporation after freezing to -20 degrees C was unaffected in H. antarctica or in Trebouxia sp. but slightly depressed in Stichococcus sp. (isolated from a less extreme Antarctic habitat). These results suggest that the freezing regime in the Antarctic desert is not injurious to endolithic algae. It is likely that the freezing-point depression inside the rock makes available liquid water for metabolic activity at subzero temperatures. Freezing may occur more frequently on the rock surface and contribute to the abiotic nature of the surface.

  15. Asymmetric cell division and its role in cell fate determination in the green alga Tetraselmis indica.

    PubMed

    Arora, Mani; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar; Burgess, Karl; Delany, Jane; Mesbahi, Ehsan

    2015-12-01

    The prasinophytes (early diverging Chlorophyta), consisting of simple unicellular green algae, occupy a critical position at the base of the green algal tree of life, with some of its representatives viewed as the cell form most similar to the first green alga, the 'ancestral green flagellate'. Relatively large-celled unicellular eukaryotic phytoflagellates (such as Tetraselmis and Scherffelia), traditionally placed in Prasinophyceae but now considered as members of Chlorodendrophyceae (core Chlorophyta), have retained some primitive characteristics of prasinophytes. These organisms share several ultrastructural features with the other core chlorophytes (Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae). However, the role of Chlorodendrophycean algae as the evolutionary link between cellular individuality and cellular cooperation has been largely unstudied. Here, we show that clonal populations of a unicellular chlorophyte, Tetraselmis indica, consist of morphologically and ultrastructurally variant cells which arise through asymmetric cell division. These cells also differ in their physiological properties. The structural and physiological differences in the clonal cell population correlate to a certain extent with the longevity and function of cells. PMID:26648037

  16. MACROALGAL VOLUME: A SURROGATE FOR BIOMASS IN SOME GREEN ALGAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two green algal morphotypes, filamentous species (e.g., Chaetomorpha spp.) and flattened or tubular (e.g.,Ulva spp. and Enteromorpha spp.) were collected from 63 sites within the Yaquina Bay estuary (Newport, OR) and used to compare an in situ volumetric biomass estimator to the...

  17. Effects of DCMU on chlorophyll fluorescence ratio F685/F735 in marine red, brown and green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bao-Gan; Zuo, Dong-Mei; Zang, Ru-Bo

    1996-03-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence ratio F685/F735 in vivo can be a useful indicator for stress detection in higher plants and seaweeds. DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea] treatment influences this ratio. The effets of DCMU on F685/F735 of marine red, brown and green algae under excitation light of different wavelengths were investigated. In the brown algae, Laminaria japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, DCMU did not increase this ratio under blue light excitation but increased the ratio slightly under excitation by green light. For the red algae, Halymenia sinensis, DCMU increased the ratio markedly under both blue and green light excitation. The percentage increase could reach 50% (under green light excitation) and was due to unequal enhancement at the two emission maxima by DCMU. A fraction of chlorophyll which contributed to fluorescence in the 735 nm region was less sensitive to DCMU and was likely from photosystem I of red algae. In the green alga, Ulva pertusa, DCMU caused a slight increase in F685/F735 value under blue, green and red light. Green light excitation during DCMU treatment increased the ratio most (16%) but induced the lowest ratio in the control (without DCMU). It is proposed that a considerable fraction of fluorescence from the 735 nm region at room temperature may be emitted by the chlorophyll of photosystem I in red algae.

  18. Laccase-like enzyme activities from chlorophycean green algae with potential for bioconversion of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Otto, Benjamin; Beuchel, Carl; Liers, Christiane; Reisser, Werner; Harms, Hauke; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the abundance and potential environmental functions of green algal laccases, we screened various algae for extracellular laccase-like activities, characterized basic features of these activities in selected species and exemplarily studied the transformation of environmental pollutants and complex natural compounds by the laccase of Tetracystis aeria. Oxidation of the classical laccase substrate ABTS was found to be widespread in chlorophycean algae. The oxidation activity detected in members of the 'Scenedesmus' clade was caused by an unknown thermostable low-molecular-mass compound. In contrast, species of the Moewusinia, including Chlamydomonas moewusii and T. aeria, excreted putative 'true' laccases. Phenolic substrates were oxidized by these enzymes optimally at neutral to alkaline pH. The Tetracystis laccase efficiently transformed bisphenol A, 17?-ethinylestradiol, nonylphenol and triclosan in the presence of ABTS as redox mediator, while anthracene, veratrylalcohol and adlerol were not attacked. Lignosulfonate and humic acid underwent slight (de)polymerization reactions in the presence of the laccase and mediator(s), probably involving the oxidation of phenolic constituents. Possible natural functions of the enzymes, such as the synthesis of complex polymers or detoxification processes, may assist the survival of the algae in adverse environments. In contaminated surface waters, laccase-producing green algae might contribute to the environmental breakdown of phenolic pollutants. PMID:25926529

  19. Strong tolerance of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae to very high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, F.; Nishihira, N.; Hada, Y.; Mori, Y.; Takarabe, K.; Saigusa, M.; Matsushima, Y.; Yamazaki, D.; Ito, E.

    2015-09-01

    It was shown in our previous reports that a few spores of moss Venturiella could tolerate the very high pressure of 20 GPa for 30 min and germinated a protonema to the length of 30 ?m. However, these spores did not grow any further, and disappeared at around 30 days of incubation after seeded. On the other hand, colonies of blue-green alga Microcystis flos-aquae came to appear about 76 days after the moss spores were seeded. Many of these colonies appeared at the places where the moss spores had disappeared. These colonies were formed by the algae that had adhered to the spore cases of the moss and survived after exposure to the very high pressure of 20 GPa. Though the appearance of the colonies of high pressure exposed algae was delayed by about 50 days compared with that of the control group which was not exposed to high pressure, there seems no difference in their shape and color from those of the control group. The pressure tolerance of blue-green alga is found to be enormously strong, and it can survive after exposure to the high pressure which corresponds to the depth of about 550-600 km from the surface of the Earth, just above the lower mantle.

  20. The adsorption potential and recovery of thallium using green micro-algae from eutrophic water sources.

    PubMed

    Birungi, Z S; Chirwa, E M N

    2015-12-15

    Thallium (Tl) is a highly volatile and toxic heavy metal regarded to cause pollution even at very low concentrations of several parts per million. Despite the extremely high risk of Tl in the environment, limited information on removal/recovery exists. The study focussed on the use of green algae to determine the sorption potential and recovery of Tl. From the study, removal efficiency was achieved at 100% for lower concentrations of ?150mg/L of Tl. At higher concentrations in a range of 250-500mg/L, the performance of algae was still higher with sorption capacity (qmax) between 830 and 1000mg/g. Generally, Chlorella vulgaris was the best adsorbent with a high qmax and lower affinity of 1000mg/g and 1.11L/g, respectively. When compared to other studies on Tl adsorption, the tested algae showed a better qmax than most adsorbents. The kinetic studies showed better correlation co-efficient of ?0.99 for Pseudo-second order model than the first order model. Recovery was achieved highest for C. vulgaris using nitric acid at 93.3%. The strongest functional groups responsible for Tl binding on the algal cell wall were carboxyl and phenols. Green algae from freshwater bodies showed significant potential for Tl removal/recovery from industrial wastewater. PMID:26093356

  1. Substitution rate calibration of small subunit ribosomal RNA identifies chlorarachniophyte endosymbionts as remnants of green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Chlorarachniophytes are amoeboid algae with chlorophyll a and b containing plastids that are surrounded by four membranes instead of two as in plants and green algae. These extra membranes form important support for the hypothesis that chlorarachniophytes have acquired their plastids by the ingestion of another eukaryotic plastid-containing alga. Chlorarachniophytes also contain a small nucleus-like structure called the nucleomorph situated between the two inner and the two outer membranes surrounding the plastid. This nucleomorph is a remnant of the endosymbiont's nucleus and encodes, among other molecules, small subunit ribosomal RNA. Previous phylogenetic analyses on the basis of this molecule provided unexpected and contradictory evidence for the origin of the chlorarachniophyte endosymbiont. We developed a new method for measuring the substitution rates of the individual nucleotides of small subunit ribosomal RNA. From the resulting substitution rate distribution, we derived an equation that gives a more realistic relationship between sequence dissimilarity and evolutionary distance than equations previously available. Phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of evolutionary distances computed by this new method clearly situate the chlorarachniophyte nucleomorphs among the green algae. Moreover, this relationship is confirmed by transversion analysis of the Chlorarachnion plastid small subunit ribosomal RNA. PMID:8755544

  2. A Green Algae Mixture of Scenedesmus and Schroederiella Attenuates Obesity-Linked Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil Arun; Magnusson, Marie; Ward, Leigh C.; Paul, Nicholas A.; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the responses to a green algae mixture of Scenedesmus dimorphus and Schroederiella apiculata (SC) containing protein (46.1% of dry algae), insoluble fibre (19.6% of dry algae), minerals (3.7% of dry algae) and omega-3 fatty acids (2.8% of dry algae) as a dietary intervention in a high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome model in four groups of male Wistar rats. Two groups were fed with a corn starch diet containing 68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides, while the other two groups were fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose in food, 25% fructose in drinking water, total 68%) and fats (saturated and trans fats from beef tallow, total 24%). High carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats showed visceral obesity with hypertension, insulin resistance, cardiovascular remodelling, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. SC supplementation (5% of food) lowered total body and abdominal fat mass, increased lean mass, and attenuated hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells into heart and liver, fibrosis, increased cardiac stiffness, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the high carbohydrate, high fat diet-fed rats. This study suggests that the insoluble fibre or protein in SC helps reverse diet-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:25875119

  3. A green algae mixture of Scenedesmus and Schroederiella attenuates obesity-linked metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Senthil Arun; Magnusson, Marie; Ward, Leigh C; Paul, Nicholas A; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the responses to a green algae mixture of Scenedesmus dimorphus and Schroederiella apiculata (SC) containing protein (46.1% of dry algae), insoluble fibre (19.6% of dry algae), minerals (3.7% of dry algae) and omega-3 fatty acids (2.8% of dry algae) as a dietary intervention in a high carbohydrate, high fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome model in four groups of male Wistar rats. Two groups were fed with a corn starch diet containing 68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides, while the other two groups were fed a diet high in simple carbohydrates (fructose and sucrose in food, 25% fructose in drinking water, total 68%) and fats (saturated and trans fats from beef tallow, total 24%). High carbohydrate, high fat-fed rats showed visceral obesity with hypertension, insulin resistance, cardiovascular remodelling, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. SC supplementation (5% of food) lowered total body and abdominal fat mass, increased lean mass, and attenuated hypertension, impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of inflammatory cells into heart and liver, fibrosis, increased cardiac stiffness, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the high carbohydrate, high fat diet-fed rats. This study suggests that the insoluble fibre or protein in SC helps reverse diet-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:25875119

  4. Ulvan, a Sulfated Polysaccharide from Green Algae, Activates Plant Immunity through the Jasmonic Acid Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaulneau, Valérie; Lafitte, Claude; Jacquet, Christophe; Fournier, Sylvie; Salamagne, Sylvie; Briand, Xavier; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérčse; Dumas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The industrial use of elicitors as alternative tools for disease control needs the identification of abundant sources of them. We report on an elicitor obtained from the green algae Ulva spp. A fraction containing most exclusively the sulfated polysaccharide known as ulvan-induced expression of a GUS gene placed under the control of a lipoxygenase gene promoter. Gene expression profiling was performed upon ulvan treatments on Medicago truncatula and compared to phytohormone effects. Ulvan induced a gene expression signature similar to that observed upon methyl jasmonate treatment (MeJA). Involvement of jasmonic acid (JA) in ulvan response was confirmed by detecting induction of protease inhibitory activity and by hormonal profiling of JA, salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Ulvan activity on the hormonal pathway was further consolidated by using Arabidopsis hormonal mutants. Altogether, our results demonstrate that green algae are a potential reservoir of ulvan elicitor which acts through the JA pathway. PMID:20445752

  5. COMPLEMENTARY CHROMATIC ADAPTATION IN A FILAMENTOUS BLUE-GREEN ALGA

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Allen; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1973-01-01

    Fluorescent and red light environments generate greatly different patterns of pigmentation and morphology in Fremyella diplosiphon. Most strikingly, red-illuminated cultures contain no measurable C-phycoerythrin and have a mean filament length about 10 times shorter than fluorescent-illuminated cultures. C-phycoerythrin behaves as a photoinducible constituent of this alga. Spectrophotometric and immunochemical procedures were devised so that C-phycoerythrin metabolism could be studied quantitatively with [14C]-phenylalanine pulse-chased cultures. Transfer of red-illuminated cultures to fluorescent light initiates C-phycoerythrin production by essentially de novo synthesis. C-phycoerythrin is not degraded to any significant extent in cultures continuously illuminated with fluorescent light. Transfer of fluorescent-illuminated cultures to red light causes an abrupt cessation of C-phycoerythrin synthesis. The C-phycoerythrin content of cultures adapting to red light decreases and subsequently becomes constant. Loss of C-phycoerythrin is not brought about by metabolic degradation, but rather by a decrease in mean filament length which is effected by transcellular breakage. In this experimental system, light influences intracellular C-phycoerythrin levels by regulating the rate of synthesis of the chromoprotein. PMID:4199659

  6. Production of Recombinant Proteins in the Chloroplast of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Zapata, Daniel; Macedo-Osorio, Karla Soledad; Almaraz-Delgado, Alma Lorena; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Badillo-Corona, Jesus Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast transformation in the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be used for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Here, we describe chloroplast transformation of C. reinhardtii followed by protein detection. Genes of interest integrate stably by homologous recombination into the chloroplast genome following introduction by particle bombardment. Genes are inherited and expressed in lines recovered after selection in the presence of an antibiotic. Recombinant proteins can be detected by conventional techniques like immunoblotting and purified from liquid cultures. PMID:26614282

  7. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae. Final technical report, June 1, 1989--February 1, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1992-12-31

    We have isolated and partially characterized many large, polyhedral, DNA containing, plaque forming viruses which infect certain unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green algae. These viruses have several unique features, including the fact that they code for DNA site-specific endonucleases and DNA methyltransferases. The primary objectives of this study were to identify, clone, and characterize some of the virus-encoded DNA methyltransferases and DNA restriction endonucleases in order to understand their biological function.

  8. Heterotrimeric G proteins in green algae: an early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophyaceaen green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:24614119

  9. Evolutionary trajectories explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Bartelt, John L; Yoshimura, Jin; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Cox, Paul Alan

    2012-08-21

    The evolution of anisogamy (the production of gametes of different size) is the first step in the establishment of sexual dimorphism, and it is a fundamental phenomenon underlying sexual selection. It is believed that anisogamy originated from isogamy (production of gametes of equal size), which is considered by most theorists to be the ancestral condition. Although nearly all plant and animal species are anisogamous, extant species of marine green algae exhibit a diversity of mating systems including both isogamy and anisogamy. Isogamy in marine green algae is of two forms: isogamy with extremely small gametes and isogamy with larger gametes. Based on disruptive selection for fertilization success and zygote survival (theory of Parker, Baker, and Smith), we explored how environmental changes can contribute to the evolution of such complex mating systems by analyzing the stochastic process in the invasion simulations of populations of differing gamete sizes. We find that both forms of isogamy can evolve from other isogamous ancestors through anisogamy. The resulting dimensionless analysis accounts for the evolutionary stability of all types of mating systems in marine green algae, even in the same environment. These results imply that evolutionary trajectories as well as the optimality of gametes/zygotes played an important role in the evolution of gamete size. PMID:22869736

  10. The prospect function of terrestrial nitrogen-fixing blue-green algae on the fixation of desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yusuo; Lei, Jiaqiang

    2003-07-01

    The Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae, which are possessed of both photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, are the leading organisms in the adverse circumstances. With their typical cell structures and physiological abilities, they are strongly resistant to drought, infertility etc. The growth of Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae can rich the soils in nitrogen and organic compounds, which are benefit to other microbes and plants. Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae are widely distributed in Gurbantunggut Desert. It was estimated that about 40% of the surface of the desert are covered by the "Black Crust". "Black Crust" is mainly occupied by Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae. It is Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae that construct the mechanical crust with a little other algae and fungi through biological, chemical and physical actions. So Terrestrial Nitrogen-fixing Blue-green Algae play an important part in desert fixation. It was analyzed that there are three species of the blue-greens in the "Black Crust": Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom.,Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye and Schizothrix mella Gardner. We had isolated Microcoleus vaginatus(Vauch)Gom. and Scytonema ocellatum Lynbye. Some tests had been made to prove the feasibility of the desert fixation of the Blue-greens. Under experiment conditions, the blue-greens grown on the surface of sand, covered the sand quickly after the inoculation, and formed a mechanical fixed surface layer (7 days for Microcoleus vaginatus, 15-21 days for Scytonema ocellatum).

  11. Impact of green algae on the measurement of Microcystis aeruginosa populations in lagoon-treated wastewater with an algae online analyser.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thang; Roddick, Felicity A; Fan, Linhua

    2015-01-01

    Tests on the algae online analyser (AOA) showed that there was a strong direct linear correlation between cell density and in vivo Chl-a concentration for M. aeruginosa over the range of interest for a biologically treated effluent at a wastewater treatment plant (25,000-65,000?cells?mL(-1), equivalent to a biovolume of 2-6?mm3?L(-1)). However, the AOA can provide an overestimate or underestimate of M. aeruginosa populations when green algae are present in the effluent, depending on their species and relative numbers. The results from this study demonstrated that the green algae (e.g., Euglena gracilis, Chlorella sp.) in the field phytoplankton population should be considered during calibration. In summary, the AOA has potential for use as an alert system for the presence of M. aeruginosa, and thus potentially of cyanobacterial blooms, in wastewater stabilization ponds. PMID:25204421

  12. Acute toxicity of live and decomposing green alga Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera to abalone Haliotis discus hannai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-05-01

    From 2007 to 2009, large-scale blooms of green algae (the so-called "green tides") occurred every summer in the Yellow Sea, China. In June 2008, huge amounts of floating green algae accumulated along the coast of Qingdao and led to mass mortality of cultured abalone and sea cucumber. However, the mechanism for the mass mortality of cultured animals remains undetermined. This study examined the toxic effects of Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera, the causative species of green tides in the Yellow Sea during the last three years. The acute toxicity of fresh culture medium and decomposing algal effluent of U. prolifera to the cultured abalone Haliotis discus hannai were tested. It was found that both fresh culture medium and decomposing algal effluent had toxic effects to abalone, and decomposing algal effluent was more toxic than fresh culture medium. The acute toxicity of decomposing algal effluent could be attributed to the ammonia and sulfide presented in the effluent, as well as the hypoxia caused by the decomposition process.

  13. Identification of phytochelatins in the cadmium-stressed conjugating green alga Micrasterias denticulata.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Aquatic environments like peat bogs are affected by anthropogenic metal input into the environment. These ecosystems are inhabited by unicellular green algae of the class Zygnematophyceae. In this study the desmid Micrasterias denticulata was stressed with 600 nM Cd, 10 ?M Cr and 300 nM Cu for 3 weeks. GSH levels were measured with HPLC and did not differ between the different treatments or the control. According to the metallo-thiolomics concept, mass spectrometry was used as a method for unambiguous thiol peptide identification. PC2, PC3 and PC4 were clearly identified in the Cd stressed sample with UPLC-MS by their MS spectrum and molecular masses. PC2 and PC3 were determined to be the main thiol compounds, while PC4 was only abundant in traces in Micrasterias. In addition, the identity of PC2 and PC3 was confirmed by MS/MS. No PCs were detected in the Cu stressed algae sample. However, in the Cr stressed sample traces of PC2 were indicated by a peak in UPLC-MS at the retention time of the PC2 standard, but the intensity was too low to acquire reliable MS and MS/MS spectra. In this study PCs have been detected for the first time in a green alga of the division Streptophyta, a close relative to higher plants. PMID:23266414

  14. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect

    Prochnik, Simon E.; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M.; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A.; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Schmitt, Rudiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the Volvox carteri genome reveals that this green alga's increased organismal complexity and multicellularity are associated with modifications in protein families shared with its unicellular ancestor, and not with large-scale innovations in protein coding capacity. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are uniquely suited for investigating the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138 Mb genome of V. carteri and compared its {approx}14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials, and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Interestingly, volvocine algal-specific proteins are enriched in Volvox, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity.

  15. Studies on the proteins of mass-cultivated, blue-green alga (Spirulina platensis)

    SciTech Connect

    Annusuyadevi, M.; Subbulakshmi, G.; Madhair'devi, K.; Venkalaramein, L.V.

    1981-05-01

    The characteristics of the protein of fresh-water, mass-cultured Spirulina platensis have been studied. The solubility of this algal protein in water and various aqueous solvents has been estimated. The total protein content of the blue-green algae was approximately 50-55% of which nearly 9.9% was nonprotein nitrogen. About 80% of the total protein nitrogen can be extracted by three successive extractions with water. Ths isoelectric point of this algal protein is found to be 3.0. The total proteins were characterized physicochemically by standard techniques. In the ultracentrifuge total proteins resolve into two major components with S20w values of 2.6 and 4.7 S. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic pattern of the total protein showed seven bands including three prominent ones. The in vitro digestibility of the total protein of fresh algae was found to be 85% when assayed with a pepsin-pancreatin system.

  16. The identification of putative RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain associated proteins in red and green algae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunlin; Hager, Paul W; Stiller, John W

    2014-01-01

    A tandemly repeated C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II is functionally essential and strongly conserved in many organisms, including animal, yeast and plant models. Although present in simple, ancestral red algae, CTD tandem repeats have undergone extensive modifications and degeneration during the evolutionary transition to developmentally complex rhodophytes. In contrast, CTD repeats are conserved in both green algae and their more complex land plant relatives. Understanding the mechanistic differences that underlie these variant patterns of CTD evolution requires knowledge of CTD-associated proteins in these 2 lineages. To provide an initial baseline comparison, we bound potential phospho-CTD associated proteins (PCAPs) to artificially synthesized and phosphorylated CTD repeats from the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae and green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our results indicate that red and green algae share a number of PCAPs, including kinases and proteins involved in mRNA export. There also are important taxon-specific differences, including mRNA splicing-related PCAPs recovered from Chlamydomonas but not Cyanidioschyzon, consistent with the relative intron densities in green and red algae. Our results also offer the first experimental indication that different proteins bind 2 distinct types of repeats in Cyanidioschyzon, suggesting a division of function between the proximal and distal CTD, similar to patterns identified in more developmentally complex model organisms. PMID:25483605

  17. A lack of parasitic reduction in the obligate parasitic green alga Helicosporidium.

    PubMed

    Pombert, Jean-François; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free-living autotroph to parasitic heterotroph where host-independence has been unexpectedly preserved. PMID:24809511

  18. A Lack of Parasitic Reduction in the Obligate Parasitic Green Alga Helicosporidium

    PubMed Central

    Pombert, Jean-François; Blouin, Nicolas Achille; Lane, Chris; Boucias, Drion; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of an obligate parasitic lifestyle is often associated with genomic reduction, in particular with the loss of functions associated with increasing host-dependence. This is evident in many parasites, but perhaps the most extreme transitions are from free-living autotrophic algae to obligate parasites. The best-known examples of this are the apicomplexans such as Plasmodium, which evolved from algae with red secondary plastids. However, an analogous transition also took place independently in the Helicosporidia, where an obligate parasite of animals with an intracellular infection mechanism evolved from algae with green primary plastids. We characterised the nuclear genome of Helicosporidium to compare its transition to parasitism with that of apicomplexans. The Helicosporidium genome is small and compact, even by comparison with the relatively small genomes of the closely related green algae Chlorella and Coccomyxa, but at the functional level we find almost no evidence for reduction. Nearly all ancestral metabolic functions are retained, with the single major exception of photosynthesis, and even here reduction is not complete. The great majority of genes for light-harvesting complexes, photosystems, and pigment biosynthesis have been lost, but those for other photosynthesis-related functions, such as Calvin cycle, are retained. Rather than loss of whole function categories, the predominant reductive force in the Helicosporidium genome is a contraction of gene family complexity, but even here most losses affect families associated with genome maintenance and expression, not functions associated with host-dependence. Other gene families appear to have expanded in response to parasitism, in particular chitinases, including those predicted to digest the chitinous barriers of the insect host or remodel the cell wall of Helicosporidium. Overall, the Helicosporidium genome presents a fascinating picture of the early stages of a transition from free-living autotroph to parasitic heterotroph where host-independence has been unexpectedly preserved. PMID:24809511

  19. A new model for the calcification of the green macro-alga Halimeda opuntia (Lamouroux)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizemann, André; Meyer, Friedrich W.; Westphal, Hildegard

    2014-12-01

    Halimeda opuntia is a cosmopolitan marine calcifying green alga in shallow tropical marine environments. Besides Halimeda's contribution to a diverse habitat, the alga is an important sediment producer. Fallen calcareous segments of Halimeda spp. are a major component of carbonate sediments in many tropical settings and play an important role in reef framework development and carbonate platform buildup. Consequently the calcification of H. opuntia accounts for large portions of the carbonate budget in tropical shallow marine ecosystems. Earlier studies investigating the calcification processes of Halimeda spp. have tended to focus on the microstructure or the physiology of the alga, thus overlooking the interaction of physiological and abiotic processes behind the formation of the skeleton. By analyzing microstructural skeletal features of Halimeda segments with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and relating their occurrence to known physiological processes, we have been able to identify the initiation of calcification within an organic matrix and demonstrate that biologically induced cementation is an important process in calcification. For the first time, we propose a model for the calcification of Halimeda spp. that considers both the alga's physiology and the carbon chemistry of the seawater with respect to the development of different skeletal features. The presence of an organic matrix and earlier detected external carbonic anhydrase activity suggest that Halimeda spp. exhibit biotic precipitation of calcium carbonate, as many other species of marine organisms do. On the other hand, it is the formation of micro-anhedral carbonate through the alga's metabolism that leads to a cementation of living segments. Precisely, this process allows H. opuntia to contribute substantial amounts of carbonate sediments to tropical shallow seas.

  20. Photosynthetic biomanufacturing in green algae; production of recombinant proteins for industrial, nutritional, and medical uses.

    PubMed

    Rasala, Beth A; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant proteins are widely used for industrial, nutritional, and medical applications. Green microalgae have attracted considerable attention recently as a biomanufacturing platform for the production of recombinant proteins for a number of reasons. These photosynthetic eukaryotic microorganisms are safe, scalable, easy to genetically modify through transformation, mutagenesis, or breeding, and inexpensive to grow. Many microalgae species are genetically transformable, but the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the most widely used host for recombinant protein expression. An extensive suite of molecular genetic tools has been developed for C. reinhardtii over the last 25 years, including a fully sequenced genome, well-established methods for transformation, mutagenesis and breeding, and transformation vectors for high levels of recombinant protein accumulation and secretion. Here, we review recent successes in the development of C. reinhardtii as a biomanufacturing host for recombinant proteins, including antibodies and immunotoxins, hormones, industrial enzymes, an orally-active colostral protein for gastrointestinal health, and subunit vaccines. In addition, we review the biomanufacturing potential of other green algae from the genera Dunaliella and Chlorella. PMID:24659086

  1. Common Ancestry Is a Poor Predictor of Competitive Traits in Freshwater Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Narwani, Anita; Alexandrou, Markos A.; Herrin, James; Vouaux, Alaina; Zhou, Charles; Oakley, Todd H.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton species traits have been used to successfully predict the outcome of competition, but these traits are notoriously laborious to measure. If these traits display a phylogenetic signal, phylogenetic distance (PD) can be used as a proxy for trait variation. We provide the first investigation of the degree of phylogenetic signal in traits related to competition in freshwater green phytoplankton. We measured 17 traits related to competition and tested whether they displayed a phylogenetic signal across a molecular phylogeny of 59 species of green algae. We also assessed the fit of five models of trait evolution to trait variation across the phylogeny. There was no significant phylogenetic signal for 13 out of 17 ecological traits. For 7 traits, a non-phylogenetic model provided the best fit. For another 7 traits, a phylogenetic model was selected, but parameter values indicated that trait variation evolved recently, diminishing the importance of common ancestry. This study suggests that traits related to competition in freshwater green algae are not generally well-predicted by patterns of common ancestry. We discuss the mechanisms by which the link between phylogenetic distance and phenotypic differentiation may be broken. PMID:26348482

  2. Detecting massive green algae ( Ulva prolifera) blooms in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea using Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Young Baek; Min, Jee-Eun; Ryu, Joo-Hyung

    2012-09-01

    The historically massive bloom of the green macroalgae Ulva prolifera reported in June-August 2008 around the Qingdao, Yellow Sea, East China Sea and Japan coasts has recurred in a similar season and region. On June 13, 2011, around Qingdao, China, the world's first Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) detected an enormous bloom of floating green algae, which originated from the nearshore Subei Bank, China. The large floating green algae patches were observed along and across the Yellow Sea and in the East China Sea during 2011 summer by various oceanic cruises. To detect the massive macroalgae blooms from space, we analyzed their spectral characteristics from in situ optical measurements and satellite-derived green algae spectra. An "Index of floating Green Algae for GOCI" (IGAG) was developed from the multiple spectral band ratios using three wavelengths (555, 660, 745 nm), which the spectral response of green algae reflected at 555, 745, and 865 nm and absorbed at 660 and 680 nm. The results were compared with those obtained by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), and Korea Ocean Satellite Center (KOSC) approaches. An advantage of the IGAG method was that muted or subtle signals of floating green algae were enhanced and separated from surrounding complex water signals. Although maps of floating green algae derived by the other approaches delineated dense green algae, they were less sensitive to subtle (less dense) features and in cases of nearby cloudy or complex water conditions. The floating green algae maps from IGAG provided a more robust estimate of wide floating green algae blooms than those derived using NDVI, EVI, or KOSC approaches. The IGAG approach should be useful for tracing and monitoring changes in green algae blooms on regional and global scales.

  3. Inhibitory effects of terpene alcohols and aldehydes on growth of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ikawa, Miyoshi; Mosley, S.P.; Barbero, L.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The growth of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa was inhibited by terpene alcohols and the terpene aldehyde citral. The strongest activity was shown by citral. Nerol, geraniol, and citronellol also showed pronounced activity. Strong inhibition was linked to acyclic terpenes containing a primary alcohol or aldehyde function. Inhibition appeared to be taking place through the vapor phase rather than by diffusion through the agar medium from the terpene-treated paper disks used in the system. Inhibition through agar diffusion was shown by certain aged samples of terpene hydrocarbons but not by recently purchased samples.

  4. In Vivo Characterization of the Electrochemical Proton Gradient Generated in Darkness in Green Algae and Its Kinetic Effects on Cytochrome b6f Turnover

    E-print Network

    Algae and Its Kinetic Effects on Cytochrome b6f Turnover Giovanni Finazzi*, and Fabrice Rappaport CNRSV) fits well with estimations based on the ATP/ADP ratio measured in green algae under the same conditions dark incubation of algae, the electrochemical transmembrane potential is determined only

  5. Determination of Volatile Compounds in Four Commercial Samples of Japanese Green Algae Using Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  6. Determination of volatile compounds in four commercial samples of Japanese green algae using solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Baldermann, Susanne; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Fujita, Akira; Mase, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Naoharu

    2014-01-01

    Green algae are of great economic importance. Seaweed is consumed fresh or as seasoning in Japan. The commercial value is determined by quality, color, and flavor and is also strongly influenced by the production area. Our research, based on solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS), has revealed that volatile compounds differ intensely in the four varieties of commercial green algae. Accordingly, 41 major volatile compounds were identified. Heptadecene was the most abundant compound from Okayama (Ulva prolifera), Tokushima (Ulva prolifera), and Ehime prefecture (Ulva linza). Apocarotenoids, such as ionones, and their derivatives were prominent volatiles in algae from Okayama (Ulva prolifera) and Tokushima prefecture (Ulva prolifera). Volatile, short chained apocarotenoids are among the most potent flavor components and contribute to the flavor of fresh, processed algae, and algae-based products. Benzaldehyde was predominant in seaweed from Shizuoka prefecture (Monostroma nitidum). Multivariant statistical analysis (PCA) enabled simple discrimination of the samples based on their volatile profiles. This work shows the potential of SPME-GC-MS coupled with multivariant analysis to discriminate between samples of different geographical and botanical origins and form the basis for development of authentication methods of green algae products, including seasonings. PMID:24592162

  7. Volvoxrhodopsin, a light-regulated sensory photoreceptor of the spheroidal green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed Central

    Ebnet, E; Fischer, M; Deininger, W; Hegemann, P

    1999-01-01

    Somatic cells of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri contain a visual rhodopsin that controls the organism's phototactic behavior via two independent photoreceptor currents. Here, we report the identification of an opsinlike gene, designated as volvoxopsin (vop). The encoded protein exhibits homologies to the opsin of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (chlamyopsin) and to the entire animal opsin family, thus providing new perspectives on opsin evolution. Volvoxopsin accumulates within the eyes of somatic cells. However, the vop transcript is detectable only in the reproductive eyeless gonidia and embryos. vop mRNA levels increase 400-fold during embryogenesis, when embryos develop in darkness, whereas the vop transcript does not accumulate when embryos develop in the light. An antisense transformant, T3, was generated. This transformant produces 10 times less volvoxopsin than does the wild type. In T3, the vop transcript is virtually absent, whereas the antisense transcript is predominant and light regulated. It follows that vop expression is under light-dependent transcriptional control but that volvoxopsin itself is not the regulatory photoreceptor. Transformant T3 is phototactic, but its phototactic sensitivity is reduced 10-fold relative to the parental wild-type strain HK10. Thus, we offer definitive genetic evidence that a rhodopsin serves as the photoreceptor for phototaxis in a green alga. PMID:10449581

  8. Effect of copper on the activation of the acid phosphatase from the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Claudio Martín; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    The presence of copper in water environment may have detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, including algae, where different enzymatic systems can be affected. Algae acid phosphatase plays important roles in metabolic processes such as decomposition of organic phosphate, autophagic digestive process, recycling cellular materials and zygote formation during reproduction. This work describes an in vitro activation effect of copper on the acid phosphatase of the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (formely Selenastrum capricornutum) under preincubation condition. Apparent Michaelis constant values of 1.21 and 0.37 mM, and activation energy values of 26.8 and 13.6 kJ mol(-1) were determined in the absence and in the presence of 0.2 mM Cu(2+), respectively. The dissociation constant value for Cu(2+) binding to the enzyme was determined to be 22.04 microM. The decrease of the apparent Michaelis constant (Km) and activation energy values in the presence of Cu(2+) correlates well with its activating effect on the acid phosphatase activity. This propriety could be used as a sensitive bioindicator for copper in environmental samples. PMID:19768555

  9. (Carbon and hydrogen metabolism of green algae in light and dark)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The focus of this project was the elucidation of anaerobic metabolism in ecuaryotic green algae, chlamydomonas reinhardii. Chlamydomonas is a versatile organism that can grow under disparate conditions such as fresh water lakes and sewage ponds. The cell an photoassimilate CO{sub 2} aerobically and anaerobically, the latter after adaptation'' to a hydrogen metabolism. It can recall the knallgas or oxyhydrogen reaction and utilize hydrogen the simplest of all reducing agents for the dark assimilation of CO{sub 2} by the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle. The dark reduction with hydrogen lies on the border line between autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon assimilation. Both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are known in which molecular hydrogen can replace either inorganic or organic hydrogen donors. Here the dark reduction of CO{sub 2} acquires a particular importance since it occurs in the same cell that carries on photoreduction and photosynthesis. We will demonstrate here that the alga chloroplast possesses a respiratory capacity. It seems likely that Chlamydomonas may have retained the chloroplastic respiratory pathway because of the selective advantage provided to the algae under a wide range of environmental conditions that the cells experience in nature. The ability to cycle electrons and poise the reduction level of the photosynthetic apparatus under aerobic and microaerobic conditions could allow more efficient CO{sub 2} fixation and enhanced growth under unfavorable conditions or survival under more severe conditions.

  10. A novel ether-linked phytol-containing digalactosylglycerolipid in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Nagamatsu, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Matsunaga, Naoyuki; Okino, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Kuniko; Ito, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Galactosylglycerolipids (GGLs) and chlorophyll are characteristic components of chloroplast in photosynthetic organisms. Although chlorophyll is anchored to the thylakoid membrane by phytol (tetramethylhexadecenol), this isoprenoid alcohol has never been found as a constituent of GGLs. We here described a novel GGL, in which phytol was linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether linkage. This unique GGL was identified as an Alkaline-resistant and Endogalactosylceramidase (EGALC)-sensitive GlycoLipid (AEGL) in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa. EGALC is an enzyme that is specific to the R-Gal?/?1-6Gal?1-structure of galactolipids. The structure of U. pertusa AEGL was determined following its purification to 1-O-phytyl-3-O-Gal?1-6Gal?1-sn-glycerol by mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. AEGLs were ubiquitously distributed in not only green, but also red and brown marine algae; however, they were rarely detected in terrestrial plants, eukaryotic phytoplankton, or cyanobacteria. PMID:25157808

  11. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of ulvan, a polysaccharide extracted from green algae.

    PubMed

    Alves, Anabela; Sousa, Rui A; Reis, Rui L

    2013-08-01

    Sustainable exploitation and valorization of natural marine resources represents a highly interesting platform for the development of novel biomaterials, with both economic and environmental benefits. In this context, toxicity data is regarded as a crucial and fundamental knowledge prior to any advances in the application development of natural derived polymers. In the present work, cytotoxicity of ulvan extracted from green algae Ulva lactuca was assessed by means of standard in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Fibroblast-like cells were incubated in the presence of this green algae's polysaccharide, and cell viability was assayed through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium test. In addition, double stranded DNA and total protein were quantified in order to assess cell number. In order to establish ulvan's non-cytotoxic behaviour, the effect of this polysaccharide on cellular metabolic activity and cell number was directly compared to hyaluronic acid (HA), used as a non-cytotoxic control material. In this study, ulvan demonstrated promising results in terms of cytotoxicity, comparable to the currently used HA, which suggests that ulvan can be considered as non-toxic in the range of concentrations studied. PMID:22972627

  12. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis. PMID:26333414

  13. Phagotrophy by the picoeukaryotic green alga Micromonas: implications for Arctic Oceans

    PubMed Central

    McKie-Krisberg, Zaid M; Sanders, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPE) are recognized as major primary producers and contributors to phytoplankton biomass in oceanic and coastal environments. Molecular surveys indicate a large phylogenetic diversity in the picoeukaryotes, with members of the Prymnesiophyceae and Chrysophyseae tending to be more common in open ocean waters and Prasinophyceae dominating coastal and Arctic waters. In addition to their role as primary producers, PPE have been identified in several studies as mixotrophic and major predators of prokaryotes. Mixotrophy, the combination of photosynthesis and phagotrophy in a single organism, is well established for most photosynthetic lineages. However, green algae, including prasinophytes, were widely considered as a purely photosynthetic group. The prasinophyte Micromonas is perhaps the most common picoeukaryote in coastal and Arctic waters and is one of the relatively few cultured representatives of the picoeukaryotes available for physiological investigations. In this study, we demonstrate phagotrophy by a strain of Micromonas (CCMP2099) isolated from Arctic waters and show that environmental factors (light and nutrient concentration) affect ingestion rates in this mixotroph. In addition, we show size-selective feeding with a preference for smaller particles, and determine P vs I (photosynthesis vs irradiance) responses in different nutrient conditions. If other strains have mixotrophic abilities similar to Micromonas CCMP2099, the widespread distribution and frequently high abundances of Micromonas suggest that these green algae may have significant impact on prokaryote populations in several oceanic regimes. PMID:24553471

  14. Evidence for equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis in a marine green alga Monostroma angicava

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Tatsuya; Horinouchi, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hironobu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    In cell divisions, relative size of daughter cells should play fundamental roles in gametogenesis and embryogenesis. Differences in gamete size between the two mating types underlie sexual selection. Size of daughter cells is a key factor to regulate cell divisions during cleavage. In cleavage, the form of cell divisions (equal/unequal in size) determines the developmental fate of each blastomere. However, strict validation of the form of cell divisions is rarely demonstrated. We cannot distinguish between equal and unequal cell divisions by analysing only the mean size of daughter cells, because their means can be the same. In contrast, the dispersion of daughter cell size depends on the forms of cell divisions. Based on this, we show that gametogenesis in the marine green alga, Monostroma angicava, exhibits equal size cell divisions. The variance and the mean of gamete size (volume) of each mating type measured agree closely with the prediction from synchronized equal size cell divisions. Gamete size actually takes only discrete values here. This is a key theoretical assumption made to explain the diversified evolution of isogamy and anisogamy in marine green algae. Our results suggest that germ cells adopt equal size cell divisions during gametogenesis. PMID:26333414

  15. Cell death in the unicellular green alga Micrasterias upon H2O2 induction

    PubMed Central

    Darehshouri, Anza; Affenzeller, Matthias; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we investigate whether the unicellular green alga Micrasterias denticulata is capable of executing programmed cell death (PCD) upon experimental induction and by which morphological, molecular and physiological hallmarks it is characterized. This is particularly interesting as unicellular fresh water green algae growing in shallow bog ponds are exposed to extreme environmental conditions and the capability to perform PCD may provide an important strategy to guarantee survival of the population. The theoretically “immortal” alga Micrasterias is an ideal object for such investigations as it has served as a cell biological model system since many years and details on its growth properties, physiology and ultrastructure throughout the cell cycle are well known. Treatment with low concentrations of H2O2 known to induce PCD in other organisms resulted in severe ultrastructural changes of organelles as observed in TEM. These include deformation and partly disintegration of mitochondria, abnormal dilatation of cisternal rims of dictyosomes, the occurrence of multivesicular bodies, an increase in the number of ER compartments and slight condensation of chromatin. Additionally, a statistically significant increase in caspase-3-like activity could be detected which was abrogated by a caspase-3 inhibitor. Photosynthetic activity measured by fast chlorophyll fluorescence decreased as a consequence of H2O2 exposure whereas pigment composition, except of a reduction in carotenoids, was the same as in untreated controls. TUNEL positive staining and ladder-like degradation of DNA, both frequently regarded as PCD hallmark in higher plants could only be detected in dead Micrasterias cells. PMID:18950431

  16. Diatom genomics: genetic acquisitions and mergers.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, R Ellen R; Kilian, Oliver; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2004-12-29

    Diatom algae arose by two-step endosymbiosis. The complete genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has now been sequenced, allowing us to reconstruct the remarkable intracellular gene transfers that occurred during this convoluted cellular evolution. PMID:15620637

  17. Antioxidant system responses in two co-occurring green-tide algae under stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Zhao, Xinyu; Tang, Xuexi

    2015-07-01

    Green tides have occurred every year from 2007 to 2014 in the Yellow Sea. Ulva prolifera (Müller) J. Agardh has been identified as the bloom-forming alga, co-occurring with U. intestinalis. We observed distinct strategies for both algal species during green tides. U. prolifera exhibited a high abundance initially and then decreased dramatically, while U. intestinalis persisted throughout. The antioxidant system responses of these two macroalgae were compared in the late phase of a green tide (in-situ) and after laboratory acclimation. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system responses differed significantly between the two. Malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide contents increased significantly in-situ in U. prolifera, but not in U. intestinalis. In U. prolifera, we observed a significant decrease in total antioxidant ability (T-AOC), antioxidant enzymes (SOD and Apx), and non-enzyme antioxidants (GSH and AsA) in-situ. U. intestinalis showed the same pattern of T-AOC and SOD, but its Gpx, Apx, and GSH responses did not differ significantly. The results suggest that U. prolifera was more susceptible than U. intestinalis to the harsh environmental changes during the late phase of a Yellow Sea green tide. The boom and bust strategy exhibited by U. prolifera and the persistence of U. intestinalis can be explained by differences in enzyme activity and antioxidant systems.

  18. Rapid Mass Movement of Chloroplasts during Segment Formation of the Calcifying Siphonalean Green Alga, Halimeda macroloba

    PubMed Central

    Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Salih, Anya; Kühl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background The calcifying siphonalean green alga, Halimeda macroloba is abundant on coral reefs and is important in the production of calcium carbonate sediments. The process by which new green segments are formed over-night is revealed here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings Growth of new segments was visualised by epifluorescence and confocal microscopy and by pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) fluorimetry. Apical colourless proto-segments were initiated on day 1, and formed a loose network of non-calcified, non-septate filaments, containing no chloroplasts. Rapid greening was initiated at dusk by i) the mass movement of chloroplasts into these filaments from the parent segment and ii) the growth of new filaments containing chloroplasts. Greening was usually complete in 3–5 h and certainly before dawn on day 2 when the first signs of calcification were apparent. Mass chloroplast movement took place at a rate of ?0.65 µm/s. Photosynthetic yield and rate remained low for a period of 1 to several hours, indicating that the chloroplasts were made de novo. Use of the inhibitors colchicine and cytochalasin d indicated that the movement process is dependent on both microtubules and microfilaments. Significance This unusual process involves the mass movement of chloroplasts at a high rate into new segments during the night and rapid calcification on the following day and may be an adaptation to minimise the impact of herbivorous activity. PMID:21750703

  19. Growth and Metabolism of the Green Alga, Chlorella Pyrenoidosa, in Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, W. Ronald

    2003-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on living organisms during space flight has been a topic of interest for some time, and a substantial body of knowledge on the subject has accumulated. Despite this, comparatively little information is available regarding the influence of microgravity on algae, even though it has been suggested for long duration flight or occupancy in space that plant growth systems, including both higher plants and algae, are likely to be necessary for bioregenerative life support systems. High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating-Wall Vessel or HARV bioreactors developed at Johnson Space Center provide a laboratory-based approach to investigating the effects of microgravity on cellular reactions. In this study, the HARV bioreactor was used to examine the influence of simulated microgravity on the growth and metabolism of the green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa. After the first 2 days of culture, cell numbers increased more slowly in simulated microgravity than in the HARV gravity control; after 7 days, growth in simulated microgravity was just over half (58%) that of the gravity control and at 14 days it was less than half (42%). Chlorophyll and protein were also followed as indices of cell competence and function; as with growth, after 2-3 days, protein and chlorophyll levels were reduced in modeled microgravity compared to gravity controls. Photosynthesis is a sensitive biochemical index of the fitness of photosynthetic organisms; thus, CO2-dependent O2 evolution was tested as a measure of photosynthetic capacity of cells grown in simulated microgravity. When data were expressed with respect to cell number, modeled microgravity appeared to have little effect on CO2 fixation. Thus, even though the overall growth rate was lower for cells cultured in microgravity, the photosynthetic capacity of the cells appears to be unaffected. Cells grown in simulated microgravity formed loose clumps or aggregates within about 2 days of culture, with aggregation increasing over time. Presently, the basis for, or significance of, the cell aggregation is unknown. The results from this study suggest that cell growth and morphological characteristics of green algae may be altered by culture in simulated microgravity. The data obtained to date should provide a solid basis for additional experimentation regarding the influence of modeled microgravity on cell morphology, physiological activity, protein production and possibly gene expression in algal and plant cell systems. The final aim of the study is to provide useful information to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the biological effects of microgravity on cells.

  20. Extraction of Nutraceuticals from Spirulina (Blue-Green Alga): A Bioorganic Chemistry Practice Using Thin-layer Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J.; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R.; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together…

  1. Overview on biological activities and molecular characteristics of sulfated polysaccharides from marine green algae in recent years.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-09-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits. PMID:25257786

  2. Unique Regulation of the Calvin Cycle in the Ultrasmall Green Alga Ostreococcus Steven Robbens,1,2

    E-print Network

    Gent, Universiteit

    Unique Regulation of the Calvin Cycle in the Ultrasmall Green Alga Ostreococcus Steven Robbens,1 of the Calvin cycle in land plants at night. GapB originated from a GapA gene duplication and differs from Gap dehydrogenase -- CP12 -- Calvin cycle Short Communication: During photosynthesis, plast- ids of land plants

  3. Overview on Biological Activities and Molecular Characteristics of Sulfated Polysaccharides from Marine Green Algae in Recent Years

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingchong; Wang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hao; Liu, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Among the three main divisions of marine macroalgae (Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta and Rhodophyta), marine green algae are valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds and remain largely unexploited in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed to isolate novel sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) from marine green algae because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Green seaweeds are known to synthesize large quantities of SPs and are well established sources of these particularly interesting molecules such as ulvans from Ulva and Enteromorpha, sulfated rhamnans from Monostroma, sulfated arabinogalactans from Codium, sulfated galacotans from Caulerpa, and some special sulfated mannans from different species. These SPs exhibit many beneficial biological activities such as anticoagulant, antiviral, antioxidative, antitumor, immunomodulating, antihyperlipidemic and antihepatotoxic activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential for further development as healthy food and medical products. The present review focuses on SPs derived from marine green algae and presents an overview of the recent progress of determinations of their structural types and biological activities, especially their potential health benefits. PMID:25257786

  4. Increase of Nitrogenase Activity in the Blue-Green Alga Nostoc muscorum (Cyanobacterium)

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Siegfried; Kerfin, Wolfgang; Böger, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Preincubation of the blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Nostoc muscorum under hydrogen or argon (nongrowing conditions, neither CO2 nor N2 or bound nitrogen present) in the light resulted in a two- to fourfold increase of light-induced hydrogen evolution and a 30% increase of acetylene reduction. Preincubation under the same gases in the dark led to a decrease of both activities. Cultivation of algae under a hydrogen-containing atmosphere (N2, H2, CO2) increased neither hydrogen nor ethylene evolution by the cells. Formation of both ethylene and hydrogen is due to nitrogenase activity, which apparently was induced by the absence of N2 or bound nitrogen and not by the presence of hydrogen. Inhibitors of protein biosynthesis prevented the increase of nitrogenase activity. Hydrogen uptake by the cells was almost unaffected under all of these conditions. With either ammonia or chloramphenicol present, nitrogenase activity decreased under growing conditions (i.e., an atmosphere of N2 and CO2). The kinetics of decrease were the same with ammonia or chloramphenicol, which was interpreted as being due to rapid protein breakdown with a half-life of approximately 4 h. The decay of nitrogenase activity caused by chloramphenicol could be counteracted by nitrogenase-inducing conditions, i.e., by the absence of N2 or bound nitrogen. A cell-free system from preconditioned algae with an adenosine 5?-triphosphate-generating system exhibited the same increase or decrease of nitrogenase activity as the intact cell filaments, indicating that this effect resided in the nitrogenase complex only. We tentatively assume that not the whole nitrogenase complex, but merely a subunit or a special protein with regulatory function, is susceptible to fast turnover. PMID:6777364

  5. Ocean acidification alters the calcareous microstructure of the green macro-alga Halimeda opuntia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizemann, André; Meyer, Friedrich W.; Hofmann, Laurie C.; Wild, Christian; Westphal, Hildegard

    2015-09-01

    Decreases in seawater pH and carbonate saturation state ( ?) following the continuous increase in atmospheric CO2 represent a process termed ocean acidification, which is predicted to become a main threat to marine calcifiers in the near future. Segmented, tropical, marine green macro-algae of the genus Halimeda form a calcareous skeleton that involves biotically initiated and induced calcification processes influenced by cell physiology. As Halimeda is an important habitat provider and major carbonate sediment producer in tropical shallow areas, alterations of these processes due to ocean acidification may cause changes in the skeletal microstructure that have major consequences for the alga and its environment, but related knowledge is scarce. This study used scanning electron microscopy to examine changes of the CaCO3 segment microstructure of Halimeda opuntia specimens that had been exposed to artificially elevated seawater pCO2 of ~650 µatm for 45 d. In spite of elevated seawater pCO2, the calcification of needles, located at the former utricle walls, was not reduced as frequent initiation of new needle-shaped crystals was observed. Abundance of the needles was ~22 % µm-2 higher and needle crystal dimensions ~14 % longer. However, those needles were ~42 % thinner compared with the control treatment. Moreover, lifetime cementation of the segments decreased under elevated seawater pCO2 due to a loss in micro-anhedral carbonate as indicated by significantly thinner calcified rims of central utricles (35-173 % compared with the control treatment). Decreased micro-anhedral carbonate suggests that seawater within the inter-utricular space becomes CaCO3 undersaturated ( ? < 1) during nighttime under conditions of elevated seawater pCO2, thereby favoring CaCO3 dissolution over micro-anhedral carbonate accretion. Less-cemented segments of H. opuntia may impair the environmental success of the alga, its carbonate sediment contribution, and the temporal storage of atmospheric CO2 within Halimeda-derived sediments.

  6. The vegetative arctic freshwater green alga Zygnema is insensitive to experimental UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Roleda, Michael Y; Lütz, Cornelius

    2009-12-01

    The physiological performance and ultrastructural integrity of the vegetative freshwater green alga Zygnema sp., growing under ambient polar day solar radiation and after exposure to experimentally low radiation, but with high UVR:PAR ratio were investigated. In the laboratory, algae were exposed to low photosynthetic active radiation (PAR=P, 400-700 nm, 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), PAR + UV-A = PA (320-400 nm, 4.00 W m(-2) = UV-A) and PAR + UV-A + UV-B = PAB (280-320 nm, 0.42 W m(-2) = UV-B) for 24 h at 7 degrees C. Photosynthetic performance and ultrastructure of ambient solar radiation-exposed (field control) and experimentally treated Zygnema samples were assessed using chlorophyll fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No significant treatment effect was observed in the photosynthesis-irradiance curve parameters. Exclusion of the UV-B spectrum in the laboratory treatment caused significantly lower effective photosynthetic quantum yield compared to samples exposed to the whole radiation spectrum. TEM revealed no obvious differences in the ultrastructure of field control and laboratory P-, PA- and PAB-exposed samples. Substantial amounts of lipid bodies, visualized by Sudan IV staining, were observed in all samples. Chloroplasts contained numerous plastoglobules. Organelles like mitochondria, Golgi bodies and the nucleus remained unaffected by the radiation exposures. Zygnema is well adapted to ambient solar radiation, enabling the alga to cope with experimental UV exposure and it is expected to persist in a scenario with enhanced UV radiation caused by stratospheric ozone depletion. PMID:19660959

  7. Ketocarotenoid biosynthesis outside of plastids in the unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, K; Hirschberg, J; Hagen, C

    2001-02-23

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in algae and plants takes place within plastids. In these organelles, carotenoids occur either in a free form or bound to proteins. Under stress, the unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis accumulates secondary carotenoids, mainly astaxanthin esters, in cytoplasmic lipid vesicles up to 4% of its dry mass. It is therefore one of the favored organisms for the biotechnological production of these antioxidative compounds. We have studied the cellular localization and regulation of the enzyme beta-carotene oxygenase in H. pluvialis that catalyzes the introduction of keto functions at position C-4 of the beta-ionone ring of beta-carotene and zeaxanthin. Using immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections and Western blot analysis of cell fractions, we discovered that under inductive conditions, beta-carotene oxygenase was localized both in the chloroplast and in the cytoplasmic lipid vesicles, which are (according to their lipid composition) derived from cytoplasmic membranes. However, beta-carotene oxygenase activity was confined to the lipid vesicle compartment. Because an early carotenogenic enzyme in the pathway, phytoene desaturase, was found only in the chloroplast (Grünewald, K., Eckert, M., Hirschberg, J., and Hagen, C. (2000) Plant Physiol. 122, 1261-1268), a transport of intermediates from the site of early biosynthetic steps in the chloroplast to the site of oxygenation and accumulation in cytoplasmic lipid vesicles is proposed. PMID:11085982

  8. A diverse assemblage of indole-3-acetic acid producing bacteria associate with unicellular green algae.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Christopher E; Piskorska, Magdalena; Soule, Tanya; Petelos, Angela; Yeager, Chris M

    2014-08-01

    Microalgae have tremendous potential as a renewable feedstock for the production of liquid transportation fuels. In natural waters, the importance of physical associations and biochemical interactions between microalgae and bacteria is generally well appreciated, but the significance of these interactions to algal biofuels production have not been investigated. Here, we provide a preliminary report on the frequency of co-occurrence between indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)-producing bacteria and green algae in natural and engineered ecosystems. Growth experiments with unicellular algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, revealed IAA concentration-dependent responses in chlorophyll content and dry weight. Importantly, discrete concentrations of IAA resulted in cell culture synchronization, suggesting that biochemical priming of cellular metabolism could vastly improve the reliability of high density cultivation. Bacterial interactions may have an important influence on algal growth and development; thus, the preservation or engineered construction of the algal-bacterial assembly could serve as a control point for achieving low input, reliable production of algal biofuels. PMID:24879600

  9. The Unicellular Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as an Experimental System to Study Chloroplast RNA Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, J.; Kück, U.

    Chloroplasts are typical organelles of photoautotrophic eukaryotic cells which drive a variety of functions, including photosynthesis. For many years the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has served as an experimental organism for studying photosynthetic processes. The recent development of molecular tools for this organism together with efficient methods of genetic analysis and the availability of many photosynthesis mutants has now made this alga a powerful model system for the analysis of chloroplast biogenesis. For example, techniques have been developed to transfer recombinant DNA into both the nuclear and the chloroplast genome. This allows both complementation tests and analyses of gene functions in vivo. Moreover, site-specific DNA recombinations in the chloroplast allow targeted gene disruption experiments which enable a "reverse genetics" to be performed. The potential of the algal system for the study of chloroplast biogenesis is illustrated in this review by the description of regulatory systems of gene expression involved in organelle biogenesis. One example concerns the regulation of trans-splicing of chloroplast mRNAs, a process which is controlled by both multiple nuclear- and chloroplast-encoded factors. The second example involves the stabilization of chloroplast mRNAs. The available data lead us predict distinct RNA elements, which interact with trans-acting factors to protect the RNA against nucleolytic attacks.

  10. Fatty acid profiles of four filamentous green algae under varying culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although benthic filamentous algae are interesting targets for wastewater treatment and biotechnology, relatively little is known about their biochemical composition and variation in response to growth conditions. Fatty acid composition of four benthic filamentous green algae was determined in different culture conditions. Although the response was partly species-dependent, increasing culture age, nitrogen deprivation and dark exposure of stationary phase greatly increased both total fatty acid content (TFA) from 12-35 to 40-173mgg(-1) dry weight (DW) and the relative proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from 21-58% to 55-87% of TFA, with dark exposure having the greatest effect. However, the main variation in fatty acid composition was between species, with Uronema being rich in C16:0 (2.3% of DW), Klebsormidium in C18:2?6 (5.4% of DW) and Stigeoclonium in C18:3?3 (11.1% of DW). This indicates the potential of the latter two species as potential sources of these PUFAs. PMID:26555240

  11. The influence of nitrogen on heterocyst production in blue-green algae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogawa, Roann E.; Carr, John F.

    1969-01-01

    A series of experiments on heterocyst production in Anabaena variabilis provides some strong indirect evidence for the role of heterocysts in nitrogen fixation. Of the algae tested (Anabaena variabilis, A. inaequalis, A. cylindrica, A. flos-aquae, Tolypothrix distorta, Gloeotrichia echinulata, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, Oscillatoria sp., and Microcystis aeruginosa), only those with heterocysts grew in a nitrate-free medium. Growth in the nitrate-free medium was accompanied by an increase in heterocysts. Heterocyst formation in A. variabilis was evident 24 hr after transfer from a nitrate-containing to a nitrate-free medium. The number of heterocysts was altered by changes in the nitrogen source. Numbers were lowest when NH4-N was used as a nitrogen source and highest when nitrogen (N2-N) was derived from the atmosphere. Heterocyst numbers could also be regulated by controlling the concentration of NO3-N in the medium. Heterocyst production depended on the absence of combined nitrogen and the presence of phosphate. Data are presented on the occurrence of blue-green algae (with heterocysts) in Lake Erie and the environmental conditions apparently necessary for them to become dominant.

  12. [Cellular response of freshwater green algae to the toxicity of tetracycline antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-mei; Wang, Yan-hua; Rao, Gui-wei

    2013-09-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics are a group of antibiotics which has been extensively used in most countries and are also the most widely used veterinary drugs and food additives in aquaculture and livestock industries of China. Because the substances are poorly adsorbed in the gut of animals and are only partially eliminated in sewage treatment plants, the antibiotics and their metabolites reach surface water where they may affect the aquatic organisms and human health. Herein, using green algae as test organisms, we studied the effects of tetracycline (TC), chlortetracycline (CTC) and deoxyteracycline (DC) on the cell permeability and growth inhibition of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus. After 96 h of antibiotics exposure, the permeability of the cell membranes of both algae was decreased in the entire concentration range of doxycycline and was increased after exposure to a low concentration of tetracycline and chlortetracycline, then was decreased with the increase of the two antibiotics concentrations. The growth inhibiting effects of these three antibiotics on Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Scenedesmus obliquus were in an order of DC > TC > CTC. The ecotoxic response of Scenedesmus obliquus to tetracycline antibiotics was more sensitive than Chlorella pyrenoidosa. PMID:24288980

  13. Genotoxic effects of commercial formulations of Chlorpyrifos and Tebuconazole on green algae.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo Santiago; Di Marzio, Walter Darío; Sáenz, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    The alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used for the study of the genotoxic effects of insecticide Chlorpyrifos and fungicide Tebuconazole (commercial formulations) on two freshwater green algae species, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nannocloris oculata, after 24 h of exposure. The percentage of DNA in tail of migrating nucleoids was taken as an endpoint of DNA impairment. Cell viability was measured by fluorometric detection of chlorophyll "a" in vivo and the determination of cell auto-fluorescence. Only the higher concentration of Chlorpyrifos tested resulted to affect significantly the cell viability of P. subcapitata, whereas cells of N. oculata were not affected. Tebuconazole assayed concentrations (3 and 6 mg/l) did not affect cell viability of both species. The results of comet assay on P. subcapitata showed that Chlorpyrifos concentration evaluated (0.8 mg/l) exerted a genotoxic effects; while for the other specie a concentration of 10 mg/l was needed. Tebuconazole was genotoxic at 3 and 6 mg/l for both species. The comet assay evidenced damage at the level of DNA simple strains molecule at pesticide concentrations were cytotoxicity was not evident, demonstrating that algae are models to take into account in ecological risk assessments for aquatic environments. PMID:25230876

  14. Rapid biotransformation of arsenate into oxo-arsenosugars by a freshwater unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shinichi; Fujiwara, Shoko; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Kaise, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    We examined the short-term metabolic processes of arsenate for 24 h in a freshwater unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type strain CC-125. The arsenic species in the algal extracts were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after water extraction using a sonicator. Speciation analyses of arsenic showed that the levels of arsenite, arsenate, and methylarsonic acid in the cells rapidly increased for 30 min to 1 h, and those of dimethylarsinic acid and oxo-arsenosugar-glycerol also tended to increase continuously for 24 h, while that of oxo-arsenosugar-phosphate was quite low and fluctuated throughout the experiment. These results indicate that this alga can rapidly biotransform arsenate into oxo-arsenosugar-glycerol for at least 10 min and then oxo-arsenosugar-phosphate through both reduction of incorporated arsenate to arsenite and methylation of arsenite and/or arsenate retained in the cells to dimethylarsinic acid via methylarsonic acid as an possible intermediate. PMID:21389618

  15. Catalytic pyrolysis of green algae for hydrocarbon production using H+ZSM-5 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Thangalazhy-Gopakumar, Suchithra; Adhikari, Sushil; Chattanathan, Shyamsundar Ayalur; Gupta, Ram B

    2012-08-01

    Microalgae are considered as an intriguing candidate for biofuel production due to their high biomass yield. Studies on bio-oil production through fast pyrolysis and upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels using algal biomass are limited as compared to other terrestrial biomass. Therefore, in this study, a fresh water green alga, Chlorella vulgaris, was taken for pyrolysis study. The average activation energy for pyrolysis zone was found to be 109.1 kJ/mol. Fixed-bed pyrolysis of algae gave a bio-oil yield of 52.7 wt.%, which accounts for 60.7 wt.% carbon yield. In addition, analytical pyrolysis of C. vulgaris was carried out in a Py/GC-MS to identify major compounds present in bio-oil with and without catalyst (H(+)ZSM-5). The study found that in catalytic-pyrolysis, as the catalyst loading increased from zero to nine times of the biomass, the carbon yield of aromatic hydrocarbons increased from 0.9 to 25.8 wt.%. PMID:22705518

  16. A LARGE SCALE QUASI-CRYSTALLINE LAMELLAR LATTICE IN CHLOROPLASTS OF THE GREEN ALGA ZYGNEMA

    PubMed Central

    Mclean, Robert J.; Pessoney, George F.

    1970-01-01

    A quasi-crystalline lamellar lattice was observed in chloroplasts of the filamentous green alga Zygnema. The lattice does not appear in the cells until cultures are at the end of the log phase of growth. Pseudograna are also present and become more numerous towards the middle of the log phase. The three-dimensional lattice superficially resembles the configuration of cubic prolamellar bodies but is about 10 times larger and is entirely different in internal structure. The lattice is composed of one or two appressed thylakoids in a stroma matrix which is bounded on each side by a single thylakoid membrane. This multilayered sandwich of membranes and matrix occupies a position equivalent to the single membrane of a cubic prolamellar body. PMID:5459939

  17. Synchronization of Green Algae by Light and Dark Regimes for Cell Cycle and Cell Division Studies.

    PubMed

    Hlavová, Monika; Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kate?ina

    2016-01-01

    A synchronous population of cells is one of the prerequisites for studying cell cycle processes such as DNA replication, nuclear and cellular division. Green algae dividing by multiple fission represent a unique single cell system enabling the preparation of highly synchronous cultures by application of a light-dark regime similar to what they experience in nature. This chapter provides detailed protocols for synchronization of different algal species by alternating light-dark cycles; all critical points are discussed extensively. Moreover, detailed information on basic analysis of cell cycle progression in such cultures is presented, including analyses of nuclear, cellular, and chloroplast divisions. Modifications of basic protocols that enable changes in cell cycle progression are also suggested so that nuclear or chloroplast divisions can be followed separately. PMID:26659950

  18. Assessment of blue-green algae in substantially reducing nitrogen fertilizer requirements for biomass fuel crops

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.B.; Molten, P.M.; Metting, B.

    1981-07-01

    Laboratory, mass culture, and field studies are being undertaken in order to assess the potential of using blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) as nitrogen biofertilizers on irrigated ground. Of seven candidate strains, two were chosen for application to replicated field plots sown to field corn and the basis of laboratory-scale soil tray experiments and ease of semi-continuous 8000 l culture. Chosen were Anabaena BM-165, isolated from a local soil and Tolypothrix tenuis, imported from India. Using the acetylene reduction method, Anabaena is estimated from laboratory soil experiments to be able to fix from 30 to 62 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1527 mg dry wt/l. T. tenuis is estimated from laboratory experiments to be able to fix from 27 to 65 kg N/ha/y, and has been mass cultured to a density of 1630 mg dry wt/l.

  19. Viruses of eukaryotic green algae; Progress report, June 20, 1990--July 1, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Van Etten, J.L.

    1991-12-31

    Many large polyhedral, dsDNA containing (ca. 330 kb), plaque forming viruses which infect a unicellular, eukaryotic, chlorella-like green alga have been isolated and characterized. The plaque assay, the ability to synchronously infect the host, the short life cycle, and the ability of the viruses to undergo homologous recombination make them excellent model systems for studying many plant cell functions in the manner that bacterial and animal viruses have been used to study bacterial and animal cell functions. These viruses have several unique features including: (1) coding for DNA methyltransferase and site-specific (restriction) endonucleases and (2) unlike other viruses, these viruses appear to code for the enzymes involved in the glycosylation of their glycoproteins.

  20. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:25764429

  1. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein

    PubMed Central

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of Characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  2. Vesicular trafficking in characean green algae and the possible involvement of a VAMP72-family protein.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion; Hametner, Christina; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The RAB5 GTPase ARA6 (AtARA6) of Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be involved in endosomal trafficking by targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane. During this process AtARA6 is working in close relationship with the SNARE protein VAMP727 (vesicle associated membrane protein 727). Recently, ARA6 of the characean green algae Chara australis (CaARA6) was shown to have properties similar to AtARA6, pointing to similar trafficking pathways. In order to gain further insight into the vesicle trafficking machinery of characeae, C. australis was analyzed for homologous proteins of the VAMP72-family. A CaVAMP72 protein was detected and classified by protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses. PMID:24614164

  3. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using polysaccharides extracted from marine macro algae.

    PubMed

    El-Rafie, H M; El-Rafie, M H; Zahran, M K

    2013-07-25

    Green synthesis of nanoparticles that have environmentally acceptable solvent systems and eco-friendly reducing agents is of great importance. The aim of this work was to synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using water soluble polysaccharides extracted from four marine macro-algae, namely, Pterocladia capillacae (Pc), Jania rubins (Jr), Ulva faciata (Uf), and Colpmenia sinusa (Cs) as reducing agents for silver ions as well as stabilizing agents for the synthesized AgNPs. The formed Ag-NPs have been confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR analysis and TEM. The resultant Ag-NPs colloidal solutions were applied to cotton fabrics in presence and absence of citric acid (CA) or a binder (B). The antimicrobial activity of the treated fabrics was evaluated. The results revealed that the antimicrobial activity depends on type of the fabric treatment, size of the synthesized Ag-NPs and the algal species used for polysaccharides extraction. PMID:23768580

  4. Mössbauer study of cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue green alga)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambe, Shizuko

    1990-07-01

    Mössbauer emission and absorption studies have been performed on cobalt and iron in the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga). The Mössbauer spectrum of the cyanobacterium cultivated with57Co is decomposed into two doublets. The parameters of the major doublet are in good agreement with those of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) labeled with57Co. The other minor doublet has parameters close to those of Fe(II) coordinated with six nitrogen atoms. These suggest that cobalt is used for the biosynthesis of vitamin B12 or its analogs in the cyanobacterium. The spectra of the cyanobacterium grown with57Fe show that iron is in the high-spin trivalent state and possibly in the form of ferritin, iron storage protein.

  5. Plastoquinone as a common link between photosynthesis and respiration in a blue-green alga.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Satoh, K; Katoh, S

    1980-09-01

    The role of plastoquinone in a thermophilic blue-green alga, Shynechococcus sp., was studied by measuring reduction kinetics of cytochrome 553 which was oxidized with red flash preferentially exciting photosystem I. Sensitivity of the cytochrome reduction to DBMIB Abbreviations: DCMU = 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea; DBMIB = 2,5-dib romo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone; HOQNO = 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide indicates that cytochrome 553 accepts electrons from reduced plastoquinone. Plastoquinone is in turn reduced in cells without electrons from photosystem II, since DCMU Abbreviations: DCMU = 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea; DBMIB = 2,5-dib romo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone; HOQNO = 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide , which inhibited methyl viologen photoreduction more strongly than DBMIB, failed to affect the cytochrome reduction. Participation of cyclic electron transport around photosystem I in cytochrome reduction in the presence of DCMU was excluded, because methyl viologen and antimycin A had no effect on the cytochrome kinetics. On the other hand, electron donation from endogenous substrates to plastoquinone was suggested from decreases in rate of the cytochrome reduction by dark starvation of cells and also from restoration of fast reduction kinetics by the addition of exogenous substrates to or by reillumination of starved cells.KCN, which completely suppressed respiratory O2-uptake, induced a marked acceleration of the cytochrome reduction in starved cells. The poison was less or not effective in stimulating the cytochrome reduction in more extensively starved or reilluminated cells.Results indicate that plastoquinone is functioning not only in the photosynthetic but also in the respiratory electron transport chain, thereby forming a common link between the two energy conservation systems of the blue-green alga. PMID:24470079

  6. A multidisciplinary study of iron transport and storage in the marine green alga Tetraselmis suecica.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies being distinguished: strategy I involves the induction of a Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) along with Fe(II) or Fe(III) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine, plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the green alga Tetraselmis suecica. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Tetraselmis in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor and other studies it appears that a reductive-oxidative pathway such as that found in yeast and the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is likely. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopies, to identify three metabolites. The first exhibits Mössbauer parameters typical of a [Fe(4)S(4)](2+) cluster and which accounts for approximately 10% of the total intracellular iron pool. The second displays a spectrum typical of a [Fe(II)O(6)] system accounting for approximately 2% of the total pool. The largest component (ca. 85+%) consists of polymeric iron-oxo mineral species with parameters between that of the crystalline ferrihydrite core of animal ferritins and the amorphous hydrated ferric phosphate of bacterial and plant ferritins. PMID:23041362

  7. Pectin metabolism and assembly in the cell wall of the charophyte green alga Penium margaritaceum.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Sřrensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G T; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-05-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  8. From algae to angiosperms–inferring the phylogeny of green plants (Viridiplantae) from 360 plastid genomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing has provided a wealth of plastid genome sequence data from an increasingly diverse set of green plants (Viridiplantae). Although these data have helped resolve the phylogeny of numerous clades (e.g., green algae, angiosperms, and gymnosperms), their utility for inferring relationships across all green plants is uncertain. Viridiplantae originated 700-1500 million years ago and may comprise as many as 500,000 species. This clade represents a major source of photosynthetic carbon and contains an immense diversity of life forms, including some of the smallest and largest eukaryotes. Here we explore the limits and challenges of inferring a comprehensive green plant phylogeny from available complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequence data. Results We assembled protein-coding sequence data for 78 genes from 360 diverse green plant taxa with complete or nearly complete plastid genome sequences available from GenBank. Phylogenetic analyses of the plastid data recovered well-supported backbone relationships and strong support for relationships that were not observed in previous analyses of major subclades within Viridiplantae. However, there also is evidence of systematic error in some analyses. In several instances we obtained strongly supported but conflicting topologies from analyses of nucleotides versus amino acid characters, and the considerable variation in GC content among lineages and within single genomes affected the phylogenetic placement of several taxa. Conclusions Analyses of the plastid sequence data recovered a strongly supported framework of relationships for green plants. This framework includes: i) the placement of Zygnematophyceace as sister to land plants (Embryophyta), ii) a clade of extant gymnosperms (Acrogymnospermae) with cycads?+?Ginkgo sister to remaining extant gymnosperms and with gnetophytes (Gnetophyta) sister to non-Pinaceae conifers (Gnecup trees), and iii) within the monilophyte clade (Monilophyta), Equisetales?+?Psilotales are sister to Marattiales?+?leptosporangiate ferns. Our analyses also highlight the challenges of using plastid genome sequences in deep-level phylogenomic analyses, and we provide suggestions for future analyses that will likely incorporate plastid genome sequence data for thousands of species. We particularly emphasize the importance of exploring the effects of different partitioning and character coding strategies. PMID:24533922

  9. Evaluation of toxicity data to green algae and relationship with hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ling; Li, Jin J; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiao H; Wen, Yang; Qun, Wei C; Su, Li M; Zhao, Yuan H

    2015-02-01

    The quality of the biological activity data is of great importance for the development of algal quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. However, a number of algal QSAR models in the literature were developed based on toxicity data without considering the response endpoints, exposure periods and species sensitivity. In this paper, 2323 algal toxicity data (log 1/EC50) in different toxicity response endpoints for 1081 compounds to 26 algal species within different exposure periods (14 and 15 min; 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 and 192 h) were used to evaluate the quality of the toxicity data to green algae. Analysis of 72 h toxicity to algae showed that the closed test had the same sensitivity as the open test for most of the test compounds, but a significant difference was observed for a few compounds. The overall average difference for all compounds ranges from 0.15 to 0.43 log units between toxicity endpoints (yield–growth rate). The relationships between exposure periods of 24, 48, 72 and 96 h indicated that 48 h exposure period is the most sensitive for algal growth inhibition test, and its sensitivity is 0.25 log units greater than 72 and 96 h exposure periods, respectively. Interspecies relationships showed that some algal species have very close sensitivity (e.g. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Chlorella pyrenoidosa or Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus, respectively), whereas some species have significantly different sensitivity (e.g. P. subcapitata and S. obliquus). Relationships between toxicity and hydrophobicity demonstrated that no difference was observed for non-polar narcotics within different exposure periods (24, 48, 72, and 96 h) or response variables (yield and growth rate). For polar narcotics, in contrast, algal toxicity is dependent on algal species and is related to the response variables and exposure period. We cannot expect significant QSAR models between algal toxicity and descriptors without considering species sensitivity, exposure periods and response endpoints. PMID:25462296

  10. Screening and isolation of the algicidal compounds from marine green alga Ulva intestinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xue; Jin, Haoliang; Zhang, Lin; Hu, Wei; Li, Yahe; Xu, Nianjun

    2015-07-01

    Twenty species of seaweed were collected from the coast of Zhejiang, China, extracted with ethanol, and screened for algicidal activity against red tide microalgae Heterosigma akashiwo and Prorocentrum micans. Inhibitory effects of fresh and dried tißsues of green alga Ulva intestinalis were assessed and the main algicidal compounds were isolated, purified, and identified. Five seaweed species, U. intestinalis, U. fasciata, Grateloupia romosissima, Chondria crassicaulis, and Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis, were investigated for their algicidal activities. Fresh tissues of 8.0 and 16.0 mg/mL of U. intestinalis dissolved in media significantly inhibited growth of H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. Dried tissue and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts of U. intestinalis at greater than 1.2 and 0.04 mg/mL, respectively, were fatal to H. akashiwo, while its water and EtOAc extracts in excess of 0.96 and 0.32 mg/mL, respectively, were lethal to P. micans. Three algicidal compounds in the EtOAc extracts were identified as 15-ethoxy- (6z,9z,12z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (I), (6E,9E,12E)-(2-acetoxy-?-D-glucose)-octadecatrienoic acid ester (II) and hexadecanoic acid (III). Of these, compound II displayed the most potent algicidal activity with IC50 values of 4.9 and 14.1 µg/mL for H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. Compound I showed moderate algicidal activity with IC50 values of 13.4 and 24.7 µg/mL for H. akashiwo and P. micans, respectively. These findings suggested that certain macroalgae or products therefrom could be used as effective biological control agents against red tide algae.

  11. Acute toxicities of pharmaceuticals toward green algae. mode of action, biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system and quantile regression models.

    PubMed

    Villain, Jonathan; Minguez, Laetitia; Halm-Lemeille, Marie-Pierre; Durrieu, Gilles; Bureau, Ronan

    2016-02-01

    The acute toxicities of 36 pharmaceuticals towards green algae were estimated from a set of quantile regression models representing the first global quantitative structure-activity relationships. The selection of these pharmaceuticals was based on their predicted environmental concentrations. An agreement between the estimated values and the observed acute toxicity values was found for several families of pharmaceuticals, in particular, for antidepressants. A recent classification (BDDCS) of drugs based on ADME properties (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) was clearly correlated with the acute ecotoxicities towards algae. Over-estimation of toxicity from our QSAR models was observed for classes 2, 3 and 4 whereas our model results were in agreement for the class 1 pharmaceuticals. Clarithromycin, a class 3 antibiotic characterized by weak metabolism and high solubility, was the most toxic to algae (molecular stability and presence in surface water). PMID:26590695

  12. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  13. Foreign gene recruitment to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Baglivi, Francesca L; Jenkins, Christina E; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are highly successful marine and freshwater algae that contribute up to 20% of global carbon fixation. These species are leading candidates for biofuel production owing to ease of culturing and high fatty acid content. To assist in strain improvement and downstream applications for potential use as a biofuel, it is important to understand the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms. The evolutionary history of diatoms is however complicated by likely multiple endosymbioses involving the capture of foreign cells and horizontal gene transfer into the host genome. Using a phylogenomic approach, we assessed the evolutionary history of 12 diatom genes putatively encoding functions related to lipid biosynthesis. We found evidence of gene transfer likely from a green algal source for seven of these genes, with the remaining showing either vertical inheritance or evolutionary histories too complicated to interpret given current genome data. The functions of horizontally transferred genes encompass all aspects of lipid biosynthesis (initiation, biosynthesis, and desaturation of fatty acids) as well as fatty acid elongation, and are not restricted to plastid-targeted proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the transfer, duplication, and subfunctionalization of genes were key steps in the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms and other photosynthetic eukaryotes. This target pathway for biofuel research is highly chimeric and surprisingly, our results suggest that research done on related genes in green algae may have application to diatom models. PMID:24404416

  14. Foreign gene recruitment to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cheong Xin; Baglivi, Francesca L; Jenkins, Christina E; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2013-09-01

    Diatoms are highly successful marine and freshwater algae that contribute up to 20% of global carbon fixation. These species are leading candidates for biofuel production owing to ease of culturing and high fatty acid content. To assist in strain improvement and downstream applications for potential use as a biofuel, it is important to understand the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms. The evolutionary history of diatoms is however complicated by likely multiple endosymbioses involving the capture of foreign cells and horizontal gene transfer into the host genome. Using a phylogenomic approach, we assessed the evolutionary history of 12 diatom genes putatively encoding functions related to lipid biosynthesis. We found evidence of gene transfer likely from a green algal source for seven of these genes, with the remaining showing either vertical inheritance or evolutionary histories too complicated to interpret given current genome data. The functions of horizontally transferred genes encompass all aspects of lipid biosynthesis (initiation, biosynthesis, and desaturation of fatty acids) as well as fatty acid elongation, and are not restricted to plastid-targeted proteins. Our findings demonstrate that the transfer, duplication, and subfunctionalization of genes were key steps in the evolution of lipid biosynthesis in diatoms and other photosynthetic eukaryotes. This target pathway for biofuel research is highly chimeric and surprisingly, our results suggest that research done on related genes in green algae may have application to diatom models. PMID:24404416

  15. [Peculiarities of growth of the monocellular green algae culture after the influence of electromagnetic field in deuterated water-containing media].

    PubMed

    Semenov, K T; Aslanian, R R

    2013-01-01

    Exposing the inoculum of monocellular green algae Dunalialla tertiolecta and Tetraselmis viridis to 50 Hz electromagnetic field for several hours resulted in a reduced growth rate in both cultures. It was ascertained that heavy water inhibited growth of algae Dunaliella tertiolecta. The light water activated growth of the culture in the exponential phase only. PMID:23650857

  16. Evidence for land plant cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms in charophyte green algae

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, Maria D.; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Johansen, Ida E.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Doblin, Monika S.; Bacic, Antony; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The charophyte green algae (CGA) are thought to be the closest living relatives to the land plants, and ancestral CGA were unique in giving rise to the land plant lineage. The cell wall has been suggested to be a defining structure that enabled the green algal ancestor to colonize land. These cell walls provide support and protection, are a source of signalling molecules, and provide developmental cues for cell differentiation and elongation. The cell wall of land plants is a highly complex fibre composite, characterized by cellulose cross-linked by non-cellulosic polysaccharides, such as xyloglucan, embedded in a matrix of pectic polysaccharides. How the land plant cell wall evolved is currently unknown: early-divergent chlorophyte and prasinophyte algae genomes contain a low number of glycosyl transferases (GTs), while land plants contain hundreds. The number of GTs in CGA is currently unknown, as no genomes are available, so this study sought to give insight into the evolution of the biosynthetic machinery of CGA through an analysis of available transcriptomes. Methods Available CGA transcriptomes were mined for cell wall biosynthesis GTs and compared with GTs characterized in land plants. In addition, gene cloning was employed in two cases to answer important evolutionary questions. Key Results Genetic evidence was obtained indicating that many of the most important core cell wall polysaccharides have their evolutionary origins in the CGA, including cellulose, mannan, xyloglucan, xylan and pectin, as well as arabino-galactan protein. Moreover, two putative cellulose synthase-like D family genes (CSLDs) from the CGA species Coleochaete orbicularis and a fragment of a putative CSLA/K-like sequence from a CGA Spirogyra species were cloned, providing the first evidence that all the cellulose synthase/-like genes present in early-divergent land plants were already present in CGA. Conclusions The results provide new insights into the evolution of cell walls and support the notion that the CGA were pre-adapted to life on land by virtue of the their cell wall biosynthetic capacity. These findings are highly significant for understanding plant cell wall evolution as they imply that some features of land plant cell walls evolved prior to the transition to land, rather than having evolved as a result of selection pressures inherent in this transition. PMID:25204387

  17. Response of the green alga Oophila sp., a salamander endosymbiont, to a PSII-inhibitor under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Leilan; Brain, Richard; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Hosmer, Alan; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    In a rare example of autotroph-vertebrate endosymbiosis, eggs of the yellow-spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum) are colonized by a green alga (Oophila sp.) that significantly enhances salamander development. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for impacts to the salamander embryo when growth of the algae is impaired by exposure to herbicides. To further investigate this relationship, the authors characterized the response of the symbiotic algae (Oophila sp.) alone to the photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor atrazine under controlled laboratory conditions. After extraction of the alga from A. maculatum eggs and optimization of culturing conditions, 4 toxicity assays (96 h each) were conducted. Recovery of the algal population was also assessed after a further 96 h in untreated media. Average median effective concentration (EC50) values of 123 µg L(-1) (PSII yield), 169 µg L(-1) (optical density), and 299 µg L(-1) (growth rate) were obtained after the 96-h exposure. Full recovery of exposed algal populations after 96 h in untreated media was observed for all endpoints, except for optical density at the greatest concentration tested (300 µg L(-1) ). Our results show that, under laboratory conditions, Oophila sp. is generally less sensitive to atrazine than standard test species. Although conditions of growth in standard toxicity tests are not identical to those in the natural environment, these results provide an understanding of the tolerance of this alga to PSII inhibitors as compared with other species. PMID:24782078

  18. Culture observation and molecular phylogenetic analysis on the blooming green alga Chaetomorpha valida (Cladophorales, Chlorophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yunyan; Tang, Xiaorong; Zhan, Zifeng; Teng, Linhong; Ding, Lanping; Huang, Bingxin

    2013-05-01

    The marine green alga Chaetomorpha valida fouls aquaculture ponds along the coastal cities of Dalian and Rongcheng, China. Unialgal cultures were observed under a microscope to determine the developmental morphological characters of C. valida. Results reveal that gametophytic filaments often produce lateral branches under laboratory culture conditions, suggesting an atypical heteromorphic life cycle of C. valida between unbranched sporophytes and branched gametophytes, which differs from typical isomorphic alternation of Chaetomorpha species. The shape of the basal attachment cell, an important taxonomic character within the genus, was found variable depending on environmental conditions. The 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA regions were used to explore the phylogenetic affinity of the taxa. Inferred trees from 18S rDNA sequences revealed a close relationship between C. valida and Chaetomorpha moniligera. These results would enrich information in general biology and morphological plasticity of C. valida and provided a basis for future identification of green tide forming algae.

  19. Extraction of nutraceuticals from Spirulina (blue-green alga): A bioorganic chemistry practice using thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Herrera Bravo de Laguna, Irma; Toledo Marante, Francisco J; Luna-Freire, Kristerson R; Mioso, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina is a blue-green alga (cyanobacteria) with high nutritive value. This work provides an innovative and original approach to the consideration of a bioorganic chemistry practice, using Spirulina for the separation of phytochemicals with nutraceutical characteristics via thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The aim is to bring together current research, theory, and practice, and always in accordance with pedagogical ideas. PMID:26331489

  20. Shear-oriented Microfibrils in the Mucilaginous Investments of Two Motile Oscillatoriacean Blue-Green Algae1

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Hayes C.

    1969-01-01

    Trichomes of two oscillatoriacean blue-green algae execute screw-like gliding motion, but the two organisms differ from each other with respect to the screw sense of motion. Electron microscopy of serial longitudinal sections reveals extracellular microfibrils which lie roughly parallel to stream-lines at the surface of each organism. The author proposes that the microfibrils are oriented by shear in a zone just external to the outer unit membrane-like component of the cell wall. Images PMID:5764337

  1. Molecular Identification of Rickettsial Endosymbionts in the Non-Phagotrophic Volvocalean Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kawafune, Kaoru; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hamaji, Takashi; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background The order Rickettsiales comprises Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria (also called rickettsias) that are mainly associated with arthropod hosts. This group is medically important because it contains human-pathogenic species that cause dangerous diseases. Until now, there has been no report of non-phagotrophic photosynthetic eukaryotes, such as green plants, harboring rickettsias. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the bacterial endosymbionts of two freshwater volvocalean green algae: unicellular Carteria cerasiformis and colonial Pleodorina japonica. Epifluorescence microscopy using 4?-6-deamidino-2-phenylindole staining revealed the presence of endosymbionts in all C. cerasiformis NIES-425 cells, and demonstrated a positive correlation between host cell size and the number of endosymbionts. Strains both containing and lacking endosymbionts of C. cerasiformis (NIES-425 and NIES-424) showed a >10-fold increase in cell number and typical sigmoid growth curves over 192 h. A phylogenetic analysis of 16 S ribosomal (r)RNA gene sequences from the endosymbionts of C. cerasiformis and P. japonica demonstrated that they formed a robust clade (hydra group) with endosymbionts of various non-arthropod hosts within the family Rickettsiaceae. There were significantly fewer differences in the 16 S rRNA sequences of the rickettsiacean endosymbionts between C. cerasiformis and P. japonica than in the chloroplast 16 S rRNA or 18 S rRNA of the host volvocalean cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated the existence of the rickettsiacean endosymbionts in the cytoplasm of two volvocalean species. Conclusions/Significance The rickettsiacean endosymbionts are likely not harmful to their volvocalean hosts and may have been recently transmitted from other non-arthropod organisms. Because rickettsias are the closest relatives of mitochondria, incipient stages of mitochondrial endosymbiosis may be deduced using both strains with and without C. cerasiformis endosymbionts. PMID:22363720

  2. Heterotrimeric G-proteins in green algae. An early innovation in the evolution of the plant lineage.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Pandey, Sona

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins (G-proteins, hereafter) are important signaling components in all eukaryotes. The absence of these proteins in the sequenced genomes of Chlorophycean green algae has raised questions about their evolutionary origin and prevalence in the plant lineage. The existence of G-proteins has often been correlated with the acquisition of embryophytic life-cycle and/or terrestrial habitats of plants which occurred around 450 million years ago. Our discovery of functional G-proteins in Chara braunii, a representative of the Charophycean green algae, establishes the existence of this conserved signaling pathway in the most basal plants and dates it even further back to 1-1.5 billion years ago. We have now identified the sequence homologs of G-proteins in additional algal families and propose that green algae represent a model system for one of the most basal forms of G-protein signaling known to exist to date. Given the possible differences that exist between plant and metazoan G-protein signaling mechanisms, such basal organisms will serve as important resources to trace the evolutionary origin of proposed mechanistic differences between the systems as well as their plant-specific functions. PMID:25764428

  3. THE EFFECTS OF ISOPROPYL N-PHENYL CARBAMATE ON THE GREEN ALGA OEDOGONIUM CARDIACUM

    PubMed Central

    Coss, Ronald A.; Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy D.

    1974-01-01

    Cell division in vegetative filaments of the green alga Oedogonium cardiacum is presented as an experimental system. We report on how we have used this system to study the effects of isopropyl N-phenylcarbamate (IPC) on the mitotic apparatus and on the phycoplast, a planar array of cytokinetic microtubules. Polymerization of microtubules was prevented when filaments, synchronized by a light/dark regime and chilled (2°C) while in metaphase or just before phycoplast formation, were exposed to 5.5 x 10-4 M IPC and then returned to room temperature. Spindles reformed or phycoplasts formed when these filaments were transferred to growth medium free of IPC. However, the orientation of both microtubular systems was disturbed: the mitotic apparatus often contained three poles, frequently forming three daughter nuclei upon karyokinesis; the phycoplast was often stellate rather than planar, and it sometimes was displaced to the side of both daughter nuclei, resulting in a binucleate and an anucleate cell upon cytokinesis. Our results suggest that IPC (a) prevents the assembly of microtubules, (b) increases the number of functional polar bodies, and (c) affects the orientation of microtubules in O. cardiacum. High voltage (1,000 kV) electron microscopy of 0.5-µm thick sections allowed us to visualize the polar structures, which were not discernible in thin sections. PMID:4419583

  4. Effects of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) on growth and physiological characteristics of green algae, Cladophora.

    PubMed

    Cao, De-Ju; Xie, Pan-Pan; Deng, Juan-Wei; Zhang, Hui-Min; Ma, Ru-Xiao; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Ren-Jing; Liang, Yue-Gan; Li, Hao; Shi, Xiao-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Effects of various concentrations of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/L) on the growth, malondialdehyde (MDA), the intracellular calcium, and physiological characteristics of green algae, Cladophora, were investigated. Low Zn(2+) concentrations accelerated the growth of Cladophora, whereas Zn(2+) concentration increases to 0.25 mg/L inhibited its growth. Cu(2+) greatly influences Cladophora growth. The photosynthesis of Cladophora decreased under Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) stress. Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) treatment affected the content of total soluble sugar in Cladophora and has small increases in its protein content. Zn(2+) induced the intracellular calcium release, and copper induced the intracellular calcium increases in Cladophora. Exposure to Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) induces MDA in Cladophora. The stress concent of Cu(2+) was strictly correlated with the total soluble sugar content, Chla+Chlb, and MDA in Cladophora, and the stress concent of Zn(2+) was strictly correlated with the relative growth rate (RGR) and MDA of Cladophora. PMID:26077320

  5. Two components of photoreceptor potential in phototaxis of the flagellated green alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Sineshchekov, O A; Litvin, F F; Keszthelyi, L

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the photoreceptor potential of phototaxis in biflagellated green alga Haematococcus pluvialis in response to a 10-ns laser pulse of three wavelengths (465, 550, and 590 nm) were measured in single cells with 30 mus time resolution. The rise and the decay of photoinduced potential are both at least biphasic. The first component of the rise is very stable and has no measurable (<30 mus) time delay. The second component is triggered after a 120-400-mus lag period, depending on flash intensity. Its appearance is sensitive to the physiological state of the cell and the amplitude can be increased by phototactically ineffective red background illumination. The electrical generators for both components are localized in the same region of the cell membrane (on the stigma-bearing side) and these components have the same depolarizing sign. The results indicate that the photoreceptor potential in phototaxis comprises two components, which could be interpreted as light-induced charge movement within the photoreceptor molecules and changes in ion permeability of the cell membrane. PMID:19431753

  6. Health benefits of blue-green algae: prevention of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-02-01

    Blue-green algae (BGA) are among the most primitive life forms on earth and have been consumed as food or medicine by humans for centuries. BGA contain various bioactive components, such as phycocyanin, carotenoids, ?-linolenic acid, fibers, and plant sterols, which can promote optimal health in humans. Studies have demonstrated that several BGA species or their active components have plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering properties due to their modulation of intestinal cholesterol absorption and hepatic lipogenic gene expression. BGA can also reduce inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor ? B activity, consequently reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, BGA inhibit lipid peroxidation and have free radical scavenging activity, which can be beneficial for the protection against oxidative stress. The aforementioned effects of BGA can contribute to the prevention of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the health-promoting functions of BGA against cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which are major health threats in the developed countries. PMID:23402636

  7. Growth rate affects the responses of the green alga Tetraselmis suecica to external perturbations.

    PubMed

    Fanesi, Andrea; Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario

    2014-02-01

    Acclimation to environmental changes involves a modification of the expressed proteome and metabolome. The reproductive advantage associated with the higher fitness that acclimation provides to the new conditions more than compensates for the costs of acclimation. To exploit such an advantage, however, the duration of the perturbation must be sufficiently long relative to the growth rate. Otherwise, a selective pressure may exist in favour of responses that minimize changes in carbon allocation and resource use and do not require reversal of the acclimation after the perturbation ceases (compositional homeostasis). We hypothesize that the choice between acclimation and homeostasis depends on the duration of the perturbation relative to the length of the cell cycle. To test this hypothesis, we cultured the green alga Tetraselmis suecica at two growth rates and subjected the cultures to three environmental perturbations. Carbon allocation was studied with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; elemental stoichiometry was investigated by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectroscopy. Our data confirmed that growth rate is a crucial factor for C allocation in response to external changes, with a higher degree of compositional homeostasis in cells with lower growth rate. PMID:23927015

  8. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.

  9. Health Benefits of Blue-Green Algae: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chai Siah; Yang, Yue; Park, Youngki

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Blue-green algae (BGA) are among the most primitive life forms on earth and have been consumed as food or medicine by humans for centuries. BGA contain various bioactive components, such as phycocyanin, carotenoids, ?-linolenic acid, fibers, and plant sterols, which can promote optimal health in humans. Studies have demonstrated that several BGA species or their active components have plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride-lowering properties due to their modulation of intestinal cholesterol absorption and hepatic lipogenic gene expression. BGA can also reduce inflammation by inhibiting the nuclear factor ? B activity, consequently reducing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, BGA inhibit lipid peroxidation and have free radical scavenging activity, which can be beneficial for the protection against oxidative stress. The aforementioned effects of BGA can contribute to the prevention of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of the health-promoting functions of BGA against cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which are major health threats in the developed countries. PMID:23402636

  10. New ?-Glucosidase Inhibitory Triterpenic Acid from Marine Macro Green Alga Codium dwarkense Boergs

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Liaqat; Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Kharusi, Lubna; Hussain, Javid; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The marine ecosystem has been a key resource for secondary metabolites with promising biological roles. In the current study, bioassay-guided phytochemical investigations were carried out to assess the presence of enzyme inhibitory chemical constituents from the methanolic extract of marine green alga—Codium dwarkense. The bioactive fractions were further subjected to chromatographic separations, which resulted in the isolation of a new triterpenic acid; dwarkenoic acid (1) and the known sterols; androst-5-en-3?-ol (2), stigmasta-5,25-dien-3?,7?-diol (3), ergosta-5,25-dien-3?-ol (4), 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one-7-O-?-d-fucopyranoside (5), 7-hydroxystigmasta-4,25-dien-3-one (6), and stigmasta-5,25-dien-3?-ol (7). The structure elucidation of the new compound was carried out by combined mass spectrometry and 1D (1H and 13C) and 2D (HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY) NMR spectroscopic data. The sub-fractions and pure constituents were assayed for enzymatic inhibition of alpha-glucosidase. Compound 1 showed significant inhibition at all concentrations. Compounds 2, 3, 5, and 7 exhibited a dose-dependent response, whereas compounds 4–6 showed moderate inhibition. Utilizing such marine-derived biological resources could lead to drug discoveries related to anti-diabetics. PMID:26184240

  11. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S G; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolution beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub-30-nm resolution structural images and ?90-nm-resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context. PMID:25675478

  12. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes. PMID:25927230

  13. A novel alphaproteobacterial ectosymbiont promotes the growth of the hydrocarbon-rich green alga Botryococcus braunii

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Okazaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Masaki; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kai, Atsushi; Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Makoto M.

    2015-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a colony-forming green alga that accumulates large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons within the colony. The utilization of B. braunii for biofuel production is however hindered by its low biomass productivity. Here we describe a novel bacterial ectosymbiont (BOTRYCO-2) that confers higher biomass productivity to B. braunii. 16S rDNA analysis indicated that the sequence of BOTRYCO-2 shows low similarity (<90%) to cultured bacterial species and located BOTRYCO-2 within a phylogenetic lineage consisting of uncultured alphaproteobacterial clones. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies and transmission electric microscopy indicated that BOTRYCO-2 is closely associated with B. braunii colonies. Interestingly, FISH analysis of a water bloom sample also found BOTRYCO-2 bacteria in close association with cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa colonies, suggesting that BOTRYCO-2 relatives have high affinity to phytoplankton colonies. A PCR survey of algal bloom samples revealed that the BOTRYCO-2 lineage is commonly found in Microcystis associated blooms. Growth experiments indicated that B. braunii Ba10 can grow faster and has a higher biomass (1.8-fold) and hydrocarbon (1.5-fold) yield in the presence of BOTRYCO-2. Additionally, BOTRYCO-2 conferred a higher biomass yield to BOT-22, one of the fastest growing strains of B. braunii. We propose the species name ‘Candidatus Phycosocius bacilliformis’ for BOTRYCO-2. PMID:26130609

  14. Palindromic Genes in the Linear Mitochondrial Genome of the Nonphotosynthetic Green Alga Polytomella magna

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Hua, Jimeng; Archibald, John M.; Lee, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Organelle DNA is no stranger to palindromic repeats. But never has a mitochondrial or plastid genome been described in which every coding region is part of a distinct palindromic unit. While sequencing the mitochondrial DNA of the nonphotosynthetic green alga Polytomella magna, we uncovered precisely this type of genic arrangement. The P. magna mitochondrial genome is linear and made up entirely of palindromes, each containing 1–7 unique coding regions. Consequently, every gene in the genome is duplicated and in an inverted orientation relative to its partner. And when these palindromic genes are folded into putative stem-loops, their predicted translational start sites are often positioned in the apex of the loop. Gel electrophoresis results support the linear, 28-kb monomeric conformation of the P. magna mitochondrial genome. Analyses of other Polytomella taxa suggest that palindromic mitochondrial genes were present in the ancestor of the Polytomella lineage and lost or retained to various degrees in extant species. The possible origins and consequences of this bizarre genomic architecture are discussed. PMID:23940100

  15. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cornish, Adam J.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Green, Robin; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Gärtner, Katrin; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Mason, Saundra; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI; Hegg, Eric L.; Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobicmore »conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.« less

  16. Characterization of Hydrogen Metabolism in the Multicellular Green Alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, Adam J.; Green, Robin; Gärtner, Katrin; Mason, Saundra; Hegg, Eric L.

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen gas functions as a key component in the metabolism of a wide variety of microorganisms, often acting as either a fermentative end-product or an energy source. The number of organisms reported to utilize hydrogen continues to grow, contributing to and expanding our knowledge of biological hydrogen processes. Here we demonstrate that Volvox carteri f. nagariensis, a multicellular green alga with differentiated cells, evolves H2 both when supplied with an abiotic electron donor and under physiological conditions. The genome of Volvox carteri contains two genes encoding putative [FeFe]-hydrogenases (HYDA1 and HYDA2), and the transcripts for these genes accumulate under anaerobic conditions. The HYDA1 and HYDA2 gene products were cloned, expressed, and purified, and both are functional [FeFe]-hydrogenases. Additionally, within the genome the HYDA1 and HYDA2 genes cluster with two putative genes which encode hydrogenase maturation proteins. This gene cluster resembles operon-like structures found within bacterial genomes and may provide further insight into evolutionary relationships between bacterial and algal [FeFe]-hydrogenase genes.

  17. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C.; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H+-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  18. Photosynthetic regeneration of ATP using a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Sawa, Y.; Kanayama, K.; Ochiai, H.

    1982-02-01

    Photosynthetic ATP accumulation was shown in the presence of exogenous ADP plus ortho-phosphate on illumination to the intact cells of a strain of thermophilic blue-green algae isolated from Matsue hot springs, Mastigocladus sp. Kinetic studies of various effectors on the ATP accumulation proved that the ATP synthesis depends mainly on the cyclic photophosphorylation system around photosystem I (PS-I) in the algal cells. The temperature and pH optima for the accumulation were found at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5. Maximum yield was obtained with light intensity higher than 15 mW/squared cm. Borate ion exerted pronounced enhancement on the ATP synthesis. With a continuous reactor at a flow rate of 1 ml/hour at 45 degrees C and pH 7.5, efficient photoconversion of ADP (2mM, at substrate reservoir) to ATP (1mM, at product outlet) has been maintained for a period of 2.5 days, though the efficiency has decreased in a further 2-day period to the level of 0.5 mM ATP/9.5 h of residence time. (Refs. 24).

  19. Comparison of the Photosynthetic Yield of Cyanobacteria and Green Algae: Different Methods Give Different Answers

    PubMed Central

    Schuurmans, R. Milou; van Alphen, Pascal; Schuurmans, J. Merijn; Matthijs, Hans C. P.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2015-01-01

    The societal importance of renewable carbon-based commodities and energy carriers has elicited a particular interest for high performance phototrophic microorganisms. Selection of optimal strains is often based on direct comparison under laboratory conditions of maximal growth rate or additional valued features such as lipid content. Instead of reporting growth rate in culture, estimation of photosynthetic efficiency (quantum yield of PSII) by pulse-amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorimetry is an often applied alternative method. Here we compared the quantum yield of PSII and the photonic yield on biomass for the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana 211-8K and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our data demonstrate that the PAM technique inherently underestimates the photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria by rendering a high F0 and a low FM, specifically after the commonly practiced dark pre-incubation before a yield measurement. Yet when comparing the calculated biomass yield on light in continuous culture experiments, we obtained nearly equal values for both species. Using mutants of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we analyzed the factors that compromise its PAM-based quantum yield measurements. We will discuss the role of dark respiratory activity, fluorescence emission from the phycobilisomes, and the Mehler-like reaction. Based on the above observations we recommend that PAM measurements in cyanobacteria are interpreted only qualitatively. PMID:26394153

  20. Convoluted Plasma Membrane Domains in the Green Alga Chara are Depleted of Microtubules and Actin Filaments.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Hoepflinger, Marion C; Schmalbrock, Sarah; Bulychev, Alexander; Foissner, Ilse

    2015-10-01

    Charasomes are convoluted plasma membrane domains in the green alga Chara australis. They harbor H(+)-ATPases involved in acidification of the medium, which facilitates carbon uptake required for photosynthesis. In this study we investigated the distribution of cortical microtubules and cortical actin filaments in relation to the distribution of charasomes. We found that microtubules and actin filaments were largely lacking beneath the charasomes, suggesting the absence of nucleating and/or anchoring complexes or an inhibitory effect on polymerization. We also investigated the influence of cytoskeleton inhibitors on the light-dependent growth and the darkness-induced degradation of charasomes. Inhibition of cytoplasmic streaming by cytochalasin D significantly inhibited charasome growth and delayed charasome degradation, whereas depolymerization of microtubules by oryzalin or stabilization of microtubules by paclitaxel had no effect. Our data indicate that the membrane at the cytoplasmic surface of charasomes has different properties in comparison with the smooth plasma membrane. We show further that the actin cytoskeleton is necessary for charasome growth and facilitates charasome degradation presumably via trafficking of secretory and endocytic vesicles, respectively. However, microtubules are required neither for charasome growth nor for charasome degradation. PMID:26272553

  1. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore »beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  2. Diatom Communities and Metrics as Indicators of Urbanization Effects on Streams and Potential Moderation by Landscape Green Infrastructure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diatoms are very useful and important indicators of anthropogenic impacts on streams because they are the foundation of primary production and are responsive to nutrients, conductivity, and habitat conditions. We characterized relationships of diatom assemblages with water chemis...

  3. New chemical constituents from Oryza sativa straw and their algicidal activities against blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ateeque; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Ali, Mohd; Park, Inmyoung; Kim, Jin-Seog; Kim, Eun-Hye; Lim, Ju-Jin; Kim, Seul-Ki; Chung, Ill-Min

    2013-08-28

    Five new constituents, 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,3'-dimethoxyflavone-4'-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a?1b)-2a-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b?1c)-2b-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-2c-octadecanoate (1), 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,3'-dimethoxyflavone-4'-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a?1b)-2a-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b?1c)-2b-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c?1d)-2c-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-2d-octadecanoate (2), kaempferol-3-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a?1b)-2a-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b?1c)-2b-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c?1d)-2c-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-2d-hexadecanoate (3), methyl salicylate-2-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2a?1b)-2a-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2b?1c)-2b-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2c?1d)-2c-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2d?1e)-2d-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2e?1f)-2e-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2f?1g)-2f-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-(2g?1h)-2g-O-?-D-xylopyranosyl-2h-geranilan-8',10'-dioic acid-1'-oate (4), and oleioyl-?-D-arabinoside (5), along with eight known compounds, were isolated from a methanol extract of Oryza sativa straw. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated using one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopies in combination with IR, ESI/MS, and HR-ESI/FTMS. In bioassays with blue-green algae, the efficacies of the algicidal activities of the five new compounds (1-5) were evaluated at concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 mg/L. Compound 5 had the highest growth inhibition (92.6 ± 0.3%) for Microcystis aeruginosa UTEX 2388 at a concentration of 100 ppm (mg/L). Compound 5 has high potential for the ecofriendly control of weeds and algae harmful to water-logged rice. PMID:23889328

  4. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA of the red alga Porphyra purpurea. Cyanobacterial introns and shared ancestry of red and green algae.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, G; Saint-Louis, D; Gray, M W; Lang, B F

    1999-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Porphyra purpurea, a circular-mapping genome of 36,753 bp, has been completely sequenced. A total of 57 densely packed genes has been identified, including the basic set typically found in animals and fungi, as well as seven genes characteristic of protist and plant mtDNAs and specifying ribosomal proteins and subunits of succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The mitochondrial large subunit rRNA gene contains two group II introns that are extraordinarily similar to those found in the cyanobacterium Calothrix sp, suggesting a recent lateral intron transfer between a bacterial and a mitochondrial genome. Notable features of P. purpurea mtDNA include the presence of two 291-bp inverted repeats that likely mediate homologous recombination, resulting in genome rearrangement, and of numerous sequence polymorphisms in the coding and intergenic regions. Comparative analysis of red algal mitochondrial genomes from five different, evolutionarily distant orders reveals that rhodophyte mtDNAs are unusually uniform in size and gene order. Finally, phylogenetic analyses provide strong evidence that red algae share a common ancestry with green algae and plants. PMID:10488235

  5. Assessing the combined effects from two kinds of cephalosporins on green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) based on response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruixin; Xie, Weishu; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-04-01

    The present work evaluated the combined effects of cefradine and ceftazidime on the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa using response surface methodologies (RSM). After a 48?h-exposure, the population growth rate (PGR), the chlorophyll-a content and the SOD content of the alga increased with increased concentrations of two antibiotics. However, the three responses did not continue to demonstrate significant increases once antibiotic concentrations exceed a moderate level. Three two order polynomial regression equations were obtained to describe well the relationship between the responses of the alga and the two antibiotics' concentration (R(2)?=?0.9997, 0.9292 and 0.9039, respectively). Three 3?D-surface graphs and their contour plots showed directly the changing trends of the alga under the combined effects of two antibiotics. This study for the first time employed the RSM in ecotoxicology, which indicated that the RSM should be placed under a feasible and a potential application prospect in toxicity assessment. PMID:25684417

  6. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata

    PubMed Central

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae. PMID:25922486

  7. Optimization of culture conditions and comparison of biomass productivity of three green algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonduck; Park, Jang Min; Gim, Geun Ho; Jeong, Sang-Hwa; Kang, Chang Min; Kim, Duk-Jin; Kim, Si Wouk

    2012-01-01

    Culture conditions for the mass production of three green algae, Chlorella sp., Dunaliella salina DCCBC2 and Dunaliella sp., were optimized using a response surface methodology (RSM). A central composite design was applied to investigate the effects of initial pH, nitrogen and phosphate concentrations on the cultivation of microalgae. The optimal growth conditions estimated from the design are as follows: Chlorella sp. (initial pH 7.2, ammonium 17 mM, phosphate 1.2 mM), D. salina DCCBC2 (initial pH 8.0, nitrate 3.3 mM, phosphate 0.0375 mM) and Dunaliella sp. (initial pH 8.0, nitrate 3.7 mM, phosphate 0.17 mM). Culturing the microalgae with the optimized conditions confirmed that the maximum growth rates were attained for these parameters. The optimum CO(2) concentrations of Chlorella sp., D. salina DCCBC2 and Dunaliella sp. were 1.0, 3.0 and 1.0% (v/v), respectively. The specific growth rates (?) of Chlorella sp., D. salina DCCBC2 and Dunaliella sp. were 0.58, 0.78 and 0.56 day(-1), respectively, and the biomass productivities were 0.28, 0.54 and 0.30 g dry cell wt l(-1) day(-1), respectively. The CO(2) fixation rates of Chlorella sp., D. salina DCCBC2 and Dunaliella sp. were 42.8, 90.9 and 45.5 mg l(-1) day(-1), respectively. Mixotrophic cultivation of Chlorella sp. with glucose increased biomass productivity from 0.28 to 0.51 g dry cell wt l(-1) day(-1). However, D. salina DCCBC2 and Dunaliella sp. were not stimulated by several organic compounds tested. PMID:21909669

  8. In Vitro Reconstitution of Light-harvesting Complexes of Plants and Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Natali, Alberto; Roy, Laura M.; Croce, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In plants and green algae, light is captured by the light-harvesting complexes (LHCs), a family of integral membrane proteins that coordinate chlorophylls and carotenoids. In vivo, these proteins are folded with pigments to form complexes which are inserted in the thylakoid membrane of the chloroplast. The high similarity in the chemical and physical properties of the members of the family, together with the fact that they can easily lose pigments during isolation, makes their purification in a native state challenging. An alternative approach to obtain homogeneous preparations of LHCs was developed by Plumley and Schmidt in 19871, who showed that it was possible to reconstitute these complexes in vitro starting from purified pigments and unfolded apoproteins, resulting in complexes with properties very similar to that of native complexes. This opened the way to the use of bacterial expressed recombinant proteins for in vitro reconstitution. The reconstitution method is powerful for various reasons: (1) pure preparations of individual complexes can be obtained, (2) pigment composition can be controlled to assess their contribution to structure and function, (3) recombinant proteins can be mutated to study the functional role of the individual residues (e.g., pigment binding sites) or protein domain (e.g., protein-protein interaction, folding). This method has been optimized in several laboratories and applied to most of the light-harvesting complexes. The protocol described here details the method of reconstituting light-harvesting complexes in vitro currently used in our laboratory,and examples describing applications of the method are provided. PMID:25350712

  9. Metribuzin impairs the unicell-colony transformation in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Lürling, M

    2011-01-01

    Active growth is a prerequisite for the formation of grazing-protective, mostly eight-celled colonies by the ubiquitous green alga Scenedesmus in response to chemical cues from zooplankton. Colonies can also be evoked by chemically quite similar manmade anionic surfactants, such as FFD-6. In this study, it was hypothesized that growth-inhibiting concentrations of the herbicide metribuzin impair the ability of Scenedesmus obliquus to form colonies in response to the surfactant morphogen FFD-6. The results confirmed that the formation of colonies in S. obliquus was hampered by metribuzin. EC50 values of metribuzin for colony inhibition (approximately 11 ?g L(-1)) were similar to those for growth and photosynthesis inhibition (12-25 ?g metribuzinL(-1)). In the absence of the colony-inducing surfactant FFD-6, S. obliquus populations were comprised of 92% unicells, having on average 1.2 cells per colony at all tested metribuzin concentrations (0-100 ?g L(-1)). In contrast, in the presence of FFD-6 and at low metribuzin concentrations (0 and 5 ?g L(-1)), S. obliquus had more than five cells per colony with a high portion of eight-celled colonies. However, increasing concentrations of metribuzin decreased the number of colonies in the FFD-6-exposed populations and caused them to remain mostly unicellular at the highest concentrations (50 and 100 ?g L(-1)). This study revealed that metribuzin impeded growth and by doing so, also obstructed the possibility for unicellular Scenedesmus to form colonies. Consequently, an increase in mortality of Scenedesmus from grazing is expected. PMID:20971494

  10. Assessing potential health risks from microcystin toxins in blue-green algae dietary supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, D J; Kauffman, K W; Hall, R A; Huang, X; Chu, F S

    2000-01-01

    The presence of blue-green algae (BGA) toxins in surface waters used for drinking water sources and recreation is receiving increasing attention around the world as a public health concern. However, potential risks from exposure to these toxins in contaminated health food products that contain BGA have been largely ignored. BGA products are commonly consumed in the United States, Canada, and Europe for their putative beneficial effects, including increased energy and elevated mood. Many of these products contain Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, a BGA that is harvested from Upper Klamath Lake (UKL) in southern Oregon, where the growth of a toxic BGA, Microcystis aeruginosa, is a regular occurrence. M. aeruginosa produces compounds called microcystins, which are potent hepatotoxins and probable tumor promoters. Because M. aeruginosa coexists with A. flos-aquae, it can be collected inadvertently during the harvesting process, resulting in microcystin contamination of BGA products. In fall 1996, the Oregon Health Division learned that UKL was experiencing an extensive M. aeruginosa bloom, and an advisory was issued recommending against water contact. The advisory prompted calls from consumers of BGA products, who expressed concern about possible contamination of these products with microcystins. In response, the Oregon Health Division and the Oregon Department of Agriculture established a regulatory limit of 1 microg/g for microcystins in BGA-containing products and tested BGA products for the presence of microcystins. Microcystins were detected in 85 of 87 samples tested, with 63 samples (72%) containing concentrations > 1 microg/g. HPLC and ELISA tentatively identified microcystin-LR, the most toxic microcystin variant, as the predominant congener. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10811570

  11. The Diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoermer, E. F.; Smol, John P.

    1999-05-01

    Diatoms are microscopic algae which are found in virtually every habitat where water is present. This volume is an up-to-date summary of the expanding field of their uses in environmental and earth sciences. Their abundance and wide distribution, and their well-preserved glass-like walls make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications as both fossils and living organisms. Examples of their wide range of applications include environmental indicators, oil exploration, and forensic examination. The major emphasis is on their use in analyzing ecological problems such as climate change, acidification, and eutrophication. The contributors to the volume are leading researchers in their fields and are brought together for the first time to give a timely synopsis of a dynamic and important area. This book should be read by environmental scientists, phycologists, limnologists, ecologists and palaeoecologists, oceanographers, archaeologists and forensic scientists.

  12. The Diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoermer, E. F.; Smol, John P.

    2001-07-01

    Diatoms are microscopic algae which are found in virtually every habitat where water is present. This volume is an up-to-date summary of the expanding field of their uses in environmental and earth sciences. Their abundance and wide distribution, and their well-preserved glass-like walls make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications as both fossils and living organisms. Examples of their wide range of applications include environmental indicators, oil exploration, and forensic examination. The major emphasis is on their use in analyzing ecological problems such as climate change, acidification, and eutrophication. The contributors to the volume are leading researchers in their fields and are brought together for the first time to give a timely synopsis of a dynamic and important area. This book should be read by environmental scientists, phycologists, limnologists, ecologists and palaeoecologists, oceanographers, archaeologists and forensic scientists.

  13. Evolutionary relatedness does not predict competition and co-occurrence in natural or experimental communities of green algae.

    PubMed

    Alexandrou, Markos A; Cardinale, Bradley J; Hall, John D; Delwiche, Charles F; Fritschie, Keith; Narwani, Anita; Venail, Patrick A; Bentlage, Bastian; Pankey, M Sabrina; Oakley, Todd H

    2015-01-22

    The competition-relatedness hypothesis (CRH) predicts that the strength of competition is the strongest among closely related species and decreases as species become less related. This hypothesis is based on the assumption that common ancestry causes close relatives to share biological traits that lead to greater ecological similarity. Although intuitively appealing, the extent to which phylogeny can predict competition and co-occurrence among species has only recently been rigorously tested, with mixed results. When studies have failed to support the CRH, critics have pointed out at least three limitations: (i) the use of data poor phylogenies that provide inaccurate estimates of species relatedness, (ii) the use of inappropriate statistical models that fail to detect relationships between relatedness and species interactions amidst nonlinearities and heteroskedastic variances, and (iii) overly simplified laboratory conditions that fail to allow eco-evolutionary relationships to emerge. Here, we address these limitations and find they do not explain why evolutionary relatedness fails to predict the strength of species interactions or probabilities of coexistence among freshwater green algae. First, we construct a new data-rich, transcriptome-based phylogeny of common freshwater green algae that are commonly cultured and used for laboratory experiments. Using this new phylogeny, we re-analyse ecological data from three previously published laboratory experiments. After accounting for the possibility of nonlinearities and heterogeneity of variances across levels of relatedness, we find no relationship between phylogenetic distance and ecological traits. In addition, we show that communities of North American green algae are randomly composed with respect to their evolutionary relationships in 99% of 1077 lakes spanning the continental United States. Together, these analyses result in one of the most comprehensive case studies of how evolutionary history influences species interactions and community assembly in both natural and experimental systems. Our results challenge the generality of the CRH and suggest it may be time to re-evaluate the validity and assumptions of this hypothesis. PMID:25473009

  14. Diatoms in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R.; Hoyle, F.; Wallis, M. K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    1986-01-01

    The fossil record of the microscopic algae classified as diatoms suggests they were injected to earth at the Cretaceous boundary. Not only could diatoms remain viable in the cometary environment, but also many species might replicate in illuminated surface layers or early interior layers of cometary ice. Presumably they reached the solar system on an interstellar comet as an already-evolved assemblage of organisms. Diatoms might cause color changes to comet nuclei while their outgassing decays and revives around highly elliptical orbits. Just as for interstellar absorption, high-resolution IR observations are capable of distinguishing whether the 10-micron feature arises from siliceous diatom material or mineral silicates. The 10-30-micron band and the UV 220-nm region can also provide evidence of biological material.

  15. Interactive effects of copper oxide nanoparticles and light to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Cheloni, Giulia; Marti, Elodie; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the effect of light with different spectral composition on the stability of CuO-nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dispersions and their effects to green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The results showed that simulated natural light (SNL) and light with enhanced UVB radiation (UVR*) do not affect the dissolution of CuO-NPs as compared to light irradiation conditions typically used in laboratory incubator (INC). Comparable values of ?-potential and hydrodynamic size during 24h were found under all studied conditions. Concentrations of CuO-NPs below 1mgL(-1) do not attenuate the light penetration in the algal suspensions in comparison with NP-free system. Exposure to a combination of 8?gL(-1) or 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and INC or SNL has no significant effect on the algal growth inhibition, algal fluorescence and membrane integrity under short-term exposure. However, an enhancement of the percentage of cells experiencing oxidative stress was observed upon exposure to 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs and SNL for 4 and 8h. Combination of UVR* and 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs resulted in synergistic effects for all biological endpoints. Despite the photocatalytic properties of CuO-NPs no significant increase in abiotic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production under simulated solar radiation was observed suggesting that the synergistic effect observed might be correlated to other factors than CuO-NP-mediated ROS photoproduction. Tests performed with CuSO4 confirmed the important role of dissolution as toxicity driving force for lower CuO-NP concentration. However, they failed to clarify the contribution of dissolved Cu on the combined effects at 0.8mgL(-1) CuO-NPs. The results point out the necessity of taking into account the possible interactions between ENPs and changing light conditions when evaluating the potential effects of ENPs to phytoplankton in natural waters. PMID:26655656

  16. Comparative Genomics of the Pennate Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum1[w

    PubMed Central

    Montsant, Anton; Jabbari, Kamel; Maheswari, Uma; Bowler, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the most important constituents of phytoplankton communities in aquatic environments, but in spite of this, only recently have large-scale diatom-sequencing projects been undertaken. With the genome of the centric species Thalassiosira pseudonana available since mid-2004, accumulating sequence information for a pennate model species appears a natural subsequent aim. We have generated over 12,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and upon assembly into a nonredundant set, 5,108 sequences were obtained. Significant similarity (E < 1E-04) to entries in the GenBank nonredundant protein database, the COG profile database, and the Pfam protein domains database were detected, respectively, in 45.0%, 21.5%, and 37.1% of the nonredundant collection of sequences. This information was employed to functionally annotate the P. tricornutum nonredundant set and to create an internet-accessible queryable diatom EST database. The nonredundant collection was then compared to the putative complete proteomes of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and the centric diatom T. pseudonana. A number of intriguing differences were identified between the pennate and the centric diatoms concerning activities of relevance for general cell metabolism, e.g. genes involved in carbon-concentrating mechanisms, cytosolic acetyl-Coenzyme A production, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate metabolism. Finally, codon usage and utilization of C and G relative to gene expression (as measured by EST redundance) were studied, and preferences for utilization of C and CpG doublets were noted among the P. tricornutum EST coding sequences. PMID:15665249

  17. Comparative Genomics of a Bacterivorous Green Alga Reveals Evolutionary Causalities and Consequences of Phago-Mixotrophic Mode of Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Burns, John A; Paasch, Amber; Narechania, Apurva; Kim, Eunsoo

    2015-01-01

    Cymbomonas tetramitiformis-a marine prasinophyte-is one of only a few green algae that still retain an ancestral particulate-feeding mechanism while harvesting energy through photosynthesis. The genome of the alga is estimated to be 850 Mb-1.2 Gb in size-the bulk of which is filled with repetitive sequences-and is annotated with 37,366 protein-coding gene models. A number of unusual metabolic pathways (for the Chloroplastida) are predicted for C. tetramitiformis, including pathways for Lipid-A and peptidoglycan metabolism. Comparative analyses of the predicted peptides of C. tetramitiformis to sets of other eukaryotes revealed that nonphagocytes are depleted in a number of genes, a proportion of which have known function in feeding. In addition, our analysis suggests that obligatory phagotrophy is associated with the loss of genes that function in biosynthesis of small molecules (e.g., amino acids). Further, C. tetramitiformis and at least one other phago-mixotrophic alga are thus unique, compared with obligatory heterotrophs and nonphagocytes, in that both feeding and small molecule synthesis-related genes are retained in their genomes. These results suggest that early, ancestral host eukaryotes that gave rise to phototrophs had the capacity to assimilate building block molecules from inorganic substances (i.e., prototrophy). The loss of biosynthesis genes, thus, may at least partially explain the apparent lack of instances of permanent incorporation of photosynthetic endosymbionts in later-divergent, auxotrophic eukaryotic lineages, such as metazoans and ciliates. PMID:26224703

  18. Biosynthetic pathway and health benefits of fucoxanthin, an algae-specific xanthophyll in brown seaweeds.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koji; Hosokawa, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is the main carotenoid produced in brown algae as a component of the light-harvesting complex for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In contrast to the complete elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in red and green algae, the biosynthetic pathway of fucoxanthin in brown algae is not fully understood. Recently, two models for the fucoxanthin biosynthetic pathway have been proposed in unicellular diatoms; however, there is no such information for the pathway in brown seaweeds to date. Here, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for fucoxanthin in the brown seaweed, Ectocarpus siliculosus, derived from comparison of carotenogenic genes in its sequenced genome with those in the genomes of two diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Currently, fucoxanthin is receiving attention, due to its potential benefits for human health. Therefore, new knowledge regarding the medical and nutraceutical properties of fucoxanthin from brown seaweeds is also summarized here. PMID:23820585

  19. Biosynthetic Pathway and Health Benefits of Fucoxanthin, an Algae-Specific Xanthophyll in Brown Seaweeds

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Koji; Hosokawa, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is the main carotenoid produced in brown algae as a component of the light-harvesting complex for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In contrast to the complete elucidation of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathways in red and green algae, the biosynthetic pathway of fucoxanthin in brown algae is not fully understood. Recently, two models for the fucoxanthin biosynthetic pathway have been proposed in unicellular diatoms; however, there is no such information for the pathway in brown seaweeds to date. Here, we propose a biosynthetic pathway for fucoxanthin in the brown seaweed, Ectocarpus siliculosus, derived from comparison of carotenogenic genes in its sequenced genome with those in the genomes of two diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Currently, fucoxanthin is receiving attention, due to its potential benefits for human health. Therefore, new knowledge regarding the medical and nutraceutical properties of fucoxanthin from brown seaweeds is also summarized here. PMID:23820585

  20. The GC-Rich Mitochondrial and Plastid Genomes of the Green Alga Coccomyxa Give Insight into the Evolution of Organelle DNA Nucleotide Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Roy; Burki, Fabien; Yamada, Takashi; Grimwood, Jane; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2011-05-13

    Most of the available mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences are biased towards adenine and thymine (AT) over guanine and cytosine (GC). Examples of GC-rich organelle DNAs are limited to a small but eclectic list of species, including certain green algae. Here, to gain insight in the evolution of organelle nucleotide landscape, we present the GC-rich mitochondrial and plastid DNAs from the trebouxiophyte green alga Coccomyxa sp. C-169. We compare these sequences with other GC-rich organelle DNAs and argue that the forces biasing them towards G and C are nonadaptive and linked to the metabolic and/or life history features of this species. The Coccomyxa organelle genomes are also used for phylogenetic analyses, which highlight the complexities in trying to resolve the interrelationships among the core chlorophyte green algae, but ultimately favour a sister relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae, with the Trebouxiophyceae branching at the base of the chlorophyte crown.

  1. Evolution and diversity of plant cell walls: from algae to flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Popper, Zoë A; Michel, Gurvan; Hervé, Cécile; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T; Tuohy, Maria G; Kloareg, Bernard; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2011-01-01

    All photosynthetic multicellular Eukaryotes, including land plants and algae, have cells that are surrounded by a dynamic, complex, carbohydrate-rich cell wall. The cell wall exerts considerable biological and biomechanical control over individual cells and organisms, thus playing a key role in their environmental interactions. This has resulted in compositional variation that is dependent on developmental stage, cell type, and season. Further variation is evident that has a phylogenetic basis. Plants and algae have a complex phylogenetic history, including acquisition of genes responsible for carbohydrate synthesis and modification through a series of primary (leading to red algae, green algae, and land plants) and secondary (generating brown algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) endosymbiotic events. Therefore, organisms that have the shared features of photosynthesis and possession of a cell wall do not form a monophyletic group. Yet they contain some common wall components that can be explained increasingly by genetic and biochemical evidence. PMID:21351878

  2. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga—Competition or Allelopathy?

    PubMed Central

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  3. Metabolite Profiling and Integrative Modeling Reveal Metabolic Constraints for Carbon Partitioning under Nitrogen Starvation in the Green Algae Haematococcus pluvialis*

    PubMed Central

    Recht, Lee; Töpfer, Nadine; Batushansky, Albert; Sikron, Noga; Gibon, Yves; Fait, Aaron; Nikoloski, Zoran; Boussiba, Sammy; Zarka, Aliza

    2014-01-01

    The green alga Hematococcus pluvialis accumulates large amounts of the antioxidant astaxanthin under inductive stress conditions, such as nitrogen starvation. The response to nitrogen starvation and high light leads to the accumulation of carbohydrates and fatty acids as well as increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Although the behavior of individual pathways has been well investigated, little is known about the systemic effects of the stress response mechanism. Here we present time-resolved metabolite, enzyme activity, and physiological data that capture the metabolic response of H. pluvialis under nitrogen starvation and high light. The data were integrated into a putative genome-scale model of the green alga to in silico test hypotheses of underlying carbon partitioning. The model-based hypothesis testing reinforces the involvement of starch degradation to support fatty acid synthesis in the later stages of the stress response. In addition, our findings support a possible mechanism for the involvement of the increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in carbon repartitioning. Finally, the in vitro experiments and the in silico modeling presented here emphasize the predictive power of large scale integrative approaches to pinpoint metabolic adjustment to changing environments. PMID:25183014

  4. Localization and Quantification of Callose in the Streptophyte Green Algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium: Correlation with Desiccation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater green algae started to colonize terrestrial habitats about 460 million years ago, giving rise to the evolution of land plants. Today, several streptophyte green algae occur in aero-terrestrial habitats with unpredictable fluctuations in water availability, serving as ideal models for investigating desiccation tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that callose, a ?-d-1,3-glucan, is incorporated specifically in strained areas of the cell wall due to cellular water loss, implicating a contribution to desiccation tolerance. In the early diverging genus Klebsormidium, callose was drastically increased already after 30 min of desiccation stress. Localization studies demonstrated an increase in callose in the undulating cross cell walls during cellular water loss, allowing a regulated shrinkage and expansion after rehydration. This correlates with a high desiccation tolerance demonstrated by a full recovery of the photosynthetic yield visualized at the subcellular level by Imaging-PAM. Furthermore, abundant callose in terminal cell walls might facilitate cell detachment to release dispersal units. In contrast, in the late diverging Zygnema, the callose content did not change upon desiccation for up to 3.5 h and was primarily localized in the corners between individual cells and at terminal cells. While these callose deposits still imply reduction of mechanical damage, the photosynthetic yield did not recover fully in the investigated young cultures of Zygnema upon rehydration. The abundance and specific localization of callose correlates with the higher desiccation tolerance in Klebsormidium when compared with Zygnema. PMID:26412780

  5. Effects of Cylindrospermopsin Producing Cyanobacterium and Its Crude Extracts on a Benthic Green Alga-Competition or Allelopathy?

    PubMed

    B-Béres, Viktória; Vasas, Gábor; Dobronoki, Dalma; Gonda, Sándor; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by filamentous cyanobacteria which could work as an allelopathic substance, although its ecological role in cyanobacterial-algal assemblages is mostly unclear. The competition between the CYN-producing cyanobacterium Chrysosporum (Aphanizomenon) ovalisporum, and the benthic green alga Chlorococcum sp. was investigated in mixed cultures, and the effects of CYN-containing cyanobacterial crude extract on Chlorococcum sp. were tested by treatments with crude extracts containing total cell debris, and with cell debris free crude extracts, modelling the collapse of a cyanobacterial water bloom. The growth inhibition of Chlorococcum sp. increased with the increasing ratio of the cyanobacterium in mixed cultures (inhibition ranged from 26% to 87% compared to control). Interestingly, inhibition of the cyanobacterium growth also occurred in mixed cultures, and it was more pronounced than it was expected. The inhibitory effects of cyanobacterial crude extracts on Chlorococcum cultures were concentration-dependent. The presence of C. ovalisporum in mixed cultures did not cause significant differences in nutrient content compared to Chlorococcum control culture, so the growth inhibition of the green alga could be linked to the presence of CYN and/or other bioactive compounds. PMID:26528991

  6. Localization and Quantification of Callose in the Streptophyte Green Algae Zygnema and Klebsormidium: Correlation with Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Freshwater green algae started to colonize terrestrial habitats about 460 million years ago, giving rise to the evolution of land plants. Today, several streptophyte green algae occur in aero-terrestrial habitats with unpredictable fluctuations in water availability, serving as ideal models for investigating desiccation tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that callose, a ?-d-1,3-glucan, is incorporated specifically in strained areas of the cell wall due to cellular water loss, implicating a contribution to desiccation tolerance. In the early diverging genus Klebsormidium, callose was drastically increased already after 30 min of desiccation stress. Localization studies demonstrated an increase in callose in the undulating cross cell walls during cellular water loss, allowing a regulated shrinkage and expansion after rehydration. This correlates with a high desiccation tolerance demonstrated by a full recovery of the photosynthetic yield visualized at the subcellular level by Imaging-PAM. Furthermore, abundant callose in terminal cell walls might facilitate cell detachment to release dispersal units. In contrast, in the late diverging Zygnema, the callose content did not change upon desiccation for up to 3.5 h and was primarily localized in the corners between individual cells and at terminal cells. While these callose deposits still imply reduction of mechanical damage, the photosynthetic yield did not recover fully in the investigated young cultures of Zygnema upon rehydration. The abundance and specific localization of callose correlates with the higher desiccation tolerance in Klebsormidium when compared with Zygnema. PMID:26412780

  7. Ca(2+)-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca(2+) signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca(2+)-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca(2+)-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  8. Ca2+-regulated cyclic electron flow supplies ATP for nitrogen starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Hu, Jinlu; Qiao, Yaqin; Chen, Weixian; Rong, Junfeng; Zhang, Yunming; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that both the linear photosynthetic electron transportation rate and the respiration rate dropped significantly during N starvation-induced neutral lipid accumulation in an oil-producing microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana, and proposed a possible role for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in ATP supply. In this study, we further exploited this hypothesis in both Chlorella sorokiniana C3 and the model green alga Chlamydomonas. We found that both the rate of CEF around photosystem I and the activity of thylakoid membrane-located ATP synthetase increased significantly during N starvation to drive ATP production. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the Chlamydomonas mutant pgrl1, which is deficient in PGRL1-mediated CEF, accumulated less neutral lipids and had reduced rates of CEF under N starvation. Further analysis revealed that Ca2+ signaling regulates N starvation-induced neutral lipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas by increasing calmodulin activity and boosting the expression of the calcium sensor protein that regulates Pgrl1-mediated CEF. Thus, Ca2+-regulated CEF supplies ATP for N starvation-induced lipid biosynthesis in green alga. The increased CEF may re-equilibrate the ATP/NADPH balance and recycle excess light energy in photosystems to prevent photooxidative damage, suggesting Ca2+-regulated CEF also played a key role in protecting and sustaining photosystems. PMID:26450399

  9. System Responses to Equal Doses of Photosynthetically Usable Radiation of Blue, Green, and Red Light in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  10. New “missing link” genus of the colonial volvocine green algae gives insights into the evolution of oogamy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evolution of oogamy from isogamy, an important biological event, can be summarized as follows: morphologically similar gametes (isogametes) differentiated into small “male” and large “female” motile gametes during anisogamy, from which immotile female gametes (eggs) evolved. The volvocine green algae represent a model lineage to study this type of sex evolution and show two types of gametic unions: conjugation between isogametes outside the parental colonies (external fertilization during isogamy) and fertilization between small motile gametes (sperm) and large gametes (eggs) inside the female colony (internal fertilization during anisogamy and oogamy). Although recent cultural studies on volvocine algae revealed morphological diversity and molecular genetic data of sexual reproduction, an intermediate type of union between these two gametic unions has not been identified. Results We identified a novel colonial volvocine genus, Colemanosphaera, which produces bundles of spindle-shaped male gametes through successive divisions of colonial cells. Obligately anisogamous conjugation between male and female motile gametes occurred outside the female colony (external fertilization during anisogamy). This new genus contains 16- or 32-celled spheroidal colonies similar to those of the volvocine genera Yamagishiella and Eudorina. However, Colemanosphaera can be clearly distinguished from these two genera based on its sister phylogenetic position to the enigmatic flattened colonial volvocine Platydorina and external fertilization during anisogamy. Two species of Colemanosphaera were found in a Japanese lake; these species are also distributed in European freshwaters based on a published sequence of an Austrian strain and the original description of Pandorina charkowiensis from Ukraine. Conclusions Based on phylogeny and morphological data, this novel genus exhibits a missing link between Platydorina and the typical spheroidal colonial volvocine members such as Pandorina or Yamagishiella. Considering the external obligate anisogamy, oogamy evolution may have been preceded by the transition from external to internal fertilization during anisogamy within the volvocine green algae. PMID:24589311

  11. Effect of dynamic factors of space flights on the green alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Moskvitin, E V; Vaulina, E N

    1974-01-01

    The biological effects of vibrational and linear acceleration on the alga Chlorella vulgaris were studied. Periodic vibration in the frequency range of 4-4000 Hz with vibrational acceleration up to 16 g did not affect the survival and mutability of Chlorella cells and did not modify the effects of acute gamma-radiation. However, random vibration similar to that occurring during launch of spaceships, combined with linear acceleration increased the radiation damage to algae produced by acute gamma-radiation at a dose of 10000 r. This effect is seen only in cells at the beginning of the G1 stage, which precedes DNA synthesis. PMID:12691110

  12. Three-Dimensional Ultrastructural Study of Oil and Astaxanthin Accumulation during Encystment in the Green Alga Haematococcus pluvialis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Hazuki; Nango, Nobuhito; Hirata, Aiko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Haematococcus pluvialis is a freshwater species of green algae and is well known for its accumulation of the strong antioxidant astaxanthin, which is used in aquaculture, various pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. High levels of astaxanthin are present in cysts, which rapidly accumulate when the environmental conditions become unfavorable for normal cell growth. It is not understood, however, how accumulation of high levels of astaxanthin, which is soluble in oil, becomes possible during encystment. Here, we performed ultrastructural 3D reconstruction based on over 350 serial sections per cell to visualize the dynamics of astaxanthin accumulation and subcellular changes during the encystment of H. pluvialis. This study showcases the marked changes in subcellular elements, such as chloroplast degeneration, in the transition from green coccoid cells to red cyst cells during encystment. In green coccoid cells, chloroplasts accounted for 41.7% of the total cell volume, whereas the relative volume of astaxanthin was very low (0.2%). In contrast, oil droplets containing astaxanthin predominated in cyst cells (52.2%), in which the total chloroplast volume was markedly decreased (9.7%). Volumetric observations also demonstrated that the relative volumes of the cell wall, starch grains, pyrenoids, mitochondria, the Golgi apparatus, and the nucleus in a cyst cell are smaller than those in green coccid cells. Our data indicated that chloroplasts are degraded, resulting in a net-like morphology, but do not completely disappear, even at the red cyst stage. PMID:23326471

  13. Bacterial diversity in surface water of the Yellow Sea during and after a green alga tide in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cong; Li, Fuchao; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu; Qin, Song

    2011-11-01

    From May to August 2008, a large "green tide", consisting of the alga Ulva ( Enteromorpha) prolifera, occurred in the Yellow Sea, China, affecting the local marine ecosystem and human activities. We investigated the influence of the green tide on the microbial community in the surface seawater, at four sites from July to August 2008, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. We sequenced 228 clones of unique patterns identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) techniques. The results show that 228 sequenced clones fell into six bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, and Planctomycetes. Alphaproteobacteria (33%), Gammaproteobacteria (25%), Bacteroidetes (23%) and Cyanobacteria (9%) dominated the assemblage. Comparison between samples collected in July (during the tide) and those collected in August (after the tide) showed that, in the microbial community, diversities of Alphaproteobacteria and Cyanobacteria increased after the tide, while those of Gammaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. These results indicate that the green tide influenced the growth of some bacteria, and provide information for further studies on the interactions and relationships between U. prolifera and the bacterial community. This study suggests that microbial community analysis is a good approach to monitoring green tides.

  14. Biogeography of Marine Algae

    E-print Network

    Biogeography of Marine Algae David J Garbary, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia and vicariance in establishing distributions and as factors associated with speciation. Since eukaryotic algae. There are many species that are virtually cosmopolitan (e.g. the green alga Enteromorpha intestinalis, the red

  15. COMMON EVOLUTIONARY ORIGIN OF STARCH BIOSYNTHETIC ENZYMES IN GREEN AND RED ALGAE1

    E-print Network

    Keeling, Patrick

    evolved. In con- trast, floridean starch synthesis in red algae proceeds via uridine diphosphate, large subunit; PGM, phosphoglucomutase; SS, soluble starch synthase; SSU, small subunit; UDP, uridine by glycosyltransferases, which use uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose or ADP-glucose as the sugar donor and a preexisting a

  16. Transcriptomics of Desiccation Tolerance in the Streptophyte Green Alga Klebsormidium Reveal a Land Plant-Like Defense Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kaplan, Franziska; Blaas, Kathrin; Zechmann, Bernd; Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Water loss has significant effects on physiological performance and survival rates of algae. However, despite the prominent presence of aeroterrestrial algae in terrestrial habitats, hardly anything is known about the molecular events that allow aeroterrestrial algae to survive harsh environmental conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome and physiology of a strain of the alpine aeroterrestrial alga Klebsormidium crenulatum under control and strong desiccation-stress conditions. Principal Findings For comparison we first established a reference transcriptome. The high-coverage reference transcriptome includes about 24,183 sequences (1.5 million reads, 636 million bases). The reference transcriptome encodes for all major pathways (energy, carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, sugars), nearly all deduced pathways are complete or missing only a few transcripts. Upon strong desiccation, more than 7000 transcripts showed changes in their expression levels. Most of the highest up-regulated transcripts do not show similarity to known viridiplant proteins, suggesting the existence of some genus- or species-specific responses to desiccation. In addition, we observed the up-regulation of many transcripts involved in desiccation tolerance in plants (e.g. proteins similar to those that are abundant in late embryogenesis (LEA), or proteins involved in early response to desiccation ERD), and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFO) known to act as osmolytes). Major physiological shifts are the up-regulation of transcripts for photosynthesis, energy production, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, which is supported by elevated cellular glutathione content as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy as well as an increase in total antiradical power. However, the effective quantum yield of Photosystem II and CO2 fixation decreased sharply under the applied desiccation stress. In contrast, transcripts for cell integrative functions such as cell division, DNA replication, cofactor biosynthesis, and amino acid biosynthesis were down-regulated. Significance This is the first study investigating the desiccation transcriptome of a streptophyte green alga. Our results indicate that the cellular response is similar to embryophytes, suggesting that embryophytes inherited a basic cellular desiccation tolerance from their streptophyte predecessors. PMID:25340847

  17. Brown blob (algae?) (Native) 

    E-print Network

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    | pg. 20 cientists at three Texas universities investigating golden algae, its explosive growth, and its deadly toxins have dis- covered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes. Understanding... this competition could lead them closer to controlling this harmful algae, the researchers said. ?Our biggest finding so far,? said Dr. Daniel Roelke of Texas AgriLife Research and one of the investigators, ?is that there appears to be a chemical warfare...

  18. Lipophilic pigments from cyanobacterial (blue-green algal) and diatom mats in Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmisano, A. C.; Summons, R. E.; Cronin, S. E.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Lipophilic pigments were examined in microbial mat communities dominated by cyanobacteria in the intertidal zone and by diatoms in the subtidal and sublittoral zones of Hamelin Pool, Shark Bay, Western Australia. These microbial mats have evolutionary significance because of their similarity to lithfied stromatolites from the Proterozoic and Early Paleozoic eras. Fucoxanthin, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, beta-carotene, and chlorophylls a and c characterized the diatom mats, whereas cyanobacterial mats contained myxoxanthophyll, zeaxanthin, echinenone, beta-carotene, chlorophyll a and, in some cases, sheath pigment. The presence of bacteriochlorophyll a within the mats suggest a close association of photosynthetic bacteria with diatoms and cyanobacteria. The high carotenoids : chlorophyll a ratios (0.84-2.44 wt/wt) in the diatom mats suggest that carotenoids served a photoprotective function in this high light environment. By contrast, cyanobacterial sheath pigment may have largely supplanted the photoprotective role of carotenoids in the intertidal mats.

  19. Developing Optimal Growth Parameters for the Green Microalgae Nannochloris oculata and the Diatom Nitzschia sp. for Large scale Raceway Production 

    E-print Network

    Luedecke, Phillip Ryan

    2011-10-21

    cell wall composition, diatoms are believed to be more susceptible to shear forces which can result in lysis. Determining the natural settling rate to the minimum channel velocity relationship in cultivation ponds was the objective. No flocculants/coagulants...

  20. Characterization of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex and its regulator from the green alga Chara braunii expands the evolutionary breadth of plant G-protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-12-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the G?, G?, and G? subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbG? and CbG?, CbG? and CbG?, and CbG? and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae. PMID:24179134

  1. Promotive effect of se on the growth and antioxidation of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi-Gang, Zhou; Zhi-Li, Liu

    1998-12-01

    Cultures of a blue-green alga Spirulina maxima (Setch. et Gard.) Geitler with various concentrations of Se in Zarrouk's medium showed that not higher than 40 mg/L Se could promote its growth. The present experiments showed that S. maxima grown under normal conditions, has an oxidant stress defence system for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) removal, which is the Halliwell-Asada pathway. When 4 to 20 mg/L Se was added to the algal medium, this pathway was replaced by a so-called Sestressed pathway containing GSH peroxidase (GSH-POD). As a result of the occurrence of both higher activity of GSH-POD and lower levels of hydroxyl radical (OH·), the Se-stressed pathway scavenged H2O2 so effectively that the growth of S. maxima was promoted by 4 to 20 mg/L Se. While GSH-POD activity of the alga disappeared at 40 mg/L Se, the recovery of ascorbate peroxidase was observed. The lower levels of ascorbic acid and GSH made the Halliwell-Asada pathway for scavenging H2O2 less effective, while the highest activity of catalase might be responsible in part for the H2O2 removal, causing the level of OH· in S. maxima grown at 40 mg/L Se to be much higher than the OH· level in this alga grown at 4 to 20 mg/L Se, but lower than that in the control. The OH· level changes caused the growth of S. maxima cultured at 40 mg/L Se to increase slightly to close to that of the control.

  2. Influence of PbS nanoparticle polymer coating on their aggregation behavior and toxicity to the green algae Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Hajar; Moradshahi, Ali; Jahromi, Hamed Dehdashti; Sheikhi, Mohammad Hosein

    2014-09-01

    The potential hazards of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment and to living organisms need to be considered for a safe development of nanotechnology. In the present study, the potential toxic effects of uncoated and gum Arabic-coated lead sulfide nanoparticles (GA-coated PbS NPs) on the growth, lipid peroxidation, reducing capacity and total carotenoid content of the hypersaline unicellular green algae Dunaliella salina were investigated. Coatings of PbS NPs with GA, as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, reduced the toxicity of PbS NPs. Uncoated PbS NP toxicity to D. salina was attributed to higher algal cell-NP agglomerate formation, higher lipid peroxidation, lower content of total reducing substances and lower total carotenoid content. Low levels of Pb(2+) in the growth culture media indicate that PbS NP dissolution does not occur in the culture. Also, the addition of 100 ?M Pb(2+) to the culture media had no significant (P>0.05) effect on algal growth. The shading of light (shading effect) by PbS NPs, when simulated using activated charcoal, did not contribute to the overall toxic effect of PbS NPs which was evident by insignificant (P>0.05) reduction in the growth and antioxidant capacity of the algae. When PbS NP aggregation in culture media (without algal cells) was followed for 60 min, uncoated form aggregated rapidly reaching aggregate sizes with hydrodynamic diameter of over 2500 nm within 60 min. Effective particle-particle interaction was reduced in the GA-coated NPs. Aggregates of about 440 nm hydrodynamic diameter were formed within 35 min. Afterwards the aggregate size remained constant. It is concluded that PbS NPs have a negative effect on aquatic algae and their transformation by GA capping affects NPs aggregation properties and toxicity. PMID:24907922

  3. Anti-cancer effects of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, a natural source of bilirubin-like tetrapyrrolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Koní?ková, Renata; Va?ková, Kate?ina; Vaníková, Jana; Vá?ová, Kate?ina; Muchová, Lucie; Subhanová, Iva; Zadinová, Marie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Dvo?ák, Aleš; Kolá?, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Rimpelová, Silvie; Ruml, Tomáš; J Wong, Ronald; Vítek, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Spirulina platensis is a blue-green alga used as a dietary supplement because of its hypocholesterolemic properties. Among other bioactive substances, it is also rich in tetrapyrrolic compounds closely related to bilirubin molecule, a potent antioxidant and anti-proliferative agent. The aim of our study was to evaluate possible anticancer effects of S. platensis and S. platensis-derived tetrapyrroles using an experimental model of pancreatic cancer. The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components [phycocyanobilin (PCB) and chlorophyllin, a surrogate molecule for chlorophyll A] were tested on several human pancreatic cancer cell lines and xenotransplanted nude mice. The effects of experimental therapeutics on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and glutathione redox status were also evaluated. Compared to untreated cells, experimental therapeutics significantly decreased proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.16 g•L-1 [S. platensis], 60 ?M [PCB], and 125 ?M [chlorophyllin], p<0.05). The anti-proliferative effects of S. platensis were also shown in vivo, where inhibition of pancreatic cancer growth was evidenced since the third day of treatment (p < 0.05). All tested compounds decreased generation of mitochondrial ROS and glutathione redox status (p = 0.0006; 0.016; and 0.006 for S. platensis, PCB, and chlorophyllin, respectively). In conclusion, S. platensis and its tetrapyrrolic components substantially decreased the proliferation of experimental pancreatic cancer. These data support a chemopreventive role of this edible alga. Furthermore, it seems that dietary supplementation with this alga might enhance systemic pool of tetrapyrroles, known to be higher in subjects with Gilbert syndrome. PMID:24552870

  4. Raman spectroscopic insights into the chemical gradients within the wound plug of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia.

    PubMed

    Weissflog, Ina A; Grosser, Katharina; Bräutigam, Maximilian; Dietzek, Benjamin; Pohnert, Georg; Popp, Juergen

    2013-04-15

    The invasive unicellular green macroalga Caulerpa taxifolia has spread dramatically in the Mediterranean Sea over the last decades. Its success is based on rapid plug formation after wounding, to prevent the loss of cell content. This quick and efficient process involves the rapid transformation of the secondary metabolite caulerpenyne to the reactive 1,4-dialdehyde oxytoxin 2, which acts as a protein crosslinker. The main metabolites of the wound plug were identified as proteins, caulerpenyne derivatives, and sulfated polysaccharides. Because of a methodological deficit, however, the detailed distribution of the compounds within the wound plug of C. taxifolia was unknown. This study demonstrates the suitability of FT-Raman spectroscopy for the noninvasive in vivo determination of caulerpenyne and its derivatives, as well as ?-carotene, from signals with special spectral features within the wound plug and the adjacent intact alga tissue, with a resolution of 100 ?m. FT-Raman spectra allowed four different zones with distinct chemical compositions around the region of wounds to be characterized. Gradients of the investigated metabolites within the wound plug and the alga could be determined. Moreover, various caulerpenyne derivatives could be identified spectroscopically, and this has led to a mechanistic proposal for the internal and the external wound plug formation. PMID:23526760

  5. Selenium Accumulation in Unicellular Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris and Its Effects on Antioxidant Enzymes and Content of Photosynthetic Pigments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xian; Zhong, Yu; Huang, Zhi; Yang, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate selenite effects in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris as a primary producer and the relationship with intracellular bioaccumulation. The effects of selenite were evaluated by measuring the effect of different selenite concentrations on algal growth during a 144 h exposure period. It was found that lower Se concentrations (?75 mg L?1) positively promoted C. vulgaris growth and acted as antioxidant by inhibiting lipid peroxidation (LPO) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidative effect was associated with an increase in guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and photosynthetic pigments. Meanwhile, significant increase in the cell growth rate and organic Se content was also detected in the algae. In contrast, these changes were opposite in C. vulgaris exposed to Se higher than 100 mg L?1. The antioxidation and toxicity appeared to be correlated to Se bioaccumulation, which suggests the appropriate concentration of Se in the media accumulation of C. vulgaris should be 75 mg L?1. Taken together, C. vulgaris possesses tolerance to Se, and Se-Chlorella could be developed as antioxidative food for aquaculture and human health. PMID:25375113

  6. Anticholinesterase poisonings in dogs from a cyanobacterial (blue-green algae) bloom dominated by Anabaena flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, N A; Carmichael, W W; Pfahler, D

    1988-04-01

    Cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) implicated in the deaths of 9 dogs at Richmond Lake, SD, on Aug 26, 1985, were analyzed. The dominant cyanobacterial species from the water sample was Anabaena flos-aquae. The lyophilized bloom material or the high-performance liquid chromatography purified toxin peak, when administered to mice IP, induced clinical signs of salivation, lacrimation, urinary incontinence, defecation, convulsion, fasciculation, and respiratory arrest. Further comparison of the semipurified bloom toxin with an irreversible anticholinesterase anatoxin-a(s), produced by A flos-aquae strain NRC-525-17, revealed the bloom toxin and anatoxin-a(s) had similar properties on high-performance liquid chromatography and on the inhibition of electric eel acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7). PMID:3132068

  7. Chemical constituents of the aquatic plant Schoenoplectus lacustris: evaluation of phytotoxic effects on the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum.

    PubMed

    D'Abrosca, Brigida; Dellagreca, Marina; Fiorentino, Antonio; Isidori, Marina; Monaco, Pietro; Pacifico, Severina

    2006-01-01

    Forty-nine secondary metabolites were isolated from aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the aquatic plant Shoenoplectus lacustris. All compounds were characterized based on spectroscopic data. Eleven free and glycosylated low-molecular polyphenols, 17 cinnamic acid and dihydrocinnamic acid derivatives, 11 flavonoids, and 10 C13 nor-isoprenoids were identified. The structure of the new compound, 1-benzoyl-glycerol-2-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside, was elucidated by 2D NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC, HMBC, NOESY). To evaluate potential phytotoxic effects, all compounds were tested on the green alga Selenastrum capricornutum, a unicellular organism commonly used in tests of toxicity as a bioindicator of eutrophic sites. The most active compound was (-)-catechin, showing an inhibition similar to that of the algaecide CuSO4. PMID:16525872

  8. New lipid-producing, cold-tolerant yellow-green alga isolated from the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R; Mengistu, Sinafik; Ranum, Paul; Celio, Gail; Mashek, Mara; Mashek, Douglas; Lefebvre, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    A new strain of yellow-green algae (Xanthophyceae, Heterokonta), tentatively named Heterococcus sp. DN1 (UTEX accession number UTEX ZZ885), was discovered among snow fields in the Rocky Mountains. Axenic cultures of H. sp. DN1 were isolated and their cellular morphology, growth, and composition of lipids were characterized. H. sp. DN1 was found to grow at temperatures approaching freezing to accumulate large intracellular stores of lipids. H. sp. DN1 produces the highest quantity of lipids when grown undisturbed with high light in low temperatures. Of particular interest was the accumulation of eicosapentaenoic acid, known to be important for human nutrition, and palmitoleic acid, known to improve biodiesel feedstock properties. PMID:23754623

  9. Toxicity of volcanic-ash leachate to a blue-green alga. Results of a preliminary bioassay experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Feder, G.L.; Stiles, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the possible effects of volcanic ash from the May 18,1980, eruption of Mt. St. Helens, Washington, on aquatic ecosystems, we conducted a bioassay experiment with a blue-green alga, Anabaena flos-aquae. Results showed that leachate (obtained by leaching 151 g of ash with 130 mL of simulated freshwater) was lethal to Anabaena flos-aquae cultures when diluted as much as 1:100 with culture medium. Cultures exposed to a 1:500 dilution grew, but a toxic effect was indicated by abnormalities in the Anabaena filaments. This study indicates that ash from the Mt. St. Helens volcano could have an effect on aquatic ecosystems in the areas of significant ashfall. Further study is needed to determine the toxic chemical constituents in the ash and also its possible effects on other aquatic organisms.

  10. Sequence of the gene coding for the beta-subunit of dinitrogenase from the blue-green alga Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Mazur, B J; Chui, C F

    1982-11-01

    The nitrogen fixation nif K gene of the blue-green alga Anabaena, which codes for the beta-subunit of dinitrogenase, has been subjected to sequence analysis. The nif K protein is predicted to be 512 amino acids long, to have a M(r) or 57,583, and to contain six cysteine residues. Three of these cysteines are within peptides homologous to FeS cluster-binding cysteinyl peptides from ferredoxins and from a high potential iron protein and, thus, may be ligands to which FeS clusters bind in dinitrogenase. The sequences surrounding the cysteine residues are 70% homologous to the corresponding cysteinyl tryptic peptides of the Azotobacter vinelandii dinitrogenase, although the positions of the cysteine residues are not always conserved between the two proteins. A 15-amino acid coding sequence precedes nif K on its transcript. Amino acid codon usage is highly asymmetric and parallels that found for the Anabaena dinitrogenase reductase gene (nif H). Putative promoter and ribosome binding site sequences were identified for nif K. These regulatory sequences are homologous to sequences preceding nif D; nif D codes for the alpha-subunit of dinitrogenase but is separated from nif K on the chromosome by 11,000 nucleotides. The nif K promoter also is virtually identical to a promoter-like sequence that immediately precedes the start of the transcript for the large subunit of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase from maize chloroplasts. This homology appears to support the theory that chloroplasts evolved from blue-green algae. PMID:16593247

  11. Pectin Metabolism and Assembly in the Cell Wall of the Charophyte Green Alga Penium margaritaceum1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Sřrensen, Iben; Popper, Zoë A.; Ochs, Julie; Andreas, Amanda; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Pielach, Anna; Sacks, Carly; Brechka, Hannah; Ruisi-Besares, Pia; Willats, William G.T.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2014-01-01

    The pectin polymer homogalacturonan (HG) is a major component of land plant cell walls and is especially abundant in the middle lamella. Current models suggest that HG is deposited into the wall as a highly methylesterified polymer, demethylesterified by pectin methylesterase enzymes and cross-linked by calcium ions to form a gel. However, this idea is based largely on indirect evidence and in vitro studies. We took advantage of the wall architecture of the unicellular alga Penium margaritaceum, which forms an elaborate calcium cross-linked HG-rich lattice on its cell surface, to test this model and other aspects of pectin dynamics. Studies of live cells and microscopic imaging of wall domains confirmed that the degree of methylesterification and sufficient levels of calcium are critical for lattice formation in vivo. Pectinase treatments of live cells and immunological studies suggested the presence of another class of pectin polymer, rhamnogalacturonan I, and indicated its colocalization and structural association with HG. Carbohydrate microarray analysis of the walls of P. margaritaceum, Physcomitrella patens, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) further suggested the conservation of pectin organization and interpolymer associations in the walls of green plants. The individual constituent HG polymers also have a similar size and branched structure to those of embryophytes. The HG-rich lattice of P. margaritaceum, a member of the charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants, was shown to be important for cell adhesion. Therefore, the calcium-HG gel at the cell surface may represent an early evolutionary innovation that paved the way for an adhesive middle lamella in multicellular land plants. PMID:24652345

  12. Population and community changes of attached algae to zinc stress alone and in combination with selected environmental variables

    SciTech Connect

    Genter, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Three experiments were performed along the New River, Virginia. Outdoor flow-through stream mesocosms were continuously supplied with natural river water, and chemical treatments were administered with peristaltic pumps. The response variable was biovolume of algae attached to glass-rod artificial substrates. The first experiment was performed in spring, summer, and fall, 1984. Algal communities were exposed to four zinc (Zn) treatments (Ambient, 0.05, 0.5, 1.0 mg Zn/l). Treatments as low as 0.05 mg Zn/l reduced abundance of diatoms characteristics of the control treatment and increased abundance of green and blue-green algae. A similarity index (SIMI) indicated that samples generally became less similar to control samples as treatment increased from 0.05 to 1.0 mg/l. Total biovolume responded later than individual taxa and sometimes failed to distinguish between treatments. Zinc bound to periphyton was more reliable than total Zn in water for identifying Zn treatments. The second experiment investigated factorial treatments of snail grazing (absent, 400 Mudalia sp/m) and Zn (ambient, 0.5 mg/l) on algal abundance. Zinc treatment inhibited all algal taxa regardless of snail treatment. Snail grazing reduced abundance of 5 of 10 diatom taxa, but low temperature may have reduced grazing rate so that these algal populations increased by the end of the experiment. A third experiment investigated change in algal biovolume due to factorial treatments of pH (6, ambient, 9) and Zn (ambient, 0.05 mg An/l). Added Zn and pH 6 treatments reduced abundance of some diatoms and a filamentous blue-green alga and increased abundance of other diatoms, green, and coccoid blue-green algae.

  13. Functional Characterization of the Plastidic Phosphate Translocator Gene Family from the Thermo-Acidophilic Red Alga Galdieria sulphuraria Reveals Specific Adaptations of Primary Carbon Partitioning in Green Plants and Red Algae1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Linka, Marc; Jamai, Aziz; Weber, Andreas P.M.

    2008-01-01

    In chloroplasts of green plants and algae, CO2 is assimilated into triose-phosphates (TPs); a large part of these TPs is exported to the cytosol by a TP/phosphate translocator (TPT), whereas some is stored in the plastid as starch. Plastidial phosphate translocators have evolved from transport proteins of the host endomembrane system shortly after the origin of chloroplasts by endosymbiosis. The red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria shares three conserved putative orthologous transport proteins with the distantly related seed plants and green algae. However, red algae, in contrast to green plants, store starch in their cytosol, not inside plastids. Hence, due to the lack of a plastidic starch pool, a larger share of recently assimilated CO2 needs to be exported to the cytosol. We thus hypothesized that red algal transporters have distinct substrate specificity in comparison to their green orthologs. This hypothesis was tested by expression of the red algal genes in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and assessment of their substrate specificities and kinetic constants. Indeed, two of the three red algal phosphate translocator candidate orthologs have clearly distinct substrate specificities when compared to their green homologs. GsTPT (for G. sulphuraria TPT) displays very narrow substrate specificity and high affinity; in contrast to green plant TPTs, 3-phosphoglyceric acid is poorly transported and thus not able to serve as a TP/3-phosphoglyceric acid redox shuttle in vivo. Apparently, the specific features of red algal primary carbon metabolism promoted the evolution of a highly efficient export system with high affinities for its substrates. The low-affinity TPT of plants maintains TP levels sufficient for starch biosynthesis inside of chloroplasts, whereas the red algal TPT is optimized for efficient export of TP from the chloroplast. PMID:18799657

  14. Characterisation Of Polysacharides And Lipids From Selected Green Algae Species By FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used in this study to identify and determine spectral features of Chromochloris zofingiensis (Dönz) Fucíková et L.A. Lewis (SAG 211-14, Gottingen, Germany), Acutodesmus obliguus (Turpin) Hegewald (SAG 276-1, Gottingen, Germany) and Chlorella sorokiniana (K. Brandt) Pröschold et Darienko (SAG 211-40c, Gottingen, Germany). Polysaccharides and lipids from these three algae species were determined using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) with ATR accessory with diamante crystal in spectral range from 400 - 4000 cm-1 and resolution 4.

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell-type specific gene expression in the green alga Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Ghazaleh; Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Background The multicellular alga Volvox carteri possesses only two cell types: mortal, motile somatic cells and potentially immortal, immotile reproductive cells. It is therefore an attractive model system for studying how cell-autonomous cytodifferentiation is programmed within a genome. Moreover, there are ongoing genome projects both in Volvox carteri and in the closely related unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, gene sequencing is only the beginning. To identify cell-type specific expression and to determine relative expression rates, we evaluate the potential of real-time RT-PCR for quantifying gene transcript levels. Results Here we analyze a diversified pool of 39 target genes by real-time RT-PCR for each cell type. This gene pool contains previously known genes with unknown localization of cellular expression, 28 novel genes which are described in this study for the first time, and a few known, cell-type specific genes as a control. The respective gene products are, for instance, part of photosynthesis, cellular regulation, stress response, or transport processes. We provide expression data for all these genes. Conclusion The results show that quantitative real-time RT-PCR is a favorable approach to analyze cell-type specific gene expression in Volvox, which can be extended to a much larger number of genes or to developmental or metabolic mutants. Our expression data also provide a basis for a detailed analysis of individual, previously unknown, cell-type specifically expressed genes. PMID:17184518

  16. BUILDING SHAPE AND TEXTURE MODELS OF DIATOMS FOR ANALYSIS AND SYNTHESIS OF

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    , principal curves, diatoms. 1 Introduction Diatoms are unicellular algae with a highly ornate silica shell and providing the ability to compare photographs and drawings has significant benefits for the biological

  17. Bicarbonate in vivo Requirement of Photosystem II in the Green Alga Chlamydobotrys stellata.

    PubMed

    Mende, D; Wiessner, W

    1985-03-01

    Flash induced 685 nm fluorescence emission of preilluminated and dark kept Chlamydobotrys stellata has been measured under conditions of CO(2)-deprivation. The difference in fluorescence intensity between dark kept and preilluminated cells is taken as a measure for the reduced state of the primary stable electron acceptor of photosystem II, Q, at the given intensity of preillumination. CO(2) removal from growing cultures of this alga for 15 min diminishes photosynthetic electron transport at the oxidizing side of this photosystem. Prolonged CO(2)-absence influences also its reducing side. Measurements of flash induced oxygen yields support the conclusion that both sides of photosystem II are affected in the absence of bicarbonate. PMID:23196010

  18. Direct and indirect toxic effects of cotton-derived cellulose nanofibres on filamentous green algae.

    PubMed

    Munk, Michele; Brandăo, Humberto M; Nowak, Sophie; Mouton, Ludovic; Gern, Juliana C; Guimaraes, Alessandro S; Yéprémian, Claude; Couté, Alain; Raposo, Nádia R B; Marconcini, José M; Brayner, Roberta

    2015-12-01

    Recently, cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have attracted considerable attention as natural, abundant polymers with excellent mechanical properties and biodegradability. CNFs provide a new materials platform for the sustainable production of high-performance nano-enable products for various applications. Given the increasing rates of CNF production, the potential for their release to the environment and the subsequent impact on ecosystem is becoming an increasing concern that needs to be addressed. Here, we used the Klebsormidium flaccidum as a bioindicator organism of terrestrial and freshwater habitats pollution using a battery of biomarkers. Our results show that cotton CNFs inhibit the proliferation of algae and induce morphological changes in them. The two main toxicity mechanisms induced by cotton CNFs are: (i) a direct contact of CNFs with the cell wall and cellular membrane and (ii) an indirect effect through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26363983

  19. Hydrogen production from salt water by Marine blue green algae and solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, A.; Rosner, D.; Kumazawa, S.; Barciela, S.; Phlips, E.

    1985-01-01

    Two marine bluegreen algae, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7 and Synechococcus sp Miami 041511 have been selected as the result of over 10 years continuous and intensive effort of isolation, growth examination, and the screening of hydrogen photoproduction capability in this laboratory. Both strains photoproduced hydrogen for several days at high rates and a quantity of hydrogen was accumulated in a closed vessel. Overall hydrogen donor substance of the hydrogen photoproduction was found to be salt water. Using strain Miami BG 7, a two step method of hydrogen photoproduction from salt water was successfully developed and this was recycled several times over a one month period using both free cells and immobilized cells in both indoor and outdoor under natural sunlight. According to these experiments, a prototype floating hydrogen production system was designed for further development of the biosolar hydrogen production system.

  20. Seasonal variation of antibacterial activities in the green alga Ulva pertusa Kjellman.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Ha, Yu-Mi; Lee, Bo-Bae; Moon, Hye Eun; Cho, Kwang Keun; Choi, In Soon

    2014-03-01

    The present study was performed to screen out the extracts of algae and assess the seasonal variation in antimicrobial activity of Ulva pertusa against Gardnerella vaginalis. Seasonal variation in antibacterial activity was observed, with the extracts showing no activity during summer and autumn, and showing antibacterial activity from early winter (December) to middle spring (April). The maximum value of antimicrobial activity (6.5 mm inhibition zone at 5 mg disk(-1)) of U. pertusa against G. vaginalis was observed in April. Otherwise, for both chlorophyll a and b, the highest content (2.87 mg g(-1) and 1.37 mg g(-1)) was observed in March 2009. These results may reflect variation in cellular chemical compositions such as secondary metabolite(s) rather than chlorophyll and biological activities according to season. PMID:24665759

  1. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    1987-01-01

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself was conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6 liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46 percent) at a rate of 100 to approx. 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  2. Food production and gas exchange system using blue-green alga (Spirulina) for CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguchi, Mitsuo; Otsubo, Koji; Nitta, Keiji; Hatayama, Shigeki

    In order to reduce the cultivation area required for the growth of higher plants in space adoption of algae, which have a higher photosynthetic ability, seems very suitable for obtaining oxygen and food as a useful source of high quality protein. The preliminary cultivation experiment for determining optimum cultivation conditions and for obtaining the critical design parameters of the cultivator itself has been conducted. Spirulina was cultivated in the 6-liter medium containing a sodium hydrogen carbonate solution and a cultivation temperature controlled using a thermostat. Generated oxygen gas was separated using a polypropyrene porous hollow fiber membrane module. Through this experiment, oxygen gas (at a concentration of more than 46%) at a rate of 100 ~ 150 ml per minute could be obtained.

  3. The Glass Menagerie: diatoms for novel applications in nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard; Losic, Dusan; Tiffany, Mary Ann; Nagy, Stephen S; Sterrenburg, Frithjof A S

    2009-02-01

    Diatoms are unicellular, eukaryotic, photosynthetic algae that are found in aquatic environments. Diatoms have enormous ecological importance on this planet and display a diversity of patterns and structures at the nano- to millimetre scale. Diatom nanotechnology, a new interdisciplinary area, has spawned collaborations in biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, chemistry, material science and engineering. We survey diatom nanotechnology since 2005, emphasizing recent advances in diatom biomineralization, biophotonics, photoluminescence, microfluidics, compustat domestication, multiscale porosity, silica sequestering of proteins, detection of trace gases, controlled drug delivery and computer design. Diatoms might become the first organisms for which the gap in our knowledge of the relationship between genotype and phenotype is closed. PMID:19167770

  4. Green energy from marine algae: biogas production and composition from the anaerobic digestion of Irish seaweed species.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, C H; Bartlett, J

    2013-01-01

    Marine algae have emerged as an alternative feedstock for the production of a number of renewable fuels, including biogas. In addition to energy potential, other characteristics make them attractive as an energy source, including their ability to absorb carbon dioxide (CO2), higher productivity rates than land-based crops and the lack of water use or land competition. For Ireland, biofuels from marine algae can play an important role by reducing imports of fossil fuels as well as providing the necessary energy in rural communities. In this study, five potential seaweed species common in Irish waters, Saccorhiza polyschides, Ulva sp., Laminaria digitata, Fucus serratus and Saccharina latissima, were co-digested individually with bovine slurry. Batch reactors of 120ml and 1000ml were set up and incubated at 35 degrees C to investigate their suitability for production of biogas. Digesters fed with S. latissima produced the maximum methane yield (335 ml g volatile solids(-1) (g(VS)(-1) followed by S. polyschides with 255 ml g(VS)(-1). L. digitata produced 246ml g(VS)(-1) and the lowest yields were from the green seaweed Ulva sp. 191ml g(VS)(-1). The methane and CO2 percentages ranged between 50-72% and 10-45%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the seaweed species investigated are good feedstocks candidates for the production of biogas and methane as a source of energy. Their use on a large-scale process will require further investigation to increase yields and reduce production costs. PMID:24350482

  5. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the first ARA6 homologue, a RAB5 GTPase, from green algae

    PubMed Central

    Foissner, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    RAB5 GTPases are important regulators of endosomal membrane traffic in yeast, plants, and animals. A specific subgroup of this family, the ARA6 group, has been described in land plants including bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. Here, we report on the isolation of an ARA6 homologue in a green alga. CaARA6 (CaRABF1) from Chara australis, a member of the Characeae that is a close relative of land plants, encodes a polypeptide of 237 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 25.4kDa, which is highly similar to ARA6 members from Arabidopsis thaliana and other land plants and has GTPase activity. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells, fluorescently tagged CaARA6 labelled organelles with diameters between 0.2 and 1.2 µm, which co-localized with fluorescently tagged AtARA6 known to be present on multivesicular endosomes. Mutations in the membrane-anchoring and GTP-binding sites altered the localization of CaARA6 comparable to that of A. thaliana ARA6 (RABF1). In characean internodal cells, confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy with antibodies against AtARA6 and CaARA6 revealed ARA6 epitopes not only at multivesicular endosomes but also at the plasma membrane, including convoluted domains (charasomes), and at the trans-Golgi network. Our findings demonstrate that ARA6-like proteins have a more ancient origin than previously thought. They indicate further that ARA6-like proteins could have different functions in spite of the high similarity between characean algae and flowering plants. PMID:24127512

  6. Molecular and biochemical analysis of the first ARA6 homologue, a RAB5 GTPase, from green algae.

    PubMed

    Hoepflinger, Marion C; Geretschlaeger, Anja; Sommer, Aniela; Hoeftberger, Margit; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Hammerl, Peter; Tenhaken, Raimund; Ueda, Takashi; Foissner, Ilse

    2013-12-01

    RAB5 GTPases are important regulators of endosomal membrane traffic in yeast, plants, and animals. A specific subgroup of this family, the ARA6 group, has been described in land plants including bryophytes, lycophytes, and flowering plants. Here, we report on the isolation of an ARA6 homologue in a green alga. CaARA6 (CaRABF1) from Chara australis, a member of the Characeae that is a close relative of land plants, encodes a polypeptide of 237 aa with a calculated molecular mass of 25.4 kDa, which is highly similar to ARA6 members from Arabidopsis thaliana and other land plants and has GTPase activity. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells, fluorescently tagged CaARA6 labelled organelles with diameters between 0.2 and 1.2 µm, which co-localized with fluorescently tagged AtARA6 known to be present on multivesicular endosomes. Mutations in the membrane-anchoring and GTP-binding sites altered the localization of CaARA6 comparable to that of A. thaliana ARA6 (RABF1). In characean internodal cells, confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy with antibodies against AtARA6 and CaARA6 revealed ARA6 epitopes not only at multivesicular endosomes but also at the plasma membrane, including convoluted domains (charasomes), and at the trans-Golgi network. Our findings demonstrate that ARA6-like proteins have a more ancient origin than previously thought. They indicate further that ARA6-like proteins could have different functions in spite of the high similarity between characean algae and flowering plants. PMID:24127512

  7. Flash kinetics and light intensity dependence of oxygen evolution in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed

    Ley, A C; Babcock, G T; Sauer, K

    1975-05-15

    Patterns of oxygen evolution in flashing light for the glue-green alga Anacystis nidulans are compared with those for broken spinach chloroplasts and whole cells of the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The oscillations of oxygen yield with flash number that occur in both Anacystis and Chlorella, display a greater degree of damping than do those of isolated spinach chloroplasts. The increase in damping results from a two- to threefold increase in the fraction (alpha) of reaction centers "missed" by a flash. The increase in alpha cannot be explained by non-saturing flash intensities or by the dark reduction of the oxidized intermediates formed by the flash. Anaerobic conditions markedly increase alpha in Anacystis and Chlorella but have no effect on alpha in broken spinach chloroplasts. The results signify that the mechanism of charge separation and water oxidation involved in all three orgainsms is the same, but that the pool of secondary electron acceptors between Photosystem II and Photosystem I is more reduced in the dark, in the algal cells, than in the isolated spinach chloroplasts. Oxygen evolution in flashing light for Anacystis and Chlorella show light saturation curves for the oxygen yield of the third flash (Y3) that differ markedly from those of the steady-state flashes(YS). In experiments in which all flashes are uniformly attenuated, Y3 requires nearly twice as much light as YS to reach half-saturation. Under these conditions Y3 has a sigmoidal dependence on intensity, while that of YS is hyperbolic. These differences depend on the number of flashes attenuated. When any one of the first three flashes is attenuated, the variation of Y3 with intensity resembles that of YS. When two of the first three flashes are attenuated, Y3 is intermediate in shape between the two extremes. A quantitative interpretation of these results based on the model of Kok et al. (Kik, B., Forbush, B.and McGloin, M. (1970) Photochem. Photobiol. 14, 307-321) fits the experimental data. PMID:804933

  8. Green alga Ulva pertusa--a new source of bioactive compounds with antialgal activity.

    PubMed

    Ying-ying, Sun; Hui, Wang; Gan-lin, Guo; Yin-fang, Pu; Bin-lun, Yan; Chang-hai, Wang

    2015-07-01

    We tested the effects of solvent fractions (FA, FB, FC, and FD), which partitioned by liquid-liquid extraction from the methanol extract of Ulva pertusa, on the growth of red tide microalgae (Karenia mikimitoi, Skeletonema costatum, Alexandrium tamarense, Heterosigma akashiwo, Prorocentrum donghaiense), and FA, FB, and FC exhibited significantly antialgal activity. The chemical constituent analysis showed the existence of bioactive compounds such as phenols and alkaloids. Further, four solvent fractions were applied to silica gel column and repeated preparative TLC to produce 13 samples and their purity qualified as thin-layer chromatographic grade. Among these purified samples, FA111, FB411, FC411, FD111, and FD211 exhibited stronger antialgal activity. Furthermore, their functional groups were analyzed by colorimetric methods and UV spectra data. FD111 and FD211 were temptatively identified as alkaloids; the others were initially identified as phenolic acids. This is a preliminary study and the structure identification of these purified samples requires further investigation. While concentration of these purified samples in this algae was very small, they showed excellent effects against red tide microalgae. PMID:25724801

  9. Flow shear induced cross-stream migration by a green alga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengala, Anwar; Hondzo, Miki; Sheng, Jian

    2010-11-01

    Swimming and migration characteristics of micro-organisms in shear flows has overarching implications in formation of biological thin layers in aquatic ecosystems, design of bioreactors, and cell separations. Experiments are conducted in a microfluidic channel using digital holographic microscopy. A motile micro-alga, Dunaliella primolecta, is studied in a laminar shear flow at maximum shear rates ranging from 0.1 to 25 s-1. It is found that D. primolecta cells aggregate in the direction of positive vorticity when a critical local shear rate of 5 s-1 is reached. Unlike nonmotile cells, D. primolecta in high shear flow do not rotate along the Jeffrey orbits, neither resumes the local vorticity of flow. The torque on cell body is counter-acted by the spatial alignment of beating flagella. It is speculated that under severe viscous stresses, motile cells "opt" to align themselves in the direction where the least stresses are experienced on cell wall. Beating of flagella, which prevents cells from assuming local flow vorticity, consequently propel them in the span wise direction and allow them to disperse only in a thin two-dimensional layer.

  10. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants

    PubMed Central

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-01-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life. PMID:25530158

  11. The liverwort Pellia endiviifolia shares microtranscriptomic traits that are common to green algae and land plants.

    PubMed

    Alaba, Sylwia; Piszczalka, Pawel; Pietrykowska, Halina; Pacak, Andrzej M; Sierocka, Izabela; Nuc, Przemyslaw W; Singh, Kashmir; Plewka, Patrycja; Sulkowska, Aleksandra; Jarmolowski, Artur; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2015-04-01

    Liverworts are the most basal group of extant land plants. Nonetheless, the molecular biology of liverworts is poorly understood. Gene expression has been studied in only one species, Marchantia polymorpha. In particular, no microRNA (miRNA) sequences from liverworts have been reported. Here, Illumina-based next-generation sequencing was employed to identify small RNAs, and analyze the transcriptome and the degradome of Pellia endiviifolia. Three hundred and eleven conserved miRNA plant families were identified, and 42 new liverwort-specific miRNAs were discovered. The RNA degradome analysis revealed that target mRNAs of only three miRNAs (miR160, miR166, and miR408) have been conserved between liverworts and other land plants. New targets were identified for the remaining conserved miRNAs. Moreover, the analysis of the degradome permitted the identification of targets for 13 novel liverwort-specific miRNAs. Interestingly, three of the liverwort microRNAs show high similarity to previously reported miRNAs from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. This is the first observation of miRNAs that exist both in a representative alga and in the liverwort P. endiviifolia but are not present in land plants. The results of the analysis of the P. endivifolia microtranscriptome support the conclusions of previous studies that placed liverworts at the root of the land plant evolutionary tree of life. PMID:25530158

  12. The stoichiometry and antenna size of the two photosystems in marine green algae, Bryopsis maxima and Ulva pertusa, in relation to the light environment of their natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jun-Ya; Suzuki, Takahisa; Maruta, Emiko; Kamimura, Yasumaro

    2005-06-01

    The stoichiometry and antenna sizes of the two photosystems in two marine green algae, Bryopsis maxima and Ulva pertusa, were investigated to examine whether the photosynthetic apparatus of the algae can be related to the light environment of their natural habitat. Bryopsis maxima and Ulva pertusa had chlorophyll (Chl) a/b ratios of 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, indicating large levels of Chl b, which absorbs blue-green light, relative to Chl a. The level of photosystem (PS) II was equivalent to that of PS I in Bryopsis maxima but lower than that of PS I in Ulva pertusa. Analysis of Q(A) photoreduction and P-700 photo-oxidation with green light revealed that >50% of PS II centres are non-functional in electron transport. Thus, the ratio of the functional PS II to PS I is only 0.46 in Bryopsis maxima and 0.35 in Ulva pertusa. Light-response curves of electron transport also provided evidence that PS I had a larger light-harvesting capacity than did the functional PS II. Thus, there was a large imbalance in the light absorption between the two photosystems, with PS I showing a larger total light-harvesting capacity than PS II. Furthermore, as judged from the measurements of low temperature fluorescence spectra, the light energy absorbed by Chl b was efficiently transferred to PS I in both algae. Based on the above results, it is hypothesized that marine green algae require a higher ATP:NADPH ratio than do terrestrial plants to grow and survive under a coastal environment. PMID:15797939

  13. Evolutionary Origins and Functions of the Carotenoid Biosynthetic Pathway in Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Coesel, Sacha; Oborník, Miroslav; Varela, Joao; Falciatore, Angela; Bowler, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Carotenoids are produced by all photosynthetic organisms, where they play essential roles in light harvesting and photoprotection. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway of diatoms is largely unstudied, but is of particular interest because these organisms have a very different evolutionary history with respect to the Plantae and are thought to be derived from an ancient secondary endosymbiosis between heterotrophic and autotrophic eukaryotes. Furthermore, diatoms have an additional xanthophyll-based cycle for dissipating excess light energy with respect to green algae and higher plants. To explore the origins and functions of the carotenoid pathway in diatoms we searched for genes encoding pathway components in the recently completed genome sequences of two marine diatoms. Consistent with the supplemental xanthophyll cycle in diatoms, we found more copies of the genes encoding violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE) and zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZEP) enzymes compared with other photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, the similarity of these enzymes with those of higher plants indicates that they had very probably diversified before the secondary endosymbiosis had occurred, implying that VDE and ZEP represent early eukaryotic innovations in the Plantae. Consequently, the diatom chromist lineage likely obtained all paralogues of ZEP and VDE genes during the process of secondary endosymbiosis by gene transfer from the nucleus of the algal endosymbiont to the host nucleus. Furthermore, the presence of a ZEP gene in Tetrahymena thermophila provides the first evidence for a secondary plastid gene encoded in a heterotrophic ciliate, providing support for the chromalveolate hypothesis. Protein domain structures and expression analyses in the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum indicate diverse roles for the different ZEP and VDE isoforms and demonstrate that they are differentially regulated by light. These studies therefore reveal the ancient origins of several components of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes and provide information about how they have diversified and acquired new functions in the diatoms. PMID:18682837

  14. A Ca(2+)- and voltage-modulated flagellar ion channel is a component of the mechanoshock response in the unicellular green alga Spermatozopsis similis.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Hemmler, R; Kovermann, P; Calenberg, M; Kreimer, G; Wagner, R

    2000-06-01

    In flagellate green algae, behavioral responses to photo- and mechanoshock are induced by different external stimuli within 10-15 ms. In the accompanying changes in flagella beat, Ca(2+) has important regulatory roles. Although the axonemal Ca(2+) responsive elements are well characterized, analyses of flagellar channels involved in Ca(2+) signalling as well as other ion channels at the single-channel level were not yet conducted in green algae. To gain a further understanding of these important signaling elements in movement responses, intact flagella of Spermatozopsis similis were isolated and characterized and the solubilized flagellar membrane proteins were reconstituted into liposomes. We observed three types of channel activity, two of which were weakly anion and cation-selective and in the high-conductance regime typical for porin-like solute channels. The dominating channel activity was a voltage dependent, rectifying, low conductance (Lambda=80 pS in 50 mM KCl) cation-selective channel modulated by, and highly permeable to, Ca(2+) ions (SFC1: Spermatozopsis flagellar cation channel 1). Depolarizations necessary to activate SFC1 probably only occur in vivo during avoidance reactions of this alga. Ca(2+)-activation of SFC1 points to a direct link to Ca(2+)-mediated signaling pathway(s) in the flagella. Both the response to mechanoshock and SFC1 activity were inhibited by Gd(3+) and Ba(2+), thus supporting our assumption that SFC1 represents a major flagellar ion channel involved in this green algal avoidance reaction. PMID:10825442

  15. Influence of the CO2 absorbent monoethanolamine on growth and carbon fixation by the green alga Scenedesmus sp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wookjin; Kim, Garam; Lee, Kisay

    2012-09-01

    The influence of monoethanolamine (MEA) as a CO(2) absorbent on photoautotrophic culture of CO(2)-fixing microalgae was investigated. When 300 ppm MEA (4.92 mM) was added to blank culture medium, the dissolved inorganic carbon and the molar absorption ratio increased to 51.0mg/L and 0.34 mol CO2 = mol MEA, respectively, which was an almost 6-fold increase in CO(2) solubility. When free MEA up to 300 mg/L was added to a green alga Scenedesmus sp. culture that was supplied 5% (v/v) CO(2) at 0.1 vvm, both cell growth rate and final cell density were enhanced compared to when no MEA was added. The cell growth rate reached 288.6 mg/L/d, which was equivalent to 539.6 mg-CO(2)/L/d as a CO(2)-fixation rate and enhancement of about 63.0% compared to not adding MEA. Chlorophyll-a content and nitrate consumption rate increased correspondingly. MEA doses higher than 400mg/L inhibited cell growth, probably due to toxicity of the carbamate intermediate. PMID:22771020

  16. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin 'slices' (5-10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred ?m(3) provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER-Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge "trans-ER" sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation. PMID:24135121

  17. 3-D analysis of dictyosomes and multivesicular bodies in the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by FIB/SEM tomography?

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Gerhard; Schäfer, Tillman; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we employ FIB/SEM tomography for analyzing 3-D architecture of dictyosomes and formation of multivesicular bodies (MVB) in high pressure frozen and cryo-substituted interphase cells of the green algal model system Micrasterias denticulata. The ability of FIB/SEM of milling very thin ‘slices’ (5–10 nm), viewing the block face and of capturing cytoplasmic volumes of several hundred ?m3 provides new insight into the close spatial connection of the ER–Golgi machinery in an algal cell particularly in z-direction, complementary to informations obtained by TEM serial sectioning or electron tomography. Our FIB/SEM series and 3-D reconstructions show that interphase dictyosomes of Micrasterias are not only closely associated to an ER system at their cis-side which is common in various plant cells, but are surrounded by a huge “trans-ER” sheath leading to an almost complete enwrapping of dictyosomes by the ER. This is particularly interesting as the presence of a trans-dictyosomal ER system is well known from mammalian secretory cells but not from cells of higher plants to which the alga Micrasterias is closely related. In contrast to findings in plant storage tissue indicating that MVBs originate from the trans-Golgi network or its derivatives our investigations show that MVBs in Micrasterias are in direct spatial contact with both, trans-Golgi cisternae and the trans-ER sheath which provides evidence that both endomembrane compartments are involved in their formation. PMID:24135121

  18. A freshwater green alga under cadmium stress: ameliorating calcium effects on ultrastructure and photosynthesis in the unicellular model Micrasterias.

    PubMed

    Andosch, Ancuela; Affenzeller, Matthias J; Lütz, Cornelius; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium is a highly toxic heavy metal pollutant arising mainly from increasing industrial disposal of electronic components. Due to its high solubility it easily enters soil and aquatic environments. Via its similarity to calcium it may interfere with different kinds of Ca dependent metabolic or developmental processes in biological systems. In the present study we investigate primary cell physiological, morphological and ultrastructural responses of Cd on the unicellular freshwater green alga Micrasterias which has served as a cell biological model system since many years and has proved to be highly sensitive to any kind of abiotic stress. Our results provide evidence that the severe Cd effects in Micrasterias such as unidirectional disintegration of dictyosomes, occurrence of autophagy, decline in photosystem II activity and oxygen production as well as marked structural damage of the chloroplast are based on a disturbance of Ca homeostasis probably by displacement of Ca by Cd. This is indicated by the fact that physiological and structural cadmium effects could be prevented in Micrasterias by pre-treatment with Ca. Additionally, thapsigargin an inhibitor of animal and plant Ca(2+)-ATPase mimicked the adverse Cd induced morphological and functional effects on dictyosomes. Recovery experiments indicated rapid repair mechanisms after Cd stress. PMID:22762790

  19. Elevated water temperature reduces the acute toxicity of the widely used herbicide diuron to a green alga, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Tasmin, Rumana; Shimasaki, Yohei; Tsuyama, Michito; Qiu, Xuchun; Khalil, Fatma; Okino, Nozomu; Yamada, Naotaka; Fukuda, Shinji; Kang, Ik-Joon; Oshima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    In the actual environment, temperatures fluctuate drastically through season or global warming and are thought to affects risk of pollutants for aquatic biota; however, there is no report about the effect of water temperature on toxicity of widely used herbicide diuron to fresh water microalgae. The present research investigated inhibitory effect of diuron on growth and photosynthetic activity of a green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata at five different temperatures (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 °C) for 144 h of exposure. As a result, effective diuron concentrations at which a 50% decrease in algal growth occurred was increased with increasing water temperature ranging from 9.2 to 20.1 ?g L(-1) for 72 h and 9.4-28.5 ?g L(-1) for 144 h. The photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F v/F m ratio) was significantly reduced at all temperatures by diuron exposure at 32 ?g L(-1) after 72 h. Inhibition rates was significantly increased with decreased water temperature (P?

  20. Starch Division and Partitioning. A Mechanism for Granule Propagation and Maintenance in the Picophytoplanktonic Green Alga Ostreococcus tauri1[w

    PubMed Central

    Ral, Jean-Philippe; Derelle, Evelyne; Ferraz, Conchita; Wattebled, Fabrice; Farinas, Benoit; Corellou, Florence; Buléon, Alain; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Delvalle, David; d'Hulst, Christophe; Rombauts, Stephane; Moreau, Hervé; Ball, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Whereas Glc is stored in small-sized hydrosoluble glycogen particles in archaea, eubacteria, fungi, and animal cells, photosynthetic eukaryotes have resorted to building starch, which is composed of several distinct polysaccharide fractions packed into a highly organized semicrystalline granule. In plants, both the initiation of polysaccharide synthesis and the nucleation mechanism leading to formation of new starch granules are currently not understood. Ostreococcus tauri, a unicellular green alga of the Prasinophyceae family, defines the tiniest eukaryote with one of the smallest genomes. We show that it accumulates a single starch granule at the chloroplast center by using the same pathway as higher plants. At the time of plastid division, we observe elongation of the starch and division into two daughter structures that are partitioned in each newly formed chloroplast. These observations suggest that in this system the information required to initiate crystalline polysaccharide growth of a new granule is contained within the preexisting polysaccharide structure and the design of the plastid division machinery. PMID:15448195

  1. Potent anti-inflammatory activity of pheophytin a derived from edible green alga, Enteromorpha prolifera (Sujiao-nori).

    PubMed

    Okai, Y; Higashi-Okai, K

    1997-06-01

    Recently, a chlorophyll-related compound, pheophytin a, has been identified from an edible green alga, Enteromorpha prolifera (Sujiao-nori in Japanese) as a potent suppressive substance against genotoxin-induced umu C gene expression in a tester bacteria (Okai and Higashi-Okai, 1997, J. Sci. Food Agricul. 71, 531-535). In the present study, anti-inflammatory effects of pheophytin a from Enteromorpha prolifera have been analyzed using in vitro and in vivo experiments. 1. Pheophytin a suppressed the production of superoxide anion (O2-) in mouse macrophages induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) using the cytochrome C reduction method. 2. Pheophytin a caused a suppressive effect against formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, (FMLP)-induced chemotaxis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in Boyden's chamber experiment. 3. Pheophytin a exhibited a significant suppression against TPA-induced inflammatory reaction such as edema formation in BALB/c mouse ear. These results suggest that pheophytin a from Enteromorpha prolifera has a potent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:9467755

  2. The effect of lead on the growth, content of primary metabolites, and antioxidant response of green alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Niczyporuk, Alicja; Bajguz, Andrzej; Talarek, Marta; Bralska, Monika; Zambrzycka, El?bieta

    2015-12-01

    Green unicellular alga Acutodesmus obliquus (Turpin) Hegewald et Hanagata (SAG strain no. 276-6) (Chlorophyceae) was used for determination of phytotoxicity of lead (Pb) at the range of concentrations 0.01-500 ?M during 7 days of culture. The accumulation of Pb in algal cells was found to be increased in a concentration- and duration-dependent manner. The highest Pb uptake value was obtained in response to 500 ?M Pb on the seventh day of cultivation. The decrease in the number and the size of cells and the contents of selected primary metabolites (photosynthetic pigments, monosaccharides, and proteins) in A. obliquus cells were observed under Pb stress. Heavy metal stimulated also formation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) and oxidative damage as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, the deleterious effects of Pb resulting from the cellular oxidative state can be alleviated by enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbate, glutathione) antioxidant systems. These results suggest that A. obliquus is a promising bioindicator of heavy metal toxicity in aquatic environment, and it has been identified as good scavenger of Pb from aqueous solution. PMID:26233754

  3. Glycosyltransferase Family 43 Is Also Found in Early Eukaryotes and Has Three Subfamilies in Charophycean Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Taujale, Rahil; Yin, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    The glycosyltransferase family 43 (GT43) has been suggested to be involved in the synthesis of xylans in plant cell walls and proteoglycans in animals. Very recently GT43 family was also found in Charophycean green algae (CGA), the closest relatives of extant land plants. Here we present evidence that non-plant and non-animal early eukaryotes such as fungi, Haptophyceae, Choanoflagellida, Ichthyosporea and Haptophyceae also have GT43-like genes, which are phylogenetically close to animal GT43 genes. By mining RNA sequencing data (RNA-Seq) of selected plants, we showed that CGA have evolved three major groups of GT43 genes, one orthologous to IRX14 (IRREGULAR XYLEM14), one orthologous to IRX9/IRX9L and the third one ancestral to all land plant GT43 genes. We confirmed that land plant GT43 has two major clades A and B, while in angiosperms, clade A further evolved into three subclades and the expression and motif pattern of A3 (containing IRX9) are fairly different from the other two clades likely due to rapid evolution. Our in-depth sequence analysis contributed to our overall understanding of the early evolution of GT43 family and could serve as an example for the study of other plant cell wall-related enzyme families. PMID:26023931

  4. Adaptability of free-floating green tide algae in the Yellow Sea to variable temperature and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianheng; Huo, Yuanzi; Zhou, Lingjie; Wu, Qing; Chen, Liping; Yu, Kefeng; He, Peimin

    2015-12-30

    In this study, the influence of temperature and light intensity on the growth of seedlings and adults of four species of green tide algae (Ulvaprolifera, Ulvacompressa, Ulva flexuosa and Ulvalinza) from the Yellow Sea was evaluated. The results indicated that the specific growth rate (SGR) of seedlings was much higher than that of adults for the four species. The adaptability of U. prolifera is much wider: Adult daily SGRs were the highest among the four species at 15-20°C with 10-600?mol·m(-2)·s(-1) and 25-30°C with 200-600?mol·m(-2)·s(-1). SGRs were 1.5-3.5 times greater than the other three species at 15-25°C with 200-600?mol·m(-2)·s(-1). These results indicate that U. prolifera has better tolerance to high temperature and light intensity than the other three species, which may in part explain why only U. prolifera undergoes large-scale outbreaks and floats to the Qingdao coast while the other three species decline and disappear at the early stage of blooming. PMID:26573134

  5. Response of benthic algae to environmental gradients in an agriculturally dominated landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munn, M.D.; Black, R.W.; Gruber, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    Benthic algal communities were assessed in an agriculturally dominated landscape in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington, to determine which environmental variables best explained species distributions, and whether algae species optima models were useful in predicting specific water-quality parameters. Land uses in the study area included forest, range, urban, and agriculture. Most of the streams in this region can be characterized as open-channel systems influenced by intensive dryland (nonirrigated) and irrigated agriculture. Algal communities in forested streams were dominated by blue-green algae, with communities in urban and range streams dominated by diatoms. The predominance of either blue-greens or diatoms in agricultural streams varied greatly depending on the specific site. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated a strong gradient effect of several key environmental variables on benthic algal community composition. Conductivity and % agriculture were the dominant explanatory variables when all sites (n = 24) were included in the CCA; water velocity replaced conductivity when the CCA included only agricultural and urban sites. Other significant explanatory variables included dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), orthophosphate (OP), discharge, and precipitation. Regression and calibration models accurately predicted conductivity based on benthic algal communities, with OP having slightly lower predictability. The model for DIN was poor, and therefore may be less useful in this system. Thirty-four algal taxa were identified as potential indicators of conductivity and nutrient conditions, with most indicators being diatoms except for the blue-greens Anabaena sp. and Lyngbya sp.

  6. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Diatom cell division in an environmental context

    E-print Network

    , are part of the stramenopile group that assembles brown algae with other chromist algae and oomycetes that brought together three partners; a red alga, a green alga, and a eukaryotic heterotroph [3]. Additionally

  7. UNUSUAL PHENOLIC COMPOUNDS CONTRIBUTE TO ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE IN THE PURPLE-COLORED GREEN ALGA ZYGOGONIUM ERICETORUM (ZYGNEMATOPHYCEAE, STREPTOPHYTA) FROM A HIGH-ALPINE HABITAT

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Siegfried; Remias, Daniel; Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous green alga Zygogonium ericetorum (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) was collected in a high-alpine rivulet in Tyrol, Austria. Two different morphotypes of this alga were found: a purple morph with a visible purple vacuolar content and a green morph lacking this coloration. These morphotypes were compared with respect to their secondary metabolites, ultrastructure, and ecophysiological properties. Colorimetric tests with aqueous extracts of the purple morph indicated the presence of soluble compounds such as phenolics and hydrolyzable tannins. High-performance liquid chromatography-screening showed that Z. ericetorum contained several large phenolic peaks with absorption maxima at ?280 nm and sometimes with minor maxima at ?380 nm. Such compounds are uncommon for freshwater green microalgae, and could contribute to protect the organism against increased UV and visible (VIS) irradiation. The purple Z. ericetorum contained larger amounts (per dry weight) of the putative phenolic substances than the green morph; exposure to irradiation may be a key factor for accumulation of these phenolic compounds. Transmission electron microscopy of the purple morph showed massive vacuolization with homogenous medium electron-dense content in the cell periphery, which possibly contains the secondary compounds. In contrast, the green morph had smaller, electron-translucent vacuoles. The ecophysiological data on photosynthesis and desiccation tolerance indicated that increasing photon fluence densities led to much higher relative electron transport rates (rETR) in the purple than in the green morph. These data suggest that the secondary metabolites in the purple morph are important for light acclimation in high-alpine habitats. However, the green morph recovered better after 4 d of rehydration following desiccation stress. PMID:25810559

  8. The Genome of the Diatom Thalassiosira Pseudonana: Ecology, Evolution and Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Armbrust, E V; Berges, J A; Bowler, C; Green, B R; Martinez, D; Putnam, N H; Zhou, S; Allen, A E; Apt, K E; Bechner, M; Brzezinski, M A; Chaal, B K; Chiovitti, A; Davis, A K; Demarest, M S; Detter, J C; del Rio, T G; Goodstein, D; Hadi, M Z; Hellsten, U; Hildebrand, M; Jenkins, B D; Jurka, J; Kapitonov, V V; Kroger, N; Lau, W Y; Lane, T W; Larimer, F W; Lippmeier, J C; Lucas, S; Medina, M; Montsant, A; Obornik, M; Parker, M S; Palenik, B; Pazour, G J; Richardson, P M; Rynearson, T A; Saito, M A; Schwartz, D C; Thamatrakoln, K; Valentin, K; Vardi, A; Wilkerson, F P; Rokhsar, D S

    2005-11-14

    Diatoms are unicellular algae with plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis. They are responsible for {approx}20% of global carbon fixation. We report the 34 Mbp draft nuclear genome of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and its 129 Kbp plastid and 44 Kbp mitochondrial genomes. Sequence and optical restriction mapping revealed 24 diploid nuclear chromosomes. We identified novel genes for silicic acid transport and formation of silica-based cell walls, high-affinity iron uptake, biosynthetic enzymes for several types of polyunsaturated fatty acids, utilization of a range of nitrogenous compounds and a complete urea cycle, all attributes that allow diatoms to prosper in the marine environment. Diatoms are unicellular, photosynthetic, eukaryotic algae found throughout the world's oceans and freshwater systems. They form the base of short, energetically-efficient food webs that support large-scale coastal fisheries. Photosynthesis by marine diatoms generates as much as 40% of the 45-50 billion tonnes of organic carbon produced each year in the sea (1), and their role in global carbon cycling is predicted to be comparable to that of all terrestrial rainforests combined (2, 3). Over geological time, diatoms may have influenced global climate by changing the flux of atmospheric carbon dioxide into the oceans (4). A defining feature of diatoms is their ornately patterned silicified cell wall or frustule, which displays species-specific nano-structures of such fine detail that diatoms have long been used to test the resolution of optical microscopes. Recent attention has focused on biosynthesis of these nano-structures as a paradigm for future silica nanotechnology (5). The long history (over 180 million years) and dominance of diatoms in the oceans is reflected by their contributions to vast deposits of diatomite, most cherts and a significant fraction of current petroleum reserves (6). As photosynthetic heterokonts, diatoms reflect a fundamentally different evolutionary history from the higher plants that dominate photosynthesis on land. Higher plants and green, red and glaucophyte algae are derived from a primary endosymbiotic event in which a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing (or being invaded by) a prokaryotic cyanobacterium. In contrast, dominant bloom-forming eukaryotic phytoplankton in the ocean, such as diatoms and haptophytes, were derived by secondary endosymbiosis whereby a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing a photosynthetic eukaryote, probably a red algal endosymbiont (Fig. 1). Each endosymbiotic event led to new combinations of genes derived from the hosts and endosymbionts (7). Prior to this project, relatively few diatom genes had been sequenced, few chromosome numbers were known, and genetic maps did not exist (8). The ecological and evolutionary importance of diatoms motivated our sequencing and analysis of the nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial genomes of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  9. The genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana: Ecology,evolution, and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrust, E.V.; Berges, J.; Bowler, C.; Green, B.; Martinez, D.; Putnam, N.; Zhou, S.; Allen, A.; Apt, K.; Bechner, M.; Brzezinski, M.; Chaal, B.; Chiovitti, A.; Davis, A.; Goodstein, D.; Hadi, M.; Hellsten,U.; Hildebrand, M.; Jenkins, B.; Jurka, J.; Kapitonov, V.; Kroger, N.; Lau, W.; Lane, T.; Larimer, F.; Lippmeier, J.; Lucas, S.; Medina, M.; Montsant, A.; Obornik, M.; Parker, M. Schnitzler; Palenik, B.; Pazour,G.; Richardson, P.; Rynearson, T.; Saito, M.; Schwartz, D.; Thamatrakoln,K.; Valentin, K.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.; Rokhsar, D.; Vardi, A.; Wilkerson, F.P.; Rokhsar, D.S.

    2004-09-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae with plastids acquired by secondary endosymbiosis. They are responsible for {approx}20% of global carbon fixation. We report the 34 Mbp draft nuclear genome of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and its 129 Kbp plastid and 44 Kbp mitochondrial genomes. Sequence and optical restriction mapping revealed 24 diploid nuclear chromosomes. We identified novel genes for silicic acid transport and formation of silica-based cell walls, high-affinity iron uptake, biosynthetic enzymes for several types of polyunsaturated fatty acids, utilization of a range of nitrogenous compounds and a complete urea cycle, all attributes that allow diatoms to prosper in the marine environment. Diatoms are unicellular, photosynthetic, eukaryotic algae found throughout the world's oceans and freshwater systems. They form the base of short, energetically-efficient food webs that support large-scale coastal fisheries. Photosynthesis by marine diatoms generates as much as 40% of the 45-50 billion tonnes of organic carbon produced each year in the sea (1), and their role in global carbon cycling is predicted to be comparable to that of all terrestrial rainforests combined (2, 3). Over geological time, diatoms may have influenced global climate by changing the flux of atmospheric carbon dioxide into the oceans (4). A defining feature of diatoms is their ornately patterned silicified cell wall or frustule, which displays species-specific nano-structures of such fine detail that diatoms have long been used to test the resolution of optical microscopes. Recent attention has focused on biosynthesis of these nano-structures as a paradigm for future silica nanotechnology (5). The long history (over 180 million years) and dominance of diatoms in the oceans is reflected by their contributions to vast deposits of diatomite, most cherts and a significant fraction of current petroleum reserves (6). As photosynthetic heterokonts, diatoms reflect a fundamentally different evolutionary history from the higher plants that dominate photosynthesis on land. Higher plants and green, red and glaucophyte algae are derived from a primary endosymbiotic event in which a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing (or being invaded by) a prokaryotic cyanobacterium. In contrast, dominant bloom-forming eukaryotic phytoplankton in the ocean, such as diatoms and haptophytes, were derived by secondary endosymbiosis whereby a non-photosynthetic eukaryote acquired a chloroplast by engulfing a photosynthetic eukaryote, probably a red algal endosymbiont (Fig. 1). Each endosymbiotic event led to new combinations of genes derived from the hosts and endosymbionts (7). Prior to this project, relatively few diatom genes had been sequenced, few chromosome numbers were known, and genetic maps did not exist (8). The ecological and evolutionary importance of diatoms motivated our sequencing and analysis of the nuclear, plastid, and mitochondrial genomes of the marine centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  10. Evaluation of an oil-producing green alga Chlorella sp. C2 for biological DeNOx of industrial flue gases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hui; Chen, Weixian; Qiao, Yaqin; He, Chenliu; Wang, Qiang

    2014-09-01

    NOx, a significant portion of fossil fuel flue gases, are among the most serious environmental issues in the world and must be removed in an additional costly gas treatment step. This study evaluated the growth of the green alga Chlorella sp. C2 under a nitrite-simulated NOx environment and the removal rates of actual flue gas fixed salts (FGFSs) from Sinopec's Shijiazhuang refinery along with lipid production. The results showed that nitrite levels lower than 176.5 mM had no significant adverse effects on the cell growth and photosynthesis of Chlorella sp. C2, demonstrating that this green alga could utilize nitrite and NOx as a nitrogen source. High concentrations of nitrite (88.25-176.5 mM) also resulted in the accumulation of neutral lipids. A 60% nitrite removal efficiency was obtained together with the production of 33% algae lipids when cultured with FGFS. Notably, the presence of nitrate in the FGFS medium significantly enhanced the nitrite removal capability, biomass and lipid production. Thus, this study may provide a new insight into the economically viable application of microalgae in the synergistic combination of biological DeNOx of industrial flue gases and biodiesel production. PMID:25105531

  11. Subfractionation of eyespot apparatuses from the green alga Spermatozopsis similis: isolation and characterization of eyespot globules.

    PubMed

    Renninger, S; Backendorf, E; Kreimer, G

    2001-05-01

    Despite the well-characterized function of the green-algal eyespot apparatus as a combined absorption/reflection screen for the photoreceptor for phototaxis, little is known about the proteins involved in the formation of this complex organelle. We therefore purified the carotenoid-rich lipid globules, which are the most conspicuous component of the eyespot sensu strictu from Spermatozopsis similis Preisig et Melkonian. Electron microscopy and an average carotenoid:chlorophyll ratio of 51, confirmed the high purity of the fraction. The diameter of isolated globules (approx. 112 nm) fell within their in vivo range (90-120 nm). Absorption spectra in aqueous media peaked at 535 nm. The predominant carotenoids were beta/psi-, beta, beta- and delta-carotene. Freeze-fracture studies with cells and whole-mount electron microscopy of isolated globules demonstrated regularly arranged particles at the globule surface. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophresis revealed specific enrichment of 10 tightly bound major proteins and several minor proteins with the globules. Proteases were used to analyze their topology and function. Upon treatment with thermolysin, globules were released from a fraction enriched in isolated eyespot apparatuses. Major proteins of these globules, and those treated with thermolysin after isolation, were identical. However, the purified proteins were sensitive to thermolysin, indicating that domains of them are normally hidden in the globule matrix. In contrast, pronase degraded all globule-associated proteins in situ. These globules were not stable and easily fused, whereas thermolysin-treated globules were relatively stable. Lipase did not affect globule stability. These results indicate that the five thermolysin-resistant proteins (apparent Mr values: 56, 52, 32, 29, 27 kDa) are close to the surface and might be crucial for globule stabilization, whereas the thermolysin-accessible proteins are probably involved in globule/globule interactions and/or globule/eyespot-membrane interactions. PMID:11523656

  12. Colony organization in the green alga Botryococcus braunii (Race B) is specified by a complex extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Taylor L; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vitha, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas; Devarenne, Timothy P; Goodenough, Ursula

    2012-12-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quick-freeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell is surrounded by a fibrous ?-1, 4- and/or ?-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form "drapes" between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. We propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM. PMID:22941913

  13. Addressing unknown constants and metabolic network behaviors through petascale computing: understanding H2 production in green algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Christopher; Alber, David; Graf, Peter; Kim, Kwiseon; Seibert, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H2-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high-performance systems ranging from distributed grids to unified petascale architectures.

  14. Addressing Unknown Constants and Metabolic Network Behaviors Through Petascale Computing: Understanding H2 Production in Green Algae

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Alber, D.; Graf, P.; Seibert, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Genomics Revolution has resulted in a massive and growing quantity of whole-genome DNA sequences, which encode the metabolic catalysts necessary for life. However, gene annotations can rarely be complete, and measurement of the kinetic constants associated with the encoded enzymes can not possibly keep pace, necessitating the use of careful modeling to explore plausible network behaviors. Key challenges are (1) quantitatively formulating kinetic laws governing each transformation in a fixed model network; (2) characterizing the stable solution (if any) of the associated ordinary differential equations (ODEs); (3) fitting the latter to metabolomics data as it becomes available; and, (4) optimizing a model output against the possible space of kinetic parameters, with respect to properties such as robustness of network response, or maximum consumption/production. This SciDAC-2 project addresses this large-scale uncertainty in the genome-scale metabolic network of the water-splitting, H{sub 2}-producing green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Each metabolic transformation is formulated as an irreversible steady-state process, such that the vast literature on known enzyme mechanisms may be incorporated directly. To start, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and basic fermentation pathways have been encoded in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) with careful annotation and consistency with the KEGG database, yielding a model with 3 compartments, 95 species, 38 reactions, and 109 kinetic constants. To study and optimize such models with a view toward larger models, we have developed a system which takes as input an SBML model, and automatically produces C code that when compiled and executed optimizes the model's kinetic parameters according to test criteria. We describe the system and present numerical results. Further development, including overlaying of a parallel multistart algorithm, will allow optimization of thousands of parameters on high-performance systems ranging from distributed grids to unified petascale architectures.

  15. Characterization of a low-relative-molecular-mass prolyl 4-hydroxylase from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardii.

    PubMed Central

    Kaska, D D; Günzler, V; Kivirikko, K I; Myllylä, R

    1987-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase was partially purified and characterized from the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardii. This enzyme differed from all the animal and plant prolyl 4-hydroxylases studied so far in that its Mr was only about 40,000 by gel filtration, being thus less than one-sixth of those determined for the vertebrate and higher-plant enzymes. The algal enzyme did not hydroxylate to any significant extent chick-embryo protocollagen or triple-helical (Pro-Pro-Gly)10, whereas a low hydroxylation rate was found with denatured (Pro-Pro-Gly)10. Poly(L-proline), which is an effective inhibitor of the vertebrate enzymes but acts as a substrate for some higher-plant enzymes, was a good substrate. In the absence of poly(L-proline) the enzyme catalysed an uncoupled decarboxylation of 2-oxoglutarate. Studies of the Km values for the co-substrates and cofactors and the specificity of the 2-oxoglutarate requirement, as well as inhibition studies with selected 2-oxoglutarate analogues, suggested that the catalytic site of the algal enzyme is similar to, but not identical with, those of the vertebrate enzymes. The existence of distinct similarities was further demonstrated by an inhibition of the algal enzyme activity with a monoclonal antibody to the beta-subunit of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase. The amount of prolyl 4-hydroxylase activity in the algal cells was not altered by signals which recognize the presence or absence of the cell wall, as determined in studies on experimental cell-wall regeneration and wall-less mutants. PMID:3036064

  16. Colony Organization in the Green Alga Botryococcus braunii (Race B) Is Specified by a Complex Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Taylor L.; Roth, Robyn; Goodson, Carrie; Vitha, Stanislav; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Jannette; Holzenburg, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a colonial green alga whose cells associate via a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) and produce prodigious amounts of liquid hydrocarbons that can be readily converted into conventional combustion engine fuels. We used quick-freeze deep-etch electron microscopy and biochemical/histochemical analysis to elucidate many new features of B. braunii cell/colony organization and composition. Intracellular lipid bodies associate with the chloroplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but show no evidence of being secreted. The ER displays striking fenestrations and forms a continuous subcortical system in direct contact with the cell membrane. The ECM has three distinct components. (i) Each cell is surrounded by a fibrous ?-1, 4- and/or ?-1, 3-glucan-containing cell wall. (ii) The intracolonial ECM space is filled with a cross-linked hydrocarbon network permeated with liquid hydrocarbons. (iii) Colonies are enclosed in a retaining wall festooned with a fibrillar sheath dominated by arabinose-galactose polysaccharides, which sequesters ECM liquid hydrocarbons. Each cell apex associates with the retaining wall and contributes to its synthesis. Retaining-wall domains also form “drapes” between cells, with some folding in on themselves and penetrating the hydrocarbon interior of a mother colony, partitioning it into daughter colonies. We propose that retaining-wall components are synthesized in the apical Golgi apparatus, delivered to apical ER fenestrations, and assembled on the surfaces of apical cell walls, where a proteinaceous granular layer apparently participates in fibril morphogenesis. We further propose that hydrocarbons are produced by the nonapical ER, directly delivered to the contiguous cell membrane, and pass across the nonapical cell wall into the hydrocarbon-based ECM. PMID:22941913

  17. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from the green alga, Dunaliella salina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase was partially purified and characterized from the green alga Dunaliella salina. The enzyme was activated at free Ca2+ concentrations above 10(-7) molar. and half-maximal activation was at about 3 x 10(-7) molar. The optimum pH for its Ca(2+)-dependent activity was 7.5. The addition of various phospholipids and diolein had no effects on enzyme activity and did not alter the sensitivity of the enzyme toward Ca2+. The enzyme was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide in a dose-dependent manner while the protein kinase C inhibitor, sphingosine, had little effect on enzyme activity up to 800 micromolar. Immunoassay showed some calmodulin was present in the kinase preparations. However, it is unlikely the kinase was calmodulin regulated, since it still showed stimulation by Ca2+ in gel assays after being electrophoretically separated from calmodulin by two different methods. This gel method of detection of the enzyme indicated that a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 showed protein kinase activity at each one of the several steps in the purification procedure. Gel assay analysis also showed that after native gel isoelectric focusing the partially purified kinase preparations had two bands with calcium-dependent activity, at isoelectric points 6.7 and 7.1. By molecular weight, by isoelectric point, and by a comparative immunoassay, the Dunaliella kinase appears to differ from at least some of the calcium-dependent, but calmodulin and phospholipid independent kinases described from higher plants.

  18. Evidence for a direct role of nascent basal bodies during spindle pole initiation in the green alga Spermatozopsis similis.

    PubMed

    Lechtreck, K F; Grunow, A

    1999-08-01

    Basal body replication in the naked biflagellate green alga Spermatozopsis similis was analyzed using standard electron microscopy and immunogold localization of centrin, an ubiquitous centrosomal protein, and p210, a recently characterized basal apparatus component of S. similis. Fibrous disks representing probasal bodies appear at the proximal end of parental basal bodies at the end of interphase and development proceeds via a ring of nine singlet microtubules. Nascent basal bodies dock early to the plasma membrane but p210, usually present in basal body-membrane-linkers of S. similis, was already present on the cytosolic basal body precursors. In addition to the distal connecting fiber and the nuclear basal body connectors (NBBC) of the parental basal bodies, centrin was present on the fibrous probasal bodies, in a linker between probasal bodies and the basal apparatus, in the connecting fiber between nascent basal bodies and their corresponding parent, and, finally, a fiber linking the nascent basal bodies to the nucleus. This NBBC probably is present only in mitotic cells. During elongation a cartwheel of up to seven layers is formed, protruding from the proximal end of nascent basal bodies. Microtubules develop on the cartwheel indicating that it temporarily functions as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). These microtubules and probably the cartwheels, touch the nuclear envelope at both sides of a nuclear projection. We propose that spindle assembly is initiated at these attachment sites. During metaphase, the spindle poles were close to thylakoid-free lobes of the chloroplast, and the basal bodies were not in the spindle axis. The role of nascent basal bodies during the initial steps of spindle assembly is discussed. PMID:10505416

  19. Anticoagulant effect of marine algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Wijesekara, Isuru

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been developed in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries to isolate natural anticoagulant compounds from marine resources. Among marine resources, marine algae are valuable sources of novel bioactive compounds with anticoagulant effect. Phlorotannins and sulfated polysaccharides such as fucoidans in brown algae, carrageenans in red algae, and ulvans in green algae have been recognized as potential anticoagulant agents. Therefore, marine algae-derived phlorotannins and SPs have great potential for developing as anticoagulant drugs in nutraceutical and pharmaceutical areas. This chapter focuses on the potential anticoagulant agents in marine algae and presents an overview of their anticoagulant effect. PMID:22054951

  20. The All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory of Algae in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, with a Focus on the Acidophilic Diatom, Eunotia Ehrenberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, P. C.; Lowe, R.; Johansen, J. R.

    2005-05-01

    Since the late 1990's, the National Park Service and Discover Life In America have taken on the ambitious task of completing an All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). As one of the most species-rich areas in the temperate zone, GSMNP is considered a hot spot of biological diversity and has been designated as an International Biosphere Reserve. Previous research has suggested that the algal diversity is high in the GSMNP and many species are new, endemic, or restricted in range. To date, 67 species new to science and 163 taxa new to the park have been reported. An update of new species and new park findings will be presented. In particular, the GSMNP supports a diverse community of the acidophilic diatom Eunotia Ehr., both in terms of number of species and geographical distribution. Eunotia species can flourish in the park because of aquatic and aerial habitats that are 5-10X more acidic than normal, in combination with the presence of a complex geology and range of altitudes. An image-rich documentation of the Eunotia will be presented, including both light microscope and scanning electron micrographs that show the diversity, distribution and the variability in morphology.

  1. Response of freshwater algae to water quality in Qinshan Lake within Taihu Watershed, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianying; Ni, Wanmin; Luo, Yang; Jan Stevenson, R.; Qi, Jiaguo

    Although frequent algal blooms in Taihu Lake in China have become major environmental problems and have drawn national and international attention, little is understood about the relationship between algal blooms and water quality. The goal of this study was to assess the growth and species responses of freshwater algae to variation in water quality in Qinshan Lake, located in headwaters of the Taihu watershed. Water samples were collected monthly from ten study sites in the Qinshan Lake and were analyzed for species distribution of freshwater algae and physiochemical parameters such as total nitrogen (TN), NH4+-N, NO3--N, total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD Mn) and Chl-a. The results showed that average TN was 4.47 mg/L, with 92.2% of values greater than the TN standard set by the Chinese Environmental Protection Agency; average TP was 0.051 mg/L, with 37.9% of values above the TP national standard; and average trophic level index (TLI) was 53, the lower end of eutrophic condition. Average Chl-a concentration was 12.83 mg/m 3. Green algae and diatom far outweighed other freshwater algae and were dominant most time of the year, with the highest relative abundances of 96% and 99%, respectively. Blue-green algae, composed mainly toxic strains like Microcystis sp ., Nostoc sp. and Oscillatoria sp., became most dominant in the summer with the maximum relative abundance of 69%. The blue-green algae sank to the lake bottom to overwinter, and then dinoflagellates became the dominant species in the winter, with highest relative abundance of 89%. Analysis indicated that nutrients, especially control of ammonia and co-varying nutrients were the major restrictive factor of population growth of blue-green algae, suggesting that control in nutrient enrichments is the major preventive measure of algal blooms in Qinshan Lake.

  2. Model based analysis of transient fluorescence yield induced by actinic laser flashes in spinach leaves and cells of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N E; Schmitt, F-J; Paschenko, V Z; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Renger, G

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of Single Flash Induced Transient Fluorescence Yield (SFITFY) on spinach leaves and whole cells of green thermophilic alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were analyzed for electron transfer (ET) steps and coupled proton transfer (PT) on both the donor and the acceptor side of the reaction center (RC) of photosystem II (PS II). A specially developed PS II model (Belyaeva et al., 2008, 2011a) allowed the determination of ET steps that occur in a hierarchically ordered time scale from nanoseconds to several seconds. Our study demonstrates that our SFITFY data is consistent with the concept of the reduction of P680(+) by YZ in both leaves and algae (studied on spinach leaves and cells of Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick). The multiphasic P680(+) reduction kinetics by YZ in PS II core complexes with high oxygen evolution capacity was seen in both algae and leaves. Model simulation to fit SFITFY curves for dark adapted species used here gives the rate constants to verify nanosecond kinetic stages of P680(+) reduction by YZ in the redox state S1 of the water oxidizing complex (WOC) shown in Kühn et al. (2004). Then a sequence of relaxation steps in the redox state S1, outlined by Renger (2012), occurs in both algae and leaves as a similar non-adiabatic ET reactions. Coupled PT is discussed briefly to understand a rearrangement of hydrogen bond protons in the protein matrix of the WOC (Umena et al., 2011). On the other hand, present studies showed a slower reoxidation of reduced QA by QB in algal cells as compared with that in a leaf that might be regarded as a consequence of differences of spatial domains at the QB-site in leaves compared to algae. Our comparative study helped to correlate theory with experimental data for molecular photosynthetic mechanisms in thylakoid membranes. PMID:24556534

  3. Integration of TiO2 into the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii during frustule synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Yvonne; Monte, Francisco del; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Dockery, Peter; Finn, David P.; Pandit, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Nature has inspired the design of complex hierarchical structures in the field of material science. Diatoms, unicellular algae with a hallmark intricate siliceous cell wall, have provided such a stimulus. Altering the chemistry of the diatom frustule has been explored to expand on the potential application of diatoms. The ability to modify the diatom in vivo opens the possibility to tailor the diatom to the end application. Herein, we report the chemical modification of the living diatom T. weissflogii using a titania precursor, titanium (IV) bis-(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (TiBALDH). Incorporation of Ti into the diatom is achieved via repeated treatment of cultures with non-toxic concentrations of TiBALDH. The characteristic architectural features of the diatom are unaltered following chemical modification. Transformation of the living diatom provides opportunity to confer novel structural, chemical or functional properties upon the diatom. We report on a photocatalytic ability imparted upon the TiBALDH-modified diatom. PMID:24220344

  4. Diatom Identication: a Double Challenge Called ADIAC Hans du Buf, University of Algarve, Faro, Portugal

    E-print Network

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    identiřcation as a new and chal­ lenging area in pattern recognition, we start with ex­ plaining the history modeling and contour extraction. 1.1 History: from hobby to profession The ADIAC project was ibornj in May's MAST programme. 1.2 What are diatoms? Diatoms are unicellular algae related to brown algae (Phaeophyta

  5. Characterization and optimization of hydrogen production by a salt water blue-green alga Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. II - Use of immobilization for enhancement of hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phlips, E. J.; Mitsui, A.

    1986-01-01

    The technique of cellular immobilization was applied to the process of hydrogen photoproduction of nonheterocystous, filamentous marine blue-green alga, Oscillatoria sp. Miami BG 7. Immobilization with agar significantly improved the rate and longevity of hydrogen production, compared to free cell suspensions. Rates of H2 production in excess of 13 microliters H2 mg dry/wt h were observed and hydrogen production was sustained for three weeks. Immobilization also provided some stabilization to environmental variability and was adaptable to outdoor light conditions. In general, immobilization provides significant advantages for the production and maintenance of hydrogen photoproduction for this strain.

  6. BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes

    E-print Network

    BOTANICAL BRIEFING Streptophyte algae and the origin of embryophytes Burkhard Becker* and Birger March 2009 Background Land plants (embryophytes) evolved from streptophyte green algae, a small group of freshwater algae ranging from scaly, unicellular flagellates (Mesostigma) to complex, filamentous thalli

  7. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes ?-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  8. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes ?-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  9. The cortical cytoskeletal network and cell-wall dynamics in the unicellular charophycean green alga Penium margaritaceum

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Julie; LaRue, Therese; Tinaz, Berke; Yongue, Camille; Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Penium margaritaceum is a unicellular charophycean green alga with a unique bi-directional polar expansion mechanism that occurs at the central isthmus zone prior to cell division. This entails the focused deposition of cell-wall polymers coordinated by the activities of components of the endomembrane system and cytoskeletal networks. The goal of this study was to elucidate the structural organization of the cortical cytoskeletal network during the cell cycle and identify its specific functional roles during key cell-wall developmental events: pre-division expansion and cell division. Methods Microtubules and actin filaments were labelled during various cell cycle phases with an anti-tubulin antibody and rhodamine phalloidin, respectively. Chemically induced disruption of the cytoskeleton was used to elucidate specific functional roles of microtubules and actin during cell expansion and division. Correlation of cytoskeletal dynamics with cell-wall development included live cell labelling with wall polymer-specific antibodies and electron microscopy. Key Results The cortical cytoplasm of Penium is highlighted by a band of microtubules found at the cell isthmus, i.e. the site of pre-division wall expansion. This band, along with an associated, transient band of actin filaments, probably acts to direct the deposition of new wall material and to mark the plane of the future cell division. Two additional bands of microtubules, which we identify as satellite bands, arise from the isthmus microtubular band at the onset of expansion and displace toward the poles during expansion, ultimately marking the isthmus of future daughter cells. Treatment with microtubule and actin perturbation agents reversibly stops cell division. Conclusions The cortical cytoplasm of Penium contains distinct bands of microtubules and actin filaments that persist through the cell cycle. One of these bands, termed the isthmus microtubule band, or IMB, marks the site of both pre-division wall expansion and the zone where a cross wall will form during cytokinesis. This suggests that prior to the evolution of land plants, a dynamic, cortical cytoskeletal array similar to a pre-prophase band had evolved in the charophytes. However, an interesting variation on the cortical band theme is present in Penium, where two satellite microtubule bands are produced at the onset of cell expansion, each of which is destined to become an IMB in the two daughter cells after cytokinesis. These unique cytoskeletal components demonstrate the close temporal control and highly coordinated cytoskeletal dynamics of cellular development in Penium. PMID:24603606

  10. Structural Features and Anti-coagulant Activity of the Sulphated Polysaccharide SPS-CF from a Green Alga Capsosiphon fulvescens.

    PubMed

    Synytsya, Andriy; Choi, Doo Jin; Pohl, Radek; Na, Ye Seul; Capek, Peter; Lattová, Erika; Taubner, Tomáš; Choi, Ji Won; Lee, Chang Won; Park, Jae Kweon; Kim, Woo Jung; Kim, Sung Min; Lee, Jisun; Park, Yong Il

    2015-12-01

    Previously, we reported that the sulphated polysaccharides (SPS)-CF, a water-soluble polysaccharide isolated and purified from Korean green alga Maesaengi (Capsosiphon fulvescens, Chlorophyta), is a glucuronogalactomannan based mainly on the monosaccharide composition determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis after 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) labelling of sugars in the acid (trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)) hydrolyzates of SPS-CF, which showed mannose (55.4 mol %), galactose (25.3 mol %) and glucuronic acid (16.3 mol %) as major sugars (Na et al., Int Immunopharmacol 10:364-370, 2010). However, the results of the present study re-performed for monosaccharide composition of this polysaccharide using, in addition to HPLC of PMP-labelled sugars, other separation methods, i.e. high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), gas chromatography with flame ionising detection (GC-FID) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC), clearly demonstrated that the most prominent neutral monosaccharides of SPS-CF are xylose (38.6-49.4 mol %) and rhamnose (39.6-45 mol %), while mannose and galactose are present at a much lesser extent or in negligible amount. These extensive monosaccharide analyses, correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) measurements confirmed the sulphated glucuronorhamnoxylan (ulvan) type of SPS-CF polysaccharide, whose backbone is composed of alternating sequence of 4-linked L-rhamnose-3-sulphate and D-xylose residues (ulvobiose U3s) carrying monomeric D-glucuronic acid or D-glucuronic acid-3-sulphate on O-2 of some L-rhamnose-3-sulphate units as the side chains. The SPS-CF exhibited significant in vitro anti-coagulant activity by which the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin time (TT) were significantly prolonged. The results of this study demonstrated that the ulvan SPS-CF isolated from Korean Maesaengi C. fulvescens can be considered a potential anti-coagulant agent. PMID:26337523

  11. The photochemical and fluorescence properties of whole cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum.

    PubMed

    Tel-or, E; Malkin, S

    1977-02-01

    The photochemical activities and fluorescence properties of cells, spheroplasts and spheroplast particles from the blue-green alga Phormidium luridum were compared. The photochemical activities were measured in a whole range of wavelengths and expressed as quantum yield spectra (quantum yield vs. wavelength). The following reactions were measured. Photosynthesis (O2 evolution) in whole cells; Hill reaction (O2 evolution) with Fe(CN)63- and NADP as electron acceptors (Photosystem II and photosystem II + Photosystem I reactions); electron transfer from reduced 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol to diquat (Photosystem I reaction). The fluorescence properties were emission spectra, quantum yield spectra and the induction pattern. On the basis of comparison between the quantum yield spectra and the pigments compositions the relative contribution of each pigment to each photosystem was estimated. In normal cells and spheroplasts it was found that Photosystem I (Photosystem II) contains about 90% (10%) of the chlorophyll a, 90% (10%) of the carotenoids and 15% (85%) of the phycocyanin. In spheroplast particles there is a reorganization of the pigments; they loose a certain fraction (about half) of the phycocyanin but the remaining phycocyanin attaches itself exclusively to Photosystem I (!). This is reflected by the loss of Photosystem II activity, a flat quantum yield vs. wavelength dependence and a loss of the fluorescence induction. The fluorescence quantum yield spectra conform qualitatively to the above conclusion. More quantitative estimation shows that only a fraction (20--40%) of the chlorophyll of Photosystem II is fluorescent. Total emission spectrum and the ratio of variable to constant fluorescence are in agreement with this conclusion. The fluorescence emission spectrum shows characteristic differences between the constant and variable components. The variable fluorescence comes exclusively from chlorophyll a; the constant fluorescence is contributed, in addition to chlorophyll a, by phycocyanine and an unidentified long wavelength component. The variable fluorescence does not change in the transition from whole cells to spheroplasts. However, the constant fluorescence increases considerably. This indicates the release of a small fraction of pigments from the photosynthetic photochemical apparatus which then become fluorescent. PMID:402150

  12. Characterization of chlorophyll-protein complexes isolated from two marine green algae, Bryopsis maxima and Ulva pertusa, growing in the intertidal zone.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Jun-ya; Kozu, Arisu; Fukunaga, Yuko

    2006-07-01

    Three Chl-protein complexes were isolated from thylakoid membranes of Bryopsis maxima and Ulva pertusa, marine green algae that inhabit the intertidal zone of the Pacific Ocean off the eastern coast of Japan by dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The slowest-moving fractions showed low Chl a/b and Chl/P-700 ratios, indicating that this fraction corresponds to complexes in PS I, which is large in both algae. The intermediate and fastest-moving fractions showed the traits of PS II complexes, with some associated Chl a/b-protein complexes and LHC II, respectively. The spectral properties of the separated Chl-proteins were also determined. The absorption spectra showed a shallow shoulder at 540 nm derived from siphonaxanthin in Bryopsis maxima, but not in Ulva pertusa. The 77 K emission spectra showed a single peak in Bryopsis maxima and two peaks in Ulva pertusa. Besides the excitation spectra indicated that the excitation energy transfer to the PS I complexes differed quite a lot higher plants. This suggested that the mechanisms of energy transfer in both of these algae differ from those of higher plants. Considering the light environment of this coastal area, the large size of the antennae of PS I complexes implies that the antennae are arranged so as to balance light absorption between the two photosystems. In addition, we discuss the relationships among the photosystem stoichiometry, the energy transfer, and the distribution between the two photosystems. PMID:16729200

  13. Blue-green algae

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have a high-salt content, but some types grow in large fresh water lakes. The natural color ... bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin; clopidogrel (Plavix); nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such ...

  14. Liver failure in a dog following suspected ingestion of blue-green algae (Microcystis spp.): a case report and review of the toxin.

    PubMed

    Sebbag, Lionel; Smee, Nicole; van der Merwe, Deon; Schmid, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    A 2.5 yr old spayed female Weimaraner presented after ingestion of blue-green algae (Microcystis spp.). One day prior to presentation, the patient was swimming at a local lake known to be contaminated with high levels of blue-green algae that was responsible for deaths of several other dogs the same summer. The patient presented 24 hr after exposure with vomiting, inappetence, weakness, and lethargy. Blood work at the time of admission was consistent with acute hepatic failure, characteristic findings of intoxication by Microcystis spp. Diagnosis was suspected by analyzing a water sample from the location where the patient was swimming. Supportive care including fluids, fresh frozen plasma, whole blood, vitamin K, B complex vitamins, S-adenosyl methionine, and Silybum marianum were started. The patient was discharged on supportive medications, and follow-up blood work showed continued improvement. Ingestion is typically fatal for most patients. This is the first canine to be reported in the literature to survive treatment after known exposure. PMID:23861261

  15. POT1 proteins in green algae and land plants: DNA-binding properties and evidence of co-evolution with telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shakirov, Eugene V.; Song, Xiangyu; Joseph, Jessica A.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Telomeric DNA terminates with a single-stranded 3? G-overhang that in vertebrates and fission yeast is bound by POT1 (Protection Of Telomeres). However, no in vitro telomeric DNA binding is associated with Arabidopsis POT1 paralogs. To further investigate POT1–DNA interaction in plants, we cloned POT1 genes from 11 plant species representing major branches of plant kingdom. Telomeric DNA binding was associated with POT1 proteins from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus and two flowering plants, maize and Asparagus. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that several residues critical for telomeric DNA recognition in vertebrates are functionally conserved in plant POT1 proteins. However, the plant proteins varied in their minimal DNA-binding sites and nucleotide recognition properties. Green alga POT1 exhibited a strong preference for the canonical plant telomere repeat sequence TTTAGGG with no detectable binding to hexanucleotide telomere repeat TTAGGG found in vertebrates and some plants, including Asparagus. In contrast, POT1 proteins from maize and Asparagus bound TTAGGG repeats with only slightly reduced affinity relative to the TTTAGGG sequence. We conclude that the nucleic acid binding site in plant POT1 proteins is evolving rapidly, and that the recent acquisition of TTAGGG telomere repeats in Asparagus appears to have co-evolved with changes in POT1 DNA sequence recognition. PMID:19783822

  16. The optimum conditions for the extraction of antioxidant compounds from the Persian gulf green algae (Chaetomorpha sp.) using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Safari, Parva; Rezaei, Masoud; Shaviklo, Amir Reza

    2015-05-01

    The potential of antioxidant activity of the green algae (Chaetomorpha sp.) was studied in this work. The optimum processing conditions for the extraction of antioxidant compounds from dried green algae were determined using response surface methodology (RSM). A central composite design (CCD) was applied to determine the effects of three process variables as follows: solvent concentration (percent), extraction time (min) and microwave power (w) on total phenolic contents, ferric reducing power, 2'2-dipheny-l-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and total antioxidant capacity assays. The independent variables were coded at five levels and CCD included 20 experimental runs with six replications at the center point. The statistical analysis of data was performed using design expert software and second-order polynomial models generated after analysis of variance (ANOVA) applied for predicting the responses. The results revealed that the highest total phenol content and reducing power were 1.09 and 0.12 mg of tannic acid equivalent/g dry weight, respectively. The maximum antioxidant activity was 0.19 mg ascorbic acid equivalent/g dry weight and DPPH was 99.8 % under MAE. The optimum conditions using RSM for the predicted responses were: microwave power 300 W, extraction time 8 min and solvent concentration 25 %, respectively. Furthermore the actual experimental values were adjacent to the corresponding predicted values which demonstrated fitness of the employed models and suitability of RSM in extraction parameters optimization. PMID:25892798

  17. [Photoreduction of Se (VI) by marine algae-transitional metals-light system].

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Deng, Nan-Sheng; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Zhu, Guo-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Seven marine phytoplankton, including five green algae (Tetraselmis levis, Chlorella autotrophica, Dunaliella salina, Nannochloropsis sp. and Tetraselmis subcordiformis), one diatom (Phaeodactylum tricornutum), one red alga (Porphyridium purpureum), and three usual transitional metals (Fe(III), Cu(II), Mn(II)) were used to make up marine phytoplankton-light or transitional metals-light or marine phytoplankton-transitional metals-light system. In such system, Se(VI) could be transformed into Se(IV) by photoreduction. The species transformation of selenium could be photo-induced by redox reaction of transitional metals. The photochemical activity of marine phytoplankton was confirmed for the first time, because marine phytoplankton could adsorb and concentrated of selenium, transitional metals and organic substances (including the exudation of algae, as reducing agent) which redox potentials were changed. The ratios of Se(VI) to Se(IV) were dominated by the species, the concentration of marine phytoplankton and transitional metals, and it could be enhanced through increasing the concentration of marine algae or the combined effect from marine algae and transitional metals. After photoreduction by ternary system, the ratio of Se(VI) to Se(IV) ranges from 1.17 to 2.85, which is close to the actual value in euphotic layer of seawater. The photochemical process that is induced by marine algae and transitional metals dominative the leading effects on the distribution of oxidation states of selenium. PMID:16212166

  18. Green evolution and dynamic adaptations revealed by genomes of the marine picoeukaryotes Micromonas

    E-print Network

    Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2009-01-01

    and brown algae) presumably reflected losses (or extensive divergence) in other green lineage organisms and redred, green, glaucophyte, and chromalveolate algae appear in red, green, magenta, and brown

  19. Leveraging metabolomics for functional investigations in sequenced marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Fernie, Alisdair R; Obata, Toshihiro; Allen, Andrew E; Araújo, Wagner L; Bowler, Chris

    2012-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed the genomic decoding of a wide range of photosynthetic organisms from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the complex genomes of important crop species to single-celled marine phytoplankton. The comparative sequencing of green, red and brown algae has provided considerable insight into a number of important questions concerning their evolution, physiology and metabolism. The combinatorial application of metabolomics has further deepened our understanding both of the function of individual genes and of metabolic processes. Here we discuss the power of utilising metabolomics in conjunction with sequencing data to gain greater insight into the metabolic hierarchies underpinning the function of individual organisms, using unicellular marine diatoms as a case study to exemplify the advantages of this approach. PMID:22465020

  20. How 5000 independent rowers coordinate their strokes in order to row into the sunlight: Phototaxis in the multicellular green alga Volvox

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evolution of multicellular motile organisms from unicellular ancestors required the utilization of previously evolved tactic behavior in a multicellular context. Volvocine green algae are uniquely suited for studying tactic responses during the transition to multicellularity because they range in complexity from unicellular to multicellular genera. Phototactic responses are essential for these flagellates because they need to orientate themselves to receive sufficient light for photosynthesis, but how does a multicellular organism accomplish phototaxis without any known direct communication among cells? Several aspects of the photoresponse have previously been analyzed in volvocine algae, particularly in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas. Results In this study, the phototactic behavior in the spheroidal, multicellular volvocine green alga Volvox rousseletii (Volvocales, Chlorophyta) was analyzed. In response to light stimuli, not only did the flagella waveform and beat frequency change, but the effective stroke was reversed. Moreover, there was a photoresponse gradient from the anterior to the posterior pole of the spheroid, and only cells of the anterior hemisphere showed an effective response. The latter caused a reverse of the fluid flow that was confined to the anterior hemisphere. The responsiveness to light is consistent with an anterior-to-posterior size gradient of eyespots. At the posterior pole, the eyespots are tiny or absent, making the corresponding cells appear to be blind. Pulsed light stimulation of an immobilized spheroid was used to simulate the light fluctuation experienced by a rotating spheroid during phototaxis. The results demonstrated that in free-swimming spheroids, only those cells of the anterior hemisphere that face toward the light source reverse the beating direction in the presence of illumination; this behavior results in phototactic turning. Moreover, positive phototaxis is facilitated by gravitational forces. Under our conditions, V. rousseletii spheroids showed no negative phototaxis. Conclusions On the basis of our results, we developed a mechanistic model that predicts the phototactic behavior in V. rousseletii. The model involves photoresponses, periodically changing light conditions, morphological polarity, rotation of the spheroid, two modes of flagellar beating, and the impact of gravity. Our results also indicate how recently evolved multicellular organisms adapted the phototactic capabilities of their unicellular ancestors to multicellular life. PMID:20663212

  1. Diatoms in space: testing prospects for reliable diatom nanotechnology in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Richard; Hoover, Richard B.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; de Luis, Javier; Camp, Philip J.; Tiffany, Mary Ann; Nagy, Stephen S.; Fayek, Mostafa; Lopez, Pascal J.; Lerner, Beatriz E.

    2007-09-01

    The worldwide effort to grow nanotechnology, rather than use lithography, focuses on diatoms, single cell eukaryotic algae with ornate silica shells, which can be replaced by oxides and ceramics, or reduced to elemental silicon, to create complex nanostructures with compositions of industrial and electronics importance. Diatoms produce an enormous variety of structures, some of which are microtubule dependent and perhaps sensitive to microgravity. The NASA Single Loop for Cell Culture (SLCC) for culturing and observing microorganisms permits inexpensive, low labor in-space experiments. We propose to send up to the International Space Station diatom cultures of the three diatom species whose genomes are currently being sequenced, plus the giant diatoms of Antarctica (up to 6 mm length for a single cell) and the unique colonial diatom, Bacillaria paradoxa. Bacillaria cells move against each other in partial synchrony, like a sliding deck of cards, by a microfluidics mechanism. Will normal diatoms have aberrant patterns, shapes or motility compared to ground controls? The generation time is typically one day, so that many generations may be examined from one flight. Rapid, directed evolution may be possible running the SLCC as a compustat. The shell shapes and patterns are preserved in hard silica, so that the progress of normal and aberrant morphogenesis may be followed by drying samples on a moving filter paper "diatom tape recorder". With a biodiversity of 100,000 distinct species, diatom nanotechnology may offer a compact and portable nanotechnology toolkit for space exploration anywhere.

  2. Characterization of the Heterotrimeric G-Protein Complex and Its Regulator from the Green Alga Chara braunii Expands the Evolutionary Breadth of Plant G-Protein Signaling1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hackenberg, Dieter; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Pandey, Sona

    2013-01-01

    The lack of heterotrimeric G-protein homologs in the sequenced genomes of green algae has led to the hypothesis that, in plants, this signaling mechanism coevolved with the embryophytic life cycle and the acquisition of terrestrial habitat. Given the large evolutionary gap that exists between the chlorophyte green algae and most basal land plants, the bryophytes, we evaluated the presence of this signaling complex in a charophyte green alga, Chara braunii, proposed to be the closest living relative of land plants. The C. braunii genome encodes for the entire G-protein complex, the G?, G?, and G? subunits, and the REGULATOR OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING (RGS) protein. The biochemical properties of these proteins and their cross-species functionality show that they are functional homologs of canonical G-proteins. The subunit-specific interactions between CbG? and CbG?, CbG? and CbG?, and CbG? and CbRGS are also conserved, establishing the existence of functional G-protein complex-based signaling mechanisms in green algae. PMID:24179134

  3. RNA-mediated silencing in Algae: biological roles and tools for analysis of gene function.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Heriberto; Ma, Xinrong; Msanne, Joseph; Repas, Timothy

    2011-09-01

    Algae are a large group of aquatic, typically photosynthetic, eukaryotes that include species from very diverse phylogenetic lineages, from those similar to land plants to those related to protist parasites. The recent sequencing of several algal genomes has provided insights into the great complexity of these organisms. Genomic information has also emphasized our lack of knowledge of the functions of many predicted genes, as well as the gene regulatory mechanisms in algae. Core components of the machinery for RNA-mediated silencing show widespread distribution among algal lineages, but they also seem to have been lost entirely from several species with relatively small nuclear genomes. Complex sets of endogenous small RNAs, including candidate microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, have now been identified by high-throughput sequencing in green, red, and brown algae. However, the natural roles of RNA-mediated silencing in algal biology remain poorly understood. Limited evidence suggests that small RNAs may function, in different algae, in defense mechanisms against transposon mobilization, in responses to nutrient deprivation and, possibly, in the regulation of recently evolved developmental processes. From a practical perspective, RNA interference (RNAi) is becoming a promising tool for assessing gene function by sequence-specific knockdown. Transient gene silencing, triggered with exogenously synthesized nucleic acids, and/or stable gene repression, involving genome-integrated transgenes, have been achieved in green algae, diatoms, yellow-green algae, and euglenoids. The development of RNAi technology in conjunction with system level "omics" approaches may provide the tools needed to advance our understanding of algal physiological and metabolic processes. PMID:21803865

  4. Development of a Nuclear Transformation System for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa and Genetic Complementation of a Mutant Strain, Deficient in Arachidonic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Leu, Stefan; Shapira, Michal; Kaye, Yuval; Tourasse, Nicolas; Vallon, Olivier; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising source for various high value products, such as carotenoids, ?-3 and ?-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The unicellular green alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa is an outstanding candidate for the efficient phototrophic production of arachidonic acid (AA), an essential ?-6 PUFA for infant brain development and a widely used ingredient in the baby formula industry. Although phototrophic production of such algal products has not yet been established, estimated costs are considered to be 2–5 times higher than competing heterotrophic production costs. This alga accumulates unprecedented amounts of AA within triacylglycerols and the molecular pathway of AA biosynthesis in L. incisa has been previously elucidated. Thus, progress in transformation and metabolic engineering of this high value alga could be exploited for increasing the efficient production of AA at competitive prices. We describe here the first successful transformation of L. incisa using the ble gene as a selection marker, under the control of the endogenous RBCS promoter. Furthermore, we have succeeded in the functional complementation of the L. incisa mutant strain P127, containing a mutated, inactive version of the delta-5 (?5) fatty acid desaturase gene. A copy of the functional ?5 desaturase gene, linked to the ble selection marker, was transformed into the P127 mutant. The resulting transformants selected for zeocine resistant, had AA biosynthesis partially restored, indicating the functional complementation of the mutant strain with the wild-type gene. The results of this study present a platform for the successful genetic engineering of L. incisa and its long-chain PUFA metabolism. PMID:25133787

  5. Genetic engineering of the green alga Chlorella zofingiensis: a modified norflurazon-resistant phytoene desaturase gene as a dominant selectable marker.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Gerken, Henri; Huang, Junchao; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2014-06-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlorella zofingiensis has been proposed as a promising producer of natural astaxanthin, a commercially important ketocarotenoid. But the genetic toolbox for this alga is not available. In the present study, an efficient transformation system was established for C. zofingiensis. The transformation system utilized a modified norflurazon-resistant phytoene desaturase (PDS-L516F, with an leucine-phenylalanine change at position 516) as the selectable marker. Three promoters from endogenous PDS, nitrate reductase (NIT), and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit (RBCS) genes were tested, with the RBCS promoter demonstrating the highest transformation efficiency. Inclusion of the first intron of the PDS gene further enhanced the efficiency by 91 %. Both particle bombardment and electroporation methods were examined, and the latter gave a fourfold higher transformation efficiency. The introduction of PDS-L516F, which exhibited a 33 % higher desaturation activity than the unaltered enzyme, enabled C. zofingiensis to produce 32.1 % more total carotenoids (TCs) and 54.1 % more astaxanthin. The enhanced accumulation of astaxanthin in transformants was revealed to be related to the increase in the transcripts of PDS, ?-carotenoid ketolase (BKT), and hydroxylase (CHYb) genes. Our study clearly shows that the modified PDS gene is a dominant selectable marker for the transformation of C. zofingiensis and possibly for the genetic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. In addition, the engineered C. zofingiensis might serve as an improved source of natural astaxanthin. PMID:24584513

  6. Postglacial environments on the eastern Laptev Sea shelf: evidence from diatom and aquatic palynomorph assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, Ye. I.; Bauch, H. A.; Novichkova, T. S.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2003-04-01

    So far, the Pleistocene geological history of the Laptev Sea shelf was reconstructed mainly on the basis of high-resolution seismic data and their extrapolation to the terrestrial geology. Due to successful realization of the drilling program executed by the Russian-German expedition TRANSDRIFT VIII in 2000, the uppermost part of last glacial sediments were recovered from the Eastern Laptev Sea. Core PS-51/135-4 and borehole KI005 used in this study were obtained from the eastern Yana River paleodelta channel and covered the time interval 17 5 ka based on radiocarbon chronology. For the purpose of reconstructing variations in riverine discharge and surface water salinity we used the ratio between marine and freshwater diatoms, and the ratio between dinoflagellate cysts represented by marine species and cysts of freshwater chlorophyte algae, which are transported to the sea shelves by rivers. The established linkage between distribution patterns in relative abundances of these groups of microfossils in surface sediments of the Eurasian Arctic seas and the surface water salinity indicates that they can be utilized to make assumption on paleosalinity fluctuations in the Laptev Sea. Several palaeoenvironmental events are recognized on the Eastern Laptev Sea shelf for the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene. The oldest, Upper Pleistocene, sediments are represented by riverine and lake sediments. The time span between 11.1 and 10.7 ka was characterized by ”avalanche-like precipitation” of freshwater diatoms and green algae in the inner shelf zone near the former location of the river mouth. The following time interval (10.7 to 9.6 ka), characterized by an overall decrease of concentrations and relative abundances of freshwater diatoms and chlorophyte cysts, indicates a transitional phase. During the time interval from 9.6 to 9.0 ka, the increase of relative abundances of dinoflagellate cysts and marine diatoms indicates development of marine conditions and the influence of Atlantic water masses on this outer shelf region.

  7. Does the abundance of girellids and kyphosids correlate with cover of the palatable green algae, Ulva spp.? A test on temperate rocky intertidal reefs.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A M; Harvey, E S; Rees, M J; Knott, N A

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether the abundance of girellids and kyphosids was related to cover of the palatable green algae, Ulva australis and Ulva compressa, on rocky intertidal reefs in Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia. No relationship was found between Ulva spp. cover and abundance of Girella tricuspidata, Girella elevata and Kyphosus sydneyanus during a period of relatively low Ulva spp. cover (i.e. February 2011 to March 2011), but during a period of significantly higher Ulva spp. cover (i.e. October 2011 to November 2011) there was a strong correlation between Ulva spp. cover and G. tricuspidata abundance. Spatial analysis indicated that the abundance of G. tricuspidata was consistent across time, suggesting G. tricuspidata were not moving between reefs in response to variation in Ulva spp. cover between periods but rather that large schools of G. tricuspidata resided on reefs that had relatively higher Ulva spp. cover at certain times of the year. PMID:25557432

  8. Anatoliacodium gen. nov. (Halimedaceae, Green algae) from the Ilerdian-Cuisian in the Eski?ehir region (Western Central Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Nazire Özgen; Radoicic, Rajka

    2009-08-01

    A new genus Anatoliacodium (Halimedaceae, Green algae) is described from the Ilerdian-Cuisian shallow-water sediments of Eski?ehir region, central-western Turkey. These sequences consist of limestones, clayey limestones, sandy limestones and claystones. Anatoliacodium gen. nov. is characterized by erected calcareous segments with well differentiated inner structure: prevailing with large medulla of more or less densely set parallel filaments and cortical zone of prevailing horizontal to subhorizontal cortical filaments, once branching and without constriction. It is supposed that poorly and rarely preserved noncalcareous structures on the skeleton surface could be reproductive structures. The type species of the new genus is Anatoliacodium xinanmui gen. nov. sp. nov. A further new species is also described: Anatoliacodium merici gen. nov. sp. nov. Finally Gymnocodium nummuliticum Pfender, 1966 is emended and transferred to the genus Anatoliacodium.

  9. Severe hepatotoxicity caused by the tropical cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Woloszynska) Seenaya and Subba Raju isolated from a domestic water supply reservoir.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, P R; Runnegar, M T; Jackson, A R; Falconer, I R

    1985-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, a tropical blooming species of cyanobacterium (blue-green alga), was isolated from the domestic water supply reservoir on Palm Island, a continental island off the tropical northeast coast of Australia. This species, not previously known to be toxic, was shown to be severely hepatotoxic for mice. The 50% lethal dose at 24 h after injection was found to be 64 +/- 5 mg of freeze-dried culture per kg of mouse. The principal lesion produced was centrilobular to massive hepatocyte necrosis, but various degrees of injury were also seen in the kidneys, adrenal glands, lungs, and intestine. The possible implication of this finding in relation to an incident of hepatoenteritis in humans living on the island is discussed. Images PMID:3937492

  10. Experimental Substantiation of the Possibility of Developing Selenium- and Iodine-Containing Pharmaceuticals Based on Blue-Green Algae Spirulina Platensis

    E-print Network

    Mosulishvili, L M; Belokobylsky, A I; Khisanishvili, L A; Frontasyeva, M V; Pavlov, C C; Gundorina, S F

    2001-01-01

    The great potential of using blue-green algae Spirulina platensis as a matrix for the production of selenium- and iodine-containing pharmaceuticals is shown experimentally. The background levels of 31 major, minor and trace elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni (using -reaction), As, Br, Zn, Rb, Mo, Ag, Sb, I, Ba, Sm, Tb, Tm, Hf, Ta, W, Au, Hg, Th) in Spirulina platensis biomass were determined by means of epithermal neutron activation analysis. The dependence of selenium and iodine accumulation in spirulina biomass on a nutrient medium loding of the above elements was characterised. To demonstrate the possibilities of determining toxic element intake by spirulina biomass, mercury was selected. The technological parameters for production of iodinated treatment-and-prophylactic pills are developed.

  11. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    PubMed

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. PMID:26256632

  12. Identification of the green alga, Chlorella vulgaris (SDC1) using cyanobacteria derived 16S rDNA primers: targeting the chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Burja, A M; Tamagnini, P; Bustard, M T; Wright, P C

    2001-08-21

    We have tested a set of oligonucleotide primers originally developed for the specific amplification of 16S rRNA gene segments from cyanobacteria, in order to determine their versatility as an identification tool for phototrophic eucaryotes. Using web-based bioinformatics tools we determined that these primers not only targeted cyanobacterium sequences as previously described, but also 87% of sequences derived from phototrophic eucaryotes. In order to qualify our finding, a type culture and environmental strain from the freshwater unicellular, green algae genus Chlorella Beijerinck, were selected for further study. Subsequently, we sequenced a 578-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene, which proved to be present within the chloroplast genome, performed sequence analysis and positively identified our solvent-degrading environmental strain (SDC1) as Chlorella vulgaris. PMID:11520614

  13. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. PMID:26232488

  14. Bioinformatics Reveal Five Lineages of Oleosins and the Mechanism of Lineage Evolution Related to Structure/Function from Green Algae to Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2015-09-01

    Plant cells contain subcellular lipid droplets with a triacylglycerol matrix enclosed by a layer of phospholipids and the small structural protein oleosin. Oleosins possess a conserved central hydrophobic hairpin of approximately 72 residues penetrating into the lipid droplet matrix and amphipathic amino- and carboxyl (C)-terminal peptides lying on the phospholipid surface. Bioinformatics of 1,000 oleosins of green algae and all plants emphasizing biological implications reveal five oleosin lineages: primitive (in green algae, mosses, and ferns), universal (U; all land plants), and three in specific organs or phylogenetic groups, termed seed low-molecular-weight (SL; seed plants), seed high-molecular-weight (SH; angiosperms), and tapetum (T; Brassicaceae) oleosins. Transition from one lineage to the next is depicted from lineage intermediates at junctions of phylogeny and organ distributions. Within a species, each lineage, except the T oleosin lineage, has one to four genes per haploid genome, only approximately two of which are active. Primitive oleosins already possess all the general characteristics of oleosins. U oleosins have C-terminal sequences as highly conserved as the hairpin sequences; thus, U oleosins including their C-terminal peptide exert indispensable, unknown functions. SL and SH oleosin transcripts in seeds are in an approximately 1:1 ratio, which suggests the occurrence of SL-SH oleosin dimers/multimers. T oleosins in Brassicaceae are encoded by rapidly evolved multitandem genes for alkane storage and transfer. Overall, oleosins have evolved to retain conserved hairpin structures but diversified for unique structures and functions in specific cells and plant families. Also, our studies reveal oleosin in avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and no acyltransferase/lipase motifs in most oleosins. PMID:26232488

  15. Supramolecular organization of fucoxanthin-chlorophyll proteins in centric and pennate diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gardian, Zdenko; Litvín, Radek; Bína, David; Vácha, František

    2014-07-01

    Fucoxanthin-chlorophyll proteins (FCP) are the major light-harvesting proteins of diatom algae, a major contributor to marine carbon fixation. FCP complexes from representatives of centric (Cyclotella meneghiniana) and pennate (Phaeodactylum tricornutum) diatoms were prepared by sucrose gradient centrifugation and studied by means of electron microscopy followed by single particle analysis. The oligomeric FCP from a centric diatom were observed to take the form of unusual chain-like or circular shapes, a very unique supramolecular assembly for such antennas. The existence of the often disputed oligomeric form of FCP in pennate diatoms has been confirmed. Contrary to the centric diatom FCP, pennate diatom FCP oligomers are very similar to oligomeric antennas from related heterokont (Stramenopila) algae. Evolutionary aspects of the presence of novel light-harvesting protein arrangement in centric diatoms are discussed. PMID:24715699

  16. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    at Arlington have also discovered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes. ?There appears to be a chemical warfare between golden algae and blue green algae. Only when golden algae wins this chemical... warfare is it able to bloom,? Roelke said. The research team is exploring potential management strategeties to mitigate blooms. ?It may be that through the manipulation of water chemistry in the coves of these lakes, systemwide blooms can...

  17. Toxic and deadly: Working to manage algae in Lake Granbury 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    at Arlington have also discovered an apparent competition between golden algae and blue green algae in certain Texas lakes. ?There appears to be a chemical warfare between golden algae and blue green algae. Only when golden algae wins this chemical... warfare is it able to bloom,? Roelke said. The research team is exploring potential management strategeties to mitigate blooms. ?It may be that through the manipulation of water chemistry in the coves of these lakes, systemwide blooms can...

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Chemical Composition of Mixed and Pure Cultures of Green Algae and Their Decomposed Residues by 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zelibor, J. L.; Romankiw, L.; Hatcher, P. G.; Colwell, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    It is known that macromolecular organic matter in aquatic environments, i.e., humic substances, is highly aliphatic. These aliphatic macromolecules, predominantly paraffinic in structure, are prevalent in marine and lacustrine sediments and are believed to originate from algae or bacteria. A comparative study of mixed and pure cultures of green algae and their decomposed residues was performed by using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as the primary analytical method. Results obtained in this study confirm the presence of components that are chemically refractory and that are defined as alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin. These were detected in heterogeneous, homogeneous, and axenic biomasses composed of several genera of Chlorophyta. Although the chemical composition of algal biomass varied with culture conditions, the chemical structure of the alghumin and hydrolyzed alghumin, demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy appeared to be constant for members of the Chlorophyta examined in this study. The alghumin was dominated by carbohydrate-carbon, with minor amounts of amide or carboxyl carbon and paraffinic carbon, the latter surviving strong hydrolysis by 6 N HCI (hydrolyzed alghumin). Bacterial decomposition of heterogeneous algal biomass labeled with 13C was conducted under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to determine chemical structure and stability of the refractory material. The refractory fraction ranged from 33% in aerobic to 44% in anaerobic cultures. The refractory fraction recovered from either aerobic or anaerobic degradation comprised 40% alghumin, which represented an enrichment by 10% relative to the proportion of alghumin derived from whole cells of algae. The paraffinic component in the hydrolyzed alghumin of whole algal cells was found to be 1.8% and increased to 5.1 and 6.9% after aerobic and anaerobic bacterial degradation, respectively. It is concluded that members of the Chlorophyta contain a common insoluble structure composed of paraffinic carbon that is resistant to chemical and bacterial degradation under conditions used in this study. The paraffinic structure is identical to those constituting humin of aquatic origin. Thus, alga-derived macromolecular compounds deposited in aquatic environments (alghumin) probably contribute to sedimentary humic substances. PMID:16347601

  19. Antiproliferative activity of methanolic extracts from two green algae, Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rizoclonium riparium on HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural compounds can be alternative sources for finding new lead anti-cancer molecules. Marine algae have been a traditional source for bioactive compounds. Enteromorpha intestinalis and Rhizoclonium riparium are two well distributed saline/brackish water algae from Sundarbans. There’s no previous report of these two for their anti-proliferative activities. Methods Cytotoxicity of the algal methanolic extracts (AMEs) on HeLa cells were assayed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay. Morphological examinations were done by Haematoxylin, Hoechst 33258 and Acridine orange staining. DNA fragmentation was checked. Gene expressions of Cysteine aspartate protease (Caspase) 3, Tumor protein (TP) 53, Bcl-2 associated protein X (Bax) were studied by Reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) keeping Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as internal control. Protein expressions were studied for Caspase 3, phospho-p53, Bax, Microtubule associated proteins-1/ light chain B (MAP1/LC3B) by western blot. Results The AMEs were found to be cytotoxic with Inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values 309.048?±?3.083 ?g/ml and 506.081?±?3.714 ?g/ml for E. intestinalis and R. riparium extracts respectively. Treated cells became round with blebbings with condensed nuclei. Acidic lysosomal vacuoles formation occurred in treated cells. Expression of apoptotic genes in both mRNA and protein level was lowered. Expression of LC3B-II suggested occurrence of autophagy in treated cells. Conclusions These two algae can be potent candidates for isolating new lead anticancer molecules. So they need further characterization at both molecular and structural levels. PMID:24355313

  20. A Simple Green Synthesis of Palladium Nanoparticles with Sargassum Alga and Their Electrocatalytic Activities Towards Hydrogen Peroxide.

    PubMed

    Momeni, S; Nabipour, I

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the synthesis of palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) using the extract derived from the marine alga, Sargassum bovinum, collected from Persian Gulf area. Water-soluble compounds that exist in the marine alga extract were the main cause of the reduction of palladium ions to Pd nanoparticles. The basic properties of PdNPs produced in this method were confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). TEM confirmed the monodispersed and octahedral shape of PdNPs within the size ranges from 5 to 10 nm. Catalytic performance of the biosynthetic PdNPs was investigated by electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PdNP-modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (PdNPs/CILE) was developed as a nonenzymatic sensor for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. Amperometric measurements showed that PdNPs/CILE is a reliable sensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 5.0 ?M-15.0 mM with a sensitivity of 284.35 mAmM(-1) cm(-2) and a detection limit of 1.0 ?M. Moreover, PdNPs/CILE exhibits a wide linear range, high sensitivity and selectivity, and excellent stability for the detection of H2O2 in aqueous solutions. PMID:26041058

  1. Green algae (Chlorella pyrenoidosa) adsorbs Bacillus thurigiensis (Bt) toxin, Cry1Ca insecticidal protein, without an effect on growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiamei; Chen, Xiuping; Li, Yunhe; Su, Changqing; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2014-08-01

    The effect of purified Cry1Ca insecticidal protein on the growth of Chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied in a three-generation toxicity test. The C. pyrenoidosa medium with a density of 5.4 × 10(5) cells/mL was subcultured for three generations with added Cry1Ca at 0, 10, 100, and 1000 µg/L, and cell numbers were determined daily. To explore the distribution of Cry1Ca in C. pyrenoidosa and the culture medium, Cry1Ca was added at 1000 µg/L to algae with a high density of 4.8 × 10(6) cells/mL, and Cry1Ca content was determined daily in C. pyrenoidosa and the culture medium by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our results showed that the growth curves of C. pyrenoidosa exposed to 10, 100, and 1000 µg/L of Cry1Ca almost overlapped with that of the blank control, and there were no statistically significant differences among the four treatments from day 0 to day 7, regardless of generation. Moreover, the Cry1Ca content in the culture medium and in C. pyrenoidosa sharply decreased under exposure of 1000 µg/L Cry1Ca with high initial C. pyrenoidosa cell density. The above results demonstrate that Cry1Ca in water can be rapidly adsorbed and degraded by C. pyrenoidosa, but it has no suppressive or stimulative effect on algae growth. PMID:24836871

  2. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved. PMID:24957995

  3. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  4. Diatom Community Response to Global Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, W. F.; Rose, J.; Langley, J. A.; Coyne, K. J.

    2008-12-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous components of marine and freshwater environments and are responsible for nearly a quarter of the world's primary production. These microscopic algae are excellent indicators of environmental change and are routinely used as indicators of water quality. Diatom frustules have also been used to infer past climate change. With anticipated increases in atmospheric CO2 and eutrophication, understanding the contribution by diatoms as sinks for carbon in the world's oceans and estuaries is crucial. Benthic diatoms are especially significant in this respect due to their interactions with both atmospheric and sedimentary carbon cycling. We investigated changes in marsh sediment diatom community structure in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and nitrogen input. Twenty plots of brackish marsh were enclosed in environmental chambers and exposed to two levels of atmospheric CO2 (ambient and elevated) crossed with a nitrogen-addition treatment (2 x 2 factorial) beginning in May 2006. DNA was extracted from sediment samples obtained from environmentally controlled marsh plots in June, 2008. Using diatom-specific primers, the diatom community was amplified by PCR and evaluated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The diatom community composition was then compared across the four treatments (Amb, Amb+N, Elev, Elev+N) using multivariate statistical methods. Multidimensional scaling plots revealed clear grouping of samples according to treatment. A global analysis of similarity test was significant, as were all pairwise comparisons of treatments. The greatest changes in community structure occurred in the elevated CO2 group. In contrast, Amb+N was more similar to Elev+N, suggesting that nitrogen effects may mask elevated CO2 effects on diatom community structure in these plots.

  5. Evolution and Functional Diversification of Fructose Bisphosphate Aldolase Genes in Photosynthetic Marine Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew E.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Montsant, Anton; Eckert, Angelika; Kroth, Peter G.; Bowler, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms and other chlorophyll-c containing, or chromalveolate, algae are among the most productive and diverse phytoplankton in the ocean. Evolutionarily, chlorophyll-c algae are linked through common, although not necessarily monophyletic, acquisition of plastid endosymbionts of red as well as most likely green algal origin. There is also strong evidence for a relatively high level of lineage-specific bacterial gene acquisition within chromalveolates. Therefore, analyses of gene content and derivation in chromalveolate taxa have indicated particularly diverse origins of their overall gene repertoire. As a single group of functionally related enzymes spanning two distinct gene families, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) illustrate the influence on core biochemical pathways of specific evolutionary associations among diatoms and other chromalveolates with various plastid-bearing and bacterial endosymbionts. Protein localization and activity, gene expression, and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum contains five FBA genes with very little overall functional overlap. Three P. tricornutum FBAs, one class I and two class II, are plastid localized, and each appears to have a distinct evolutionary origin as well as function. Class I plastid FBA appears to have been acquired by chromalveolates from a red algal endosymbiont, whereas one copy of class II plastid FBA is likely to have originated from an ancient green algal endosymbiont. The other copy appears to be the result of a chromalveolate-specific gene duplication. Plastid FBA I and chromalveolate-specific class II plastid FBA are localized in the pyrenoid region of the chloroplast where they are associated with ?-carbonic anhydrase, which is known to play a significant role in regulation of the diatom carbon concentrating mechanism. The two pyrenoid-associated FBAs are distinguished by contrasting gene expression profiles under nutrient limiting compared with optimal CO2 fixation conditions, suggestive of a distinct specialized function for each. Cytosolically localized FBAs in P. tricornutum likely play a role in glycolysis and cytoskeleton function and seem to have originated from the stramenopile host cell and from diatom-specific bacterial gene transfer, respectively. PMID:21903677

  6. The leaves of green plants as well as a cyanobacterium, a red alga, and fungi contain insulin-like antigens.

    PubMed

    Silva, L B; Santos, S S S; Azevedo, C R; Cruz, M A L; Venâncio, T M; Cavalcante, C P; Uchôa, A F; Astolfi Filho, S; Oliveira, A E A; Fernandes, K V S; Xavier-Filho, J

    2002-03-01

    We report the detection of insulin-like antigens in a large range of species utilizing a modified ELISA plate assay and Western blotting. We tested the leaves or aerial parts of species of Rhodophyta (red alga), Bryophyta (mosses), Psilophyta (whisk ferns), Lycopodophyta (club mosses), Sphenopsida (horsetails), gymnosperms, and angiosperms, including monocots and dicots. We also studied species of fungi and a cyanobacterium, Spirulina maxima. The wide distribution of insulin-like antigens, which in some cases present the same electrophoretic mobility as bovine insulin, together with results recently published by us on the amino acid sequence of an insulin isolated from the seed coat of jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis) and from the developing fruits of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), suggests that pathways depending on this hormone have been conserved through evolution. PMID:11887207

  7. Validation of Polytomella piriformis nomen nudum (Chlamydomonadaceae): a Distinct Lineage Within a Genus of Nonphotosynthetic Green Algae.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shelley M; Lee, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Polytomella strain SAG 63-10 was first described by Pringsheim (1963) as Polytomella piriformis nomen nudum. The current study validates the name Polytomella piriformis following the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN). We present 18S rRNA sequences of SAG 63-10 and several other Polytomella strains, which, along with existing mitochondrial DNA sequences, clearly distinguishes P. piriformis n. sp. from other available Polytomella species. The first type material of the species is presented, as well as an illustration and micrographs. Our own observations of P. piriformis SAG 63-10 are compared to Pringsheim's description and to descriptions of other valid Polytomella spp. PMID:26047054

  8. Aureochrome 1a Is Involved in the Photoacclimation of the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Jungandreas, Anne; Bartulos, Carolina Rio; Gruber, Ansgar; Jakob, Torsten; Kroth, Peter G.; Wilhelm, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Aureochromes constitute a family of blue light (BL) receptors which are found exclusively in heterokont algae such as diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) and yellow-green algae (Xanthophyceae). Previous studies on the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum indicate that the formation of a high light acclimated phenotype is mediated by the absorption of BL and that aureochromes might play an important role in this process. P. tricornutum possesses four genes encoding aureochromes. In this study we confirm the nuclear localisation of the PtAUREO1a, 1b and 2 proteins. Furthermore we studied the physiology of light quality acclimation in genetically transformed P. tricornutum cell lines with reduced expression of the aureochrome 1a gene. The results demonstrate that the AUREO1a protein has a distinct function in light acclimation. However, rather unexpectedly AUREO1a seems to repress high light acclimation which resulted in a state of ‘hyper’ high light acclimation in aureo1a silenced strains. This was indicated by characteristic changes of several photosynthetic parameters, including increased maximum photosynthesis rates, decreased chlorophyll a contents per cell and increased values of non-photochemical quenching in AUREO1a silenced strains compared to wild type cultures. Strikingly, AUREO1a silenced strains exhibited phenotypic differences compared to wild type cells during cultivation under BL as well as under red light (RL) conditions. Therefore, AUREO1a might influence the RL signalling process, suggesting an interaction of AUREO1a with RL perception pathways. PMID:24073211

  9. The Physiological Response of Two Green Calcifying Algae from the Great Barrier Reef towards High Dissolved Inorganic and Organic Carbon (DIC and DOC) Availability

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Friedrich Wilhelm; Vogel, Nikolas; Teichberg, Mirta; Uthicke, Sven; Wild, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Increasing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations associated with ocean acidification can affect marine calcifiers, but local factors, such as high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations through sewage and algal blooms, may interact with this global factor. For calcifying green algae of the genus Halimeda, a key tropical carbonate producer that often occurs in coral reefs, no studies on these interactions have been reported. These data are however urgently needed to understand future carbonate production. Thus, we investigated the independent and combined effects of DIC (pCO2 402 ?atm/ pHtot 8.0 and 996 ?atm/ pHtot 7.7) and DOC (added as glucose in 0 and 294 ?mol L-1) on growth, calcification and photosynthesis of H. macroloba and H. opuntia from the Great Barrier Reef in an incubation experiment over 16 days. High DIC concentrations significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 130 % and led to net dissolution, but did not affect H. macroloba. High DOC concentrations significantly reduced daily oxygen production of H. opuntia and H. macroloba by 78 % and 43 %, respectively, and significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 70%. Combined high DIC and DOC did not show any interactive effects for both algae, but revealed additive effects for H. opuntia where the combination of both factors reduced dark calcification by 162 % compared to controls. Such species-specific differences in treatment responses indicate H. opuntia is more susceptible to a combination of high DIC and DOC than H. macroloba. From an ecological perspective, results further suggest a reduction of primary production for Halimeda-dominated benthic reef communities under high DOC concentrations and additional decreases of carbonate accretion under elevated DIC concentrations, where H. opuntia dominates the benthic community. This may reduce biogenic carbonate sedimentation rates and hence the buffering capacity against further ocean acidification. PMID:26267650

  10. The physiological response of two green calcifying algae from the Great Barrier Reef towards high dissolved inorganic and organic carbon (DIC and DOC) availability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Friedrich Wilhelm; Vogel, Nikolas; Teichberg, Mirta; Uthicke, Sven; Wild, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Increasing dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations associated with ocean acidification can affect marine calcifiers, but local factors, such as high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations through sewage and algal blooms, may interact with this global factor. For calcifying green algae of the genus Halimeda, a key tropical carbonate producer that often occurs in coral reefs, no studies on these interactions have been reported. These data are however urgently needed to understand future carbonate production. Thus, we investigated the independent and combined effects of DIC (pCO2 402 ?atm/ pHtot 8.0 and 996 ?atm/ pHtot 7.7) and DOC (added as glucose in 0 and 294 ?mol L-1) on growth, calcification and photosynthesis of H. macroloba and H. opuntia from the Great Barrier Reef in an incubation experiment over 16 days. High DIC concentrations significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 130 % and led to net dissolution, but did not affect H. macroloba. High DOC concentrations significantly reduced daily oxygen production of H. opuntia and H. macroloba by 78 % and 43 %, respectively, and significantly reduced dark calcification of H. opuntia by 70%. Combined high DIC and DOC did not show any interactive effects for both algae, but revealed additive effects for H. opuntia where the combination of both factors reduced dark calcification by 162 % compared to controls. Such species-specific differences in treatment responses indicate H. opuntia is more susceptible to a combination of high DIC and DOC than H. macroloba. From an ecological perspective, results further suggest a reduction of primary production for Halimeda-dominated benthic reef communities under high DOC concentrations and additional decreases of carbonate accretion under elevated DIC concentrations, where H. opuntia dominates the benthic community. This may reduce biogenic carbonate sedimentation rates and hence the buffering capacity against further ocean acidification. PMID:26267650

  11. Characterization of thylakoid membrane in a heterocystous cyanobacterium and green alga with dual-detector fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with a systematic change of incident laser power.

    PubMed

    Nozue, Shuho; Mukuno, Akira; Tsuda, Yumi; Shiina, Takashi; Terazima, Masahide; Kumazaki, Shigeichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been applied to plants, algae and cyanobacteria, in which excitation laser conditions affect the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime due to several mechanisms. However, the dependence of FLIM data on input laser power has not been quantitatively explained by absolute excitation probabilities under actual imaging conditions. In an effort to distinguish between photosystem I and photosystem II (PSI and PSII) in microscopic images, we have obtained dependence of FLIM data on input laser power from a filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis and single cellular green alga Parachlorella kessleri. Nitrogen-fixing cells in A. variabilis, heterocysts, are mostly visualized as cells in which short-lived fluorescence (?0.1ns) characteristic of PSI is predominant. The other cells in A. variabilis (vegetative cells) and P. kessleri cells show a transition in the status of PSII from an open state with the maximal charge separation rate at a weak excitation limit to a closed state in which charge separation is temporarily prohibited by previous excitation(s) at a relatively high laser power. This transition is successfully reproduced by a computer simulation with a high fidelity to the actual imaging conditions. More details in the fluorescence from heterocysts were examined to assess possible functions of PSII in the anaerobic environment inside the heterocysts for the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, nitrogenase. Photochemically active PSII:PSI ratio in heterocysts is tentatively estimated to be typically below our detection limit or at most about 5% in limited heterocysts in comparison with that in vegetative cells. PMID:26474523

  12. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae

    E-print Network

    Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae Matthew D. Herron1 , Jeremiah-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution occurred dozens of times independently, for example in the red algae, brown algae, land plants, animals

  13. A lycopene ?-cyclase/lycopene ?-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce ?-carotene and ?-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as ?-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene ?-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ?-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of ?-carotene and ?-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the ?-carotene-to-?-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids ?-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi. PMID:25759133

  14. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species

    E-print Network

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and species Zhaohui Abstract Five species of freshwater green algae, including three strains of Botryococcus braunii (two in the algae, including alkadienes, botryococcenes, heptadecenes, fatty acids, and phytadiene, were measured

  15. [Computational analysis of a cys-loop ligand gated ion channel from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii].

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Plants possess several neurotransmitters with well-known physiological roles. Currently only receptors for glutamate were reported to be found in plants, while receptors for acetylcholine, serotonin and GABA have not yet been reported. In animals, these neurotransmitters act via one class of ligand binding ion channels called Cys-loop receptors which play a major role in fast synaptic transmission. They show the presence of two domains namely Neurotransmitter-gated ion-channel ligand-binding domain (Pfam: PF02931) and Neurotransmitter-gated transmembrane domain (Pfam: PF02932). Cys-loop receptors are also known in prokaryotes. No cys-loop receptor has been characterized from plants yet. In this study, the Ensembl plants database was searched for proteins with these two domains in the sequenced plant genomes, what resulted in only one protein (LIC1) from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. BLAST and profile HMM searches against the pdb structure database showed that this protein is related to animal and prokaryotic cys-loop receptors, although the cysteine residues characteristic of the cys-loop are absent. Physico-chemical and sequence analysis indicate that LIC1 is an anionic receptor. A model of this protein was generated using homology modeling based on a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo marmorata. The characteristic extracellular domain (ECD) and transmembrane domain (TMD) are well structured but the intercellular region is poorly formed. This is the first report on a detailed characterization of a cys-loop receptor from the plant kingdom. PMID:26510602

  16. Azoxystrobin-induced excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of photosynthesis in the unicellular green algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Gao-Xue

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the short-term toxicity of azoxystrobin (AZ), one of strobilurins used as an effective fungicidal agent to control the Asian soybean rust, on aquatic unicellular algae Chlorella vulgaris. The median percentile inhibition concentration (IC??) of AZ for C. vulgaris was found to be 510 ?g L(-1). We showed that the algal cells were obviously depressed or shrunk in 300 and 600 ?g L(-1) AZ treatments by using the electron microscopy. Furthermore, 19, 75, and 300 ?g L(-1) AZ treatments decreased the soluble protein content and chlorophyll concentrations in C. vulgaris and altered the energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expression levels in 48- and 96-h exposure periods. Simultaneously, our results showed that AZ could increase the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and compromise superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), glutathione S transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and glutathione (GSH) content. These situations might render C. vulgaris more vulnerable to oxidative damage. Overall, the present study indicated that AZ might be toxic to the growth of C. vulgaris, affect energy-photosynthesis-related mRNA expressions, and induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in C. vulgaris. PMID:25672875

  17. Metagenome changes in the mesophilic biogas-producing community during fermentation of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Roland; Lakatos, Gergely; Böjti, Tamás; Maróti, Gergely; Bagi, Zoltán; Kis, Mihály; Kovács, Attila; Ács, Norbert; Rákhely, Gábor; Kovács, Kornél L

    2015-12-10

    A microalgal biomass offers a potential alternative to the maize silage commonly used in biogas technology. In this study, photoautotrophically grown Scenedesmus obliquus was used as biogas substrate. This microalga has a low C/N ratio of 8.5 relative to the optimum 20-30. A significant increase in the ammonium ion content was not observed. The methane content of the biogas generated from Sc. obliquus proved to be higher than that from maize silage, but the specific biogas yield was lower. Semi-continuous steady biogas production lasted for 2 months. Because of the thick cell wall of Sc. obliquus, the biomass-degrading microorganisms require additional time to digest its biomass. The methane concentration in the biogas was also high, in co-digestion (i.e., 52-56%) as in alga-fed anaerobic digestion (i.e., 55-62%). These results may be related to the relative predominance of the order Clostridiales in co-digestion and to the more balanced C/N ratio of the mixed algal-maize biomass. Predominance of the order Methanosarcinales was observed in the domain Archaea, which supported the diversity of metabolic pathways in the process. PMID:26087313

  18. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using marine algae Caulerpa racemosa and their antibacterial activity against some human pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathiraven, T.; Sundaramanickam, A.; Shanmugam, N.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2015-04-01

    We present the synthesis and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles using Caulerpa racemosa, a marine algae. Fresh C. racemosa was collected from the Gulf of Mannar, Southeast coast of India. The seaweed extract was used for the synthesis of AgNO3 at room temperature. UV-visible spectrometry study revealed surface plasmon resonance at 413 nm. The characterization of silver nanoparticle was carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). FT-IR measurements revealed the possible functional groups responsible for reduction and stabilization of the nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the particles were crystalline in nature with face-centered cubic geometry.TEM micrograph has shown the formation of silver nanoparticles with the size in the range of 5-25 nm. The synthesized AgNPs have shown the best antibacterial activity against human pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis. The above eco-friendly synthesis procedure of AgNPs could be easily scaled up in future for the industrial and therapeutic needs.

  19. Lipid content and fatty acid composition of green algae Scenedesmus obliquus grown in a constant cell density apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, K. J.; Nakhost, Z.; Barzana, E.; Karel, M.

    1987-01-01

    The lipids of alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown under controlled conditions were separated and fractionated by column and thin-layer chromatography, and fatty acid composition of each lipid component was studied by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). Total lipids were 11.17%, and neutral lipid, glycolipid and phospholipid fractions were 7.24%, 2.45% and 1.48% on a dry weight basis, respectively. The major neutral lipids were diglycerides, triglycerides, free sterols, hydrocarbons and sterol esters. The glycolipids were: monogalactosyl diglyceride, digalactosyl diglyceride, esterified sterol glycoside, and sterol glycoside. The phospholipids included: phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl ethanolamine. Fourteen fatty acids were identified in the four lipid fractions by GLC. The main fatty acids were C18:2, C16:0, C18:3(alpha), C18:1, C16:3, C16:1, and C16:4. Total unsaturated fatty acid and essential fatty acid compositions of the total algal lipids were 80% and 38%, respectively.

  20. RNAi knock-down of LHCBM1, 2 and 3 increases photosynthetic H2 production efficiency of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Oey, Melanie; Ross, Ian L; Stephens, Evan; Steinbeck, Janina; Wolf, Juliane; Radzun, Khairul Adzfa; Kügler, Johannes; Ringsmuth, Andrew K; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Single cell green algae (microalgae) are rapidly emerging as a platform for the production of sustainable fuels. Solar-driven H2 production from H2O theoretically provides the highest-efficiency route to fuel production in microalgae. This is because the H2-producing hydrogenase (HYDA) is directly coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain, thereby eliminating downstream energetic losses associated with the synthesis of carbohydrate and oils (feedstocks for methane, ethanol and oil-based fuels). Here we report the simultaneous knock-down of three light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCMB1, 2 and 3) in the high H2-producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant Stm6Glc4 using an RNAi triple knock-down strategy. The resultant Stm6Glc4L01 mutant exhibited a light green phenotype, reduced expression of LHCBM1 (20.6% ±0.27%), LHCBM2 (81.2% ±0.037%) and LHCBM3 (41.4% ±0.05%) compared to 100% control levels, and improved light to H2 (180%) and biomass (165%) conversion efficiencies. The improved H2 production efficiency was achieved at increased solar flux densities (450 instead of ?100 µE m(-2) s(-1)) and high cell densities which are best suited for microalgae production as light is ideally the limiting factor. Our data suggests that the overall improved photon-to-H2 conversion efficiency is due to: 1) reduced loss of absorbed energy by non-photochemical quenching (fluorescence and heat losses) near the photobioreactor surface; 2) improved light distribution in the reactor; 3) reduced photoinhibition; 4) early onset of HYDA expression and 5) reduction of O2-induced inhibition of HYDA. The Stm6Glc4L01 phenotype therefore provides important insights for the development of high-efficiency photobiological H2 production systems. PMID:23613840

  1. RNAi Knock-Down of LHCBM1, 2 and 3 Increases Photosynthetic H2 Production Efficiency of the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Oey, Melanie; Ross, Ian L.; Stephens, Evan; Steinbeck, Janina; Wolf, Juliane; Radzun, Khairul Adzfa; Kügler, Johannes; Ringsmuth, Andrew K.; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Single cell green algae (microalgae) are rapidly emerging as a platform for the production of sustainable fuels. Solar-driven H2 production from H2O theoretically provides the highest-efficiency route to fuel production in microalgae. This is because the H2-producing hydrogenase (HYDA) is directly coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain, thereby eliminating downstream energetic losses associated with the synthesis of carbohydrate and oils (feedstocks for methane, ethanol and oil-based fuels). Here we report the simultaneous knock-down of three light-harvesting complex proteins (LHCMB1, 2 and 3) in the high H2-producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant Stm6Glc4 using an RNAi triple knock-down strategy. The resultant Stm6Glc4L01 mutant exhibited a light green phenotype, reduced expression of LHCBM1 (20.6% ±0.27%), LHCBM2 (81.2% ±0.037%) and LHCBM3 (41.4% ±0.05%) compared to 100% control levels, and improved light to H2 (180%) and biomass (165%) conversion efficiencies. The improved H2 production efficiency was achieved at increased solar flux densities (450 instead of ?100 µE m?2 s?1) and high cell densities which are best suited for microalgae production as light is ideally the limiting factor. Our data suggests that the overall improved photon-to-H2 conversion efficiency is due to: 1) reduced loss of absorbed energy by non-photochemical quenching (fluorescence and heat losses) near the photobioreactor surface; 2) improved light distribution in the reactor; 3) reduced photoinhibition; 4) early onset of HYDA expression and 5) reduction of O2-induced inhibition of HYDA. The Stm6Glc4L01 phenotype therefore provides important insights for the development of high-efficiency photobiological H2 production systems. PMID:23613840

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on diatom biosilica photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Fanghui; Campbell, Jeremy; Hasan, Dihan; Wang, Xiangyu; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Wang, Alan X.

    Diatoms are a group of single-celled photosynthetic algae that make skeletal shells of hydrated amorphous silica, called frustules, which possess hierarchical nanoscale photonic crystal features made by a bottom-up approach at ambient temperature and pressure. In this paper, we theoretically investigate electric field enhancements of plasmonic nanoparticles coated on the surface of diatom skeletal shells. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering substrates are prepared by evaporating 10 nm thick silver film and self-assembling silver nanoparticles on diatom surfaces, which show significantly better SERS signals than silver nanoparticles on flat glass substrates.

  3. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Bogumil J.; Diner, Rachel E.; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P.R.; Noddings, Chari M.; Brunson, John K.; Valas, Ruben E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T.F.; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H.; Glass, John I.; Hutchison III, Clyde A.; Smith, Hamilton O.; Venter, J. Craig; Allen, Andrew E.; Dupont, Christopher L.; Weyman, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research. PMID:25897682

  4. Characterization of a nitric oxide synthase from the plant kingdom: NO generation from the green alga Ostreococcus tauri is light irradiance and growth phase dependent.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; Parisi, Gustavo; Caló, Gonzalo; Salerno, Graciela; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2010-11-01

    The search for a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) sequence in the plant kingdom yielded two sequences from the recently published genomes of two green algae species of the Ostreococcus genus, O. tauri and O. lucimarinus. In this study, we characterized the sequence, protein structure, phylogeny, biochemistry, and expression of NOS from O. tauri. The amino acid sequence of O. tauri NOS was found to be 45% similar to that of human NOS. Folding assignment methods showed that O. tauri NOS can fold as the human endothelial NOS isoform. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that O. tauri NOS clusters together with putative NOS sequences of a Synechoccocus sp strain and Physarum polycephalum. This cluster appears as an outgroup of NOS representatives from metazoa. Purified recombinant O. tauri NOS has a K(m) for the substrate l-Arg of 12 ± 5 ?M. Escherichia coli cells expressing recombinant O. tauri NOS have increased levels of NO and cell viability. O. tauri cultures in the exponential growth phase produce 3-fold more NOS-dependent NO than do those in the stationary phase. In O. tauri, NO production increases in high intensity light irradiation and upon addition of l-Arg, suggesting a link between NOS activity and microalgal physiology. PMID:21119059

  5. Evaluation and selection of reference genes for ecotoxicogenomic study of the green alga Closterium ehrenbergii using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ah; Guo, Ruoyu; Ebenezer, Vinitha; Ki, Jang-Seu

    2015-05-01

    The green alga Closterium ehrenbergii occurs in fresh water environments and has been suggested as a model for ecotoxicological assessment. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), with its high sensitivity and specificity, is a preferred method for reliable quantification of gene expression levels. qRT-PCR requires reference genes to normalize the transcription level of the target gene, and selection of appropriate references is crucial. Here, we evaluated nine housekeeping genes, that is, 18S rRNA, ACT, TUA, TUB, eIF, H4, UBQ, rps4, and GAPDH, using 34 RNA samples of C. ehrenbergii cultured in various environments (e.g. exposure to heat shock, UV, metals, and non-metallic chemicals). Each housekeeping gene tested displayed different ranges of C T values for each experimental condition. The gene stability was determined using the descriptive statistic software geNorm, which showed that ACT, H4, and TUA were the most suitable reference genes for all the conditions tested. In addition, at least three genes were required for proper normalization. With these references, we assessed the expression level of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene in C. ehrenbergii cells exposed to thermal and toxic contaminant stress and found that it was significantly up-regulated by these stressors. This study provides potential reference genes for gene expression studies on C. ehrenbergii with qRT-PCR. PMID:25724346

  6. Stable transformation and reverse genetic analysis of Penium margaritaceum: a platform for studies of charophyte green algae, the immediate ancestors of land plants.

    PubMed

    Sřrensen, Iben; Fei, Zhangjun; Andreas, Amanda; Willats, William G T; Domozych, David S; Rose, Jocelyn K C

    2014-02-01

    The charophyte green algae (CGA, Streptophyta, Viridiplantae) occupy a key phylogenetic position as the immediate ancestors of land plants but, paradoxically, are less well-studied than the other major plant lineages. This is particularly true in the context of functional genomic studies, where the lack of an efficient protocol for their stable genetic transformation has been a major obstacle. Observations of extant CGA species suggest the existence of some of the evolutionary adaptations that had to occur for land colonization; however, to date, there has been no robust experimental platform to address this genetically. We present a protocol for high-throughput Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of Penium margaritaceum, a unicellular CGA species. The versatility of Penium as a model for studying various aspects of plant cell biology and development was illustrated through non-invasive visualization of protein localization and dynamics in living cells. In addition, the utility of RNA interference (RNAi) for reverse genetic studies was demonstrated by targeting genes associated with cell wall modification (pectin methylesterase) and biosynthesis (cellulose synthase). This provided evidence supporting current models of cell wall assembly and inter-polymer interactions that were based on studies of land plants, but in this case using direct observation in vivo. This new functional genomics platform has broad potential applications, including studies of plant organismal biology and the evolutionary innovations required for transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. PMID:24308430

  7. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in muticellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation. PMID:25874475

  8. Artificial microRNA-mediated knockdown of pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1) provides evidence for an active 3-hydroxybutyrate production pathway in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Steven J; Tredwell, Gregory; Molnŕr, Attila; Bundy, Jacob G; Nixon, Peter J

    2012-11-30

    Artificial microRNA technology was investigated as a means of down regulating metabolic pathways in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, targeting pyruvate formate lyase (PFL1), which catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and formate during anoxic conditions. Two transformants with an 80-90% reduction in target protein and mRNA levels were identified. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed a substantial decrease in the production of formate in the knockdown lines during dark anoxic conditions and a re-routing of metabolism leading to enhanced production of ethanol and lactate. Under microaerobic conditions in the light, induced by sulphur-deprivation, knock-down of PFL1 resulted in reduced formate and ethanol production, increased net consumption of acetate and the excretion of lactate but no increase in the production of hydrogen. In addition the production of 3-hydroxybutyrate was identified in knock-down line cultures during the transition between microaerobic and anoxic conditions. Overall our results indicate that microRNA knock-down is a useful tool to manipulate anaerobic metabolism in C. reinhardtii. PMID:22687249

  9. RuBP limitation of photosynthetic carbon fixation during NH sub 3 assimilation: Interactions between photosynthesis, respiration, and ammonium assimilation in N-limited green algae

    SciTech Connect

    Elrifi, I.R.; Holmes, J.J.; Weger, H.G.; Mayo, W.P.; Turpin, D.H. )

    1988-06-01

    The effects of ammonium assimilation on photosynthetic carbon fixation and O{sub 2} exchange were examined in two species of N-limited green algae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum minutum. Under light-saturating conditions, ammonium assimilation resulted in a suppression of photosynthetic carbon fixation by S. minutum but not by C. pyrenoidosa. These different responses are due to different relationships between cellular ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) concentration and the RuBP binding site density of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a decrease in RuBP concentration. In S. minutum the concentration fell below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco, indicating RuBP limitation of carboxylation. In contrast, RuBP concentration remained above the binding site density in C. pyrenoidosa. Compromising RuBP regeneration in C. pyrenoidosa with low light resulted in an ammonium-induced decrease in RuBP concentration below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco. This resulted in a decrease in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a larger decrease in net O{sub 2} evolution than in carbon fixation. Mass spectrometric analysis shows this to be a result of an increase in the rate of mitochondrial respiration in the light.

  10. Testing Prospects for Reliable Diatom Nanotechnology in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Richard; Hoover, Richard B.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; deLuis, Javier; Camp, Philip J.; Tiffany, Mary Ann; Nagy, Stephen S.; Lerner, Beatriz E.

    2007-01-01

    The worldwide effort to grow nanotechnology, rather than use lithography, focuses on diatoms, single cell eukaryotic algae with ornate silica shells, which can be replaced by oxides and ceramics, or reduced to elemental silicon, to create complex nanostructures with compositions of industrial and electronics importance. Diatoms produce an enormous variety of structures, some of which are microtubule dependent and perhaps sensitive to microgravity. The NASA Single Loop for Cell Culture (SLCC) for culturing and observing microorganisms permits inexpensive, low labor in-space experiments. We propose to send up to the International Space Station diatom cultures of the three diatom species whose genomes are being sequenced, plus the giant diatoms of Antarctica (up to 2 mm diameter for a single cell) and the unique colonial diatom, Bacillaria paradoxa. Bacillaria cells move against each other in partial synchrony, like a sliding deck of cards, by a microfluidics mechanism. Will normal diatoms have aberrant pattern and shape or motility compared to ground controls? The generation time is typically one day, so that many generations may be examined from one flight. Rapid, directed evolution may be possible running the SLCC as a compustat. The shell shapes and patterns are preserved in hard silica, so that the progress of normal and aberrant morphogenesis may be followed by drying samples on a moving filter paper "diatom tape recorder". With a biodiversity of 100,000 distinct species, diatom nanotechnology may offer a compact and portable nanotechnology toolkit for exploration anywhere.

  11. Isolation and biochemical characterization of underwater adhesives from diatoms.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils; Harrington, Matthew J; Brunner, Eike; Paasch, Silvia; Buhmann, Matthias T

    2014-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms are able to colonize surfaces through the secretion of underwater adhesives. Diatoms are unicellular algae that have the capability to colonize any natural and man-made submerged surfaces. There is great technological interest in both mimicking and preventing diatom adhesion, yet the biomolecules responsible have so far remained unidentified. A new method for the isolation of diatom adhesive material is described and its amino acid and carbohydrate composition determined. The adhesive materials from two model diatoms show differences in their amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but also share characteristic features including a high content of uronic acids, the predominance of hydrophilic amino acid residues, and the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyproline, an extremely rare amino acid. Proteins containing dihydroxyphenylalanine, which mediate underwater adhesion of mussels, are absent. The data on the composition of diatom adhesives are consistent with an adhesion mechanism based on complex coacervation of polyelectrolyte-like biomolecules. PMID:24689803

  12. Nitrogen Limitation and Slow Drying Induce Desiccation Tolerance in Conjugating Green Algae (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta) from Polar Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Pichrtová, Martina; Kulichová, Jana; Holzinger, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background Filamentous Zygnematophyceae are typical components of algal mats in the polar hydro-terrestrial environment. Under field conditions, they form senescent vegetative cells, designated as pre-akinetes, which are tolerant to desiccation and osmotic stress. Key Findings Pre-akinete formation and desiccation tolerance was investigated experimentally under monitored laboratory conditions in four strains of Arctic and Antarctic isolates with vegetative Zygnema sp. morphology. Phylogenetic analyses of rbcL sequences revealed one Arctic strain as genus Zygnemopsis, phylogenetically distant from the closely related Zygnema strains. Algae were cultivated in liquid or on solidified medium (9 weeks), supplemented with or lacking nitrogen. Nitrogen-free cultures (liquid as well as solidified) consisted of well-developed pre-akinetes after this period. Desiccation experiments were performed at three different drying rates (rapid: 10% relative humidity, slow: 86% rh and very slow); viability, effective quantum yield of PS II, visual and ultrastructural changes were monitored. Recovery and viability of pre-akinetes were clearly dependent on the drying rate: slower desiccation led to higher levels of survival. Pre-akinetes survived rapid drying after acclimation by very slow desiccation. Conclusions The formation of pre-akinetes in polar Zygnema spp. and Zygnemopsis sp. is induced by nitrogen limitation. Pre-akinetes, modified vegetative cells, rather than specialized stages of the life cycle, can be hardened by mild desiccation stress to survive rapid drying. Naturally hardened pre-akinetes play a key role in stress tolerance and dispersal under the extreme conditions of polar regions, where sexual reproduction and production of dormant stages is largely suppressed. PMID:25398135

  13. Copepod Population-Specific Response to a Toxic Diatom Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lauritano, Chiara; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Miralto, Antonio; Procaccini, Gabriele; Ianora, Adrianna

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are key phytoplankton organisms and one of the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. However, many diatom species produce a series of secondary metabolites, collectively termed oxylipins, that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers, such as copepods, that feed on these unicellular algae. We hypothesized that different populations of copepods may deal differently with the same oxylipin-producing diatom diet. Here we provide comparative studies of expression level analyses of selected genes of interest for three Calanus helgolandicus populations (North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea) exposed to the same strain of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi using as control algae the flagellate Rhodomonas baltica. Expression levels of detoxification enzymes and stress proteins (e.g. glutathione S-transferase, glutathione synthase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenases and heat shock proteins) and proteins involved in apoptosis regulation and cell cycle progression were analyzed in copepods after both 24 and 48 hours of feeding on the diatom or on a control diet. Strong differences occurred among copepod populations, with the Mediterranean population of C. helgolandicus being more susceptible to the toxic diet compared to the others. This study opens new perspectives for understanding copepod population-specific responses to diatom toxins and may help in underpinning the cellular mechanisms underlying copepod toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:23056617

  14. LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    LIFETIME OF THE EXCITED STATE IN VIVO I. CHLOROPHYLL a IN ALGAE, AT ROOM AND AT LIQUID NITROGEN decay of chloro- phyll (Chl) a in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa, the red alga Porphyridium cruentum, and the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans was measured by the phase- shift method under

  15. Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects of

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    1973-01-01

    Plant & CellPhysiol. 14: 1081-1097 (1973) Photophosphorylation in intact algae: Effects alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and of the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. A few measurements in extracts from intact cells of the green alga Chlorella in the early 1950's (3, 4), few workers measured

  16. Seaweed extracts and unsaturated fatty acid constituents from the green alga Ulva lactuca as activators of the cytoprotective Nrf2–ARE pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Paul, Valerie J.; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Increased amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in many pathological conditions, including cancer. The major machinery that the cell employs to neutralize excess ROS is through the activation of the antioxidant-response element (ARE) that controls the activation of many phase II detoxification enzymes. The transcription factor that recognizes the ARE, Nrf2, can be activated by a variety of small molecules, most of which contain an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl system. In the pursuit of chemopreventive agents from marine organisms, we built, fractionated, and screened a library of 30 field-collected eukaryotic algae from Florida. An edible green alga, Ulva lactuca, yielded multiple active fractions by ARE–luciferase reporter assay. We isolated three monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivatives as active components, including a new keto-type C18 fatty acid (1), the corresponding shorter chain C16 acid (2), and an amide derivative (3) of the C18 acid. Their chemical structures were elucidated by NMR and mass spectrometry. All three contain the conjugated enone motif between C7 and C9, which is thought to be responsible for the ARE activity. Subsequent biological studies focused on 1, the most active and abundant ARE activator isolated. C18 acid 1 induced the expression of ARE-regulated cytoprotective genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase 1, thioredoxin reductase 1, both subunits of the glutamate–cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit and modifier subunit), and the cystine/glutamate exchange transporter, in IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. Its cellular activity requires the presence of Nrf2 and PI3K function, based on RNA interference and pharmacological inhibitor studies, respectively. Treatment with 1 led only to Nrf2 activation, and not the increase in production of NRF2 mRNA. To test its ARE activity and cytoprotective potential in vivo, we treated mice with a single dose of a U. lactuca fraction that was enriched with 1, which showed ARE-activating effects similar to those observed in vitro. This could be owing to this fraction's ability to stabilize Nrf2 through inhibition of Keap1-mediated Nrf2 ubiquitination and the subsequent accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. The induction of many ARE-driven antioxidant genes in vivo and most prominently in the heart agreed with the commonly recognized cardioprotective properties of MUFAs. A significant increase in Nqo1 transcript levels was also found in other mouse tissues such as the brain, lung, and stomach. Collectively, this study provides new insight into why consumption of dietary seaweed may have health benefits, and the identified compounds add to the list of chemopreventive dietary unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:23291594

  17. Seaweed extracts and unsaturated fatty acid constituents from the green alga Ulva lactuca as activators of the cytoprotective Nrf2-ARE pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Paul, Valerie J; Luesch, Hendrik

    2013-04-01

    Increased amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in many pathological conditions, including cancer. The major machinery that the cell employs to neutralize excess ROS is through the activation of the antioxidant-response element (ARE) that controls the activation of many phase II detoxification enzymes. The transcription factor that recognizes the ARE, Nrf2, can be activated by a variety of small molecules, most of which contain an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl system. In the pursuit of chemopreventive agents from marine organisms, we built, fractionated, and screened a library of 30 field-collected eukaryotic algae from Florida. An edible green alga, Ulva lactuca, yielded multiple active fractions by ARE-luciferase reporter assay. We isolated three monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) derivatives as active components, including a new keto-type C18 fatty acid (1), the corresponding shorter chain C16 acid (2), and an amide derivative (3) of the C18 acid. Their chemical structures were elucidated by NMR and mass spectrometry. All three contain the conjugated enone motif between C7 and C9, which is thought to be responsible for the ARE activity. Subsequent biological studies focused on 1, the most active and abundant ARE activator isolated. C18 acid 1 induced the expression of ARE-regulated cytoprotective genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, heme oxygenase 1, thioredoxin reductase 1, both subunits of the glutamate-cysteine ligase (catalytic subunit and modifier subunit), and the cystine/glutamate exchange transporter, in IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells. Its cellular activity requires the presence of Nrf2 and PI3K function, based on RNA interference and pharmacological inhibitor studies, respectively. Treatment with 1 led only to Nrf2 activation, and not the increase in production of NRF2 mRNA. To test its ARE activity and cytoprotective potential in vivo, we treated mice with a single dose of a U. lactuca fraction that was enriched with 1, which showed ARE-activating effects similar to those observed in vitro. This could be owing to this fraction's ability to stabilize Nrf2 through inhibition of Keap1-mediated Nrf2 ubiquitination and the subsequent accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. The induction of many ARE-driven antioxidant genes in vivo and most prominently in the heart agreed with the commonly recognized cardioprotective properties of MUFAs. A significant increase in Nqo1 transcript levels was also found in other mouse tissues such as the brain, lung, and stomach. Collectively, this study provides new insight into why consumption of dietary seaweed may have health benefits, and the identified compounds add to the list of chemopreventive dietary unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:23291594

  18. Light acclimation in diatoms: from phenomenology to mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Christian; Jungandreas, Anne; Jakob, Torsten; Goss, Reimund

    2014-08-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about light acclimation processes in diatoms. Against the background of the phenomenological description of the process in the 70s-80s, the recent progress in diatom genetics has generated new information about the underlying mechanisms. Although the general responses of diatoms to changes in the light climate are comparable to the green algal lineage, many differences in the underlying mechanisms have been observed in the last ten years, yielding clear evidence that the regulatory network in diatoms has unique traits that might explain their ecological success. PMID:24412570

  19. The Study of Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  20. Diatoms (50 Species)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Photomicrograph depicting the siliceous frustulesof fifty species of diatoms arranged within a circular shape. Diatoms form the base of many marine and aquatic food chains and upon death, their glassy frustules form sediments known as diatomaceous earth....

  1. Diatoms (50 Species)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Photomicrograph depicting the siliceous frustules of fifty species of diatoms arranged within a circular shape. Diatoms form the base of many marine and aquatic food chains and upon death, their glassy frustules form sediments known as diatomaceous earth....

  2. The effect on photosynthetic electron transport of temperature-dependent changes in the fluidity of the thylakoid membrane in a thermophilic blue-green alga.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Satoh, K; Katoh, S

    1981-05-13

    Various electron transport reactions in cell or isolated thylakoid membranes of the thermophilic blue-green alga, Synechococcus sp. were measured at different temperatures between 72 and 3 degrees C. They are classified into two groups with respect to their temperature dependency. The first group involves cytochrome 553 photooxidation, methyl viologen photoreduction with reduced 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol as electron donor and 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea-resistant ferricyanide photoreduction determined in the presence or absence of silicomolybdate. The Arrhenius plot of these reactions showed a single straight line with the activation energy of about 10 kcal/mol throughout wide temperature ranges studied. Methyl viologen photoreduction with water as electron donor, reduction of flash-oxidized cytochrome 553, ferricyanide photoreduction and photosynthetic O2 evolution form the second group. Their arrhenius plots are characterized by discontinuities or breaks at about 30 and 10 degrees C, which respectively correspond to the upper and lower boundaries of the lateral phase separation of the membrane lipids. The first group reactions represent short spans of electron transport which are mediated either by Photosystem I or Photosystem II alone and not related to plastoquinone, whereas all the reactions of the second group involve plastoquinone. It is concluded therefore that the membrane fluidity affect electron transport specifically at the region of plastoquinone. It is proposed that the reaction center chlorophyll-protein complexes of both Photosystems I and II are closely associated with related electron carrier proteins to form functional supramolecular assemblies so that electron transfer within such a cluster of proteins proceeds independently of the phase changes in the membrane lipids. On the other hand, the role of plastoquinone as a mobile electron carrier mediating electron transfer from the protein assembly of Photosystem II to that of Photosystem I through the fluid hydrophobic matrix of the membranes is highly sensitive to the physical state of the membrane lipids. PMID:6786347

  3. Effects of Long-Term Supplementation of Blue-Green Algae on Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yue; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of long-term supplementation of two blue-green algae (BGA) species, i.e., Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), on lipid metabolism in vivo. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 2.5 or 5% (wt/wt) NO or SP for 6 months. Mice fed NO and SP showed lower plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations than control at certain months during 6 month experimental period. Both BGA supplementation for 6 months significantly increased hepatic TC contents whereas SP-fed groups had significantly less TG levels in the liver compared with control and NO groups. None of BGA-fed animals showed significantly different mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression was higher in NO groups than the other groups in the liver. Furthermore, NO supplementation increased the hepatic expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1?, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 but SP did not elicit any significant changes in mRNA levels of the genes compared with control. LDLR protein level was significantly higher in NO 2.5% and SP 5%, as compared to the control and NO 5% groups; while the level of fatty acid synthase protein in the liver was significantly higher in NO 5% and SP 5%, than that in the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that long-term supplementation of NO and SP decreased plasma TC and TG concentrations. Therefore, supplementation of NO and SP may be potentially beneficial for preventing dyslipidemia-associated chronic diseases. PMID:25614902

  4. Cd2+ Toxicity to a Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as Influenced by Its Adsorption on TiO2 Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-Wan; Miao, Ai-Jun; Yang, Liu-Yan

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, Cd2+ adsorption on polyacrylate-coated TiO2 engineered nanoparticles (TiO2-ENs) and its effect on the bioavailability as well as toxicity of Cd2+ to a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were investigated. TiO2-ENs could be well dispersed in the experimental medium and their pHpzc is approximately 2. There was a quick adsorption of Cd2+ on TiO2-ENs and a steady state was reached within 30 min. A pseudo-first order kinetics was found for the time-related changes in the amount of Cd2+ complexed with TiO2-ENs. At equilibrium, Cd2+ adsorption followed the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum binding capacity 31.9, 177.1, and 242.2 mg/g when the TiO2-EN concentration was 1, 10, and 100 mg/l, respectively. On the other hand, Cd2+ toxicity was alleviated in the presence of TiO2-ENs. Algal growth was less suppressed in treatments with comparable total Cd2+ concentration but more TiO2-ENs. However, such toxicity difference disappeared and all the data points could be fitted to a single Logistic dose-response curve when cell growth inhibition was plotted against the free Cd2+ concentration. No detectable amount of TiO2-ENs was found to be associated with the algal cells. Therefore, TiO2-ENs could reduce the free Cd2+ concentration in the toxicity media, which further lowered its bioavailability and toxicity to C. reinhardtii. PMID:22403644

  5. The ferredoxin-thioredoxin system of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: identification and characterization of thioredoxins and ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huppe, H. C.; de Lamotte-Guery, F.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1990-01-01

    The components of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (FT) system of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been purified and characterized. The system resembled that of higher plants in consisting of a ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR) and two types of thioredoxin, a single f and two m species, m1 and m2. The Chlamydomonas m and f thioredoxins were antigenically similar to their higher-plant counterparts, but not to one another. The m thioredoxins were recognized by antibodies to both higher plant m and bacterial thioredoxins, whereas the thioredoxin f was not. Chlamydomonas thioredoxin f reacted, although weakly, with the antibody to spinach thioredoxin f. The algal thioredoxin f differed from thioredoxins studied previously in behaving as a basic protein on ion-exchange columns. Purification revealed that the algal thioredoxins had molecular masses (Mrs) typical of thioredoxins from other sources, m1 and m2 being 10700 and f 11500. Chlamydomonas FTR had two dissimilar subunits, a feature common to all FTRs studied thus far. One, the 13-kDa ("similar") subunit, resembled its counterpart from other sources in both size and antigenicity. The other, 10-kDa ("variable") subunit was not recognized by antibodies to any FTR tested. When combined with spinach, (Spinacia oleracea L.) thylakoid membranes, the components of the FT system functioned in the light activation of the standard target enzymes from chloroplasts, corn (Zea mays L.) NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) and spinach fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11) as well as the chloroplast-type fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase from Chlamydomonas. Activity was greatest if ferredoxin and other components of the FT system were from Chlamydomonas. The capacity of the Chlamydomonas FT system to activate autologous FBPase indicates that light regulates the photosynthetic carbon metabolism of green algae as in other oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

  6. Hypolipidemic Effect of a Blue-Green Alga (Nostoc commune) Is Attributed to Its Nonlipid Fraction by Decreasing Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption in C57BL/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chai Siah; Kim, Bohkyung; Pham, Tho X; Yang, Yue; Weller, Curtis L; Carr, Timothy P; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated that Nostoc commune var. sphaeroids Kützing (NO), a blue-green alga (BGA), exerts a hypolipidemic effect in vivo and its lipid extract regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism in vitro. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the hypolipidemic effect of NO is attributed to an algal lipid or a delipidated fraction in vivo compared with Spirulina platensis (SP). Male C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93M diet containing 2.5% or 5% of BGA (w/w) or a lipid extract equivalent to 5% of BGA for 4 weeks to measure plasma and liver lipids, hepatic gene expression, intestinal cholesterol absorption, and fecal sterol excretion. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) was significantly lower in 2.5% and 5% NO-fed groups, while plasma triglyceride (TG) levels were decreased in the 5% NO group compared with controls. However, neither NO organic extract (NOE) nor SP-fed groups altered plasma lipids. Hepatic mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1?, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 were induced in 5% NO-fed mice, while there were no significant changes in hepatic lipogenic gene expression between groups. NO, but not NOE and SP groups, significantly decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption. When HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes were incubated with NOE and SP organic extract (SPE), there were marked decreases in protein levels of HMGR, low-density lipoprotein receptor, and fatty acid synthase. In conclusion, the nonlipid fraction of NO exerts TC and TG-lowering effects primarily by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption and by increasing hepatic fatty acid oxidation, respectively. PMID:26161942

  7. FLUORESCENCE QUENCHING AND THE DIADINOXANTHIN CYCLE IN A MARINE DIATOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diadinoxanthin cycle (DD-cycle) in chromophyta algae involves the interconversion of two carotenoids, diadinoxanthin (DD) and diatoxanthin (DT). e investigated the kinetics of light-induced DD-cycling in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum triconutum and its role in dissipating e...

  8. Seasonal fluctuations of Lake Michigan diatoms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, Ruth E.

    1969-01-01

    Diatoms were collected in four areas of Lake Michigan and in southern Green Bay from April to early November 1965. The flora of the lake was characterized by Fragilaria crotonensis, Tabellaria flocculosa, Melosira islandica, Cyclotella 'glomerata-stelligera,' Cyclotella michiganiana, Asterionella formosa, and Stephanodiscus tenuis. Stephanodiscus niagarae always dominated the diatom biomass in Green Bay; also characteristic of the bay were Melosira granulata, Melosira ambigua, Melosira binderana, Fragilaria capucina, and Fragilaria crotonensis. There was an average of 517 diatoms per ml in the lake and 944 in the bay. Diatom abundance appeared to have one peak in the lake and two in the bay. At times of maximum abundance, optimum depth was usually 5 m. Numbers were greater in Green Bay and the inshore areas than in the offshore areas and appreciably higher near the eastern shore than the western shore of the lake. The higher populations near the eastern shore and in Green Bay appeared to be correlated with higher concentrations of phosphorus and chlorophyll a and lower concentrations of nitrate-N.

  9. Stochastic Forecasting of Algae Blooms in Lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2013-01-15

    We consider the development of harmful algae blooms (HABs) in a lake with uncertain nutrients inflow. Two general frameworks, Fokker-Planck equation and the PDF methods, are developed to quantify the resultant concentration uncertainty of various algae groups, via deriving a deterministic equation of their joint probability density function (PDF). A computational example is examined to study the evolution of cyanobacteria (the blue-green algae) and the impacts of initial concentration and inflow-outflow ratio.

  10. Gene discovery and expression profiling in the toxin-producing marine diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (Hasle) Hasle

    E-print Network

    Boissonneault, Katie Rose, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Toxic algae are a growing concern in the marine environment. One unique marine diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (Hasle) Hasle, produces the neurotoxin domoic acid, which is the cause of amnesic shellfish poisoning. The ...

  11. Palaeolimnological conditions inferred from fossil diatom assemblages and derivative spectral properties of sediments in thermokarst ponds of

    E-print Network

    /prokaryotic algae ratio and anoxia or hypoxia in bottom waters; and (iii) limonite (iron oxide) and redox conditions revealed similar trends between (i) opal (amorphous silica) and diatom abundances; (ii) eukaryotic

  12. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  13. Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad

    E-print Network

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Gille-STPA 35 1 Noxious Algae in Carlsbad Spanish explorers of this region came across a lagoon Woodfield Dubbed "killer algae," the alien seaweed Caulerpa taxifolia was discovered in June 2000. Caulerpa taxifolia is a green alga native to tropical waters that typically grows to small size

  14. [Accumulation of polycyclic arenes in Baltic Sea algae].

    PubMed

    Veldre, I A; Itra, A R; Paal'me, L P; Kukk, Kh A

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents data on the level of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and some other polycyclic arenes in alga and phanerogam specimens from different gulfs of the Baltic Sea. Algae were shown to absorb BP from sea water. The mean concentration of BP in sea water was under 0.004 microgram/1, while in algae it ranged 0.1-21.2 micrograms/kg dry weight. Algae accumulate BP to a higher degree than phanerogams. The highest concentrations of BP were found in algae Enteromorpha while the lowest ones in Furcellaria. In annual green algae, BP level was higher in autumn, i. e. at the end of vegetation period, than in spring. Brown algae Fucus vesiculosus is recommended for monitoring polycyclic arene pollution in the area from Vormsi Island to Käsmu and green algae Cladophora or Enteromorpha in the eastern part of the Finnish Gulf. PMID:4060672

  15. Structure and orientation of the oxygen-evolving manganese complex of green algae and higher plants investigated by X-ray absorption linear dichroism spectroscopy on oriented photosystem II membrane particles.

    PubMed

    Schiller, H; Dittmer, J; Iuzzolino, L; Dörner, W; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Solé, V A; Nolting, H; Dau, H

    1998-05-19

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Mn K-edge has been performed on multilayers of photosystem II-enriched fragments of the native thylakoid membrane prepared from a higher plant (spinach) and a unicellular green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Spectra collected for various angles between the prevailing orientation of the thylakoid membrane normal and the X-ray electric field vector contain information on the atomic structure of the tetranuclear manganese complex of photosystem II (PS II) and its orientation with respect to the membrane normal. The previously used approach for evaluation of the dichroism of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra [George, G. N., et al. (1989) Science 243, 789-791] is modified, and the following results are obtained for PS II in its dark-stable state (S1-state): (1) structure and orientation of the PS II manganese complexes of green algae and higher plants are highly similiar or fully identical; (2) two 2.7-A vectors, which, most likely, connect the Mn nuclei of a planar Mn2(mu-O2) structure, are at an average angle of 80 degrees +/- 10 degrees with respect to the thylakoid normal; (3) the plane of the Mn2(mu-O2) structures is rather in parallel with the thylakoid plane than perpendicular. Structural models for the oxygen-evolving manganese complex and its orientation in the thylakoid membrane are discussed within the context of the presented results. PMID:9585548

  16. Genome diversity in microbial Casey L. McGrath1

    E-print Network

    Katz, Laura

    morphological SYNAPOMORPHIES (see Glossary), including the stramenopiles (water molds, brown algae, diatoms glaucocystophytes, red algae and green algae (including plants) [10­13]. All other photosynthetic eukaryotes (e

  17. Growth and release of extracellular organic compounds by benthic diatoms depend on interactions with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Christian G; Rehm, Charlotte; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Kroth, Peter G

    2011-04-01

    Phototrophic epilithic biofilms harbour a distinct assemblage of heterotrophic bacteria, cyanobacteria and photoautotrophic algae. Secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by these organisms and the physicochemical properties of the EPS are important factors for the development of the biofilms. We have isolated representative diatom and bacteria strains from epilithic biofilms of Lake Constance. By pairwise co-cultivating these strains we found that diatom growth and EPS secretion by diatoms may depend on the presence of individual bacteria. Similar results were obtained after addition of spent bacterial medium to diatom cultures, suggesting that soluble substances from bacteria have an impact on diatom physiology. While searching for putative bacterial signal substances, we found that concentrations of various dissolved free amino acids (DFAA) within the diatom cultures changed drastically during co-cultivation with bacteria. Further, the secretion of extracellular carbohydrates and proteins can be influenced by bacteria or their extracellular substances. We have performed mass spectrometric peptide mapping to identify proteins which are secreted when co-cultivating the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Bohlin and Escherichia coli. The identified proteins are possibly involved in signalling, extracellular carbohydrate modification and uptake, protein and amino acid modification, and cell/cell aggregation of diatom and bacteria strains. Our data indicate that diatom-bacteria biofilms might be regulated by a complex network of chemical factors involving EPS, amino acid monomers and other substances. Thus interactions with bacteria can be considered as one of the main factors driving biofilm formation by benthic diatoms. PMID:21244599

  18. Methods for DNA barcoding photosynthetic protists emphasizing the macroalgae and diatoms.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Gary W; McDevit, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    This chapter outlines the current practices used in our laboratory for routine DNA barcode analyses of the three major marine macroalgal groups, viz., brown (Phaeophyceae), red (Rhodophyta), and green (Chlorophyta) algae, as well as for the microscopic diatoms (Bacillariophyta). We start with an outline of current streamlined field protocols, which facilitate the collection of substantial (hundreds to thousands) specimens during short (days to weeks) field excursions. We present the current high-throughput DNA extraction protocols, which can, nonetheless, be easily modified for manual molecular laboratory use. We are advocating a two-marker approach for the DNA barcoding of protists with each major lineage having a designated primary and secondary barcode marker of which one is always the LSU D2/D3 (divergent domains D2/D3 of the nuclear ribosomal large subunit DNA). We provide a listing of the primers that we currently use in our laboratory for amplification of DNA barcode markers from the groups that we study: LSU D2/D3, which we advocate as a eukaryote-wide barcode marker to facilitate broad ecological and environmental surveys (secondary barcode marker in this capacity); COI-5P (the standard DNA barcode region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene) as the primary barcode marker for brown and red algae; rbcL-3P (the 3' region of the plastid large subunit of ribulose-l-5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) as the primary barcode marker for diatoms; and tufA (plastid elongation factor Tu gene) as the primary barcode marker for chlorophytan green algae. We outline our polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing methodologies, which have been streamlined for efficiency and to reduce unnecessary cleaning steps. The combined information should provide a helpful guide to those seeking to complete barcode research on these and related "protistan" groups (the term protist is not used in a phylogenetic context; it is simply a catch-all term for the bulk of eukaryotic diversity, i.e., all lineages excluding animals, true fungi, and plants). PMID:22684958

  19. Diatoms (50 Species)

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A photomicrograph depicting the siliceous frustules of fifty species of diatoms arranged within a circular shape. The image has been inverted to white on black to bring out details. Diatoms form the base of many marine and aquatic foodchains and upon death, their glassy frustules form sediments know...

  20. Diatomic Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 114 Diatomic Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 121 diatomic molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty, and reference are given for each transition reported.

  1. Diatom vertical migration within land-fast Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumack, C. F.; Juhl, A. R.; Krembs, C.

    2014-11-01

    Light levels inside first-year, landfast sea ice were experimentally altered by manipulating overlying snow depths. Irradiance available for ice algae growing near the ice-bottom, and under the ice, was highly dependent on snow depths ranging from 0 to > 30 cm. Importantly, algal vertical distributions also changed under different irradiances. Under thick snow (low light), the majority of algae were found several cm above the ice-seawater interface, while progressively more were found nearer the interface at locations with thinner overlying snow (higher light). Short-term field experiments suggested that ice algae were able to reposition themselves within the ice column within 3 days after manipulating snow depths. Laboratory gliding rate measurements of a cultured ice diatom suggested that it is capable of daily cm-scale movement. Vertical migration may help ice diatoms balance opposing light and nutrient resource gradients, similar to strategies used by some benthic and pelagic algae. Moreover, when ice algae congregate near the ice-seawater interface, they may be especially susceptible to loss from the ice environment. Vertical repositioning in response to changing light dynamics may be a mechanism to optimize between vertically-opposing environmental factors and help explain the connection between melting snow cover and export of biomass from sea ice.

  2. Bacteria Associated with Benthic Diatoms from Lake Constance: Phylogeny and Influences on Diatom Growth and Secretion of Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    PubMed Central

    Bruckner, Christian G.; Bahulikar, Rahul; Rahalkar, Monali; Schink, Bernhard; Kroth, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    The composition of diatom-associated bacterial communities was studied with 14 different unialgal xenic diatom cultures isolated from freshwater epilithic biofilms of Lake Constance, Germany. A clear dominance of Alphaproteobacteria was observed, followed by Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Pure cultures of the diatom Cymbella microcephala, which was found to be dominant in epilithic biofilms in Lake Constance, were cocultivated with six associated bacterial strains. All these bacterial strains were able to grow in C. microcephala cultures in the absence of organic cosubstrates. Diatom growth was generally enhanced in the presence of bacteria, and polysaccharide secretion was generally increased in the presence of Proteobacteria. The monomer composition of extracellular polysaccharides of C. microcephala changed in relation to the presence of different bacteria, but the dominant monomers were less affected. Our results indicate that these changes were caused by the diatom itself rather than by specific bacterial degradation. One Bacteroidetes strain strongly influenced carbohydrate secretion by the alga via extracellular soluble compounds. Biofilms were formed only in the presence of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis and coculture studies indicate an adaptation of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes to the microenvironment created by the diatom biofilm. PMID:18931294

  3. Do red and green make brown?: perspectives on plastid acquisitions within chromalveolates.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Smith, Alison G

    2011-07-01

    The chromalveolate "supergroup" is of key interest in contemporary phycology, as it contains the overwhelming majority of extant algal species, including several phyla of key importance to oceanic net primary productivity such as diatoms, kelps, and dinoflagellates. There is also intense current interest in the exploitation of these algae for industrial purposes, such as biodiesel production. However, the evolution of the constituent species, and in particular the origin and radiation of the chloroplast genomes, remains poorly understood. In this review, we discuss current theories of the origins of the extant red alga-derived chloroplast lineages in the chromalveolates and the potential ramifications of the recent discovery of large numbers of green algal genes in chromalveolate genomes. We consider that the best explanation for this is that chromalveolates historically possessed a cryptic green algal endosymbiont that was subsequently replaced by a red algal chloroplast. We consider how changing selective pressures acting on ancient chromalveolate lineages may have selectively favored the serial endosymbioses of green and red algae and whether a complex endosymbiotic history facilitated the rise of chromalveolates to their current position of ecological prominence. PMID:21622904

  4. Amino acid compositon and microbial contamination of spirulina maxima, a blue-green alga, grown on the effluent of different fermented animal wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.F.; Pond, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The nutrient compositions of various fermented manures were compared. Large differences in the mineral concentration were observed. There were no important differences among the amino acid composition of S. spirulina grown on the different nutrient media. All were low in methionine, but were rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid, arginine, and leucine. The crude protein content was 71.8-60.1%. Considerable contamination of the waste-grown algae with yeast, fungi, and sporogenous bacteria was experienced.

  5. Star-shaped polymers of bio-inspired algae core and poly(acrylamide) and poly(acrylic acid) as arms in dissolution of silica/silicate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kalpana; Patiyal, Priyanka; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S; Sharma, Praveen

    2014-06-01

    Silica, in natural waters (due to weathering of rocks) decreases system performance in water processing industry due to scaling. In view of that, the present work involves the synthesis of novel green star shaped additives of algae core (a bio-inspired material as diatom maintains silicic acid equilibrium in sea water) as silica polymerization inhibitors. Star shaped materials with bio-inspired core and poly(acrylamide) [poly(AAm)] and poly(acrylic acid) [poly(AAc)] arms were synthesized by economical green approach. The proficiency was evaluated in 'mini lab' scale for the synthesized APAAm (Algae-g-poly(AAm)) and APAAc (Algae-g-poly(AAc)) dendrimers (star shaped) in colloidal silica mitigation/inhibition at 35 °C and 55 °C. Synthesized dendrimers were equally proficient in silica inhibition at 12 h and maintains ?450 ppm soluble silica. However, APAAm dendrimers of generation 0 confirmed better results (?300 ppm) in contrast to APAAc dendrimers in silica inhibition at 55 °C. Additionally, dendrimers also worked as a nucleator for heterogeneous polymerization to inhibit silica homo-polymerization. APAAm dendrimer test set showed no silica deposit for more than 10 days of inhibition. EDX characterization results support nucleator mechanism with Si content of 6.97%-10.98% by weight in silica deposits (SiO2-APAAm dendrimer composites). PMID:24681378

  6. Solar PAR and UVR modify the community composition and photosynthetic activity of sea ice algae.

    PubMed

    Enberg, Sara; Piiparinen, Jonna; Majaneva, Markus; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Autio, Riitta; Rintala, Janne-Markus

    2015-10-01

    The effects of increased photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on species diversity, biomass and photosynthetic activity were studied in fast ice algal communities. The experimental set-up consisted of nine 1.44 m(2) squares with three treatments: untreated with natural snow cover (UNT), snow-free (PAR + UVR) and snow-free ice covered with a UV screen (PAR). The total algal biomass, dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates, increased in all treatments during the experiment. However, the smaller biomass growth in the top 10-cm layer of the PAR + UVR treatment compared with the PAR treatment indicated the negative effect of UVR. Scrippsiella complex (mainly Scrippsiella hangoei, Biecheleria baltica and Gymnodinium corollarium) showed UV sensitivity in the top 5-cm layer, whereas Heterocapsa arctica ssp. frigida and green algae showed sensitivity to both PAR and UVR. The photosynthetic activity was highest in the top 5-cm layer of the PAR treatment, where the biomass of the pennate diatom Nitzschia frigida increased, indicating the UV sensitivity of this species. This study shows that UVR is one of the controlling factors of algal communities in Baltic Sea ice, and that increased availability of PAR together with UVR exclusion can cause changes in algal biomass, photosynthetic activity and community composition. PMID:26310455

  7. A cDNA from the green alga Spermatozopsis similis encodes a protein with homology to the newly discovered Roadblock/LC7 family of dynein-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Dole, V; Jakubzik, C R; Brünjes, B; Kreimer, G

    2000-01-31

    A clone, designated as B15, was isolated from a cDNA library of the unicellular green alga Spermatozopsis similis and characterised. The deduced amino acid sequence of its open reading frame exhibits high homology to members of the recently discovered roadblock/LC7 protein family (robl/LC7) of dynein-associated proteins. Homologies were highest to a robl/LC7-member from human testis (86%, identity 56%) and to the roadblock protein of Drosophila (88%, identity 52%). Data bank analyses revealed no homologies to known higher plant proteins. B15 is a single copy gene in the genome of Sperm-latozopsis and its transcript was detectable throughout the cell cycle. PMID:10786626

  8. DIATOM: A DIALOG Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldstein, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Describes DIATOM, an online bibliographic retrieval system designed and implemented at Syracuse University to teach search strategy and the use of DIALOG to library science students. System features and database storage considerations are explained. (FM)

  9. "A 100-year record of changing toxic algae in Scottish coastal waters related to change in land use and temperature"

    E-print Network

    Brierley, Andrew

    "A 100-year record of changing toxic algae in Scottish coastal waters related to change in land use in the incidence of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins deriving from marine algae are cause for concern is to produce a quantitative reconstruction of dinoflagellate cysts and diatom frustules preserved in sediments

  10. Microplate Technique for Determining Accumulation of Metals by Algae

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, James M.; Jennett, J. Charles; Smith, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A microplate technique was developed to determine the conditions under which pure cultures of algae removed heavy metals from aqueous solutions. Variables investigated included algal species and strain, culture age (11 and 44 days), metal (mercury, lead, cadmium, and zinc), pH, effects of different buffer solutions, and time of exposure. Plastic, U-bottomed microtiter plates were used in conjunction with heavy metal radionuclides to determine concentration factors for metal-alga combinations. The technique developed was rapid, statistically reliable, and economical of materials and cells. Results (expressed as concentration factors) were in reasonably good agreement with literature values. All species of algae studied removed mercury from solution. Green algae proved better at accumulating cadmium than did blue-green algae. No alga studied removed zinc, perhaps because cells were maintained in the dark during the labeling period. Chlamydomonas sp. proved superior in ability to remove lead from solution. PMID:16345764

  11. Recovery of dilute metal ions by biosorption on river algae and its component

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Kogita, Hiroki; Mamiya, Mitsuo; Yen, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Green algae taken from an acidic mine drainage and blue-green algae take from an alkaline hot spring stream were collected and tested for their ability to recover or remove dilute metal ions. Experimental results demonstrated that unwashed blue-green algae and washed green algae effectively adsorbed base metals ions and eluted the at pH 1. It was also found that washed and dried algae adsorbed precious metal ions more effectively than unwashed algae. For example, the washed and dried blue-green algae was capable of adsorbing 0.31 kg of gold pre kg of algae. The gold from tetrachloroaurate solution which was adsorbed on washed blue-green algae was found to change to a metallic state following initial metal binding. In the case of a dilute gold complex solution leached with thiourea, only a small amount of gold could be captured by algae. Further experiments were conducted on components of the algae, such as alginic acid, agar, cellulose and chitin and mixtures of these components, in order to determine their contribution to metal adsorption characteristics. However, a mixture of these two components demonstrated both good adsorption and desorption characteristics indicating an interaction between the individual components.

  12. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    ScienceCinema

    Elliott, Doug

    2014-06-02

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  13. Algae to Bio-Crude in Less Than 60 Minutes

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Doug

    2013-12-17

    Engineers have created a chemical process that produces useful crude oil just minutes after engineers pour in harvested algae -- a verdant green paste with the consistency of pea soup. The PNNL team combined several chemical steps into one continuous process that starts with an algae slurry that contains as much as 80 to 90 percent water. Most current processes require the algae to be dried -- an expensive process that takes a lot of energy. The research has been licensed by Genifuel Corp.

  14. Sensitivity of the Green Alga Pediastrum duplex Meyen to Allelochemicals Is Strain-Specific and Not Related to Co-Occurrence with Allelopathic Macrophytes

    PubMed Central

    Eigemann, Falk; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Hilt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific differences in the response of microalgae to stress have numerous ecological implications. However, little is known of intraspecific sensitivities and the potential role of local genetic adaptation of populations. We compared the allelochemical sensitivity of 23 Pediastrum duplex Meyen strains, a common component of the freshwater phytoplankton. In order to test for local genetic adaptation, strains were isolated from water bodies with and without the allelopathically-active submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum. Strains were assigned to P. duplex on the basis of cell shape and colony morphology and only P. duplex strains that belonged to the same lineage in an ITS rDNA phylogeny were used. Inhibition of strain growth rates and maximum quantum yields of photosystem II were measured after exposure to tannic acid (TA) and co-culture with Myriophyllum spicatum. Growth rate inhibition varied over one order of magnitude between the P. duplex strains. There was no correlation between the presence of Myriophyllum in the source location and the sensitivity of the strains to TA or the presence of Myriophyllum, suggesting that at least strong unidirectional local adaptation to Myriophyllum had not taken place in the studied water bodies. The maximum quantum yield of photosystem II of TA exposed algae decreased, whereas the yield of algae exposed to M. spicatum was slightly higher than that of the controls. The ranking of P. duplex strain sensitivities differed between the types of exposure (single additions of TA versus co-existence with M. spicatum) and the parameter measured (growth rate versus maximum quantum yield), emphasizing the importance of measuring multiple traits when analysing strain-specific sensitivities towards allelochemicals. The observation that sensitivities to allelochemicals vary widely among strains of a single freshwater algal species should be taken into account if evaluating ecological consequences of allelopathic interactions. PMID:24167626

  15. Sulfated polysaccharides as bioactive agents from marine algae.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Dai-Hung; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid by consumers toward natural bioactive compounds as functional ingredients in nutraceuticals. Marine algae are considered as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Marine algae are rich in sulfated polysaccharides (SPs) such as carrageenans in red algae, fucoidans in brown algae and ulvans in green algae. These SPs exhibit many health beneficial nutraceutical effects such as antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, anticancer and anticoagulant activities. Therefore, marine algae derived SPs have great potential to be further developed as medicinal food products or nutraceuticals in the food industry. This contribution presents an overview of nutraceutical effects and potential health benefits of SPs derived from marine algae. PMID:23994790

  16. Actin, actin-related proteins and profilin in diatoms: a comparative genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aumeier, Charlotte; Polinski, Ellen; Menzel, Diedrik

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are heterokont unicellular algae with a widespread distribution throughout all aquatic habitats. Research on diatoms has advanced significantly over the last decade due to available genetic transformation methods and publicly available genome databases. Yet up to now, proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton in diatoms are largely unknown. Consequently, this work focuses on actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs) encoded in the diatom genomes of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Thalassiosira oceanica, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries. Our comparative genomic study revealed that most diatoms possess only a single conventional actin and a small set of ARPs. Among these are the highly conserved cytoplasmic Arp1 protein and the nuclear Arp4 as well as Arp6. Diatom genomes contain genes coding for two structurally different homologues of Arp4 that might serve specific functions. All diatom species examined here lack ARP2 and ARP3 proteins, suggesting that diatoms are not capable of forming the Arp2/3 complex, which is essential in most eukaryotes for actin filament branching and plus-end dynamics. Interestingly, none of the sequenced representatives of the Bacillariophyta phylum code for profilin. Profilin is an essential actin-binding protein regulating the monomer actin pool and is involved in filament plus-end dynamics. This is the first report of organisms not containing profilin. PMID:26298820

  17. Author's personal copy A time-calibrated multi-gene phylogeny of the diatom genus Pinnularia

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    College, New London, CT 06320, USA e Department of Botany, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, Belgium a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 16 March 2011 Revised 17 August 2011 Accepted 31. Introduction Diatoms are an extremely diverse group of unicellular algae that are uniquely characterized

  18. Colourful Cultures: Classroom Experiments with the Unicellular Alga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delpech, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes an investigation into the photosynthetic potential of the different developmental stages of the green unicellular alga Haematococcus pluvialis. Reviews the biotechnological applications of astaxanthin, the red pigment which can be extracted from Haematococcus pluvialis. (Author/MM)

  19. MONITORING CHLOROPHYLL-A AS A MEASURE OF ALGAE IN LAKE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algae are an important quality component in water bodies. They are photosynthesizing organisms and are the foundation of most aquatic food webs; however, some algae (e.g. blue-green algae) can produce algal toxins. The presence of algal toxins in water bodies has important ...

  20. Kalinella bambusicola gen. et sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a novel coccoid Chlorella-like subaerial alga

    E-print Network

    -like subaerial alga from Southeast Asiapre_534 159..169 Jirí Neustupa,* Yvonne Nemcová, Marek Eliás and Pavel, Czech Republic SUMMARY The traditional green algal genus Chlorella, which com- prised coccoid algae lineage of the trebouxiophycean Watanabea clade, dissimilar from other members of this group. The alga has

  1. BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA 213 ACTION OF HYDROXYLAMINE IN THE RED ALGA PORPHYRIDIUM

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    BIOCHIMICA ET BIOPHYSICA ACTA 213 BBA 46182 ACTION OF HYDROXYLAMINE IN THE RED ALGA PORPHYRIDIUM CR and fluorescence transient studies, made with the intact cells of red alga Porphyridium cruentum, suggest earlier with spinach chloroplasts and green alga Chlorella by other workers. Fluorescence transient data

  2. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited growth rate effects

    E-print Network

    Sachs, Julian P.

    Hydrogen isotope fractionation in freshwater and marine algae: II. Temperature and nitrogen limited isotope fractionation in freshwater algae: I. Variations among lipids and spe- cies. Organic Geochemistry. Two species of freshwater green algae, Eudorina unicocca and Volvox aureus, were grown in batch

  3. Environmental investigations using diatom microfossils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Flocks, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular phytoplankton (microscopic plant-like organisms) with cell walls made of silica (called a frustule). They live in both freshwater and saltwater and can be found in just about every place on Earth that is wet. The shape and morphology of the diatom frustule unique to each species are used for identification. Due to the microscopic size of diatoms, high-power microscopy is required for diatom identification. Diatoms are vital to life on Earth. They are photosynthetic primary producers, using sunlight to create oxygen and organic carbon from carbon dioxide and water. They are a significant source of the oxygen we breathe, have a major impact on the global carbon cycle (Smetacek, 1999), and are a food source for many aquatic organisms (Mann, 1993). Diatom abundance has even been demonstrated to have an influence on the diversity of larger marine mammals, including whales (Marx and Uhen, 2010). Data on diatom abundance and diversity are extremely useful in environmental studies.

  4. During summer 2005, many Floridians noticed bright green

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    of species of blue-green algae inhabit Florida's waters, and several can produce toxins, including and estuaries (Figure 1). Newspaper articles reported widely on the `toxic blue-green algae blooms' observed Algae Threat in Florida: A Tempered View, by Ed Phlips). Given the publicity surrounding this year

  5. Identity and physiology of a new psychrophilic eukaryotic green alga, Chlorella sp., strain BI, isolated from a transitory pond near Bratina Island, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan-Kiss, R. M.; Ivanov, A.G.; Modla, S.; Czymmek, K.; Huner, N.P.A.; Priscu, J.C.; Lisle, J.T.; Hanson, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    Permanently low temperature environments are one of the most abundant microbial habitats on earth. As in most ecosystems, photosynthetic organisms drive primary production in low temperature food webs. Many of these phototrophic microorganisms are psychrophilic; however, functioning of the photosynthetic processes of these enigmatic psychrophiles (the 'photopsychrophiles') in cold environments is not well understood. Here we describe a new chlorophyte isolated from a low temperature pond, on the Ross Ice Shelf near Bratina Island, Antarctica. Phylogenetic and morphological analyses place this strain in the Chlorella clade, and we have named this new chlorophyte Chlorella BI. Chlorella BI is a psychrophilic species, exhibiting optimum temperature for growth at around 10??C. However, psychrophily in the Antarctic Chlorella was not linked to high levels of membrane-associated poly-unsaturated fatty acids. Unlike the model Antarctic lake alga, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241, Chlorella BI has retained the ability for dynamic short term adjustment of light energy distribution between photosystem II (PS II) and photosystem I (PS I). In addition, Chlorella BI can grow under a variety of trophic modes, including heterotrophic growth in the dark. Thus, this newly isolated photopsychrophile has retained a higher versatility in response to environmental change than other well studied cold-adapted chlorophytes. ?? 2008 Springer.

  6. Fossil diatoms and neogene paleolimnology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.

    1988-01-01

    Diatoms have played an important role in the development of Neogene continental biostratigraphy and paleolimnology since the mid-19th Century. The history of progress in Quaternary diatom biostratigraphy has developed as a result of improved coring techniques that enable sampling sediments beneath existing lakes coupled with improved chronological control (including radiometric dating and varve enumeration), improved statistical treatment of fossil diatom assemblages (from qualitative description to influx calculations of diatom numbers or volumes), and improved ecological information about analogous living diatom associations. The last factor, diatom ecology, is the most critical in many ways, but progresses slowly. Fortunately, statistical comparison of modern diatom assemblages and insightful studies of the nutrient requirements of some common freshwater species are enabling diatom paleolimnologists to make more detailed interpretations of the Quaternary record than had been possible earlier, and progress in the field of diatom biology and ecology will continue to refine paleolimnological studies. The greater age and geologic setting of Tertiary diatomaceous deposits has prompted their study in the contexts of geologic history, biochronology and evolution. The distribution of diatoms of marine affinities in continental deposits has given geologists insights about tectonism and sea-level change, and the distribution of distinctive (extinct?) diatoms has found utilization both in making stratigraphic correlations between outcrops of diatomaceous deposits and in various types of biochronological studies that involve dating deposits in different areas. A continental diatom biochronologic scheme will rely upon evolution, such as the appearance of new genera within a family, in combination with regional environmental changes that are responsible for the wide distribution of distinctive diatom species. The increased use of the scanning electron microscope for the detailed descriptions of fossil diatoms will provide the basis for making more accurate correlations and identifications, and the micromorphological detail for speculations about evolutionary relationships. ?? 1988.

  7. Star Trek replicators and diatom nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Drum, Ryan W; Gordon, Richard

    2003-08-01

    Diatoms are single celled algae, the 10(5)-10(6) species of which create a wide variety of three-dimensional amorphous silica shells. If we could get them to produce useful structures, perhaps by compustat selection experiments (i.e. forced evolution of development or evodevo), their exponential growth in suspension cultures could compete with the lithography techniques of present day nanotechnology, which have limited 3D capabilities. Alternatively, their fine detail could be used for templates for MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems), or their silica deposition systems isolated for guiding silica deposition. A recent paper has demonstrated that silica can be replaced atom for atom without change of shape--a step towards the Star Trek replicator. PMID:12902165

  8. Physical data and biological data for algae, aquatic invertebrates, and fish from selected reaches on the Carson and Truckee rivers, Nevada and California, 1993-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, S.J.; Seiler, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    This report, a product of the National Water- Quality Assessment Program, is a compilation of physical data and biological data for algae, aquatic invertebrates, and fish collected in the Carson and Truckee River Basins, Nevada and California. Most of the data were collected between 1993 and 1996 at selected reaches on the Carson and Truckee Rivers. Algae and aquatic invertebrate samples were collected from cobble riffles, submerged woody-snag habitats, and from depositional areas such as pools. Between 1993 and 1996, fish and crayfish were collected from all wadeable habitats at each of seven basic-fixed sites using either electroshocking methods or seining. Additional fish and crayfish were collected at one site on the Truckee River in 1997. Fish were identified to species, measured for total and standard length, checked for anomalies, and weighed at the collection site. Fish were returned to the stream after measurements were taken. Measurements of water depth, stream velocity, determinations of substrate type and substrate embeddedness were made at each sampling site. Algae and aquatic invertebrate samples were sent to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Laboratory for identification and enumeration. A total of 103 semi-quantitative and 55 qualitative algae samples were collected at 20 river reaches on the Carson and Truckee Rivers between 1993 and 1996. These samples represent algae in cobble riffles, on submerged woody snags, and on sediment surfaces in depositional areas. In those 158 samples, 514 algal species, varieties, or forms were identified. Of the 8 algal phyla represented, the diatoms (Phylum Bacillariophyta) were the most abundant with 351 species, varieties, or forms. The green algae (Phylum Chlorophyta) were next in abundance with 108 species, varieties, or forms followed by the blue-green algae (Phylum Cyanophyta) with 41 species, varieties, or forms. A total of 49 semi-quantitative aquatic invertebrate samples were collected at 27 river reaches on the Carson and Truckee Rivers between 1993 and 1996. These samples represent invertebrates in cobble riffles and on submerged woody snags. In those 49 samples, members of 6 phyla were identified. Roundworms were identified only to phylum (Nematoda) and free-living flatworms and snails were identified only to class (Turbellaria and Gastroda). Organisms were identified as belonging to 19 invertebrate orders. Most of the invertebrates that could be identified to genus or species belonged in the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera of the arthropod class Insecta. Fish and crayfish populations in the Carson and Truckee Rivers were sampled 29 times between 1993 and 1997. These collections resulted in the identification of 18 fish species and one endemic crayfish species. Twelve of the 18 fish species identified are not native to the Carson and Truckee River Basins.

  9. A golden opportunity: Researchers making progress in understanding toxic algae 

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    this competition could lead them closer to controlling this harmful algae, the researchers said. ?Our biggest finding so far,? said Dr. Daniel Roelke of Texas AgriLife Research and one of the investigators, ?is that there appears to be a chemical warfare... between golden algae and blue green algae. Only when golden algae wins this chemical warfare is it able to bloom.? Roelke, along with Dr. Bryan Brooks of Baylor University and Dr. James Grover of the University of Texas at Arlington, have studied...

  10. Diatom Milking: A Review and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Vinayak, Vandana; Manoylov, Kalina M.; Gateau, Hélčne; Blanckaert, Vincent; Hérault, Josiane; Pencréac’h, Gaëlle; Marchand, Justine; Gordon, Richard; Schoefs, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The rise of human populations and the growth of cities contribute to the depletion of natural resources, increase their cost, and create potential climatic changes. To overcome difficulties in supplying populations and reducing the resource cost, a search for alternative pharmaceutical, nanotechnology, and energy sources has begun. Among the alternative sources, microalgae are the most promising because they use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biomass and/or valuable compounds. Once produced, the biomass is ordinarily harvested and processed (downstream program). Drying, grinding, and extraction steps are destructive to the microalgal biomass that then needs to be renewed. The extraction and purification processes generate organic wastes and require substantial energy inputs. Altogether, it is urgent to develop alternative downstream processes. Among the possibilities, milking invokes the concept that the extraction should not kill the algal cells. Therefore, it does not require growing the algae anew. In this review, we discuss research on milking of diatoms. The main themes are (a) development of alternative methods to extract and harvest high added value compounds; (b) design of photobioreactors; (c) biodiversity and (d) stress physiology, illustrated with original results dealing with oleaginous diatoms. PMID:25939034

  11. A Model for Carbohydrate Metabolism in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum Deduced from Comparative Whole Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Aaron; Caron, Lise; Weber, Till; Maheswari, Uma; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Bowler, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Background Diatoms are unicellular algae responsible for approximately 20% of global carbon fixation. Their evolution by secondary endocytobiosis resulted in a complex cellular structure and metabolism compared to algae with primary plastids. Methodology/Principal Findings The whole genome sequence of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has recently been completed. We identified and annotated genes for enzymes involved in carbohydrate pathways based on extensive EST support and comparison to the whole genome sequence of a second diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Protein localization to mitochondria was predicted based on identified similarities to mitochondrial localization motifs in other eukaryotes, whereas protein localization to plastids was based on the presence of signal peptide motifs in combination with plastid localization motifs previously shown to be required in diatoms. We identified genes potentially involved in a C4-like photosynthesis in P. tricornutum and, on the basis of sequence-based putative localization of relevant proteins, discuss possible differences in carbon concentrating mechanisms and CO2 fixation between the two diatoms. We also identified genes encoding enzymes involved in photorespiration with one interesting exception: glycerate kinase was not found in either P. tricornutum or T. pseudonana. Various Calvin cycle enzymes were found in up to five different isoforms, distributed between plastids, mitochondria and the cytosol. Diatoms store energy either as lipids or as chrysolaminaran (a ?-1,3-glucan) outside of the plastids. We identified various ?-glucanases and large membrane-bound glucan synthases. Interestingly most of the glucanases appear to contain C-terminal anchor domains that may attach the enzymes to membranes. Conclusions/Significance Here we present a detailed synthesis of carbohydrate metabolism in diatoms based on the genome sequences of Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. This model provides novel insights into acquisition of dissolved inorganic carbon and primary metabolic pathways of carbon in two different diatoms, which is of significance for an improved understanding of global carbon cycles. PMID:18183306

  12. ALGAE-BACTERIA INTERACTION IN A LIGHT-DARK CYCLE (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient and population dynamics accompanying algae-bacteria interaction were observed in unialgal, 18-liter batch cultures during a light-dark cycle. The green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and the nitrogen fixing blue-green Anabaena flos-aquae were inoculated with an aquatic communi...

  13. Diatom-associated bacteria are required for aggregation of Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    PubMed

    Gärdes, Astrid; Iversen, Morten H; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Passow, Uta; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2011-03-01

    Aggregation of algae, mainly diatoms, is an important process in marine systems leading to the settling of particulate organic carbon predominantly in the form of marine snow. Exudation products of phytoplankton form transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), which acts as the glue for particle aggregation. Heterotrophic bacteria interacting with phytoplankton may influence TEP formation and phytoplankton aggregation. This bacterial impact has not been explored in detail. We hypothesized that bacteria attaching to Thalassiosira weissflogii might interact in a yet-to-be determined manner, which could impact TEP formation and aggregate abundance. The role of individual T. weissflogii-attaching and free-living new bacterial isolates for TEP production and diatom aggregation was investigated in vitro. T. weissflogii did not aggregate in axenic culture, and striking differences in aggregation dynamics and TEP abundance were observed when diatom cultures were inoculated with either diatom-attaching or free-living bacteria. The data indicated that free-living bacteria might not influence aggregation whereas bacteria attaching to diatom cells may increase aggregate formation. Interestingly, photosynthetically inactivated T. weissflogii cells did not aggregate regardless of the presence of bacteria. Comparison of aggregate formation, TEP production, aggregate sinking velocity and solid hydrated density revealed remarkable differences. Both, photosynthetically active T. weissflogii and specific diatom-attaching bacteria were required for aggregation. It was concluded that interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and diatoms increased aggregate formation and particle sinking and thus may enhance the efficiency of the biological pump. PMID:20827289

  14. Diatom plastids depend on nucleotide import from the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Ast, Michelle; Gruber, Ansgar; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Neuhaus, Horst Ekkehard; Kroth, Peter G.; Horn, Matthias; Haferkamp, Ilka

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are ecologically important algae that acquired their plastids by secondary endosymbiosis, resulting in a more complex cell structure and an altered distribution of metabolic pathways when compared with organisms with primary plastids. Diatom plastids are surrounded by 4 membranes; the outermost membrane is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum. Genome analyses suggest that nucleotide biosynthesis is, in contrast to higher plants, not located in the plastid, but in the cytosol. As a consequence, nucleotides have to be imported into the organelle. However, the mechanism of nucleotide entry into the complex plastid is unknown. We identified a high number of putative nucleotide transporters (NTTs) in the diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum and characterized the first 2 isoforms (NTT1 and NTT2). GFP-based localization studies revealed that both investigated NTTs are targeted to the plastid membranes, and that NTT1 most likely enters the innermost plastid envelope via the stroma. Heterologously expressed NTT1 acts as a proton-dependent adenine nucleotide importer, whereas NTT2 facilitates the counter exchange of (deoxy-)nucleoside triphosphates. Therefore, these transporters functionally resemble NTTs from obligate intracellular bacteria with an impaired nucleotide metabolism rather than ATP/ADP exchanging NTTs from primary plastids. We suggest that diatoms harbor a specifically-adapted nucleotide transport system and that NTTs are the key players in nucleotide supply to the complex plastid. PMID:19221027

  15. Investigation of porous silica nanostructures in diatoms isolated from Kurichi and Sulur lakes of Coimbatore, India using field emission scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    N, Seethalakshmi; R, Selvakumar

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae that possess cell wall made of silica. These diatoms play a pivotal role in synthesis of variety of silica nanostructures and have adorning morphology in nature. In the present study, we have used field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate their morphological features like pore size, shape, and porous pattern in various diatoms isolated from Kurichi and Sulur fresh water lakes, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India. Diatoms were identified as Nitzschia sp., Cyclotella meneghiniana, Coscinodiscus sp. and Cyclotella atomus based on their morphological features. The arrangement of porous nanostructures in these diatoms have been characterized. The change in the nanostructures present in the diatoms have been correlated to the contamination of water bodies. PMID:26296232

  16. Isotopic discrimination and kinetic parameters of RubisCO from the marine bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Boller, A J; Thomas, P J; Cavanaugh, C M; Scott, K M

    2015-01-01

    The cosmopolitan, bloom-forming diatom, Skeletonema costatum, is a prominent primary producer in coastal oceans, fixing CO2 with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) that is phylogenetically distinct from terrestrial plant RubisCO. RubisCOs are subdivided into groups based on sequence similarity of their large subunits (IA-ID, II, and III). ID is present in several major oceanic primary producers, including diatoms such as S. costatum, coccolithophores, and some dinoflagellates, and differs substantially in amino acid sequence from the well-studied IB enzymes present in most cyanobacteria and in green algae and plants. Despite this sequence divergence, and differences in isotopic discrimination apparent in other RubisCO enzymes, stable carbon isotope compositions of diatoms and other marine phytoplankton are generally interpreted assuming enzymatic isotopic discrimination similar to spinach RubisCO (IB). To interpret phytoplankton ?(13) C values, S. costatum RubisCO was characterized via sequence analysis, and measurement of its KCO2 and Vmax , and degree of isotopic discrimination. The sequence of this enzyme placed it among other diatom ID RubisCOs. Michaelis-Menten parameters were similar to other ID enzymes (KCO2 = 48.9 ± 2.8 ?m; Vmax = 165.1 ± 6.3 nmol min(-1 ) mg(-1) ). However, isotopic discrimination (? = [(12) k/(13) k - 1] × 1000) was low (18.5‰; 17.0-19.9, 95% CI) when compared to IA and IB RubisCOs (22-29‰), though not as low as ID from coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi (11.1‰). Variability in ?-values among RubisCOs from primary producers is likely reflected in ?(13) C values of oceanic biomass. Currently, ?(13) C variability is ascribed to physical or chemical factors (e.g. illumination, nutrient availability) and physiological responses to these factors (e.g. carbon-concentrating mechanisms). Estimating the importance of these factors from ?(13) C measurements requires an accurate ?-value, and a mass-balance model using the ?-value for S. costatum RubisCO is presented. Clearly, appropriate ?-values must be included in interpreting ?(13) C values of environmental samples. PMID:25302659

  17. Carotenoids in algae: distributions, biosyntheses and functions.

    PubMed

    Takaichi, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    For photosynthesis, phototrophic organisms necessarily synthesize not only chlorophylls but also carotenoids. Many kinds of carotenoids are found in algae and, recently, taxonomic studies of algae have been developed. In this review, the relationship between the distribution of carotenoids and the phylogeny of oxygenic phototrophs in sea and fresh water, including cyanobacteria, red algae, brown algae and green algae, is summarized. These phototrophs contain division- or class-specific carotenoids, such as fucoxanthin, peridinin and siphonaxanthin. The distribution of ?-carotene and its derivatives, such as lutein, loroxanthin and siphonaxanthin, are limited to divisions of Rhodophyta (macrophytic type), Cryptophyta, Euglenophyta, Chlorarachniophyta and Chlorophyta. In addition, carotenogenesis pathways are discussed based on the chemical structures of carotenoids and known characteristics of carotenogenesis enzymes in other organisms; genes and enzymes for carotenogenesis in algae are not yet known. Most carotenoids bind to membrane-bound pigment-protein complexes, such as reaction center, light-harvesting and cytochrome b(6)f complexes. Water-soluble peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP) and orange carotenoid protein (OCP) are also established. Some functions of carotenoids in photosynthesis are also briefly summarized. PMID:21747749

  18. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the consequences of our actions, and we saw for ourselves how we are polluting and killing the environment. Releasing excess nutrients into our waterways is creating a destructive chain reaction, but if we monitor our output of pollution, we can minimize the amount of damage we do to algae, organisms, and the environment in general.

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Thylakoid ATP/ADP Carrier Reveals New Insights into Its Function Restricted to Green Plants.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Cornelia; Pfeil, Bernard E; Schoefs, Benoît

    2011-01-01

    ATP is the common energy currency of cellular metabolism in all living organisms. Most of them synthesize ATP in the cytosol or on the mitochondrial inner membrane, whereas land plants, algae, and cyanobacteria also produce it on the thylakoid membrane during the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis. From the site of synthesis, ATP is transported to the site of utilization via intracellular membrane transporters. One major type of ATP transporters is represented by the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier family. Here we review a recently characterized member, namely the thylakoid ATP/ADP carrier from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTAAC). Thus far, no orthologs of this carrier have been characterized in other organisms, although similar sequences can be recognized in many sequenced genomes. Protein Sequence database searches and phylogenetic analyses indicate the absence of TAAC in cyanobacteria and its appearance early in the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes. The TAAC clade is composed of carriers found in land plants and some green algae, but no proteins from other photosynthetic taxa, such as red algae, brown algae, and diatoms. This implies that TAAC-like sequences arose only once before the divergence of green algae and land plants. Based on these findings, it is proposed that TAAC may have evolved in response to the need of a new activity in higher photosynthetic eukaryotes. This activity may provide the energy to drive reactions during biogenesis and turnover of photosynthetic complexes, which are heterogeneously distributed in a thylakoid membrane system composed of appressed and non-appressed regions. PMID:22629269

  20. Ancient signals: comparative genomics of green plant CDPKs

    E-print Network

    Sheen, Jen

    from green algae and early land plants to examine how well the previously described CDPK family from the colonization of the land by plants, whereas CDPKs from ancestor green algae have continued to evolveAncient signals: comparative genomics of green plant CDPKs Louis-Philippe Hamel1 , Jen Sheen2

  1. High Mannose-binding Lectin with Preference for the Cluster of ?1–2-Mannose from the Green Alga Boodlea coacta Is a Potent Entry Inhibitor of HIV-1 and Influenza Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2011-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lectin from the green alga Boodlea coacta (BCA), which was determined by a combination of Edman degradation of its peptide fragments and cDNA cloning, revealed the following: 1) B. coacta used a noncanonical genetic code (where TAA and TAG codons encode glutamine rather than a translation termination), and 2) BCA consisted of three internal tandem-repeated domains, each of which contains the sequence motif similar to the carbohydrate-binding site of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins. Carbohydrate binding specificity of BCA was examined by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC assay using 42 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. BCA bound to high mannose-type N-glycans but not to the complex-type, hybrid-type core structure of N-glycans or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. This lectin had exclusive specificity for ?1–2-linked mannose at the nonreducing terminus. The binding activity was enhanced as the number of terminal ?1–2-linked mannose substitutions increased. Mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannopentaose were incapable of binding to BCA. Thus, BCA preferentially recognized the nonreducing terminal ?1–2-mannose cluster as a primary target. As predicted from carbohydrate-binding propensity, this lectin inhibited the HIV-1 entry into the host cells at a half-maximal effective concentration of 8.2 nm. A high association constant (3.71 × 108 m?1) of BCA with the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Moreover, BCA showed the potent anti-influenza activity by directly binding to viral envelope hemagglutinin against various strains, including a clinical isolate of pandemic H1N1-2009 virus, revealing its potential as an antiviral reagent. PMID:21460211

  2. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity?†

    PubMed Central

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so other compounds/mechanisms must be present in the other Pseudoalteromonas strains with antifouling activity. PMID:22003011

  3. A Novel Basal Apparatus Protein of 90 kD (BAp90) from the Flagellate Green Alga Spermatozopsis similis is a Component of the Proximal Plates and Identifies the d-(dexter)Surface of the Basal Body.

    PubMed

    Geimer, S; Lechtreck, K F; Melkonian, M

    1998-05-01

    The flagellar basal apparatus consists of the basal bodies and associated fibrous structures, and represents the organizing center for the microtubular cytoskeleton in many flagellate protists. To identify novel proteins associated with the basal bodies, basal apparatuses from the flagellate green alga Spermatozopsis similis (Chlorophyceae) were isolated and purified. A polyclonal antibody raised against a 95kD protein band enriched in purified basal apparatuses was used to screen a cDNA library of S. similis which resulted in the isolation of a full length clone coding for a novel protein of 812 amino acids (85.3kD). Sequence analysis of this clone identified extended a-helical regions and predicted several coiled-coil forming domains interrupted by spacer segments of variable lengths. A polyclonal antibody (anti-BAp90) raised against the bacterially expressed protein recognized a 90kD band (BAp90) in SDS-PAGE of isolated basal apparatuses of S. similis. Immunogold labeling using anti-BAp90 decorated the proximal plates (two striated, triangular fibers which serve as spacers between the basal bodies in their proximal region) and parts of the d-fibers (df) which interconnect the basal bodies with the microtubular d-roots and the striated microtubule-associated fibers (SMAFs). Thus, the 90kD basal apparatus protein of S. similis represents a biochemical landmark for the lateral asymmetry of the basal body identifying its d-(dexter)surface. Cytoskeletal elements containing BAp90 or structurally related proteins may be involved in the organization and/or maintenance of the positional relationship between basal bodies and the cellular cytoskeleton, and hence cell polarity. PMID:23196167

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.; Sabir, Jamal S.; Alfassi, Fahad A.; Hajarah, Nahid H.; Kabli, Saleh A.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Ashworth, Matt P.; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K.; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  5. Metabolomic Profiling of 13 Diatom Cultures and Their Adaptation to Nitrate-Limited Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bromke, Mariusz A; Sabir, Jamal S; Alfassi, Fahad A; Hajarah, Nahid H; Kabli, Saleh A; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L; Ashworth, Matt P; Méret, Michaël; Jansen, Robert K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are very efficient in their use of available nutrients. Changes in nutrient availability influence the metabolism and the composition of the cell constituents. Since diatoms are valuable candidates to search for oil producing algae, measurements of diatom-produced compounds can be very useful for biotechnology. In order to explore the diversity of lipophilic compounds produced by diatoms, we describe the results from an analysis of 13 diatom strains. With the help of a lipidomics platform, which combines an UPLC separation with a high resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometer, we were able to measure and annotate 142 lipid species. Out of these, 32 were present in all 13 cultures. The annotated lipid features belong to six classes of glycerolipids. The data obtained from the measurements were used to create lipidomic profiles. The metabolomic overview of analysed cultures is amended by the measurement of 96 polar compounds. To further increase the lipid diversity and gain insight into metabolomic adaptation to nitrogen limitation, diatoms were cultured in media with high and low concentrations of nitrate. The growth in nitrogen-deplete or nitrogen-replete conditions affects metabolite accumulation but has no major influence on the species-specific metabolomic profile. Thus, the genetic component is stronger in determining metabolic patterns than nitrogen levels. Therefore, lipid profiling is powerful enough to be used as a molecular fingerprint for diatom cultures. Furthermore, an increase of triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation was observed in low nitrogen samples, although this trend was not consistent across all 13 diatom strains. Overall, our results expand the current understanding of metabolomics diversity in diatoms and confirm their potential value for producing lipids for either bioenergy or as feed stock. PMID:26440112

  6. Light, temperature, and desiccation effects on photosynthetic activity, and drought-induced ultrastructural changes in the green alga Klebsormidium dissectum (Streptophyta) from a high alpine soil crust.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Members of the cosmopolitan green algal genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) are typical components of terrestrial microbiotic communities such as biological soil crusts, which have many important ecological functions. In the present study, Klebsormidium dissectum (Gay) Ettl & Gärtner was isolated from a high alpine soil crust in the Tyrolean Alps, Austria. Physiological performance in terms of growth and photosynthesis was investigated under different controlled abiotic conditions and compared with ultrastructural changes under the treatments applied. K. dissectum showed very low light requirements as reflected in growth patterns and photosynthetic efficiency. Increasing temperatures from 5°C to 40°C led to different effects on respiratory oxygen consumption and photosynthetic oxygen evolution. While at low temperatures (5-10°C), respiration was not detectable or on a very low level, photosynthesis was relatively high, Reversely, at the highest temperature, respiration was unaffected, and photosynthesis strongly inhibited pointing to strong differences in temperature sensitivity between both physiological processes. Although photosynthetic performance of K. dissectum was strongly affected under short-term desiccation and recovered only partly after rehydration, this species was capable to survive even 3 weeks at 5% relative air humidity. K. dissectum cells have a cell width of 5.6?±?0.3 ?m and a cell length of 8.4?±?2.0 ?m. Desiccated cells showed a strongly reduced cell width (46% of control) and cell length (65% of control). In addition, in desiccated cells, fewer mitochondria were stained by DIOC(6), and damaged plasma membranes were detected by FM 1-43 staining. High-pressure freeze fixation as well as chemical fixation allowed visualizing ultrastructural changes caused by desiccation. In such cells, the nucleus and chloroplast were still visibly intact, but the extremely thin cell walls (75-180 nm) were substantially deformed. The cytoplasm appeared electron dense and mitochondria were altered. Although K. dissectum can be characterized as euryoecious species, all ecophysiological and ultrastructural data indicate susceptibility to desiccation. However, the steadily occurring fragmentation of filaments into smaller units leads to improved self protection and thus may represent a life strategy to better survive longer periods of drought in exposed alpine soil crusts. PMID:21811791

  7. Characterization of the Kootenai River Algae Community and Primary Productivity Before and After Experimental Nutrient Addition, 2004–2007 [Chapter 2, Kootenai River Algal Community Characterization, 2009 KTOI REPORT].

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charlie; Anders, Paul; Shafii, Bahman

    2009-07-01

    The Kootenai River ecosystem (spelled Kootenay in Canada) has experienced numerous ecological changes since the early 1900s. Some of the largest impacts to habitat, biological communities, and ecological function resulted from levee construction along the 120 km of river upstream from Kootenay Lake, completed by the 1950s, and the construction and operation of Libby Dam on the river near Libby Montana, completed in 1972. Levee construction isolated tens of thousands of hectares of historic functioning floodplain habitat from the river channel downstream in Idaho and British Columbia (B.C.) severely reducing natural biological productivity and habitat diversity crucial to large river-floodplain ecosystem function. Libby Dam greatly reduces sediment and nutrient transport to downstream river reaches, and dam operations cause large changes in the timing, duration, and magnitude of river flows. These and other changes have contributed to the ecological collapse of the post-development Kootenai River ecosystem and its native biological communities. In response to large scale loss of nutrients, experimental nutrient addition was initiated in the North Arm of Kootenay Lake in 1992, in the South Arm of Kootenay Lake in 2004, and in the Kootenai River at the Idaho-Montana border during 2005. This report characterizes baseline chlorophyll concentration and accrual (primary productivity) rates and diatom and algal community composition and ecological metrics in the Kootenai River for four years, one (2004) before, and three (2005 through 2007) after nutrient addition. The study area encompassed a 325 km river reach from the upper Kootenay River at Wardner, B.C. (river kilometer (rkm) 445) downstream through Montana and Idaho to Kootenay Lake in B.C. (rkm 120). Sampling reaches included an unimpounded reach furthest upstream and four reaches downstream from Libby Dam affected by impoundment: two in the canyon reach (one with and one without nutrient addition), a braided reach, and a meandering reach. The study design included 14 sampling sites: an upstream, unimpounded reference site (KR-14), four control (non-fertilized) canyon sites downstream from Libby Dam, but upstream from nutrient addition (KR-10 through KR-13), two treatment sites referred to collectively as the nutrient addition zone (KR-9 and KR-9.1, located at and 5 km downstream from the nutrient addition site), two braided reach sites (KR-6 and KR-7), and four meander reach sites (KR-1 through KR-4). A series of qualitative evaluations and quantitative analyses were used to assess baseline conditions and effects of experimental nutrient addition treatments on chlorophyll, primary productivity, and taxonomic composition and metric arrays for the diatom and green algae communities. Insufficient density in the samples precluded analyses of bluegreen algae taxa and metrics for pre- and post-nutrient addition periods. Chlorophyll a concentration (mg/m{sup 2}), chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d), total chlorophyll concentration (chlorophyll a and b) (mg/m{sup 2}), and total chlorophyll accrual rate (mg/m{sup 2}/30d) were calculated. Algal taxa were identified and grouped by taxonomic order as Cyanophyta (blue-greens), Chlorophyta (greens), Bacillariophyta (diatoms), Chrysophyta (goldens), and dominant species from each sample site were identified. Algal densities (number/ml) in periphyton samples were calculated for each sample site and sampling date. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed to reduce the dimension of diatom and algae data and to determine which taxonomic groups and metrics were contributing significantly to the observed variation. PCA analyses were tabulated to indicate eigenvalues, proportion, and cumulative percent variation, as well as eigenvectors (loadings) for each of the components. Biplot graphic displays of PCA axes were also generated to characterize the pattern and structure of the underlying variation. Taxonomic data and a series of biological and ecological metrics were used with PCA for diatoms and algae. Algal metrics included

  8. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  9. Planktonic diatoms of Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinwand, Jerry F.

    1969-01-01

    The major species of diatoms in surface collections from Lake Ontario in September 1964 were Asterionella formosa, Fragilaria crotonensis, and Tabellaris fenestrata. Dominant species in the deep-water samples were Stephanodiscus astraea, S. astraea var. mintula, and F. crotonensis. The diatom flora in surface collections varied among several stations in the eastern end of the lake.

  10. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  11. 77 FR 4060 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ...the U.S.A. The applicant plans to take from the Palmer Station area approximately 20 brown marine algae, 30 green marine algae, 10 red marine algae, and 10 diatom marine algae to sublimate cultures of [[Page 4061

  12. Understanding amine catalyzed silica polymerization : diatoms as bioarchitects.

    SciTech Connect

    Spoerke, Erik David; Aubry, Sylvie; Lane, Pamela; Robinson, David B; Bauer, Christina A.; Zendejas, Frank; Tran, Huu; Lane, Todd W.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

    2007-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art biomimetic methodologies employed worldwide for the realization of self-assembled nanomaterials are adequate for certain unique applications, but a major breakthrough is needed if these nanomaterials are to obtain their true promise and potential. These routes typically utilize a 'top-down' approach in terms of controlling the nucleation, growth, and deposition of structured nanomaterials. Most of these techniques are inherently limited to primarily 2D and simple 3D structures, and are therefore limited in their ultimate functionality and field of use. Zeolites, one of the best-known and understood synthetic silica structures, typically possess highly ordered silica domains over very small length scales. The development of truly organized and hierarchical zeolites over several length scales remains an intense area of research world wide. Zeolites typically require high-temperature and complex synthesis routes that negatively impact certain economic parameters and, therefore, the ultimate utility of these materials. Nonetheless, zeolite usage is in the tons per year worldwide and is quickly becoming ubiquitous in its applications. In addition to these more mature aspects of current practices in materials science, one of the most promising fields of nanotechnology lies in the advent and control of biologically self-assembled materials, especially those involved with silica and other ceramics such as hydroxyapatite. Nature has derived, through billions of years of evolutionary steps, numerous methods by which fault-tolerant and mechanically robust structures can be created with exquisite control and precision at relatively low temperature ranges and pressures. Diatoms are one of the best known examples that exhibit this degree of structure and control known that is involved with the biomineralization of silica. Diatoms are eukaryotic algae that are ubiquitous in marine and freshwater environments. They are a dominant form of phytoplankton critical to global carbon fixation. The silicified cell wall of the diatom is called the frustule, and the intricate silica structure characteristic of a given species is known as the valve. There are two general classes of diatoms, based on their overall morphologies, the pennate and centric. Diatoms achieve their silicified structures in exact fashion through genetically inspired design rules coupled with precisely directed biochemistry occurring at temperatures ranging from a few degrees Celsius (polar species) to temperatures just over room temperature (tropical species). Different species of diatoms produce markedly different structures. To start with, there are two basic types of frustule macromorphologies: pennate diatoms display bilateral symmetry and centric diatoms show radial symmetry. There are thousands of permutations of these two basic forms and the micromorphology of the valve can be quite complex with all types of pore arrangements and morphologies (Figure 1.1). The detailed morphology of the cell wall of a given diatom species is reproduced with exactness, because the process is genetically encoded. Three types of cell wall proteins have been identified in diatoms; the frustulins, pleuralins, and silaffins. Frustulins are cell wall proteins that form an organic coat to protect the silica structures from dissolution into the aqueous environment. Pleuralins are associated with a specific subcomponent of the frustule during cell division, and play a role in hypotheca-epitheca development. Silaffins from Cylindrotheca fusiformis are short chain-length peptides that play a direct role in the silica polymerization process, and possess unique biochemical post-translation functionalization. Larger proteins with silaffin activity have recently been described in Thalassiosira pseudonana. Frustulins and pleuralins play no role in silica polymerization or structure formation in diatoms, whereas the silaffins are one of the primary polymerization determinants. In addition to the silaffins, a class of long-chain polyamines associated with diatom silica has been

  13. New insights into hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian-stream system through the use of terrestrial diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Wetzel, Carlos E.; Frentress, Jay; Tauro, Flavia; Coles, Anna; Ector, Luc; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Hoffmann, Lucien; Pfister, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta), one of the most common and diverse algal groups (ca. 200000 species, ~10-200 µm, unicellular, eukaryotic algae), have recently been used as novel, natural tracers to infer connectivity in the hillslope-riparian-stream system. In the schistous Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg), terrestrial diatom abundance in the stream systematically increased with precipitation during several events, suggesting rapid connectivity between the soil surface and stream water. Nevertheless, a marginal contribution of overland flow to stream water was determined using end-member mixing analysis with geochemical and water isotope tracers. These contradictory results raised new questions regarding how terrestrial diatoms, living on the soil surface, reached the stream network. Taking into consideration that no diatoms were found in groundwater samples, we first hypothesised that flushing of the terrestrial diatoms may take place through networks of macropores in the shallow soils of the catchment. This hypothesis was tested by conducting laboratory percolation experiments with fluorescent diatoms (see contribution by Tauro et al. in session HS2.4) and results suggest that diatom flushing through the soil cores does not occur. A second hypothesis arose when performing simulated rainfall events to determine diatom population depletion. Simulated rainfall experiments showed that terrestrial diatom populations in the riparian zone deplete in response to rainfall. These field and laboratory experimental results suggest that terrestrial diatoms may reach the stream suspended in event water via - yet undocumented - surface or near-surface pathways. Surface saturated and subsurface mixing processes in the riparian zone are currently being investigated in the catchment using water isotope and geochemical tracers, infrared thermography and piezometers (see contribution by Frentress et al. in session HS2.4). Further research will focus on pathways that terrestrial diatoms located further from the stream network (i.e. hillslopes) use to reach the stream. Ultimately, we seek to combine these results from multi-tracer studies to develop an improved, holistic understanding of catchment behaviour.

  14. Diatomic gasdynamic lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Predictions from a numerical model of the vibrational relaxation of anharmonic diatomic oscillators in supersonic expansions are used to show the extent to which the small anharmonicity of gases like CO can cause significant overpopulations of upper vibrational states. When mixtures of CO and N2 are considered, radiative gain on many of the vibration-rotation transitions of CO is predicted. Experiments are described that qualitatively verify the predictions by demonstrating laser oscillation in CO-N2 expansions. The resulting CO-N2 gasdynamic laser displays performance characteristics that equal or exceed those of similar CO2 lasers.

  15. Diatomic gasdynamic lasers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Predictions from a numerical model of the vibrational relaxation of anharmonic diatomic oscillators in supersonic expansions are used to show the extent to which the small anharmonicity of gases like CO can cause significant overpopulations of upper vibrational states. When mixtures of CO and N2 are considered, radiative gain on many of the vibration-rotation transitions of CO is predicted. Experiments are described that qualitatively verify the predictions by demonstrating laser oscillation in CO-N2 expansions. The resulting CO-N2 gasdynamic laser displays performance characteristics that equal or exceed those of similar CO2 lasers.

  16. Diatomic predissociation line widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Predissociation by rotation and curve crossing in diatomic molecules is discussed. The pattern of predissociation line widths is seen as providing a highly sensitive yardstick for the determination of unknown potential curves. In addition, the computation of such a pattern for given potential curves is considered a matter of routine, unless the predissociation happens to occur from an adiabatic potential curve. Analytic formulas are used to provide physical insight into the details of the predissociation pattern, to the extent that a direct inversion procedure is developed for determination of the repulsive potential curves for Type 1 predissociations.

  17. Managing phosphorus fertilizer to reduce algae, maintain water quality, and sustain yields in water-seeded rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In water-seeded rice systems blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) hinder early-season crop growth by dislodging rice seedlings and reducing light. Since algae are often phosphorus (P) limited, we investigated whether changing the timing of P fertilizer application could reduce algae without reducing cro...

  18. SYMBIOSIS (2008) 46, 153160 2008 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Changes in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae

    E-print Network

    2008-01-01

    in chloroplast structure in lichenized algae Ond ej Peksa1,2* and Pavel kaloud2 1 The West Bohemian Museum in the systematic classification of trebouxioid algae. However, in different ontogenetic, physiological the lichen thallus. Keywords: Confocal laser scanning microscopy, green algae, isolation, Lecanorales

  19. The Effects of Bryophyte Morphology on Epiphytic Diatom Distribution in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, J. M.; Lowe, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Diatoms and aquatic bryophytes have specific habitat requirements and are easily accessible in the field, making them ideal taxa for assessing water quality and environmental change. Although they both inhabit the same substrates within streams, there is a dearth of information regarding the relationship between these two indicator organisms. With this study, we examined the relationship between bryophytes and their epiphytic diatom communities from streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We hypothesized that bryophyte morphologies with more crevices between leaves would provide algae with a more protected micro-environment, resulting in a higher density of diatoms on these taxa compared to bryophytes with greatly exposed leaves. In addition, we also expect that bryophytes rich in crevices will have a high relative abundance of non-rheophilic taxa. Diatom community structure on bryophytes was determined using light microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, bryophytes were examined to compare the distribution and density of diatoms on the abnate and adnate surfaces of leaves. Preliminary results indicate that diatom density is not correlated with bryophyte species.

  20. Evolutionary origins, molecular cloning and expression of carotenoid hydroxylases in eukaryotic photosynthetic algae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthophylls, oxygenated derivatives of carotenes, play critical roles in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria, algae, and higher plants. Although the xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway of algae is largely unknown, it is of particular interest because they have a very complicated evolutionary history. Carotenoid hydroxylase (CHY) is an important protein that plays essential roles in xanthophylls biosynthesis. With the availability of 18 sequenced algal genomes, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of chy genes and explored their distribution, structure, evolution, origins, and expression. Results Overall 60 putative chy genes were identified and classified into two major subfamilies (bch and cyp97) according to their domain structures. Genes in the bch subfamily were found in 10 green algae and 1 red alga, but absent in other algae. In the phylogenetic tree, bch genes of green algae and higher plants share a common ancestor and are of non-cyanobacterial origin, whereas that of red algae is of cyanobacteria. The homologs of cyp97a/c genes were widespread only in green algae, while cyp97b paralogs were seen in most of algae. Phylogenetic analysis on cyp97 genes supported the hypothesis that cyp97b is an ancient gene originated before the formation of extant algal groups. The cyp97a gene is more closely related to cyp97c in evolution than to cyp97b. The two cyp97 genes were isolated from the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis, and transcriptional expression profiles of chy genes were observed under high light stress of different wavelength. Conclusions Green algae received a ?-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway from host organisms. Although red algae inherited the pathway from cyanobacteria during primary endosymbiosis, it remains unclear in Chromalveolates. The ?-xanthophylls biosynthetic pathway is a common feature in green algae and higher plants. The origination of cyp97a/c is most likely due to gene duplication before divergence of green algae and higher plants. Protein domain structures and expression analyses in green alga H. pluvialis indicate that various chy genes are in different manners response to light. The knowledge of evolution of chy genes in photosynthetic eukaryotes provided information of gene cloning and functional investigation of chy genes in algae in the future. PMID:23834441

  1. The Diatom EST Database

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, Uma; Montsant, Anton; Goll, Johannes; Krishnasamy, S.; Rajyashri, K. R.; Patell, Villoo Morawala; Bowler, Chris

    2005-01-01

    The Diatom EST database provides integrated access to expressed sequence tag (EST) data from two eukaryotic microalgae of the class Bacillariophyceae, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The database currently contains sequences of close to 30?000 ESTs organized into PtDB, the P.tricornutum EST database, and TpDB, the T.pseudonana EST database. The EST sequences were clustered and assembled into a non-redundant set for each organism, and these non-redundant sequences were then subjected to automated annotation using similarity searches against protein and domain databases. EST sequences, clusters of contiguous sequences, their annotation and analysis with reference to the publicly available databases, and a codon usage table derived from a subset of sequences from PtDB and TpDB can all be accessed in the Diatom EST Database. The underlying RDBMS enables queries over the raw and annotated EST data and retrieval of information through a user-friendly web interface, with options to perform keyword and BLAST searches. The EST data can also be retrieved based on Pfam domains, Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontologies (GO) assigned to them by similarity searches. The Database is available at http://avesthagen.sznbowler.com. PMID:15608213

  2. Antheraxanthin, a light harvesting carotenoid found in a chromophyte alga. [Chrysophaera magna Becher, Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    SciTech Connect

    Alberte, R.S.; Andersen, R.A.

    1986-02-01

    The pigments of the chromophyte freshwater alga, Chrysophaera magna Belcher were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to reveal the presence of chlorophylls a and c, ..beta..-carotene, fucoxanthin, and antheraxanthin. The presence of antheraxanthin was verified by comparison of TLC R/sub F/ values, HPLC retention times, and absorption features to those of authentic, synthetic antheraxanthin. Antheraxanthin accounted for about 15% of the total carotenoid content of C. magna. The molar ratio of the major carotenoids was antheraxanthin:fucoxanthin:..beta..-carotene, 1:2.3:3.3. The whole-cell absorption spectrum revealed a broad band between 470 and 520 nanometers which was attributed to fucoxanthin and antheraxanthin in vivo. Upon extraction in hydrocarbon, this broad absorption region was lost. The in vivo fluorescence excitation spectrum for 680 nm emission revealed the energy transfer activities and light harvesting roles of chlorophylls a and c, and fucoxanthin. In addition, an excitation band was resolved at 487 nanometers which could be attributed only to antheraxanthin. Comparison of whole-cell fluorescence excitation spectra of C. magna with the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, which possesses fucoxanthin but not antheraxanthin, supports the assignment of the 487 nm band to antheraxanthin. This is the first report of a photosynthetic light harvesting function of the xanthophyll, antheraxanthin. This carotenoid broadens the absorption cross-section for photosynthesis in C. magna and extends light harvesting into the green portion of the spectrum.

  3. Diatoms as a tracer of hydrological connectivity: the Oak Creek case study (Oregon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marta; Martínez-Carreras, Nuria; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    The vast heterogeneity and complexity of rainfall-runoff transformation processes expresses itself in a multitude of water sources and flowpaths - ultimately resulting in the well-known intricacy of hydrological connectivity. Pioneering work of Pfister et al. (2009) conducted in the Weierbach catchment (0.45 km2, NW Luxembourg, semi-oceanic climate) demonstrated the potential for diatoms (unicellular, eukaryotic algae) to be used as a tracer of hydrological connectivity. Diatoms originating from terrestrial habitats had been shown to be systematically flushed from the riparian areas into the stream during storm events. Here, we present a study conducted in the Oak Creek(0.17 km2, Oregon, Mediterranean climate), characterised by a large riparian area. Our first working hypothesis (H1) stipulates that diatoms are an ubiquitous tracer of fast hydrological flowpaths. The second hypothesis (H2) states that the riparian area is the major reservoir of terrestrial diatoms that contributes to the flushing process during rainfall events. A winter rainfall-runoff event was monitored in March 2012. Diatom samples were collected from soil, moss, epipelon and streamwater in order to characterise the communities along the hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) continuum. Diatoms in each sample were also assigned to different wetness categories (according to Van Dam et al., 1994). The catchment was instrumented with an ISCO automatic streamwater sampler and the samples were analysed for conductivity, 18O, 2H, chemical elements and presence/abundance of diatoms belonging to different wetness categories. Our results show that the percentage of diatom species originating from habitats located outside of the stream evolves along the rising and falling limbs of the hydrograph. This observation confirms the event-related flushing of diatoms from terrestrial habitats to the stream and, consequently, the potential for diatoms to be used for the detection of hydrological connectivity in the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum (H1). Moreover, almost no strictly terrestrial diatoms were found in the stream during the event, indicating the majority of the diatoms (identified as aerophytic) being exported from the riparian area (H2).

  4. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se, especially in low phosphate regimes such as oligotrophic waters and late stage phytoplankton blooms.

  5. The Hawaiian freshwater algae biodiversity survey (2009–2014): systematic and biogeographic trends with an emphasis on the macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A remarkable range of environmental conditions is present in the Hawaiian Islands due to their gradients of elevation, rainfall and island age. Despite being well known as a location for the study of evolutionary processes and island biogeography, little is known about the composition of the non-marine algal flora of the archipelago, its degree of endemism, or affinities with other floras. We conducted a biodiversity survey of the non-marine macroalgae of the six largest main Hawaiian Islands using molecular and microscopic assessment techniques. We aimed to evaluate whether endemism or cosmopolitanism better explain freshwater algal distribution patterns, and provide a baseline data set for monitoring future biodiversity changes in the Hawaiian Islands. Results 1,786 aquatic and terrestrial habitats and 1,407 distinct collections of non-marine macroalgae were collected from the islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Maui, Lanai and Hawaii from the years 2009–2014. Targeted habitats included streams, wet walls, high elevation bogs, taro fields, ditches and flumes, lakes/reservoirs, cave walls and terrestrial areas. Sites that lacked freshwater macroalgae were typically terrestrial or wet wall habitats that were sampled for diatoms and other microalgae. Approximately 50% of the identifications were of green algae, with lesser proportions of diatoms, red algae, cyanobacteria, xanthophytes and euglenoids. 898 DNA sequences were generated representing eight different markers, which enabled an assessment of the number of taxonomic entities for genera collected as part of the survey. Forty-four well-characterized taxa were assessed for global distribution patterns. This analysis revealed no clear biogeographic affinities of the flora, with 27.3% characterized as “cosmopolitan”, 11.4% “endemic”, and 61.3% as intermediate. Conclusions The Hawaiian freshwater algal biodiversity survey represents the first comprehensive effort to characterize the non-marine algae of a tropical region in the world using both morphological and molecular tools. Survey data were entered in the Hawaiian Freshwater Algal Database, which serves as a digital repository of photographs and micrographs, georeferenced localities and DNA sequence data. These analyses yielded an updated checklist of the non-marine macroalgae of the Hawaiian Islands, and revealed varied biogeographic affinities of the flora that are likely a product of both natural and anthropogenic dispersal. PMID:25343968

  6. Algae (Microcystis and Scenedesmus) absorption spectra and its application on Chlorophyll a retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Chen, Maosi; Wang, Qiao; Gao, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Blue algae and green algae are the dominant phytoplankton groups that contribute to the eutrophication and the water bloom in inland water of China. The absorption coefficients (spectra) of the algae, which do not change with its intrinsic optical characteristics and the observation geometry, are strictly additive quantities. The characteristics of the absorption spectra of the two algae are presented. The pure blue algae and the pure green algae cultured in the laboratory environment are diluted and mixed at ten volume ratios. The Quantitative Filter Technique was applied to measure their absorption spectra. The "hot-ethanol extraction" method was chosen to calculate their concentration of Chlorophyll a. The retrieval algorithm developed in this study extracts the mapping information between each individual alga and their Chlorophyll a concentration via Continuous Wavelet Transform, and retrieves the Chlorophyll a concentration of each alga in their mixture using a trust region optimizer. The results show that the retrieved and the measured Chlorophyll a concentrations of the blue algae and the green algae components in the ten mixture match well with the average relative error of 5.55%.

  7. Sensitivity of freshwater periphytic diatoms to agricultural herbicides.

    PubMed

    Debenest, T; Pinelli, E; Coste, M; Silvestre, J; Mazzella, N; Madigou, C; Delmas, F

    2009-06-01

    The biomonitoring of pesticide pollution in streams and rivers using algae such as diatoms remains difficult. The responses of diatom communities to toxic stress in stream water are disturbed by the variations of environmental parameters. In this study, periphytic algae collected in situ were exposed under controlled conditions to two major herbicides used in French agriculture (isoproturon and s-metolachlor). Three exposure regimes were tested: 5 and 30 microg L(-1) for 6 days and 30 microg L(-1) for 3 days followed by a recovery period of 3 days. The algal biomasses were assessed from pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a and c) and from live cell density. The highest concentration (30 microg L(-1)) of isoproturon inhibited the biomass increase statistically significantly. In periphyton exposed to 5 and 30 microg L(-1) of s-metolachlor, chlorophyll c concentration and live cell density were also statistically significantly lower than in the control. Periphyton left to recover after reduced exposure duration (3 days) showed higher growth rates after treatment with s-metolachlor than with isoproturon. Taxonomic identifications showed that species like Melosira varians, Nitzschia dissipata and Cocconeis placentula were not affected by the herbicide exposure. Other species like Eolimna minima and Navicula reichardtiana were more sensitive. Studying diatoms according to their trophic mode showed that facultative heterotroph species were statistically significantly favoured by isoproturon exposure at the highest concentration. Results obtained with s-metolachlor exposure showed a disturbance of cell multiplication rather than that of photosynthesis. These results suggest that photosynthesis inhibitors like isoproturon favour species able to survive when the autotroph mode is inhibited. PMID:19342109

  8. Interactions of the Algicidal Bacterium Kordia algicida with Diatoms: Regulated Protease Excretion for Specific Algal Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors. PMID:21695044

  9. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Dunahay, Terri Goodman (2710 Arbor Glen Pl., Boulder, CO 80304); Roessler, Paul G. (15905 Ellsworth Pl., Golden, CO 80401); Jarvis, Eric E. (3720 Smuggler Pl., Boulder, CO 80303)

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae which includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae.

  10. Method to transform algae, materials therefor, and products produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Dunahay, T.G.; Roessler, P.G.; Jarvis, E.E.

    1997-08-26

    Disclosed is a method to transform chlorophyll C-containing algae. The method includes introducing a recombinant molecule comprising a nucleic acid molecule encoding a dominant selectable marker operatively linked to an algal regulatory control sequence into a chlorophyll C-containing alga in such a manner that the marker is produced by the alga. In a preferred embodiment the algal regulatory control sequence is derived from a diatom and preferably Cyclotella cryptica. Also disclosed is a chimeric molecule having one or more regulatory control sequences derived from one or more chlorophyll C-containing algae operatively linked to a nucleic acid molecule encoding a selectable marker, an RNA molecule and/or a protein, wherein the nucleic acid molecule does not normally occur with one or more of the regulatory control sequences. Further, specifically disclosed are molecules pACCNPT10, pACCNPT4.8 and pACCNPT5.1. The methods and materials of the present invention provide the ability to accomplish stable genetic transformation of chlorophyll C-containing algae. 2 figs.

  11. Stuart R. Stidolph diatom atlas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stidolph, S.R.; Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Smith, K.E.L.; Kraberg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Stuart R. Stidolph Diatom Atlas" is a comprehensive volume of diatom taxa identified and micrographed by Stuart R. Stidoph during the 1980s and 1990s. The samples were collected from marine coasts of various geographic regions within tropical and subtropical climates. The plates included within this report have never been published and are being published by the USGS as an online reference so that others may have access to this incredible collection.

  12. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    ). Native that prefers clear, rocky, and vegetated stream pools and lake margins. It is carnivorous, and its small mammals. Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum). Carnivorous night feeders, eating fishes such as yellow (Cyprinus carpio). Large, omnivorous fish. Uproot plants on which ducks feed, muddy the water, and destroy

  13. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    Freshwater Drum Gizzard Shad Yellow Perch Emerald Shiner Channel Catfish Rainbow Smelt Raptorial waterflea. Emerald shiner (Notropis atherinoides). Very abundant in Lake Erie where they are important forage

  14. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    herring Deepwater Sculpin Rainbow Smelt Raptorial waterflea Brook Trout Kiyi Mayfly nymphsLake Sturgeon sculpin (Myoxocephalus quadricornis thompsonii). A native glacial relic that lives at the bottom of cold water bays and basins, usually in soft sediments. The presence of this sensitive organism indicates good

  15. Blue-green algae Flagellates Rotifers

    E-print Network

    Zebra/Quagga mussels MollusksChironomids Amphipods Opossum Shrimp Lake Whitefish Invasive waterflea of amphipod found in fish diets that began declining in the late 1990's. Opossum shrimp (Mysis relicta

  16. Natural Abundance 14C Content of Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP) from Three Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Namikoshi, Michio; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Teruaki; Ukai, Kazuyo

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of the natural abundance 14C content of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) from two edible brown algae, Undaria pinnatifida and Laminaria japonica, and a green alga, Ulva sp., revealed that the DBP was naturally produced. The natural abundance 14C content of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) obtained from the same algae was about 50–80% of the standard sample and the 14C content of the petrochemical (industrial) products of DBP and DEHP were below the detection limit.

  17. Diatom milking: a review and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Vandana; Manoylov, Kalina M; Gateau, Hélčne; Blanckaert, Vincent; Hérault, Josiane; Pencréac'h, Gaëlle; Marchand, Justine; Gordon, Richard; Schoefs, Benoît

    2015-05-01

    The rise of human populations and the growth of cities contribute to the depletion of natural resources, increase their cost, and create potential climatic changes. To overcome difficulties in supplying populations and reducing the resource cost, a search for alternative pharmaceutical, nanotechnology, and energy sources has begun. Among the alternative sources, microalgae are the most promising because they use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biomass and/or valuable compounds. Once produced, the biomass is ordinarily harvested and processed (downstream program). Drying, grinding, and extraction steps are destructive to the microalgal biomass that then needs to be renewed. The extraction and purification processes generate organic wastes and require substantial energy inputs. Altogether, it is urgent to develop alternative downstream processes. Among the possibilities, milking invokes the concept that the extraction should not kill the algal cells. Therefore, it does not require growing the algae anew. In this review, we discuss research on milking of diatoms. The main themes are (a) development of alternative methods to extract and harvest high added value compounds; (b) design of photobioreactors; PMID:25939034

  18. Genomic reduction and evolution of novel genetic membranes and protein-targeting machinery in eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras (meta-algae).

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2003-01-29

    Chloroplasts originated just once, from cyanobacteria enslaved by a biciliate protozoan to form the plant kingdom (green plants, red and glaucophyte algae), but subsequently, were laterally transferred to other lineages to form eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras or meta-algae. This process of secondary symbiogenesis (permanent merger of two phylogenetically distinct eukaryote cells) has left remarkable traces of its evolutionary role in the more complex topology of the membranes surrounding all non-plant (meta-algal) chloroplasts. It took place twice, soon after green and red algae diverged over 550 Myr ago to form two independent major branches of the eukaryotic tree (chromalveolates and cabozoa), comprising both meta-algae and numerous secondarily non-photosynthetic lineages. In both cases, enslavement probably began by evolving a novel targeting of endomembrane vesicles to the perialgal vacuole to implant host porter proteins for extracting photosynthate. Chromalveolates arose by such enslavement of a unicellular red alga and evolution of chlorophyll c to form the kingdom Chromista and protozoan infrakingdom Alveolata, which diverged from the ancestral chromalveolate chimaera. Cabozoa arose when the common ancestor of euglenoids and cercozoan chlorarachnean algae enslaved a tetraphyte green alga with chlorophyll a and b. I suggest that in cabozoa the endomembrane vesicles originally budded from the Golgi, whereas in chromalveolates they budded from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) independently of Golgi-targeted vesicles, presenting a potentially novel target for drugs against alveolate Sporozoa such as malaria parasites and Toxoplasma. These hypothetical ER-derived vesicles mediated fusion of the perialgal vacuole and rough ER (RER) in the ancestral chromist, placing the former red alga within the RER lumen. Subsequently, this chimaera diverged to form cryptomonads, which retained the red algal nucleus as a nucleomorph (NM) with approximately 464 protein-coding genes (30 encoding plastid proteins) and a red or blue phycobiliprotein antenna pigment, and the chromobiotes (heterokonts and haptophytes), which lost phycobilins and evolved the brown carotenoid fucoxanthin that colours brown seaweeds, diatoms and haptophytes. Chromobiotes transferred the 30 genes to the nucleus and lost the NM genome and nuclear-pore complexes, but retained its membrane as the periplastid reticulum (PPR), putatively the phospholipid factory of the periplastid space (former algal cytoplasm), as did the ancestral alveolate independently. The chlorarachnean NM has three minute chromosomes bearing approximately 300 genes riddled with pygmy introns. I propose that the periplastid membrane (PPM, the former algal plasma membrane) of chromalveolates, and possibly chlorarachneans, grows by fusion of vesicles emanating from the NM envelope or PPR. Dinoflagellates and euglenoids independently lost the PPM and PPR (after diverging from Sporozoa and chlorarachneans, respectively) and evolved triple chloroplast envelopes comprising the original plant double envelope and an extra outermost membrane, the EM, derived from the perialgal vacuole. In all metaalgae most chloroplast proteins are coded by nuclear genes and enter the chloroplast by using bipartite targeting sequences--an upstream signal sequence for entering the ER and a downstream chloroplast transit sequence. I present a new theory for the four-fold diversification of the chloroplast OM protein translocon following its insertion into the PPM to facilitate protein translocation across it (of both periplastid and plastid proteins). I discuss evidence from genome sequencing and other sources on the contrasting modes of protein targeting, cellular integration, and evolution of these two major lineages of eukaryote "cells within cells". They also provide powerful evidence for natural selection's effectiveness in eliminating most functionless DNA and therefore of a universally useful non-genic function for nuclear non-coding DNA, i.e. most DNA in the biosphere, and dramatic examples of genomic redu

  19. Genomic reduction and evolution of novel genetic membranes and protein-targeting machinery in eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras (meta-algae).

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier-Smith, T

    2003-01-01

    Chloroplasts originated just once, from cyanobacteria enslaved by a biciliate protozoan to form the plant kingdom (green plants, red and glaucophyte algae), but subsequently, were laterally transferred to other lineages to form eukaryote-eukaryote chimaeras or meta-algae. This process of secondary symbiogenesis (permanent merger of two phylogenetically distinct eukaryote cells) has left remarkable traces of its evolutionary role in the more complex topology of the membranes surrounding all non-plant (meta-algal) chloroplasts. It took place twice, soon after green and red algae diverged over 550 Myr ago to form two independent major branches of the eukaryotic tree (chromalveolates and cabozoa), comprising both meta-algae and numerous secondarily non-photosynthetic lineages. In both cases, enslavement probably began by evolving a novel targeting of endomembrane vesicles to the perialgal vacuole to implant host porter proteins for extracting photosynthate. Chromalveolates arose by such enslavement of a unicellular red alga and evolution of chlorophyll c to form the kingdom Chromista and protozoan infrakingdom Alveolata, which diverged from the ancestral chromalveolate chimaera. Cabozoa arose when the common ancestor of euglenoids and cercozoan chlorarachnean algae enslaved a tetraphyte green alga with chlorophyll a and b. I suggest that in cabozoa the endomembrane vesicles originally budded from the Golgi, whereas in chromalveolates they budded from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) independently of Golgi-targeted vesicles, presenting a potentially novel target for drugs against alveolate Sporozoa such as malaria parasites and Toxoplasma. These hypothetical ER-derived vesicles mediated fusion of the perialgal vacuole and rough ER (RER) in the ancestral chromist, placing the former red alga within the RER lumen. Subsequently, this chimaera diverged to form cryptomonads, which retained the red algal nucleus as a nucleomorph (NM) with approximately 464 protein-coding genes (30 encoding plastid proteins) and a red or blue phycobiliprotein antenna pigment, and the chromobiotes (heterokonts and haptophytes), which lost phycobilins and evolved the brown carotenoid fucoxanthin that colours brown seaweeds, diatoms and haptophytes. Chromobiotes transferred the 30 genes to the nucleus and lost the NM genome and nuclear-pore complexes, but retained its membrane as the periplastid reticulum (PPR), putatively the phospholipid factory of the periplastid space (former algal cytoplasm), as did the ancestral alveolate independently. The chlorarachnean NM has three minute chromosomes bearing approximately 300 genes riddled with pygmy introns. I propose that the periplastid membrane (PPM, the former algal plasma membrane) of chromalveolates, and possibly chlorarachneans, grows by fusion of vesicles emanating from the NM envelope or PPR. Dinoflagellates and euglenoids independently lost the PPM and PPR (after diverging from Sporozoa and chlorarachneans, respectively) and evolved triple chloroplast envelopes comprising the original plant double envelope and an extra outermost membrane, the EM, derived from the perialgal vacuole. In all metaalgae most chloroplast proteins are coded by nuclear genes and enter the chloroplast by using bipartite targeting sequences--an upstream signal sequence for entering the ER and a downstream chloroplast transit sequence. I present a new theory for the four-fold diversification of the chloroplast OM protein translocon following its insertion into the PPM to facilitate protein translocation across it (of both periplastid and plastid proteins). I discuss evidence from genome sequencing and other sources on the contrasting modes of protein targeting, cellular integration, and evolution of these two major lineages of eukaryote "cells within cells". They also provide powerful evidence for natural selection's effectiveness in eliminating most functionless DNA and therefore of a universally useful non-genic function for nuclear non-coding DNA, i.e. most DNA in the biosphere, and dramatic examples of genomic reduction. I b

  20. Bio-crude transcriptomics: Gene discovery and metabolic network reconstruction for the biosynthesis of the terpenome of the hydrocarbon oil-producing green alga, Botryococcus braunii race B (Showa)*

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Molnár, István; Lopez, David; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Hackett, Jeremiah D.

    2012-10-30

    Microalgae hold promise for yielding a biofuel feedstock that is sustainable, carbon-neutral, distributed, and only minimally disruptive for the production of food and feed by traditional agriculture. Amongst oleaginous eukaryotic algae, the B race of Botryococcus braunii is unique in that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons of terpenoid origin. These are comparable to fossil crude oil, and are sequestered outside the cells in a communal extracellular polymeric matrix material. The biosynthetic engineering of terpenoid bio-crude production requires identification of genes and reconstruction of metabolic pathways responsible for production of both hydrocarbons and other metabolites of the alga thatmore »compete for photosynthetic carbon and energy.« less

  1. 77 FR 4060 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... to take from the Palmer Station area approximately 20 brown marine algae, 30 green marine algae, 10 red marine algae, and 10 diatom marine algae to sublimate cultures of ] filamentous Antarctic... interactions of epiphytic and endophytic algae (both filamentous macroalgae and diatoms) with larger...

  2. 77 FR 3799 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... plans to take from the Palmer Station area approximately 20 brown marine algae, 30 green marine algae, 10 red marine algae, and 10 diatom marine algae to sublimate cultures of filamentous Antarctic... interactions of epiphytic and endophytic algae (both filamentous macroalgae and diatoms) with larger...

  3. MONITORING CHLOROPHYLL-A AS A MEASURE OF ALGAE IN LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake water quality in five marinas on Lake Texoma was determined over a two year period. Quality parameters were methyl tert-butyl ether, nitrate, some metals, fecal coliform and algae. Common blue-green algae can produce a toxin harmful to other aquatic organisms and humans. ...

  4. 428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE

    E-print Network

    Govindjee

    428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA BBA 46126 pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE on the "slow" (min) time course of Chlorophyll a fluorescence yield in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa conformational changes) of the chloroplast to the yield of chlorophyll a fluorescence in vivo. Light

  5. Metabolic Influence of Psychrophilic Diatoms on Travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3? etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  6. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong natural scenic district of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season.Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite.Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3? etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25590097

  7. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-06-01

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis. PMID:26065408

  8. Metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms on travertines at the Huanglong Natural Scenic District of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Dong, Faqin; Ehrlich, Hermann; Zhao, Xueqing; Liu, Mingxue; Dai, Qunwei; Li, Qiongfang; An, Dejun; Dong, Hailiang

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are a highly diversified group of algae that are widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems, and various species have different nutrient and temperature requirements for optimal growth. Here, we describe unusual psychrophilic diatoms of Cymbella in a travertine deposition environment in southwestern China in winter season. Travertine surfaces are colonized by these psychrophilic diatoms, which form biofilms of extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) with active metabolic activities in extremely cold conditions. The travertine in Huanglong, is a typical single crystalline calcite with anisotropic lattice distortions of unit cell parameters along axes of a and c, and this structure is suggestive of some level of metabolic mediation on mineralization. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) results further confirmed the occurrence of biogenic distortion of the crystal lattice of travertine calcite. Overall, our results imply that the metabolic influence of psychrophilic diatoms may be particularly important for promoting formation and dissolution of travertine in extremely cold environments of Huanglong. The EPS of psychrophilic diatoms will protect travertine from HCO3- etching and provide template for forming travertine when water re-flowing, in warm season. PMID:25522049

  9. Low-Molecular-Weight Metabolites from Diatoms: Structures, Biological Roles and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stonik, Valentin; Stonik, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are abundant and important biological components of the marine environment that biosynthesize diverse natural products. These microalgae are rich in various lipids, carotenoids, sterols and isoprenoids, some of them containing toxins and other metabolites. Several groups of diatom natural products have attracted great interest due to their potential practical application as energy sources (biofuel), valuable food constituents, and prospective materials for nanotechnology. In addition, hydrocarbons, which are used in climate reconstruction, polyamines which participate in biomineralization, new apoptotic agents against tumor cells, attractants and deterrents that regulate the biochemical communications between marine species in seawaters have also been isolated from diatoms. However, chemical studies on these microalgae are complicated by difficulties, connected with obtaining their biomass, and the influence of nutrients and contaminators in their environment as well as by seasonal and climatic factors on the biosynthesis of the corresponding natural products. Overall, the number of chemically studied diatoms is lower than that of other algae, but further studies, particularly those connected with improvements in the isolation and structure elucidation technique as well as the genomics of diatoms, promise both to increase the number of studied species with isolated biologically active natural products and to provide a clearer perception of their biosynthesis. PMID:26065408

  10. Dissociation of diatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections has been applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of rotational and vibrational states. Although the preexponential factor of the Arrhenius rate expression is shown to be a complex function of the dimensionless activation energy, the average over all states in the ladder is well represented by a single factor that varies about as T exp (-n), where the coefficient n is the order of unity. This relation agrees very well with experimental data for dissociation of O2 and N2, for example. The results validate previous empirical assignment of a single preexponential factor in the Arrhenius expression and justify the extrapolation of the expression well beyond the range of data. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators the results are about the same as for harmonic oscillators, and the dissociation from a ladder of equilibrium rotational and nonequilibrium vibrational states is close to an analytic approximation provided by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare for harmonic oscillators all dissociating from the ground rotational state.

  11. Relationship between diatom thanatocoenoses and anthropogenically-induced environmental changes in the Seto Inland Sea, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, K.; Hirose, K.; Sako, M.; Irizuki, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Seto Inland Sea (SIS), which is surrounded by Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku islands, is the largest enclosed sea in Japan. Water and bottom environments there deteriorated due to various anthropogenically-induced environmental changes from 1955 to 1973 (e.g. Yanagi, 2008). Then, several effluents have been regulated since the 1980s. Diatoms are one of important unicellular algae as a primary producer in waters. As diatoms respond rapidly to the nutrient supply in waters, they are good indicator of eutrophication. Thus, we clarified the spatio-temporal changes of diatom thanatocoenoses in Harima-Nada, eastern part of the SIS, and compared them with previous results in other areas in the SIS (Hirose et al., 2008; Hirose and Gotoh, 2009; Sako et al., unpublished data) to discuss the relationship between diatom thanatocoenoses and degree of anthropogenically-induced environmental changes in the SIS. The surface and/or core sediments were collected from the northern, northwestern, and southern parts of Harima-Nada. We conducted 14C, 210Pb and 137Cs dating of cores, diatom analysis, CHNS analysis, and grain size analysis of sediment samples. The results showed that marine environments in all areas of Harima-Nada deteriorated recently and the abundance of planktonic diatoms increased due to intense eutrophication. The comparison with the present and previous studies lead that Neodelphineis pelagica, small Thalassiosira spp., and resting spores of Chaetoceros spp. dominated other taxa in the most areas of the SIS since the mid-20th century, and the relative frequencies of the latter two taxa seem to be useful indicators for evaluating modern marine conditions. References: Yanagi (2008) Kouseisha-Kouseikaku Co., pp. 130; Hirose and Gotoh (2009) Diatom, 25, p. 21-36; Hirose et al. (2008) The Quaternary Research, 47, 287-296.

  12. Determining the relative sensitivity of benthic diatoms to atrazine using rapid toxicity testing: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rebecca J; Mitrovic, Simon M; Kefford, Ben J

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides pose a potential threat to aquatic ecosystems, especially to phototrophic organisms such as benthic diatoms. Benthic diatoms may be a valuable indicator of the toxic impacts of herbicides in aquatic systems. However, this requires information on the herbicide sensitivity of a wide range of freshwater benthic diatom taxa. Unfortunately this information is only available for a limited number of species as current methods of developing new algae toxicity tests on individual taxa are lengthy and costly. To address this issue, we developed a new rapid toxicity test method to test natural benthic communities, from which the relative herbicide sensitivity of many individual taxa can be derived. This involved the collection of natural benthic communities from rocks in situ, which were placed directly into laboratory toxicity tests. Sensitivity data for several diatom genera in a 48 hour exposure toxicity test were produced, without the need for cultures or multiple site visits. After exposure to the highest treatment of atrazine (500 ?g L(-1)) there were significant declines of healthy cells in the most sensitive genera: Gomphonema declined by 74%, Amphora by 62%, Cymbella by 54% and Ulnaria by 34% compared to control levels. In contrast, the genera, Eunotia, Achnanthidium and Navicula, had no statistically significant decline in cell health. This method can identify the diatom taxa most at risk of herbicide toxicity within the natural benthic diatom community. The rapid toxicity testing method presented is a simple and effective method to obtain sensitivity data for multiple taxa within a natural benthic diatom community in a relatively short period of time. PMID:24742551

  13. Potential impact of stress activated retrotransposons on genome evolution in a marine diatom

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile DNA sequences present in the genomes of most organisms. They have been extensively studied in animals, fungi, and plants, and have been shown to have important functions in genome dynamics and species evolution. Recent genomic data can now enlarge the identification and study of TEs to other branches of the eukaryotic tree of life. Diatoms, which belong to the heterokont group, are unicellular eukaryotic algae responsible for around 40% of marine primary productivity. The genomes of a centric diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and a pennate diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, that likely diverged around 90 Mya, have recently become available. Results In the present work, we establish that LTR retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the most abundant TEs inhabiting these genomes, with a much higher presence in the P. tricornutum genome. We show that the LTR-RTs found in diatoms form two new phylogenetic lineages that appear to be diatom specific and are also found in environmental samples taken from different oceans. Comparative expression analysis in P. tricornutum cells cultured under 16 different conditions demonstrate high levels of transcriptional activity of LTR retrotransposons in response to nitrate limitation and upon exposure to diatom-derived reactive aldehydes, which are known to induce stress responses and cell death. Regulatory aspects of P. tricornutum retrotransposon transcription also include the occurrence of nitrate limitation sensitive cis-regulatory components within LTR elements and cytosine methylation dynamics. Differential insertion patterns in different P. tricornutum accessions isolated from around the world infer the role of LTR-RTs in generating intraspecific genetic variability. Conclusion Based on these findings we propose that LTR-RTs may have been important for promoting genome rearrangements in diatoms. PMID:20028555

  14. Picoeucaryot alga infecting blue mussel Mytilus edulis in southern Norway.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stein; Harkestad, Lisbeth S; Stene, Rolf-Olav; Renault, Tristan

    2005-01-25

    During summer 2001, blue mussels Mytilus edulis with abnormal shell growth were collected near Kragerř, southern Norway. The mussels had green spots in their mantle tissues, mainly posteriorly and ventrally, and in the adductor muscle. Mussels from 4 sites had a prevalence of green spots varying from 2 to 71% that correlated well with shell deformities. Histological examination revealed the presence of round or ovoid algae, 0.9 to 1.5 x 1.2 to 2.4 microm, free within haemocytes and in the lesions, characterised by an inflammatory response and the presence of cellular debris. The alga contain a relatively large nucleus, 1 chloroplast and 1 mitochondrion. Size and morphology suggest that the alga might be a picoeucaryot green alga. Infection of mussel tissues appears to start in the posterior mantle edge, near the siphons, and spread anterior-ventrally in the mantle connective and storage tissues-occasionally spots were also found in the gonad follicles. Large infected areas were also observed in sinuses within the adductor muscle. Only mussels that were 3 yr old or more were infected. Deformations apparently resulted from years of continuous shell formation by a contracted, partly deformed mantle. Most deformed mussels had eroded shells, allowing some light penetration through the exposed, thin nacre. Young, thin-shelled mussels were not infected. The present work suggests that the alga has, at least partially, a parasitic relationship with the mussels, and is associated with pathological alterations in mussel tissues. PMID:15759797

  15. The protists include a weird and wonderful potpourri of

    E-print Network

    McFadden, Geoff

    in endosymbiosis: glaucophytes 000 Red algae: rhodophytes 000 Green algae: chlorophytes 000 Applications Green: chrysophytes 000 Chalk comes from dead algae: haptophytes 000 Algae in glass houses: diatoms 000 Brown algae (such as the `algae') are now known to be only distantly related. Thus, in this chapter we will not use

  16. Hydrogeological and landscape controls on terrestrial diatoms input to the stream network during rainfall-runoff events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Carlos Eduardo; Klaus, Julian; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Ector, Luc; Pfister, Laurent

    2014-05-01

    We explore the dynamics of terrestrial diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) in streamflow during rainfall-runoff events collected in seven nested catchments in the Attert River basin (Luxembourg, Europe). Our main objective is to provide a sound basis for the use of these microscopic algae for the identification and understanding of spatial patterns in runoff sources. Water samples (n=150) were simultaneously collected during precipitation events using automatic samplers. Diatom assemblages were identified and quantified (ca. 400 valves per sample). The fine-grained taxonomic treatment of the samples allowed the identification of 421 diatom species, among which 85 were considered terrestrial and/or aerophytic. Their occurrence is related to moisture content and associated to the respective hydrological category (i.e. Cat. 4: mainly occurring on wet and moist or temporarily dry places and Cat. 5: nearly exclusively occurring outside water bodies; Categories 1, 2 and 3 representing aquatic and/or very wet environments). In all seven sub-catchments terrestrial diatom abundance systematically increased during all sampled events as a response to increasing discharge and precipitation. Thus, the flushing of terrestrial diatoms mobilized during these events suggests a rapid connectivity between the soil surface and the stream water, despite the distinct richness and abundance of terrestrial diatoms in the different catchments. In event samples taken at peak discharge, terrestrial diatoms were more abundant in small forested streams reaching up to 40.8% and 70.0% of the diatom assemblages, respectively. In lowland reaches we found the lowest amount of terrestrial diatom valves (mean=0.91, min=0, max=4.2, n=15). We have also explored the effects of catchment complexity in terms of physiography, land use patterns, and lithology. The tested linear correlations between environmental factors and diatom distribution were primarily explained by land use (forest R2=0.70, grassland R2=0.59, urban area R2=0.44 and agriculture R2=0.44) and lithology categories (schists R2=0.89 and sandstones R2=0.48). Forest cover was the main landscape descriptor positively related to the highest abundances of terrestrial diatoms (r =0.75), while agriculture (r = -0.92), urban areas (r = -0.79) and grassland cover (r = -0.50) were negatively related to the maximum input of terrestrial diatoms. Although small forested areas located in the headwater streams do account for the overall richness of terrestrial diatom species, a 'dilution' effect (e.g. high turnover of assemblages) probably masks the presence of these species further downstream.

  17. Using phylogeny to model cell size evolution in marine and freshwater diatoms Teofil Nakov,1,* Edward C. Theriot,1,2 and Andrew J. Alverson 3

    E-print Network

    diatom cell size evolution in opposite directions, with larger sizes conferring benefits in marine that shape cell size evolution in phytoplankton would benefit from models that incorporate phylogeny unicellular algae are expected to evolve picoplanktonic (# 2 mm) dimensions, thereby maximizing their surface

  18. Do diatoms run downhill? Using biodiversity of terrestrial and aquatic diatoms to identify hydrological connectivity between aquatic zones in Luxembourg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; Wetzel, C. E.; Martinez-Carreras, N.; Frentress, J.; Ector, L.; Hoffmann, L.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Diatoms are siliceous unicellular algae, and range in size between a few and more than 500 micrometers. Diatoms are spread worldwide, live in many aquatic habitats, have many life forms and their short generation time make them respond rapidly to environmental changes. Their taxonomic diversity represents a valuable tool to assess water quality as each taxon has specific responses to environmental factors. Recently, diatoms have been used as tracers to detect the onset/cessation of surface runoff through binary classification of terrestrial and aquatic species in the Attert basin in Luxembourg. In order to continue the validation of these first results, we have collected samples during rain events at different seasons of the year using automatic stream water samplers, grab samples of diatoms from various terrestrial and subaerial substrates (bryophytes, litter and leaves), as well as from aquatic habitats (epilithon, epipelon and drift samples). This new type of information will be used to constrain assumptions of the conventional tracer-based hydrograph separation technique (i.e. using geochemistry and stable isotopes). The first results concerning the diatom flora, based on 39 samples, revealed 152 species belonging to 38 genera. The most species-rich genera were Pinnularia (15.8% - 24 taxa), Eunotia (13.2% - 20 taxa), Gomphonema (8.6% - 13 taxa), Navicula (7.2% - 11 taxa) and Stauroneis (5.3% - 8 taxa). The flora are mainly composed of oligotrophic and/or acidophilic taxa (32.0%), ubiquitous (14.0%) or poorly known ecologically species (43.0%). The most important taxa found in drift samples were Fragilariforma virescens, Fragilaria capucina sensu lato, Planothidium lanceolatum, Eunotia minor, Achnanthidium kranzii, Karayevia oblongella and Eunotia incisa. In the riparian zone (n = 10), 102 species were observed, with Eunotia exigua var. tenella, Eunotia botuliformis and Pinnularia perirrorata being among the most frequent. Epilithic samples from the main channel have been represented mainly by monoraphid species such as Achnanthidium subatomoides and Achnanthidium minutissimum. A general qualitative overview of the diatom flora - concerning specific ecological requirements of the taxa - showed that most diatom species are characteristic of the riparian zone (30%), while 12% are typical of the riparian/upland transition zone. Only 3% of species are strictly freshwater (Aquatic zone) forms and 8% stem from the aquatic/riparian zone. The qualitative analysis of drift collected by automatic samplers showed that during floods the origin of diatom species partly stems from riparian and/or terrestrial-upland habitats. Additional investigations over a longer period and range of events are being conducted. Furthermore, the study of the biodiversity of diatoms in this small catchment will also contribute to a better definition of the ecological preferences of many species which are still poorly known to date.

  19. Diatom paleoecology Pass Key core 37, Everglades National Park, Florida Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyle, Laura; Cooper, S.R.; Huvane, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    During the 20th century, there have been large-scale anthropogenic modifications to the South Florida ecosystem. The effects of these changes on Florida Bay and its biological communities are currently of political and scientific interest. This study is part of a larger effort to reconstruct the history of environmental changes in the bay, using paleoecological techniques. We are using diatom indicators preserved in Florida Bay sediments to infer long-term water quality, productivity, nutrient, and salinity changes. We are also obtaining information concerning the natural variability of the ecosystem. Diatoms are microscopic algae, the remains of which are generally well preserved in sediments, and their distributions are closely linked to water quality. Diatoms were extracted from a 70-cm sediment core collected from the Pass Key mudbank of Florida Bay by the U.S. Geological Survey. Between 300-500 diatom valves from each of 15 core samples were identified and counted. Estimates of absolute abundance, species richness, Shannon-Wiener diversity, and centric:pennate ratios were calculated for each sample that was counted. Information on the ecology of the diatom species is presented, and changes in diatom community composition are evaluated. Samples contained an average of four million diatom valves per gram of sediment. Major changes in the diatom community are evident down core. These include increases in the percent abundance of marine diatoms in the time period represented by the core, probably the result of increasing salinity at Pass Key. Benthic diatoms become less abundant in the top half of the core. This may be related to a number of factors including the die-off of sea grass beds or increased turbidity of the water column. Once the chronology of the Pass Key core 37 is established, these down-core changes can be related to historical events and compared with other indicators in the sedimentary record that are currently being investigated by U.S Geological Survey researchers. This report is preliminary and has not been reviewed for conformity with U.S. Geological Survey editorial standards or with the North American Stratigraphic Code. Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

  20. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.