Science.gov

Sample records for grey alder stands

  1. The impact of a pulsing groundwater table on greenhouse gas emissions in riparian grey alder stands.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ülo; Maddison, Martin; Soosaar, Kaido; Teemusk, Alar; Kanal, Arno; Uri, Veiko; Truu, Jaak

    2015-02-01

    Floods control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in floodplains; however, there is a lack of data on the impact of short-term events on emissions. We studied the short-term effect of changing groundwater (GW) depth on the emission of (GHG) carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in two riparian grey alder (Alnus incana) stands of different age in Kambja, southern Estonia, using the opaque static chamber (five replicates in each site) and gas chromatography methods. The average carbon and total nitrogen content in the soil of the old alder (OA) stand was significantly higher than in the young alder (YA) stand. In both stands, one part was chosen for water table manipulation (Manip) and another remained unchanged with a stable and deeper GW table. Groundwater table manipulation (flooding) significantly increases CH4 emission (average: YA-Dry 468, YA-Manip 8,374, OA-Dry 468, OA-Manip 4,187 μg C m(-2) h(-1)) and decreases both CO2 (average: OA-Dry 138, OA-Manip 80 mg C m(-2) h(-1)) and N2O emissions (average: OA-Dry 23.1, OA-Manip 11.8 μg N m(-2) h(-1)) in OA sites. There was no significant difference in CO2 and CH4 emissions between the OA and YA sites, whereas in OA sites with higher N concentration in the soil, the N2O emission was significantly higher than at the YA sites. The relative CO2 and CH4 emissions (the soil C stock-related share of gaseous losses) were higher in manipulated plots showing the highest values in the YA-Manip plot (0.03 and 0.0030 % C day(-1), respectively). The soil N stock-related N2O emission was very low achieving 0.000019 % N day(-1) in the OA-Dry plot. Methane emission shows a negative correlation with GW, whereas the 20 cm depth is a significant limit below which most of the produced CH4 is oxidized. In terms of CO2 and N2O, the deeper GW table significantly increases emission. In riparian zones of headwater streams, the short-term floods (e.g. those driven by extreme climate events) may significantly enhance

  2. Humus bacteria of Norway spruce stands: plant growth promoting properties and birch, red fescue and alder colonizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Elo; Maunuksela; Salkinoja-Salonen; Smolander; Haahtela

    2000-02-01

    We studied the potential of the humus layer of the Norway spruce stands to supply beneficial rhizobacteria to birch (Betula pendula), alder (Alnus incana) and fescue grass (Festuca rubra), representatives of pioneer vegetation after clear-cutting of the coniferous forest. Axenically grown seedlings of these species were inoculated with the acid spruce humus, pH 3.7-5.3. Actinorhizal propagules, capable of nodulating alder, were present in high density (10(3) g(-1)) in humus of long-term limed plots, whereas plots with nitrogen fertilization contained almost none (

  3. Description and identification of Alnus acuminata ectomycorrhizae from Argentinean alder stands.

    PubMed

    Pritsch, Karin; Becerra, Alejandra; Põlme, Sergei; Tedersoo, Leho; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the morphological and anatomical features of five unidentified ectomycorrhizal types of Alnus acuminata and to complement their identification based on ITS-rDNA sequence analysis. The combined approach of morphotyping and sequence analysis based on ITS sequence comparison with sequences contained in GenBank and the UNITE database let us assign three of the five field-collected ectomycorrhiza morphotypes to the tomentella-thelephora lineage that closely matched European and North American species. The sequencing results within Tomentella point toward alder specific clades within T. sublilacina, T. ellisii and T. stuposa sensu lato. The two other EcM morphotypes matched Lactarius omphaliiformis and a Russula sp. Better focused, concomitant fruit body surveys are needed for accurate identification of South American ectomycorrhizal fungi because of the evidence of cryptic speciation in both agaricoid and resupinate mycobionts. PMID:20943556

  4. Root tensile strength of grey alder and mountain maple grown on a coarse grained eco-engineered slope in the Swiss Alps related to wood anatomical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kink, Dimitri; Bast, Alexander; Meyer, Christine; Meier, Wolfgang; Egli, Markus; Gärtner, Holger

    2014-05-01

    . In order to confirm this assumption and possibly find more important root properties which have an influence on soil stabilization, the root systems of seven trees (three grey alder, four mountain maple) were excavated and analyzed. The study site is a catchment, where shallow landslides are common. It is located in the Prättigau valley in the Eastern Swiss Alps and was eco-engineered in 1997. The substrate is coarse-grained morainic material, mean annual air temperature reaches 4.64°C, average precipitation is 1170 mm, and the altitude is about 1000 m a.s.l.. The root system of each tree was uncovered carefully by hand to keep the roots undamaged, before removal it was photographed in situ to document the root distribution. The root systems were then cut into single root pieces of about 20 cm length and the position of each sample was documented. The root samples were then hierarchically classified in several root classes. The tensile strength of more than 500 samples was determined. In addition, the values for age, diameter, and root moisture were ascertained. Since it was assumed, that the cellular structure of the roots has an influence on the tensile strength, two microscopic thin-sections were prepared from all successfully tested root samples. The microscopic analysis focused on anatomical parameters such as the size and number of vessels, their distribution as well as their conductivity. The results for the final correlation between the anatomical characteristics and the root's tensile strength are presented for both tree species.

  5. The effect of alder forest cover and alder forest conversion on site fertility and productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Van Miegroet, H.; Cole, D.W.; Homann, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is known for its ability to improve the status of soil N through symbiotic N fixation. The objective of this paper is to assess the effect of red alder forests and their removal on soil and solution chemistry and on the growth of trees subsequently established on such sites. This was achieved through a series of paired field comparisons at two locations in Washington, involving similar-aged pure alder and Douglas-fir forests on soils that were essentially the same prior to stand establishment. At Pack Forest alder and Douglas-fir stands on high- and low-productivity sites were subjected to three levels of harvesting: bore only removal, whole tree (aboveground) harvesting, and complete removal of all vegetation and forest floor. The effect of harvesting intensity was examined on nutrient removal with biomass and through leaching, and on subsequent seedling growth. At Thompson Research Center adjacent Douglas-fir and alder forests were harvested, and half of each area was replanted with either Douglas-fir or red alder seedlings, yielding four forest conversion units. Differences in growth patterns, tree nutrient status, and leaching losses between these conversion plots were examined. Compared with adjacent Douglas-fir forests, substantially more N, P, K, and Ca are tied up in aboveground vegetation and on the forest floor of alder forests, and these elements also cycle faster in alder ecosystems primarily due to the deciduous nature of alder.

  6. Changes in cortical grey matter density associated with long-standing retinal visual field defects

    PubMed Central

    Boucard, Christine C.; Hernowo, Aditya T.; Maguire, R. Paul; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Hooymans, Johanna M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Retinal lesions caused by eye diseases such as glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration can, over time, eliminate stimulation of parts of the visual cortex. This could lead to degeneration of inactive cortical neuronal tissue, but this has not been established in humans. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging to assess the effects of prolonged sensory deprivation in human visual cortex. High-resolution anatomical magnetic resonance images were obtained in subjects with foveal (age-related macular degeneration) and peripheral (glaucoma) retinal lesions as well as age-matched controls. Comparison of grey matter between patient and control groups revealed density reductions in the approximate retinal lesion projection zones in visual cortex. This indicates that long-term cortical deprivation, due to retinal lesions acquired later in life, is associated with retinotopic-specific neuronal degeneration of visual cortex. Such degeneration could interfere with therapeutic strategies such as the future application of artificial retinal implants to overcome lesion-induced visual impairment. PMID:19467992

  7. Grey analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, G.D.

    1996-12-01

    Grey logic is not another name for fuzzy logic. Grey logic--also called grey analysis or grey system theory--is a new technology, a group of techniques for system analysis and modeling. Like fuzzy logic, grey logic is useful in situations with incomplete and uncertain information. Grey analysis is particularly applicable in instances with very limited data and in cases with little system knowledge or understanding. In this paper, a summary of the basic concepts of grey analysis is provided, with descriptions of its application to several classes of problems. Calculations methods are provided for grey relation analysis, and for modeling and prediction using grey methods.

  8. The Influence of Speckled Alder on Nitrogen Accumulation in Adirondack Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, B. D.; Hurd, T. M.; Raynal, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Shrub-dominated wetlands of the Adirondacks typically support vigorous populations of nitrogen-fixing speckled alder Alnus incana (L.) Moench var. americana Regel), and are the second most abundant wetland type in the Adirondack region. In symbiotic association with an actinomycete of the genus Frankia, this shrub fixes 37-43 kg N/ha/yr in monotypic stands. This study was undertaken to quantify the abundance of alder in wetlands typed as "Scrub-shrub 1" (SS1; known as alder/willow wetlands) in the National Wetlands Inventory, and to determine the accumulation of nitrate and ammonium in alder wetland substrates. Twenty wetlands from the Oswegatchie-Black (OB) and Upper Hudson (UH) watersheds were randomly selected using the Adirondack Park Agency's GIS data base which includes wetland cover types assigned using remotely sensed data. Wetlands designated as "SS1" (scrub-shrub vegetation) and "SS1/EM1" (scrub-shrub with emergent herbaceous vegetation) were included in the sample. Six wetlands varying in alder abundance were chosen to estimate N accumulation in the substrate, with measurement of dissolved inorganic N in groundwater and ion exchange resin extracts. In the OB watershed, A. incana averaged 30 % of total shrub density in SS1 wetlands and 36 % in SS1/EM1 wetlands. Alder accounted for 49 % of all stems in UH SS1 wetlands, 28 % in the SS1/EM1 wetlands and in total accounted for 35 % of all stems in this study. Nitrate in IER extracts and groundwater was significantly higher in high-density alder wetlands (p < 0.05). Eight of the 20 wetlands included in this study were estimated to have less than 3,000 alder stems/ha, and five were estimated to have greater than 10,000 stems/ha. The other seven wetlands averaged 6,000 stems/ha. At nine sites, foliar N equaled or exceeded estimated atmospheric deposition (~10 kg/ha/yr), and was likely derived from N fixation. We conclude that 50 % of the SS1/EM1 wetlands and at least 75 % of the SS1 wetlands in these watersheds

  9. Headwater riparian invertebrate communities associated with red alder and conifer wood and leaf litter in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LeSage, C.M.; Merritt, R.W.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how management of young upland forests in southeastern Alaska affect riparian invertebrate taxa richness, density, and biomass, in turn, potentially influencing food abundance for fish and wildlife. Southeastern Alaska forests are dominated by coniferous trees including Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), with mixed stands of red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn.). Red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) is hypothesized to influence the productivity of young-growth conifer forests and through forest management may provide increased riparian invertebrate abundance. To compare and contrast invertebrate densities between coniferous and alder riparian habitats, leaf litter and wood debris (early and late decay classes) samples were collected along eleven headwater streams on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, during the summers of 2000 and 2001. Members of Acarina and Collembola were the most abundant taxa collected in leaf litter with alder litter having significantly higher mean taxa richness than conifer litter. Members of Acarina were the most abundant group collected on wood debris and alder wood had significantly higher mean taxa richness and biomass than conifer wood. Alder wood debris in more advanced decay stages had the highest mean taxa richness and biomass, compared to other wood types, while conifer late decay wood debris had the highest densities of invertebrates. The inclusion of alder in young-growth conifer forests can benefit forest ecosystems by enhancing taxa richness and biomass of riparian forest invertebrates. ?? 2005 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  10. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. The pentadehydro-Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Naredla, Rajasekhar Reddy; Thompson, Severin K; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-04-28

    In the classic Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction, the overall degree of unsaturation (or oxidation state) of the 4π (diene) and 2π (dienophile) pairs of reactants dictates the oxidation state of the newly formed six-membered carbocycle. For example, in the classic Diels-Alder reaction, butadiene and ethylene combine to produce cyclohexene. More recent developments include variants in which the number of hydrogen atoms in the reactant pair and in the resulting product is reduced by, for example, four in the tetradehydro-Diels-Alder (TDDA) and by six in the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reactions. Any oxidation state higher than tetradehydro (that is, lacking more than four hydrogens) leads to the production of a reactive intermediate that is more highly oxidized than benzene. This increases the power of the overall process substantially, because trapping of the reactive intermediate can be used to increase the structural complexity of the final product in a controllable and versatile manner. Here we report an unprecedented overall 4π + 2π cycloaddition reaction that generates a different, highly reactive intermediate known as an α,3-dehydrotoluene. This species is in the same oxidation state as a benzyne. Like benzynes, α,3-dehydrotoluenes can be captured by various trapping agents to produce structurally diverse products that are complementary to those arising from the HDDA process. We call this new cycloisomerization process a pentadehydro-Diels-Alder (PDDA) reaction-a nomenclature chosen for chemical taxonomic reasons rather than mechanistic ones. In addition to alkynes, nitriles (RC≡N), although non-participants in aza-HDDA reactions, readily function as the 2π component in PDDA cyclizations to produce, via trapping of the α,3-(5-aza)dehydrotoluene intermediates, pyridine-containing products. PMID:27088605

  12. Use of wetlands for production of woody plants for fuels and petrochemical substitutes. [Alders, willows, poplars

    SciTech Connect

    Farnham, R.S.; Read, P.

    1981-03-01

    Work performed on this project in the past year has included the evaluations of natural stands productivity for wetland biomass species; propagation studies with alder, willow and poplar species; nursery establishment for production of cultivars and evaluation of wetland soils suitable for production of woody biomass species. Also a biomass research facility has been established in N. Minnesota suitable for long-term research and demonstration. Propagation research has included both micro and macro propagation techniques with native willows, selected willow clones from Sweden, alder seed selection from Finland and hybrid poplar clones from US Forest Service, Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Approximately 100,000 rooted plants will be available for field research by June 1, 1981.

  13. Factors affecting distribution of wood, detritus, and sediment in headwater streams draining managed young-growth red alder - Conifer forests in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomi, T.; Johnson, A.C.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Orlikowska, E.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Factors (riparian stand condition, management regimes, and channel properties) affecting distributions of wood, detritus (leaves and branches), and sediment were examined in headwater streams draining young-growth red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer riparian forests (40 years old) remained in channels and provided sites for sediment and organic matter storage. Despite various alder-conifer mixtures and past harvesting effects, the abundance of large wood, fine wood, and detritus accumulations significantly decreased with increasing channel bank-full width (0.5-3.5 m) along relatively short channel distances (up to 700 m). Changes in wood, detritus, and sediment accumulations together with changes in riparian stand characteristics create spatial and temporal variability of in-channel conditions in headwater systems. A component of alder within young-growth riparian forests may benefit both wood production and biological recovery in disturbed headwater stream channels. ?? 2006 NRC.

  14. Origins of Stereoselectivity in the trans-Diels-Alder Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Paton, Robert S.; Mackey, Joel L.; Kim, Woo Han; Lee, Jun Hee; Danishefsky, Samuel J.; Houk, K. N.

    2010-01-01

    The regioselectivity and stereoselectivity aspects of the Diels-Alder/radical hydrodenitration reaction sequence leading to trans-fused ring systems have been investigated with density functional calculations. A continuum of transition structures representing Diels-Alder and hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadditions as well as a sigmatropic rearrangement have been located, and they all lie very close in energy on the potential energy surface. All three pathways are found to be important in the formation of the Diels-Alder adduct. Reported regioselectivities are reproduced by the calculations. The stereoselectivity of radical hydrodenitration of the cis-Diels-Alder adduct is found to be related to the relative conformational stabilities of bicyclic radical intermediates. Overall, the computations provide understanding of the regioselectivities and stereoselectivities of the trans-Diels-Alder paradigm. PMID:20557046

  15. Enantio- and periselective nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Narcis, Maurice J; Sprague, Daniel J; Captain, Burjor; Takenaka, Norito

    2012-12-14

    The periselective Diels-Alder reaction of 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes and nitroethylene has been realized by helical-chiral hydrogen bond donor catalysts. To our knowledge, this represents the first asymmetric catalytic nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction via activation of nitroalkene, and thus establishes its proof-of-principle. PMID:23104427

  16. Grey water biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Ghunmi, Lina Abu; Zeeman, Grietje; Fayyad, Manar; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-02-01

    Knowing the biodegradability characteristics of grey water constituents is imperative for a proper design and operation of a biological treatment system of grey water. This study characterizes the different COD fractions of dormitory grey water and investigates the effect of applying different conditions in the biodegradation test. The maximum aerobic and anaerobic biodegradability and conversion rate for the different COD fractions is determined. The results show that, on average, dormitory grey water COD fractions are 28% suspended, 32% colloidal and 40% dissolved. The studied factors incubation time, inoculum addition and temperature are influencing the determined biodegradability. The maximum biodegradability and biodegradation rate differ between different COD fractions, viz. COD(ss), COD(col) and COD(diss). The dissolved COD fraction is characterised by the lowest degradation rate, both for anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The maximum biodegradability for aerobic and anaerobic conditions is 86 and 70% respectively, whereas the first order conversion rate constant, k₂₀, is 0.119 and 0.005 day⁻¹, respectively. The anaerobic and aerobic conversion rates in relation to temperature can be described by the Arrhenius relation, with temperature coefficients of 1.069 and 1.099, respectively. PMID:20658309

  17. Grey swan tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    We define `grey swan’ tropical cyclones as high-impact storms that would not be predicted based on history but may be foreseeable using physical knowledge together with historical data. Here we apply a climatological-hydrodynamic method to estimate grey swan tropical cyclone storm surge threat for three highly vulnerable coastal regions. We identify a potentially large risk in the Persian Gulf, where tropical cyclones have never been recorded, and larger-than-expected threats in Cairns, Australia, and Tampa, Florida. Grey swan tropical cyclones striking Tampa, Cairns and Dubai can generate storm surges of about 6 m, 5.7 m and 4 m, respectively, with estimated annual exceedance probabilities of about 1/10,000. With climate change, these probabilities can increase significantly over the twenty-first century (to 1/3,100-1/1,100 in the middle and 1/2,500-1/700 towards the end of the century for Tampa). Worse grey swan tropical cyclones, inducing surges exceeding 11 m in Tampa and 7 m in Dubai, are also revealed with non-negligible probabilities, especially towards the end of the century.

  18. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Christopher; Adzima, Brian J.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  19. Can an Alder Disease Influence the Controls of Ecosystem Water Flux?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrs-Richey, J. K.; Mulder, C. P.; Ruess, R. W.; Winton, L. M.; Stanosz, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    In Alaska, nitrogen-fixing shrubs (Alnus spp.) comprise a large component of the vegetation and are important for water and energy flux in the Alaskan tundra, the Interior boreal forest, and south-central Alaska. Recently there has been high incidence and severity of a canker disease on Alnus which alters small scale controls (e.g., leaves, branches) of water and carbon flux and may have ecosystem scale effects in severely diseased areas. The fungal pathogen, Valsa melanodiscus (anamorph =Cytospora umbrina), kills active xylem and phloem, causes long, girdling cankers on stems, and is frequently associated with stem mortality in the thin leaf alder (Alnus tenuifolia) and green alder (Alnus crispa). We are just beginning to understand how this canker disease affects the physiology of its host and the implications for water loss and carbon fixation. An inoculation experiment at the University of Alaska is currently being conducted on well-watered and water-limited green alders to: 1) monitor the response of the water transport system to infection and canker development; 2) assess the ability of colonized alders to adjust water use efficiency; and 3) measure the effect of canker development on photosynthesis. Only 4 weeks after inoculation, stems (3-5 mm diam.) with incipient cankers had an overall reduction in total daily water loss and up to 50 percent decrease in daily peak water loss. Stems with incipient cankers were also unable to attain the maximum photosynthetic rate of healthy stems, and had lower light saturation points and quantum efficiencies. Further quantification of these relationships is underway. This study, in combination with recent field measurements of sapflow, will allow us to estimate the impact of varying degrees of disease severity on stand-level water flux. Alders are a keystone species and are currently responding to climate change by expanding into the Alaska tundra, increasing abundance in northern Alaska, and migrating into river

  20. Microwave-Based Reaction Screening: Tandem Retro-Diels-Alder/Diels-Alder Cycloadditions of ortho-Quinol Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Suwei; Cahill, Kath arine J.; Kang, Moon -Il; Colburn, Nancy H.; Henrich, Curtis J.; Wilson, Jennifer A.; Beutler, John A.; Johnson, Richard P.; Porco, John A.

    2011-01-01

    We have accomplished a parallel screen of cycloaddition partners for ortho-quinols utilizing a plate-based microwave system. Microwave irradiation improves the efficiency of retro-Diels-Alder/Diels-Alder cascades of ortho-quinol dimers which generally proceed in a diastereoselective fashion. Computational studies indicate that asynchronous transition states are favored in Diels-Alder cycloadditions of ortho-quinols. Subsequent biological evaluation of a collection of cycloadducts has identified an inhibitor of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an oncogenic transcription factor. PMID:21942286

  1. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  2. 54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. ALDER CREEK DIVERSION, PROJECT 1933, EXHIBIT F, SANTA ANA POWERHOUSE NO. 2 SCE drawing no. 5206858, no date (FERC no. 1933-48). - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. Growth and N2 fixation in an Alnus hirsuta (Turcz.) var. sibirica stand in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shigeaki F; Yazaki, Kenichi; Komatsu, Masabumi; Kitao, Mitsutoshi

    2013-11-01

    To estimate the N2 fixation ability of the alder (Alnus hirsuta (Turcz.) var. sibirica), we examined the seasonal variation in nitrogenase activity of nodules using the acetylene reduction method in an 18-year-old stand naturally regenerated after disturbance by road construction in Japan. To evaluate the contribution of N2 fixation to the nitrogen (N) economy in this alder stand, we also measured the phenology of the alder, the litterfall, the decomposition rate of the leaf litter, and N accumulation in the soil. The acetylene reduction activity per unit nodule mass (ARA) under field conditions appeared after bud break, peaked the maximum in midsummer after full expansion of the leaves, and disappeared after all leaves had fallen. There was no consistent correlation between ARA and tree size (dbh). The amount of N2 fixed in this alder stand was estimated at 56.4 kg ha-1 year-1 when a theoretical molar ratio of 3 was used to convert the amount of reduced acetylene to the amount of fixed N2. This amount of N2 fixation corresponded to the 66.4 percent of N in the leaf litter produced in a year. These results suggested that N2 fixation still contributed to the large portion of N economy in this alder stand. PMID:24287656

  4. The Holocene vegetation history of the Khibiny Mountains: implications for the post-glacial expansion of spruce and alder on the Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremenetski, Constantin; Vaschalova, Tatiana; Sulerzhitsky, Leopold

    1999-02-01

    Pollen and peat botanical investigations of the Lutnermayok peat bog, Kola Peninsula, northwestern Russia, were carried out, and 21 surface pollen samples were studied. Combined with previous studies our data form the basis for the vegetation history over the last 7000 yr of the Khibiny Mountains. Pinus sylvestris was the dominant species between 7000 and 5000 yr BP and Picea obovata penetrated to the Khibiny Mountains ca. 5500/5300 yr BP. Since 4500 yr BP, Picea replaced Pinus in major parts of the area and dominated the forest cover. Picea immigrated to the Kola Peninsula after 7000 yr BP. There were two paths of spruce migration: from the southeast and the southwest. Grey alder, Alnusincana, immigrated to the Kola Peninsula from the southwest and northwest about ca. 8000 yr BP. Grey alder has been restricted to its modern range since 4000 yr BP. The range of vertical movement of the treeline in Khibiny Mountains during the last 700 yr was 240-260 m, which corresponds to an amplitude of summer temperature change of 2°C.

  5. Mountain Pine Beetle Impact on Stand-level Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. A.; Woods, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic has disturbed millions of hectares throughout the Rocky Mountain West. The most persistent effects of MPB infestation on the stand-level water balance are likely concomitant with the grey stage of the disturbance cycle. The grey stage occurs within 3 to 5 years of the initial infestation after the needles of an infected tree have turned red and fallen off due to tree death. Large numbers of grey-stage trees in a stand may remain on the landscape for up to 20 years, until windthrow or another disturbance sends them to the forest floor. The greater temporal persistence of the grey stage over antecedent stages suggested that an examination of the grey stage would best capture long-term effects of MPB disturbance on the forest water balance. In this study we hypothesized that changes to the forest canopy associated with MPB disturbance may affect the stand-level water balance. The needle loss and windthrow that follows MPB disturbance is expected to increase the amount of precipitation reaching the forest floor. Additionally, overstory evapotranspiration (ET) demand is expected to decrease as MPB-induced tree mortality increases within disturbed stands. The expected cumulative effect of MPB disturbance on the stand-level water balance is an increase in soil moisture due to increased precipitation inputs and reduced overstory ET. This study was conducted in Lubrecht Experimental Forest and adjacent Bureau of Land Management areas near Missoula, Montana. Sub-canopy measurements of soil moisture, precipitation (rain and snow water equivalent), overstory transpiration and micro-meteorological data (net radiation, temperature, wind speed, etc.) were collected in three 50 x 50 meter plots. The plots consisted of a uniform stand of grey-stage lodgepole pine, a uniform stand of non-infested lodgepole pine, and a recent clear-cut stand, which served as a control unit. Water balances for each stand were constructed using a mass

  6. 3D Photofixation Lithography in Diels–Alder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Adzima, Brian J.; Kloxin, Christopher J.; DeForest, Cole A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2013-01-01

    3D structures were written and developed in a crosslinked polymer initially formed by a Diels–Alder reaction. Unlike conventional liquid resists, small features cannot sediment, as the reversible crosslinks function as a support, and the modulus of the material is in the MPa range at room temperature. The support structure, however, can be easily removed by heating the material which depolymerizes the polymer into a mixture of low-viscosity monomers. Complex shapes were written into the polymer network using two-photon techniques to spatially control the photoinitiation and subsequent thiol–ene reaction to selectively convert the Diels–Alder adducts into irreversible crosslinks. PMID:23080017

  7. 61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Photocopy of Engine Room Floor Plan, White Alder. The Niagara Shipbuilding Corp. Engineering Department, Buffalo, New York. Coast Guard Headquarters Drawing No. 540-WAGL-1604-10, dated February 1943; revised January 1963. Original drawing property of the U.S. Coast Guard. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  8. N2-fixing red alder indirectly accelerates ecosystem nitrogen cycling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Matkins, Joselin J.; Hibbs, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic N2-fixing tree species can accelerate ecosystem N dynamics through decomposition via direct pathways by producing readily decomposed leaf litter and increasing N supply to decomposers, as well as via indirect pathways by increasing tissue and detrital N in non-fixing vegetation. To evaluate the relative importance of these pathways, we compared three-year decomposition and N dynamics of N2-fixing red alder leaf litter (2.34 %N) to both low-N (0.68 %N) and high-N (1.21 %N) litter of non-fixing Douglas-fir, and decomposed each litter source in four forests dominated by either red alder or Douglas-fir. We also used experimental N fertilization of decomposition plots to assess elevated N availability as a potential mechanism of N2-fixer effects on litter mass loss and N dynamics. Direct effects of N2-fixing red alder on decomposition occurred primarily as faster N release from red alder than Douglas-fir litter, but direct increases in N supply to decomposers via fertilization did not stimulate decomposition of any litter. Fixed N indirectly influenced detrital dynamics by increasing Douglas-fir tissue and litter N concentrations, which accelerated litter N release without accelerating mass loss. By increasing soil N, tissue N, and the rate of N release from litter of non-fixers, we conclude that N2-fixing vegetation can indirectly foster plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to the persistence of elevated N availability in terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. Continuous Flow of Nitroso Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Our flow reaction systems have provided quantitative yields of nitroso Diels-Alder products with no byproducts in cases of cyclic dienes without temperature and pressure controls. Additionally, the reaction times were significantly shortened by using homogeneous catalyst (CuCl) or heterogeneous reagent (MnO2) in comparison with batch reaction. PMID:26138229

  10. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78°C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and α- or β-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  11. High stereoselectivity on low temperature Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    da Silva Filho, Luiz Carlos; Lacerda Júnior, Valdemar; Constantino, Mauricio Gomes; da Silva, Gil Valdo José; Invernize, Paulo Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We have found that some of the usually poor dienophiles (2-cycloenones) can undergo Diels-Alder reaction at -78 degrees C with unusually high stereoselectivity in the presence of niobium pentachloride as a Lewis acid catalyst. A remarkable difference in reaction rates for unsubstituted and alpha- or beta-methyl substituted 2-cycloenones was also observed. PMID:16542029

  12. Whole-brain grey matter density predicts balance stability irrespective of age and protects older adults from falling.

    PubMed

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P; Cheval, Boris; van Ruitenbeek, Peter; Levin, Oron; Renaud, Olivier; Chanal, Julien; Swinnen, Stephan P

    2016-03-01

    Functional and structural imaging studies have demonstrated the involvement of the brain in balance control. Nevertheless, how decisive grey matter density and white matter microstructural organisation are in predicting balance stability, and especially when linked to the effects of ageing, remains unclear. Standing balance was tested on a platform moving at different frequencies and amplitudes in 30 young and 30 older adults, with eyes open and with eyes closed. Centre of pressure variance was used as an indicator of balance instability. The mean density of grey matter and mean white matter microstructural organisation were measured using voxel-based morphometry and diffusion tensor imaging, respectively. Mixed-effects models were built to analyse the extent to which age, grey matter density, and white matter microstructural organisation predicted balance instability. Results showed that both grey matter density and age independently predicted balance instability. These predictions were reinforced when the level of difficulty of the conditions increased. Furthermore, grey matter predicted balance instability beyond age and at least as consistently as age across conditions. In other words, for balance stability, the level of whole-brain grey matter density is at least as decisive as being young or old. Finally, brain grey matter appeared to be protective against falls in older adults as age increased the probability of losing balance in older adults with low, but not moderate or high grey matter density. No such results were observed for white matter microstructural organisation, thereby reinforcing the specificity of our grey matter findings. PMID:26979897

  13. Grey Literature and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Karen A.

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation standards for professional schools offering social work degrees mandate curriculum content that provides students with skills to analyze, formulate, and influence social policies. An important source of analytical thinking about social policy is the "grey" literature issued by public policy organizations, think tanks,…

  14. Take a Stand for Standing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labandz, Stephenie

    2010-01-01

    As a school-based physical therapist, the author sees children with a wide variety of diagnoses affecting their mobility and motor function. Supported standing is an important part of the routines of those who are unable to stand independently due to issues affecting the neuromuscular system. Being eye-to-eye with their peers and interacting with…

  15. Enhanced stereocontrol in Diels-Alder reactions of chiral dienols.

    PubMed

    Cayzer, Tory N; Miller, Natalie A; Paddon-Row, Michael N; Sherburn, Michael S

    2006-05-21

    This combined experimental-computational investigation demonstrates that the presence of a removable bromine substituent on a diene leads to complete pi-diastereofacial and endo/exo stereoselection in both intermolecular and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions. The influence of the bromine upon stereoselectivity is dramatic: the cycloaddition of nonbrominated precursor 18E, for example, gives four diastereomeric products in a 55:13:16:16 ratio; the bromine-containing analogue gives one stereoisomer within the limits of detection. The examination of B3LYP/6-31+G(d) transition structures allows an interpretation of these experimental findings. A method for the completely stereoselective synthesis of complimentary diastereomeric products (30Z and 31Z) from the same simple starting materials (28 and 2) is reported. Discrepancies between calculation and experiment in an earlier investigation into the Diels-Alder reaction are explained. PMID:16688346

  16. Recent Progress in Dehydro(genative) Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbo; Zhou, Liejin; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-01-26

    In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in dehydro or dehydrogenative Diels-Alder (D-A) reactions. This Minireview gives an overview of the major two strategies for dehydro(genative) Diels-Alder reactions, which differ in dehydrogenation and D-A cyclization sequence. Reactions in which D-A cycloaddition is followed by dehydrogenation are useful methods for the synthesis of various aromatic compounds, whereas advancements in dehydro genative procedures with oxidants or catalysts prior to D-A cycloaddition offer yet further new routes to functionalized cycloadducts. Recent leading findings are highlighted and the current state of the art, scope, and limitations of these processes are discussed in this Minireview. PMID:26786814

  17. Cullen Sign and Grey Turner Sign Revisited.

    PubMed

    Wright, William F

    2016-06-01

    Cullen sign and Grey Turner sign, named after Thomas Stephen Cullen, MB, and George Grey Turner, MBBS, respectively, are signs of abdominal wall hemorrhage and are generally associated with acute pancreatitis. However, the research from which these signs arose was documented long before Cullen and Grey Turner made their contributions. The present article examines the history, pathologic mechanisms, and clinical application of these signs in relation to acute pancreatitis and ectopic pregnancy. PMID:27214777

  18. Alder (alnus crispa) effects on soils in ecosystems of the agashashok river valley, northwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhoades, C.; Oskarsson, H.; Binkley, D.; Stottlemyer, B.

    2001-01-01

    At the northern limit of the boreal forest biome, alder (Alnus crispa [Ait.] Pursh) shrubs occur in a variety of ecosystems. We assessed the effects of individual alder shrubs on soil properties and understory plant tissue nitrogen in floodplain terraces, valley slopes and tussock tundra ridges. The three ecosystems differed with respect to soil properties and abiotic conditions and supported distinct plant communities. Alder increased resin-exchangeable soil N and NO3 production significantly in each ecosystem. The greatest difference between alder canopy and surrounding soil NO3 measured both under field and laboratory conditions occured in floodplain sites. The shrub effect on soil pH and soil organic matter was greatest on tundra ridges. Alder shrubs also influenced the nitrogen nutrition of plants growing beneath their canopies. Plants growing below alder canopies had higher foliar nitrogen concentration and natural abundance 15N composition and lower carbon to nitrogen ratio than open-grown plants. Similar to soil N availability, understory plant leaf chemistry responded more to alder on floodplains than on slope or tundra ecosystems. This pattern suggests that understory plants rely more heavily on alder-fixed-N in this resource-poor ecosystem.

  19. Enantioselective and regioselective pyrone Diels-Alder reactions of vinyl sulfones: total synthesis of (+)-cavicularin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Beaudry, Christopher M

    2014-09-22

    The total synthesis of (+)-cavicularin is described. The synthesis features an enantio- and regioselective pyrone Diels-Alder reaction of a vinyl sulfone to construct the cyclophane architecture of the natural product. The Diels-Alder substrate was prepared by a regioselective one-pot three-component Suzuki reaction of a non-symmetric dibromoarene. PMID:25082270

  20. Tree Age Effects on Fine Root Biomass and Morphology over Chronosequences of Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur and Alnus glutinosa Stands

    PubMed Central

    Jagodzinski, Andrzej M.; Ziółkowski, Jędrzej; Warnkowska, Aleksandra; Prais, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on fine root biomass and morphology change in relation to stand age. Based on chronosequences for beech (9–140 years old), oak (11–140 years) and alder (4–76 years old) we aimed to examine how stand age affects fine root biomass and morphology. Soil cores from depths of 0–15 cm and 16–30 cm were used for the study. In contrast to previously published studies that suggested that maximum fine root biomass is reached at the canopy closure stage of stand development, we found almost linear increases of fine root biomass over stand age within the chronosequences. We did not observe any fine root biomass peak in the canopy closure stage. However, we found statistically significant increases of mean fine root biomass for the average individual tree in each chronosequence. Mean fine root biomass (0–30 cm) differed significantly among tree species chronosequences studied and was 4.32 Mg ha-1, 3.71 Mg ha-1 and 1.53 Mg ha-1, for beech, oak and alder stands, respectively. The highest fine root length, surface area, volume and number of fine root tips (0–30 cm soil depth), expressed on a stand area basis, occurred in beech stands, with medium values for oak stands and the lowest for alder stands. In the alder chronosequence all these values increased with stand age, in the beech chronosequence they decreased and in the oak chronosequence they increased until ca. 50 year old stands and then reached steady-state. Our study has proved statistically significant negative relationships between stand age and specific root length (SRL) in 0–30 cm soil depth for beech and oak chronosequences. Mean SRLs for each chronosequence were not significantly different among species for either soil depth studied. The results of this study indicate high fine root plasticity. Although only limited datasets are currently available, these data have provided valuable insight into fine root biomass and morphology of beech, oak and alder stands. PMID:26859755

  1. Locating grey literature on communication disorders.

    PubMed

    Shpilko, Inna

    2005-01-01

    This article provides an overview of selected Web-based resources containing grey literature in the area of communication disorders. It is geared to practitioners, researchers, students, and consumers seeking reliable, freely available scientific information. Grey (or gray) literature has been defined as "that which is produced on all levels of government, academics, business, and industry in print and electronic formats, but which is not controlled by commercial publishers."1 This paper reviews various general reference sources potentially containing grey literature on communication disorders. This review includes identification of the methods specialists in this field use to obtain this valuable, yet often overlooked, literature. Access points and search tools for identifying grey literature on communication disorders are recommended. Commercial databases containing grey literature are not included. Conclusions presented in this article are considered complementary to traditionally published information resources on communication disorders, such as scholarly journals, online databases, etc. PMID:15982956

  2. Ectomycorrhizal root development in wet Alder carr forests in response to desiccation and eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Baar, J; Bastiaans, T; van de Coevering, M A; Roelofs, J G M

    2002-06-01

    Effects of desiccation and eutrophication on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root development in wet Alder carr forests in The Netherlands were studied. In northwestern Europe, wet Alder carr forests are found mostly in peatlands and along streams, forming an important component of wetland ecosystems. The dominant tree species in wet Alder carr forests is Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. (Black alder), which associates with ectomycorrhizal fungi. During recent decades, wet Alder carr forests in Europe have declined because of desiccation and eutrophication, particularly in The Netherlands. In the present study, the number of root tips of A. glutinosa trees was highest in an undisturbed wet Alder carr forest in a peatland area. Eutrophication in the peatland area significantly inhibited ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root development of A. glutinosa. In the eutrophied forest, ECM root tips were observed only close to A. glutinosa trees growing on hummocks. The concentrations of nitrate and potassium in soil water of the eutrophied forest were significantly higher than in the undisturbed forest, while magnesium and iron concentrations and the pH were significantly lower. The number of ECM root tips of A. glutinosa in a desiccated forest along a stream was generally lower than in an undisturbed wet Alder carr forest on waterlogged soil in the same area. The sulphate concentration in soil water in the desiccated forest was significantly higher than in the forest on waterlogged soil. ECM root development of A. glutinosa may have been negatively affected by the chemical composition of the soil water. PMID:12072985

  3. Electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2'-hydroxychalcones.

    PubMed

    Cong, Huan; Ledbetter, Dustin; Rowe, Gerard T; Caradonna, John P; Porco, John A

    2008-07-23

    An efficient approach to cyclohexenyl chalcones employing highly electron rich 2'-hydroxychalcone dienophiles via electron transfer-initiated Diels-Alder cycloaddition is described. Using the methodology, the total synthesis of nicolaiodesin C has been accomplished. PMID:18576647

  4. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  5. Heavy metal stress in alders: Tolerance and vulnerability of the actinorhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Roy, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Alders have already demonstrated their potential for the revegetation of both mining and industrial sites. These actinorhizal trees and shrubs and the actinobacteria Frankia associate in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis which could however be negatively affected by the presence of heavy metals, and accumulate them. In our hydroponic assay with black alders, quantification of the roots and shoots metal concentrations showed that, in the absence of stress, symbiosis increases Mo and Ni root content and simultaneously decreases Mo shoot content. Interestingly, the Mo shoot content also decreases in the presence of Ni, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd for symbiotic alders. In symbiotic alders, Pb shoot translocation was promoted in presence of Pb. On the other hand, Cd exclusion in symbiotic root tissues was observed with Pb and Cd. In the presence of symbiosis, only Cd and Pb showed translocation into aerial tissues when present in the nutrient solution. Moreover, the translocation of Ni to shoot was prevented by symbiosis in the presence of Cd, Ni and Pb. The hydroponic experiment demonstrated that alders benefit from the symbiosis, producing more biomass (total, root and shoot) than non nodulated alders in control condition, and in the presence of metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd). Heavy metals did not reduce the nodule numbers (SNN), but the presence of Zn or Cd did reduce nodule allocation. Our study suggests that the Frankia-alder symbiosis is a promising (and a compatible) plant-microorganism association for the revegetation of contaminated sites, with minimal risk of metal dispersion. PMID:26091871

  6. Isotopologue ratios of N2O and N2 measurements underpin the importance of denitrification in differently N-loaded riparian alder forests.

    PubMed

    Mander, Ulo; Well, Reinhard; Weymann, Daniel; Soosaar, Kaido; Maddison, Martin; Kanal, Arno; Lõhmus, Krista; Truu, Jaak; Augustin, Jürgen; Tournebize, Julien

    2014-10-21

    Known as biogeochemical hotspots in landscapes, riparian buffer zones exhibit considerable potential concerning mitigation of groundwater contaminants such as nitrate, but may in return enhance the risk for indirect N2O emission. Here we aim to assess and to compare two riparian gray alder forests in terms of gaseous N2O and N2 fluxes and dissolved N2O, N2, and NO3(-) in the near-surface groundwater. We further determine for the first time isotopologue ratios of N2O dissolved in the riparian groundwater in order to support our assumption that it mainly originated from denitrification. The study sites, both situated in Estonia, northeastern Europe, receive contrasting N loads from adjacent uphill arable land. Whereas N2O emissions were rather small at both sites, average gaseous N2-to-N2O ratios inferred from closed-chamber measurements and He-O laboratory incubations were almost four times smaller for the heavily loaded site. In contrast, groundwater parameters were less variable among sites and between landscape positions. Campaign-based average (15)N site preferences of N2O (SP) in riparian groundwater ranged between 11 and 44 ‰. Besides the strong prevalence of N2 emission over N2O fluxes and the correlation pattern between isotopologue and water quality data, this comparatively large range highlights the importance of denitrification and N2O reduction in both riparian gray alder stands. PMID:25264900

  7. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Incoherently Coupled Grey-Grey Spatial Soliton Pairs in Biased Two-Photon Photovoltaic Photorefractive Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yan-Li; Jiang, Qi-Chang; Ji, Xuan-Mang

    2010-05-01

    The incoherently coupled grey-grey screening-photovoltaic spatial soliton pairs are predicted in biased two-photon photovoltaic photorefractive crystals under steady-state conditions. These grey-grey screening-photovoltaic soliton pairs can be established provided that the incident beams have the same polarization, wavelength, and are mutually incoherent. The grey-grey screening-photovoltaic soliton pairs can be considered as the united form of grey-grey screening soliton pairs and open or closed-circuit grey-grey photovoltaic soliton pairs.

  8. 36. LARGE MOLD MAKING MACHINE, GREY IRON UNIT #4 SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. LARGE MOLD MAKING MACHINE, GREY IRON UNIT #4 SHOWING PATTERNS THAT FLASKS FIT OVER PRIOR TO BEING FILLED WITH SAND AND COMPRESSED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. 40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. THIS TUMBLING MILL IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED TO TUMBLE CASTINGS OVER EACH OTHER TO BREAK OFF RUNNERS AND SPRUES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Linking Landscape Characteristics and High Stream Nitrogen in the Oregon Coast Range: Red Alder Complicates Use of Nutrient Criteria

    EPA Science Inventory

    Red alder (a nitrogen-fixing tree) and sea salt inputs can strongly influence stream nitrogen concentrations in western Oregon and Washington. We compiled a database of stream nitrogen and landscape characteristics in the Oregon Coast Range. Basal area of alder, expressed as a ...

  11. Diels-Alder reactions: The effects of catalyst on the addition reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Özgür; Kus, Nermin Simsek; Tunç, Tuncay; Sahin, Ertan

    2015-10-01

    The reaction between 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene and dimethyl 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hepta-2,5-diene-2,3-dicarboxylate is efficiently achieved with small amounts of catalyst, i.e. phenol, AcOH, nafion, and β-cyclodextrin. Exo-diastereoselective cycloaddition reactions were observed both without catalyst and different catalysts for 48 days. As a result, different products (tricyclicmolecule 5, retro-Diels-Alder product 6, and oxidation product 7) were obtained with different catalysts. In addition, we synthesized Diels-Alders product 8 and tricyclocyclitol 10 via Diels-Alder reaction. The structures of these products were characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and IR spectroscopy.

  12. Electrostatic catalysis of a Diels-Alder reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragonès, Albert C.; Haworth, Naomi L.; Darwish, Nadim; Ciampi, Simone; Bloomfield, Nathaniel J.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Diez-Perez, Ismael; Coote, Michelle L.

    2016-03-01

    It is often thought that the ability to control reaction rates with an applied electrical potential gradient is unique to redox systems. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that oriented electric fields could affect the outcomes of a range of chemical reactions, regardless of whether a redox system is involved. This possibility arises because many formally covalent species can be stabilized via minor charge-separated resonance contributors. When an applied electric field is aligned in such a way as to electrostatically stabilize one of these minor forms, the degree of resonance increases, resulting in the overall stabilization of the molecule or transition state. This means that it should be possible to manipulate the kinetics and thermodynamics of non-redox processes using an external electric field, as long as the orientation of the approaching reactants with respect to the field stimulus can be controlled. Here, we provide experimental evidence that the formation of carbon-carbon bonds is accelerated by an electric field. We have designed a surface model system to probe the Diels-Alder reaction, and coupled it with a scanning tunnelling microscopy break-junction approach. This technique, performed at the single-molecule level, is perfectly suited to deliver an electric-field stimulus across approaching reactants. We find a fivefold increase in the frequency of formation of single-molecule junctions, resulting from the reaction that occurs when the electric field is present and aligned so as to favour electron flow from the dienophile to the diene. Our results are qualitatively consistent with those predicted by quantum-chemical calculations in a theoretical model of this system, and herald a new approach to chemical catalysis.

  13. Grey Documentation as a Knowledge Base in Social Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Yitzhak

    1994-01-01

    Defines grey documentation as documents issued informally and not available through normal channels and discusses the role that grey documentation can play in the social work knowledge base. Topics addressed include grey documentation and science; social work and the empirical approach in knowledge development; and dissemination of grey…

  14. 23. INTERIOR VIEW WITH UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INTERIOR VIEW WITH UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC SETTING A 1 X 1/2 INCH ELBOW PIPE FITTING, A 'GREY IRON EL'. THIS MACHINE SETS CORES THROUGH AN AUTOMATED PROCESS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. NORTHEAST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHEAST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA SHOWING CORE ROOM ROOF DIRECTLY NORTHEAST, GREY IRON FOUNDRY TO THE RIGHT, MALLEABLE IRON CUPOLAS AND FOUNDRY NORTHEAST OF GREY IRON FOUNDRY WITH THE BRASS FOUNDRY IN THE REAR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. 24. INTERIOR VIEW WITH UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. INTERIOR VIEW WITH UNIT NO. 2 GREY IRON DISAMATIC SETTING A 1 X 1/2 INCH ELBOW PIPE FITTING, A 'GREY IRON EL', THROUGH AN AUTOMATED PROCESS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Knowledge Transfer in Social Work: The Role of Grey Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Yitzhak

    1995-01-01

    Discusses scholarly journals in the field of social work, information sources for social work practitioners versus researchers, and grey documentation as an alternative means of knowledge transfer. Highlights include research versus practice; grey documentation and scientific credibility; and dissemination of grey literature. (LRW)

  18. Ecophysiological characteristics of Taiwan alder (Alnus formosana) seedlings adapted to the subtropical region.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tien-Szu; Weng, Jen-Hsien

    2002-04-01

    We investigated several ecophysiological characteristics of seedlings of a low-elevation (100-200 m) and a high-elevation (2000-2400 m) population of Taiwan alder (Alnus formosana Makino) from subtropical Taiwan. Both populations had a wide optimal temperature range for photosynthesis, and there was little difference in the optimal temperature range for photosynthesis between populations. Photosynthetic rate (P(N)) was near maximal from 20 to 35 degrees C when seedlings of both the low-elevation and the high-elevation populations were acclimated at a day/night temperature of 30/23 degrees C. When seedlings were acclimated at a day/night temperature of 20/10 degrees C, P(N) was near maximal over the range 15-35 degrees C in the low-elevation population and 15-30 degrees C in the high-elevation population. Compared with nine other tree species native to Taiwan, Taiwan alder had a high P(N) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) under well-watered conditions. Reflecting its higher transpiration rate, Taiwan alder had a significantly greater leaf-air temperature difference than camphor (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) J. Presl), a co-occurring lowland tree species with leaves similar in shape and size to those of Taiwan alder. Despite higher g(s), high root and shoot hydraulic conductances enabled Taiwan alder to maintain higher leaf water potentials than camphor under well-watered conditions. We conclude that both photosynthetic characteristics and water relations are important factors enabling Taiwan alder to adapt to a wide temperature range, thereby ensuring its success at both high and low elevations in subtropical Taiwan. PMID:11960760

  19. B-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The B-1 test stand, the largest of three test stands used for Space Shuttle Main Engine testing at Stennis Space Center, is a dual position engine stand that was modified for single-engine tests. This structure stands 295 feet tall or 407 feet tall with the crane fully extended.

  20. Stereoselection in Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of 2-Cyano-1-azadienes: Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Tay, Gidget C; Sizemore, Nicholas; Rychnovsky, Scott D

    2016-07-01

    Progress toward understanding the scope and diastereoselectivity of intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions using 2-cyano-1-azadienes is described herein. The resulting cyanoenamine products are underutilized intermediates in organic synthesis. Assembly of the Diels-Alder precursors was achieved using an improved imine condensation/oxidative cyanation protocol. By this method, several highly substituted indolizidine and quinolizidine architectures were constructed. Quantum mechanical DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory were performed for these cyclizations and provide insights into the origins of the observed diastereoselectivities. PMID:27295460

  1. Schleyer hyperconjugative aromaticity and Diels-Alder reactivity of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes.

    PubMed

    Levandowski, Brian J; Zou, Lufeng; Houk, K N

    2016-01-01

    Schleyer's discovery of hyperconjugative aromaticity and antiaromaticity in 5-substituted cyclopentadienes further expanded our understanding of the pervasive influence of aromaticity. Acceptors induce antiaromatic character by Schleyer's negative hyperconjugative aromaticity, and donors have the opposite effect. We computationally explored the Diels-Alder reactivity of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes with ethylene and maleic anhydride. The predicted billionfold difference in the computed gas phase rate constants at room temperature for the Diels-Alder reactions of 5-substituted cyclopentadienes with ethylene or maleic anhydride results from differences in the transition state distortion energies, which are directly related to the hyperconjugative aromaticity of these molecules. PMID:26444427

  2. Preparation and Diels-Alder reactions of 1′-heterosubsituted vinylimidazoles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Abhisek; Mukherjee, Sabuj; Das, Jayanta; Bhandari, Manoj K.; Du, Hongwang; Yousufuddin, Muhammed; Lovely, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    A Diels-Alder/rearrangement sequence has been pursued in our lab en route to a number of oroidin dimers. In order to access the fully substituted core of these molecules, 1′,2′-disubstituted 4-vinylimidazoles were required as dienes. The preparation of a series of a 4-vinylimidazoles containing substituents on the vinyl moiety via hydroalumination/electrophilic trapping or hydrosilylation are described. These derivatives undergo Diels-Alder reactions with N-phenylmaleimide to provide the tetrahydrobenzimidazole derivatives. The cycloadducts derived from halosubstituted systems generally undergo elimination, leading to the corresponding dihydrobenzimidazole, whereas the silyl and stannyl derivatives provide the corresponding 4-substituted tetrahydrobenzimidazole. PMID:26139945

  3. Enantioselective Organocatalytic Diels–Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Hydroxy‐o‐Quinodimethanes

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Amico, Luca; Vega‐Peñaloza, Alberto; Cuadros, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The photoenolization/Diels–Alder strategy offers straightforward access to synthetically valuable benzannulated carbocyclic products. This historical light‐triggered process has never before succumbed to efforts to develop an enantioselective catalytic approach. Herein, we demonstrate how asymmetric organocatalysis provides simple yet effective catalytic tools to intercept photochemically generated hydroxy‐o‐quinodimethanes with high stereoselectivity. We used a chiral organic catalyst, derived from natural cinchona alkaloids, to activate maleimides toward highly stereoselective Diels–Alder reactions. An unconventional mechanism of stereocontrol is operative, wherein the organocatalyst is actively involved in both the photochemical pathway, by leveraging the formation of the reactive photoenol, and the stereoselectivity‐defining event. PMID:26797768

  4. Competition between classical and hexadehydro-Diels–Alder (HDDA) reactions of HDDA triynes with furan

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang Luu; Baire, Beeraiah; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    We report here thermal reactions between furan and one of three related triyne substrates. Each triyne is capable of reacting initially in two modes: (i) unimolecular hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction or (ii) bimolecular Diels-Alder reaction between one of its alkynes with furan. The relative rates of these initial events are such that two of the substrates react essentially in only one of modes (i) or (ii). The third is intermediate in behavior; its bifurcation is dependent on the concentration of the furan reactant. These results teach, more generally, principles relevant to the design of efficient HDDA-based reaction cascades. PMID:26028780

  5. Comparative phylogenies and host specialization in the alder ectomycorrhizal fungi Alnicola, Alpova and Lactarius (Basidiomycota) in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycorrhizal fungi form intimate associations with their host plants that constitute their carbon resource and habitat. Alnus spp. (Betulaceae) are known to host an exceptional species-poor and specialized ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community compared to other tree species, but the host-specificity pattern and its significance in terms of fungal diversification and speciation remain poorly documented. The degree of parallel speciation, host switching, and patterns of biogeography were explored in the historical associations between alders and three ECM taxa of Basidiomycetes: Alnicola (Agaricales), Alpova (Boletales), and Lactarius (Russulales). The aim was to develop an evolutionary framework on host specificity and diversification of Basidiomycetes in this highly specialized plant-fungus symbiosis. Results Sporocarps of Alnicola (220), Lactarius (61) and Alpova (29) were collected from stands of the four European alder species (A. alnobetula including the endemic subsp. suaveolens in Corsica, A. cordata, A. glutinosa, A. incana) in Western Europe (mainly in France and Austria), from 1995 to 2009. Specimens were morphologically identified to the species level. From these, 402 sequences of four DNA regions (ITS, rpb2, gpd, and the V9 domain of the mit-SSU rDNA) were successfully obtained and analyzed in addition with 89 sequences available in GenBank and UNITE databases. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted on all sequence data sets (individual and combined) using maximum likelihood reconstruction and Bayesian inference. Fungal phylogenies are compared and discussed in relation to the host, with a focus on species boundaries by associating taxonomic, systematic and molecular information. Conclusions Patterns of host specificity and phylogenies of Alnicola and Lactarius suggest coevolution as a basal factor of speciation in relation with the subgeneric diversification of Alnus, possibly due to the very selective pressure of the host. A second element of

  6. Standing Tall: The Benefits of Standing Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    In the author's opinion as a pediatric physical therapist, with the exception of a wheelchair, there is no other piece of assistive technology that is more beneficial to children and adults with special needs than a standing device. Postural symmetry during standing and walking activities is extremely important for everyone. Very few children…

  7. Assembly of the Isoindolinone Core of Muironolide A by Asymmetric Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Beatris; Molinski, Tadeusz F.

    2011-01-01

    The hexahydro-1H-isoindolin-1-one core of muironolide A was prepared by asymmetric intramolecular Diels Alder cycloaddition using a variant of the MacMillan organocatalyst which sets the C4,C5 and C11 stereocenters. PMID:21751773

  8. WATERSHED BIOGEOCHEMISTRY IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF RED ALDER AND SALMON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  9. The Phytophthora species assemblage and diversity in riparian alder ecosystems of western Oregon, USA.

    PubMed

    Sims, Laura Lee; Sutton, Wendy; Reeser, Paul; Hansen, Everett M

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora species were systematically sampled, isolated, identified and compared for presence in streams, soil and roots of alder (Alnus species) dominated riparian ecosystems in western Oregon. We describe the species assemblage and evaluate Phytophthora diversity associated with alder. We recovered 1250 isolates of 20 Phytophthora species. Only three species were recovered from all substrates (streams, soil, alder roots): P. gonapodyides, the informally described "P. taxon Pgchlamydo", and P. siskiyouensis. P. alni ssp. uniformis along with five other species not previously recovered in Oregon forests are included in the assemblage: P.citricola s.l., P. gregata, P. gallica, P. nicotianae and P. parsiana. Phytophthora species diversity was greatest in downstream riparian locations. There was no significant difference in species diversity comparing soil and unwashed roots (the rhizosphere) to stream water. There was a difference between the predominating species from the rhizosphere compared to stream water. The most numerous species was the informally described "P. taxon Oaksoil", which was mainly recovered from, and most predominant in, stream water. The most common species from riparian forest soils and alder root systems was P. gonapodyides. PMID:26240311

  10. The role of curvature in Diels-Alder functionalization of carbon-based materials.

    PubMed

    Willocq, B; Lemaur, V; El Garah, M; Ciesielski, A; Samorì, P; Raquez, J-M; Dubois, Ph; Cornil, J

    2016-06-18

    We have estimated theoretically the impact of curvature on the free energies of activation and reaction associated with Diels-Alder reactions on carbon-based materials. Significant reduction is observed for both energy values with increasing curvature for core-functionalization, while the opposite trend prevails for edge-functionalization, as further supported by SEM/fluorescence measurements. PMID:27226252

  11. Enantioselective Synthesis of (+)-Estrone Exploiting a Hydrogen Bond-Promoted Diels−Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Dane’s diene and methylcyclopentenedione, (+)-estrone is synthesized along the Quinkert−Dane route in 24% total yield. The key step is an enantioselective Diels−Alder reaction promoted by an amidinium catalyst as efficiently as by a traditional Ti-TADDOLate Lewis acid. PMID:20302330

  12. Reactions of nitroso hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadducts with azides: stereoselective formation of triazolines and aziridines.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Brian S; Miller, Marvin J

    2007-05-11

    The addition of azides to acylnitroso hetero-Diels-Alder cycloadducts derived from cyclopentadiene affords exo-triazolines in excellent yield. The reaction is greatly affected by the level of alkene strain, while sterically demanding azides do not hinder the reaction. Conversion of the triazolines to aziridines is also described. PMID:17429998

  13. Reactions of Nitroso Hetero Diels-Alder Cycloadducts with Azides: Stereoselective Formation of Triazolines and Aziridines

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Brian S.

    2011-01-01

    The addition of azides to acylnitroso hetero Diels-Alder cycloadducts derived from cyclopentadiene affords exo triazolines in excellent yield. The reaction is greatly affected by reducing the level of alkene strain, while sterically demanding azides do not hinder the reaction. Conversion of the triazolines to aziridines is also described. PMID:17429998

  14. A solvent-free Diels-Alder reaction of graphite into functionalized graphene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Min; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2014-12-01

    A solvent-free Diels-Alder reaction was carried out by heating a mixture of graphite and a typical dienophile, maleic anhydride (MA) or maleimide (MI), in a sealed glass ampoule of argon. The functionalization of graphite with dienophiles was confirmed by various characterization techniques, suggesting the efficient functionalization and delamination of graphite into a few layers of graphitic nanosheets. PMID:25314623

  15. Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysis of Tetraalkylammonium Salts in an Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kumatabara, Yusuke; Kaneko, Shiho; Nakata, Satoshi; Shirakawa, Seiji; Maruoka, Keiji

    2016-08-01

    A piperidine-derived tetraalkylammonium salt with a non-coordinating counteranion worked as an effective hydrogen-bonding catalyst in an aza-Diels-Alder reaction of imines and a Danishefsky diene. The hydrogen-bonding interaction between the ammonium salt and an imine was observed as part of a (1) H NMR titration study. PMID:27311924

  16. Synthesis of a natural chromenoquinone via the Diels-Alder reaction of pyranobenzyne and furan.

    PubMed

    Katakawa, Kazuaki; Sato, Ayaka; Iwasaki, Mari; Horikawa, Tomofumi; Kumamoto, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    We describe the total synthesis of angular chromenoquinone 1 isolated from Conospermum plants. Iodophenol, a precursor of pyranobenzyne, was prepared by Claisen rearrangement of an iodoresorcinol derivative. Diels-Alder reaction of the pyranobenzyne and a substituted furan proceeded in low regioselectivity to afford desired 1 and its regioisomer. PMID:25087635

  17. A Computational Experiment of the Endo versus Exo Preference in a Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Christopher N.; Woo, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and tested a computational laboratory that investigates an endo versus exo Diels-Alder cycloaddition. This laboratory employed density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the cycloaddition of N-phenylmaleimide to furan. The endo and exo stereoisomers of the product were distinguished by building the two isomers in a…

  18. Changes in sediment volume in Alder Lake, Nisqually River Basin, Washington, 1945-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Olsen, Theresa D.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Gish, Casey C.

    2012-01-01

    The Nisqually River drains the southwest slopes of Mount Rainier, a glaciated stratovolcano in the Cascade Range of western Washington. The Nisqually River was impounded behind Alder Dam when the dam was completed in 1945 and formed Alder Lake. This report quantifies the volume of sediment deposited by the Nisqually and Little Nisqually Rivers in their respective deltas in Alder Lake since 1945. Four digital elevation surfaces were generated from historical contour maps from 1945, 1956, and 1985, and a bathymetric survey from 2011. These surfaces were used to compute changes in sediment volume since 1945. Estimates of the volume of sediment deposited in Alder Lake between 1945 and 2011 were focused in three areas: (1) the Nisqually River delta, (2) the main body of Alder Lake, along a 40-meter wide corridor of the pre-dam Nisqually River, and (3) the Little Nisqually River delta. In each of these areas the net deposition over the 66-year period was 42,000,000 ± 4,000,000 cubic meters (m3), 2,000,000 ± 600,000 m3, and 310,000 ± 110,000 m3, respectively. These volumes correspond to annual rates of accumulation of 630,000 ± 60,000 m3/yr, 33,000 ± 9,000 m3/yr, and 4,700 ± 1,600 m3/yr, respectively. The annual sediment yield of the Nisqually (1,100 ± 100 cubic meters per year per square kilometer [(m3/yr)/km2]) and Little Nisqually River basins [70 ± 24 (m3/yr)/km2] provides insight into the yield of two basins with different land cover and geomorphic processes. These estimates suggest that a basin draining a glaciated stratovolcano yields approximately 15 times more sediment than a basin draining forested uplands in the Cascade Range. Given the cumulative net change in sediment volume in the Nisqually River delta in Alder Lake, the total capacity of Alder Lake since 1945 decreased about 3 percent by 1956, 8 percent by 1985, and 15 percent by 2011.

  19. Dendrochronology and lakes: using tree-rings of alder to reconstruct lake levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Maaten, Ernst; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Wilmking, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is considered a major threat for ecosystems around the world. Assessing its effects is challenging, amongst others, as we are unsure how ecosystems may respond to climate conditions they were not exposed to before. However, increased insight may be obtained by analyzing responses of ecosystems to past climate variability. In this respect, lake ecosystems appear as valuable sentinels, because they provide direct and indirect indicators of change through effects of climate. Lake-level fluctuations of closed catchments, for example, reflect a dynamic water balance, provide detailed insight in past moisture variations, and thereby allow for assessments of effects of anticipated climate change. Up to now, lake-level data are mostly obtained from gauging records and reconstructions from sediments and landforms. However, these records are in many cases only available over relatively short time periods, and, since geoscientific work is highly demanding, lake-level reconstructions are lacking for many regions. Here, we present and discuss an alternative method to reconstruct lake levels, which is based on tree-ring data of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.). This tree species tolerates permanently waterlogged and temporally flooded conditions (i.e. riparian vegetation), and is often found along lakeshores. As the yearly growth of trees varies depending upon the experienced environmental conditions, annual rings of black alder from lakeshore vegetation likely capture information on variations in water table, and may therefore be used to reconstruct lake levels. Although alder is a relatively short-lived tree species, the frequent use of its' decay-resistant wood in foundations of historical buildings offers the possibility of extending living tree-chronologies back in time for several centuries. In this study, the potential to reconstruct lake-level fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder is explored for three lake ecosystems in the Mecklenburg

  20. δ15N patterns of Douglas-fir and red alder riparian forests in the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, E.E.; Perakis, S.S.; Hibbs, D.E.

    2008-01-01

    We used naturally occurring stable isotopes of N to compare N dynamics in near-stream and upslope environments along riparian catenas in N-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forests in the Coast Range of western Oregon. Based on the existing literature, we expected soil δ15N to be enriched closer to streams owing to inputs of isotopically heavy, marine-derived N by spawning salmon, higher rates of denitrification near the stream, or both. However, it has been unclear what effect red alder might have on soil δ15N patterns near streams. We found a consistent −1‰ δ15N signature in red alder foliage, and δ15N of total N in soils under red alder averaged 2.2‰ along sampling transects extending 20 m upslope from the stream. Surprisingly, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir was progressively depleted nearer to streams, opposite from the pattern expected from N losses by denitrification or N inputs from anadromous salmon. Instead, δ15N of total N in soil under Douglas-fir converged toward soil δ15N values typical of red alder sites. We consider that the historic presence of red alder may have contributed a legacy of lower soil δ15N nearer to streams on sites that are currently dominated by young Douglas-fir forest.

  1. Grey('s) Identity: Complications of Learning and Becoming in a Popular Television Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubas, Kaela

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines an analysis of the American show "Grey's Anatomy" as an example of how popular culture represents identity and the process of professional identity construction in a medical workplace, particularly the surgical service of a large urban hospital. In discussing identity, she connects professional identity to…

  2. Grey Component Replacement In Newspaper Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhola, Helene

    1990-06-01

    The possibilities to achieve a good four-colour print quality are much more limited in newspaper printing than in heat-set or gravure web printing. Nevertheless, the percentage of four-colour printing and, consequently, the quality requirements continue to grow in newspapers. One way of making the printer's work easier in the colour separation process is the socalled Grey Component Replacement (GCR). This technology has been available with digital scanners for several years. Our laboratory has also studied its applicability, especially in newspaper printing, on different occasions.

  3. Distortion-Controlled Reactivity and Molecular Dynamics of Dehydro-Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peiyuan; Yang, Zhongyue; Liang, Yong; Hong, Xin; Li, Yanwei; Houk, K N

    2016-07-01

    We report density functional theory (M06-2X) studies of a series of dehydro-Diels-Alder (DDA) reactions. For these and the parent reaction, the stepwise mechanisms have similar barriers, whereas the barriers of the concerted mechanisms differ significantly. The reactivity of DDA reactions is controlled by distortion energy. The concerted and stepwise mechanisms of the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) reaction are competitive with activation barriers of ∼36 kcal/mol. This is because a large distortion energy (∼43 kcal/mol) is required to achieve the concerted transition state geometry. MD simulations reveal that productive concerted trajectories display a strong angle bending oscillation (∼25° oscillation amplitude), while the stepwise trajectories show only a chaotic pattern and less pronounced bending vibrations. PMID:27286801

  4. Cyclodextrin-promoted Diels Alder reactions of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon under mild reaction conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Sauradip; Phelan, Tyler; Levine, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Reported herein is the effect of cyclodextrins on the rates of aqueous Diels Alder reactions of 9-anthracenemethanol with a variety of N-substituted maleimides. These reactions occurred under mild reaction conditions (aqueous solvent, 40 °C), and were most efficient for the reaction of N-cyclohexylmaleimide with a methyl-β-cyclodextrin additive (94% conversion in 24 hours). These results can be explained on the basis of a model wherein the cyclodextrins bind the hydrophobic substituents on the maleimides and activate the dienophile via electronic modulation of the maleimide double bond. The results reported herein represent a new mechanism for cyclodextrin-promoted Diels Alder reactions, and have significant potential applications in the development of other cyclodextrin-promoted organic transformations. Moreover, the ability to deplanarize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) under mild conditions, as demonstrated herein, has significant applications for PAH detoxification. PMID:26692588

  5. Total synthesis of Elisabethin A: intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction under biomimetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Heckrodt, Thilo J; Mulzer, Johann

    2003-04-23

    We describe the first total synthesis of the marine diterpenoid elisabethin A. The synthesis uses (S)-hydroxy-2-methyl-propionate as the chiral starting material, which is elaborated into a dienyl-iodide and added to an aryl acetic acid ester via enolate alkylation. The hydroquinoid system is oxidized to the quinone which serves as the dienophile in a highly stereocontrolled intramolecular Diels-Alder addition. This IMDA reaction, which to our knowledge is the first one to employ a terminal (Z)-diene, proceeds under biomimetic conditions (water, ferrichloride as the oxidant, room temperature) with high yield and stereoselectivity. The Diels-Alder adduct is transformed into the natural product via a three-step sequence including selective hydrogenation, base-catalyzed epimerization of the cis- into the trans-decalin system and O-demethylation. PMID:12696865

  6. Biomass of Speckled Alder on an Air-Polluted Mountain Site and its Response to Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, Ivan; Baláš, Martin; Koňasová, Tereza; Špulák, Ondřej; Balcar, Vratislav; Millerová, Kateřina Bednářová; Kacálek, Dušan; Jakl, Michal; Zahradník, Daniel; Vítámvás, Jan; Š´astná, Jaroslava; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2014-12-01

    The article summarizes outcomes of a biomass study conducted in a young speckled alder plantation on a cold mountain site. At this location, the previously existing old forest was clear felled because of damage from air pollution, and present-day surface humus is in need of restoration. The intention of this study was to quantify the biomass and nutrients accumulated by alders and their components and assess whether the initial fertilization resulted in increased biomass production and nutrient accumulation in the biomass. Besides the control, two fertilized treatments were installed. In the surface treatment (SUT), the amendment was applied as a base dressing in small circles around trees. In the planting-hole treatment (PHT), the amendment was incorporated into soil inside the planting holes. Five growth seasons after planting and fertilization, six alders from each treatment were harvested including roots. Their biomass was quantified and analyzed for macroelements. The greatest pool of dry mass (DM) was branches in the control and stem wood in the fertilized treatments. The greatest pools of macroelements were leaves and branches. The most pronounced effects of fertilization were recorded in the DM and consequently in the absolute quantities of nutrients. The DM of an average tree in the control, SUT, and PHT was 85, 226, and 231 g, respectively. The absolute contents of nutrients per tree in the fertilized treatments showed the following increases, as compared with the control: (N) 2.5-2.6 times; (P) 1.6-2.4 times; (K) 1.8-2.1 times; and (Mg) 1.8-2.0 times, respectively. Speckled alder responded positively to fertilization.

  7. Biomass of speckled alder on an air-polluted mountain site and its response to fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kuneš, Ivan; Baláš, Martin; Koňasová, Tereza; Spulák, Ondřej; Balcar, Vratislav; Millerová, Kateřina Bednářová; Kacálek, Dušan; Jakl, Michal; Zahradník, Daniel; Vítámvás, Jan; Stastná, Jaroslava; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana

    2014-12-01

    The article summarizes outcomes of a biomass study conducted in a young speckled alder plantation on a cold mountain site. At this location, the previously existing old forest was clear felled because of damage from air pollution, and present-day surface humus is in need of restoration. The intention of this study was to quantify the biomass and nutrients accumulated by alders and their components and assess whether the initial fertilization resulted in increased biomass production and nutrient accumulation in the biomass. Besides the control, two fertilized treatments were installed. In the surface treatment (SUT), the amendment was applied as a base dressing in small circles around trees. In the planting-hole treatment (PHT), the amendment was incorporated into soil inside the planting holes. Five growth seasons after planting and fertilization, six alders from each treatment were harvested including roots. Their biomass was quantified and analyzed for macroelements. The greatest pool of dry mass (DM) was branches in the control and stem wood in the fertilized treatments. The greatest pools of macroelements were leaves and branches. The most pronounced effects of fertilization were recorded in the DM and consequently in the absolute quantities of nutrients. The DM of an average tree in the control, SUT, and PHT was 85, 226, and 231 g, respectively. The absolute contents of nutrients per tree in the fertilized treatments showed the following increases, as compared with the control: (N) 2.5-2.6 times; (P) 1.6-2.4 times; (K) 1.8-2.1 times; and (Mg) 1.8-2.0 times, respectively. Speckled alder responded positively to fertilization. PMID:25294419

  8. TEMPO-Mediated Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Synthesis of Tetrahydropyridazines Using Ketohydrazones and Olefins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Long; Peng, Xie-Xue; Chen, Fei; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    A novel, facile, and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyridazines by a one-pot tandem reaction of easily accessible ketohydrazones and olefins in the presence of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) has been successfully developed. The reaction involves the initial generation of azoalkenes from direct oxidative dehydrogenation of ketohydrazones using TEMPO as the commercially available oxidant, followed by a subsequent aza-Diels-Alder reaction with olefins. PMID:27120574

  9. Diels-Alder Reactions of Furans with Itaconic Anhydride: Overcoming Unfavorable Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Pehere, Ashok D; Xu, Shu; Thompson, Severin K; Hillmyer, Marc A; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Unfavorable thermodynamics often render furans reluctant to engage in high-yielding Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition reactions. Here, we report the highly efficient conversion of the biosourced reactants itaconic anhydride (IA) and furfuryl alcohol (FA) to a single DA adduct. The free energy advantages provided by anhydride ring opening and crystal lattice energy of the product overcome the loss of aromaticity of the furanoid diene. Detailed (1)H NMR studies provided valuable insights about relevant kinetic and thermodynamic features. PMID:27214494

  10. New L-Serine Derivative Ligands as Cocatalysts for Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Carlos A. D.; Rodríguez-Borges, José E.; Freire, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    New L-serine derivative ligands were prepared and tested as cocatalyst in the Diels-Alder reactions between cyclopentadiene (CPD) and methyl acrylate, in the presence of several Lewis acids. The catalytic potential of the in situ formed complexes was evaluated based on the reaction yield. Bidentate serine ligands showed good ability to coordinate medium strength Lewis acids, thus boosting their catalytic activity. The synthesis of the L-serine ligands proved to be highly efficient and straightforward. PMID:24383009

  11. Molecular Complexity via C–H Activation: A Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Erik M.; White, M. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, C–H oxidation reactions install oxidized functionality onto a preformed molecular skeleton, resulting in a local molecular change. The use of C–H activation chemistry to construct complex molecular scaffolds is a new area with tremendous potential in synthesis. We report a Pd(II)/bis-sulfoxide catalyzed dehydrogenative Diels-Alder reaction that converts simple terminal olefins into complex cycloadducts in a single operation. PMID:21842902

  12. On grey levels in random CAPTCHA generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Fraser; Kouritzin, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    A CAPTCHA is an automatically generated test designed to distinguish between humans and computer programs; specifically, they are designed to be easy for humans but difficult for computer programs to pass in order to prevent the abuse of resources by automated bots. They are commonly seen guarding webmail registration forms, online auction sites, and preventing brute force attacks on passwords. In the following, we address the question: How does adding a grey level to random CAPTCHA generation affect the utility of the CAPTCHA? We treat the problem of generating the random CAPTCHA as one of random field simulation: An initial state of background noise is evolved over time using Gibbs sampling and an efficient algorithm for generating correlated random variables. This approach has already been found to yield highly-readable yet difficult-to-crack CAPTCHAs. We detail how the requisite parameters for introducing grey levels are estimated and how we generate the random CAPTCHA. The resulting CAPTCHA will be evaluated in terms of human readability as well as its resistance to automated attacks in the forms of character segmentation and optical character recognition.

  13. 11. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR VIEW WITH JAMES WILLIAMS INSIDE GREY IRON UNIT NO. 1 MOLDING CONVEYOR, AIR CLEANING A PATTERN AS IT SITS WITHIN A FLASK ON A MOLDING MACHINE PRIOR TO BEING FILLED WITH SAND FROM THE OVERHEAD CONVEYOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. 31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. PETIBONE SAND THROWING MACHINE BOX FLOOR GREY IRON FOUNDRY FORCES CONDITIONED MOLDING SAND, AT HIGH VELOCITY, INTO MOLDS TOO BIG TO BE MADE ON ONE OF THE CONVEYOR SYSTEMS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. 30. NATIONAL SHELL CORE MACHINE IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. NATIONAL SHELL CORE MACHINE IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY AUTOMATICALLY INJECTS SAND INTO CLOSED, HEATED CORE BOXES THAT SET THE RESINS AND PERMIT A HARDENED CORE TO BE REMOVED BY THE OPERATOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. A High Precision Prediction Model Using Hybrid Grey Dynamic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Guo-Dong; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Nagai, Masatake; Masuda, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new prediction analysis model which combines the first order one variable Grey differential equation Model (abbreviated as GM(1,1) model) from grey system theory and time series Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model from statistics theory. We abbreviate the combined GM(1,1) ARIMA model as ARGM(1,1)…

  17. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. 28. CORE STORAGE AREA OF THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. CORE STORAGE AREA OF THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY SHOWING CORES THAT WILL BE USED TO CREATE INTERIOR WALLS OF SMALL BALL VALVES, FOREGROUND, AND LARGE GATE VALVES, BACKGROUND. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. 17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH GREY UNIT NO. 1 MOLD CONVEYOR SHOWING CHAIN HELD WEIGHTS THAT TRAVEL AT THE SAME SPEED AS THE CONVEYOR AND REST ON COMPLETED MOLDS TO HOLD THE SAND SEAMS TOGETHER AS MOLTED IRON IS POURED INTO THE MOLD CAVITY. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. 32. LARGE LADLE, BOX FLOOR, GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. LARGE LADLE, BOX FLOOR, GREY IRON FOUNDRY IS USED TO CARRY LARGE BATCHES OF IRON FROM THE CUPOLA AREAS TO THE LARGE MOLDS MADE ON BOX FLOOR AREA. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. 42. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. 8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACES AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS, CUPOLA TENDER RICHARD SLAUGHTER SUPERVISING THE POUR. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING WEST, WITH GREY IRON HOLDING FURNACE AND AN IRON POUR IN PROCESS. MOLTEN DUCTILE IRON IS POURED FROM THIS 25-TON HOLDING FURNACE INTO LADLES FOR TRANSPORT TO CASTING STATIONS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Planter unit test stand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A planter test stand was developed to evaluate individual row-crop metering units in early 2013. This test stand provided the ability to quantify actual seed metering in terms of population, seed spacing, skips, and multiples over a range of meter RPMs and vacuum pressures. Preliminary data has been...

  7. Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, R.L.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin

    1996-10-01

    Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

  8. Color and Grey Scale in Sonar Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraiss, K. F.; Kuettelwesch, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    In spite of numerous publications 1 it is still rather unclear, whether color is of any help in sonar displays. The work presented here deals with a particular type of sonar data, i.e., LOFAR-grams (low frequency analysing and recording) where acoustic sensor data are continuously written as a time-frequency plot. The question to be answered quantitatively is, whether color coding does improve target detection when compared with a grey scale code. The data show significant differences in receiver-operating characteristics performance for the selected codes. In addition it turned out, that the background noise level affects the performance dramatically for some color codes, while others remain stable or even improve. Generally valid rules are presented on how to generate useful color scales for this particular application.

  9. An unusual cause of Grey Turner's sign.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Oliver Burton; Hunter, Alison Emma; Edwards, Gray Alexander Dyfan; Squires, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A woman in her late 70s presented to the acute general surgical take with a 3-day history of worsening right leg pain and swelling. She had undergone right revision total hip arthroplasty 20 months previously and reported chronic postoperative right thigh pain attributed to a femoral deep venous thrombosis for which she had been warfarinised. On examination, Grey Turner's sign (bruising of the flanks indicating retroperitoneal haemorrhage) was present, as well as a large tender mass in the right iliac fossa and pitting oedema throughout the right lower limb. Urgent CT scan with intravenous contrast revealed a right retroperitoneal haematoma secondary to a right acetabular screw protruding into the right external iliac vein. The patient was successfully managed with warfarin reversal and surgical removal of the relevant acetabular screw. At 2-month follow-up, the patient's symptoms continue to resolve. PMID:23682085

  10. Phylogeographic history of grey wolves in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While it is generally accepted that patterns of intra-specific genetic differentiation are substantially affected by glacial history, population genetic processes occurring during Pleistocene glaciations are still poorly understood. In this study, we address the question of the genetic consequences of Pleistocene glaciations for European grey wolves. Combining our data with data from published studies, we analysed phylogenetic relationships and geographic distribution of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for 947 contemporary European wolves. We also compared the contemporary wolf sequences with published sequences of 24 ancient European wolves. Results We found that haplotypes representing two haplogroups, 1 and 2, overlap geographically, but substantially differ in frequency between populations from south-western and eastern Europe. A comparison between haplotypes from Europe and other continents showed that both haplogroups are spread throughout Eurasia, while only haplogroup 1 occurs in contemporary North American wolves. All ancient wolf samples from western Europe that dated from between 44,000 and 1,200 years B.P. belonged to haplogroup 2, suggesting the long-term predominance of this haplogroup in this region. Moreover, a comparison of current and past frequencies and distributions of the two haplogroups in Europe suggested that haplogroup 2 became outnumbered by haplogroup 1 during the last several thousand years. Conclusions Parallel haplogroup replacement, with haplogroup 2 being totally replaced by haplogroup 1, has been reported for North American grey wolves. Taking into account the similarity of diets reported for the late Pleistocene wolves from Europe and North America, the correspondence between these haplogroup frequency changes may suggest that they were associated with ecological changes occurring after the Last Glacial Maximum. PMID:20409299

  11. Test Stand 500

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a ground level view of Test Stand 500 at the east test area of the Marshall Space Flight Center. Originally constructed in 1966, Test Stand 500 is a multipurpose, dual-position test facility. The stand was utilized to test liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen turbopumps and combustion devices for the J-2 engine. One test position has a high superstructure with lines and tankage for testing liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen turbopumps while the other position is adaptable to pressure-fed test programs such as turbo machinery bearings or seals. The facility was modified in 1980 to support Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) bearing testing.

  12. Using atmospheric pressure plasma treatment for treating grey cotton fabric.

    PubMed

    Kan, Chi-Wai; Lam, Chui-Fung; Chan, Chee-Kooi; Ng, Sun-Pui

    2014-02-15

    Conventional wet treatment, desizing, scouring and bleaching, for grey cotton fabric involves the use of high water, chemical and energy consumption which may not be considered as a clean process. This study aims to investigate the efficiency of the atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on treating grey cotton fabric when compared with the conventional wet treatment. Grey cotton fabrics were treated with different combinations of plasma parameters with helium and oxygen gases and also through conventional desizing, scouring and bleaching processes in order to obtain comparable results. The results obtained from wicking and water drop tests showed that wettability of grey cotton fabrics was greatly improved after plasma treatment and yielded better results than conventional desizing and scouring. The weight reduction of plasma treated grey cotton fabrics revealed that plasma treatment can help remove sizing materials and impurities. Chemical and morphological changes in plasma treated samples were analysed by FTIR and SEM, respectively. Finally, dyeability of the plasma treated and conventional wet treated grey cotton fabrics was compared and the results showed that similar dyeing results were obtained. This can prove that plasma treatment would be another choice for treating grey cotton fabrics. PMID:24507269

  13. Dimerization of quercetin, Diels-Alder vs. radical-coupling approach: a joint thermodynamics, kinetics, and topological study.

    PubMed

    Fourré, Isabelle; Di Meo, Florent; Podloucká, Pavlína; Otyepka, Michal; Trouillas, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Quercetin is a prototypical antioxidant and prominent member of flavonoids, a large group of natural polyphenols. The oxidation of quercetin may lead to its dimerization, which is a paradigm of the more general polyphenol oligomerization. There exist two opposing mechanisms to describe the dimerization process, namely radical-coupling or Diels-Alder reactions. This work presents a comprehensive rationalization of this dimerization process, acquired from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that the two-step radical-coupling pathway is thermodynamically and kinetically preferred over the Diels-Alder reaction. This is in agreement with the experimental results showing the formation of only one isomer, whereas the Diels-Alder mechanism would yield two isomers. The evolution in bonding, occurring during these two processes, is investigated using the atoms in molecules (AIM) and electron localization function (ELF) topological approaches. It is shown that some electron density is accumulated between the fragments in the transition state of the radical-coupling reaction, but not in the transition state of the Diels-Alder process. Graphical Abstract Quantum chemistry calculations of the dimerization process of quercetin show that a radical coupling approach is preferred to a Diels-Alder type reaction, in agreement with experimental results. Analysis of the bonding evolution highlights the reaction mechanism. PMID:27449669

  14. Phagocytosis in pup and adult harbour, grey and harp seals.

    PubMed

    Frouin, Héloïse; Lebeuf, Michel; Hammill, Mike; Fournier, Michel

    2010-04-15

    Knowledge on pinniped immunology is still in its infancy. For instance, age-related and developmental aspects of the immune system in pinnipeds need to be better described. The present study examined the phagocytic activity and efficiency of harbour, grey and harp seal leukocytes. In the first part of the study, peripheral blood was collected from captive female harbour seals of various ages. Data showed an age-related decrease in phagocytosis in female harbour seals from sub-adult to adulthood. In the second part of the study, changes in phagocytosis were quantified during lactation in wild newborn harbour, grey and harp seals and in their mothers (harp and grey seals). In newborns of the same age, leukocytes of harbour and harp seals phagocytosed less than those of grey seal pups. The phagocytic activity and efficiency increased significantly from early to mid-lactation in newborn harbour seals, and from early to late lactation in newborn grey seals, which could suggest that the transfer of phagocytosis-promoting factor(s) in colostrum is an important feature of temporary protection for pups. In contrast, no changes in phagocytic activity and efficiency were observed in lactating females of the two seal species, harp and grey, examined. At late lactation, phagocytic activity in both grey and harp seal pups and phagocytic efficiency in grey seal pups were significantly higher than in their mothers. These results could reflect either the capacity of phagocytes of the newborn harp and grey seals to respond to pathogens. Results from this study suggest that the phagocytosis of the seal species examined is not fully developed at birth as it generally increases in pups during lactation. Thereafter, the phagocytic activity of seals appears to decrease throughout adulthood. PMID:19766324

  15. NEO Test Stand Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, Cody J.

    2015-01-01

    A project within SwampWorks is building a test stand to hold regolith to study how dust is ejected when exposed to the hot exhaust plume of a rocket engine. The test stand needs to be analyzed, finalized, and fabrication drawings generated to move forward. Modifications of the test stand assembly were made with Creo 2 modeling software. Structural analysis calculations were developed by hand to confirm if the structure will hold the expected loads while optimizing support positions. These calculations when iterated through MatLab demonstrated the optimized position of the vertical support to be 98'' from the far end of the stand. All remaining deflections were shown to be under the 0.6'' requirement and internal stresses to meet NASA Ground Support Equipment (GSE) Safety Standards. Though at the time of writing, fabrication drawings have yet to be generated, but are expected shortly after.

  16. The Stimulus test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Christofek, L.; Rapidis, P.; Reinhard, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    The Stimulus Test Stand was originally constructed and assembled for testing the SVX2 ASIC readout and then upgraded for SVX3 ASIC prototyping and testing. We have modified this system for SVX4 ASIC [1] prototype testing. We described the individual components below. Additional details for other hardware for SVX4 testing can be found in reference [2]. We provide a description of the Stimulus Test Stand used for prototype testing of the SVX4 chip.

  17. Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloids Himandravine and GB17 Using Biomimetic Diels–Alder Reactions of Double Diene Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Reed T.; Pemberton, Ryan P.; Franke, Jenna M.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Thomson, Regan J.

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective total syntheses of himandravine and GB17 were completed through a common biomimetic strategy involving Diels–Alder reactions of unusual double diene containing linear precursors. The double diene precursors, containing or lacking a C12 substituent as required to produce GB17 or himandravine, respectively, were found to undergo Diels–Alder reactions to afford mixtures of regioisomeric cycloadducts that map onto the alternative carbocyclic frameworks of both himandravine and GB17. Computational investigations revealed that these Diels–Alder reactions proceed via transition state structures of similar energy that have a high degree of bispericyclic character and that the low levels of regioselectivity observed in the reactions are a consequence of competing orbital interaction and distortion energies. The combined experimental and computational results provide valuable insights into the biosynthesis of the Galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:26305231

  18. Total Synthesis of the Galbulimima Alkaloids Himandravine and GB17 Using Biomimetic Diels-Alder Reactions of Double Diene Precursors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Reed T; Pemberton, Ryan P; Franke, Jenna M; Tantillo, Dean J; Thomson, Regan J

    2015-09-01

    The enantioselective total syntheses of himandravine and GB17 were completed through a common biomimetic strategy involving Diels-Alder reactions of unusual double diene containing linear precursors. The double diene precursors, containing or lacking a C12 substituent as required to produce GB17 or himandravine, respectively, were found to undergo Diels-Alder reactions to afford mixtures of regioisomeric cycloadducts that map onto the alternative carbocyclic frameworks of both himandravine and GB17. Computational investigations revealed that these Diels-Alder reactions proceed via transition state structures of similar energy that have a high degree of bispericyclic character and that the low levels of regioselectivity observed in the reactions are a consequence of competing orbital interaction and distortion energies. The combined experimental and computational results provide valuable insights into the biosynthesis of the Galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:26305231

  19. Recent Advances in Inverse-Electron-Demand Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of 1-Oxa-1,3-Butadienes.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    This review is an endeavor to highlight the progress in the inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes in recent years. The huge number of examples of 1-oxadienes cycloadditions found in the literature clearly demonstrates the incessant importance of this transformation in pyran ring synthesis. This type of reaction is today one of the most important methods for the synthesis of dihydropyrans which are the key building blocks in structuring of carbohydrate and other natural products. Two different modes, inter- and intramolecular, of inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxadienes are discussed. The domino Knoevenagel hetero-Diels-Alder reactions are also described. In recent years the use of chiral Lewis acids, chiral organocatalysts, new optically active heterodienes or dienophiles have provided enormous progress in asymmetric synthesis. Solvent-free and aqueous hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of 1-oxabutadienes were also investigated. The reactivity of reactants, selectivity of cycloadditions, and chemical stability in aqueous solutions and under physiological conditions were taken into account to show the potential application of the described reactions in bioorthogonal chemistry. New bioorthogonal ligation by click inverse-electron-demand hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition of in situ-generated 1-oxa-1,3-butadienes and vinyl ethers was developed. It seems that some of the hetero-Diels-Alder reactions described in this review can be applied in bioorthogonal chemistry because they are selective, non-toxic, and can function in biological conditions taking into account pH, an aqueous environment, and temperature. PMID:27573264

  20. Diarylheptanoids from green alder bark and their potential for DNA protection.

    PubMed

    Novaković, Miroslav; Stanković, Miroslava; Vučković, Ivan; Todorović, Nina; Trifunović, Snežana; Apostolović, Danijela; Mandić, Boris; Veljić, Milan; Marin, Petar; Tešević, Vele; Vajs, Vlatka; Milosavljević, Slobodan

    2014-06-01

    Nine diarylheptanoids, 1-9, catechin (11), and a phenolic glucoside, 10, were isolated from the bark of green alder (Alnus viridis). Four of the isolated compounds, i.e., 2, 5, 8, 10, are new. The structures of 1-11 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data. All isolated compounds were evaluated for their in vitro protective effects on chromosome aberrations in peripheral human lymphocytes using cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Almost all of them exerted a pronounced effect of decreasing DNA damage of human lymphocytes, acting stronger than the known synthetic protector amifostine. PMID:24934673

  1. Hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of hetaryl and aryl thioketones with acetylenic dienophiles.

    PubMed

    Mlostoń, Grzegorz; Grzelak, Paulina; Mikina, Maciej; Linden, Anthony; Heimgartner, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Selected hetaryl and aryl thioketones react with acetylenecarboxylates under thermal conditions in the presence of LiClO4 or, alternatively, under high-pressure conditions (5 kbar) at room temperature yielding thiopyran derivatives. The hetero-Diels-Alder reaction occurs in a chemo- and regioselective manner. The initially formed [4 + 2] cycloadducts rearrange via a 1,3-hydrogen shift sequence to give the final products. The latter were smoothly oxidized by treatment with mCPBA to the corresponding sulfones. PMID:26124858

  2. On the theory of Brownian motion with the Alder-Wainwright effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Yasunori

    1986-12-01

    The Stokes-Boussinesq-Langevin equation, which describes the time evolution of Brownian motion with the Alder-Wainwright effect, can be treated in the framework of the theory of KMO-Langevin equations which describe the time evolution of a real, stationary Gaussian process with T-positivity (reflection positivity) originating in axiomatic quantum field theory. After proving the fluctuation-dissipation theorems for KMO-Langevin equations, we obtain an explicit formula for the deviation from the classical Einstein relation that occurs in the Stokes-Boussinesq-Langevin equation with a white noise as its random force. We are interested in whether or not it can be measured experimentally.

  3. Conformations of allylic fluorides and stereoselectivities of their diels-alder cycloadditions.

    PubMed

    Grée, D; Vallerie, L; Grée, R; Toupet, L; Washington, I; Pelicier, J P; Villacampa, M; Pérez, J M; Houk, K N

    2001-04-01

    The preparations of new allylic fluorides from the corresponding alcohols are reported. Conformational analysis is achieved by comparison of experimental NMR measurements with theoretical (B3LYP) calculations of relative energies of conformers and J(H,H) and J(H,F) coupling constants. The Diels-Alder reactions of allylic fluorides are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The stereoselectivities of the reactions were determined by NMR analysis and, in one case, by X-ray crystallography. Theoretical predictions of stereoselectivity based upon transition state modeling provided good agreement with experiment. Theoretical models for allylic fluorides and transition state conformations are reported. PMID:11281778

  4. The Nitrosocarbonyl Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction as a Useful Tool for Organic Syntheses

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Brian S.

    2014-01-01

    Organic transformations that result in the formation of multiple covalent bonds within the same reaction are some of the most powerful tools in synthetic organic chemistry. Nitrosocarbonyl hetero-Diels–Alder (HDA) reactions allow for the simultaneous stereospecific introduction of carbon–nitrogen and carbon–oxygen bonds in one synthetic step, and provide direct access to 3,6-dihydro-1,2-oxazines. This Review describes the development of the nitrosocarbonyl HDA reaction and the utility of the resulting oxazine ring in the synthesis of a variety of important, biologically active molecules. PMID:21520360

  5. Insight on mendable resin made by combining Diels-Alder epoxy adducts with DGEBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Iacono, S.; Martone, A.; Filippone, G.; Acierno, D.; Zarrelli, M.; Giordano, M.; Amendola, E.

    2016-05-01

    Formation of micro-cracks is a critical problem in polymers and polymer composites during their service in structural applications. In this context, materials endowed with self-healing features would lead to the next polymers generation. In the present paper, an epoxy system integrating Diels-Alder epoxy adducts is investigated by thermal and spectroscopic analysis. The direct and retro D-A reaction have been studied by FTIR and specific absorption bands have been identified. Finally, mechanical tests have been performed on the system. The polymer is able to heal fracture and micro-cracks recovering its stiffness after a thermal treatment.

  6. Silver Nanoparticle-Catalyzed Diels-Alder Cycloadditions of 2′-Hydroxychalcones

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Huan; Becker, Clinton F.; Elliott, Sean J.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Porco, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles are currently being employed as catalysts for a number of classical chemical transformations. In contrast, identification of novel reactions of nanoparticles, especially towards the synthesis of complex natural products and derivatives, is highly underdeveloped and represents a bourgeoning area in chemical synthesis. Herein, we report silica-supported silver nanoparticles as solid, recyclable catalysts for Diels-Alder cycloadditions of 2′-hydroxychalcones and dienes in high yield and turnover number. The use of silver nanoparticle catalysts is further demonstrated by the total synthesis of the cytotoxic natural product panduratin A employing a highly electron-rich dienophile and Lewis acid-sensitive diene. PMID:20443601

  7. Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyuan; Nguyen, Son T.; Williams, John D.; Peet, Norton P.

    2015-01-01

    Diels-Alder reactions of five-membered heterocycles containing one heteroatom with an N-arylmaleimide were studied. Cycloaddition of 2,5-dimethylfuran (4) with 2-(4-methylphenyl)maleimide (3) in toluene at 60 °C gave bicyclic adduct 5. Cycloadditions of 3 with 2,5-dimethylthiophene (11) and 1,2,5-trimethylpyrrole (14) were also studied. Interestingly, the bicyclic compound 5 cleanly rearranged, with loss of water, when treated with p-toluenesulfonic acid in toluene at 80 °C to give 4,7-dimethyl-2-p-tolylisoindoline-1,3-dione (6). PMID:25838605

  8. Structural Modification of Sol-Gel Materials through Retro Diels-Alder Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCCLAIN,MARK D.; PRABAKAR,SHESHASAYANA; GREAVES,JOHN; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    1999-12-08

    Hydrolysis and condensation of organically bridged bis-triethoxysilanes, (EtO){sub 3}Si-R-Si(OEt){sub 3}, results in the formation of three dimensional organic/inorganic hybrid networks (Equation 1). Properties of these materials, including porosity, are dependent on the nature of the bridging group, R. Flexible groups (akylene-spacers longer than five carbons in length) polymerize under acidic conditions to give non-porous materials. Rigid groups (such as arylene-, alkynylene-, or alkenylene) form non-porous, microporous, and macroporous gels. In many cases the pore size distributions are quite narrow. One of the motivations for preparing hybrid organic-inorganic materials is to extend the range of properties available with sol-gel systems by incorporating organic groups into the inorganic network. For example, organically modified silica gels arc either prepared by co-polymerizing an organoalkoxysilane with a silica precursor or surface silylating the inorganic gel. This can serve to increase hydrophobicity or to introduce some reactive organic functionality. However, the type and orientation of these organic functionalities is difficult to control. Furthermore, many organoalkoxysilanes can act to inhibitor even prevent gelation, limiting the final density of organic functionalities. We have devised a new route for preparing highly functionalized pores in hybrid materials using bridging groups that are thermally converted into the desired functionalities after the gel has been obtained. In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of bridged polysilsesquioxanes with Diels-Alder adducts as the bridging groups from the sol-gel polymerization of monomers 2 and 4. The bridging groups are constructed such that the retro Diela-Alder reaction releases the dienes and leaves the dienophiles as integral parts of the network polymers. In the rigid architecture of a xerogel, this loss of organic functionality should liberate sufficient space to modify the

  9. Energy storage capacity of reversible liquid phase Diels-Alder reactions as determined by drop calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.P.

    1983-01-01

    Several Diels-Alder reactions were evaluated as possible candidates for energy storage. The goal was to use simple drop calorimetry to screen reactions and to identify those with high energy storage capacities. The dienes used were furan and substituted furans. The dienophiles used were maleic anhydride and substituted maleic anhydrides. Sixteen reactions have been examined. Three had energy storage capacities that were increased due to reaction (maleic anhydride and 2-methyl furan, maleic anhydride and 2-ethyl furan, maleic anhydride and 2,5-dimethyl furan). The remaining thirteen showed no increase in apparent heat capacity due to reaction.

  10. Continuous-flow stereoselective organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions in a chiral catalytic "homemade" HPLC column.

    PubMed

    Chiroli, Valerio; Benaglia, Maurizio; Cozzi, Franco; Puglisi, Alessandra; Annunziata, Rita; Celentano, Giuseppe

    2013-07-19

    Continuous-flow organocatalyzed Diels-Alder reactions have been performed with excellent enantioselectivity for the first time in a chiral "homemade" HPLC column, packed with silica on which a MacMillan catalyst has been supported by a straightforward immobilization procedure. The versatility of the system was also proven by running with the same column continuous-flow stereoselective reactions with three different substrates, showing that the catalytic reactor may efficiently work in continuo for more than 150 h; the regeneration of the HPLC column was also demonstrated, allowing to further extend the activity of the reactor to more than 300 operating hours. PMID:23808663

  11. Control of femtosecond laser driven retro-Diels-Alder-like reaction of dicyclopentadiene

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipak Kumar; Goswami, Tapas; Goswami, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Using femtosecond time resolved degenerate pump-probe mass spectrometry coupled with simple linearly chirped frequency modulated pulse, we elucidate that the dynamics of retro-Diels-Alder-like reaction of diclopentadiene (DCPD) to cyclopentadiene (CPD) in supersonic molecular beam occurs in ultrafast time scale. Negatively chirped pulse enhances the ion yield of CPD, as compared to positively chirped pulse. This indicates that by changing the frequency (chirp) of the laser pulse we can control the ion yield of a chemical reaction. PMID:23814449

  12. Hetero-Diels–Alder reactions of hetaryl and aryl thioketones with acetylenic dienophiles

    PubMed Central

    Grzelak, Paulina; Mikina, Maciej; Linden, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selected hetaryl and aryl thioketones react with acetylenecarboxylates under thermal conditions in the presence of LiClO4 or, alternatively, under high-pressure conditions (5 kbar) at room temperature yielding thiopyran derivatives. The hetero-Diels–Alder reaction occurs in a chemo- and regioselective manner. The initially formed [4 + 2] cycloadducts rearrange via a 1,3-hydrogen shift sequence to give the final products. The latter were smoothly oxidized by treatment with mCPBA to the corresponding sulfones. PMID:26124858

  13. 29. DEPENDABLE FORDATHSHELL CORE MACHINES IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DEPENDABLE FORDATH-SHELL CORE MACHINES IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY INJECTS SAND INTO A CLOSED CORE BOX. SOME OF THE UNITS HEAT THE CORE BOX TO FIX THE RESINS AS THE CORE REMAINS IN THE BOX, OTHERS MERELY SHAPED THE CORE SAND REQUIRING BAKING OF THE CORES TO HARDEN THEM. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. The Inverse Demand Oxa-Diels-Alder Reaction of Resorcinarenes: An Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Regioselectivity and Diastereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Stefańska, Karolina; Jędrzejewska, Hanna; Wierzbicki, Michał; Szumna, Agnieszka; Iwanek, Waldemar

    2016-07-15

    The Diels-Alder reaction enables introduction of new functionalities onto the resorcinarene skeleton with simultaneous generation of new stereogenic centers and expansion of the internal cavity. We present highly regio- and diastereoselective inverse electron demand oxa-Diels-Alder reactions of resorcinarene ortho-quinone methide with benzofuran and indene, each generating 12 new stereogenic centers. The mechanism and reasons for regioselectivity and diastereoselectivity were analyzed using theoretical calculations (NBO charges, Fukui functions, transition state energies, and thermodynamic stability of the products). Enantiomers were separated, and their configurations were determined by comparison of experimental and theoretical electronic circular dichroism spectra. PMID:27336857

  15. Chiral Pyridinium Phosphoramide as a Dual Brønsted Acid Catalyst for Enantioselective Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Saki; Tahira, Yuu; Terazawa, Kanako; Yamazaki, Ken; Kitamura, Chitoshi; Hara, Osamu

    2016-05-01

    Chiral pyridinium phosphoramide 1·HX was designed to be a new class of chiral Brønsted acid catalyst in which both the pyridinium proton and the adjacent imide-like proton activated by the electron-withdrawing pyridinium moiety could work cooperatively as strong dual proton donors. The potential of 1·HX was shown in the enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions of 1-amino dienes with various dienophiles including N-unsubstituted maleimide, which has yet to be successfully used in an asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction. PMID:27093584

  16. Medium-Ring Effects on the Endo/Exo Selectivity of the Organocatalytic Intramolecular Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Joel F; James, Natalie C; Bozkurt, Esra; Aviyente, Viktorya; White, Jonathan M; Holland, Mareike C; Gilmour, Ryan; Holmes, Andrew B; Houk, K N

    2015-12-18

    The intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction has been used as a powerful method to access the tricyclic core of the eunicellin natural products from a number of 9-membered-ring precursors. The endo/exo selectivity of this reaction can be controlled through a remarkable organocatalytic approach, employing MacMillan's imidazolidinone catalysts, although the mechanistic origin of this selectivity remains unclear. We present a combined experimental and density functional theory investigation, providing insight into the effects of medium-ring constraints on the organocatalyzed intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form the isobenzofuran core of the eunicellins. PMID:26560246

  17. Enantio- and periselective nitroalkene Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by helical-chiral hydrogen bond donor catalysts.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhili; Narcis, Maurice J; Takenaka, Norito

    2013-01-01

    Helical-chiral double hydrogen bond donor catalysts promote the nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction in an enantio- and periselective manner. This represents the first asymmetric catalytic nitroalkene Diels-Alder reaction via LUMO-lowering catalysis. To gain an insight into this new process, the substrate scope of our catalyst was investigated by exploiting readily available 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes. The catalyst was found to tolerate dienes with different steric demands as well as dienes substituted with heteroatoms. The synthetic utility of 5-substituted pentamethylcyclopentadienes is rather limited, and thus we have developed a three-step route to 1,4,5,5-tetrasubstituted cyclopentadienes from commercially available ketones. PMID:23966083

  18. Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northeast from Test Stand 'A' superstructure towards Test Stand 'D' tower (4223/E-24, left background), Test Stand 'C' tower (4217/E-18, center), and Test Stand 'B' (4215/E-16, right foreground). - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  20. Standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  1. Standing waves braneworlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogberashvili, Merab; Mantidze, Irakli; Sakhelashvili, Otari; Shengelia, Tsotne

    2016-05-01

    The class of nonstationary braneworld models generated by the coupled gravitational and scalar fields is reviewed. The model represents a brane in a spacetime with single time and one large (infinite) and several small (compact) spacelike extra dimensions. In some particular cases the model has the solutions corresponding to the bulk gravi-scalar standing waves bounded by the brane. Pure gravitational localization mechanism of matter particles on the node of standing waves, where the brane is placed, is discussed. Cosmological applications of the model is also considered.

  2. The Hexadehydro-Diels-Alder Cycloisomerization Reaction Proceeds by a Stepwise Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R

    2016-06-29

    We report here experiments showing that the hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (HDDA) cycloisomerization reaction proceeds in a stepwise manner-i.e., via a diradical intermediate. Judicious use of substituent effects was decisive. We prepared (i) a series of triyne HDDA substrates that differed only in the R group present on the remote terminus of the diynophilic alkyne and (ii) an analogous series of dienophilic alkynes (n-C7H15COC≡CR) for use in classical Diels-Alder (DA) reactions (with 1,3-cyclopentadiene). The R groups were CF3, CHO, COMe/Et, CO2Me, CONMe2/Et2, H, and 1-propynyl. The relative rates of both the HDDA cyclization reactions and the simple DA cycloadditions were measured. The reactivity trends revealed a dramatic difference in the behaviors of the CF3 (slowest HDDA and nearly fastest DA) and 1-propynyl (fastest HDDA and slowest DA) containing members of each series. These differences can be explained by invoking radical-stabilizing energies rather than electron-withdrawing effects as the dominating feature of the HDDA reaction. PMID:27266843

  3. New Insights into the Diels-Alder Reaction of Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Brisebois, Patrick P; Kuss, Christian; Schougaard, Steen B; Izquierdo, Ricardo; Siaj, Mohamed

    2016-04-18

    Graphene oxide is regarded as a major precursor for graphene-based materials. The development of graphene oxide based derivatives with new functionalities requires a thorough understanding of its chemical reactivity, especially for canonical synthetic methods such as the Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The Diels-Alder reaction has been successfully extended with graphene oxide as a source of diene by using maleic anhydride as a dienophile, thereby outlining the presence of the cis diene present in the graphene oxide framework. This reaction provides fundamental information for understanding the exact structure and chemical nature of graphene oxide. On the basis of high-resolution (13) C-SS NMR spectra, we show evidence for the formation of new sp(3) carbon centers covalently bonded to graphene oxide following hydrolysis of the reaction product. DFT calculations are also used to show that the presence of a cis dihydroxyl and C vacancy on the surface of graphene oxide are promoting the reaction with significant negative reaction enthalpies. PMID:26953926

  4. Free-Standing Canes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehresman, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A precane device, called the "free-standing cane," was developed to help children with blindness along with other disabilities. The cane detects obstacles; guides the user's hands into a relaxed, static position in front of the hips; facilitates postural security and control; and offers tactile and kinesthetic feedback. (JDD)

  5. Assessment of global grey water footprint of major food crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong; Liu, Wenfeng; Antonelli, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural production is one of the major sources of water pollution in the world. This is closely related to the excess application of fertilizers. Leaching of N and P to water bodies has caused serious degradation of water quality in many places. With the persistent increase in the demand for agricultural products, agricultural intensification evident during the past decades will continue in the future. This will lead to further increase in fertilizer application and consequently water pollution. Grey water footprint is a measure of the intensity of water pollution caused by water use for human activities. It is defined as the volume of water that is required to assimilate a load of pollutants to a freshwater body, based on natural background concentrations and water quality standards. This study conducts a global assessment of grey water footprint for major cereal crops, wheat, maize and rice. A crop model, Python-based EPIC (PEPIT), is applied to quantify the leaching of N and P from the fertilizer application in the three crops on a global scale with 0.5 degree spatial resolution. The hotspots of leaching are identified. The results suggest that, based on the definition and method of grey water footprint proposed by the World Water Footprint Network, the grey water footprint in many parts of the world has exceeded their total water resources availability. This indicates the seriousness of water pollution caused by agricultural production. However, the situation may also call for the development of a realistic measurement of grey water footprint which is more pertinent to water resources management. This paper proposes some alternatives in measuring grey water footprint and also discusses incorporation of grey water footprint assessment into water policy formulation and river basins plan development.

  6. Relationship between grey matter integrity and executive abilities in aging.

    PubMed

    Manard, Marine; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Salmon, Eric; Collette, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate grey matter changes that occur in healthy aging and the relationship between grey matter characteristics and executive functioning. Thirty-six young adults (18-30 years old) and 43 seniors (60-75 years old) were included. A general executive score was derived from a large battery of neuropsychological tests assessing three major aspects of executive functioning (inhibition, updating and shifting). Age-related grey matter changes were investigated by comparing young and older adults using voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness methods. A widespread difference in grey matter volume was found across many brain regions, whereas cortical thinning was mainly restricted to central areas. Multivariate analyses showed age-related changes in relatively similar brain regions to the respective univariate analyses but appeared more limited. Finally, in the older adult sample, a significant relationship between global executive performance and decreased grey matter volume in anterior (i.e. frontal, insular and cingulate cortex) but also some posterior brain areas (i.e. temporal and parietal cortices) as well as subcortical structures was observed. Results of this study highlight the distribution of age-related effects on grey matter volume and show that cortical atrophy does not appear primarily in "frontal" brain regions. From a cognitive viewpoint, age-related executive functioning seems to be related to grey matter volume but not to cortical thickness. Therefore, our results also highlight the influence of methodological aspects (from preprocessing to statistical analysis) on the pattern of results, which could explain the lack of consensus in literature. PMID:27107940

  7. NITROGEN EXPORT FROM FORESTED WATERSHEDS IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE: THE ROLE OF N2-FIXING RED ALDER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in plant community composition across the landscape can influence nutrient retention and loss at the watershed scale. A striking example of plant species influence is the role of N2-fixing red alder (Alnus rubra) in the biogeochemistry of Pacific Northwest forests. T...

  8. Anomalous Reactivity and Selectivity in the Intermolecular Diels-Alder Reactions of Multisubstituted Acyclic Dienes with Geometrical Isomers of Enals.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia-Hui; Cai, Sai-Hu; Xu, Yun-He; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2016-05-20

    A Lewis-acid catalyzed intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction between multisubstituted acyclic dienes and the E and Z isomers of α,β-enals was studied. It was found that the diene reacted selectively with the Z-isomer of the α,β-enal. PMID:27132468

  9. A Kinetic Study of the Diels-Alder Reaction. An Experiment Illustrating Simple Second-Order Reaction Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvestri, Michael G.; Dills, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment for teaching the basic concepts of chemical kinetics. Provides background information about first- and second-order reactions, experimental procedures of the Diels-Alder reaction between cyclopentadiene and dimethyl fumarate, and the experimental results. (YP)

  10. Microwave-Enhanced Organic Syntheses for the Undergraduate Laboratory: Diels-Alder Cycloaddition, Wittig Reaction, and Williamson Ether Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Falcone, Danielle; Gordon, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Microwave heating enhanced the rate of three reactions typically performed in our undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory: a Diels-Alder cycloaddition, a Wittig salt formation, and a Williamson ether synthesis. Ninety-minute refluxes were shortened to 10 min using a laboratory-grade microwave oven. In addition, yields improved for the Wittig…

  11. The Preparation and Properties of Thermo-reversibly Cross-linked Rubber Via Diels-Alder Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Polgar, Lorenzo Massimo; van Duin, Martin; Picchioni, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A method for using Diels Alder thermo-reversible chemistry as cross-linking tool for rubber products is demonstrated. In this work, a commercial ethylene-propylene rubber, grafted with maleic anhydride, is thermo-reversibly cross-linked in two steps. The pending anhydride moieties are first modified with furfurylamine to graft furan groups to the rubber backbone. These pendant furan groups are then cross-linked with a bis-maleimide via a Diels-Alder coupling reaction. Both reactions can be performed under a broad range of experimental conditions and can easily be applied on a large scale. The material properties of the resulting Diels-Alder cross-linked rubbers are similar to a peroxide-cured ethylene/propylene/diene rubber (EPDM) reference. The cross-links break at elevated temperatures (> 150 °C) via the retro-Diels-Alder reaction and can be reformed by thermal annealing at lower temperatures (50-70 °C). Reversibility of the system was proven with infrared spectroscopy, solubility tests and mechanical properties. Recyclability of the material was also shown in a practical way, i.e., by cutting a cross-linked sample into small parts and compression molding them into new samples displaying comparable mechanical properties, which is not possible for conventionally cross-linked rubbers. PMID:27583665

  12. Asymmetric synthesis of bicyclic dihydropyrans via organocatalytic inverse-electron-demand oxo-Diels-Alder reactions of enolizable aliphatic aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Long; Yang, Kai-Chuan; Li, Yi; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Hong-Ping; Han, Bo; Peng, Cheng; Zhi, Yong-Gang; Gou, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-23

    A highly enantioselective organocatalytic inverse-electron-demand oxo-Diels-Alder reaction involving aqueous acetaldehyde has been discovered. The reaction, in which cyclic enones serve as dienes in the presence of readily available secondary amine catalysts, allows facile construction of optically active bicyclic dihydropyrans. Other typical enolizable aliphatic aldehydes can also serve as competent dienophiles in the reaction. PMID:27436351

  13. Sorocenols G and H, Anti-MRSA Oxygen Heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type Adducts from Sorocea muriculata Roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a root extract of Sorocea muriculata led to the isolation and identification of two new oxygen heterocyclic Diels-Alder-type adducts, sorocenols G (1) and H (2), along with lupeol-3-(3'R-hydroxytetradecanoate) and oxyresveratrol. The structures of 1 and 2 were eluci...

  14. Grey relational clustering associated with CAPRI applied to FPGA placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jan-Ou; Fan, Yang-Hsin; Wang, San-Fu

    2016-04-01

    Grey relational clustering is used to minimise wire length during field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) placement and routing. The proposed Grey Relational Clustering Apply to Placement (GRAP) algorithm combines grey relational clustering and convex assigned placement for regular ICs method to construct a placement netlist, which was successfully used to solve the problem of minimising wire length in an FPGA placement. Upon calculating the grey relational grade, GRAP can rank the sequence and analyse the minimal distance in configuration logic blocks based on the grey relational sequence and combined connection-based approaches. The experimental results demonstrate that the GRAP effectively compares the Hibert, Z and Snake with bounding box (BB) cost function in the space-filling curve. The GRAP improved BB cost by 0.753%, 0.324% and 0.096% for the Hilbert, Z and Snake, respectively. This study also compares the critical path with the space-filling curve. The GRAP approach improved the critical path for Snake by 1.3% in the space-filling curve; however, the GRAP increased critical path wire by 1.38% and 0.03% over that of the Hilbert and Z of space-filling curve, respectively.

  15. Grey matter abnormalities in social anxiety disorder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Syal, Supriya; Hattingh, Coenraad J; Fouché, Jean-Paul; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Carey, Paul D; Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2012-09-01

    While a number of studies have explored the functional neuroanatomy of social anxiety disorder (SAD), data on grey matter integrity are lacking. We conducted structural MRI scans to examine the cortical thickness of grey matter in individuals with SAD. 13 unmedicated adult patients with a primary diagnosis of generalized social anxiety disorder and 13 demographically (age, gender and education) matched healthy controls underwent 3T structural magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical thickness and subcortical volumes were estimated using an automated algorithm (Freesurfer Version 4.5). Compared to controls, social anxiety disorder patients showed significant bilateral cortical thinning in the fusiform and post central regions. Additionally, right hemisphere specific thinning was found in the frontal, temporal, parietal and insular cortices of individuals with social anxiety disorder. Although uncorrected cortical grey matter volumes were significantly lower in individuals with SAD, we did not detect volumetric differences in corrected amygdala, hippocampal or cortical grey matter volumes across study groups. Structural differences in grey matter thickness between SAD patients and controls highlight the diffuse neuroanatomical networks involved in both social anxiety and social behavior. Additional work is needed to investigate the causal mechanisms involved in such structural abnormalities in SAD. PMID:22527992

  16. Regional Grey and White Matter Changes in Heavy Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rongjun; Zhao, Liyan; Lu, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is highly prevalent in the general population but the effects of chronic smoking on brain structures are still unclear. Previous studies have found mixed results regarding regional grey matter abnormalities in smokers. To characterize both grey and white matter changes in heavy male smokers, we investigated 16 heavy smokers and 16 matched healthy controls, using both univariate voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and multivariate pattern classification analysis. Compared with controls, heavy smokers exhibited smaller grey matter volume in cerebellum, as well as larger white matter volume in putamen, anterior and middle cingulate cortex. Further, the spatial patterns of grey matter or white matter both discriminated smokers from controls in these regions as well as in other brain regions. Our findings demonstrated volume abnormalities not only in the grey matter but also in the white matter in heavy male smokers. The multivariate analysis suggests that chronic smoking may be associated with volume alternations in broader brain regions than those identified in VBM analysis. These results may better our understanding of the neurobiological consequence of smoking and inform smoking treatment. PMID:22076160

  17. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets. PMID:25875156

  18. 20. Building 202, detail of stand A, rocket test stand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Building 202, detail of stand A, rocket test stand in test cell. View looking southeast. - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. Get up, Stand up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melia, Ed

    2009-01-01

    Ignorance about dyslexia meant a miserable school experience for Barrie Hughes. He was in his 50s when he found the courage to stand up in front of a classroom of learners and admit he couldn't read. Barrie, who is now 59 and works for the parks department of Brighton and Hove Council, only began to learn how to read words in the last three years…

  20. A grey {gamma}-ray transfer procedure for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    The {gamma}-ray transfer in supernovae for the purposes of energy deposition in the ejecta can be approximated as grey radiative transfer using mean opacities. In past work there is a single pure absorption mean opacity which is a free parameter. Accurate results can be obtained by varying this mean opacity to fit the results of more accurate procedures. In this paper, the authors present a grey {gamma}-ray transfer procedure for energy deposition in which there are multiple mean opacities that are not free parameters and that have both absorption and scattering components. This procedure is based on a local-state (LS) approximation, and so they call it the LS grey {gamma}-ray transfer procedure or LS procedure for short.

  1. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  2. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that themore » diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.« less

  3. Economic considerations in establishing European alder in herbaceous cover on surface-mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, J.M.; Graves, D.H.

    1985-12-09

    Herbicides are a practical tool for selectively controlling vegetative competition during tree seedling establishment. A study to investigate the effects of eight herbicide treatments on the survival and height growth of European alder (Alnus glutinosa) seedlings established in herbaceous cover indicated a positive treatment effect, but very little difference between the herbicide treatments themselves. Since the costs of the herbicides varied considerably, similar results could be obtained using the different herbicides, but at substantially different costs. Biological data were combined with the economic data to derive a modified benefit/cost ratio. This ratio facilitates herbicide treatment choice by comparing the amount of added survival or growth obtained per dollar spent on herbicides. 5 references, 6 tables.

  4. Kondrat'eva ligation: Diels-Alder-based irreversible reaction for bioconjugation.

    PubMed

    Jouanno, Laurie-Anne; Chevalier, Arnaud; Sekkat, Nawal; Perzo, Nicolas; Castel, Hélène; Romieu, Anthony; Lange, Norbert; Sabot, Cyrille; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2014-11-01

    Diversification of existing chemoselective ligations is required to efficiently access complex and well-defined biomolecular assemblies with unique and valuable properties. The development and bioconjugation applications of a novel Diels-Alder-based irreversible site-specific ligation are reported. The strategy is based on a Kondrat'eva cycloaddition between bioinert and readily functionalizable 5-alkoxyoxazoles and maleimides that readily react together under mild and easily tunable reaction conditions to afford a fully stable pyridine scaffold. The potential of this novel bioconjugation is demonstrated through the preparation of fluorescent conjugates of biomolecules and a novel Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probe suitable for the in vivo detection and imaging of urokinase-like plasminogen activator (uPA), which is a key protease involved in cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:25346140

  5. A mechanochemical study of the effects of compression on a Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjiv K; Brown, Katie; Todde, Guido; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2016-08-21

    We examine the effects of compressive external forces on the mechanisms of the parent Diels-Alder (DA) reaction between butadiene and ethylene. Reaction pathways and transition states were calculated using the nudged elastic band method within a mechanochemical framework at the CASSCF(6,6)/6-31G**, as well as the B3LYP/6-311++G** levels of theory. Our results suggest that compressive hydrostatic pressure lowers the energy barrier for the parent DA reaction while suppressing the undesirable side reaction, thereby leading to a direct increase in the yield of cyclohexene. Compressive pressure also increases the exothermicity of the parent DA reaction, which would lead to increased temperatures in a reaction vessel and thereby indirectly increase the yield of cyclohexene. Our estimates indicate that the compression used in our study corresponds to a range of 68 MPa-1410 MPa. PMID:27544105

  6. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  7. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that the diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.

  8. Click and Patterned Functionalization of Graphene by Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Meng; Zhou, Li-Li; Lang, Shuang-Yan; Lu, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong; Chen, Chuan-Feng; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Chemical functionalization is a promising approach to controllably manipulate the characteristics of graphene. Here, we designed cis-dienes, featuring two dihydronaphthalene backbones, to decorate a graphene surface via Diels-Alder (DA) click reaction. The installation of a diene moiety into a nonplanar molecular structure to form cis-conformation enables a rapid (∼5 min) DA reaction between graphene and diene groups. Patterned graphene of sub-micrometer resolution can be obtained by easily soaking poly(methyl methacrylate)-masked graphene in solution of hydroxyl-substituted cis-diene at room temperature. The functionalization degree can be further controlled by carrying out the reaction at higher temperature. The present result gives important insight into the effect of molecular conformation on the graphene functionalization process, and provides an effective and facile method for graphene functionalization. PMID:27264112

  9. Total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine via an organocatalytic Diels-Alder approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Duan, Shengguo; Tao, Cheng; Zhai, Hongbin; Qiu, Fayang G

    2015-01-01

    The structurally complex alkaloid gelsemine was previously thought to have no significant biological activities, but a recent study has shown that it has potent and specific antinociception in chronic pain. While this molecule has attracted significant interests from the synthetic community, an efficient synthetic strategy is still the goal of many synthetic chemists. Here we report the asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine, including a highly diastereoselective and enantioselective organocatalytic Diels-Alder reaction, an efficient intramolecular trans-annular aldol condensation furnishing the prolidine ring and establishing the configuration of the C20 quaternary carbon stereochemical centre. The entire gelsemine skeleton was constructed through a late-stage intramolecular SN2 substitution. The enantiomeric excess of this total synthesis is over 99%, and the overall yield is around 5%. PMID:25995149

  10. Total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine via an organocatalytic Diels–Alder approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoming; Duan, Shengguo; Tao, Cheng; Zhai, Hongbin; Qiu, Fayang G.

    2015-01-01

    The structurally complex alkaloid gelsemine was previously thought to have no significant biological activities, but a recent study has shown that it has potent and specific antinociception in chronic pain. While this molecule has attracted significant interests from the synthetic community, an efficient synthetic strategy is still the goal of many synthetic chemists. Here we report the asymmetric total synthesis of (+)-gelsemine, including a highly diastereoselective and enantioselective organocatalytic Diels–Alder reaction, an efficient intramolecular trans-annular aldol condensation furnishing the prolidine ring and establishing the configuration of the C20 quaternary carbon stereochemical centre. The entire gelsemine skeleton was constructed through a late-stage intramolecular SN2 substitution. The enantiomeric excess of this total synthesis is over 99%, and the overall yield is around 5%. PMID:25995149

  11. Synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes and chemistry beyond Diels–Alder reactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xijian; Peng, Siyu; Li, Li; Huang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Electron-rich dienes have revolutionized the synthesis of complex compounds since the discovery of the legendary Diels–Alder cycloaddition reaction. This highly efficient bond-forming process has served as a fundamental strategy to assemble many structurally formidable molecules. Amino silyloxy butadienes are arguably the most reactive diene species that are isolable and bottleable. Since the pioneering discovery by Rawal, 1-amino-3-silyloxybutadienes have been found to undergo cycloaddition reactions with unparalleled mildness, leading to significant advances in both asymmetric catalysis and total synthesis of biologically active natural products. In sharp contrast, this class of highly electron-rich conjugated olefins has not been studied in non-cycloaddition reactions. Here we report a simple synthesis of tetrasubstituted 1-silyloxy-3-aminobutadienes, a complementarily substituted Rawal's diene. This family of molecules is found to undergo a series of intriguing chemical transformations orthogonal to cycloaddition reactions. Structurally diverse polysubstituted ring architectures are established in one step from these dienes. PMID:25898310

  12. Dynamics of Methane Production, Sulfate Reduction, and Denitrification in a Permanently Waterlogged Alder Swamp

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition or poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses. PMID:16347472

  13. Dancing in the grey zone between normality and risk.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, Hannah

    2016-06-01

    Childbirth is mainly grey. The most straightforward of births can lead to unexpected, heart-stopping moments--and the highest risk woman can, despite our fears, birth without any of the imagined horrors being realised. As midwives we can choose to be paralysed with fear over this, or responsive to--and respectful of--such an amazing process. This paper discusses how midwives can learn to 'dance in the grey zone', while meeting their professional obligations and protecting women's human rights. Come dance the waltz, the tango and the hip-hop with me on the dance floor created by the 'triangle of wisdom'. PMID:27451486

  14. Venture Capital Investment Base on Grey Relational Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xubo

    This paper builds a venture capital investment projects selection evaluation model base on risk-weight investment return using grey relational analysis. The risk and return in venture capital investment projects selection process is analyses. These risk and return mainly constricted in management ability, operation ability, market ability, exit obtain and investment cost. The 18 sub-indicators are the impact factors contributed to these five evaluation aspects. Grey relation analysis is use to evaluate the venture capital investment selection. Get the optimal solution of risk-weight double objective investment selection evaluation model. An example is used to demonstrate the model in this paper.

  15. Taking Stock and Standing down

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peeler, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Standing down is an action the military takes to review, regroup, and reorganize. Unfortunately, it often comes after an accident or other tragic event. To stop losses, the military will "stand down" until they are confident they can resume safe operations. Standing down is good for everyone, not just the military. In today's fast-paced world,…

  16. Comparison of grey matter volume and thickness for analysing cortical changes in chronic schizophrenia: a matter of surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li; Herold, Christina J; Zöllner, Frank; Salat, David H; Lässer, Marc M; Schmid, Lena A; Fellhauer, Iven; Thomann, Philipp A; Essig, Marco; Schad, Lothar R; Erickson, Kirk I; Schröder, Johannes

    2015-02-28

    Grey matter volume and cortical thickness are the two most widely used measures for detecting grey matter morphometric changes in various diseases such as schizophrenia. However, these two measures only share partial overlapping regions in identifying morphometric changes. Few studies have investigated the contributions of the potential factors to the differences of grey matter volume and cortical thickness. To investigate this question, 3T magnetic resonance images from 22 patients with schizophrenia and 20 well-matched healthy controls were chosen for analyses. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were measured by VBM and Freesurfer. Grey matter volume results were then rendered onto the surface template of Freesurfer to compare the differences from cortical thickness in anatomical locations. Discrepancy regions of the grey matter volume and thickness where grey matter volume significantly decreased but without corresponding evidence of cortical thinning involved the rostral middle frontal, precentral, lateral occipital and superior frontal gyri. Subsequent region-of-interest analysis demonstrated that changes in surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature accounted for the discrepancies. Our results suggest that the differences between grey matter volume and thickness could be jointly driven by surface area, grey/white matter intensity contrast and curvature. PMID:25595222

  17. Study on tunnel settlement prediction method based on parallel grey neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Huang, Teng; Shen, Yue-qian; Zeng, Xian-min

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, according to the characteristics of the grey forecast method and the neural network, constructed the parallel grey neural network model(PGNN) and apply to forecast a tunnel monitoring point's settlement displacement data based on Nanjing metro. The results showed that the prediction accuracy of PGNN is significantly higher than that of unitary grey and neural forecast method. proves that the effectiveness of PGNN in the tunnel settlement prediction. Keywords: Tunnel settlement, grey model, neural network model, prediction

  18. High Brightness Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Boyd, J.K.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-08-07

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements.

  19. 20. SIMILAR TO THE SYSTEM INSTALLED IN THE GREY IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. SIMILAR TO THE SYSTEM INSTALLED IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY, MALLEABLE WORKERS FILLED MOLDS TRAVELING ON A CONVEYOR FROM LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAILS WHILE THEY STOOD ON A PLATFORM MOVING AT THE SAME SPEED AS THE CONVEYOR, CA. 1950 - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL TOILET SYSTEMS AND GREY WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the field program was to determine the operational characteristics and overall acceptability of popular models of biological toilets and a few select grey water systems. A field observation scheme was devised to take advantage of in-use sites throughout the State...

  1. 78 FR 17183 - Information Collection: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ...In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), this notice announces the Forest Service's intent to request: (1) An extension from the Office of Management and Budget; and (2) to merge the currently approved information collection 0596- 0222, ``Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card'' with 0596-0226, ``Forest Service Generic Clearance for the Collection of Qualitative......

  2. SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHWEST VIEW OF FOUNDRY FROM TOP OF GREY IRON CUPOLA SHOWING OPENED TOP OF CUPOLA WITH EMISSION RECOVERY DUCT COMING OFF. TO THE RIGHT IS THE STORAGE AND SHIPPING BUILDING. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. The Grey Nomad Phenomenon: Changing the Script of Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyx, Jenny; Leonard, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    This article explores a relatively new and little understood phenomenon, that of the Australian Grey Nomads. Every year increasing numbers of older Australians take to the road. This article explores the phenomenon both empirically and theoretically. A grounded approach is used by which the experience is explored from an ethnographic account…

  4. Non-grey thermal effects in irradiated planets atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Vivien; Guillot, Tristan; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    The large diversity of exoplanets in terms of irradiation temperature, gravity and chemical composition discovered around stars with different properties call for the development of fast, accurate and versatile atmospheric models. We derive a new, non-grey analytical model for the thermal structure of irradiated exoplanets. Using two different opacity bands in the thermal frequency range, we highlight the dual role of thermal non-grey opacities in shaping the temperature profile of the atmosphere. Opacities dominated by lines enable the upper atmosphere to cool down significantly compared to a grey atmosphere whereas opacities dominated by bands lead both to a significant cooling of the upper atmosphere and a significant heating of the deep atmosphere.We compare our analytical model to a grid of temperature-pressure profiles for solar composition atmospheres obtained with a state-of-the-art numerical model taking into account the full wavelength, temperature and pressure dependence of the opacities. We demonstrate the importance of thermal non-grey opacities in setting the deep temperature of irradiated giant planets atmospheres. In the particular case of highly irradiated planets we show that the presence of TiO in their atmospheres alters both the optical and the thermal opacities. The greenhouse effect - a semi-grey effect - and the "blanketing effect" - an intrisically non-grey effect - contribute equally to set the deep temperature profile of the planet atmosphere. We conclude that non-grey thermal effects are fundamental to understand the deep temperature profile of hot Jupiters.Our calibrated analytical model matches the numerical model within 10% over a wide range of effective temperature, internal temperature and gravities and properly predict the depth of the radiative/convective boundary, an important quantity to understand the cooling history of a giant planet. Such a fast and accurate model can be of great use when numerous temperature profiles need to

  5. Salmonberry and salal annual aerial stem production: The maintenance of shrub cover in forest stands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tappeiner, J. C., II; Zasada, J.; Huffman, D.; Ganio, L.

    2001-01-01

    Annual sprouting of aerial stems and ramets enables populations of salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis Pursh), salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh), and probably other forest shrubs to maintain dense covers (>20 000 stems/ha). We studied annual stem production of salmonberry on cut (all stems cut within 15 cm of the ground) and uncut (stems were not treated) plots for 8 years and salal for 5 years in the understories of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), alder, and riparian stands, as well as clearcuts, which are all common stand types in western Oregon. Mean salmonberry stem production on uncut plots ranged from 4.7 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 2.9a??7.4) in alder stands and clearcuts to 1.6 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 1.0a??2.6) in conifer stands. Mean salal production was greater, ranging from 58 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 25a??135) to 8.6 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 3.7a??20.1) on uncut plots in clearcuts and unthinned Douglas-fir stands, respectively. Annual production of both species was somewhat greater on cut plots. Most stems produced in early spring die by December, but enough are recruited to replace mortality of older stems. Stem density was maintained for 8 years for salmonberry and 5 years for salal on both cut and uncut plots. Based on length of rhizomes and bud density we estimate that only 1a??5% of the buds in the rhizomes are needed to support this annual stem production. Although these species sprout vigorously after their aerial stems are killed, disturbance is not necessary for maintaining a dense cover. It appears that, once established, salal, salmonberry, and probably other clonal forest shrubs can maintain a dense cover that can interfere with establishment of trees and other shrubs in canopy gaps or other openings.

  6. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated Dienes with Acrylic Esters: A Novel Approach to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilhan, Faysal; Tyson, Daniel S.; Smith, Deedee; Meador, Mary Ann; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloadditions have often been utilized in polymer synthesis as an alternative to condensation reactions. In our earlier efforts, we developed a new method for the preparation of linear aromatic polyimides, which employs o-quionodimethanes (o-QDMs), generated by a well-known photochemical reaction: the photoenolization of o-methylphenyl ketones. Photolysis of o-methylbenzophenone 1 produces hydroxy-o-quino- diemthane 2, which can be trapped with dienophiles, such as dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate, to efficiently yield the corresponding cycloadduct (Scheme 1). Here we extend this approach to a novel photocuring process for development of polymer films. We synthesized a series of molecules with multi o-mehtylphenyl ketone functionalities. We further investigated these molecules as photoreactive monomers to obtain polyester films through Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

  7. Exploring Reaction Mechanism on Generalized Force Modified Potential Energy Surfaces (G-FMPES) for Diels-Alder Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjiv; Brown, Katie; Subramanian, Gopinath

    We apply a recent formulation for searching minimum energy reaction path (MERP) and saddle point to atomic systems subjected to an external force. We demonstrate the effect of a loading modality resembling hydrostatic pressure on the trans to cis conformational change of 1,3-butadiene, and the simplest Diels-Alder reaction between ethylene and 1,3-butadiene. The calculated MERP and saddle points on the generalized force modified potential energy surface (G-FMPES) are compared with the corresponding quantities on an unmodified potential energy surface. Our study is performed using electronic structure calculations at the HF/6-31G** level as implemented in the AIMS-MOLPRO code. Our calculations suggest that the added compressive pressure lowers the energy of cis butadiene. The activation energy barrier for the concerted Diels-Alder reaction is found to decrease progressively with increasing compressive pressure.

  8. Blue and grey water footprint of textile industry in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Laili; Ding, Xuemei; Wu, Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Water footprint (WF) is a newly developed idea that indicates impacts of freshwater appropriation and wastewater discharge. The textile industry is one of the oldest, longest and most complicated industrial chains in the world's manufacturing industries. However, the textile industry is also water intensive. In this paper, we applied a bottom-up approach to estimate the direct blue water footprint (WFdir,blue) and direct grey water footprint (WFdir,grey) of China's textile industry at sector level based on WF methodology. The results showed that WFdir,blue of China's textile industry had an increasing trend from 2001 to 2010. The annual WFdir,blue surpassed 0.92 Gm(3)/yr (giga cubic meter a year) since 2004 and rose to peak value of 1.09 Gm(3)/yr in 2007. The original and residuary WFdir,grey (both were calculated based on the concentration of chemical oxygen demand (CODCr)) of China's textile industry had a similar variation trend with that of WFdir,blue. Among the three sub-sectors of China's textile industry, the manufacture of textiles sector's annual WFdir,blue and WFdir,grey were much larger than those of the manufacture of textile wearing apparel, footware and caps sector and the manufacture of chemical fibers sector. The intensities of WFdir,blue and WF(res)dir,grey of China's textile industry were year by year decreasing through the efforts of issuing restriction policies on freshwater use and wastewater generation and discharge, and popularization of water saving and wastewater treatment technologies. PMID:24334900

  9. Studies on the synthesis of (-)-spinosyn a: application of the steric directing group strategy to transannular Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Frank, Scott A; Roush, William R

    2002-06-14

    A highly diastereoselective and enantioselective synthesis of the decahydro-as-indacene nucleus 12 of (-)-spinosyn A (1) is reported. By implementing the steric directing group strategy, tricyclic lactone 37 was produced from a remarkably diastereoselective transannular Diels-Alder reaction of lactone 9. The tricyclic core of the natural product was then obtained by using an Ireland-Claisen ring contraction of 37. Reversal of the order of these two steps resulted in an almost complete loss of diastereoselectivity. PMID:12054969

  10. Copper-Catalyzed Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction and Halogenation: An Approach To Synthesize 7-Halogenated Chromenoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jiao; Xu, Zhanwei; Yamamoto, Yoshinori; Bao, Ming

    2016-05-20

    A new halogenation method to construct halogen-substituted quinoline moieties is described. The Cu-catalyzed intramolecular aza-Diels-Alder reaction and halogenation reaction proceeded smoothly under mild conditions to produce the corresponding 7-chloro-6H-chromeno[4,3-b]quinolines and 7-chloro-6H-thiochromeno[4,3-b]quinolines in satisfactory yields. PMID:27145113

  11. Quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship modeling for Diels-Alder ligations utilizing quantum chemical structural descriptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we show the correlation of quantum chemical structural descriptors with the activation barriers of the Diels-Alder ligations. A set of 72 non-catalysed Diels-Alder reactions were subjected to quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) under the framework of theoretical quantum chemical descriptors calculated solely from the structures of diene and dienophile reactants. Experimental activation barrier data were obtained from literature. Descriptors were computed using Hartree-Fock theory using 6-31G(d) basis set as implemented in Gaussian 09 software. Results Variable selection and model development were carried out by stepwise multiple linear regression methodology. Predictive performance of the quantitative structure-activation barrier relationship (QSABR) model was assessed by training and test set concept and by calculating leave-one-out cross-validated Q2 and predictive R2 values. The QSABR model can explain and predict 86.5% and 80% of the variances, respectively, in the activation energy barrier training data. Alternatively, a neural network model based on back propagation of errors was developed to assess the nonlinearity of the sought correlations between theoretical descriptors and experimental reaction barriers. Conclusions A reasonable predictability for the activation barrier of the test set reactions was obtained, which enabled an exploration and interpretation of the significant variables responsible for Diels-Alder interaction between dienes and dienophiles. Thus, studies in the direction of QSABR modelling that provide efficient and fast prediction of activation barriers of the Diels-Alder reactions turn out to be a meaningful alternative to transition state theory based computation. PMID:24171724

  12. A Catalyst-Enabled Diastereodivergent Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Complementarity of N-Heterocyclic Carbenes and Chiral Amines.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Min; Chow, Chi Hao Eugene; Zhao, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Highly efficient and diastereodivergent aza-Diels-Alder reactions have been developed to access either diastereomeric series of benzofuran-fused δ-lactams and dihydropyridines in nearly perfect stereoselectivity (d.r. >20:1, >99 % ee for all examples). The complementarity of N-heterocyclic carbene and chiral amine as the catalyst was demonstrated for the first time, together with an excellent level of catalytic efficiency (1 mol % loading). PMID:27219298

  13. A new approach to the synthesis of monomers and polymers incorporating furan/maleimide Diels-Alder adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banella, Maria Barbara; Gioia, Claudio; Vannini, Micaela; Colonna, Martino; Celli, Annamaria; Gandini, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleimide moieties is a well-known and widely used strategy to build bio-based macromolecular structures with peculiar properties. The furan-maleimide adducts are thermally reversible because they can be broken above about 120°C and recombined at lower temperatures. At the moment only the monomers exhibiting the furan or the maleimide moieties on their extremity are used in order to get linear or cross-linked polymeric structures. The innovative idea described here consists in using a monomer bearing two carboxylic acidic groups on its extremities and a furan-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct within its structure. This monomer can give rise to classical polycondensation reactions leading to polymers. These polymers (which are polyesters in the present case) can be broken at high temperatures in correspondence of the furane-maleimide Diels-Alder adduct leading to segments exhibiting furan or maleimide moieties at their extremities, which at lower temperature recombine leading to random or block copolymers.

  14. Performance of ectomycorrhizal alders exposed to specific Canadian oil sands tailing stressors under in vivo bipartite symbiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin-Nadeau, Martin; Gagné, André; Bissonnette, Cyntia; Bélanger, Pier-Anne; Fortin, J André; Roy, Sébastien; Greer, Charles W; Khasa, Damase P

    2016-07-01

    Canadian oil sands tailings are predominately sodic residues contaminated by hydrocarbons such as naphthenic acids. These conditions are harsh for plant development. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inoculating roots of Alnus viridis ssp. crispa and Alnus incana ssp. rugosa with ectomycorrhizal fungi in the presence of tailings compounds. Seedlings were inoculated with 7 different strains of Paxillus involutus and Alpova diplophloeus and were grown under different treatments of NaCl, Na2SO4, and naphthenic acids in a growth chamber. Afterwards, seedling survival, height, dry biomass, leaf necrosis, and root mycorrhization rate were measured. Paxillus involutus Mai was the most successful strain in enhancing alder survival, health, and growth. Seedlings inoculated with this strain displayed a 25% increase in survival rate, 2-fold greater biomass, and 2-fold less leaf necrosis compared with controls. Contrary to our expectations, A. diplophloeus was not as effective as P. involutus in improving seedling fitness, likely because it did not form ectomycorrhizae on roots of either alder species. High intraspecific variation characterized strains of P. involutus in their ability to stimulate alder height and growth and to minimize leaf necrosis. We conclude that in vivo selection under bipartite symbiotic conditions is essential to select effective strains that will be of use for the revegetation and reclamation of derelict lands. PMID:27170470

  15. Design Paradigm Utilizing Reversible Diels-Alder Reactions to Enhance the Mechanical Properties of 3D Printed Materials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joshua R; Appuhamillage, Gayan A; Thompson, Christina M; Voit, Walter; Smaldone, Ronald A

    2016-07-01

    A design paradigm is demonstrated that enables new functional 3D printed materials made by fused filament fabrication (FFF) utilizing a thermally reversible dynamic covalent Diels-Alder reaction to dramatically improve both strength and toughness via self-healing mechanisms. To achieve this, we used as a mending agent a partially cross-linked terpolymer consisting of furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) adducts that exhibit reversibility at temperatures typically used for FFF printing. When this mending agent is blended with commercially available polylactic acid (PLA) and printed, the resulting materials demonstrate an increase in the interfilament adhesion strength along the z-axis of up to 130%, with ultimate tensile strength increasing from 10 MPa in neat PLA to 24 MPa in fmDA-enhanced PLA. Toughness in the z-axis aligned prints increases by up to 460% from 0.05 MJ/m(3) for unmodified PLA to 0.28 MJ/m(3) for the remendable PLA. Importantly, it is demonstrated that a thermally reversible cross-linking paradigm based on the furan-maleimide Diels-Alder (fmDA) reaction can be more broadly applied to engineer property enhancements and remending abilities to a host of other 3D printable materials with superior mechanical properties. PMID:27299858

  16. Effects of fungal inocula and habitat conditions on alder and eucalyptus leaf litter decomposition in streams of northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Galán, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    We investigated how fungal decomposer (aquatic hyphomycetes) communities colonizing alder and eucalyptus leaf litter respond to changes in habitat characteristics (transplantation experiment). We examined the breakdown of leaf materials and the associated fungal communities at two contrasting sites, a headwater stream (H) and a midreach (M). Agroforestry increased from headwater to midreach. One month after the start of experiments at both sites, some leaf samples from the midreach site were transplanted to the headwater site (M-H treatment). Although both sites showed similar dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations, eucalyptus leaves initially incubated at the midreach site (M, M-H) increased their breakdown rate compared to those incubated along the experiment at the headwater site (H). Alder breakdown rate was not enhanced, suggesting that their consumption was not limited by nutrient availability. Sporulation rates clearly differed between leaf types (alder > eucalyptus) and streams (H > M), but no transplantation effect was detected. When comparing conidial assemblages after transplantation, an inoculum effect (persistence of early colonizing species) was clear in both leaf species. Substrate preference and shifts in the relative importance of some fungal species along the process were also observed. Overall, our results support the determining role of the initial conditioning phase on the whole litter breakdown process, highlighting the importance of intrinsic leaf characteristics and those of the incubation habitat. PMID:24141942

  17. Short-term influence of nitrate on acetylene reduction, photosynthesis and nodule respiration of black alder seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cazell, B.H.; Samuelson, L.J.; Seiler, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Black alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaernt.) has shown significant benefits in several silvicultural applications such as nurse-trees. However, little is known concerning the nitrate/N-fixing interactions. Our objections were to examine the effects of three nitrate levels on acetylene reduction (AR), net photosynthesis (Ps) and nodule respiration (NR). Fifteen month-old black alder rooted cuttings were inoculated with one strain of Frankia inoculum (ARgN22D) at six months, maintained under 16h photoperiod at ambient greenhouse conditions, and fertilized for two months prior to study with a modified Crone's N-free solution. At study initiation seedlings were fertilized for six days with 0, 7.5 or 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. Measurements of AR, Ps and NR were collected on the second, fourth and sixth day of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} application. By day four AR was significantly lowered by 75% for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatment when compared with the controls. On day six, Ps and NR were lowered significantly by 29% and 59%, respectively, for the 15 mM NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} treatments when compared to control values. Results suggest any benefit from black alder N-fixation might be negated by nitrate fertilization.

  18. A Soil Moisture-Heat Based Early Establishment Model of Riparian White Alder (Alnus rhombifolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablkowski, P.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    Establishment of fluvially dispersed seeds on accreted gravel-sand bars is limited by water availability in streams. Past establishment models have used the stream/water table recession rate, and maximum root growth rate to determine the elevation limit of seedling establishment. This approach neglects the role of the saturated-unsaturated vadose zone in providing water to recently germinated seedlings, the physical processes that determine the soil moisture content, and the effect moisture deficit has on seedling root growth. This study combines a soil moisture-heat budget and a seedling root growth model that responds to soil moisture availability to find the elevation limit of establishment of white alder (Alnus rhombifolia) on vertically accreted bars along the south fork Eel River in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve, California. To establish successfully, seedling roots must maintain a connection with sufficient moisture to avoid water stress. This will depend on the elevation of the bar, the stream recession rate, the root growth rate, and the diurnal cycle of soil moisture. A one-dimensional moisture-heat budget of the top 15 centimeters of sediment was validated at two locations characterized by sand and clay-gravel textures respectively, using soil moisture and temperature measurements at 5, 10 and 15 cm, net radiation, air temperature, humidity, wind velocity and precipitation measured during spring-summer stream recession. Two patterns in soil water content were apparent: an average daily moisture decrease at each depth driven by stream/water table recession, and a diurnal pattern of isothermal liquid and vapour flux increasing soil water content in the upper 15 cm between 12:00 pm and 5:00 pm PDT. To determine seedling root growth rates, white alder seedlings were grown in growth chambers under a range of reduced matric potentials using polyethylene glycol. Root length measurements were made at 4 hour intervals and a quadratic equation was fit to the root

  19. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  20. 15. ELEVATED CAMERA STAND, SHOWING LINE OF CAMERA STANDS PARALLEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. ELEVATED CAMERA STAND, SHOWING LINE OF CAMERA STANDS PARALLEL TO SLED TRACK. Looking west southwest down Camera Road. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. A Single Molecular Diels-Alder Crosslinker for Achieving Recyclable Cross-Linked Polymers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Wang, Fenfen; Peng, Yongjin; Chen, Tiehong; Wu, Qiang; Sun, Pingchuan

    2015-09-01

    A triol-functional crosslinker combining the thermoreversible properties of Diels-Alder (DA) adducts in one molecule is designed, synthesized, and used as an ideal substitute of a traditional crosslinker to prepare thermal recyclable cross-linked polyurethanes with excellent mechanical properties and recyclability in a very simple and efficient way. The recycle property of these materials achieved by the DA/retro-DA reaction at a suitable temperature is verified by differential scanning calorimetry and in situ variable temperature solid-state NMR experiments during the cyclic heating and cooling processes. The thermal recyclability and remending ability of the bulk polyurethanes is demonstrated by three polymer processing methods, including hot-press molding, injection molding, and solution casting. It is notable that all the recycled cross-linked polymers display nearly invariable elongation/stress at break compared to the as-synthesized samples. Further end-group functionalization of this single molecular DA crosslinker provides the potential in preparing a wide range of recyclable cross-linked polymers. PMID:26248230

  2. Artificial Metalloenzymes with the Neocarzinostatin Scaffold: Toward a Biocatalyst for the Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Ghattas, Wadih; Cotchico-Alonso, Lur; Maréchal, Jean-Didier; Urvoas, Agathe; Rousseau, Maëva; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Ricoux, Rémy

    2016-03-01

    A copper(II) cofactor coupled to a testosterone anchor, copper(II)-(5-(Piperazin-1-yl)-1,10-phenanthroline)testosterone-17-hemisuccinamide (10) was synthesized and associated with a neocarzinostatin variant, NCS-3.24 (KD =3 μm), thus generating a new artificial metalloenzyme by following a "Trojan horse" strategy. Interestingly, the artificial enzyme was able to efficiently catalyze the Diels-Alder cyclization reaction of cyclopentadiene (1) with 2-azachalcone (2). In comparison with what was observed with cofactor 10 alone, the artificial enzymes favored formation of the exo products (endo/exo ratios of 84:16 and 62:38, respectively, after 12 h). Molecular modeling studies assigned the synergy between the copper complex and the testosterone (KD =13 μm) moieties in the binding of 10 to good van der Waals complementarity. Moreover, by pushing the modeling exercise to its limits, we hypothesize on the molecular grounds that are responsible for the observed selectivity. PMID:26677011

  3. Combinatorial Synthesis of Linearly Condensed Polycyclic Compounds, Including Anthracyclinones, Through Tandem Diels-Alder Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Pierre

    Double exocyclic 1,3-dienes such as 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane and its 1-substituted derivatives undergo two successive Diels-Alder additions with large reactivity difference between the addition of the first equivalent (k 1) and the second equivalent (k 2) of dienophile. This allows one to prepare, through parallel synthesis, a large number of linearly condensed polycyclic systems containing three annulated six-membered rings, including naphthacenyl systems and anthracyclinones. The large k 1/k 2 rate constant ratio is a consequence of the Dimroth principle, the first cycloaddition being significantly more exothermic then the second one. Control of regio- and stereoselectivity of the two successive cycloadditions is possible by 1-substitution of the 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, for instance by a 1-(dimethoxymethyl) group, or by stereoselective disubstitution of the double diene by arenesulfenyl substituents. Enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones and analogues are obtained using enantiomerically pure dienophiles such as 3-oxo-but-2-en-2-yl esters. The chemistry so-developed has allowed the preparation of enantiomerically pure 6-((aminoalkoxy)oxy)methyl-6,7-dideoxyidarubicinones that are DNA intercalators and inhibitors of topoisomerase II-induced DNA strained religation.

  4. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  5. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediate ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

  6. Storing solar energy with liquid phase Diels-Alder reactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Poling, B.E.

    1983-07-28

    At the beginning of this project, a preliminary study was completed that indicated the Diels-Alder reaction between maleic anhydride and 2 methyl furan had an energy storage capacity greater than water. During the last two years when this grant was in effect, three additional projects have been completed. First, an improved calorimetric techniques was developed for determination of the energy storage capacity of a reversible liquid phase chemical reaction. This technique confirmed the validity of the earlier results for the maleic anhydride-methyl furan reaction. Second, a technique was developed for characterizing solution nonidealities for mixtures in which reversible chemical reactions occur. It was found that for the maleic anhydride-2 methyl furan reaction, these non idealities could affect equilibrium compositions by nearly 40%. Third, drop calorimetry was used as a screening method to examine sixteen reactions for their potential as energy storage candidates. Of the sixteen examined, three (all involving maleic anhydride and substituted furan) showed an increased energy storage capacity due to reaction while the remaining thirteen showed no increase. In the following report, results of these three studies are summarized. Finally, a general summary of the status of energy storage by chemical reactions is presented.

  7. Surface confined retro Diels-Alder reaction driven by the swelling of weak polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Beier; Cha, Wenli; Mao, Tingting; Wu, Yuanzi; Qian, Hujun; Zhou, Yitian; Chen, Xiuli; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Lanying; Yang, Guang; Lu, Zhongyuan; Zhu, Qiang; Ma, Hongwei

    2015-03-25

    Recently, the type of reactions driven by mechanical force has increased significantly; however, the number of methods for activating those mechanochemical reactions stays relatively limited. Furthermore, in situ characterization of a reaction is usually hampered by the inherent properties of conventional methods. In this study, we report a new platform that utilizes mechanical force generated by the swelling of surface tethered weak polyelectrolytes. An initiator with Diels-Alder (DA) adduct structure was applied to prepare the polyelectrolyte-carboxylated poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA), so that the force could trigger the retro DA reaction. The reaction was monitored in real time by quartz crystal microbalance and confirmed with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the conventional heating method, the swelling-induced retro DA reaction proceeded rapidly with high conversion ratio and selectivity. A 23.61 kcal/mol theoretical energy barrier supported the practicability of this retro DA reaction being triggered mechanically at ambient temperature. During swelling, the tensile force was controllable and persistent. This unique feature imparts this mechanochemical platform the potential to "freeze" an intermediate state of a reaction for in situ spectroscopic observations, such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and frequency generation spectroscopy. PMID:25734373

  8. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediatemore » ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.« less

  9. OH Module Assembly Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Bolan, P.J.; /Fermilab

    1990-10-16

    There is an OR module assembly stand in use at IB4. This design has been approved by safety, as presented by Mike Foley, and has been successfully used. Another one is needed at the D-zero assembly building, but some modifications need to be made. This report will show that the new modified design is at least as strong, if not stronger, than the older IB4 design in every aspect. Since the weight distribution of the OR modules on the sling is indeterminate, this report compares three cases of support for the entire assembly: the lowest two beams only, the lowest four beams only, and all six beams. In each of these cases, the new design is stronger than the old design in maximum allowable weight. The ability of the the cradle to support the weight is also shown. For all of the failure conditions except for two, the cradle is stronger than the beams that it supports. In the two excepted situations, the calculated limit of the cradle is less than the beams it supports. This is because no credit is taken for the sling and strongback, which in reality will relieve much of the horizontal load.

  10. EUV Engineering Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Replogle, W.C.; Klebanoff, L.E.; Wronosky, J.B.; Hale, L.C.; Chapman, H.N.; Taylor, J.S.; Folta, J.A.; Montcalm, C.; Hudyma, R.M.

    2000-02-14

    The Engineering Test Stand (ETS) is an EUV laboratory lithography tool. The purpose of the ETS is to demonstrate EUV full-field imaging and provide data required to support production-tool development. The ETS is configured to separate the imaging system and stages from the illumination system. Environmental conditions can be controlled independently in the two modules to maximize EUV throughput and environmental control. A source of 13.4 nm radiation is provided by a laser plasma source in which a YAG laser beam is focused onto a xenon-cluster target. A condenser system, comprised of multilayer-coated mirrors and grazing-incidence mirrors, collects the EUV radiation and directs it onto a-reflecting reticle. A four-mirror, ring-field optical system, having a numerical aperture of 0.1, projects a 4x-reduction image onto the wafer plane. This design corresponds to a resolution of 70nm at a k{sub 1} of 0.52. The ETS is designed to produce full-field images in step: and-scan mode using vacuum-compatible, one-dimension-long-travel magnetically levitated stages for both reticle and wafer. Reticle protection is incorporated into the ETS design. This paper provides a system overview of the ETS design and specifications.

  11. Grey Component Replacement Research, Modelling Tone And Color Reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Richard S.

    1990-06-01

    Four different scanning Color Electronic Pagination System (CEPS) devices were tested to study their conventional and Grey Component Replacement/Undercolor Addition (GCR/UCA) tone and color response in the 4 color Positive Acting Offset Lithographic printing process. A common transparency input and ganged printing output was used. Inter and intra machine differences are disclosed. A new depiction of the full tone reproduction characteristics is presented for several different levels of GCR/UCA and conventional printing.

  12. The trajectory prediction of spacecraft by grey method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyue; Zhang, Zili; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Yanqing; Zhou, Weihu

    2016-08-01

    The real-time and high-precision trajectory prediction of a moving object is a core technology in the field of aerospace engineering. The real-time monitoring and tracking technology are also significant guarantees of aerospace equipment. A dynamic trajectory prediction method called grey dynamic filter (GDF) which combines the dynamic measurement theory and grey system theory is proposed. GDF can use coordinates of the current period to extrapolate coordinates of the following period. At meantime, GDF can also keep the instantaneity of measured coordinates by the metabolism model. In this paper the optimal model length of GDF is firstly selected to improve the prediction accuracy. Then the simulation for uniformly accelerated motion and variably accelerated motion is conducted. The simulation results indicate that the mean composite position error of GDF prediction is one-fifth to that of Kalman filter (KF). By using a spacecraft landing experiment, the prediction accuracy of GDF is compared with the KF method and the primitive grey method (GM). The results show that the motion trajectory of spacecraft predicted by GDF is much closer to actual trajectory than the other two methods. The mean composite position error calculated by GDF is one-eighth to KF and one-fifth to GM respectively.

  13. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOEpatents

    Miller, John V.; Carlson, William R.; Yarbrough, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  14. Cardiac responses of grey seals during diving at sea.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D; Fedak, M A

    1993-01-01

    Heart rate, swimming speed and diving depth data were collected from free-ranging grey seals, Halichoerus grypus, as they foraged and travelled in the sea around the Hebrides Islands off western Scotland. Information was collected on a tracking yacht using a combination of sonic and radio telemetry. Diving heart rate declined as a function of dive duration. In long dives, grey seals employed extreme bradycardia, with heart rates falling to 4 beats min-1 for extended periods, despite the animal being free to breath at will. This extreme dive response is part of the normal foraging behaviour. Seals spent 89% of the time submerged during bouts of long dives; swimming was restricted to ascent and descent. Dive durations exceeded estimated aerobic dive limit, even assuming resting metabolic rates. These results indicate that behavioural, and possibly cellular, energy-sparing mechanisms play an important role in diving behaviour of grey seals. This has implications not only for studies of mammalian energetics but also for our understanding of the foraging tactics and prey selection of marine mammals. If some seals are using energy-sparing mechanisms to reduce metabolic costs while at depth, they may be forced to wait for and ambush prey rather than to search for and chase it. PMID:8440964

  15. Image retrieval based on local grey-level invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordeaux, Eva; Shrikhande, Neelima

    2005-10-01

    During past decades, the enormous growth of image archives has significantly increased the demand for research efforts aimed at efficiently finding specific images within large databases. This paper investigates matching of images of buildings, architectural designs, blueprints and sketches. Their geometrical constrains lead to the proposed approach: the use of local grey-level invariants based on internal contours of the object. The problem involves three key phases: object recognition in image data, matching two images and searching the database of images. The emphasis of this paper is on object recognition based on internal contours of image data. In her master's thesis, M.M. Kulkarni described a technique for image retrieval by contour analysis implemented on external contours of an object in an image data. This is used to define the category of a building (tower, dome, flat, etc). Integration of these results with local grey-level invariant analysis creates a more robust image retrieval system. Thus, the best match result is the intersection of the results of contour analysis and grey-level invariants analysis. Experiments conducted for the database of architectural buildings have shown robustness w.r.t. to image rotation, translation, small view-point variations, partial visibility and extraneous features. The recognition rate is above 99% for a variety of tested images taken under different conditions.

  16. Grey water on three agricultural catchments in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazkova, Sarka D.; Kulasova, Alena

    2014-05-01

    The COST project EU EURO-AGRIWAT focuses apart from other problems on the assessment of water footprint (WF). WF is defined as the quantity of water used to produce some goods or a service. In particular, the WF of an agricultural product is the volume of water used during the crop growing period. It has three components: the green water which is rain or soil moisture transpired by a crop, the blue water which is the amount of irrigation water transpired and the grey water which is the volume of water required to dilute pollutants and to restore the quality standards of the water body. We have been observing three different agricultural catchments. The first of them is Smrzovka Brook, located in the protected nature area in the south part of the Jizerske Mountains. An ecological farming has been carried out there. The second agricultural catchment area is the Kralovsky Creek, which lies in the foothills of the Krkonose Mountains and is a part of an agricultural cooperative. The last agricultural catchment is the Klejnarka stream, located on the outskirts of the fertile Elbe lowlands near Caslav. Catchments Kralovsky Brook and Klejnarka carry out usual agricultural activities. On all three catchments, however, recreational cottages or houses not connected to the sewerage system and/or with inefficient septic tanks occur. The contribution shows our approach to trying to quantify the real grey water from agriculture, i.e. the grey water caused by nutrients not utilised by the crops.

  17. A-1 Test Stand work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A structural steel beam to support the new thrust measurement system on the A-1 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center is lifted to waiting employees for installation. The beam is part of the thrust takeout structure needed to support the new measurement system. Four such beams have been installed at the stand in preparation for installation of the system in upcoming weeks. Operators are preparing the stand for testing the next generation of rocket engines for the U.S. space program.

  18. Ross operation in children and young adults: the Alder Hey case series

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Shahzad Gull; Pozzi, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Background The ideal prosthesis for aortic valve replacement in children and young adults has not been found yet. In recent years there has been a renewed interest in the replacement of aortic valve with the pulmonary autograft owing to its advantages of lack of anticoagulation, potential for growth and excellent haemodynamic performance. The purpose of this study was to review our institutional experience at Alder Hey hospital with the Ross procedure in children and young adults. Methods From November 1996 to September 2003, 38 patients (mean age, 13.1 ± 5.7 years) underwent the Ross procedure for various aortic valve diseases using the root replacement technique. Clinical and echocardiographic follow-up was performed early (within 30 days), 3 to 6 months, and yearly after surgery. Medical records of all patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results There was 1 perioperative death. The patients were followed-up for a median interval of 36 months and up to 7 years. One patient died 3 years after surgery secondary to ventricular arrhythmia with overall mortality of 5.3%. Actuarial survival at 7 years was 94 ± 2.5% and there was 100% freedom from reoperation for autograft valve dysfunction or any other cause. Balloon dilatation was required in 2 patients for pulmonary homograft stenosis. The haemodynamics at the latest follow-up were also similar to those at the time of discharge after surgery. There was no progression in the degree of aortic regurgitation for 11 patients with trivial and 3 with mild regurgitation. Conclusion Our experience demonstrates that Ross operation is an attractive option for aortic valve replacement in children and young adults. Not only can the operation be accomplished with a low operative risk but the valve function stays normal over a long period of time with minimal alteration in lifestyle and no need for repeated operations to replace the valve as a result of somatic growth of the children. PMID:15096281

  19. Harnessing the bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition for pretargeted PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2015-01-01

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a (64)Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with (64)Cu or (89)Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes. PMID:25742199

  20. QM/QM' Direct Molecular Dynamics of Water-Accelerated Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengjiao; Yang, Zhongyue; Mei, Ye; Houk, K N

    2016-07-01

    A QM/QM' direct molecular dynamics study of a water-accelerated Diels-Alder reaction in aqueous solution is reported. Cyclopentadiene and methyl vinyl ketone are known to react faster in water than in nonpolar solvents. We have explored how polarization of water molecules afforded by PM3 influences the nature of the transition state, and the reaction dynamics. We compare the results with previous studies on QM/MM and QM/MM+3QM water simulations from our laboratory. Transition state sampling in vacuum PM3 water boxes indicates that the asynchronicity is 0.54 Å in QM/QM', as compared to 0.48 Å in QM/MM, and 0.54 Å in QM/MM+3QM water. The mean time gap between the formation of two C-C bonds is 19 fs for QM/QM', compared to 20 fs for QM/MM, and 25 fs for QM/MM+3QM water. The samplings and time gaps are qualitatively consistent, indicating that water polarization is not significant in sampling and dynamics of bonding changes. The dynamics of hydrogen bonding between reacting molecules and water molecules was also analyzed. From reactants to transition states, H-bond shortening is 0.4 Å by QM/QM', while only 0.15 Å for QM/MM and QM/MM+3QM water. From reactants to transition states, the mean value of the H-bond angle increases by 19° in QM/QM', but only 4° in QM/MM, and 10° in QM/MM+3QM water. These suggest that water polarization is essential for the correct representation of dynamical formation of hydrogen bonds in the transition state by water reorientation. QM/QM' overestimates the hydrogen bonding enhancement because of its underestimation of neutral hydrogen bonding within the reactants, a general deficiency of PM3. PMID:27092967

  1. Harnessing the Bioorthogonal Inverse Electron Demand Diels-Alder Cycloaddition for Pretargeted PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their exquisite affinity and specificity, antibodies have become extremely promising vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes to cancer cells for PET imaging. However, the necessity of labeling antibodies with radionuclides with long physical half-lives often results in high background radiation dose rates to non-target tissues. In order to circumvent this issue, we have employed a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the inverse electron demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The methodology decouples the antibody from the radioactivity and thus exploits the positive characteristics of antibodies, while eschewing their pharmacokinetic drawbacks. The system is composed of four steps: (1) the injection of a mAb-trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugate; (2) a localization time period during which the antibody accumulates in the tumor and clears from the blood; (3) the injection of the radiolabeled tetrazine; and (4) the in vivo click ligation of the components followed by the clearance of excess radioligand. In the example presented in the work at hand, a 64Cu-NOTA-labeled tetrazine radioligand and a trans-cyclooctene-conjugated humanized antibody (huA33) were successfully used to delineate SW1222 colorectal cancer tumors with high tumor-to-background contrast. Further, the pretargeting methodology produces high quality images at only a fraction of the radiation dose to non-target tissue created by radioimmunoconjugates directly labeled with 64Cu or 89Zr. Ultimately, the modularity of this protocol is one of its greatest assets, as the trans-cyclooctene moiety can be appended to any non-internalizing antibody, and the tetrazine can be attached to a wide variety of radioisotopes. PMID:25742199

  2. The mechanism of the retro-Diels-Alder reaction in 4-vinylcyclohexene cation radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancíř, J.; Tureček, F.

    1984-06-01

    Butadiene cation radicals are produced symmetrically from the ring and side-chain of the vinylcyclohexene cation radical near the onset of the fragmentation. The appearance energies of C 4H 6+- and C 4H 2D 4+- from (3,3,6,6-D 4)vinylcyclohex ene were measured as 11.07 ± 0.05 and 11.06 ± 0.06 eV, respectively. This sets the barrier to retro-Diels-Alder decomposition at 1140 kJ mol -1 above the energy of 1 and 44 kJ mol -1 above the thermochemical threshold corresponding to C 4H 6+- + C 4H 6. Topological molecular orbital calculations indicate that this lowest-energy path involves a sequential rupture of the C 3C 4 and C 5C 6 bonds, with a calculated barrier of 211 kJ mol -1. The second, two-step reaction channel proceeds by subsequent fission of the C 5C 6 and C 3C 4 bonds with a barrier of 299 kJ mol -1. This channel is found experimentally as a break on the ionization efficiency curve at 12.1 eV. Both the supra-supra and the supra-antara pericyclic reactions go through energy maxima and are therefore forbidden. The supra-supra process is the most favorable route for decomposition from the first excited state, the activation energy being 333 kJ mol -1. The preference for the two-step mechanism is due to hyperconjugative stabilization of intermediate molecular configurations.

  3. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Katrina L.; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  4. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Joshua J.; Davis, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  5. Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Joshua J; Davis, Mark E

    2014-06-10

    Terephthalic acid (PTA), a monomer in the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), is obtained by the oxidation of petroleum-derived p-xylene. There is significant interest in the synthesis of renewable, biomass-derived PTA. Here, routes to PTA starting from oxidized products of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) that can be produced from biomass are reported. These routes involve Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and avoid the hydrogenation of HMF to 2,5-dimethylfuran. Oxidized derivatives of HMF are reacted with ethylene over solid Lewis acid catalysts that do not contain strong Brønsted acids to synthesize intermediates of PTA and its equally important diester, dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic acid (HMFA), is reacted with high pressure ethylene over a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework tin (Sn-Beta) to produce the Diels-Alder dehydration product, 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoic acid (HMBA), with 31% selectivity at 61% HMFA conversion after 6 h at 190 °C. If HMFA is protected with methanol to form methyl 5-(methoxymethyl)furan-2-carboxylate (MMFC), MMFC can react with ethylene in the presence of Sn-Beta for 2 h to produce methyl 4-(methoxymethyl)benzenecarboxylate (MMBC) with 46% selectivity at 28% MMFC conversion or in the presence of a pure-silica molecular sieve containing framework zirconium (Zr-Beta) for 6 h to produce MMBC with 81% selectivity at 26% MMFC conversion. HMBA and MMBC can then be oxidized to produce PTA and DMT, respectively. When Lewis acid containing mesoporous silica (MCM-41) and amorphous silica, or Brønsted acid containing zeolites (Al-Beta), are used as catalysts, a significant decrease in selectivity/yield of the Diels-Alder dehydration product is observed. PMID:24912153

  6. Actinorhizal Alder Phytostabilization Alters Microbial Community Dynamics in Gold Mine Waste Rock from Northern Quebec: A Greenhouse Study.

    PubMed

    Callender, Katrina L; Roy, Sébastien; Khasa, Damase P; Whyte, Lyle G; Greer, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Phytotechnologies are rapidly replacing conventional ex-situ remediation techniques as they have the added benefit of restoring aesthetic value, important in the reclamation of mine sites. Alders are pioneer species that can tolerate and proliferate in nutrient-poor, contaminated environments, largely due to symbiotic root associations with the N2-fixing bacteria, Frankia and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. In this study, we investigated the growth of two Frankia-inoculated (actinorhizal) alder species, A. crispa and A. glutinosa, in gold mine waste rock from northern Quebec. Alder species had similar survival rates and positively impacted soil quality and physico-chemical properties in similar ways, restoring soil pH to neutrality and reducing extractable metals up to two-fold, while not hyperaccumulating them into above-ground plant biomass. A. glutinosa outperformed A. crispa in terms of growth, as estimated by the seedling volume index (SVI), and root length. Pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene for bacteria and the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region for fungi provided a comprehensive, direct characterization of microbial communities in gold mine waste rock and fine tailings. Plant- and treatment-specific shifts in soil microbial community compositions were observed in planted mine residues. Shannon diversity and the abundance of microbes involved in key ecosystem processes such as contaminant degradation (Sphingomonas, Sphingobium and Pseudomonas), metal sequestration (Brevundimonas and Caulobacter) and N2-fixation (Azotobacter, Mesorhizobium, Rhizobium and Pseudomonas) increased over time, i.e., as plants established in mine waste rock. Acetate mineralization and most probable number (MPN) assays showed that revegetation positively stimulated both bulk and rhizosphere communities, increasing microbial density (biomass increase of 2 orders of magnitude) and mineralization (five-fold). Genomic techniques proved useful in investigating

  7. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Maaten, Ernst; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater) fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific) signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1) local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2) site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI). Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological) wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible. PMID:26317768

  8. Can We Use Tree Rings of Black Alder to Reconstruct Lake Levels? A Case Study for the Mecklenburg Lake District, Northeastern Germany.

    PubMed

    van der Maaten, Ernst; van der Maaten-Theunissen, Marieke; Buras, Allan; Scharnweber, Tobias; Simard, Sonia; Kaiser, Knut; Lorenz, Sebastian; Wilmking, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore the potential to reconstruct lake-level (and groundwater) fluctuations from tree-ring chronologies of black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.) for three study lakes in the Mecklenburg Lake District, northeastern Germany. As gauging records for lakes in this region are generally short, long-term reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations could provide valuable information on past hydrological conditions, which, in turn, are useful to assess dynamics of climate and landscape evolution. We selected black alder as our study species as alder typically thrives as riparian vegetation along lakeshores. For the study lakes, we tested whether a regional signal in lake-level fluctuations and in the growth of alder exists that could be used for long-term regional hydrological reconstructions, but found that local (i.e. site-specific) signals in lake level and tree-ring chronologies prevailed. Hence, we built lake/groundwater-level reconstruction models for the three study lakes individually. Two sets of models were considered based on (1) local tree-ring series of black alder, and (2) site-specific Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Indices (SPEI). Although the SPEI-based models performed statistically well, we critically reflect on the reliability of these reconstructions, as SPEI cannot account for human influence. Tree-ring based reconstruction models, on the other hand, performed poor. Combined, our results suggest that, for our study area, long-term regional reconstructions of lake-level fluctuations that consider both recent and ancient (e.g., archaeological) wood of black alder seem extremely challenging, if not impossible. PMID:26317768

  9. Design and synthesis of polycyclic sulfones via Diels–Alder reaction and ring-rearrangement metathesis as key steps

    PubMed Central

    Gunta, Rama

    2015-01-01

    Summary Here, we describe a new and simple synthetic strategy to various polycyclic sulfones via Diels–Alder reaction and ring-rearrangement metathesis (RRM) as the key steps. This approach delivers tri- and tetracyclic sulfones with six (n = 1), seven (n = 2) or eight-membered (n = 3) fused-ring systems containing trans-ring junctions unlike the conventional all cis-ring junctions generally obtained during the RRM sequence. Interestingly the starting materials used are simple and commercially available. PMID:26425192

  10. Nitroso Diels-Alder (NDA) Reaction as an Efficient Tool for the Functionalization of Diene-Containing Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Carosso, Serena; Miller, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the use of nitroso Diels-Alder reactions for the functionalization of complex diene-containing natural products in order to generate libraries of compounds with potential biological activity. The application of this methodology to the structural modification of a series of natural products (thebaine, steroidal dienes, rapamycin, leucomycin, colchicine, isocolchicine and piperine) is discussed using relevant examples from the literature from 1973 onwards. The biological activity of the resulting compounds is also discussed. Additional comments are provided that evaluate the methodology as a useful tool in organic, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry. PMID:25119424

  11. Concise Approach to (ent)-14 β-Hydroxysteroids through Highly Diastereo-/Enantioselective Diels-Alder Reactions.

    PubMed

    Peter, Clovis; Ressault, Blandine; Geoffroy, Philippe; Miesch, Michel

    2016-07-25

    14β-Hydroxysteroids, especially 14β-hydroxyandrostane derivatives are closely related to the cardenolide skeletons. The latter were readily available through highly diastero/enantioselective Diels-Alder (DA) reactions requiring high pressure or Lewis acid activation. Moreover, in the presence of (R)- or (S)-carvone as a chiral dienophile, the DA-reaction takes place under chemodivergent parallel kinetic resolution control affording highly enantiomerically enriched 14β-hydroxysteroid derivatives or the corresponding (ent)-14β-hydroxysteroid derivatives. PMID:27192692

  12. Tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR). An easy entry to linear bicyclic scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Miró, Javier; Sánchez-Roselló, María; Sanz, Álvaro; Rabasa, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Summary A new tandem cross enyne metathesis (CEYM)–intramolecular Diels–Alder reaction (IMDAR) has been carried out. It involves conjugated ketones, esters or amides bearing a remote olefin and aromatic alkynes as the starting materials. The overall process enables the preparation of a small family of linear bicyclic scaffolds in a very simple manner with moderate to good levels of diastereoselectivity. This methodology constitutes one of the few examples that employ olefins differently than ethylene in tandem CEYM–IMDAR protocols. PMID:26425205

  13. Standing Waves on a Shoestring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Describes the construction of a wave generator used to review the algebraic relationships of wave motion. Students calculate and measure the weight needed to create tension to generate standing waves at the first eight harmonics. (MDH)

  14. Detecting Sirex noctilio grey-attacked and lightning-struck pine trees using airborne hyperspectral data, random forest and support vector machines classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M.; Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Ismail, Riyad

    2014-02-01

    The visual progression of sirex (Sirex noctilio) infestation symptoms has been categorized into three distinct infestation phases, namely the green, red and grey stages. The grey stage is the final stage which leads to almost complete defoliation resulting in dead standing trees or snags. Dead standing pine trees however, could also be due to the lightning damage. Hence, the objective of the present study was to distinguish amongst healthy, sirex grey-attacked and lightning-damaged pine trees using AISA Eagle hyperspectral data, random forest (RF) and support vector machines (SVM) classifiers. Our study also presents an opportunity to look at the possibility of separating amongst the previously mentioned pine trees damage classes and other landscape classes on the study area. The results of the present study revealed the robustness of the two machine learning classifiers with an overall accuracy of 74.50% (total disagreement = 26%) for RF and 73.50% (total disagreement = 27%) for SVM using all the remaining AISA Eagle spectral bands after removing the noisy ones. When the most useful spectral bands as measured by RF were exploited, the overall accuracy was considerably improved; 78% (total disagreement = 22%) for RF and 76.50% (total disagreement = 24%) for SVM. There was no significant difference between the performances of the two classifiers as demonstrated by the results of McNemar's test (chi-squared; χ2 = 0.14, and 0.03 when all the remaining ASIA Eagle wavebands, after removing the noisy ones and the most important wavebands were used, respectively). This study concludes that AISA Eagle data classified using RF and SVM algorithms provide relatively accurate information that is important to the forest industry for making informed decision regarding pine plantations health protocols.

  15. Process Hood Stand Support Steel

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-04-03

    This package is written to comply with EN-6-035-00 for upgrade dedication of commercial grade items (CGI). The SNF-5953 CGI package provides the Technical evaluation to identify the critical characteristics and the acceptance criteria associated with the safety function of the Hood Stand Support Steel. Completion of the technical and quality requirements identified in the dedication package will provide enough data to be reasonably assured that CGI Hood Stand Support Steel will perform its SC function.

  16. Copper(II)-catalyzed room temperature aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides to acyl-nitroso and azo intermediates, and their Diels-Alder trapping.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaveij, Duangduan; Cleary, Leah; Batsanov, Andrei S; Marder, Todd B; Shea, Kenneth J; Whiting, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    CuCl(2), in the presence of a 2-ethyl-2-oxazoline ligand, is an effective catalyst for the room temperature, aerobic oxidation of hydroxamic acids and hydrazides, to acyl-nitroso and azo dienophiles respectively, which are efficiently trapped in situ via both inter- and intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder reactions with dienes. Both inter- and intramolecular variants of the Diels-Alder reaction are suitable under the reaction conditions using a variety of solvents. Under the same conditions, an acyl hydrazide was also oxidized to give an acyl-azo dienophile which was trapped intramolecularly by a diene. PMID:21644530

  17. Grey-scale ultrasonography for assessment of gynecologic pelvic masses.

    PubMed Central

    Cassoff, J.; Hanna, T.

    1979-01-01

    In a retrospective study the grey-scale ultrasonographic appearance of pelvic masses was correlated with the surgical findings in 93 patients. Of the masses found at the time of laparotomy 95% had been detected preoperatively. In most instances useful information about size, consistency and location of the mass was provided by ultrasonography. Certain pathologic entities produce a characteristic sonographic appearance, but there is a wide overlap for others. Data obtained by history-taking and physical examination must be integrated with the sonographic findings for a correct diagnosis. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B FIG. 2 FIG. 3A FIG. 3B FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:761130

  18. Grey-Turner's sign after modified Kugel herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhe; Tian, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yingyi; Jing, Huirong; Pan, Jiyong; Wang, Shuang

    2014-01-01

    Tension-free hernia repairing techniques is a popular herniorrhaphy for open inguinal hernioplasty and the modified Kugel herniorrhaphy (MKH) is a kind of tension-free hernia repairing technique. The modified Kugel herniorrhaphy (MKH) is a minimally invasive, non-laparoscopic, conventional anterior approach, preperitoneal and sutureless technique. It is well accepted by most people because of few complications and low recurrence rate. A case of an 82-year-old man underwent MKH. After the third day of postoperation, a strange symptom of Grey-Turner's sign appeared and maintained for 10 days. PMID:25664136

  19. Insight into the informational-structure behavior of the Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and maleic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Molina-Espíritu, Moyocoyani; Esquivel, Rodolfo O; Kohout, Miroslav; Angulo, Juan Carlos; Dobado, José A; Dehesa, Jesús S; LópezRosa, Sheila; Soriano-Correa, Catalina

    2014-08-01

    The course of the Diels-Alder reactions of cyclopentadiene and maleic anhydride were studied. Two reaction paths were modelled: endo- and exo-selective paths. All structures within the transient region were characterized and analyzed by means of geometrical descriptors, physicochemical parameters and information-theoretical measures in order to observe the linkage between chemical behavior and the carriage of information. We have shown that the information-theoretical characterization of the chemical course of the reaction is in complete agreement with its phenomenological behavior in passing from reactants to products. In addition, we were able to detect the main differences between the two reaction mechanisms. This type of informational analysis serves to provide tools to help understand the chemical reactivity of the two simplest Diels-Alder reactions, which permits the establishment of a connection between the quantum changes that molecular systems exert along reaction coordinates and standard physicochemical phenomenology. In the present study, we have shown that every reaction stage has a family of subsequent structures that are characterized not solely by their phenomenological behavior but also by informational properties of their electronic density distribution (localizability, order, uniformity). Moreover, we were able to describe the main differences between endo-adduct and exo-adduct pathways. With the advent of new experimental techniques, it is in principle possible to observe the structural changes in the transient regions of chemical reactions. Indeed, through this work we have provided the theoretical concepts needed to unveil the concurrent processes associated with chemical reactions. PMID:25086767

  20. An interpenetrating HA/G/CS biomimic hydrogel via Diels-Alder click chemistry for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Cao, Xiaodong; Zeng, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Xiaofeng

    2013-08-14

    In order to mimic the natural cartilage extracellular matrix, a novel biological degradable interpenetrating network hydrogel was synthesized from the gelatin (G), hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) by Diels-Alder "click" chemistry. HA was modified with furylamine and G was modified with furancarboxylic acid respectively. (1)H NMR spectra and elemental analysis showed that the substitution degrees of HA-furan and G-furan were 71.5% and 44.5%. Then the hydrogels were finally synthesized by cross-linking furan-modified HA and G derivatives with dimaleimide poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL). The mechanical and degradation properties of the hydrogels could be tuned simply through varying the molar ratio between furan and maleimide. Rheological, mechanical and degradation studies demonstrated that the Diels-Alder "click" chemistry is an efficient method for preparing high performance biological interpenetrating hydrogels. This biomimic hydrogel with improved mechanical properties could have great potential applications in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:23769536

  1. Cooperative problem solving in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Péron, F; Rat-Fischer, L; Lalot, M; Nagle, L; Bovet, D

    2011-07-01

    One of the main characteristics of human societies is the extensive degree of cooperation among individuals. Cooperation is an elaborate phenomenon, also found in non-human primates during laboratory studies and field observations of animal hunting behaviour, among other things. Some authors suggest that the pressures assumed to have favoured the emergence of social intelligence in primates are similar to those that may have permitted the emergence of complex cognitive abilities in some bird species such as corvids and psittacids. In the wild, parrots show cooperative behaviours such as bi-parental care and mobbing. In this study, we tested cooperative problem solving in African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus). Our birds were tested using several experimental setups to explore the different levels of behavioural organisation between participants, differing in temporal and spatial complexity. In our experiments, African grey parrots were able to act simultaneously but mostly failed during the delay task, maybe because of a lack of inhibitory motor response. Confronted with the possibility to adapt their behaviour to the presence or absence of a partner, they showed that they were able to coordinate their actions. They also collaborated, acting complementarily in order to solve tasks, but they were not able to place themselves in the partner's role. PMID:21384141

  2. Adoption in Eastern Grey Kangaroos: A Consequence of Misdirected Care?

    PubMed Central

    King, Wendy J.; Forsyth, David M.; Coulson, Graeme; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Adoption is rare in animals and is usually attributed to kin selection. In a 6-year study of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), 11 of 326 juveniles were adopted. We detected eight adoptions by observing behavioural associations and nursing between marked mothers and young and three more by analysing the relatedness of mothers and young using microsatellite DNA. Four adoptions involved reciprocal switches and three were by mothers whose own pouch young were known to subsequently disappear. Adoptive mothers were not closely related to each other or to adoptees but adoptive mothers and young associated as closely as did biological pairs, as measured by half-weight indices. Switch mothers did not associate closely. Maternal age and body condition did not influence the likelihood of adoption but females were more likely to adopt in years with high densities of females with large pouch young. Adoption did not improve juvenile survival. We conclude that adoptions in this wild population were potentially costly and likely caused by misdirected care, suggesting that eastern grey kangaroos may have poorly developed mother-offspring recognition mechanisms. PMID:25970624

  3. Communications systems design for testability: Grey-box testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, Robert L.; Geldrez, Cecilia

    Large systems such as telecommunications systems may involve several million lines of executable code and tend to evolve incrementally, thus rendering testing and maintainability a very complex task. For this reason, testing and verification requirements must be defined and incorporated into the development process early in the software development cycle. Thus, design becomes a key component of these systems. An approach to assist in enhancing the testability of software designs is proposed, termed grey-box testing. One particular grey-box testing paradigm named semantic instrumentation is illustrated. Designs are represented as design machines, an extension of finite-state machines. A design-level plan for verification/test is then derived to guarantee branch coverage of the design machine for both normal behaviors and for processing of exceptions. Finally, semantic probes are defined to provide a mapping from the design machine to implemented code. These probes are used to document design decisions, implementation decisions, and execution traces during code verification and test. The process of semantic instrumentation is illustrated on communications services, more precisely, on the service of the alternating bit protocol.

  4. [Landscape influence on the Grey Herons colonies distribution].

    PubMed

    Boisteau, Benjamin; Marion, Loïc

    2006-03-01

    We analysed the spatial relationship between the location and the size of the 112 grey heron colonies existing in 1994 in the two refuge areas after their decline of the species in the 19th century in France: South Brittany (Loire-Atlantique and Morbihan), and eastern France (Haute-Saône, Saône-et-Loire, Meurthe-et-Moselle, Vosges). We tested 35 variables describing the hydrographical network surrounding the colonies from a local to a regional scale using a Geographic Information System. The results show that, whatever the scale, the distribution of the breeding colonies was not governed by the same elements of the hydrographical network in the different areas. Two strategies of spatial utilization were observed between the western and the eastern parts of France. Moreover, two quite distinct situations were also distinguished between Morbihan and Loire-Atlantique. This study stresses that the type and the spatial organization of the hydrographical elements, but also of the history of the populations, are important in the distribution of the Grey Heron colonies. PMID:16545763

  5. Forecasting Performance of Grey Prediction for Education Expenditure and School Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui-Wen Vivian; Yin, Mu-Shang

    2012-01-01

    GM(1,1) and GM(1,1) rolling models derived from grey system theory were estimated using time-series data from projection studies by National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). An out-of-sample forecasting competition between the two grey prediction models and exponential smoothing used by NCES was conducted for education expenditure and…

  6. Vocal Learning in Grey Parrots: A Brief Review of Perception, Production, and Cross-Species Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepperberg, Irene M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter briefly reviews what is known-and what remains to be understood--about Grey parrot vocal learning. I review Greys' physical capacities--issues of auditory perception and production--then discuss how these capacities are used in vocal learning and can be recruited for referential communication with humans. I discuss cross-species…

  7. Bioflocculation of grey water for improved energy recovery within decentralized sanitation concepts.

    PubMed

    Hernández Leal, L; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; Buisman, C J N

    2010-12-01

    Bioflocculation of grey water was tested with a lab-scale membrane bioreactor in order to concentrate the COD. Three concentration factors were tested based on the ratio of sludge retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT): 3, 8 and 12. COD concentration factor was up to 7.1, achieving a final concentration of 7.2 g COD L(-1). Large fractions of suspended COD were recovered in the concentrate (57%, 81% and 82% at SRT/HRT ratios of 3, 8 and 12, respectively) indicating a strong bioflocculation of grey water. A maximum of 11% of COD mineralization of grey water was measured at the longest SRT tested (1 d). The integration of bioflocculation of grey water in decentralized sanitation concepts may increase the overall production of methane by 73%, based on the biogas produced by black water only. Therefore, bioflocculation is a promising grey water pre-treatment step for energy recovery within decentralized sanitation concepts. PMID:20691588

  8. Survival and band recovery rates of sympatric grey ducks and mallards in New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caithness, T.; Williams, M.; Nichols, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    We used band recovery data from grey ducks (Anas superciliosa) and mallards. (A. platyrhynchos) banded sympatrically during 1957-74 to estimate annual survival and recovery rates. Young birds tended to have higher recovery rates and lower survival rates than adults for both species. Both species showed strong evidence of year-to-year variation in annual survival rates. Survival rates of male mallards were higher than those in females, as is typical for this species in North America, but there was no evidence of sex-specific survival differences in grey ducks. Recovery rate estimates for grey ducks were high and were significantly higher than those for mallards. However, survival rates did not differ significantly between the 2 species within any age-sex class. The similar survival rates, when mallard populations were increasing and grey ducks were decreasing, suggest that mallard reproductive rates have been greater than those of grey ducks.

  9. Synthesis of the Reported Pyranonaphthoquinone Structure of the Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase Inhibitor Annulin B by Regioselective Diels-Alder Reaction.

    PubMed

    Inman, Martyn; Carvalho, Catarina; Lewis, William; Moody, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Annulin B, isolated from the marine hydroid isolated from Garveia annulata, is a potent inhibitor of the tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). A synthesis of the reported pyranonaphthoquinone structure is described, in which the key step is a regioselective Diels-Alder reaction between a pyranobenzoquinone dienophile and a silyl ketene acetal diene. PMID:27513176

  10. Integration of Computational and Preparative Techniques to Demonstrate Physical Organic Concepts in Synthetic Organic Chemistry: An Example Using Diels-Alder Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David R. J.

    2004-01-01

    The Diels-Alder reaction is used as an example for showing the integration of computational and preparative techniques, which help in demonstrating the physical organic concepts in synthetic organic chemistry. These experiments show that the students should not accept the computational results without questioning them and in many Diels-Alder…

  11. Bicyclic Guanidine Catalyzed Asymmetric Tandem Isomerization Intramolecular-Diels-Alder Reaction: The First Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)-alpha-Yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Jiang, Danfeng; Kee, Choon-Wee; Liu, Hongjun; Tan, Choon-Hong

    2016-02-01

    Hydroisoquinoline derivatives were prepared in moderate to good enantioselectivities via a bicyclic guanidine-catalyzed tandem isomerization intramolecular-Diels-Alder (IMDA) reaction of alkynes. With this synthetic method, the first enantioselective synthesis of (+)-alpha-yohimbine was completed in 9 steps from the IMDA products. PMID:25932622

  12. Diels-Alder Synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baar, Marsha R.; Wustholz, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    A study investigated the Diels-Alder synthesis of endo-cis-N-phenylbicyclo [2.2.2]oct-5-en-2,3-dicarboximide. The amount of time taken by a reaction between the 1,3-cyclohexadiene and N-phenylmaleimide at room temperature and also whether the desired cycloadduct would precipitate directly from the reaction mixture was examined.

  13. Fast Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions Using 4-Phenyl-1,2,4-Triazoline-3,5-Dione (PTAD) as the Dienophile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celius, Tevye C.

    2010-01-01

    A hetero-Diels-Alder reaction that proceeds rapidly and only requires a simple filtration to purify the product is presented. The dienophile, 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD), is prepared by the heterogeneous oxidation of 4-phenylurazole by the bromenium ion, Br[superscript +], generated in situ by the oxidation of potassium bromide by…

  14. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  15. The Synthesis of "N"-Benzyl-2-Azanorbornene via Aqueous Hetero Diels-Alder Reaction: An Undergraduate Project in Organic Synthesis and Structural Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Xavier; Delaude, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of "N"-benzyl-2-azanorbornene via aqueous hetero Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene and benzyliminium chloride formed in situ from benzylamine hydrochloride and formaldehyde is described. Characterization of the product was achieved by IR and NMR spectroscopies. The spectral data acquired are thoroughly discussed. Numerous…

  16. Diels-Alder Cycloadditions: A MORE Experiment in the Organic Laboratory Including a Diene Identification Exercise Involving NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Roosevelt; Severin, Ashika; Balfour, Miguel; Nettles, Columbus

    2005-01-01

    Two Diels-Alder reactions are described that are suitable for a MORE (microwave-induced organic reaction enhanced) experiment in the organic chemistry laboratory course. A second experiment in which the splitting patterns of the vinyl protons in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two MORE adducts are used in conjunction with molecular…

  17. Synthesis of a Self-Healing Polymer Based on Reversible Diels-Alder Reaction: An Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory at the Interface of Organic Chemistry and Materials Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weizman, Haim; Nielsen, Christian; Weizman, Or S.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory experiment exposes students to the chemistry of self-healing polymers based on a Diels-Alder reaction. Students accomplish a multistep synthesis of a monomer building block and then polymerize it to form a cross-linked polymer. The healing capability of the polymer is verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments.…

  18. N,N'-Dioxide/nickel(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with 2,3-dioxopyrrolidines and 2-alkenoyl pyridines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhou, Yuhang; Lin, Lili; Zheng, Haifeng; Fu, Kai; Liu, Xiaohua; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    A chiral N,N'-dioxide/Ni(OTf)2 complex-catalyzed asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with 2,3-dioxopyrrolidines and 2-alkenoyl pyridines has been achieved. The corresponding chiral bridged compounds were obtained in high yields with excellent dr and ee values (up to 97% yield, 95 : 5 dr and 97% ee). PMID:27284594

  19. A π-electronic covalent organic framework catalyst: π-walls as catalytic beds for Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xu, Hong; Chen, Xiong; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2015-06-25

    We report a strategy for developing π-electronic covalent organic frameworks as heterogeneous catalysts that enable the use of columnar π-walls as catalytic beds to facilitate organic transformations in their one-dimensional open channels. The π-frameworks exhibit outstanding catalytic activity, promote Diels-Alder reactions under ambient conditions and are robust for cycle use. PMID:26000867

  20. Grey nurse shark (Carcharias taurus) diving tourism: Tourist compliance and shark behaviour at Fish Rock, Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kirby; Scarr, Mark; Scarpaci, Carol

    2010-11-01

    Humans can dive with critically endangered grey nurse sharks (Carcharias taurus) along the east coast of Australia. This study investigated both compliance of tourist divers to a code of conduct and legislation and the behaviour of grey nurse sharks in the presence of divers. A total of 25 data collection dives were conducted from December 2008 to January 2009. Grey nurse shark and diver behaviour were documented using 2-min scan samples and continuous observation. The proportion of time spent observing human-shark interactions was 9.4% of total field time and mean human-shark interaction time was 15.0 min. Results were used to gauge the effectiveness of current management practices for the grey nurse shark dive industry at Fish Rock in New South Wales, Australia. Grey nurse shark dive tourists were compliant to stipulations in the code of conduct and legislation (compliance ranged from 88 to 100%). The research detailed factors that may promote compliance in wildlife tourism operations such as the clarity of the stipulations, locality of the target species and diver perceptions of sharks. Results indicated that grey nurse sharks spent the majority of their time milling (85%) followed by active swimming (15%). Milling behaviour significantly decreased in the presence of more than six divers. Distance between sharks and divers, interaction time and number of sharks were not significantly correlated with grey nurse shark school behaviour. Jaw gaping, rapid withdrawal and stiff or jerky movement were the specific behaviours of grey nurse sharks that occurred most frequently and were associated with distance between divers and sharks and the presence of six or more divers. Revision of the number of divers allowed per interaction with a school of grey nurse sharks and further research on the potential impacts that shark-diving tourism may pose to grey nurse sharks is recommended. PMID:20872140

  1. Grey Nurse Shark ( Carcharias taurus) Diving Tourism: Tourist Compliance and Shark Behaviour at Fish Rock, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kirby; Scarr, Mark; Scarpaci, Carol

    2010-11-01

    Humans can dive with critically endangered grey nurse sharks ( Carcharias taurus) along the east coast of Australia. This study investigated both compliance of tourist divers to a code of conduct and legislation and the behaviour of grey nurse sharks in the presence of divers. A total of 25 data collection dives were conducted from December 2008 to January 2009. Grey nurse shark and diver behaviour were documented using 2-min scan samples and continuous observation. The proportion of time spent observing human-shark interactions was 9.4% of total field time and mean human-shark interaction time was 15.0 min. Results were used to gauge the effectiveness of current management practices for the grey nurse shark dive industry at Fish Rock in New South Wales, Australia. Grey nurse shark dive tourists were compliant to stipulations in the code of conduct and legislation (compliance ranged from 88 to 100%). The research detailed factors that may promote compliance in wildlife tourism operations such as the clarity of the stipulations, locality of the target species and diver perceptions of sharks. Results indicated that grey nurse sharks spent the majority of their time milling (85%) followed by active swimming (15%). Milling behaviour significantly decreased in the presence of more than six divers. Distance between sharks and divers, interaction time and number of sharks were not significantly correlated with grey nurse shark school behaviour. Jaw gaping, rapid withdrawal and stiff or jerky movement were the specific behaviours of grey nurse sharks that occurred most frequently and were associated with distance between divers and sharks and the presence of six or more divers. Revision of the number of divers allowed per interaction with a school of grey nurse sharks and further research on the potential impacts that shark-diving tourism may pose to grey nurse sharks is recommended.

  2. Taking Stands for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lorinda; Rios, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe efforts to help students take a stand for social justice in the College of Education at one predominantly White institution in the western Rocky Mountain region. The authors outline the theoretical frameworks that inform this work and the context of our work. The focus is on specific pedagogical strategies used…

  3. Chitosan based grey wastewater treatment--a statistical design approach.

    PubMed

    Thirugnanasambandham, K; Sivakumar, V; Prakash Maran, J; Kandasamy, S

    2014-01-01

    In this present study, grey wastewater was treated under different operating conditions such as agitation time (1-3 min), pH (2.5-5.5), chitosan dose (0.3-0.6g/l) and settling time (10-20 min) using response surface methodology (RSM). Four factors with three levels Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD) were employed to optimize and investigate the effect of process variables on the responses such as turbidity, BOD and COD removal. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and second order polynomial models were developed in order to predict the responses. Under the optimum conditions, experimental values such as turbidity (96%), BOD (91%) and COD (73%) removals are closely agreed with predicted values. PMID:24274548

  4. Classification enhancible grey relational analysis for cardiac arrhythmias discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hung

    2006-04-01

    This paper proposes a method for electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat recognition using classification enhancible grey relational analysis (GRA). The ECG beat recognition can be divided into a sequence of stages, starting with feature extraction and then according to characteristics to identify the cardiac arrhythmias including the supraventricular ectopic beat, bundle branch ectopic beat, and ventricular ectopic beat. Gaussian wavelets are used to enhance the features from each heartbeat, and GRA performs the recognition tasks. With the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed non-invasive method. Compared with artificial neural network, the test results also show high accuracy, good adaptability, and faster processing time for the detection of heartbeat signals. PMID:16937172

  5. MHC genotype and near-deterministic mortality in grey seals.

    PubMed

    de Assunção-Franco, M; Hoffman, J I; Harwood, J; Amos, W

    2012-01-01

    The Major Histocompatability Complex (MHC) is one of the best known and best characterised components of the immune system, yet its functions remain somewhat enigmatic, including both anti-pathogen activity and kin recognition. To explore the importance of the MHC relative to literally hundreds of other components of the immune system, we compared MHC genotype frequencies between pups and adults in the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), one of many marine mammals that exhibit low allelic diversity. We find that one allele is strongly associated with pup survival, pups being more likely to be found dead if they lack it, while total allele number is a remarkably strong predictor of survivorship to adulthood. We estimate that approximately 70% of mortality can be attributed to the MHC. Our study therefore shows that low MHC allele diversity belies its critical role in determining whether a weaned pup negotiates disease to become a breeding adult. PMID:22997548

  6. Emergence of Linguistic Communication: Studies on Grey Parrots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepperberg, Irene M.

    Most studies on the evolution of communication systems concentrate on the primate lineage, ignoring the concept of parallel lines of evolution. Although phylogenetically remote from humans, some birds—particularly Grey parrots—share many cognitive and communicative abilities with humans. On certain tasks, they demonstrate processing abilities comparable to 5-6 year-old humans; they learn very simple vocal syntactic patterns and referential elements of human communication, but only through social interaction and in a manner that proceeds in ways similar to those of humans. Given this knowledge of vocal learning in birds, of the effects of social interaction on such learning, and of birds' complex cognitive abilities, we should not ignore the avian line if we wish to determine the evolutionary pressures that purportedly affected the evolution of complex communication systems—particularly vocal systems—and develop theories and models that can be tested.

  7. Non-grey radiation in a liquid rocket combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehtarnavaz, H.; Dang, A. L.; Chiu, H. H.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of radiation on droplets gasification in liquid rocket combustion chambers has been studied. The modeling includes a Legendre pseudo-spectral collocation approximation to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The band model has been utilized to account for non-grey emitting and absorbing gases present in the comustion chamber. The GEMCHIP II code has been utilized to study the fuel and oxidizer droplets combustion and interaction. The submodels within this code are capable of accounting for group combustion and conjugate effects between many droplets. The radiative model has been coupled with the GEMCHIP II code accounting for radial effects only, to provide the tool for studying the combustion-radiation coupling effects in a bipropellant system. The results indicate that the gasification/combustion process will be enhanced upstream of the chamber causing thicker flame sheet and associated higher combustion efficiency.

  8. Causality in condensates: grey solitons as remnants of BEC formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Symmetry breaking during phase transitions can lead to the formation of topological defects (such as vortex lines in superfluids). However, the usually studied BEC's have the shape of a cigar, a geometry that impedes vortex formation, survival, and detection. I show that, in elongated traps, one can expect the formation of 'grey solitons' (long-lived, non-topological 'phase defects') as a result of the same mechanism. Their number will rise approximately in proportion to the transition rate. This steep rise is due to the increasing size of the region of the BEC cigar where the phase of the condensate wavefunction is chosen locally (rather than passed on from the already formed BEC).

  9. Data expansion: the potential of grey literature for understanding floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Bertelmann, R.; Merz, B.

    2012-09-01

    Sophisticated methods have been developed and become standard in analysing floods as well as for assessing the flood risk. However, increasingly critique of the current standards and scientific practice can be found both in the flood hydrology community as well as in the risk community who argue that the considerable amount of information already available on natural disasters has not been adequately deployed and brought to effective use. We describe this phenomenon as a failure to synthesize knowledge that results from barriers and ignorance in awareness, use and management of the entire spectrum of relevant content, that is, data, information and knowledge. In this paper we argue that the scientific community in flood risk research ignores event specific analysis and documentations as another source of data. We present results from a systematic search that includes an intensive study on sources and ways of information dissemination of flood relevant publications. We obtain 183 documents that contain information on the sources, pathways, receptors and/or consequences for any of the 40 strongest trans-basin floods in Germany in the period 1952-2002. This study therefore provides the most comprehensive meta-data collection of flood documentations for the considered geographical space and period. 87.5% of all events have been documented and especially the most severe floods have received extensive coverage. Only 30% of the material has been produced in the scientific/academic environment and the majority of all documents (about 80%) can be considered grey literature. Therefore, ignoring grey sources in flood research also means ignoring the largest part of knowledge available on single flood events (in Germany). Further, the results of this study underpin the rapid changes in information dissemination of flood event literature over the last decade. We discuss the options and obstacles of incorporating this data in the knowledge building process in the light of the

  10. Data expansion: the potential of grey literature for understanding floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, S.; Bertelmann, R.; Merz, B.

    2013-03-01

    Sophisticated methods have been developed and become standard in analysing floods as well as for assessing flood risk. However, increasingly critique of the current standards and scientific practice can be found both in the flood hydrology community as well as in the risk community who argue that the considerable amount of information already available on natural disasters has not been adequately deployed and brought to effective use. We describe this phenomenon as a failure to synthesize knowledge that results from barriers and ignorance in awareness, use and management of the entire spectrum of relevant content, that is, data, information and knowledge. In this paper we argue that the scientific community in flood risk research ignores event-specific analysis and documentations as another source of data. We present results from a systematic search that includes an intensive study on sources and ways of information dissemination of flood-relevant publications. We obtain 186 documents that contain information on the sources, pathways, receptors and/or consequences for any of the 40 strongest trans-basin floods in Germany in the period 1952-2002. This study therefore provides the most comprehensive metadata collection of flood documentations for the considered geographical space and period. A total of 87.5% of all events have been documented, and especially the most severe floods have received extensive coverage. Only 30% of the material has been produced in the scientific/academic environment, and the majority of all documents (about 80%) can be considered grey literature (i.e. literature not controlled by commercial publishers). Therefore, ignoring grey sources in flood research also means ignoring the largest part of knowledge available on single flood events (in Germany). Further, the results of this study underpin the rapid changes in information dissemination of flood event literature over the last decade. We discuss the options and obstacles of incorporating

  11. Ecotoxicological assessment of grey water treatment systems with Daphnia magna and Chironomus riparius.

    PubMed

    Hernández Leal, L; Soeter, A M; Kools, S A E; Kraak, M H S; Parsons, J R; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; Buisman, C J N

    2012-03-15

    In order to meet environmental quality criteria, grey water was treated in four different ways: 1) aerobic 2) anaerobic+aerobic 3) aerobic+activated carbon 4) aerobic+ozone. Since each treatment has its own specific advantages and disadvantages, the aim of this study was to compare the ecotoxicity of differently treated grey water using Chironomus riparius (96 h test) and Daphnia magna (48 h and 21d test) as test organisms. Grey water exhibited acute toxicity to both test organisms. The aerobic and combined anaerobic+aerobic treatment eliminated mortality in the acute tests, but growth of C. riparius was still affected by these two effluents. Post-treatment by ozone and activated carbon completely removed the acute toxicity from grey water. In the chronic toxicity test the combined anaerobic+aerobic treatment strongly affected D. magna population growth rate (47%), while the aerobic treatment had a small (9%) but significant effect. Hence, aerobic treatment is the best option for biological treatment of grey water, removing most of the toxic effects of grey water. If advanced treatment is required, the treatment with either ozone or GAC were shown to be very effective in complete removal of toxicity from grey water. PMID:22197265

  12. Diels-Alder attachment of a planar organic molecule to a dangling bond dimer on a hydrogenated semiconductor surface.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kawai, Hiroyo; Engelund, Mads; Kolmer, Marek; Zuzak, Rafal; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Novell-Leruth, Gerard; Echavarren, Antonio M; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Joachim, Christian; Saeys, Mark

    2016-06-22

    Construction of single-molecule electronic devices requires the controlled manipulation of organic molecules and their properties. This could be achieved by tuning the interaction between the molecule and individual atoms by local "on-surface" chemistry, i.e., the controlled formation of chemical bonds between the species. We demonstrate here the reversible attachment of a planar conjugated polyaromatic molecule to a pair of unpassivated dangling bonds on a hydrogenated Ge(001):H surface via a Diels-Alder [4+2] addition using the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Due to the small stability difference between the covalently bonded and a nearly undistorted structure attached to the dangling bond dimer by long-range dispersive forces, we show that at cryogenic temperatures the molecule can be switched between both configurations. The reversibility of this covalent bond forming reaction may be applied in the construction of complex circuits containing organic molecules with tunable properties. PMID:27271337

  13. Pyrone Diels-Alder Routes to Indolines and Hydroindolines: Syntheses of Gracilamine, Mesembrine, and Δ(7) -Mesembrenone.

    PubMed

    Gan, Pei; Smith, Myles W; Braffman, Nathaniel R; Snyder, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Although the Diels-Alder reaction has long been utilized for the preparation of numerous heterocycles, opportunities to extend its power remain. Herein, we detail a simple, modular, and robust approach that combines various amines regioselectively with 4,6-dichloropyrone to create substrates which, under appropriate conditions, can directly deliver varied indolines and hydroindolines through [4+2] cycloadditions with substitution patterns difficult to access otherwise. As an initial demonstration of the power of the strategy, several different natural products have been obtained either formally or by direct total synthesis, with efforts toward one of these-the complex amaryllidaceae alkaloid gracilamine-affording the shortest route to date in terms of linear step count. PMID:26865400

  14. Catalytic Effects of Oxide Surfaces on Diels-Alder Cycloaddition between Furan and Methyl Acrylate: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-Fard, Taha; Jenness, Glen; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas

    Using density functional theory with periodic boundary conditions, we study the catalytic effects of oxide surfaces such as ZrO_2 and HfO_2 on Diels-Alder reaction between furan and methyl acrylate. The cycloadduct can be dehydrated later to produce methyl benzoic which is an important step toward benzoic acid production. The gas-phase and on-surface reaction mechanisms are studied in detail. The surface hydration effects on the reaction mechanism and energy profile are studied as well. Our calculations show that the oxide surfaces catalyze the reaction significantly through the interaction of metal sites with methyl acrylate. The calculations are interpreted by making use of electronic density of states and band structure of the catalyst.

  15. Factors Controlling the Reactivity and Selectivity of the Diels-Alder Reactions Involving 1,2-Azaborines.

    PubMed

    García-Rodeja, Yago; Fernández, Israel

    2016-08-01

    The factors controlling the reactivity and endo/exo selectivity of the Diels-Alder reactions involving 1,2-azaborines have been computationally explored within the density functional theory framework. It is found that the AlCl3-catalyzed [4 + 2]-cycloaddition reaction between these dienes and N-methylmaleimide proceeds concertedly and leads almost exclusively to the corresponding endo cycloadduct, which is in good agreement with previous experimental observations. In addition, the effect of the substituent directly attached to the boron atom of the 1,2-azaborine on the process is also analyzed in detail. To this end, the combination of the activation strain model of reactivity and the energy decomposition analysis methods has been applied to gain a quantitative understanding into the origins of the endo selectivity of the process as well as the influence of the boron and nitrogen substituent on the barrier heights of the transformations. PMID:27383907

  16. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  17. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  18. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Do, Phuong T M; McAtee, Jesse R; Watson, Donald A; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  19. Elucidation of Diels-Alder Reaction Network of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Ethylene on HY Zeolite Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Do, Phuong T.M.; McAtee, Jesse R.; Watson, Donald A.; Lobo, Raul F.

    2012-01-01

    The reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene to produce p-xylene represents a potentially important route for the conversion of biomass to high-value organic chemicals. Current preparation methods suffer from low selectivity and produce a number of byproducts. Using modern separation and analytical techniques, the structure of many of the byproducts produced in this reaction when HY zeolite is employed as a catalyst has been identified. From these data, a detailed reaction network is proposed demonstrating that hydrolysis and electrophilic alkylation reactions compete with the desired Diels-Alder/dehydration sequence. This information will allow the rational identification of more selective catalysts and more selective reaction conditions. PMID:23316419

  20. Irreversible endo-Selective Diels–Alder Reactions of Substituted Alkoxyfurans: A General Synthesis of endo-Cantharimides

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Robert W; Benhamou, Laure; Porter, Michael J; Bučar, Dejan-Krešimir; Hailes, Helen C; Tame, Christopher J; Sheppard, Tom D

    2015-01-01

    The [4+2] cycloaddition of 3-alkoxyfurans with N-substituted maleimides provides the first general route for preparing endo-cantharimides. Unlike the corresponding reaction with 3H furans, the reaction can tolerate a broad range of 2-substitued furans including alkyl, aromatic, and heteroaromatic groups. The cycloaddition products were converted into a range of cantharimide products with promising lead-like properties for medicinal chemistry programs. Furthermore, the electron-rich furans are shown to react with a variety of alternative dienophiles to generate 7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane derivatives under mild conditions. DFT calculations have been performed to rationalize the activation effect of the 3-alkoxy group on a furan Diels–Alder reaction. PMID:25756502

  1. Diels-Alder functionalized carbon nanotubes for bone tissue engineering: in vitro/in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, D.; Amaral, M.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Colaço, B.; Gama, A.; Paiva, M. C.; Gomes, P. S.; Silva, R. F.; Fernandes, M. H.

    2015-05-01

    The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT membranes (p,f-CNTs). The in vivo subcutaneously implanted materials showed a higher biological reactivity, thus inducing a slighter intense inflammatory response compared to non-functionalized CNT membranes (p-CNTs), but still showing a reduced cytotoxicity profile. Moreover, the in vivo biodegradation of CNTs was superior for p,f-CNT membranes, likely mediated by the oxidation-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) in neutrophil and macrophage inflammatory milieus. This proves the biodegradability faculty of functionalized CNTs, which potentially avoids long-term tissue accumulation and triggering of acute toxicity. On the whole, the proposed Diels-Alder functionalization accounts for the improved CNT biological response in terms of the biocompatibility and biodegradability profiles. Therefore, CNTs can be considered for use in bone tissue engineering without notable toxicological threats.The risk-benefit balance for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dictates their clinical fate. To take a step forward at this crossroad it is compulsory to modulate the CNT in vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability via e.g. chemical functionalization. CNT membranes were functionalised combining a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction to generate cyclohexene (-C6H10) followed by a mild oxidisation to yield carboxylic acid groups (-COOH). In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human osteoblastic cells were maximized on functionalized CNT

  2. Enantio- and Diastereoselective Formal Hetero-Diels-Alder Reactions of Trifluoromethylated Enones Catalyzed by Chiral Primary Amines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Jun; Du, Li-Na; Kang, Tai-Ran; Liu, Quan-Zhong; Chen, Ze-Qin; He, Long

    2015-08-10

    Enantioselective formal hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of trifluoromethylated enones and 2-amino-1,3-butadienes generated in situ from aliphatic acyclic enones and chiral primary amines are reported. The corresponding tetrahydropyran-4-ones are formed in up to 94 % yield and with up to 94 % ee. The reaction was carried out through a stepwise mechanism, including initial aminocatalytic aldol condensation of 2-amino-1,3-butadiene to the trifluoromethylated carbonyl group followed by an intramolecular oxa-Michael addition. Both NMR investigation and theoretical calculations on the transition state indicate that the protonated tertiary amine could effectively activate the carbonyl group of the trifluoromethyl ketone to promote the addition process through hydrogen-bonding interaction of N-H⋅⋅⋅F and N-H⋅⋅⋅O simultaneously, and thus provide a chiral environment for the approach of amino-1,3-butadienes to the activated trifluoromethyl ketone, resulting in high enantioselectivity. PMID:26179273

  3. Enhancement of the Click Chemistry for the Inverse Diels Alder Technology by Functionalization of Amide-Based Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Lorenz, Peter; Muehlhausen, Ute; Fleischhacker, Heinz; Koch, Mario; Braun, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In the near future personalized medicine with nucleic acids will play a key role in molecular diagnostics and therapy, which require new properties of the nucleic acids, like stability against enzymatic degradation. Here we demonstrate that the replacement of nucleobases with PNA by functional molecules harbouring either a dienophile or a diene reactivity is feasible and confers all new options for functionalization. These newly developed derivatives allow independent multi-ligations of multi-faceted components by use of the inverse Diels Alder technology. The high chemical stability and the ease of synthesis qualify these polyamide building blocks as favourites for intracellular delivery and targeting applications. This allows local drug concentrations sufficient for imaging and therapy and simultaneously a reduction of the application doses. It is important to point out that this technology is not restricted to ligation of medicament material; it is also a candidate to develop new and highly efficient active compounds for a “sustainable pharmacy”. PMID:21750642

  4. Diels-Alder Trapping of Photochemically Generated o-Quinodimethane Intermediates: An Alternative Route to Photocured Polymer Film Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyson, Daniel S.; Ilhan, Faysal; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Smith, Dee Dee; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Meador, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Photolysis of o-methylphenyl ketones generates bis-o-quinodimethane intermediates that can be trapped in situ by dienophiles through Diels-Alder cycloadditions. This well-known photochemical process is applied to a series of six new photoreactive monomers containing bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone) functionalities combined with diacrylate and triacrylate ester monomers for the development of acrylic ester copolymer blends. Irradiation of cyclohexanone solutions of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s and acrylate esters produce thin polymer films. Solid state 13C NMR data indicated 47- 100% reaction of the bis-(o-methylphenyl ketone)s, depending on experimental conditions, to yield the desired products. DSC and TGA analyses were performed to determine the glass transition temperature, T,, and onset of decomposition, Td, of the resulting polymer films. A statistical Design of Experiments approach was used to obtain a systematic understanding of the effects of experimental variables on the extent of polymerization and the final polymer properties.

  5. Regioselective Synthesis of C-3-Functionalized Quinolines via Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloaddition of Azadienes with Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Saunthwal, Rakesh K; Patel, Monika; Verma, Akhilesh K

    2016-08-01

    A highly efficient metal and protection-free approach for the regioselective synthesis of C-3-functionalized quinolines from azadienes (in situ generated from 2-aminobenzyl alcohol) and terminal alkynes through [4 + 2] cycloaddition has been developed. An unprecedented reaction of 2-aminobenzyl alcohol with 1,3- and 1,4-diethynylbenzene provided the C-3 tolylquinolines via [4 + 2] HDA and oxidative decarboxylation. The -NH2 group directed mechanistic approach was well supported by the control experiments and deuterium-labeling studies and by isolating the azadiene intermediate. The reactivity and selectivity of unprotected azadiene in metal-free base-assisted hetero-Diels-Alder reaction is exploited to quickly assemble an important class of C-3-functionalized quinolines, which are difficult to access. PMID:27380814

  6. Diels-Alder reactions for the rational design of benzo[b]thiophenes: DFT-based guidelines for synthetic chemists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasca, Romina; Kneeteman, María N.; Mancini, Pedro M. E.; Fabian, Walter M. F.

    2012-02-01

    In this work we studied the capability of several diene/dienophile pairs to undergo Diels-Alder (DA) reactions leading to benzo[b]thiophenes. A variety of synthetically and commercially available nitrothiophenes were chosen as dienophiles. Methyl 5-nitro-3-thiophenecarboxylate was selected as a potential strong electrophilic candidate based on some DFT-based properties and the substitution pattern of the expected product. The mechanistic details concerning the participation of this dienophile in polar DA reactions were investigated through a theoretical point of view. The results were compared with the experimental outcomes. This methodology should allow synthetic chemists to analyze DA reactions in detail in a stage prior to the synthetic job.

  7. Effects of surface inactivation, high temperature drying and preservative treatment on surface roughness and colour of alder and beech wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Ismail; Colakoglu, Gursel

    2005-10-01

    Although extensive research has been conducted in wood surface quality analysis, a unified approach to surface quality characterisation does not exist. Measurements of the variation in surface roughness and surface colour are used widely for the evaluation of wood surface quality. Colour is a basic visual feature for wood and wood-based products. Colour measurement is one of the quality control tests that should be carried out because the colour deviations are spotted easily by the consumers. On the other hand, a common problem faced by plywood manufacturers is panel delamination, for which a major cause is poor quality glue-bonds resulting from rough veneer. Rotary cut veneers with dimensions of 500 mm × 500 mm × 2 mm manufactured from alder ( Alnus glutinosa subsp. barbata) and beech ( Fagus orientalis Lipsky) logs were used as materials in this study. Veneer sheets were oven-dried in a veneer dryer at 110 °C (normal drying temperature) and 180 °C (high drying temperature) after peeling process. The surfaces of some veneers were then exposed at indoor laboratory conditions to obtain inactive wood surfaces for glue bonds, and some veneers were treated with borax, boric acid and ammonium acetate solutions. After these treatments, surface roughness and colour measurements were made on veneer surfaces. High temperature drying process caused a darkening on the surfaces of alder and beech veneers. Total colour change value (Δ E*) increased linear with increasing exposure time. Among the treatment solutions, ammonium acetate caused the biggest colour change while treatment with borax caused the lowest changes in Δ E* values. Considerable changes in surface roughness after preservative treatment did not occur on veneer surfaces. Generally, no clear changes were obtained or the values mean roughness profile ( Ra) decreased slightly in Ra values after the natural inactivation process.

  8. Tyrosine-Lipid Peroxide Adducts from Radical Termination: Para-Coupling and Intramolecular Diels-Alder Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Shchepin, Roman; Möller, Matias N.; Kim, Hye-young H.; Hatch, Duane M.; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Radi, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Free radical co-oxidation of polyunsaturated lipids with tyrosine or phenolic analogs of tyrosine gave rise to lipid peroxide-tyrosine (phenol) adducts in both aqueous micellar and organic solutions. The novel adducts were isolated and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR as well as by mass spectrometry. The spectral data suggest that the polyunsaturated lipid peroxyl radicals give stable peroxide coupling products exclusively at the para position of the tyrosyl (phenoxy) radicals. These adducts have characteristic 13C chemical shifts at 185 ppm due to the cross-conjugated carbonyl of the phenol-derived cyclohexadienone. The primary peroxide adducts subsequently undergo intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) cyclization, affording a number of diastereomeric tricyclic adducts that have characteristic carbonyl 13C chemical shifts at ~198 ppm. All NMR HMBC and HSQC correlations support the structure assignment of the primary and Diels-Alder adducts, as does MS collision induced dissociation. Kinetic rate constants and activation parameters for the IMDA reaction were determined and the primary adducts were reduced with cuprous ion giving a phenol-derived 4-hydroxycyclohexa-2,5-dienone. No products from adduction of peroxyls at the phenolic ortho position were found either in the primary or the cuprous reduction product mixtures. These studies provide a framework for understanding the nature of lipid-protein adducts formed by peroxyl-tyrosyl radical-radical termination processes. Coupling of lipid peroxyl radicals with tyrosyl radicals leads to cyclohexenone and cyclohexadienone adducts which are of interest in and of themselves since, as electrophiles, they are likely targets for protein nucleophiles. One consequence of lipid peroxyl reactions with tyrosyls may therefore be protein-protein crosslinks via interprotein Michael adducts. PMID:21090613

  9. Chemo-protective and regenerative effects of diarylheptanoids from the bark of black alder (Alnus glutinosa) in human normal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dinić, Jelena; Ranđelović, Teodora; Stanković, Tijana; Dragoj, Miodrag; Isaković, Aleksandra; Novaković, Miroslav; Pešić, Milica

    2015-09-01

    Medicinal plants are recognized from ancient times as a source of diverse therapeutic agents and many of them are used as dietary supplements. Comprehensive approaches are needed that would identify bioactive components with evident activity against specific indications and provide a better link between science (ethno-botany, chemistry, biology and pharmacology) and market. Recently, the bark of black alder (Alnus glutinosa) appeared at market in the form of food supplement for treatment of different skin conditions. This study aimed to evaluate protective effects of two diarylheptanoids isolated from the bark of black alder: platyphylloside, 5(S)-1,7-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-heptanone-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and its newly discovered analog 5(S)-1,7-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-O-β-D-[6-(E-p-coumaroylglucopyranosyl)]heptane-3-one (2) towards doxorubicin damaging activity. To that end, we employed HaCaT cells, non-cancerous human keratinocytes commonly used for skin regenerative studies. Diarylheptanoids significantly antagonized the effects of doxorubicin by lowering the sensitivity of HaCaT cells to this drug. Compound 2 prevented doxorubicin-induced cell death by activating autophagy. Both 1 and 2 protected HaCaT cells against doxorubicin-induced DNA damage. They significantly promoted migration and affected F-actin distribution. These results indicate that chemo-protective effects of diarylheptanoids may occur at multiple subcellular levels. Therefore, diarylheptanoids 1 and 2 could be considered as protective agents for non-cancerous dividing cells during chemotherapy. PMID:26162555

  10. Non-Grey Radiation Modeling using Thermal Desktop/Sindaworks TFAWS06-1009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Paine, Chris

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the non-grey radiation modeling capabilities of Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop(Registered TradeMark) Version 4.8 SindaWorks software. The non-grey radiation analysis theory implemented by Sindaworks and the methodology used by the software are outlined. Representative results from a parametric trade study of a radiation shield comprised of a series of v-grooved shaped deployable panels is used to illustrate the capabilities of the SindaWorks non-grey radiation thermal analysis software using emissivities with temperature and wavelength dependency modeled via a Hagen-Rubens relationship.

  11. How much crosstalk can be allowed in a stereoscopic system at various grey levels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestak, Sergey; Kim, Daesik; Kim, Yongie

    2012-03-01

    We have calculated a perceptual threshold of stereoscopic crosstalk on the basis of mathematical model of human vision sensitivity. Instead of linear model of just noticeable difference (JND) known as Weber's law we applied nonlinear Barten's model. The predicted crosstalk threshold varies with the background luminance. The calculated values of threshold are in a reasonable agreement with known experimental data. We calculated perceptual threshold of crosstalk for various combinations of the applied grey level. This result can be applied for the assessment of grey-to-grey crosstalk compensation. Further computational analysis of the applied model predicts the increase of the displayable image contrast with reduction of the maximum displayable luminance.

  12. Grey-Markov model with state membership degree and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jing; Li, Bingjun; Liu, Fang

    2013-10-01

    In the Grey-Markov forecasting, the extent of a given state that a research object belongs to is expressed as state membership degree. The state membership degree can help compensate for the inaccurate states division and improve the predicted results. Based on the Grey-Markov forecasting analysis, this paper uses the central triangle albino function to calculate the state membership degrees of research objects and determine the state transition probability. Thereby, the new model achieves the improvement of conventional Grey-Markov model. Taking the grain production of Henan Province as an example, the validity and applicability of the improved model are verified.

  13. Free-standing superconductive articles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer, the ceramic superconductive material layer and the protective material layer, removing the protective material layer from the composite structure whereby a substrate-free, free-standing ceramic superconductive film remains.

  14. Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy in standing bulls

    PubMed Central

    KANEKO, Yasuyuki; TORISU, Shidow; KITAHARA, Go; HIDAKA, Yuichi; SATOH, Hiroyuki; ASANUMA, Taketoshi; MIZUTANI, Shinya; OSAWA, Takeshi; NAGANOBU, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy without insufflation was applied in 10 standing bulls aged 3 to 15 months. Nine bulls were preoperatively pointed out intra-abdominal testes by computed tomography. Preoperative fasting for a minimum of 24 hr provided laparoscopic visualization of intra-abdominal area from the kidney to the inguinal region. Surgical procedure was interrupted by intra-abdominal fat and testis size. It took 0.6 to 1.5 hr in 4 animals weighing 98 to 139 kg, 0.8 to 2.8 hr in 4 animals weighing 170 to 187 kg, and 3 and 4 hr in 2 animals weighing 244 and 300 kg to complete the cryptorchidectomy. In conclusion, standing gasless laparoscopic cryptorchidectomy seems to be most suitable for bulls weighing from 100 to 180 kg. PMID:25715955

  15. 21 CFR 203.35 - Standing requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PRESCRIPTION DRUG MARKETING Samples § 203.35 Standing requests. Manufacturers or authorized distributors of... subsequent oral communication or electronic transmission, is not considered to be a standing request....

  16. Grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) predation on harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) on the island of Helgoland, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Neer, Abbo; Jensen, Lasse Fast; Siebert, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    The prey spectrum of grey seals has to date been described as largely consisting of different fish, cephalopod and shrimp species. On the German island of Helgoland Düne, where harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) co-occur, a young male grey seal was observed in 2013 and again in 2014 preying upon young harbour seals. A harbour seal carcass with severe traumatic lesions was retrieved and post-mortem examinations were performed. In the following weeks several carcasses showing similar lesions were found. Sightings of grey seals assumed to be preying on harbour porpoises have increased around the North Sea. Increased competition as well as individualised behaviour could explain the increased number of observations, but former cases of abnormal lesions of marine mammals attributed to for example predation by sharks or mechanical processes should be revisited with regard to the emerging knowledge.

  17. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  18. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  19. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  20. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  1. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  2. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  3. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  4. 24 CFR 203.34 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit standing. 203.34 Section 203.34 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....34 Credit standing. A mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Commissioner....

  5. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  6. 24 CFR 206.37 - Credit standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit standing. 206.37 Section 206... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.37 Credit standing. Each mortgagor must have a general credit standing satisfactory to the Secretary....

  7. Improvements to the stand and hit algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Boneh, A.; Boneh, S.; Caron, R.; Jibrin, S.

    1994-12-31

    The stand and hit algorithm is a probabilistic algorithm for detecting necessary constraints. The algorithm stands at a point in the feasible region and hits constraints by moving towards the boundary along randomly generated directions. In this talk we discuss methods for choosing the standing point. As well, we present the undetected first rule for determining the hit constraints.

  8. Minimizing the effects of poor sugarcane stands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane stand establishment is crucial to produce profitable yields throughout the crop cycle. In this article, we will review some reasons for stand problems, discuss sugarcane’s ability to compensate for these problems, and describe cultural practices that may increase yields where stands are no...

  9. The Role of Google Scholar in Evidence Reviews and Its Applicability to Grey Literature Searching

    PubMed Central

    Haddaway, Neal Robert; Collins, Alexandra Mary; Coughlin, Deborah; Kirk, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Google Scholar (GS), a commonly used web-based academic search engine, catalogues between 2 and 100 million records of both academic and grey literature (articles not formally published by commercial academic publishers). Google Scholar collates results from across the internet and is free to use. As a result it has received considerable attention as a method for searching for literature, particularly in searches for grey literature, as required by systematic reviews. The reliance on GS as a standalone resource has been greatly debated, however, and its efficacy in grey literature searching has not yet been investigated. Using systematic review case studies from environmental science, we investigated the utility of GS in systematic reviews and in searches for grey literature. Our findings show that GS results contain moderate amounts of grey literature, with the majority found on average at page 80. We also found that, when searched for specifically, the majority of literature identified using Web of Science was also found using GS. However, our findings showed moderate/poor overlap in results when similar search strings were used in Web of Science and GS (10–67%), and that GS missed some important literature in five of six case studies. Furthermore, a general GS search failed to find any grey literature from a case study that involved manual searching of organisations’ websites. If used in systematic reviews for grey literature, we recommend that searches of article titles focus on the first 200 to 300 results. We conclude that whilst Google Scholar can find much grey literature and specific, known studies, it should not be used alone for systematic review searches. Rather, it forms a powerful addition to other traditional search methods. In addition, we advocate the use of tools to transparently document and catalogue GS search results to maintain high levels of transparency and the ability to be updated, critical to systematic reviews. PMID:26379270

  10. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  11. On the Diels-Alder approach to solely biomass-derived polyethylene terephthalate (PET): conversion of 2,5-dimethylfuran and acrolein into p-xylene.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Mika; Toste, F Dean

    2011-10-24

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is a polymeric material with high global demand. Conventionally, PET is produced from fossil-fuel-based materials. Herein, we explored the feasibility of a sustainable method for PET production by using solely bio-renewable resources. Specifically, 2,5-dimethylfuran (derived from lignocellulosic biomass through 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural) and acrolein (produced from glycerol, a side product of biodiesel production) were converted into the key intermediate p-xylene (a precursor of terephthalic acid). This synthesis consists of a sequential Diels-Alder reaction, oxidation, dehydration, and decarboxylation. In particular, the pivotal first step, the Diels-Alder reaction, was studied in detail to provide useful kinetic and thermodynamic data. Although it was found that this reaction requires low temperature to proceed efficiently, which presents a limitation on economic feasibility on an industrial scale, the concept was realized and bio-derived p-xylene was obtained in 34% overall yield over four steps. PMID:21922576

  12. Effects of Parasitism and Morphology on Squirrelpox Virus Seroprevalence in Grey Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis)

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Natasha E.; Marks, Nikki J.; McInnes, Colin J.; Deane, David; Maule, Aaron G.; Scantlebury, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species have been cited as major causes of population extinctions in several animal and plant classes worldwide. The North American grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) has a major detrimental effect on native red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) populations across Britain and Ireland, in part because it can be a reservoir host for the deadly squirrelpox virus (SQPV). Whilst various researchers have investigated the epizootiology of SQPV disease in grey squirrels and have modelled the consequent effects on red squirrel populations, less work has examined morphological and physiological characteristics that might make individual grey squirrels more susceptible to contracting SQPV. The current study investigated the putative relationships between morphology, parasitism, and SQPV exposure in grey squirrels. We found geographical, sex, and morphological differences in SQPV seroprevalence. In particular, larger animals, those with wide zygomatic arch widths (ZAW), males with large testes, and individuals with concurrent nematode and/or coccidial infections had an increased seroprevalence of SQPV. In addition, males with larger spleens, particularly those with narrow ZAW, were more likely to be exposed to SQPV. Overall these results show that there is variation in SQPV seroprevalence in grey squirrels and that, consequently, certain individual, or populations of, grey squirrels might be more responsible for transmitting SQPV to native red squirrel populations. PMID:24416155

  13. Grey leaves in an alpine plant: a cryptic colouration to avoid attack?

    PubMed

    Niu, Yang; Chen, Gao; Peng, De-Li; Song, Bo; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhi-Min; Sun, Hang

    2014-08-01

    Cryptic colouration is a common predation-avoidance strategy in animals that is postulated to occur in plants, but few experimental studies have rigorously tested this hypothesis. We investigated the colouration of Corydalis benecincta, an alpine plant with remarkably dimorphic leaf colours (grey and green), based on a cost-benefit analysis. First we tested the premise that herbivores (Parnassius butterflies) cannot distinguish grey leaves from a scree background by spectrographic measurements and by estimating discriminability between leaves and scree using a butterfly colour vision model. Then we estimated the potential costs of inconspicuousness by comparing the photosynthetic performance and visual attractiveness to flower visitors of the two colour morphs. Finally, we examined the potential benefits of inconspicuousness by comparing damage, survivorship and female reproductive success. It is difficult for herbivores to distinguish grey-coloured morphs against the background. This grey colour originates in a combination of anthocyanins and chlorophylls. The two colour morphs had similar photosynthetic performance, visual attractiveness and female reproductive success. However, grey morphs had significantly lower herbivore damage and higher survivorship. Grey leaves benefit C. benecincta by reducing herbivory with low investment in anthocyanin synthesis, and little cost on photosynthesis and mating opportunity. This cryptic colouration may have evolved through selection pressure imposed by visually foraging herbivores. PMID:24800901

  14. Exposing the grey seal as a major predator of harbour porpoises

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Mardik F.; Begeman, Lineke; van Bleijswijk, Judith D. L.; IJsseldijk, Lonneke L.; Witte, Harry J.; Gröne, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) stranding in large numbers around the southern North Sea with fatal, sharp-edged mutilations have spurred controversy among scientists, the fishing industry and conservationists, whose views about the likely cause differ. The recent detection of grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) DNA in bite marks on three mutilated harbour porpoises, as well as direct observations of grey seal attacks on porpoises, have identified this seal species as a probable cause. Bite mark characteristics were assessed in a retrospective analysis of photographs of dead harbour porpoises that stranded between 2003 and 2013 (n = 1081) on the Dutch coastline. There were 271 animals that were sufficiently fresh to allow macroscopic assessment of grey seal-associated wounds with certainty. In 25% of these, bite and claw marks were identified that were consistent with the marks found on animals that had tested positive for grey seal DNA. Affected animals were mostly healthy juveniles that had a thick blubber layer and had recently fed. We conclude that the majority of the mutilated harbour porpoises were victims of grey seal attacks and that predation by this species is one of the main causes of death in harbour porpoises in The Netherlands. We provide a decision tree that will help in the identification of future cases of grey seal predation on porpoises. PMID:25429021

  15. Voxel-based morphometry reveals reduced grey matter volume in the temporal cortex of developmental prosopagnosics

    PubMed Central

    Furl, Nicholas; Draganski, Bogdan; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Stevens, John; Tan, Geoffrey Chern-Yee; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Ray J.; Duchaine, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with developmental prosopagnosia exhibit severe and lasting difficulties in recognizing faces despite the absence of apparent brain abnormalities. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate whether developmental prosopagnosics show subtle neuroanatomical differences from controls. An analysis based on segmentation of T1-weighted images from 17 developmental prosopagnosics and 18 matched controls revealed that they had reduced grey matter volume in the right anterior inferior temporal lobe and in the superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus bilaterally. In addition, a voxel-based morphometry analysis based on the segmentation of magnetization transfer parameter maps showed that developmental prosopagnosics also had reduced grey matter volume in the right middle fusiform gyrus and the inferior temporal gyrus. Multiple regression analyses relating three distinct behavioural component scores, derived from a principal component analysis, to grey matter volume revealed an association between a component related to facial identity and grey matter volume in the left superior temporal sulcus/middle temporal gyrus plus the right middle fusiform gyrus/inferior temporal gyrus. Grey matter volume in the lateral occipital cortex was associated with component scores related to object recognition tasks. Our results demonstrate that developmental prosopagnosics have reduced grey matter volume in several regions known to respond selectively to faces and provide new evidence that integrity of these areas relates to face recognition ability. PMID:19887506

  16. Cyclopropanation of nitroso Diels–Alder cycloadducts and application to the synthesis of a 2’,3’-methano carbocyclic nucleoside

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng; Miller, Marvin J.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of nitroso Diels–Alder cycloadducts 1 with diazomethane in the presence of palladium acetate gives synthetically useful exo-6-oxa-7-azatricyclo[3.2.1.02,4]octane derivatives 7 in good to excellent yield. Using this methodology, a conformationally restricted 2’,3’-methano carbocyclic nucleoside was efficiently synthesized from nitroso cycloadduct 1a in 7 steps. PMID:20607121

  17. Adaptation of a Small-Molecule Hydrogen-Bond Donor Catalyst to an Enantioselective Hetero-Diels–Alder Reaction Hypothesized for Brevianamide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chiral diamine-derived hydrogen-bond donors were evaluated for their ability to effect stereocontrol in an intramolecular hetero-Diels–Alder (HDA) reaction hypothesized in the biosynthesis of brevianamides A and B. Collectively, these results provide proof of principle that small-molecule hydrogen-bond catalysis, if even based on a hypothetical biosynthesis construct, holds significant potential within enantioselective natural product synthesis. PMID:25697748

  18. New and Concise Syntheses of the Bicyclic Oxamazin Core Using an Intramolecular Nitroso Diels-Alder Reaction and Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Kyle D.; Carosso, Serena

    2013-01-01

    Herein two new and concise synthetic approaches for making an unsaturated bicyclic oxamazin core are reported. The first involves the use of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to form both of the fused rings in one step. The second approach incorporates ring-closing olefin metathesis in the final step to form the second fused ring of the core. The scope of the second approach was also expanded further to afford larger ringed bicyclic systems. PMID:23276301

  19. Ultrafine and respirable particles in an automotive grey iron foundry.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Heitbrink, William A; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2008-01-01

    Ultrafine particle number and respirable particle mass concentrations were measured throughout an automotive grey iron foundry during winter, spring and summer using a particle concentration mapping procedure. Substantial temporal and spatial variability was observed in all seasons and attributed, in part, to the batch nature of operations, process emission variability and frequent work interruptions. The need for fine mapping grids was demonstrated, where elevations in particle concentrations were highly localized. Ultrafine particle concentrations were generally greatest during winter when incoming make-up air was heated with direct fire, natural gas burners. Make-up air drawn from roof level had elevated respirable mass and ultrafine number concentrations above ambient outdoor levels, suggesting inadvertent recirculation of foundry process emissions. Elevated respirable mass concentrations were highly localized on occasions (e.g. abrasive blasting and grinding), depended on the area within the facility where measurements were obtained, but were largely unaffected by season. Particle sources were further characterized by measuring their respective number and mass concentrations by particle size. Sources that contributed to ultrafine particles included process-specific sources (e.g. melting and pouring operations), and non-process sources (e.g. direct fire natural gas heating units, a liquid propane-fuelled sweeper and cigarette smoking) were additionally identified. PMID:18056626

  20. Circadian Rhythms of Isoprene Biosynthesis in Grey Poplar Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Loivamäki, Maaria; Louis, Sandrine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Zimmer, Ina; Fischbach, Robert J.; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission varies diurnally in different species. In poplar (Populus spp.), it has recently been shown that the gene encoding the synthesizing enzyme for isoprene, isoprene synthase (ISPS), displays diurnal variation in expression. Working on shoot cultures of Grey poplar (Populus × canescens) placed under a different light regime in phytochambers, we showed that these variations in PcISPS gene expression, measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, are not only due to day-night changes, but also are linked to an internal circadian clock. Measurement of additional selected isoprenoid genes revealed that phytoene synthase (carotenoid pathway) displays similar fluctuations, whereas 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, possibly the first committed enzyme of the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate pathway, only shows light regulation. On the protein level, it appeared that PcISPS activity and protein content became reduced under constant darkness, whereas under constant light, activity and protein content of this enzyme were kept high. In contrast, isoprene emission rates under continuous irradiation displayed circadian changes as is the case for gene expression of PcISPS. Furthermore, binding assays with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) late elongated hypocotyl, a transcription factor of Arabidopsis involved in circadian regulation, clearly revealed the presence of circadian-determining regulatory elements in the promoter region of PcISPS. PMID:17122071

  1. Dysbiotic drift: mental health, environmental grey space, and microbiota.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Advances in research concerning the mental health implications of dietary patterns and select nutrients have been remarkable. At the same time, there have been rapid increases in the understanding of the ways in which non-pathogenic microbes can potentially influence many aspects of human health, including those in the mental realm. Discussions of nutrition and microbiota are often overlapping. A separate, yet equally connected, avenue of research is that related to natural (for example, green space) and built environments, and in particular, how they are connected to human cognition and behaviors. It is argued here that in Western industrial nations a 'disparity of microbiota' might be expected among the socioeconomically disadvantaged, those whom face more profound environmental forces. Many of the environmental forces pushing against the vulnerable are at the neighborhood level. Matching the developing microbiome research with existing environmental justice research suggests that grey space may promote dysbiosis by default. In addition, the influence of Westernized lifestyle patterns, and the marketing forces that drive unhealthy behaviors in deprived communities, might allow dysbiosis to be the norm rather than the exception in those already at high risk of depression, subthreshold (subsyndromal) conditions, and subpar mental health. If microbiota are indeed at the intersection of nutrition, environmental health, and lifestyle medicine (as these avenues pertain to mental health), then perhaps the rapidly evolving gut-brain-microbiota conversation needs to operate through a wider lens. In contrast to the more narrowly defined psychobiotic, the term eco-psychotropic is introduced. PMID:25947328

  2. Architectonic subdivisions of neocortex in the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peiyan; Kaas, Jon H.

    2010-01-01

    Squirrels are highly visual mammals with an expanded cortical visual system and a number of well-differentiated architectonic fields. In order to describe and delimit cortical fields, subdivisions of cortex were reconstructed from serial brain sections cut in the coronal, sagittal, or horizontal planes. Architectonic characteristics of cortical areas were visualized after brain sections were processed with immunohistochemical and histochemical procedures for revealing parvalbumin, calbindin, neurofilament protein, vesicle glutamate transporter 2, limbic-associated membrane protein, synaptic zinc, cytochrome oxidase, myelin or Nissl substance. In general, these different procedures revealed similar boundaries between areas, suggesting that functionally relevant borders were being detected. The results allowed a more precise demarcation of previously identified areas as well as the identification of areas that had not been previously described. Primary sensory cortical areas characterized by sparse zinc staining of layer 4, as thalamocortical terminations lack zinc, as well as by layer 4 terminations rich in parvalbumin and vesicle glutamate transporter 2. Primary areas also expressed higher levels of cytochrome oxidase and myelin. Primary motor cortex was associated with large SMI-32 labeled pyramidal cells in layers 3 and 5. Our proposed organization of cortex in grey squirrels includes both similarities and differences to the proposed of cortex in other rodents such as mice and rats. The presence of a number of well-differentiated cortical areas in squirrels may serve as a guide to the identification of homologous fields in other rodents, as well as a useful guide in further studies of cortical organization and function. PMID:18780299

  3. How I manage patients with grey zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kritharis, Athena; Pilichowska, Monika; Evens, Andrew M

    2016-08-01

    Since grey zone lymphoma (GZL) was originally included in the 2008 World Health Organization classification as a B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), new biological and clinical knowledge have been learned. It is important to highlight that diagnosis of this entity is complex and involvement by haematopathologists with expertise in this disease is recommended. It is recognized now that patients with GZL may present clinically with primary mediastinal localization or systemic disease without mediastinal involvement. Regardless of clinical presentation, patients with GZL have relatively high relapse rates, especially compared with primary mediastinal DLBCL or cHL. Interestingly, relapsed/refractory GZL patients appear to be salvaged fairly successfully, especially with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Off of a clinical trial, we recommend R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, oncovin, prednisolone) or dose-adjusted EPOCH-R (etoposide, prednisolone, oncovin, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, rituximab) for frontline treatment of GZL. Additionally, we advocate use of consolidative radiotherapy for localized and/or bulky disease. For patients with relapsed/refractory GZL, salvage chemotherapy followed by consolidative autologous HSCT should be considered. Finally, continued biological and pathologic examination of this unique disease entity is warranted as well as exploration towards the integration of targeted therapeutic agents (e.g., brentuximab vedotin, programmed cell death 1inhibitors, B-cell receptor inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, etc.) into the treatment paradigm of GZL. PMID:27301470

  4. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  5. Comparative Cytogenetics of the Congo African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Seibold-Torres, Cassandra; Owens, Elaine; Chowdhary, Renuka; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Tizard, Ian; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-01-01

    The Congo African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus, PER) is an endemic species of Central Africa, valued for its intelligence and listed as vulnerable due to poaching and habitat destruction. Improved knowledge about the P. erithacus genome is needed to address key biological questions and conservation of this species. The P. erithacus genome was studied using conventional and molecular cytogenetic approaches including Zoo-FISH. P. erithacus has a 'typical' parrot karyotype with 2n = 62-64 and 8 pairs of macrochromosomes. A distinct feature was a sharp macro-microchromosome boundary. Telomeric sequences were present at all chromosome ends and interstitially in PER2q, the latter coinciding with a C-band. NORs mapped to 4 pairs of microchromosomes which is in contrast to a single NOR in ancestral type avian karyotypes. Zoo-FISH with chicken macrochromosomes GGA1-9 and Z revealed patterns of conserved synteny similar to many other avian groups, though neighboring synteny combinations of GGA6/7, 8/9, and 1/4 were distinctive only to parrots. Overall, P. erithacus shared more Zoo-FISH patterns with neotropical macaws than Australian species such as cockatiel and budgerigar. The observations suggest that Psittaciformes karyotypes have undergone more extensive evolutionary rearrangements compared to the majority of other avian genomes. PMID:26894300

  6. First isolation of Mycoplasma iowae in grey partridge flocks.

    PubMed

    Catania, S; Gobbo, F; Rodio, S; Qualtieri, K; Santone, C; Nicholas, R A J

    2014-06-01

    Mycoplasma iowae, an occasional pathogen of turkeys, was isolated for the first time from captive grey partridges (Perdix perdix). Clinical signs including respiratory and intestinal disorder were seen in birds of all ages but mainly in those kept housed during rearing. Mortality rates averaged over 20% during the year. Treatment with antibiotics and antiparasitic drugs produced only a transient improvement in condition. The gross pathology findings included poor body growth, lack of development of the breast muscles, abnormalities in the keel development, and bone fragility. Some birds showed infraorbital sinusitis with serous or fibrinous exudates and catarrhal tracheitis, while others presented serofibrinous airsacculitis and splenomegaly. Laboratory investigations revealed pure cultures of M. iowae in the gut as well as sinus and air sacs. While other organisms such as coccidia, Trichomonas, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, and Aspergillus spp. were detected, the similarity of the disease with that seen in turkeys infected with M. iowae strongly suggests that this mycoplasma may be the primary pathogen here. The presence of M. iowae in game birds commonly released into the wild could have serious implications particularly in areas where industrial poultry farms are concentrated. PMID:25055642

  7. Juvenile Competency to Stand Trial.

    PubMed

    Stepanyan, Sofia T; Sidhu, Shawn S; Bath, Eraka

    2016-01-01

    Competency to stand trial is interpreted as a protected due process right for all defendants and is defined as a defendant's fundamental knowledge and understanding of the criminal charges being filed, roles and procedures within the courtroom, and a general ability to work with the defense counsel. Questions of competency are most often raised by the judge, defense, or the prosecution, and competency evaluations are most often completed by psychiatrists or psychologists with forensic training or work experience. Mental illness, intellectual disability, developmental disorders, and developmental immaturity are the 4 main factors considered in most juvenile competency evaluations. PMID:26593118

  8. NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand Safety Note

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J W

    1998-05-21

    The NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand is to be used in the building 432. Building 432 is being used to test components and processes for NIF. The test stand is to be bolted to the floor. The test stand provides a platform from which the PEPC kinematic repeatability and vibrational characteristics of the PEPC LRU can be tested. The test stand will allow user access to the LRU to install instrumentation and to make adjustments to the kinematics. The mechanical test stand is designed to hold the 1700 lb. PEPC LRU.

  9. Integrated DEA models and grey system theory to evaluate past-to-future performance: a case of Indian electricity industry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Nan; Nguyen, Nhu-Ty; Tran, Thanh-Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    The growth of economy and population together with the higher demand in energy has created many concerns for the Indian electricity industry whose capacity is at 211 gigawatts mostly in coal-fired plants. Due to insufficient fuel supply, India suffers from a shortage of electricity generation, leading to rolling blackouts; thus, performance evaluation and ranking the industry turn into significant issues. By this study, we expect to evaluate the rankings of these companies under control of the Ministry of Power. Also, this research would like to test if there are any significant differences between the two DEA models: Malmquist nonradial and Malmquist radial. Then, one advance model of MPI would be chosen to see these companies' performance in recent years and next few years by using forecasting results of Grey system theory. Totally, the realistic data 14 are considered to be in this evaluation after the strict selection from the whole industry. The results found that all companies have not shown many abrupt changes on their scores, and it is always not consistently good or consistently standing out, which demonstrated the high applicable usability of the integrated methods. This integrated numerical research gives a better "past-present-future" insights into performance evaluation in Indian electricity industry. PMID:25821854

  10. Integrated DEA Models and Grey System Theory to Evaluate Past-to-Future Performance: A Case of Indian Electricity Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chia-Nan; Tran, Thanh-Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    The growth of economy and population together with the higher demand in energy has created many concerns for the Indian electricity industry whose capacity is at 211 gigawatts mostly in coal-fired plants. Due to insufficient fuel supply, India suffers from a shortage of electricity generation, leading to rolling blackouts; thus, performance evaluation and ranking the industry turn into significant issues. By this study, we expect to evaluate the rankings of these companies under control of the Ministry of Power. Also, this research would like to test if there are any significant differences between the two DEA models: Malmquist nonradial and Malmquist radial. Then, one advance model of MPI would be chosen to see these companies' performance in recent years and next few years by using forecasting results of Grey system theory. Totally, the realistic data 14 are considered to be in this evaluation after the strict selection from the whole industry. The results found that all companies have not shown many abrupt changes on their scores, and it is always not consistently good or consistently standing out, which demonstrated the high applicable usability of the integrated methods. This integrated numerical research gives a better “past-present-future” insights into performance evaluation in Indian electricity industry. PMID:25821854

  11. Standing alone with prosodic help*

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Lyn; Clifton, Charles; Carlson, Katy; Harris, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Two partially independent issues are addressed in two auditory rating studies: under what circumstances is a sub-string of a sentence identified as a stand-alone sentence, and under what circumstances do globally ill-formed but ‘locally coherent’ analyses (Tabor, Galantucci, & Richardson., 2004) emerge? A new type of locally coherent structure is established in Experiment 1, where a that-less complement clause is at least temporarily analyzed as a stand-alone sentence when it corresponds to a prosodic phrase. In Experiment 2, reduced relative clause structures like those in Tabor et al. were investigated. As in Experiment 1, the root sentence (mis-)analyses emerged most frequently when the locally coherent clause corresponded to a prosodic phrase. However, a substantial number of locally coherent analyses emerged even without prosodic help, especially in examples with for-datives (which do not grammatically permit a reduced relative clause structure for some speakers). Overall, the results suggest that prosodic grouping of constituents encourages analysis of a sub-string as a root sentence, and raise the question of whether all local coherence structures involve analysis of an utterance-final sub-string as a root sentence. PMID:24729648

  12. Stem Photosynthesis not Pressurized Ventilation is Responsible for Light-enhanced Oxygen Supply to Submerged Roots of Alder (Alnus glutinosa)

    PubMed Central

    ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM; ARMSTRONG, JEAN

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Claims that submerged roots of alder and other wetland trees are aerated by pressurized gas flow generated in the stem by a light-induced thermo-osmosis have seemed inconsistent with root anatomy. Our aim was to seek a verification using physical root–stem models, stem segments with or without artificial roots, and rooted saplings. • Methods Radial O2 loss (ROL) from roots was monitored polarographically as the gas space system of the models, and stems were pressurized artificially. ROL and internal pressurization were also measured when stems were irradiated and the xylem stream was either CO2 enriched or not. Stem photosynthesis and respiration were measured polarographically. Stem and root anatomy were examined by light and fluorescence microscopy. • Key Results Pressurizing the models and stems to ≤10 kPa, values much higher than those reportedly generated by thermo-osmosis, created only a negligible density-induced increase in ROL, but ROL increased rapidly when ambient O2 concentrations were raised. Internal pressures rose by several kPa when shoots were exposed to high light flux and ROL increased substantially, but both were due to O2 accumulation from stem photosynthesis using internally sourced CO2. Increased stem pressures had little effect on O2 transport, which remained largely diffusive. Oxygen flux from stems in high light periods indicated a net C gain by stem photosynthesis. Chloroplasts were abundant in the secondary cortex and secondary phloem, and occurred throughout the secondary xylem rays and medulla of 3-year-old stems. Diurnal patterns of ROL, most marked when light reached submerged portions of the stem, were modified by minor variations in light flux and water level. Low root temperatures also helped improve root aeration. • Conclusions Pressurized gas flow to submerged roots does not occur to any significant degree in alder, but stem photosynthesis, using internally sourced CO2 from respiration and the

  13. Deriving Hounsfield units using grey levels in cone beam CT: a clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, TE; Mah, P; McDavid, WD

    2012-01-01

    Objective To present a clinical study demonstrating a method to derive Hounsfield units from grey levels in cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods An acrylic intraoral reference object with aluminium, outer bone equivalent material (cortical bone), inner bone equivalent material (trabecular bone), polymethlymethacrylate and water equivalent material was used. Patients were asked if they would be willing to have an acrylic bite plate with the reference object placed in their mouth during a routine CBCT scan. There were 31 scans taken on the Asahi Alphard 3030 (Belmont Takara, Kyoto, Japan) and 30 scans taken on the Planmeca ProMax 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) CBCT. Linear regression between the grey levels of the reference materials and their linear attenuation coefficients was performed for various photon energies. The energy with the highest regression coefficient was chosen as the effective energy. The attenuation coefficients for the five materials at the effective energy were scaled as Hounsfield units using the standard Hounsfield units equation and compared to those derived from the measured grey levels of the materials using the regression equation. Results In general, there was a satisfactory linear relation between the grey levels and the attenuation coefficients. This made it possible to calculate Hounsfield units from the measured grey levels. Uncertainty in determining effective energies resulted in unrealistic effective energies and significant variability of calculated CT numbers. Linear regression from grey levels directly to Hounsfield units at specified energies resulted in greater consistency. Conclusions The clinical application of a method for deriving Hounsfield units from grey levels in CBCT was demonstrated. PMID:22752324

  14. Longitudinal changes in grey and white matter during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, A; Watkins, K E; Chadwick, M; James, S; Winmill, L; Douaud, G; De Stefano, N; Matthews, P M; Smith, S M; Johansen-Berg, H; James, A C

    2010-01-01

    Brain development continues actively during adolescence. Previous MRI studies have shown complex patterns of apparent loss of grey matter (GM) volume and increases in white matter (WM) volume and fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of WM microstructure. In this longitudinal study (mean follow-up=2.5+/-0.5 years) of 24 adolescents, we used a voxel-based morphometry (VBM)-style analysis with conventional T1-weighted images to test for age-related changes in GM and WM volumes. We also performed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data to test for age-related WM changes across the whole brain. Probabilistic tractography was used to carry out quantitative comparisons across subjects in measures of WM microstructure in two fiber tracts important for supporting speech and motor functions (arcuate fasciculus [AF] and corticospinal tract [CST]). The whole-brain analyses identified age-related increases in WM volume and FA bilaterally in many fiber tracts, including AF and many parts of the CST. FA changes were mainly driven by increases in parallel diffusivity, probably reflecting increases in the diameter of the axons forming the fiber tracts. FA values of both left and right AF (but not of the CST) were significantly higher at the end of the follow-up than at baseline. Over the same period, widespread reductions in the cortical GM volume were found. These findings provide imaging-based anatomical data suggesting that brain maturation in adolescence is associated with structural changes enhancing long-distance connectivities in different WM tracts, specifically in the AF and CST, at the same time that cortical GM exhibits synaptic "pruning". PMID:19679191

  15. Grey zone simulations of the morning convective boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Beare, R. J.; Osborne, S.; Lock, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of two cases of morning boundary layer development are conducted to investigate the impact of grid resolution on mean profiles and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) partitioning from the large eddy simulation (LES) to the mesoscale limit. Idealized LES, using the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme, is shown to be capable of reproducing the boundary layer evolution when compared against measurements. However, increasing grid spacing results in the damping of resolved TKE and the production of superadiabatic temperature profiles in the boundary layer. Turbulence initiation is significantly delayed, exhibiting an abrupt onset at intermediate resolutions. Two approaches, the bounding of vertical diffusion coefficient and the blending of the 3-D Smagorinsky with a nonlocal 1D scheme, are used to model subgrid diffusion at grey zone resolutions. Simulations are compared against the coarse-grained fields from the validated LES results for each case. Both methods exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses, indicating the compromise that needs to be made currently in high-resolution numerical weather prediction. The blending scheme is able to reproduce the adiabatic profiles although turbulence is underestimated in favor of the parametrized heat flux, and the spin-up of TKE remains delayed. In contrast, the bounding approach gives an evolution of TKE that follows the coarse-grained LES very well, relying on the resolved motions for the nonlocal heat flux. However, bounding gives unrealistic static instability in the early morning temperature profiles (similar to the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme) because model dynamics are unable to resolve TKE when the boundary layer is too shallow compared to the grid spacing.

  16. Robust representation of shape in a Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Pepperberg, Irene M; Nakayama, Ken

    2016-08-01

    A Grey parrot, Griffin (Psittacus erithacus), previously taught English labels for various colors and shapes with respect to three-dimensional (3D) stimuli, was tested on his ability to transfer to very different two-dimensional (2D) images consisting of modal and amodal completion stimuli. For modal completion (aka subjective contours), Kanizsa figures were constructed using black 'pac-men' to form regular polygons on colored paper. For amodal completion, portions of variously colored regular 2D polygons were occluded by black circles or other black figures. For each task, Griffin provided a vocal English shape label for five possible shapes designated by their vertices (one, two, three, four, six). His accuracy was high for both amodal completed figures, including probe stimuli (28/38 correct) and modally completed figures (29/38 correct), with chance=0.20. The modally completed case (i.e., Kanizsa subjective figures) is of particular importance as there are no shared image parts between training and testing stimuli. We draw several conclusions from these results. First, a surface level completion process is fully operative insofar as Griffin was able to correctly identify shapes that differed considerably from training images. Second, because parrots can generalize from shapes of real objects to drawings where original image contours were clearly absent, the data provide a compelling example of shape invariance, indicating that visual shapes are processed far beyond that of their image description. Third, parrots with a repertoire of multiple vocal responses can be rigorously tested for visual competencies, an option as yet to be tried in other experimental animals. PMID:27206312

  17. Macrostructural alterations of subcortical grey matter in psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cera, Nicoletta; Delli Pizzi, Stefano; Di Pierro, Ezio Domenico; Gambi, Francesco; Tartaro, Armando; Vicentini, Carlo; Paradiso Galatioto, Giuseppe; Romani, Gian Luca; Ferretti, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Psychogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) has been defined as the persistent inability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient to permit sexual performance. It shows a high incidence and prevalence among men, with a significant impact on the quality of life. Few neuroimaging studies have investigated the cerebral basis of erectile dysfunctions observing the role played by prefrontal, cingulate, and parietal cortices during erotic stimulation. In spite of the well-known involvement of subcortical regions such as hypothalamus and caudate nucleus in male sexual response, and the key role of nucleus accumbens in pleasure and reward, poor attention was paid to their role in male sexual dysfunction. In this study, we determined the presence of grey matter (GM) atrophy patterns in subcortical structures such as amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, putamen, pallidum, thalamus, and hypothalamus in patients with psychogenic ED and healthy men. After Rigiscan evaluation, urological, general medical, metabolic and hormonal, psychological and psychiatric assessment, 17 outpatients with psychogenic ED and 25 healthy controls were recruited for structural MRI session. Significant GM atrophy of nucleus accumbens was observed bilaterally in patients with respect to controls. Shape analysis showed that this atrophy was located in the left medial-anterior and posterior portion of accumbens. Left nucleus accumbens volumes in patients correlated with low erectile functioning as measured by IIEF-5 (International Index of Erectile Function). In addition, a GM atrophy of left hypothalamus was also observed. Our results suggest that atrophy of nucleus accumbens plays an important role in psychogenic erectile dysfunction. We believe that this change can influence the motivation-related component of sexual behavior. Our findings help to elucidate a neural basis of psychogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:22723943

  18. GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF SITE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. JUPITER 'HOP' STAND, FOREGROUND CENTER, REDSTONE TEST STAND FOREGROUND RIGHT, SATURN I C TEST STAND BACKGROUND LEFT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. A house divided cannot stand

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.M. )

    1994-01-01

    When it comes to the relationships between electric utilities and public service commissions, utilities would do well to remember the words of Abraham Lincoln -- [open quotes]A house divided against itself cannot stand.[close quotes] For just as distrust, dissension, and division threatened the future of the United States during the Civil War, they threaten the future of utilities today.In an effort to lower their costs and increase their competitive advantage, utility companies are increasingly looking to reinvent cultures, reengineer work processes, and redefine corporate missions, values, and strategies. But unless utilities also rebuild regulatory relations, such efforts are doomed to fail. If this prognosis sounds overly simplistic or melodramatic -- especially as utilities appear to be moving toward an era of reduced regulation -- think again. History shows that regulatory relationships drive a utility's ability to successfully integrate demand-side management (DSM) programs that are often critical to business strategies and goals.

  20. Revisiting the concept of the (a)synchronicity of diels-alder reactions based on the dynamics of quasiclassical trajectories.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Miguel A F; Ventura, Elizete; do Monte, Silmar A; Riveros, José M; Longo, Ricardo L

    2016-03-30

    A number of model Diels-Alder (D-A) cycloaddition reactions (H2 CCH2  + cyclopentadiene and H2 CCHX + 1,3-butadiene, with X = H, F, CH3 , OH, CN, NH2 , and NO) were studied by static (transition state - TS and IRC) and dynamics (quasiclassical trajectories) approaches to establish the (a)synchronous character of the concerted mechanism. The use of static criteria, such as the asymmetry of the TS geometry, for classifying and quantifying the (a)synchronicity of the concerted D-A reaction mechanism is shown to be severely limited and to provide contradictory results and conclusions when compared to the dynamics approach. The time elapsed between the events is shown to be a more reliable and unbiased criterion and all the studied D-A reactions, except for the case of H2 CCHNO, are classified as synchronous, despite the gradual and quite distinct degrees of (a)symmetry of the TS structures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26575321

  1. Role of encapsulated metal cation in the reactivity and regioselectivity of the C₆₀ Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Cui, Cheng-Xing; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2015-03-26

    Endohedral metallofullerene has novel properties because of the interaction between the encapsulated metal atom or cation and fullerene. Experiments have demonstrated that the insertion of Li(+) into C60 can greatly promote the reactivity of the Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene (CpH) to C60. However, the reaction is sufficiently fast that its quantitative kinetic data cannot be obtained experimentally. In addition, knowledge regarding the effects of other alkali metal cations and metal cations with more charges on the reactivity and regioselectivity of C60 is almost nonexistent. In the current study, DA cycloadditions of CpH to M(+)@C60 (where M = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and Ca(2+)@C60 were investigated via density functional theory in the gas phase and in solvent. Via careful discussion and comparison with the results of C60, we concluded the following for the DA reaction of CpH to C60 and, more generally, for DA reactions of other fullerenes: (1) the encapsulated metal cations enhance the reactivity; (2) among alkali metal cations, Na(+) could be the best catalyst; (3) Ca(2+) is more favorable in promoting the reactivity than any alkali metal cation; (4) encapsulated metal cations with more positive charges enhance the reactivity of the 6-5 bond in C60, which is significant when the 6-5 adduct is the target product. PMID:25714730

  2. N-(furfural) chitosan hydrogels based on Diels-Alder cycloadditions and application as microspheres for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Herrera, Marcelino; Gandini, Alessandro; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Jacobsen, Neil E; Lizardi-Mendoza, Jaime; Recillas-Mota, Maricarmen; Argüelles-Monal, Waldo M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, chitosan was chemically modified by reductive amination in a two-step process. The synthesis of N-(furfural) chitosan (FC) was confirmed by FT-IR and (1)H NMR analysis, and the degrees of substitution were estimated as 8.3 and 23.8%. The cross-linkable system of bismaleimide (BM) and FC shows that FC shared properties of furan-maleimide chemistry. This system produced non-reversible hydrogel networks by Diels-Alder cycloadditions at 85 °C. The system composed of BM and FC (23.8% substitution) generated stronger hydrogel networks than those of FC with an 8.3% degree of substitution. Moreover, the FC-BM system was able to produce hydrogel microspheres. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed the surface of the microspheres to be non-porous with small protuberances. In water, the microspheres swelled, increasing their volume by 30%. Finally, microspheres loaded with methylene blue were able to release the dye gradually, obeying second-order kinetics for times less than 600 min. This behavior suggests that diffusion is governed by the relaxation of polymer chains in the swelled state, thus facilitating drug release outside the microspheres. PMID:26005158

  3. Self-healable interfaces based on thermo-reversible Diels-Alder reactions in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F

    2014-09-15

    Thermo-reversible Diels-Alder (DA) bonds formed between maleimide and furan groups have been used to generate an interphase between carbon fiber surface and an epoxy matrix leading to the ability of interfacial self-healing in carbon:epoxy composite materials. The maleimide groups were grafted on an untreated T700 carbon fiber from a three step surface treatment: (i) nitric acid oxidization, (ii) tetraethylenepentamine amination, and (iii) bismaleimide grafting. The furan groups were introduced in the reactive epoxy system from furfuryl glycidyl ether. The interface between untreated carbon fiber and epoxy matrix was considered as a reference. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS) was evaluated by single fiber micro-debonding test. The debonding force was shown to have a linear dependence with embedded length. The highest healing efficiency calculated from the debonding force was found to be about 82% more compared to the value for the reference interface. All the interphases designed with reversible DA bonds have a repeatable self-healing ability. As after the fourth healing, they can recover a relatively high healing efficiency (58% for the interphase formed by T700-BMI which is oxidized for 60 min during the first treatment step). PMID:24998055

  4. Microwave-assisted Intramolecular Dehydrogenative Diels-Alder Reactions for the Synthesis of Functionalized Naphthalenes/Solvatochromic Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Laura S.; Benedetti, Erica; Brummond, Kay M.

    2013-01-01

    Functionalized naphthalenes have applications in a variety of research fields ranging from the synthesis of natural or biologically active molecules to the preparation of new organic dyes. Although numerous strategies have been reported to access naphthalene scaffolds, many procedures still present limitations in terms of incorporating functionality, which in turn narrows the range of available substrates. The development of versatile methods for direct access to substituted naphthalenes is therefore highly desirable. The Diels-Alder (DA) cycloaddition reaction is a powerful and attractive method for the formation of saturated and unsaturated ring systems from readily available starting materials. A new microwave-assisted intramolecular dehydrogenative DA reaction of styrenyl derivatives described herein generates a variety of functionalized cyclopenta[b]naphthalenes that could not be prepared using existing synthetic methods. When compared to conventional heating, microwave irradiation accelerates reaction rates, enhances yields, and limits the formation of undesired byproducts. The utility of this protocol is further demonstrated by the conversion of a DA cycloadduct into a novel solvatochromic fluorescent dye via a Buchwald-Hartwig palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction. Fluorescence spectroscopy, as an informative and sensitive analytical technique, plays a key role in research fields including environmental science, medicine, pharmacology, and cellular biology. Access to a variety of new organic fluorophores provided by the microwave-assisted dehydrogenative DA reaction allows for further advancement in these fields. PMID:23609566

  5. Refrigeration system having standing wave compressor

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Timothy S.

    1992-01-01

    A compression-evaporation refrigeration system, wherein gaseous compression of the refrigerant is provided by a standing wave compressor. The standing wave compressor is modified so as to provide a separate subcooling system for the refrigerant, so that efficiency losses due to flashing are reduced. Subcooling occurs when heat exchange is provided between the refrigerant and a heat pumping surface, which is exposed to the standing acoustic wave within the standing wave compressor. A variable capacity and variable discharge pressure for the standing wave compressor is provided. A control circuit simultaneously varies the capacity and discharge pressure in response to changing operating conditions, thereby maintaining the minimum discharge pressure needed for condensation to occur at any time. Thus, the power consumption of the standing wave compressor is reduced and system efficiency is improved.

  6. Right hemisphere grey matter structure and language outcomes in chronic left hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Jiang, Xiong; Harris-Love, Michelle L; Zeng, Jinsheng; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying recovery of language after left hemisphere stroke remain elusive. Although older evidence suggested that right hemisphere language homologues compensate for damage in left hemisphere language areas, the current prevailing theory suggests that right hemisphere engagement is ineffective or even maladaptive. Using a novel combination of support vector regression-based lesion-symptom mapping and voxel-based morphometry, we aimed to determine whether local grey matter volume in the right hemisphere independently contributes to aphasia outcomes after chronic left hemisphere stroke. Thirty-two left hemisphere stroke survivors with aphasia underwent language assessment with the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised and tests of other cognitive domains. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained in aphasia patients and 30 demographically matched healthy controls. Support vector regression-based multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify critical language areas in the left hemisphere and then to quantify each stroke survivor's lesion burden in these areas. After controlling for these direct effects of the stroke on language, voxel-based morphometry was then used to determine whether local grey matter volumes in the right hemisphere explained additional variance in language outcomes. In brain areas in which grey matter volumes related to language outcomes, we then compared grey matter volumes in patients and healthy controls to assess post-stroke plasticity. Lesion-symptom mapping showed that specific left hemisphere regions related to different language abilities. After controlling for lesion burden in these areas, lesion size, and demographic factors, grey matter volumes in parts of the right temporoparietal cortex positively related to spontaneous speech, naming, and repetition scores. Examining whether domain general cognitive functions might explain these relationships, partial correlations demonstrated that grey matter

  7. TMS installation at A-1 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Stennis Space Center employees maneuver a new thrust measurement system in preparation for its installation on the A-1 Test Stand on March 3. The system was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois and represents a state-of-the-art upgrade from the equipment used on the stand for more than 40 years. The A-1 Test Stand is being upgraded to provide testing for the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program.

  8. Grey matter changes of the pain matrix in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sinding, Charlotte; Gransjøen, Anne Mari; Schlumberger, Gina; Grushka, Miriam; Frasnelli, Johannes; Singh, Preet Bano

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by a burning sensation in the mouth, usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings. Latest findings indicate that BMS could result from neuropathic trigeminal conditions. While many investigations have focused on the periphery, very few have examined possible central dysfunctions. To highlight changes of the central system of subjects with BMS, we analysed the grey matter concentration in 12 subjects using voxel-based morphometry. Data were compared with a control group (Ct). To better understand the brain mechanisms underlying BMS, the grey matter concentration of patients was also compared with those of dysgeusic patients (Dys). Dysgeusia is another oral dysfunction condition, characterized by a distorted sense of taste and accompanied by a reduced taste function. We found that a major part of the 'pain matrix' presented modifications of the grey matter concentration in subjects with BMS. Six regions out of eight were affected [anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus, lobules of the cerebellum, insula/frontal operculum, inferior temporal area, primary motor cortex, dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex (DLPFC)]. In the anterior cingulate gyrus, the lobules of the cerebellum, the inferior temporal lobe and the DLPFC, pain intensity correlated with grey matter concentration. Dys also presented changes in grey matter concentration but in different areas of the brain. Our results suggest that a deficiency in the control of pain could in part be a cause of BMS and that BMS and dysgeusia conditions are not linked to similar structural changes in the brain. PMID:26741696

  9. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice. PMID:26904144

  10. Grey fuzzy optimization model for water quality management of a river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Subhankar; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2006-07-01

    A grey fuzzy optimization model is developed for water quality management of river system to address uncertainty involved in fixing the membership functions for different goals of Pollution Control Agency (PCA) and dischargers. The present model, Grey Fuzzy Waste Load Allocation Model (GFWLAM), has the capability to incorporate the conflicting goals of PCA and dischargers in a deterministic framework. The imprecision associated with specifying the water quality criteria and fractional removal levels are modeled in a fuzzy mathematical framework. To address the imprecision in fixing the lower and upper bounds of membership functions, the membership functions themselves are treated as fuzzy in the model and the membership parameters are expressed as interval grey numbers, a closed and bounded interval with known lower and upper bounds but unknown distribution information. The model provides flexibility for PCA and dischargers to specify their aspirations independently, as the membership parameters for different membership functions, specified for different imprecise goals are interval grey numbers in place of a deterministic real number. In the final solution optimal fractional removal levels of the pollutants are obtained in the form of interval grey numbers. This enhances the flexibility and applicability in decision-making, as the decision-maker gets a range of optimal solutions for fixing the final decision scheme considering technical and economic feasibility of the pollutant treatment levels. Application of the GFWLAM is illustrated with case study of the Tunga-Bhadra river system in India.

  11. Homosexual Women Have Less Grey Matter in Perirhinal Cortex than Heterosexual Women

    PubMed Central

    Ponseti, Jorge; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Klöppel, Stefan; Wolff, Stephan; Granert, Oliver; Jansen, Olav; Mehdorn, Hubertus M.; Bosinski, Hartmut A.

    2007-01-01

    Is sexual orientation associated with structural differences in the brain? To address this question, 80 homosexual and heterosexual men and women (16 homosexual men and 15 homosexual women) underwent structural MRI. We used voxel-based morphometry to test for differences in grey matter concentration associated with gender and sexual orientation. Compared with heterosexual women, homosexual women displayed less grey matter bilaterally in the temporo-basal cortex, ventral cerebellum, and left ventral premotor cortex. The relative decrease in grey matter was most prominent in the left perirhinal cortex. The left perirhinal area also showed less grey matter in heterosexual men than in heterosexual women. Thus, in homosexual women, the perirhinal cortex grey matter displayed a more male-like structural pattern. This is in accordance with previous research that revealed signs of sex-atypical prenatal androgenization in homosexual women, but not in homosexual men. The relevance of the perirhinal area for high order multimodal (olfactory and visual) object, social, and sexual processing is discussed. PMID:17712410

  12. Sampling the Structure of Convective Turbulence and Implications for Grey-Zone Parametrizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel; Couvreux, Fleur; Masson, Valéry; Lancz, Dávid

    2016-07-01

    The grey zone of dry convection is the range of scales in which boundary-layer thermals are partly explicitly resolved by numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and partly parametrized. We seek to determine how thermals are divided into subgrid and resolved scales in the grey zone of convective boundary-layer thermals. Reference data for grid-scale and subgrid-scale fields at these resolutions are constructed by filtering 62.5-m large-eddy simulation data. A conditional sampling is adapted to detect subgrid thermals, and is used to characterize the subgrid thermals at several grid spacings in the grey zone. A mass-flux parametrization used in NWP models is compared with the subgrid thermal field. The analysis demonstrates that, although the mass-flux framework is suitable in the grey zone, some assumptions of the mass-flux schemes, usually used at the mesoscale, cannot be made in the grey zone. In particular, the thermal fraction is not small, the resolved vertical velocity is not negligible, the entrainment and detrainment rates depend on the horizontal resolution, the triggering and the closure at the surface are moreover random.

  13. Grey matter networks in people at increased familial risk for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tijms, Betty M; Sprooten, Emma; Job, Dominic; Johnstone, Eve C; Owens, David G C; Willshaw, David; Seriès, Peggy; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Grey matter brain networks are disrupted in schizophrenia, but it is still unclear at which point during the development of the illness these disruptions arise and whether these can be associated with behavioural predictors of schizophrenia. We investigated if single-subject grey matter networks were disrupted in a sample of people at familial risk of schizophrenia. Single-subject grey matter networks were extracted from structural MRI scans of 144 high risk subjects, 32 recent-onset patients and 36 healthy controls. The following network properties were calculated: size, connectivity density, degree, path length, clustering coefficient, betweenness centrality and small world properties. People at risk of schizophrenia showed decreased path length and clustering in mostly prefrontal and temporal areas. Within the high risk sample, the path length of the posterior cingulate cortex and the betweenness centrality of the left inferior frontal operculum explained 81% of the variance in schizotypal cognitions, which was previously shown to be the strongest behavioural predictor of schizophrenia in the study. In contrast, local grey matter volume measurements explained 48% of variance in schizotypy. The present results suggest that single-subject grey matter networks can quantify behaviourally relevant biological alterations in people at increased risk for schizophrenia before disease onset. PMID:26330380

  14. Sampling the Structure of Convective Turbulence and Implications for Grey-Zone Parametrizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel; Couvreux, Fleur; Masson, Valéry; Lancz, Dávid

    2016-02-01

    The grey zone of dry convection is the range of scales in which boundary-layer thermals are partly explicitly resolved by numerical weather prediction (NWP) models and partly parametrized. We seek to determine how thermals are divided into subgrid and resolved scales in the grey zone of convective boundary-layer thermals. Reference data for grid-scale and subgrid-scale fields at these resolutions are constructed by filtering 62.5-m large-eddy simulation data. A conditional sampling is adapted to detect subgrid thermals, and is used to characterize the subgrid thermals at several grid spacings in the grey zone. A mass-flux parametrization used in NWP models is compared with the subgrid thermal field. The analysis demonstrates that, although the mass-flux framework is suitable in the grey zone, some assumptions of the mass-flux schemes, usually used at the mesoscale, cannot be made in the grey zone. In particular, the thermal fraction is not small, the resolved vertical velocity is not negligible, the entrainment and detrainment rates depend on the horizontal resolution, the triggering and the closure at the surface are moreover random.

  15. Variability of dental cone beam CT grey values for density estimations

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Nackaerts, O; Bellaiche, N; Stamatakis, H; Tsiklakis, K; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Bogaerts, R; Jacobs, R; Horner, K

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the use of dental cone beam CT (CBCT) grey values for density estimations by calculating the correlation with multislice CT (MSCT) values and the grey value error after recalibration. Methods A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was developed containing inserts of different density: air, PMMA, hydroxyapatite (HA) 50 mg cm−3, HA 100, HA 200 and aluminium. The phantom was scanned on 13 CBCT devices and 1 MSCT device. Correlation between CBCT grey values and CT numbers was calculated, and the average error of the CBCT values was estimated in the medium-density range after recalibration. Results Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.7014 and 0.9996 in the full-density range and between 0.5620 and 0.9991 in the medium-density range. The average error of CBCT voxel values in the medium-density range was between 35 and 1562. Conclusion Even though most CBCT devices showed a good overall correlation with CT numbers, large errors can be seen when using the grey values in a quantitative way. Although it could be possible to obtain pseudo-Hounsfield units from certain CBCTs, alternative methods of assessing bone tissue should be further investigated. Advances in knowledge The suitability of dental CBCT for density estimations was assessed, involving a large number of devices and protocols. The possibility for grey value calibration was thoroughly investigated. PMID:23255537

  16. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice. PMID:26904144

  17. Relative roles of grey squirrels, supplementary feeding, and habitat in shaping urban bird assemblages.

    PubMed

    Bonnington, Colin; Gaston, Kevin J; Evans, Karl L

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species are frequently considered to influence urban assemblages. The grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis is one such species that is widespread in the UK and is starting to spread across Europe; it predates birds' nests and can compete with birds for supplementary food. Using distance sampling across the urbanisation intensity gradient in Sheffield (UK) we test whether urban grey squirrels influence avian species richness and density through nest predation and competition for supplementary food sources. We also assess how urban bird assemblages respond to supplementary feeding. We find that grey squirrels slightly reduced the abundance of breeding bird species most sensitive to squirrel nest predation by reducing the beneficial impact of woodland cover. There was no evidence that grey squirrel presence altered relationships between supplementary feeding and avian assemblage structure. This may be because, somewhat surprisingly, supplementary feeding was not associated with the richness or density of wintering bird assemblages. These associations were positive during the summer, supporting advocacy to feed birds during the breeding season and not just winter, but explanatory capacity was limited. The amount of green space and its quality, assessed as canopy cover, had a stronger influence on avian species richness and population size than the presence of grey squirrels and supplementary feeding stations. Urban bird populations are thus more likely to benefit from investment in improving the availability of high quality habitats than controlling squirrel populations or increased investment in supplementary feeding. PMID:25338062

  18. Relative Roles of Grey Squirrels, Supplementary Feeding, and Habitat in Shaping Urban Bird Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Bonnington, Colin; Gaston, Kevin J.; Evans, Karl L.

    2014-01-01

    Non-native species are frequently considered to influence urban assemblages. The grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis is one such species that is widespread in the UK and is starting to spread across Europe; it predates birds’ nests and can compete with birds for supplementary food. Using distance sampling across the urbanisation intensity gradient in Sheffield (UK) we test whether urban grey squirrels influence avian species richness and density through nest predation and competition for supplementary food sources. We also assess how urban bird assemblages respond to supplementary feeding. We find that grey squirrels slightly reduced the abundance of breeding bird species most sensitive to squirrel nest predation by reducing the beneficial impact of woodland cover. There was no evidence that grey squirrel presence altered relationships between supplementary feeding and avian assemblage structure. This may be because, somewhat surprisingly, supplementary feeding was not associated with the richness or density of wintering bird assemblages. These associations were positive during the summer, supporting advocacy to feed birds during the breeding season and not just winter, but explanatory capacity was limited. The amount of green space and its quality, assessed as canopy cover, had a stronger influence on avian species richness and population size than the presence of grey squirrels and supplementary feeding stations. Urban bird populations are thus more likely to benefit from investment in improving the availability of high quality habitats than controlling squirrel populations or increased investment in supplementary feeding. PMID:25338062

  19. F-1 Engine Firing in Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph depicts the F-1 engine firing in the Marshall Space Flight Center's F-1 Engine Static Test Stand. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. It is a vertical engine firing test stand, 239 feet in elevation and 4,600 square feet in area at the base, designed to assist in the development of the F-1 Engine. Capability is provided for static firing of 1.5 million pounds of thrust using liquid oxygen and kerosene. The foundation of the stand is keyed into the bedrock approximately 40 feet below grade.

  20. Grey water treatment at a sports centre for reuse in irrigation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gabarró, J; Batchelli, L; Balaguer, M D; Puig, S; Colprim, J

    2013-01-01

    Grey water has long been considered a promising option for dealing with water scarcity and reuse. However, factors such as lack of macronutrients and low carbon content make its treatment challenging. The aim of this paper was to investigate the applicability of sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technology to on-site grey water treatment at a sports centre for reuse in irrigation. The results demonstrated that the regenerated water complied with microbiological parameters concerning restriction of solids and organic matter removal. Denitrification was not fully accomplished, but ammonium was totally oxidised and low concentrations of nitrates were achieved. Effluent with good appearance and no odour was used in an experimental study to irrigate a grid system containing natural and artificial grass sections. The conclusion is that SBR technology offers a promising treatment for grey water. PMID:24191471

  1. Grey situation group decision-making method based on prospect theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Fang, Zhigeng; Liu, Xiaqing

    2014-01-01

    This paper puts forward a grey situation group decision-making method on the basis of prospect theory, in view of the grey situation group decision-making problems that decisions are often made by multiple decision experts and those experts have risk preferences. The method takes the positive and negative ideal situation distance as reference points, defines positive and negative prospect value function, and introduces decision experts' risk preference into grey situation decision-making to make the final decision be more in line with decision experts' psychological behavior. Based on TOPSIS method, this paper determines the weight of each decision expert, sets up comprehensive prospect value matrix for decision experts' evaluation, and finally determines the optimal situation. At last, this paper verifies the effectiveness and feasibility of the method by means of a specific example. PMID:25197706

  2. Can the grey mould disease of the grape-vine be controlled by yeast?

    PubMed

    Masih, E I; Alie, I; Paul, B

    2000-08-15

    Botrytis cinerea has been found to be highly pathogenic to 'Chardonnay' and 'Pinot noir' cultivars of the grape-vine producing the characteristic grey mould symptoms within 7 days of inoculation to the vitro-plants. The yeast Pichia anomala (strain FY-102), isolated from apple skin, was found to be antagonistic to B. cinerea as it completely inhibited the appearance of the grey mould symptoms when grown together. The yeast was responsible for morphological changes such as coagulation and leakage of the cytoplasm of B. cinerea. The pathogen, when applied together with P. anomala, failed to bring about the grey mould symptoms on the grape-vine, suggesting that the yeast could control the expression of this disease. An account of the interaction between B. cinerea and P. anomala, as well as the sequences of the complete ITS region of the ribosomal DNA of the yeast are described here. PMID:10930744

  3. Grey Situation Group Decision-Making Method Based on Prospect Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Fang, Zhigeng; Liu, Xiaqing

    2014-01-01

    This paper puts forward a grey situation group decision-making method on the basis of prospect theory, in view of the grey situation group decision-making problems that decisions are often made by multiple decision experts and those experts have risk preferences. The method takes the positive and negative ideal situation distance as reference points, defines positive and negative prospect value function, and introduces decision experts' risk preference into grey situation decision-making to make the final decision be more in line with decision experts' psychological behavior. Based on TOPSIS method, this paper determines the weight of each decision expert, sets up comprehensive prospect value matrix for decision experts' evaluation, and finally determines the optimal situation. At last, this paper verifies the effectiveness and feasibility of the method by means of a specific example. PMID:25197706

  4. Coverage of the organ donation process on Grey's Anatomy: the story of Denny Duquette.

    PubMed

    Quick, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of Grey's Anatomy viewing on a host of organ donation-related variables: organ donation beliefs and attitudes and a willingness to discuss organ donation with family. Following exposure to a storyline in which two myths were presented: (i) the rich and famous can buy their way to the top of organ waiting lists (purchase myth) and (ii) friends and family of medical professionals receive organ transplants quicker than other individuals (relationship myth), results revealed that loyal viewers of Grey's Anatomy are less likely to believe the purchase myth compared to non-viewers. No difference emerged between these two groups with respect to the relationship myth. Additionally, loyal viewers were more likely to talk about their willingness to donate organs than non-viewers. Results are discussed with an emphasis on how Grey's Anatomy portrayals can impact perceptions and action tendencies related to organ donation. PMID:19191808

  5. Correction of electric standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kester, Do; Avruch, Ian; Teyssier, David

    2014-12-01

    Electric Standing Waves (ESW) appear in some frequency bands of HIFI, a heterodyne spectrometer aboard the Herschel Space Observatory. ESWs consist of about 10 irregular ripples added to a continuum contribution. They distort the spectra and should be removed. ESWs change so rapidly that the standard ways to mitigate them, do not work. We have built a catalog of thousands of spectra taken on empty sky that contain only the ESW contribution. All ESWs seem to belong to a limited number of multiplicative families. To find representative members of the families we modelled them as splines and chose one representative template model for each family based on Bayesian evidence. The resulting set of models is our catalog of possible ESW templates. To correct a spectrum taken on an astronomical source, we select the template from the catalog that fits with the highest Bayesian evidence and subtract it. This has to be done in the possible presence of spectral lines and of a true astronomical continuuum. Both the true lines and continuum should be unaffected by the procedure. To exclude the lines we use a robustly weighted variety of the (gaussian) likelihood. Ideally the correction should be part of the pipeline with which all HIFI observations have to be processed. This requires a procedure having no failures, no interaction, and limited CPU usage.

  6. Musical training intensity yields opposite effects on grey matter density in cognitive versus sensorimotor networks.

    PubMed

    James, Clara E; Oechslin, Mathias S; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Hauert, Claude-Alain; Descloux, Céline; Lazeyras, François

    2014-01-01

    Using optimized voxel-based morphometry, we performed grey matter density analyses on 59 age-, sex- and intelligence-matched young adults with three distinct, progressive levels of musical training intensity or expertise. Structural brain adaptations in musicians have been repeatedly demonstrated in areas involved in auditory perception and motor skills. However, musical activities are not confined to auditory perception and motor performance, but are entangled with higher-order cognitive processes. In consequence, neuronal systems involved in such higher-order processing may also be shaped by experience-driven plasticity. We modelled expertise as a three-level regressor to study possible linear relationships of expertise with grey matter density. The key finding of this study resides in a functional dissimilarity between areas exhibiting increase versus decrease of grey matter as a function of musical expertise. Grey matter density increased with expertise in areas known for their involvement in higher-order cognitive processing: right fusiform gyrus (visual pattern recognition), right mid orbital gyrus (tonal sensitivity), left inferior frontal gyrus (syntactic processing, executive function, working memory), left intraparietal sulcus (visuo-motor coordination) and bilateral posterior cerebellar Crus II (executive function, working memory) and in auditory processing: left Heschl's gyrus. Conversely, grey matter density decreased with expertise in bilateral perirolandic and striatal areas that are related to sensorimotor function, possibly reflecting high automation of motor skills. Moreover, a multiple regression analysis evidenced that grey matter density in the right mid orbital area and the inferior frontal gyrus predicted accuracy in detecting fine-grained incongruities in tonal music. PMID:23408267

  7. Dissociated Grey Matter Changes with Prolonged Addiction and Extended Abstinence in Cocaine Users

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Colm G.; Bell, Ryan P.; Foxe, John J.; Garavan, Hugh

    2013-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that current and recently abstinent cocaine abusers compared to drug-naïve controls have decreased grey matter in regions such as the anterior cingulate, lateral prefrontal and insular cortex. Relatively little is known, however, about the persistence of these deficits in long-term abstinence despite the implications this has for recovery and relapse. Optimized voxel based morphometry was used to assess how local grey matter volume varies with years of drug use and length of abstinence in a cross-sectional study of cocaine users with various durations of abstinence (1–102 weeks) and years of use (0.3–24 years). Lower grey matter volume associated with years of use was observed for several regions including anterior cingulate, inferior frontal gyrus and insular cortex. Conversely, higher grey matter volumes associated with abstinence duration were seen in non-overlapping regions that included the anterior and posterior cingulate, insular, right ventral and left dorsal prefrontal cortex. Grey matter volumes in cocaine dependent individuals crossed those of drug-naïve controls after 35 weeks of abstinence, with greater than normal volumes in users with longer abstinence. The brains of abstinent users are characterized by regional grey matter volumes, which on average, exceed drug-naïve volumes in those users who have maintained abstinence for more than 35 weeks. The asymmetry between the regions showing alterations with extended years of use and prolonged abstinence suggest that recovery involves distinct neurobiological processes rather than being a reversal of disease-related changes. Specifically, the results suggest that regions critical to behavioral control may be important to prolonged, successful, abstinence. PMID:23527239

  8. Comparison of trace element concentrations in grey heron and black-crowned night heron chicks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungsoo; Oh, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) concentrations were measured in the prey and liver of grey heron (Ardea cinerea) and black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) chicks (24-26 days after hatching) at the Pyeongtaek colony, Korea in 2001 (n = 10, respectively) and 2008 (n = 11 and n = 10). Cadmium and Pb concentrations in livers of grey heron (Cd geomean 0.06, Pb 3.90 μg/g dw) and black-crowned night heron (Cd 0.20, Pb 4.24 μg/g dw) chicks were increased with diet concentrations of grey heron (Cd 0.18, Pb 1.76 μg/g dw) and black-crowned night heron (Cd 0.20, Pb 3.96 μg/g dw) chicks. Cadmium and Pb concentrations in prey items of grey heron and black-crowned night heron chicks were a good predictor of chick liver concentrations. Cadmium concentrations in livers of both heron species collected at the Pyeongtaek heronry were relatively low and within the background level (<3 μg/g dw) for birds. Five of 20 (25.0%) grey heron and 4 of 18 (22.2%) black-crowned night heron chicks were higher than the background level for lead (>6 μg/g dw). Prey Cd and Pb concentrations were within the range of other heron and egret studies. Manganese, Zn, and Fe concentrations in grey heron and black-crowned night heron chicks were within the background or normal physiological levels reported earlier in other birds including herons and egrets. PMID:25410946

  9. Grey matter correlates of susceptibility to scams in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Duke Han, S; Boyle, Patricia A; Yu, Lei; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; James, Bryan D; Fleischman, Debra A; Bennett, David A

    2016-06-01

    Susceptibility to scams is a significant issue among older adults, even among those with intact cognition. Age-related changes in brain macrostructure may be associated with susceptibility to scams; however, this has yet to be explored. Based on previous work implicating frontal and temporal lobe functioning as important in decision making, we tested the hypothesis that susceptibility to scams is associated with smaller grey matter volume in frontal and temporal lobe regions in a large community-dwelling cohort of non-demented older adults. Participants (N = 327, mean age = 81.55, mean education = 15.30, 78.9 % female) completed a self-report measure used to assess susceptibility to scams and an MRI brain scan. Results indicated an inverse association between overall grey matter and susceptibility to scams in models adjusted for age, education, and sex; and in models further adjusted for cognitive function. No significant associations were observed for white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, or total brain volume. Models adjusted for age, education, and sex revealed seven clusters showing smaller grey matter in the right parahippocampal/hippocampal/fusiform, left middle temporal, left orbitofrontal, right ventromedial prefrontal, right middle temporal, right precuneus, and right dorsolateral prefrontal regions. In models further adjusted for cognitive function, results revealed three significant clusters showing smaller grey matter in the right parahippocampal/hippocampal/fusiform, right hippocampal, and right middle temporal regions. Lower grey matter concentration in specific brain regions may be associated with susceptibility to scams, even after adjusting for cognitive ability. Future research is needed to determine whether grey matter reductions in these regions may be a biomarker for susceptibility to scams in old age. PMID:26100658

  10. 20 CFR 368.4 - Concession stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concession stands. 368.4 Section 368.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SALES TO MINORS § 368.4 Concession stands. Tobacco products may be sold on property occupied...

  11. 20 CFR 368.4 - Concession stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Concession stands. 368.4 Section 368.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SALES TO MINORS § 368.4 Concession stands. Tobacco products may be sold on property occupied...

  12. 20 CFR 368.4 - Concession stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Concession stands. 368.4 Section 368.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SALES TO MINORS § 368.4 Concession stands. Tobacco products may be sold on property occupied...

  13. 20 CFR 368.4 - Concession stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Concession stands. 368.4 Section 368.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SALES TO MINORS § 368.4 Concession stands. Tobacco products may be sold on property occupied...

  14. 20 CFR 368.4 - Concession stands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Concession stands. 368.4 Section 368.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES PROHIBITION OF CIGARETTE SALES TO MINORS § 368.4 Concession stands. Tobacco products may be sold on property occupied...

  15. School Furniture Dimensions: Standing and Reaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Performance of school children in regard to their standing and reach postures are described with dimensions given on the limits of their performance only. The facts of task performances are presented for the following tasks--(1) seeing into a shelf, (2) reaching into a shelf, (3) drawing on a vertical surface, (4) sitting or standing while…

  16. Grey-molasses cooling of an optically trapped Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Ryan; Jervis, Dylan; Edge, Graham; Anderson, Rhys; Trotzky, Stefan; Thywissen, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Robust sub-Doppler cooling has recently been demonstrated at the D1 (nS1/2 to nP1/2) transition of potassium and lithium, atoms that are challenging to cool on the D2 cycling transition. Two mechanisms are at work: first, Sisyphus cooling in the standing-wave dipole potential, at least partially due to polarization gradients; second, velocity-selective coherent population trapping (VSCPT) in a superposition of the two hyperfine ground states. We extend this technique to the cooling of dense clouds in optical traps. Since the VSCPT dark state relies only on ground-state coherences, it is insensitive to optical shifts from far-detuned optical traps. We also observe that the molasses has sufficient cooling power to withstand light scattering on the 4S-5P transition. Together these observations indicate that D1 cooling is a promising approach to fluorescent imaging of single fermions in an optical lattice.

  17. Beyond PubMed: Searching the "Grey Literature" for Clinical Trial Results.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Clinical trial results have been traditionally communicated through the publication of scholarly reports and reviews in biomedical journals. However, this dissemination of information can be delayed or incomplete, making it difficult to appraise new treatments, or in the case of missing data, evaluate older interventions. Going beyond the routine search of PubMed, it is possible to discover additional information in the "grey literature." Examples of the grey literature include clinical trial registries, patent databases, company and industrywide repositories, regulatory agency digital archives, abstracts of paper and poster presentations on meeting/congress websites, industry investor reports and press releases, and institutional and personal websites. PMID:25337445

  18. Antibiotic resistance in primary care in Austria - a systematic review of scientific and grey literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is an increasing challenge for health care services worldwide. While up to 90% of antibiotics are being prescribed in the outpatient sector recommendations for the treatment of community-acquired infections are usually based on resistance findings from hospitalized patients. In context of the EU-project called "APRES - the appropriateness of prescribing antibiotic in primary health care in Europe with respect to antibiotic resistance" it was our aim to gain detailed information about the resistance data from Austria in both the scientific and the grey literature. Methods A systematic review was performed including scientific and grey literature published between 2000 and 2010. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined and the review process followed published recommendations. Results Seventeen scientific articles and 23 grey literature documents could be found. In contrast to the grey literature, the scientific publications describe only a small part of the resistance situation in the primary health care sector in Austria. Merely half of these publications contain data from the ambulatory sector exclusively but these data are older than ten years, are very heterogeneous concerning the observed time period, the number and origin of the isolates and the kind of bacteria analysed. The grey literature yields more comprehensive and up-to-date information of the content of interest. These sources are available in German only and are not easily accessible. The resistance situation described in the grey literature can be summarized as rather stable over the last two years. For Escherichia coli e.g. the highest antibiotic resistance rates can be seen with fluorochiniolones (19%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (27%). Conclusion Comprehensive and up-to-date antibiotic resistance data of different pathogens isolated from the community level in Austria are presented. They could be found mainly in the grey literature, only few are

  19. An improvement of multi-attribute decision model of grey target with interval number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-li

    2013-10-01

    In view of the limits of existing decision model of grey target with interval number, a new formula for normalizing decision matrix is given based on range transformation. At the same time, on the basis of the principle of TOPSIS, a new decision model of grey target is set up considering not only the distance from positive bulls eye but also from negative one. An example is given to show the application of the method, and the results are compared with other methods. The results verify the validity and practicability of the method.

  20. Grey zone lesions of breast: Potential areas of error in cytology.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the breast is a rapid, cost-effective, and sensitive procedure to diagnose breast lesions, and was widely employed to diagnose breast lesions in the past. However, in recent times, core needle biopsy of the breast is gaining popularity and acceptability, although FNAC still looms large. There are some intrinsic disadvantages to FNAC, of which the most important is probably difficulty in classification of a significant percentage of breast lesions. Such lesions are usually denoted by the rubric "grey zone lesions of the breast." This article attempts to review these grey zone lesions and highlight the difficulties in diagnosing them. PMID:26729973

  1. Grey zone lesions of breast: Potential areas of error in cytology

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the breast is a rapid, cost-effective, and sensitive procedure to diagnose breast lesions, and was widely employed to diagnose breast lesions in the past. However, in recent times, core needle biopsy of the breast is gaining popularity and acceptability, although FNAC still looms large. There are some intrinsic disadvantages to FNAC, of which the most important is probably difficulty in classification of a significant percentage of breast lesions. Such lesions are usually denoted by the rubric “grey zone lesions of the breast.” This article attempts to review these grey zone lesions and highlight the difficulties in diagnosing them. PMID:26729973

  2. Beyond PubMed: Searching the “Grey Literature” for Clinical Trial Results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial results have been traditionally communicated through the publication of scholarly reports and reviews in biomedical journals. However, this dissemination of information can be delayed or incomplete, making it difficult to appraise new treatments, or in the case of missing data, evaluate older interventions. Going beyond the routine search of PubMed, it is possible to discover additional information in the “grey literature.” Examples of the grey literature include clinical trial registries, patent databases, company and industrywide repositories, regulatory agency digital archives, abstracts of paper and poster presentations on meeting/congress websites, industry investor reports and press releases, and institutional and personal websites. PMID:25337445

  3. Skeletal deformities and mortality in grey herons (Ardea cinerea) at Besthorpe heronry, Nottinghamshire.

    PubMed

    Feltrer, Y; Draper, E R C; Perkins, M; Cunningham, A A

    2006-10-14

    Dead and sick grey heron chicks with multiple fractures of the leg and wing bones and/or bone deformities have been reported at Besthorpe Nature Reserve heronry in north Nottinghamshire since 1996. Forty-five grey heron carcases were examined, 35 from the Besthorpe colony and 10 from other colonies where bone disease was not known to occur. On the basis of the results of radiological studies, postmortem examinations, peripheral quantitative computed tomography scanning and four-point bending tests, it was concluded that the skeletal abnormalities were probably due to metabolic bone disease. PMID:17041065

  4. 9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. WEST SIDE, TEST STAND AND SUPERSTRUCTURE. TEST STAND 1-B IN DISTANCE. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Grey matter, an endophenotype for schizophrenia? A voxel-based morphometry study in siblings of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M.; Swart, Marte; de Haan, Lieuwe; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-01-01

    Background Grey matter, both volume and concentration, has been proposed as an endophenotype for schizophrenia given a number of reports of grey matter abnormalities in relatives of patients with schizophrenia. However, previous studies on grey matter abnormalities in relatives have produced inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine grey matter differences between controls and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and to examine whether the age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms of selected individuals could explain the previously reported inconsistencies. Methods We compared the grey matter volume and grey matter concentration of healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls matched for age, sex and education using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we selected subsamples based on age (< 30 yr), genetic loading and subclinical psychotic symptoms to examine whether this would lead to different results. Results We included 89 siblings and 69 controls in our study. The results showed that siblings and controls did not differ significantly on grey matter volume or concentration. Furthermore, specifically selecting participants based on age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms did not alter these findings. Limitations The main limitation was that subdividing the sample resulted in smaller samples for the subanalyses. Furthermore, we used MRI data from 2 different scanner sites. Conclusion These results indicate that grey matter measured through VBM might not be a suitable endophenotype for schizophrenia. PMID:25768029

  6. Reduced operating voltage and grey-to-grey response time in a vertically aligned liquid crystal display using a mixture of two polyimide alignment materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Byeong Hoon; Song, Won Il; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Lee, Gi-Dong; Lee, Seung Hee

    2013-12-01

    We proposed a method to reduce the operating voltage and the grey-to-grey switching time of a vertically aligned liquid crystal display using a mixture of planar and vertical polyimide alignment materials. The surface anchoring energy of the two-polyimide mixture was smaller than that of the pure vertical polyimide and consequently, liquid crystal molecules were easily switched to a planar state with an electric field, resulting in a greater maximum retardation than that of the pure polyimide at the same applied voltage. Rising time was also significantly reduced due to the suppressed optical bouncing effect in the mixed planar polyimide, and the decaying time showed negligible change. With the proposed approach, we can reduce the cell gap to obtain half-wave retardation allowing for faster response time while keeping a low operating voltage.

  7. 2015 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on December 8 - 9, 2015. The SRP met with representatives from the Space Radiation Element and members of the Human Research Program (HRP) to review the updated research plan for the Risk of Radiation Carcinogenesis Cancer Risk. The SRP also reviewed the newly revised Evidence Reports for the Risk of Acute Radiation Syndromes Due to Solar Particle Events (SPEs) (Acute Risk), the Risk of Acute (In-flight) and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure (CNS Risk), and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation (Degen Risk), as well as a status update on these Risks. The SRP would like to commend Dr. Simonsen, Dr. Huff, Dr. Nelson, and Dr. Patel for their detailed presentations. The Space Radiation Element did a great job presenting a very large volume of material. The SRP considers it to be a strong program that is well-organized, well-coordinated and generates valuable data. The SRP commended the tissue sharing protocols, working groups, systems biology analysis, and standardization of models. In several of the discussed areas the SRP suggested improvements of the research plans in the future. These include the following: It is important that the team has expanded efforts examining immunology and inflammation as important components of the space radiation biological response. This is an overarching and important focus that is likely to apply to all aspects of the program including acute, CVD, CNS, cancer and others. Given that the area of immunology/inflammation is highly complex (and especially so as it relates to radiation), it warrants the expansion of investigators expertise in immunology and inflammation to work with the individual research projects and also the NASA Specialized Center of Research (NSCORs). Historical data on radiation injury to be entered into the Watson

  8. Antioxidative activity of diarylheptanoids from the bark of black alder (Alnus glutinosa) and their interaction with anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Dinić, Jelena; Novaković, Miroslav; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Stojković, Sonja; Mandić, Boris; Tešević, Vele; Vajs, Vlatka; Isaković, Aleksandra; Pešić, Milica

    2014-08-01

    Diarylheptanoids belong to polyphenols, a group of plant secondary metabolites with multiple biological properties. Many of them display antioxidative, cytotoxic, or anticancer actions and are increasingly recognized as potential therapeutic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate antioxidant and cytoprotective activity of two diarylheptanoids: platyphylloside 5(S)-1,7-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-heptanone-5-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1) and its newly discovered analog 5(S)-1,7-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-O-β-D-[6-(E-p-coumaroylglucopyranosyl)]heptane-3-one (2), both isolated from the bark of black alder (Alnus glutinosa). To that end, we have employed a cancer cell line (NCI-H460), normal human keratinocytes (HaCaT), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The effects on cell growth were assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. Cell death was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining on a flow cytometer. Reactive oxygen species production was examined by dihydroethidium staining. Mitochondrial structure and doxorubicin localization were visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Gene expression of manganese superoxide dismutase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Diarylheptanoids antagonized the effects of either doxorubicin or cisplatin, significantly increasing their IC50 values in normal cells. Diarylheptanoid 1 induced the retention of doxorubicin in cytoplasm and reduced mitochondrial fragmentation associated with doxorubicin application. Diarylheptanoid 2 reduced the reactive oxygen species production induced by cisplatin. Both compounds increased the messenger ribonucleic acid expression of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species elimination (manganese superoxide dismutase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α). These results indicate that neutralization of reactive oxygen species is an important mechanism of diarylheptanoid action, although these

  9. A new insight on the gas phase retro-Diels-Alder reaction of bicyclic compounds: density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Jose R.; Lezama, Jesús; Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Chuchani, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of the gas-phase thermal decomposition of bicyclo[2.2.1]heptadiene and 3,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene were examined by density functional theory calculations with the hybrid functionals: B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, MPW1PW91, and PBEPBE. Reasonable agreements were found between theoretical and experimental values with the B3LYP hybrid functional. Three molecular concerted pathways for bicyclo[2.2.1]heptadiene decomposition are proposed. The retro-Diels-Alder (retro-DA) pathway yields cyclopentadiene and acetylene through a nearly synchronous transition state structure (Sy = 0.97). The other two reaction channels are stepwise with a common step with the formation of the intermediate bicyclo[4.1.0] heptadiene. This reaction is dominated by C-C bond breaking leading to the methylene migration by an early transition state in the reaction coordinate (Sy = 0.91). The rearrangements of the latter intermediate producing toluene were also studied. The retro-DA elimination of 3,7,7-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene gives 1,5,5-trimethyl-cyclopenta-1,3-diene in a less synchronous process (Sy = 0.77). This fact may be due to the electronic effects of the methyl substituent. The latter product is unstable and undergoes methyl migrations to give a more stable isomer 1,2,3-trimethylcyclopenta-1,3-diene. The stepwise mechanism for the retro-DA reaction through a biradical intermediate appears to be unfavourable because the barrier is bigger than that for the concerted reaction.

  10. Short Rotation Woody Crops Program. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1985. [Sycamore, alders, black locust, larch, poplars, saltbush

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Perlack, R.D.; Wenzel, C.R.; Trimble, J.L.; Ranney, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report covers the progress of the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP) during the third quarter of fiscal year 1985. This report summarizes ORNL management activities, technical activities at ORNL and subcontract institutions, and the technology transfer that is occurring as a result of subcontractor and ORNL activities. Third-year results of a nutrient utilization study confirmed that there were no benefits to quarterly fertilization with urea nitrogen. Testing of one prototype short-rotation intensive culture harvester was conducted on a sycamore plantation on Scott Paper Company land in southern Alabama. Coppice yields of European black alder reported by Iowa State University indicate potential productivity of about 7.2 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ if the best trees are selected. Coppice yields were more than double first-rotation yields. About 31,000 black locust and larch trees were established in 12 genetic tests at 4 sites in Michigan. Seedling rotation productivity rates of 4-year-old hybrid poplar, based on harvest data, were reported by Pennsylvania State University. Rates varied from 4.8 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/ to 10.7 dry Mg . ha/sup -1/ . year/sup -1/, depending on site, management strategy, and planting year. An efficient method for in vitro micropropagation of elite genotypes of fourwing saltbush was developed by Plant Resources Institute. A new study to evaluate yield/density relationships was established by the USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. Dissertation research on the crown geometry of plantation-grown American sycamore was completed.

  11. Multicomponent Double Diels-Alder/Nazarov Tandem Cyclization of Symmetric Cross-Conjugated Diynones to Generate [6-5-6] Tricyclic Products.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Rachael A; Chalifoux, Wesley A

    2016-06-20

    The construction of complex polycyclic terpenoid products in an efficient and step-economical manner using multicomponent and tandem processes is highly valuable. Herein, we report a tandem cyclization sequence that initiates with a multicomponent double Diels-Alder reaction of cross-conjugated diynones, followed by a Nazarov cyclization to efficiently produce [6-5-6] tricyclic products with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity. This methodology generates five new carbon-carbon bonds, three rings, quaternary or vicinal quaternary carbons, and stereogenic centers in a one-pot reaction. PMID:27124516

  12. Regio- and stereochemically controlled formation of hydroxamic acids from indium triflate-mediated nucleophilic ring-opening reactions with acylnitroso-Diels–Alder adducts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Baiyuan; Miller, Marvin J.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of acylnitroso-Diels–Alder [2.2.1] bicyclic adducts 2a–b with indium triflate in an alcohol solvent induces ring opening reactions to afford monocyclic anti-1,2-, anti-1,4- and syn-1,4-hydroxamic acids with good to excellent regio- and stereoselectivity (up to 7:86:7). Treatment of [2.2.2] bicyclic nitroso adducts 2c–d under similar reaction conditions generates only anti-1,2- and anti-1,4-hydroxamic acids with anti-1,4-product predominant (up to 17:83). PMID:20209116

  13. Enantioselective synthesis of allenylenol silyl ethers via chiral lithium amide mediated reduction of ynenoyl silanes and their Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Michiko; Kondo, Yasuhiro; Moto-ishi, Ta-ichi; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2015-03-01

    An enantioselective Meerwein-Ponndorf-Verley-type reduction of ynenoylsilanes by a chiral lithium amide followed by a Brook rearrangement and anti-mode protonation across conjugated 1,3-enynes provides allene derivatives bearing a 2-siloxyvinyl moiety in high enantioselectivity. The E/Z geometry of enol silyl ethers is controlled by the geometry of the starting enyne moiety. Thus, (E)- and (Z)-enol silyl ethers are obtained from (Z)- and (E)-ynenoylsilans, respectively. The 2-siloxyvinylallene products can participate in Diels-Alder reactions with reactive dienophiles such as PTAD, which can be achieved in a one-pot operation from ynenoylsilanes. PMID:25689472

  14. A Base-Catalyzed, Domino Aldol/hetero-Diels-Alder Synthesis of Tricyclic Pyrano[3,4-c]chromenes in Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Bhagyashri D; Sutariya, Tushar R; Brahmbhatt, Gaurangkumar C; Parmar, Narsidas J; Kant, Rajni; Gupta, Vivek K

    2016-06-17

    The domino aldol/hetero-Diels-Alder synthesis of some new tricyclic pyrano[3,4-c]chromene derivatives has been achieved successfully after assembling a variety of acyclic or cyclic monoketones with prenyl ether-tethered aldehydes in the presence of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene in glycerol at 120 °C. The hitherto unreported stereochemical outcome of this synthetic sequence was studied and established on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and 2D NMR NOESY spectroscopy along with the isolation and characterization of the intermediate Aldol condensation product. PMID:27171909

  15. Bisadducts from the Diels-Alder Trapping of Bis(o-Xylenols) Photochemically Generated from 2,5-Dibenzoyl-p-xylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Kinder, James D.; Kirby, James P.

    2003-01-01

    Photolysis of 2,5-dibenzoyl-p-xylene produces two discrete o-xylenols which undergo Diels-Alder cycloadditions with standard dienophiles, such as methyl acrylate, to produce 1,5-dihydroxy-1,5-diphenyl-l,2,3,4,5,6,7,8-octahydroanthracenes, 2a, in good yield (greater than 80%). The anti bisadduct crystallizes into hydrogen bonded stacks. Conversion of both syn- and anti-bisadducts to the corresponding anthracenes was achieved through the use of standard dehydration and aromatization chemistry.

  16. Extracting repetitive transients for rotating machinery diagnosis using multiscale clustered grey infogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Cabrera, Diego; de Oliveira, José Valente; Sanchez, René-Vinicio; Cerrada, Mariela; Zurita, Grover

    2016-08-01

    Local faults of rotating machinery usually result in repetitive transients whose impulsiveness or cyclostationarity can be employed as faulty signatures. However, to simultaneously accommodate the impulsiveness and the cyclostationarity is a challenging task for rotating machinery diagnostics. Inspired by recently-reported infogram that is sensitive to either the impulsiveness or the cyclostationarity using spectral negentropy defined in time domain or frequency domain, a multiscale clustering grey infogram (MCGI) is proposed by combining both negentropies in a grey fashion using multiscale clustering. Fourier spectrum of the vibration signal is decomposed into multiple scales with different initial resolutions. In each scale, fine segments are grouped using hierarchical clustering. Meanwhile, both time-domain and frequency-domain spectral negentropies are taken into account to guide the clustering through grey evaluation of both negentropies. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are carried out for validating the proposed MCGI. For comparison, peer methods are applied to challenge different noises and interferences. The results show that, thanks to the multiscale clustering of the spectrum and the grey evaluation of both negentropies, the present MCGI is robust in extracting the repetitive transients for the rotating machinery diagnosis.

  17. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, Brett A; Goldizen, Anne W; Thomson, Vicki A; Seddon, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation. PMID:26024370

  18. Regional grey matter shrinks in hypertensive individuals despite successful lowering of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, J. R.; Mendelson, D. N.; Muldoon, M. F.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Gianaros, P. J.; Raz, N.; Aizenstein, H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether reduction in brain grey matter volume associated with hypertension persisted or was remediated among hypertensive patients newly treated over the course of a year. Methods Forty-one hypertensive patients were assessed over the course of a one-year successful anti-hypertensive treatment. Brain areas identified previously in cross-sectional studies as differing in volume between hypertensive and normotensive individuals were examined with a semi-automated measurement technique (ALP, automated labeling pathway). Volumes of grey matter regions were computed at baseline and after a year of treatment and compared to archival data from normotensive individuals. Results Reductions in regional grey matter volume over the follow-up period were observed despite successful treatment of blood pressure. The comparison group of older, but normotensive individuals showed no significant changes over a year in the regions tested in the treated hypertensive group. Conclusions These novel results suggest that essential hypertension is associated with regional grey matter shrinkage and successful reduction of blood pressure may not completely counter that trend. PMID:21490622

  19. The Relationship between Grey-Matter and ASD and ADHD Traits in Typical Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geurts, Hilde M.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Scholte, H. Steven

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether in 85 healthy adults (18-29 years) there is a relationship between grey-matter (GM) volume and autism and ADHD symptom severity. The structural MRI findings and autism and ADHD self-reports revealed that autism and ADHD symptom severity was correlated with GM volume in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Autism symptom-severity was…

  20. Preserving the Digital Record of Science and Engineering: The Challenge of New Forms of Grey Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musser, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Research communications today are largely conducted by digital means. At this time, however, only a small percentage of these digital communiques are archived and preserved for future use. This article provides an overview of the challenge of this digital grey literature, a brief overview of digital archiving, and the role librarians and…

  1. Voxel-based morphometry in eating disorders: correlation of psychopathology with grey matter volume.

    PubMed

    Joos, Andreas; Klöppel, Stefan; Hartmann, Armin; Glauche, Volkmar; Tüscher, Oliver; Perlov, Evgeniy; Saum, Barbara; Freyer, Tobias; Zeeck, Almut; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger

    2010-05-30

    Twenty-nine adult female patients with eating disorders (17 with bulimia nervosa, 12 with restrictive anorexia nervosa) were compared with 18 age-matched female healthy controls, using voxel-based morphometry. Restrictive anorexia nervosa patients showed a decrease of grey matter, particularly affecting the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, temporoparietal regions and the precuneus. By contrast, patients with bulimia nervosa did not differ from healthy controls. A positive correlation of "drive for thinness" and grey matter volume of the right inferior parietal lobe was found for both eating disorder groups. The strong reduction of grey matter volume in adult patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa is in line with results of adolescent patients. Contrary to other studies, this first voxel-based morphometry report of bulimic patients did not find any structural abnormalities. The inferior parietal cortex is a critical region for sensory integration of body and spatial perception, and the correlation of "drive for thinness" with grey matter volume of this region points to a neural correlate of this core psychopathological feature of eating disorders. PMID:20400273

  2. Phylogeography of Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus, Suggests a Mesic Refugium in Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies around the world have identified refugia where fauna were able to persist during unsuitable climatic periods, particularly during times of glaciation. In Australia the effects of Pleistocene climate oscillations on rainforest taxa have been well studied but less is known about the effects on mesic-habitat fauna, such as the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The eastern grey kangaroo is a large mammal that is common and widespread throughout eastern Australia, preferring dry mesic habitat, rather than rainforest. As pollen evidence suggests that the central-eastern part of Australia (southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales) experienced cycles of expansion in mesic habitat with contraction in rainforests, and vice versa during glacial and interglacial periods, respectively, we hypothesise that the distribution of the eastern grey kangaroo was affected by these climate oscillations and may have contracted to mesic habitat refugia. From 375 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences from across the distribution of eastern grey kangaroos we obtained 108 unique haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis identified two clades in Queensland, one of which is newly identified and restricted to a small coastal region in southern Queensland north of Brisbane, known as the Sunshine Coast. The relatively limited geographic range of this genetically isolated clade suggests the possibility of a mesic habitat refugium forming during rainforest expansion during wetter climate cycles. Other potential, although less likely, reasons for the genetic isolation of the highly distinct clade include geographic barriers, separate northward expansions, and strong local adaptation. PMID:26024370

  3. Aspen's Global 100: Beyond Grey Pinstripes 2009-2010--Preparing MBAs for Social and Environmental Stewardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Beyond Grey Pinstripes is a research survey and alternative ranking of business schools that spotlights innovative full-time MBA programs leading the way in integrating social and environmental stewardship into their curriculum and scholarly research. These schools are preparing today's students--tomorrow's leaders--for future market realities by…

  4. Behavioural responses of Eastern grey squirrels, Sciurus carolinensis, to cues of risk while foraging.

    PubMed

    Jayne, Kimberley; Lea, Stephen E G; Leaver, Lisa A

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that Eastern grey squirrels modify their behaviour while foraging to offset risks of social and predatory costs, but none have simultaneously compared whether such modifications are performed at a cost to foraging. The present study directly compares how grey squirrels respond to cues of these risks while foraging. We simulated social risk and predatory risk using acoustic playbacks of stimuli that grey squirrels might be exposed to at a foraging patch: calls of conspecifics, heterospecifics (competitor and non-competitor) and predators. We found that grey squirrels responded to predator, heterospecific competitor and conspecific playbacks by altering their foraging and vigilance behaviours. Foraging was most disrupted by increased vigilance when we played calls of predators. Squirrels' response to calls of heterospecific competitors did not differ from their response to conspecific calls, and they resumed foraging more quickly after both compared to predator calls: whereas they showed little response to calls of non-competitor heterospecifics and a white noise control. We conclude that squirrels respond differentially to calls made by conspecifics, heterospecific competitors and predators, with the most pronounced response being to calls of predators. We suggest that squirrels may view conspecific and corvid vocalisations as cues of potential conflict while foraging, necessitating increased vigilance. PMID:25957953

  5. Homocysteine, Grey Matter and Cognitive Function in Adults with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Andrew H.; Garrido, Griselda J.; Beer, Christopher; Lautenschlager, Nicola T.; Arnolda, Leonard; Flicker, Leon; Almeida, Osvaldo P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Elevated total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) has been associated with cognitive impairment, vascular disease and brain atrophy. Methods We investigated 150 volunteers to determine if the association between high tHcy and cerebral grey matter volume and cognitive function is independent of cardiovascular disease. Results Participants with high tHcy (≥15 µmol/L) showed a widespread relative loss of grey matter compared with people with normal tHcy, although differences between the groups were minimal once the analyses were adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and prevalent cardiovascular disease. Individuals with high tHcy had worse cognitive scores across a range of domains and less total grey matter volume, although these differences were not significant in the adjusted models. Conclusions Our results suggest that the association between high tHcy and loss of cerebral grey matter volume and decline in cognitive function is largely explained by increasing age and cardiovascular diseases and indicate that the relationship is not causal. PMID:22413017

  6. Regional grey matter shrinks in hypertensive individuals despite successful lowering of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J R; Mendelson, D N; Muldoon, M F; Ryan, C M; Gianaros, P J; Raz, N; Aizenstein, H

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the reduction in brain grey matter volume associated with hypertension persisted or was remediated among hypertensive patients newly treated over the course of a year. A total of 41 hypertensive patients were assessed over the course of a 1-year successful anti-hypertensive treatment. Brain areas identified previously in cross-sectional studies differing in volume between hypertensive and normotensive individuals were examined with a semi-automated measurement technique (automated labelling pathway). Volumes of grey matter regions were computed at baseline after a year of treatment and compared with archival data from normotensive individuals. Reductions in regional grey matter volume over the follow-up period were observed despite successful treatment of blood pressure (BP). The comparison group of older, but normotensive, individuals showed no significant changes over a year in the regions tested in the treated hypertensive group. These novel results suggest that essential hypertension is associated with regional grey matter shrinkage, and successful reduction of BP may not completely counter that trend. PMID:21490622

  7. Importance of unmanaged wasteland patches for the grey partridge Perdix perdix in suburban habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šálek, Miroslav; Marhoul, Pavel; Pintíř, Jan; Kopecký, Tomáš; Slabý, Lukáš

    2004-03-01

    A significant component of breeding habitat of the grey partridge Perdix perdix in Europe includes field boundaries with idle sites and grassy strips, loss of which is considered as one of the reasons for the decline of grey partridge populations. We associate enduring high densities of wild grey partridges in Prague, the Czech Republic, with the existence of unmanaged wasteland, herbaceous patches spread out between urbanized areas of the capital and its surrounding agricultural landscape. The study combines density estimations, home range analysis, weed seed sampling and plant composition analysis, all with the aim of explaining factors influencing partridges' habitat preference. Patch size, availability of patches within the surrounding landscape and mean height of plant cover were the most important factors influencing the numbers of breeding pairs among patches. Numbers of weed seeds collected on the soil surface seems to be of greater importance than specific plant composition. Although patches supported high densities (tens of pairs km -2), the neighboring agricultural landscape supported low densities (<10 pairs km -2) with an influence of the distance to the nearest patch. April to June home range size varied around 2.9 ha and tended to be smaller for pairs with higher availability of patch habitat. A sufficient availability of temporary patches in the study area enabled a persistence of grey partridge populations without any support through hand-reared birds or systematic predator control. A surplus of offspring may potentially saturate the less attractive surrounding landscape but only to a reduced extent limited by its carrying capacity.

  8. Macroparasite fauna of alien grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis): composition, variability and implications for native species.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Pisanu, Benoît; Preatoni, Damiano G; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduced hosts populations may benefit of an "enemy release" through impoverishment of parasite communities made of both few imported species and few acquired local ones. Moreover, closely related competing native hosts can be affected by acquiring introduced taxa (spillover) and by increased transmission risk of native parasites (spillback). We determined the macroparasite fauna of invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Italy to detect any diversity loss, introduction of novel parasites or acquisition of local ones, and analysed variation in parasite burdens to identify factors that may increase transmission risk for native red squirrels (S. vulgaris). Based on 277 grey squirrels sampled from 7 populations characterised by different time scales in introduction events, we identified 7 gastro-intestinal helminths and 4 parasite arthropods. Parasite richness is lower than in grey squirrel's native range and independent from introduction time lags. The most common parasites are Nearctic nematodes Strongyloides robustus (prevalence: 56.6%) and Trichostrongylus calcaratus (6.5%), red squirrel flea Ceratophyllus sciurorum (26.0%) and Holarctic sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri (17.7%). All other parasites are European or cosmopolitan species with prevalence below 5%. S. robustus abundance is positively affected by host density and body mass, C. sciurorum abundance increases with host density and varies with seasons. Overall, we show that grey squirrels in Italy may benefit of an enemy release, and both spillback and spillover processes towards native red squirrels may occur. PMID:24505348

  9. Grey Parrot Number Acquisition: The Inference of Cardinal Value from Ordinal Position on the Numeral List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepperberg, Irene M.; Carey, Susan

    2012-01-01

    A Grey parrot ("Psittacus erithacus") had previously been taught to use English count words ("one" through "sih" [six]) to label sets of one to six individual items (Pepperberg, 1994). He had also been taught to use the same count words to label the Arabic numerals 1 through 6. Without training, he inferred the relationship between the Arabic…

  10. Northern Alabama colonies of the endangered grey bat Myotis grisescens: Organochlorine contamination and mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Bagley, F.M.; Johnson, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    From 1976 to 1986, dead and dying grey bats Myotis grisescens and grey bat guano were collected from caves along the Tennessee River in northern Alabama to determine the possible role of organochlorine chemicals.sbd.in particular wastes from a former DDT manufacturing plant near Huntsville.sbd.in the mortalities. Concentrations of chemical residues in brains were less than known lethal levels: certain observations and analyses did indicate the possibility of past organochlorine-induced bat deaths. Levels of contaminants in bats declined slowly during the 10-year sampling period, but heavy residue burdens persist. The high ratio of DDD to DDE in residue from the former DDT plant made them identifiable as far as 140 km downriver. Grey bats concentrated chemical rsidues to higher levels and demonstrated the presence of these residues over much greater distances than did red-winged blackbirds Agelaius phoeniceus. Grey bats may be the most sensitive indicator available for monitoring the contamination from this former DDT manufacturing site.

  11. Deriving Hounsfield units using grey levels in cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mah, P; Reeves, T E; McDavid, W D

    2010-01-01

    Objectives An in vitro study was performed to investigate the relationship between grey levels in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Hounsfield units (HU) in CBCT scanners. Methods A phantom containing 8 different materials of known composition and density was imaged with 11 different dental CBCT scanners and 2 medical CT scanners. The phantom was scanned under three conditions: phantom alone and phantom in a small and large water container. The reconstructed data were exported as Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and analysed with On Demand 3D® by Cybermed, Seoul, Korea. The relationship between grey levels and linear attenuation coefficients was investigated. Results It was demonstrated that a linear relationship between the grey levels and the attenuation coefficients of each of the materials exists at some “effective” energy. From the linear regression equation of the reference materials, attenuation coefficients were obtained for each of the materials and CT numbers in HU were derived using the standard equation. Conclusions HU can be derived from the grey levels in dental CBCT scanners using linear attenuation coefficients as an intermediate step. PMID:20729181

  12. Managing the Grey Literature of a Discipline through Collaboration: AgEcon Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Julia; Letnes, Louise

    2005-01-01

    AgEcon Search, http://www.agecon.lib.umn.edu, is an important and ground-breaking example of an alternative method of delivering current research results to many potential users. AgEcon Search, through a distributed model, collects and disseminates the grey literature of the fields of agricultural and resource economics. The development of this…

  13. Macroparasite Fauna of Alien Grey Squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis): Composition, Variability and Implications for Native Species

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A.; Ferrari, Nicola; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Martinoli, Adriano; Pisanu, Benoît; Preatoni, Damiano G.; Saino, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduced hosts populations may benefit of an "enemy release" through impoverishment of parasite communities made of both few imported species and few acquired local ones. Moreover, closely related competing native hosts can be affected by acquiring introduced taxa (spillover) and by increased transmission risk of native parasites (spillback). We determined the macroparasite fauna of invasive grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Italy to detect any diversity loss, introduction of novel parasites or acquisition of local ones, and analysed variation in parasite burdens to identify factors that may increase transmission risk for native red squirrels (S. vulgaris). Based on 277 grey squirrels sampled from 7 populations characterised by different time scales in introduction events, we identified 7 gastro-intestinal helminths and 4 parasite arthropods. Parasite richness is lower than in grey squirrel's native range and independent from introduction time lags. The most common parasites are Nearctic nematodes Strongyloides robustus (prevalence: 56.6%) and Trichostrongylus calcaratus (6.5%), red squirrel flea Ceratophyllus sciurorum (26.0%) and Holarctic sucking louse Neohaematopinus sciuri (17.7%). All other parasites are European or cosmopolitan species with prevalence below 5%. S. robustus abundance is positively affected by host density and body mass, C. sciurorum abundance increases with host density and varies with seasons. Overall, we show that grey squirrels in Italy may benefit of an enemy release, and both spillback and spillover processes towards native red squirrels may occur. PMID:24505348

  14. Grey water treatment in urban slums by a filtration system: optimisation of the filtration medium.

    PubMed

    Katukiza, A Y; Ronteltap, M; Niwagaba, C B; Kansiime, F; Lens, P N L

    2014-12-15

    Two uPVC columns (outer diameter 160 cm, internal diameter 14.6 cm and length 100 cm) were operated in parallel and in series to simulate grey water treatment by media based filtration at unsaturated conditions and constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR). Grey water from bathroom, laundry and kitchen activities was collected from 10 households in the Bwaise III slum in Kampala (Uganda) in separate containers, mixed in equal proportions followed by settling, prior to transferring the influent to the tanks. Column 1 was packed with lava rock to a depth of 60 cm, while column 2 was packed with lava rock (bottom 30 cm) and silica sand, which was later replaced by granular activated carbon (top 30 cm) to further investigate nutrient removal from grey water. Operating the two filter columns in series at a HLR of 20 cm/day resulted in a better effluent quality than at a higher (40 cm/day) HLR. The COD removal efficiencies by filter columns 1 and 2 in series amounted to 90% and 84% at HLR of 20 cm/day and 40 cm/day, respectively. TOC and DOC removal efficiency amounted to 77% and 71% at a HLR of 20 cm/day, but decreased to 72% and 67% at a HLR of 40 cm/day, respectively. The highest log removal of Escherichia coli, Salmonella sp. and total coliforms amounted to 3.68, 3.50 and 3.95 at a HLR of 20 cm/day respectively. The overall removal of pollutants increased with infiltration depth, with the highest pollutant removal efficiency occurring in the top 15 cm layer. Grey water pre-treatment followed by double filtration using coarse and fine media has the potential to reduce the grey water pollution load in slum areas by more than 60%. PMID:25169645

  15. Mycoplasma gallisepticum infection in the grey partridge Perdix perdix: outbreak description, histopathology, biochemistry and antioxidant parameters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The grey partridge is an important game bird in Europe that has declined considerably over the last decades. The production and release of farm-bred birds can be threatened by infectious agents. The objective of this study was to describe the outbreak, pathology, and blood and tissue biochemical responses in a flock of grey partridges naturally infected with Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Results Morbidity and mortality rates were 100% and 60%, respectively. Necropsy revealed an accumulation of caseous exudate within the infraorbital sinuses, tracheitis, pneumonia and airsacculitis. There were significant increases in activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and amylase, and levels of total protein and glucose in Mycoplasma-infected birds when compared to control. Catalase showed significantly lower activity in the heart, lungs, liver and gonads of Mycoplasma-infected birds. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was elevated in the eye and the associated infraorbital sinus and kidneys, and decreased in the liver. Decreased levels of reduced glutathione were found in the heart, kidneys, liver and gonads. The activity of glutathione reductase was lower only in the lungs. Compared to healthy birds, mycoplasmosis in the grey partridge caused significant differences in the level of lipid peroxidation in lungs and plasma (p < 0.05), while the ferric reducing antioxidant power was lower in the heart and kidneys (p < 0.01). Significant correlations among responses of the antioxidant parameters were found namely in the heart, lungs, spleen, liver and plasma. There were also numerous significant inter-tissue correlations of all the studied antioxidant parameters. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the high susceptibility of grey partridges to natural infection by M. gallisepticum, the severity of the disease based on histopathology, and the modulation of blood chemical profiles and oxidative stress-associated parameters in the avian hosts, thus

  16. Grey Scale Record in Lake Baikal Sediments: Climate Significance for the Last 20 ka.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagel, N.; Boes, X.; Piotrovska, N.

    2004-12-01

    Three sediment cores from Lake Baïkal (52°N) are investigated to evidence Northern Eurasian regional climate and environmental changes. The last 20 ka are analyzed from Kasten cores (3-4 m) and short cores (60 cm) taken in turbidite free key-sites: Vydrino Shoulder, Posolsky Bank, and Continent Ridge (EU-CONTINENT project). The age-models of the cores are based on 14C AMS datings and magnetic susceptibility correlations. From the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) to Present, sedimentation rates range around 0,05 to 0,14 mm/yr. Thus, the standard 5 mm sampling step represent a temporal resolution of no more than 100 to 30 years. The cores material was impregnated by a new polymer technique to analyze the sediments at higher resolution from continuous thin-section cover. We present continuous grey-scale record at 20 µm resolution, measured in the undisturbed part of the sediment, i.e. outside punctual burrows. The grey-scale is visually controlled by optical microscopy, and compared with magnetic susceptibility. Due to sediment properties, the grey-scale provides a high resolution record of diatom/clay ratio. For the Holocene, the grey density record shows that the biogenic productivity (diatoms) is related to the highest values (120-150 units), whereas the lowest values (80-100 units) are related to clays mixed with iron oxides and phosphates. The grey densities show an opposite trend compared to magnetic susceptibility. Our Baikal results are compared with Siberian chronozones and with global ice core record from Greenland (GISP 2).

  17. Grey water treatment in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, Tarek; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of grey water in two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and temperatures, was investigated. The first reactor (UASB-A) was operated at ambient temperature (14-25 degrees C) and HRT of 20, 12 and 8 h, while the second reactor (UASB-30) was operated at controlled temperature of 30 degrees C and HRT of 16, 10 and 6 h. The two reactors were fed with grey water from 'Flintenbreite' settlement in Luebeck, Germany. When the grey water was treated in the UASB reactor at 30 degrees C, total chemical oxygen demand (CODt) removal of 52-64% was achieved at HRT between 6 and 16 h, while at lower temperature lower removal (31-41%) was obtained at HRT between 8 and 20 h. Total nitrogen and phosphorous removal in the UASB reactors were limited (22-36 and 10-24%, respectively) at all operational conditions. The results showed that at increasing temperature or decreasing HRT of the reactors, maximum specific methanogenic activity of the sludge in the reactors improved. As the UASB reactor showed a significantly higher COD removal (31-64%) than the septic tank (11-14%) even at low temperature, it is recommended to use UASB reactor instead of septic tank (the most common system) for grey water pre-treatment. Based on the achieved results and due to high peak flow factor, a HRT between 8 and 12 h can be considered the suitable HRT for the UASB reactor treating grey water at temperature 20-30 degrees C, while a HRT of 12-24 h can be applied at temperature lower than 20 degrees C. PMID:22097038

  18. Identifying grey matter changes in schizotypy using partial least squares correlation.

    PubMed

    Wiebels, Kristina; Waldie, Karen E; Roberts, Reece P; Park, Haeme R P

    2016-08-01

    Neuroimaging research into the brain structure of schizophrenia patients has shown consistent reductions in grey matter volume relative to healthy controls. Examining structural differences in individuals with high levels of schizotypy may help elucidate the course of disorder progression, and provide further support for the schizotypy-schizophrenia continuum. Thus far, the few studies investigating grey matter differences in schizotypy have produced inconsistent results. In the current study, we used a multivariate partial least squares (PLS) approach to clarify the relationship between psychometric schizotypy (measured by the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences) and grey matter volume in 49 healthy adults. We found a negative association between all schizotypy dimensions and grey matter volume in the frontal and temporal lobes, as well as the insula. We also found a positive association between all schizotypy dimensions and grey matter volume in the parietal and temporal lobes, and in subcortical regions. Further correlational analyses revealed that positive and disorganised schizotypy were strongly associated with key regions (left superior temporal gyrus and insula) most consistently reported to be affected in schizophrenia and schizotypy. We also compared PLS with the typically used General Linear Model (GLM) and demonstrate that PLS can be reliably used as an extension to voxel-based morphometry (VBM) data. This may be particularly valuable for schizotypy research due to PLS' ability to detect small, but reliable effects. Together, the findings indicate that healthy schizotypal individuals exhibit structural changes in regions associated with schizophrenia. This adds to the evidence of an overlap of phenotypic expression between schizotypy and schizophrenia, and may help establish biological endophenotypes for the disorder. PMID:27208815

  19. Optimization of multiple quality characteristics in bone drilling using grey relational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rupesh Kumar; Panda, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Drilling of bone is common during bone fracture treatment to fix the fractured parts with screws wires or plates. Minimally invasive drilling of the bone has a great demand as it helps in better fixation and quick healing of the broken bones. The purpose of the present investigation is to determine the optimum cutting condition for the minimization of the temperature, force and surface roughness simultaneously during bone drilling. Method In this study, drilling experiments have been performed on bovine bone with different conditions of feed rate and drill rotational speed using full factorial design. Optimal level of the drilling parameters is determined by the grey relational grade (GRG) obtained from the GRA as the performance index of multiple quality characteristics. The effect of each drilling parameter on GRG is determined using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the results obtained are validated by confirmation experiment. Results Grey relational analysis showed that the investigation with feed rate of 40 mm/min and spindle speed of 500 rpm has the highest grey relational grade and is recommended setting for minimum temperature, force and surface roughness simultaneously during bone drilling. Feed rate has the highest contribution (59.49%) on the multiple performance characteristics followed by the spindle speed (37.69%) as obtained from ANOVA analysis. Conclusions The use of grey relational analysis will simplify the complex process of optimization of the multi response characteristics in bone drilling by converting them into a single grey relational grade. The use of the above suggested methodology can greatly minimize the bone tissue injury during drilling. PMID:25829751

  20. Changes in trace elements during lactation in a marine top predator, the grey seal.

    PubMed

    Habran, Sarah; Pomeroy, Paddy P; Debier, Cathy; Das, Krishna

    2013-01-15

    Lactation in pinnipeds represents the most significant cost to mothers during the reproductive cycle. Dynamics of trace elements and their mobilization associated with energy reserves during such an intense physiological process remains poorly understood in marine mammals. The changes in tissue concentrations of 11 elements (Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, V, and Zn) were investigated in a longitudinal study during the lactation period and during the post-weaning fast period. Blood, milk, blubber, and hair samples were collected sequentially from 21 mother-pup pairs of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) from the Isle of May in Scotland. Maternal transfer through the milk was observed for all trace elements, except for Cd. As an indicator of the placental transfer, levels in pup lanugo (natal coat) revealed also the existence of maternal transfer and accumulation of all assayed trace elements during the foetal development. The placental and mammary barriers against non-essential metal transfer to offspring appear to be absent or weak in grey seals. Examining the contamination levels showed that this grey seal population seems more highly exposed to Pb than other phocid populations (2.2 mg/kg dw of grey seal hair). In contrast, blood and hair levels reflected a lower Hg exposure in grey seals from the Isle of May than in harbour seals from the southeastern North Sea. This study also showed that trace element concentrations in blood and blubber could change rapidly over the lactation period. Such physiological processes must be considered carefully during biomonitoring of trace elements, and potential impacts that rapid fluctuations in concentrations can exert on seal health should be further investigated. PMID:23010392

  1. Hydrolysis rates, methane production and nitrogen solubilisation of grey waste components during anaerobic degradation.

    PubMed

    Jokela, J P Y; Vavilin, V A; Rintala, J A

    2005-03-01

    Municipal grey waste (i.e. the remaining fraction in municipal waste management systems in which putrescibles (biowaste) and other recyclables (paper, metals, glass) are source-segregated) was manually sorted into six main fractions on the basis of composition and also separated by sieving (100 mm mesh size) into two fractions, oversized and undersized, respectively. In practice, in waste management plant the oversized fraction is (or will be) used to produce refuse-derived fuel and the undersized landfilled after biological stabilisation. The methane yields and nitrogen solubilisation of the grey waste and the different fractions (all studied samples were first milled to 5 mm particle samples) were determined in a 237-day methane production batch assay and in a water elution test, respectively. The grey waste was found to contained remnants of putrescibles and also a high amount of other biodegradable waste, including packaging, cartons and cardboard, newsprint, textiles and diapers. These waste fractions comprised 41%-w/w of the grey waste and produced 40-210 m3 methane (total solids (TS))(-1) and less than 0.01 g NH4-N kg TS(added)(-1) except diapers which produced 9.8 g NH4-N kg TS(added)(-1) in the batch assays. In the case of the two sieved fractions and on mass bases, most of the methane originated from the oversized fraction, whereas most of the NH4-N was solublised from the undersized fraction. The first-order kinetic model described rather well the degradation of each grey waste fraction and component, showing the different components to be in the range 0.021-0.058 d(-1), which was around one-sixth of the values reported for the source-segregated putrescible fraction of MSW. PMID:15491833

  2. Application of an enyne metathesis/Diels-Alder cycloaddition sequence: a new versatile approach to the syntheses of C-aryl glycosides and spiro-C-aryl glycosides.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, Ayyagari V; Palanichamy, Kalanidhi; Kaliappan, Krishna P

    2010-07-26

    An efficient approach for the synthesis of a variety of C-aryl and spiro-C-aryl glycosides is described. This diversity-oriented strategy employed here relies on a sequential enyne metathesis to generate the 1,3-diene moiety and Diels-Alder reaction with different dienophiles followed by aromatisation. Whereas cross-enyne metathesis with ethylene gas is used to install the 1,3-diene moiety at the anomeric centre for the synthesis of C-aryl glycosides, an intramolecular enyne metathesis on the sugar enyne is performed to generate the 1,3-diene moiety for the synthesis of spiro-C-aryl glycosides. Efforts to extend this strategy to the synthesis of the core structure of natural C-aryl glycoside gilvocarcin are also described. A combination of both C-aryl and spiro-C-aryl glycosides in the same moiety to combine the features thereof has also been accomplished. A tandem enyne metathesis/Diels-Alder reaction/aromatisation has also been attempted to directly access the C-aryl glycosides in one pot albeit in low yield. PMID:20549721

  3. Paxillus rubicundulus (Boletales, Paxillaceae) and two new alder-specific ectomycorrhizal species, Paxillus olivellus and Paxillus adelphus, from Europe and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Jargeat, Patricia; Moreau, Pierre-Arthur; Gryta, Hervé; Chaumeton, Jean-Paul; Gardes, Monique

    2016-05-01

    Paxillus rubicundulus P.D. Orton has been shown to be a complex of at least three ectomycorrhizal taxa strictly associated with alders (Alnus) in Europe, P. rubicundulus s. str., and two undescribed clades. To assess the taxonomic status of these three clades and their phylogenetic relationships, phylogenetic analyses of two independent gene regions (ITS and gpd), combined with macro- and micromorphological comparisons of genetically identified specimens, were carried out. A total of 85 sequences were successfully obtained from basidiomata and alder mycorrhizae collected in France and Algeria and combined with GenBank and UNITE sequences. The phylogenetic results and estimates of genetic diversity confirmed that the three clades are distinct species, often found in sympatry. As a result, P. rubicundulus s. str. was redefined based on the revision of type material, and Paxillus adelphus and Paxillus olivellus are introduced as new Linnaean names. The often used name Paxillus filamentosus is rejected since it could not be applied to any of the new species. The three species are distinguished micromorphologically by spore size and shape. They are widely distributed in Europe, North Africa and western Asia; P. rubicundulus is rare, and all species have a limited host range. PMID:27109368

  4. Total synthesis of (-)-spinosyn A: examination of structural features that govern the stereoselectivity of the key transannular Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Winbush, SusAnn M; Mergott, Dustin J; Roush, William R

    2008-03-01

    A study of elements of stereochemical control in transannular Diels-Alder reactions leading to the decahydro-as-indacene core of (-)-spinosyn A is described. Initial studies focused on macrocyclic pentaene 9, which includes C(6)-Br and C(8)-OTBS substituents. Excellent selectivity (>95:5) was observed in the cycloaddition of 9 as a consequence of 1,3-allylic strain interactions involving the C(6) and C(8) substituents in the disfavored TS-2. The major cycloadduct 22 was used in a formal synthesis of (-)-spinosyn A. The TDA cyclizations of 12 (which lacks the C(8)-OTBS unit of 9), 13 (which lacks the C(6)-Br substituent of 12), and 14 (which lacks the C(6)-Br and C(21)-Et substituents of 12) were also studied. Macrocycles 12 and 13 served as precursors to (-)-spinosyn A and the (-)-spinosyn A aglycon (34), respectively. It is striking that substrates 12-14 give very similar distributions of transannular Diels-Alder cycloadducts, indicating that the C(6)-Br and C(21)-stereocenter do not play a significant role in the diastereoselectivity of the TDA cycloaddition of spinosyn A precursor 12. It is likely that some as yet unidentified conformational or structural features of macrocycles 12-14 contribute to the levels of diastereoselectivity achieved, since these TDA reactions are more selective for the C(7)-C(9) stereochemical relationship found in the natural product than are the IMDA reactions of trienes 4 and 7. PMID:18215065

  5. DFT Study of Solvent Effects in Acid-Catalyzed Diels-Alder Cycloadditions of 2,5-Dimethylfuran and Maleic Anhydride.

    PubMed

    Salavati-fard, Taha; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Doren, Douglas J

    2015-09-24

    Density functional theory electronic structure calculations were used to explore the mechanism for the Diels-Alder reaction between 2,5-dimethylfuran and maleic anhydride (MA). Reaction paths are reported for uncatalyzed and Lewis and Brønsted acid-catalyzed reactions in vacuum and in a broad range of solvents. The calculations show that, while the uncatalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is thermally feasible in vacuum, a Lewis acid (modeled as Na(+)) lowers the activation barrier by interacting with the dienophile (MA) and decreasing the HOMO-LUMO gap of the reactants. A Brønsted acid (modeled as a proton) can bind to a carbonyl oxygen in MA, changing the reaction mechanism from concerted to stepwise and eliminating the activation barrier. Solvation effects were studied with the SMD model. Electrostatic effects play the largest role in determining the solvation energy of the transition state, which tracks the net dipole moment at the transition state. For the uncatalyzed reaction, the dipole moment is largely determined by charge transfer between the reactants, but in the reactions with ionic catalysts, there is no simple relationship between solvation of the transition state and charge transfer between the reactants. Nonelectrostatic contributions to solvation of the reactants and transition state also make significant contributions to the activation energy. PMID:26331220

  6. Cross-Linked Hydrogels Formed through Diels-Alder Coupling of Furan- and Maleimide-Modified Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid).

    PubMed

    Stewart, S Alison; Backholm, Matilda; Burke, Nicholas A D; Stöver, Harald D H

    2016-02-23

    The Diels-Alder [4 + 2] cycloaddition between furan- and maleimide-functional polyanions was used to form cross-linked synthetic polymer hydrogels. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) was reacted with furfurylamine or N-(2-aminoethyl)maleimide in acetonitrile to form pairs of furan- and maleimide-functionalized poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)s. Mixtures of these mutually reactive polyanions in water gelled within 15 min to 18 h, depending on degree of functionalization and polymer concentrations. Solution and magic-angle spinning (1)H NMR were used to confirm the formation of the Diels-Alder adduct, to analyze competing hydrolytic side reactions, and demonstrate postgelation functionalization. The effect of the degree of furan and maleimide functionalization, polymer concentration, pH, and calcium ion concentration, on gelation time, gel mechanical properties, and equilibrium swelling, are described. Release of dextran as a model drug was studied using fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of gel composition and calcium treatment. PMID:26800849

  7. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs. PMID:27465519

  8. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  9. Meeting Report: Standing Conference of Astronomy Professors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Phil; Bode, Mike

    2002-08-01

    Phil Charles and Mike Bode present the minutes of the 13th Standing Conference of Astronomy Professors (SCAP) meeting held at the NAM in Bristol on 12 April. Thirteen universities/groups were represented.

  10. Lisa's Lemonade Stand: Exploring Algebraic Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Esther M. H.; Lakatos, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity, "Lisa's Lemonade Stand," that actively engages students in algebraic thinking as they analyze change by investigating relationships between variables and gain experience describing and representing these relationships graphically. (YDS)

  11. A Mathematical Prediction of Standing Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jon

    1970-01-01

    Presents a problem in standing waves that provides an example of the mathematics used by theoretical physicists to generate predictions of new phenomena from fundamental background knowledge. Mathematical analysis required to solve problem is accomplished by simple graphical processes. (BR)

  12. Stress analysis of down force calibration stand

    SciTech Connect

    COVERDELL, B.L.

    1998-10-01

    This document presents the stress analysis of the Down Force Calibration Stand. All structural components were evaluated and found to be adequate to withstand the applicable design loads meeting all codes and standards requirements.

  13. Timelapse: Webb's Ambient Optical Assembly Stand

    NASA Video Gallery

    The clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has received a giant structural steel frame called "AOAS," the Ambient Optical Assembly Stand that will be used to assemble t...

  14. TMS delivered for A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A state-of-the-art thrust measurement system for the A-3 Test Stand under construction at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center was delivered March 17. Once completed, the A-3 stand (seen in background) will allow simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines for America's space program. Work on the stand began in 2007, with activation scheduled for 2012. The stand is the first major test structure to be built at Stennis since the 1960s. The recently delivered TMS was fabricated by Thrust Measurement Systems in Illinois. It is an advanced calibration system capable of measuring vertical and horizontal thrust loads with an accuracy within 0.15 percent at 225,000 pounds.

  15. Testing biological effects of hand-washing grey water for reuse in irrigation on an urban farm: a case study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Zain; Sim, Yei Lin; Lin, Yang Jian; Lai, Ka Man

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of reusing hand-washing grey water contaminated with antibacterial hand-washing liquid for irrigation purposes in an urban farm is explored in this case study. Experiments are carried out to investigate if the quality of this grey water allows for its reuse in agriculture as per the guidelines established by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, there is no guideline to test the biological effect of grey water prior to agricultural use. It is plausible that the antibacterial property of the grey water can harm the soil microbial system and plants when applied to land, even if all other water quality parameters satisfy the WHO limit. We use algae (Chlorella vulgaris) and indigenous soil bacteria as initial plant and soil bacteria indicators, respectively, to test the potential inhibition of the water on plants and soil bacteria. Results show that the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the grey water is 10% higher than the WHO permissible level, while all other water quality parameters are within the limits after four days of our experimental period. An inhibitory effect is observed in all of the biological tests. However, the inhibitory effect on algae and soil bacteria is not observed after the four-day period. The case study demonstrates a new approach for testing the biological effect of grey water, which can be used in conjunction with the WHO guideline, and provides data for this urban farm to set up a future water treatment system for grey-water reuse in irrigation. PMID:23530370

  16. Increased Grey Matter Associated with Long-Term Sahaja Yoga Meditation: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sergio Elías; Suero, José; Barros, Alfonso; González-Mora, José Luis; Rubia, Katya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate regional differences in grey matter volume associated with the practice of Sahaja Yoga Meditation. Design Twenty three experienced practitioners of Sahaja Yoga Meditation and twenty three non-meditators matched on age, gender and education level, were scanned using structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging and their grey matter volume were compared using Voxel-Based Morphometry. Results Grey matter volume was larger in meditators relative to non-meditators across the whole brain. In addition, grey matter volume was larger in several predominantly right hemispheric regions: in insula, ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, inferior temporal and parietal cortices as well as in left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and left insula. No areas with larger grey matter volume were found in non-meditators relative to meditators. Conclusions The study shows that long-term practice of Sahaja Yoga Meditation is associated with larger grey matter volume overall, and with regional enlargement in several right hemispheric cortical and subcortical brain regions that are associated with sustained attention, self-control, compassion and interoceptive perception. The increased grey matter volume in these attention and self-control mediating regions suggests use-dependent enlargement with regular practice of this meditation. PMID:26938433

  17. Inexpensive Guitar Stand Project Really Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horath, Larry; Horath, Elyse

    2010-01-01

    Anyone who plays a guitar needs a stand to hold the guitar when he or she is not playing it. A guitar is not an instrument that one can lay down or prop against the wall without risking potentially catastrophic and long-term damage. There are several options in pre-made guitar stands made for single or multiple guitars, but as an alternative that…

  18. 31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. HISTORIC VIEW OF TEST STAND NO. 1 AT PEENEMUENDE A-4 ENGINE AND ROCKET PROPULSION TEST STAND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. 2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAST ELEVATION OF POWER PLANT TEST STAND (HORIZONTAL TEST STAND REMNANTS OF BUILDING-BLANK WHITE WALL ONLY ORIGINAL REMAINS. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Power Plant Test Stand, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. Guitar Strings as Standing Waves: A Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael

    2007-08-01

    An undergraduate student's first exposure to modern atomic theory tends to start with Bohr's model of the atom. This familiar introduction to atomic structure also marks a general chemistry student's first foray into waves. Many popular chemistry textbooks illustrate the concept of a standing wave in the development of the modern quantum model by using the phrase “as seen on a guitar string”. In these illustrations, the wave itself is often small and difficult to discern. The same phenomenon, however, can be easily and audibly observed. This demonstration uses an acoustic guitar to produce three unique harmonic vibrations, each of which is representative of a standing wave and illustrates the concept of quantization. Manipulation of the guitar string to produce a standing wave is pervasive in popular music and is audibly recognizable. Lightly placing a finger on the 12th, 7th, or 5th fret and strumming any one or all six strings can produce an audible example of a standing wave on a guitar. This corresponds to a standing wave with 1, 2, or 3 nodes, respectively. Attempting to induce a node at other points on a guitar string does not generate a standing wave, due to destructive interference, thus no audible tone is produced.

  1. Birch Stands Growth Increase in Western Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Kuzmichev, Valeriy V.; Im, Sergey T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Birch (Betula pendula Roth) growth within the Western Siberia forest-steppe was analyzed based on long-term (1897-2006) inventory data (height, diameter at breast height [dbh], and stand volume). Analysis of biometry parameters showed increased growth at the beginning of twenty-first century compared to similar stands (stands age = 40-60 years) at the end of nineteenth century. Mean height, dbh, and stem volume increased from 14 to 20 m, from 16 to 22 cm, and from approx. 63 to approx. 220 cu m/ha, respectively. Significant correlations were found between the stands mean height, dbh, and volume on the one hand, and vegetation period length (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.74), atmospheric CO2 concentration (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.76), and drought index (Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index, r(sub s) = -0.33 to -0.51) on the other hand. The results obtained have revealed apparent climate-induced impacts (e.g. increase of vegetation period length and birch habitat drying due to drought increase) on the stands growth. Along with this, a high correlation of birch biometric parameters and [CO2] in ambient air indicated an effect of CO2 fertilization. Meanwhile, further drought increase may switch birch stand growth into decline and greater mortality as has already been observed within the Trans-Baikal forest-steppe ecotone.

  2. Intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder reaction and its impact on the structure-function properties of environmentally sensitive fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Brummond, Kay M; Kocsis, Laura S

    2015-08-18

    Reaction discovery plays a vital role in accessing new chemical entities and materials possessing important function.1 In this Account, we delineate our reaction discovery program regarding the [4 + 2] cycloaddition reaction of styrene-ynes. In particular, we highlight our studies that lead to the realization of the diverging reaction mechanisms of the intramolecular didehydro-Diels-Alder (IMDDA) reaction to afford dihydronaphthalene and naphthalene products. Formation of the former involves an intermolecular hydrogen atom abstraction and isomerization, whereas the latter is formed via an unexpected elimination of H2. Forming aromatic compounds by a unimolecular elimination of H2 offers an environmentally benign alternative to typical oxidation protocols. We also include in this Account ongoing work focused on expanding the scope of this reaction, mainly its application to the preparation of cyclopenta[b]naphthalenes. Finally, we showcase the synthetic utility of the IMDDA reaction by preparing novel environmentally sensitive fluorophores. The choice to follow this path was largely influenced by the impact this reaction could have on our understanding of the structure-function relationships of these molecular sensors by taking advantage of a de novo construction and functionalization of the aromatic portion of these compounds. We were also inspired by the fact that, despite the advances that have been made in the construction of small molecule fluorophores, access to rationally designed fluorescent probes or sensors possessing varied and tuned photophysical, spectral, and chemical properties are still needed. To this end, we report our studies to correlate fluorophore structure with photophysical property relationships for a series of solvatochromic PRODAN analogs and viscosity-sensitive cyanoacrylate analogs. The versatility of this de novo strategy for fluorophore synthesis was demonstrated by showing that a number of functional groups could be installed at

  3. Development of prolonged standing strain index to quantify risk levels of standing jobs.

    PubMed

    Halim, Isa; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Many occupations in industry such as metal stamping workers, electronics parts assembly operators, automotive industry welders, and lathe operators require working in a standing posture for a long time. Prolonged standing can contribute to discomfort and muscle fatigue particularly in the back and legs. This study developed the prolonged standing strain index (PSSI) to quantify the risk levels caused by standing jobs, and proposed recommendations to minimize the risk levels. Risk factors associated with standing jobs, such as working posture, muscles activity, standing duration, holding time, whole-body vibration, and indoor air quality, were the basis for developing the PSSI. All risk factors were assigned multipliers, and the PSSI was the product of those multipliers. Recommendations for improvement are based on the PSSI; however, extensive studies are required to validate their effectiveness. multipliers, and the PSSI was the product of those multipliers. Recommendations for improvement are based on the PSSI; however, extensive studies are required to validate their effectiveness. PMID:22429532

  4. Seal dynamics on the Swedish west coast: Scenarios of competition as Baltic grey seal intrude on harbour seal territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Carl Johan

    2012-07-01

    The Kattegat-Skagerrak region on the Swedish west coast is home to an abundant harbour seal population (Phoca vitulina) and a small scattered grey seal population (Halichoerus grypus). In addition, grey seal from the growing population in the Baltic Sea frequently migrate into the Kattegat-Skagerrak. Harbour seals on the west coast of Sweden show relatively high population growth (approximately 9%) compared to the Baltic grey seal in ice-free habitats (approximately 6%), which, in theory, makes harbour seal the stronger competitor of the two in this region. However, incidents of disease in harbour seals that lower population growth are becoming more frequent. These epidemics are primarily caused by the Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV), and may reduce population size with up to 70%. This study models the average development under potential scenarios of competing harbour- and Baltic grey seal populations using Leslie matrices and the Lotka-Volterra model of inter-specific competition. The model is parameterised with previously published data, and resource overlap is incorporated through density dependent pup survival. Using numerical methods short- and long-term abundances are simulated under weak, moderate and strong competition and for different frequencies of PDV epidemics. Results show that the harbour seals are resilient to competition while exerting a negative effect on grey seal abundance under moderate to strong competition. Hence Baltic grey seal benefit from weaker levels of competition. Under moderate and strong competition grey seal abundance is a direct function of the PDV frequency as this reduces the competitive strength of harbour seals. Theoretically this means that higher frequencies of PDV or other pathogens epidemics could facilitate an expansion of Baltic grey seal into Kattegat-Skagerrak. Independent of interaction strength and frequency of epidemics the projected changes to abundances are slow (50-100 years), and even in exceedingly stable

  5. endo/exo stereoselectivity in Diels-Alder reactions of α,β-dialkylated conjugated enals to cyclic 1,3-dienes: intermediates in the synthesis of (-)-β-santalol and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Christian; Skuy, David; de Saint Laumer, Jean-Yves; Brauchli, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Highly exo-selective [4+2] cycloadditions of cyclopenta-1,3-diene 2a to α,β-dialkyl conjugated enals 5 are compared with the analogous endo-favored Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexa-1,3-diene 7. The exo-stereoselectivity is lower in the homologous case of methylcyclopenta-1,3-diene 9. This diastereoselectivity is discussed either in terms of a retro-homo-Diels-Alder reaction, associated with thermodynamic control, or with respect to either a competing hetero-Diels-Alder/Claisen or Cope domino pathway, or retro-Claisen/retro-hetero-Diels-Alder of the endo-homo-cycloadducts. These hypothetical mechanisms have been examined by DFT calculations at the MPW1K(CH2 Cl2 )/6-31+G** level of theory for the AlCl3 -mediated cycloadditions of 5d to 2a and 7. Application of Corey's methodology to the γ-halogeno-α-methyl-substituted dienophiles 5a and 5b allowed an enantioselective preparation of known and useful intermediates for the synthesis of either the naturally occurring (-)-β-santalol or its potentially olfactive structural analogs. PMID:25329781

  6. Design of cross-linked semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone)-based networks with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties through Diels-Alder reactions.

    PubMed

    Raquez, Jean-Marie; Vanderstappen, Sophie; Meyer, Franck; Verge, Pierre; Alexandre, Michael; Thomassin, Jean-Michel; Jérôme, Christine; Dubois, Philippe

    2011-08-29

    Cross-linked poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-based polyesterurethane (PUR) systems have been synthesized through Diels-Alder reactions by reactive extrusion. The Diels-Alder and retro-Diels-Alder reactions proved to be useful for enhancing the molecular motion of PCL-based systems, and therefore their crystallization ability, in the design of cross-linked semicrystalline polymers with one-way and two-way shape-memory properties. Successive reactions between α,ω-diol PCL (PCL(2) ), furfuryl alcohol, and methylene diphenyl 4,4'-diisocyanate straightforwardly afforded the α,ω-furfuryl PCL-based PUR systems, and subsequent Diels-Alder reactions with N,N-phenylenedimaleimide afforded the thermoreversible cycloadducts. The cross-linking density could be modulated by partially replacing PCL-diol with PCL-tetraol. Interestingly, the resulting PUR systems proved to be semicrystalline cross-linked polymers, the melting temperature of which (close to 45 °C) represented the switching temperature for their shape-memory properties. Qualitative and quantitative measurements demonstrated that these PUR systems exhibited one-way and two-way shape-memory properties depending on their cross-linking density. PMID:21744399

  7. S-IC Test Stand Design Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo is of the S-IC test stand design model created prior to construction.

  8. S-IC Test Stand Design Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo is of the S-IC test stand design model.

  9. Removal of micropollutants from aerobically treated grey water via ozone and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Leal, L; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; Buisman, C J N

    2011-04-01

    Ozonation and adsorption onto activated carbon were tested for the removal micropollutants of personal care products from aerobically treated grey water. MilliQ water spiked with micropollutants (100-1600 μgL(-1)) was ozonated at a dosing rate of 1.22. In 45 min, this effectively removed (>99%): Four parabens, bisphenol-A, hexylcinnamic aldehyde, 4-methylbenzylidene-camphor (4MBC), benzophenone-3 (BP3), triclosan, galaxolide and ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate. After 60 min, the removal efficiency of benzalkonium chloride was 98%, tonalide and nonylphenol 95%, octocrylene 92% and 2-phenyl-5-benzimidazolesulfonic acid (PBSA) 84%. Ozonation of aerobically treated grey water at an applied ozone dose of 15 mgL(-1), reduced the concentrations of octocrylene, nonylphenol, triclosan, galaxolide, tonalide and 4-methylbenzylidene-camphor to below limits of quantification, with removal efficiencies of at least 79%. Complete adsorption of all studied micropollutants onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was observed in batch tests with milliQ water spiked with 100-1600 μgL(-1) at a PAC dose of 1.25 gL(-1) and a contact time of 5 min. Three granular activated carbon (GAC) column experiments were operated to treat aerobically treated grey water. The operation of a GAC column with aerobically treated grey water spiked with micropollutants in the range of 0.1-10 μgL(-1) at a flow of 0.5 bed volumes (BV)h(-1) showed micropollutant removal efficiencies higher than 72%. During the operation time of 1728 BV, no breakthrough of TOC or micropollutants was observed. Removal of micropollutants from aerobically treated grey water was tested in a GAC column at a flow of 2 BVh(-1). Bisphenol-A, triclosan, tonalide, BP3, galaxolide, nonylphenol and PBSA were effectively removed even after a stable TOC breakthrough of 65% had been reached. After spiking the aerobically treated effluent with micropollutants to concentrations of 10-100 μgL(-1), efficient removal to below limits of quantification

  10. The impact of beetle-induced conifer death on stand-scale canopy snow interception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, E. T.; Small, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Snow that falls on a forest either passes through the canopy to the ground or is intercepted by the canopy on needles, branches or bark. The interception of snowfall in forest canopies impacts the water budget because intercepted snow is more likely to sublimate than subcanopy snow. Because forest canopy characteristics are a primary control of canopy snow interception, which in turn controls subcanopy snow accumulation, reductions in canopy density have important implications for snow accumulation on the forest floor. Forest structure can be drastically and rapidly altered by forest disturbance, such as insect attack, wildfire and blowdown. Here, we look at the impact that changing forest characteristics associated with beetle infestation have on canopy snow interception. The mountain pine beetle is currently impacting more than 100,000 km2 of pine forest in western North America. Trees killed by bark beetles eventually lose the majority of their canopy material. We hypothesize that tree death significantly reduces available interception platforms, leading to greater subcanopy snow accumulation than pre-infestation conditions. These potential impacts on snow accumulation are especially important for water resources in the western U.S., where the hydrologic cycle is dominated by snowmelt. We test this hypothesis using extensive data collected from adjacent living and grey phase dead stands. We employ multiple methods to measure canopy snow interception, at both the storm- and season-scales. During the winter of 2011, we made more than 10,000 spatially distributed measurements of subcanopy snow accumulation in three living and two dead lodgepole pine stands as well as three clearings. Measurements were made daily as well as immediately prior to and following storm events, allowing us to calculate storm-scale canopy interception. Interception is estimated by comparing subcanopy snow accumulation in clearings and forests. Additionally, by taking repeated daily

  11. Unsupported standing with minimized ankle muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Mihelj, Matjaz; Munih, Marko

    2004-08-01

    In the past, limited unsupported standing has been restored in patients with thoracic spinal cord injury through open-loop functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed knee extensor muscles and the support of intact arm musculature. Here an optimal control system for paralyzed ankle muscles was designed that enables the subject to stand without hand support in a sagittal plane. The paraplegic subject was conceptualized as an underactuated double inverted pendulum structure with an active degree of freedom in the upper trunk and a passive degree of freedom in the paralyzed ankle joints. Control system design is based on the minimization of a cost function that estimates the effort of ankle joint muscles via observation of the ground reaction force position, relative to ankle joint axis. Furthermore, such a control system integrates voluntary upper trunk activity and artificial control of ankle joint muscles, resulting in a robust standing posture. Figures are shown for the initial simulation study, followed by disturbance tests on an intact volunteer and several laboratory trials with a paraplegic person. Benefits of the presented methodology are prolonged standing sessions and in the fact that the subject is able to maintain voluntary control over upper body orientation in space, enabling simple functional standing. PMID:15311817

  12. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  13. Observation of Helicobacter-like organisms in gastric mucosa of grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Hamir, Amir N; Stasko, Judi; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2004-04-01

    Archival specimens of gastric mucosa of 10 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 9 porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum), 6 grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), 6 bobcats (Lynx rufus), 4 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and 3 black bears (Ursus americanus) were microscopically examined for evidence of Helicobacter-like organisms. Such organisms were seen in the specimens from the grey foxes and bobcats only. Histochemical stains (modified Steiner and carbol fuchsin methods) revealed long spiral organisms within lumina of gastric glands; however, neither gross nor microscopic lesions were observed. By electron microscopy (EM), the organisms were found to be free in the glandular lumina and were seen occasionally in the cytoplasm of gastric epithelial cells. Morphologically, 2 different phenotypes of spiral organisms were identified by EM. The organisms associated with bobcats appeared to be more tightly coiled than those seen in grey foxes. The presence of Helicobacter-like organisms in the gastric mucosa of grey foxes has not previously been described. PMID:15188962

  14. A mathematical model relating changes of grey values to changes of thicknesses of a stepwedge.

    PubMed

    Geha, H; Bechara, B; Faddoul, T; Noujeim, M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a mathematical model relating changes in grey values to changes of thicknesses of a stepwedge. Radiographs of a stepwedge were obtained through a limited exposure range on a single Kodak 6100 charge-coupled device detector at 63 kVp and 70 kVp. Grey values from each step were evaluated relative to the corresponding step thickness. All possible regression fits were evaluated based on their coefficient of determination (R(2)) value and their mean squared errors (MSEs) relative to the original thickness. For all exposure settings, the fifth-degree polynomial was the best possible fit, with the highest R(2) value and the lowest MSE. PMID:22842639

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus).

    PubMed

    Dodt, William G; McComish, Bennet J; Nilsson, Maria A; Gibb, Gillian C; Penny, David; Phillips, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete mitochondrial genome (accession number: LK995454) of an iconic Australian species, the eastern grey kangaroo (Macropus giganteus). The mitogenomic organization is consistent with other marsupials, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, an origin of light strand replication and a control region or D-loop. No repetitive sequences were detected in the control region. The M. giganteus mitogenome exemplifies a combination of tRNA gene order and structural peculiarities that appear to be unique to marsupials. We present a maximum likelihood phylogeny based on complete mitochondrial protein and RNA coding sequences that confirms the phylogenetic position of the grey kangaroo among macropodids. PMID:25103427

  16. Grey relational analysis of amine inhibition of mild steel corrosion in acids

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.; Tan, T.C.; Lee, J.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Grey relational analysis makes use of relatively simple mathematical procedures to arrive at salient relationships in a complex system. It uses a relatively small amount of data and works with great variability in factors. Grey relational analysis was used to investigate the relationship between inhibitor structure and inhibitor performance for a series of amines of different structures in the corrosion of mild steel in acids. Results showed the molecular weight (MW), the negative of the logarithm of the dissociation constant (pK{sub a}), and the number of nitrogen donor atoms influenced inhibitor effectiveness in the active region. The number of NH bonds was an additional factor for inhibition in the passive region. Trends in these factors were rationalized in terms of adsorptive interactions between the inhibitor molecules and the substrate. Results conformed to findings in the literature and were verified by additional measurements using hexamine as the inhibitor.

  17. Microstructure Formation and Fracturing Characteristics of Grey Cast Iron Repaired Using Laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The repairing technology based on laser rapid fusion is becoming an important tool for fixing grey cast iron equipment efficiently. A laser repairing protocol was developed using Fe-based alloy powders as material. The microstructure and fracturing feature of the repaired zone (RZ) were analyzed. The results showed that regionally organized RZ with good density and reliable metallurgical bond can be achieved by laser repairing. At the bottom of RZ, dendrites existed in similar direction and extended to the secondary RZ, making the grains grow extensively with inheritance with isometric grains closer to the surface substrate. The strength of the grey cast iron base material was maintained by laser repairing. The base material and RZ were combined with robust strength and fracture resistance. The prevention and deflection of cracking process were analyzed using a cracking process model and showed that the overall crack toughness of the materials increased. PMID:25032230

  18. Pseudo-inverse Jacobian control with grey relational analysis for robot manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Lin, C. C.; Lo, H.-S.

    2009-10-01

    Interest in complex robotic systems is growing in new application areas. An example of such a robotic system is a dexterous manipulator mounted on an oscillatory base. In literature, such systems are known as macro/micro systems. This work proposes pseudo-inverse Jacobian feedback control laws and applies grey relational analysis for tuning outer-loop PID control parameters of Cartesian computed-torque control law for robotic manipulators mounted on oscillatory bases. The priority when modifying controller parameters should be the top ranking importance among parameters. Grey relational grade is utilized to investigate the sensitivity of tuning the auxiliary signal PID of the Cartesian computed-torque law to achieve desired performance. Results of this study can be feasible to numerous mechanical systems, such as mobile robots, gantry cranes, underwater robots, and other dynamic systems mounted on oscillatory bases, for moving the end-effector to a desired Cartesian position.

  19. Grey transport acceleration method for time-dependent radiative transfer problems

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, E.

    1988-10-01

    A new iterative method for solving hte time-dependent multifrequency radiative transfer equations is described. The method is applicable to semi-implicit time discretizations that generate a linear steady-state multifrequency transport problem with pseudo-scattering within each time step. The standard ''lambda'' iteration method is shown to often converge slowly for such problems, and the new grey transport acceleration (GTA) method, based on accelerating the lambda method by employing a grey, or frequency-independent transport equation, is developed. The GTA method is shown, theoretically by an iterative Fourier analysis, and experimentally by numerical calculations, to converge significantly faster than the lambda method. In addition, the GTA method is conceptually simple to implement for general differencing schemes, on either Eulerian or Lagrangian meshes. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  20. A mathematical model relating changes of grey values to changes of thicknesses of a stepwedge

    PubMed Central

    Geha, H; Bechara, B; Faddoul, T; Noujeim, M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a mathematical model relating changes in grey values to changes of thicknesses of a stepwedge. Radiographs of a stepwedge were obtained through a limited exposure range on a single Kodak 6100 charge-coupled device detector at 63 kVp and 70 kVp. Grey values from each step were evaluated relative to the corresponding step thickness. All possible regression fits were evaluated based on their coefficient of determination (R2) value and their mean squared errors (MSEs) relative to the original thickness. For all exposure settings, the fifth-degree polynomial was the best possible fit, with the highest R2 value and the lowest MSE.

  1. Effect of hunting on annual survival of grey ducks in New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, R.J.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    We used band recovery data from grey ducks (Anas superciliosa) banded in New Zealand between 1957 and 1974 to test 2 null hypotheses: (1) hunting mortality is completely additive to natural sources of mortality, and (2) hunting mortality is completely compensated by changes in natural mortality. We modeled annual survival as a function of survival in the absence of hunting and the probability of death from hunting. The complete compensation hypothesis was rejected, but we were unable to reject the completely additive hypothesis. There was no evidence of sex- or age-specificity for the relationship between kill rate and annual survival rate. We used simulated data to evaluate model performance. Parameter estimates were unbiased despite the inclusion of estimates that lay outside the bounds of the parameter space, although model-based variance estimates were consistently less than empirical variances. Our results imply that harvest-restrictions may be useful in effecting change in annual survival rates of grey ducks.

  2. Impact-characterisation for a grey water footprint - a discussion of two new approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörtenhuber, Stefan; Weißhaidinger, Rainer; Lindenthal, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Based on the water footprint concept of the Water Footprint Network (see e.g. Hoekstra et al., 2011), an increasing number of studies regarding virtual water or water footprints include so-called "grey water", i.e. an amount of dilution water needed to assimilate pollutions in freshwater. The inclusion of grey water into water footprints offers to aggregate freshwater consumption (blue water) and reduced water quality (grey water) at the inventory level by a common unit (litres or cubic metres of water). For "blue water", i.e. surface and groundwater which is consumed during production processes, Pfister et al. (2009) developed regional characterisation factors (a "water stress index", WSI), which include an impact weighting for a regional water consumption. Analogous, grey water may be characterised by a regionally varying "water quality stress" with two approaches: (A) as a function of regional concentrations of the substance that defines the grey water (e.g. nitrate) or (B) by precipitation, evapotranspiration water and groundwater recharge amounts. We chose each two exemplary wheat production systems (PS; organic and conventional) in two different Austrian regions to represent the effect of the two proposed approaches. Assumptions concerning the four PS' wheat yields, precipitation, evapotranspiration, nitrogen application and regional groundwater concentrations were taken from literature and statistics (e.g. Statistics Austria, 2011; BMLFUW, 2006). Nitrate was identified to represent the most critical substance in Austrian water bodies (Austrian Environment Agency, 2007), defining the grey water demand. The rates for leached nitrate were derived from Kolbe (2002). Nitrate leaching was estimated for 12.92 and 28.50 kg NO3-N ha-1 year-1 for the organic and the conventional systems, respectively. The characterisation factors for the two approaches are calculated by: (A) for a catchment area-based approach, a regional background concentration for the most relevant

  3. Improved segmentation of deep brain grey matter structures using magnetization transfer (MT) parameter maps

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Gunther; Draganski, Bogdan; Frackowiak, Richard; Ashburner, John; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2009-01-01

    Basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei are involved in the pathophysiology of various neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Currently available structural T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance images do not provide sufficient contrast for reliable automated segmentation of various subcortical grey matter structures. We use a novel, semi-quantitative magnetization transfer (MT) imaging protocol that overcomes limitations in T1w images, which are mainly due to their sensitivity to the high iron content in subcortical grey matter. We demonstrate improved automated segmentation of putamen, pallidum, pulvinar and substantia nigra using MT images. A comparison with segmentation of high-quality T1w images was performed in 49 healthy subjects. Our results show that MT maps are highly suitable for automated segmentation, and so for multi-subject morphometric studies with a focus on subcortical structures. PMID:19344771

  4. Standing on a declining surface reduces transient prolonged standing induced low back pain development.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kaitlin M; Callaghan, Jack P

    2016-09-01

    While alternating standing position on a sloped surface has proven successful at reducing low back pain during standing, the purpose of this study was to evaluate standing solely on a declining surface to isolate the influence of the postural change. Seventeen participants performed two 75-min prolonged standing occupational simulations- level ground and declining surface. Fifty-three percent of participants (9/17) were categorized as pain developers during the level ground standing condition. For these same pain developers, their average maximum pain scores were 58% lower during sloped standing. All participants showed greater hip flexion, trunk-to-thigh angle flexion, and posterior translation of the trunk center of gravity when standing on the sloped surface. These postural changes could cause the muscles crossing the hip posteriorly to increase passive stiffness and assist with stabilizing the pelvis. This study stresses the importance of hip kinematics, not just lumbar spine posture, in reducing prolonged standing induced low back pain. PMID:27184314

  5. Grey Literature Searching for Health Sciences Systematic Reviews: A Prospective Study of Time Spent and Resources Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ahlam A.; Ratajeski, Melissa A.; Bertolet, Marnie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify estimates of time taken to search grey literature in support of health sciences systematic reviews and to identify searcher or systematic review characteristics that may impact resource selection or time spent searching. Methods A survey was electronically distributed to searchers embarking on a new systematic review. Characteristics of the searcher and systematic review were collected along with time spent searching and what resources were searched. Time and resources were tabulated and resources were categorized as grey or non-grey. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Out of 81 original respondents, 21% followed through with completion of the surveys in their entirety. The median time spent searching all resources was 471 minutes, and of those a median of 85 minutes were spent searching grey literature. The median number of resources used in a systematic review search was four and the median number of grey literature sources searched was two. The amount of time spent searching was influenced by whether the systematic review was grant funded. Additionally, the number of resources searched was impacted by institution type and whether systematic review training was received. Conclusions This study characterized the amount of time for conducting systematic review searches including searching the grey literature, in addition to the number and types of resources used. This may aid searchers in planning their time, along with providing benchmark information for future studies. This paper contributes by quantifying current grey literature search patterns and associating them with searcher and review characteristics. Further discussion and research into the search approach for grey literature in support of systematic reviews is encouraged. PMID:25914722

  6. Microsatellite and Mitochondrial DNA Study of Native Eastern European Cattle Populations: The Case of the Romanian Grey

    PubMed Central

    Cean, Ada; Cziszter, Ludovic Toma; Gavojdian, Dinu; Ivan, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Eastern European Grey cattle are regarded as the direct descendants of the aurochs (Bos taurus primigenius). Nowadays in Romania, less than 100 Grey animals are being reared and included in the national gene reserve. We examined the genetic diversity among Romanian Grey, Brown, Spotted and Black and White cattle breeds, with a particular focus on Romanian Grey through the use of (i) 11 bovine specific microsatellite markers on 83 animals and (ii) 638 bp length of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region sequence data from a total of 81 animals. Both microsatellite and mtDNA analysis revealed a high level of genetic variation in the studied breeds. In Romanian Grey a total of 100 alleles were found, the mean number of observed alleles per locus was 9.091; the average observed heterozygosity was 0.940; the Wright’s fixation index (FIS) was negative (-0.189) and indicates that there is no inbreeding and no selection pressure. MtDNA analysis revealed 52 haplotypes with 67 variable sites among the Romanian cattle breeds without any insertion or deletion. Haplotype diversity was 0.980 ± 0.007 and ranged from 0.883 ± 0.056 (Brown) to 0.990 ± 0.028 (Spotted and Black and White). The highest genetic variability of the mtDNA was recorded in the Grey breed, where 18 haplotypes were identified. The most frequent mtDNA D-loop region belonged to T3 haplogroup (80.247%), which was found across all studied breeds, while T2 haplotypes (16.049%) was only found in Grey, Spotted and Black and White genotypes. The T1 haplotypes (3.704%) were found in the Grey and Spotted. The current results contribute to the general knowledge on genetic diversity found in Eastern European cattle breeds and could prove a valuable tool for the conservation efforts of animal genetic resources (FAnGR). PMID:26398563

  7. Microsatellite and Mitochondrial DNA Study of Native Eastern European Cattle Populations: The Case of the Romanian Grey.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Daniela Elena; Cean, Ada; Cziszter, Ludovic Toma; Gavojdian, Dinu; Ivan, Alexandra; Kusza, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    The Eastern European Grey cattle are regarded as the direct descendants of the aurochs (Bos taurus primigenius). Nowadays in Romania, less than 100 Grey animals are being reared and included in the national gene reserve. We examined the genetic diversity among Romanian Grey, Brown, Spotted and Black and White cattle breeds, with a particular focus on Romanian Grey through the use of (i) 11 bovine specific microsatellite markers on 83 animals and (ii) 638 bp length of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop region sequence data from a total of 81 animals. Both microsatellite and mtDNA analysis revealed a high level of genetic variation in the studied breeds. In Romanian Grey a total of 100 alleles were found, the mean number of observed alleles per locus was 9.091; the average observed heterozygosity was 0.940; the Wright's fixation index (FIS) was negative (-0.189) and indicates that there is no inbreeding and no selection pressure. MtDNA analysis revealed 52 haplotypes with 67 variable sites among the Romanian cattle breeds without any insertion or deletion. Haplotype diversity was 0.980 ± 0.007 and ranged from 0.883 ± 0.056 (Brown) to 0.990 ± 0.028 (Spotted and Black and White). The highest genetic variability of the mtDNA was recorded in the Grey breed, where 18 haplotypes were identified. The most frequent mtDNA D-loop region belonged to T3 haplogroup (80.247%), which was found across all studied breeds, while T2 haplotypes (16.049%) was only found in Grey, Spotted and Black and White genotypes. The T1 haplotypes (3.704%) were found in the Grey and Spotted. The current results contribute to the general knowledge on genetic diversity found in Eastern European cattle breeds and could prove a valuable tool for the conservation efforts of animal genetic resources (FAnGR). PMID:26398563

  8. Predicting grey-sided vole occurrence in northern Sweden at multiple spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Magnus; Bergsten, Arvid; Ecke, Frauke; Bodin, Orjan; Bodin, Lennart; Hörnfeldt, Birger

    2013-11-01

    Forestry is continually changing the habitats for many forest-dwelling species around the world. The grey-sided vole (Myodes rufocanus) has declined since the 1970s in forests of northern Sweden. Previous studies suggested that this might partly be caused by reduced focal forest patch size due to clear-cutting. Proximity and access to old pine forest and that microhabitats often contains stones have also been suggested previously but never been evaluated at multiple spatial scales. In a field study in 2010-2011 in northern Sweden, we investigated whether occurrence of grey-sided voles would be higher in (1) large focal patches of >60 years old forest, (2) in patches with high connectivity to surrounding patches, and (3) in patches in proximity to stone fields. We trapped animals in forest patches in two study areas (Västerbotten and Norrbotten). At each trap station, we surveyed structural microhabitat characteristics. Landscape-scale features were investigated using satellite-based forest data combined with geological maps. Unexpectedly, the vole was almost completely absent in Norrbotten. The trap sites in Norrbotten had a considerably lower amount of stone holes compared with sites with voles in Västerbotten. We suggest this might help to explain the absence in Norrbotten. In Västerbotten, the distance from forest patches with voles to stone fields was significantly shorter than from patches without voles. In addition, connectivity to surrounding patches and size of the focal forest patches was indeed related to the occurrence of grey-sided voles, with connectivity being the overall best predictor. Our results support previous findings on the importance of large forest patches, but also highlight the importance of connectivity for occurrence of grey-sided voles. The results further suggest that proximity to stone fields increase habitat quality of the forests for the vole and that the presence of stone fields enhances the voles' ability to move between nearby

  9. Retroperitoneal Haematom due to Spontaneous Rupture and Haemorrhage of Adrenal Cyst Presenting with Grey Turner's Sign.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Bedriye Muge; Yilmaz, Fevzi; Özkan, Fevzi Bircan; Ongar, Murat; Özturk, Derya; Cesur, Fatma

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage is a rare entity and a potentially life-threatening condition. A 41-year-old woman presented to our emergency department with left flank pain and dysuria. Her physical examination disclosed left abdominal and costovertebral angle tenderness, left flank ecchymosis (Grey Turner sign). Abdominal computerised tomography revealed spontaneous retroperitoneal haemorrhage. She was discharged after 10 days with recommendation of urology follow-up. PMID:26160093

  10. Specialization for aggression in sexually dimorphic skeletal morphology in grey wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Jeremy S; Brandt, Ellissa K

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour is important in the life history of many animals. In grey wolves (Canis lupus), territory defence through direct competition with conspecifics is severe and often lethal. Thus, performance in aggressive encounters may be under strong selection. Additionally, grey wolves frequently kill large dangerous prey species. Because both sexes actively participate in aggressive activities and prey capture, wolves are expected to exhibit a low level of musculoskeletal sexual dimorphism. However, male wolves more often lead in agonistic encounters with conspecifics and must provision the nursing female during the pup-rearing period of the breeding season. These behaviours may select for males that exhibit a higher degree of morphological adaptation associated with aggression and prey capture performance. To test this prediction, we assessed skeletal sexual dimorphism in three subspecies of grey wolves using functional indices reflecting morphological specialization for aggression. As expected, sexual dimorphism in skeletal shape was limited. However, in two of three subspecies, we found sexually dimorphic traits in the skull, forelimbs and hindlimbs that are consistent with the hypothesis that males are more specialized for aggression. These characters may also be associated with selection for improved prey capture performance by males. Thus, the sexually dimorphic functional traits identified by our analysis may be adaptive in the contexts of both natural and sexual selection. Several of these traits may conflict with locomotor economy, indicating the importance of aggression in the life history of male grey wolves. The presence of functional specialization for aggression in a generally monogamous species indicates that sexual dimorphism in specific musculoskeletal traits may be widespread among mammals. PMID:24810384

  11. Specialization for aggression in sexually dimorphic skeletal morphology in grey wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Morris, Jeremy S; Brandt, Ellissa K

    2014-07-01

    Aggressive behaviour is important in the life history of many animals. In grey wolves (Canis lupus), territory defence through direct competition with conspecifics is severe and often lethal. Thus, performance in aggressive encounters may be under strong selection. Additionally, grey wolves frequently kill large dangerous prey species. Because both sexes actively participate in aggressive activities and prey capture, wolves are expected to exhibit a low level of musculoskeletal sexual dimorphism. However, male wolves more often lead in agonistic encounters with conspecifics and must provision the nursing female during the pup-rearing period of the breeding season. These behaviours may select for males that exhibit a higher degree of morphological adaptation associated with aggression and prey capture performance. To test this prediction, we assessed skeletal sexual dimorphism in three subspecies of grey wolves using functional indices reflecting morphological specialization for aggression. As expected, sexual dimorphism in skeletal shape was limited. However, in two of three subspecies, we found sexually dimorphic traits in the skull, forelimbs and hindlimbs that are consistent with the hypothesis that males are more specialized for aggression. These characters may also be associated with selection for improved prey capture performance by males. Thus, the sexually dimorphic functional traits identified by our analysis may be adaptive in the contexts of both natural and sexual selection. Several of these traits may conflict with locomotor economy, indicating the importance of aggression in the life history of male grey wolves. The presence of functional specialization for aggression in a generally monogamous species indicates that sexual dimorphism in specific musculoskeletal traits may be widespread among mammals. PMID:24810384

  12. Forecasting of municipal solid waste quantity in a developing country using multivariate grey models

    SciTech Connect

    Intharathirat, Rotchana; Abdul Salam, P.; Kumar, S.; Untong, Akarapong

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Grey model can be used to forecast MSW quantity accurately with the limited data. • Prediction interval overcomes the uncertainty of MSW forecast effectively. • A multivariate model gives accuracy associated with factors affecting MSW quantity. • Population, urbanization, employment and household size play role for MSW quantity. - Abstract: In order to plan, manage and use municipal solid waste (MSW) in a sustainable way, accurate forecasting of MSW generation and composition plays a key role. It is difficult to carry out the reliable estimates using the existing models due to the limited data available in the developing countries. This study aims to forecast MSW collected in Thailand with prediction interval in long term period by using the optimized multivariate grey model which is the mathematical approach. For multivariate models, the representative factors of residential and commercial sectors affecting waste collected are identified, classified and quantified based on statistics and mathematics of grey system theory. Results show that GMC (1, 5), the grey model with convolution integral, is the most accurate with the least error of 1.16% MAPE. MSW collected would increase 1.40% per year from 43,435–44,994 tonnes per day in 2013 to 55,177–56,735 tonnes per day in 2030. This model also illustrates that population density is the most important factor affecting MSW collected, followed by urbanization, proportion employment and household size, respectively. These mean that the representative factors of commercial sector may affect more MSW collected than that of residential sector. Results can help decision makers to develop the measures and policies of waste management in long term period.

  13. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analysis of grey and white matter anomalies in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeRamus, Thomas P.; Kana, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairments in social communication and restrictive, repetitive behaviors. While behavioral symptoms are well-documented, investigations into the neurobiological underpinnings of ASD have not resulted in firm biomarkers. Variability in findings across structural neuroimaging studies has contributed to difficulty in reliably characterizing the brain morphology of individuals with ASD. These inconsistencies may also arise from the heterogeneity of ASD, and wider age-range of participants included in MRI studies and in previous meta-analyses. To address this, the current study used coordinate-based anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) analysis of 21 voxel-based morphometry (VBM) studies examining high-functioning individuals with ASD, resulting in a meta-analysis of 1055 participants (506 ASD, and 549 typically developing individuals). Results consisted of grey, white, and global differences in cortical matter between the groups. Modeled anatomical maps consisting of concentration, thickness, and volume metrics of grey and white matter revealed clusters suggesting age-related decreases in grey and white matter in parietal and inferior temporal regions of the brain in ASD, and age-related increases in grey matter in frontal and anterior-temporal regions. White matter alterations included fiber tracts thought to play key roles in information processing and sensory integration. Many current theories of pathobiology ASD suggest that the brains of individuals with ASD may have less-functional long-range (anterior-to-posterior) connections. Our findings of decreased cortical matter in parietal–temporal and occipital regions, and thickening in frontal cortices in older adults with ASD may entail altered cortical anatomy, and neurodevelopmental adaptations. PMID:25844306

  14. Structural distinction between black and grey human hair: A FTIR investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Arup; Sarkar, A.

    2013-06-01

    Hair is an important biomaterial primarily composed of structural protein, notably keratin. In this present work Fourier transformed infrared absorption (FTIR) spectrum of black and grey human hair is analyzed and compared from measured data of FTIR spectra. The change in characteristics bond vibration detected clearly. The obtained shift of the characteristics frequency caused due to change in molecular structure in the two types of human hair.

  15. Confinement and transverse standing acoustic resonances in free-standing membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Sooryakumar, R.; Bussmann, K.

    2003-09-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) reveal standing wave acoustic resonances in unsupported 100 and 200 nm thick, SiN membranes. In contrast to supported thin films where discrete high frequency (GHz) longitudinal standing wave excitations were recently reported, transverse standing resonances are observed by light scattering in an unsupported laminar structure. Due to the boundary conditions imposed by the free upper and lower surfaces, the standing wave resonances are quantized in frequency. The resonances provide for a direct, nondestructive, measure of all principal elastic constants (C11,C44) that completely characterize the mechanical properties of the membrane. In addition, the two lowest order Lamb waves (dilational and flexural modes) of the membrane are observed. The results are compared to BLS performed on nitride films atop a Si underlayer when it is found that all standing resonances transform to leaky modes leading to featureless light scattering spectra.

  16. Grey matter connectivity within and between auditory, language and visual systems in prelingually deaf adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Zhenchang; Li, Yong; Liu, Zhaohui; Yan, Fei; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Previous studies have shown brain reorganizations after early deprivation of auditory sensory. However, changes of grey matter connectivity have not been investigated in prelingually deaf adolescents yet. In the present study, we aimed to investigate changes of grey matter connectivity within and between auditory, language and visual systems in prelingually deaf adolescents. Methods: We recruited 16 prelingually deaf adolescents and 16 age-and gender-matched normal controls, and extracted the grey matter volume as the structural characteristic from 14 regions of interest involved in auditory, language or visual processing to investigate the changes of grey matter connectivity within and between auditory, language and visual systems. Sparse inverse covariance estimation (SICE) was utilized to construct grey matter connectivity between these brain regions. Results: The results show that prelingually deaf adolescents present weaker grey matter connectivity within auditory and visual systems, and connectivity between language and visual systems declined. Notably, significantly increased brain connectivity was found between auditory and visual systems in prelingually deaf adolescents. Conclusions: Our results indicate “cross-modal” plasticity after deprivation of the auditory input in prelingually deaf adolescents, especially between auditory and visual systems. Besides, auditory deprivation and visual deficits might affect the connectivity pattern within language and visual systems in prelingually deaf adolescents. PMID:25698109

  17. 17. HISTORIC VIEW OF ROCKET & LAUNCH STAND DESIGNED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. HISTORIC VIEW OF ROCKET & LAUNCH STAND DESIGNED BY HERMANN OBERTH AND RUDOLF NEBEL FOR THE MOVIE DIE FRAU IM MOND (THE WOMAN ON THE MOON). THE LAUNCH STAND WAS MODIFIED BY THE VFR FOR THE FIRST TEST STAND AT RAKETENFLUGPLATZ NEAR BERLIN. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. Forecasting sales of new vehicle with limited data using Bass diffusion model and Grey theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Noratikah; Ismail, Zuhaimy

    2015-02-01

    New product forecasting is a process that determines a reasonable estimate of sales attainable under a given set of conditions. There are several new products forecasting method in practices and Bass Diffusion Model (BDM) is one of the most common new product diffusion model used in many industries to forecast new product and technology. Hence, this paper proposed a combining BDM with Grey theory to forecast sales of new vehicle in Malaysia that certainly have limited data to build a model on. The aims of this paper is to examine the accuracy of different new product forecasting models and thus identify which is the best among the basic BDM and combining BDM with Grey theory. The results show that combining BDM with Grey theory performs better than the basic BDM based on in-sample and out-sample mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). Results also reveals combining model forecast more effectively and accurately even with insufficient previous data on the new vehicle in Malaysia.

  19. A Grey Model Based on First Differences in the Application of Satellite Clock Bias Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yue-ji; Ren, Chao; Yang, Xiu-fa; Pang, Guang-feng; Lan, Lan

    2016-01-01

    In consideration of the characteristics of satellite clock bias (SCB), a grey GM(1,1) model based on the first difference method is proposed. The first differences between the SCB values of two adjacent epoches are firstly derived to obtain the corresponding first difference sequence. Then, a grey model is made based on the sequence to predict the first difference values for the time following. Finally, the predicted first difference sequence is recovered to be the corresponding predicted SCB. The clock bias data provided by the IGS (International GNSS Service) are used as the experimental data, and the cases with different lengths of modeling data and different prediction step lengths are compared and analyzed. The result shows that the prediction accuracy of this method is higher than that of traditional grey GM(1,1) model, especially for the PRN01 satellite clock, whose forecast effect is the best. With the first difference method, the model prediction accuracy and stability can be effectively improved and enhanced. This method is feasible and reliable for the relatively long term SCB prediction.

  20. Representation of the grey zone of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnert, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction model forecasts at horizontal grid lengths in the range of 100 to 1 km are now possible. This range of scales is the "grey zone of turbulence". Previous studies, based on large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis from the MésoNH model, showed that some assumptions of some turbulence schemes on boundary-layer structures are not valid. Indeed, boundary-layer thermals are now partly resolved, and the subgrid remaining part of the thermals is possibly largely or completely absent from the model columns. First, some modifications of the equations of the shallow convection scheme have been tested in the MésoNH model and in an idealized version of the operational AROME model at resolutions coarser than 500 m. Secondly, although the turbulence is mainly vertical at mesoscale (> 2 km resolution), it is isotropic in LES (< 100 m resolution). It has been proved by LES analysis that, in convective boundary layers, the horizontal production of turbulence cannot be neglected at resolutions finer than half of the boundary-layer height. Thus, in the grey zone, fully unidirectional turbulence scheme should become tridirectional around 500 m resolution. At Météo-France, the dynamical turbulence is modelled by a K-gradient in LES as well as at mesoscale in both MésoNH and AROME, which needs mixing lengths in the formulation. Vertical and horizontal mixing lengths have been calculated from LES of neutral and convective cases at resolutions in the grey zone.

  1. A geometric network model of intrinsic grey-matter connectivity of the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Ping; O’Dea, Reuben; Crofts, Jonathan J.; Han, Cheol E.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Network science provides a general framework for analysing the large-scale brain networks that naturally arise from modern neuroimaging studies, and a key goal in theoretical neuroscience is to understand the extent to which these neural architectures influence the dynamical processes they sustain. To date, brain network modelling has largely been conducted at the macroscale level (i.e. white-matter tracts), despite growing evidence of the role that local grey matter architecture plays in a variety of brain disorders. Here, we present a new model of intrinsic grey matter connectivity of the human connectome. Importantly, the new model incorporates detailed information on cortical geometry to construct ‘shortcuts’ through the thickness of the cortex, thus enabling spatially distant brain regions, as measured along the cortical surface, to communicate. Our study indicates that structures based on human brain surface information differ significantly, both in terms of their topological network characteristics and activity propagation properties, when compared against a variety of alternative geometries and generative algorithms. In particular, this might help explain histological patterns of grey matter connectivity, highlighting that observed connection distances may have arisen to maximise information processing ability, and that such gains are consistent with (and enhanced by) the presence of short-cut connections. PMID:26503036

  2. Grey water characterization and treatment for reuse in an arid environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, E; Bani-Melhem, K

    2012-01-01

    Grey water from a university facilities building in Cairo, Egypt was analysed for basic wastewater parameters. Mean concentrations were calculated based on grab samples over a 16-month period. Values for chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nutrients exceeded values reported in a number of other studies of grey water, while coliform counts were also high. A submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) system using a hollow fibre ultrafiltration membrane was used to treat the grey water with the aim of producing effluent that meets reuse guidelines for agriculture. A test run for 50 days at constant transmembrane pressure resulted in very good removal for key parameters including COD, total suspended solids (TSS), colour, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen, anionic surfactants, and coliform bacteria. High standard deviations were observed for COD and coliform concentrations for both monthly grab samples and influent values from the 50-day SMBR experiment. SMBR effluent meets international and local guidelines for at least restricted irrigation, particularly as pertains to COD, TSS, and faecal coliforms which were reduced to mean treated values of 50 mg/L, 0 mg/L (i.e., not detected), and <50 cfu/100 mL, respectively. PMID:22678202

  3. Forecasting of municipal solid waste quantity in a developing country using multivariate grey models.

    PubMed

    Intharathirat, Rotchana; Abdul Salam, P; Kumar, S; Untong, Akarapong

    2015-05-01

    In order to plan, manage and use municipal solid waste (MSW) in a sustainable way, accurate forecasting of MSW generation and composition plays a key role. It is difficult to carry out the reliable estimates using the existing models due to the limited data available in the developing countries. This study aims to forecast MSW collected in Thailand with prediction interval in long term period by using the optimized multivariate grey model which is the mathematical approach. For multivariate models, the representative factors of residential and commercial sectors affecting waste collected are identified, classified and quantified based on statistics and mathematics of grey system theory. Results show that GMC (1, 5), the grey model with convolution integral, is the most accurate with the least error of 1.16% MAPE. MSW collected would increase 1.40% per year from 43,435-44,994 tonnes per day in 2013 to 55,177-56,735 tonnes per day in 2030. This model also illustrates that population density is the most important factor affecting MSW collected, followed by urbanization, proportion employment and household size, respectively. These mean that the representative factors of commercial sector may affect more MSW collected than that of residential sector. Results can help decision makers to develop the measures and policies of waste management in long term period. PMID:25704925

  4. Connectivity in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) determined using empirical and simulated genetic data.

    PubMed

    Momigliano, Paolo; Harcourt, Robert; Robbins, William D; Stow, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) can be one of the numerically dominant high order predators on pristine coral reefs, yet their numbers have declined even in the highly regulated Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Knowledge of both large scale and fine scale genetic connectivity of grey reef sharks is essential for their effective management, but no genetic data are yet available. We investigated grey reef shark genetic structure in the GBR across a 1200 km latitudinal gradient, comparing empirical data with models simulating different levels of migration. The empirical data did not reveal any genetic structuring along the entire latitudinal gradient sampled, suggesting regular widespread dispersal and gene flow of the species throughout most of the GBR. Our simulated datasets indicate that even with substantial migrations (up to 25% of individuals migrating between neighboring reefs) both large scale genetic structure and genotypic spatial autocorrelation at the reef scale were maintained. We suggest that present migration rates therefore exceed this level. These findings have important implications regarding the effectiveness of networks of spatially discontinuous Marine Protected Areas to protect reef sharks. PMID:26314287

  5. Multiresponse Optimization of Laser Cladding Steel + VC Using Grey Relational Analysis in the Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-05-01

    Laser cladding of metal matrix composite coatings (MMCs) has become an effective and economic method to improve the wear resistance of mechanical components. The clad quality characteristics such as clad height, carbide fraction, carbide dissolution, and matrix hardness in MMCs determine the wear resistance of the coatings. These clad quality characteristics are influenced greatly by the laser cladding processing parameters. In this study, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 420 + 20% vanadium carbide (VC) was deposited on mild steel with a high powder direct diode laser. The Taguchi-based Grey relational method was used to optimize the laser cladding processing parameters (laser power, scanning speed, and powder feed rate) with the consideration of multiple clad characteristics related to wear resistance (clad height, carbide volume fraction, and Fe-matrix hardness). A Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was designed to study the effects of processing parameters on each response. The contribution and significance of each processing parameter on each clad characteristic were investigated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Grey relational grade acquired from Grey relational analysis was used as the performance characteristic to obtain the optimal combination of processing parameters. Based on the optimal processing parameters, the phases and microstructure of the laser-cladded coating were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  6. Longitudinal measurement of the developing grey matter in preterm subjects using multi-modal MRI.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Rosen, Zach; Melbourne, Andrew; Orasanu, Eliza; Cardoso, M Jorge; Modat, Marc; Bainbridge, Alan; Kendall, Giles S; Robertson, Nicola J; Marlow, Neil; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-05-01

    Preterm birth is a major public health concern, with the severity and occurrence of adverse outcome increasing with earlier delivery. Being born preterm disrupts a time of rapid brain development: in addition to volumetric growth, the cortex folds, myelination is occurring and there are changes on the cellular level. These neurological events have been imaged non-invasively using diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI. In this population, there has been a focus on examining diffusion in the white matter, but the grey matter is also critically important for neurological health. We acquired multi-shell high-resolution diffusion data on 12 infants born at ≤ 28 weeks of gestational age at two time-points: once when stable after birth, and again at term-equivalent age. We used the Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging model (NODDI) (Zhang et al., 2012) to analyse the changes in the cerebral cortex and the thalamus, both grey matter regions. We showed region-dependent changes in NODDI parameters over the preterm period, highlighting underlying changes specific to the microstructure. This work is the first time that NODDI parameters have been evaluated in both the cortical and the thalamic grey matter as a function of age in preterm infants, offering a unique insight into neuro-development in this at-risk population. PMID:25681570

  7. Telomere regulation during ageing and tumorigenesis of the grey mouse lemur.

    PubMed

    Trochet, Delphine; Mergui, Xénia; Ivkovic, Ivana; Porreca, Rosa Maria; Gerbault-Seureau, Michèle; Sidibe, Assitan; Richard, Florence; Londono-Vallejo, Arturo; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne; Riou, Jean-François

    2015-06-01

    Telomere erosion leading to replicative senescence has been well documented in human and anthropoid primates, and provides a clue against tumorigenesis. In contrast, other mammals, such as laboratory mice, with short lifespan and low body weight mass have different telomere biology without replicative senescence. We analyzed telomere biology in the grey mouse lemur, a small prosimian model with a relative long lifespan currently used in ageing research. We report an average telomere length by telomere restriction fragment (TRF) among the longest reported so far for a primate species (25-30 kb), but without detectable overall telomere shortening with ageing on blood samples. However, we demonstrate using universal STELA (Single Telomere Length Amplification) the existence of short telomeres, the increase of which, while correlating with ageing might be related to another mechanism than replicative senescence. We also found a low stringency of telomerase restriction in tissues and an ease to immortalize fibroblasts in vitro upon spontaneous telomerase activation. Finally, we describe the first grey mouse lemur cancer cell line showing a dramatic telomere shortening and high telomerase activity associated with polyploidy. Our overall results suggest that telomere biology in grey mouse lemur is an exception among primates, with at best a physiologically limited replicative telomere ageing and closest to that observed in small rodents. PMID:25882681

  8. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Morizaki, Yutaka; Kashiyama, Takahiro; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at wrist level, and is thought to be caused by compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel. There is no standard quantitative reference for the diagnosis of CTS. Grey-scale sonography and sonoelastography (SEL) have been used as diagnostic tools. The most commonly agreed findings in grey-scale sonography for the diagnosis of CTS is enlargement of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). Several authors have assessed additional parameters. “Delta CSA” is the difference between the proximal median nerve CSA at the pronator quadratus and the maximal CSA within the carpal tunnel. The “CSA ratio” is the ratio of CSA in the carpal tunnel to the CSA at the mid forearm. These additional parameters showed better diagnostic accuracy than CSA measurement alone. Recently, a number of studies have investigated the elasticity of the median nerve using SEL, and have shown that this also has diagnostic value, as it was significantly stiffer in CTS patients compared to healthy volunteers. In this review, we summarize the usefulness of grey-scale sonography and SEL in diagnosing CTS. PMID:27027498

  9. The relation between 1st grade grey matter volume and 2nd grade math competence.

    PubMed

    Price, Gavin R; Wilkey, Eric D; Yeo, Darren J; Cutting, Laurie E

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical and numerical competence is a critical foundation for individual success in modern society yet the neurobiological sources of individual differences in math competence are poorly understood. Neuroimaging research over the last decade suggests that neural mechanisms in the parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) are structurally aberrant in individuals with mathematical learning disabilities. However, whether those same brain regions underlie individual differences in math performance across the full range of math abilities is unknown. Furthermore, previous studies have been exclusively cross-sectional, making it unclear whether variations in the structure of the IPS are caused by or consequences of the development of math skills. The present study investigates the relation between grey matter volume across the whole brain and math competence longitudinally in a representative sample of 50 elementary school children. Results show that grey matter volume in the left IPS at the end of 1st grade relates to math competence a year later at the end of 2nd grade. Grey matter volume in this region did not change over that year, and was still correlated with math competence at the end of 2nd grade. These findings support the hypothesis that the IPS and its associated functions represent a critical foundation for the acquisition of mathematical competence. PMID:26334946

  10. Motor fMRI and cortical grey matter volume in adults born very preterm

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, E.J.; Froudist-Walsh, S.; Neilan, R.; Nam, K.W.; Giampietro, V.; McGuire, P.; Murray, R.M.; Nosarti, C.

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of motor planning, initiation and execution in a cohort of young adults (mean age 20 years) who were born very preterm (VPT; <33 weeks of gestation), as these individuals are at increased risk of experiencing neuromotor difficulties compared to controls. A cued motor task was presented to 20 right-handed VPT individuals and 20 controls within a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Whole-brain grey matter volume was also quantified and associations with functional data were examined. Despite comparable task performance, fMRI results showed that the VPT group displayed greater brain activation compared to controls in a region comprising the right cerebellum and the lingual, parahippocampal and middle temporal gyri. The VPT group also displayed decreased grey matter volume in the right superior frontal/premotor cortex and left middle temporal gyri. Grey matter volume in the premotor and middle temporal clusters was significantly negatively correlated with BOLD activation in the cerebellum. Overall, these data suggest that preterm birth is associated with functional neuronal differences that persist into adulthood, which are likely to reflect neural reorganisation following early brain injury. PMID:25016248

  11. Pain Sensitivity is Inversely Related to Regional Grey Matter Density in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Nichole M.; Zeidan, Fadel; Lobanov, Oleg V.; Hadsel, Morten S.; Martucci, Katherine T.; Quevedo, Alexandre S.; Starr, Christopher J.; Nahman-Averbuch, Hadas; Weissman-Fogel, Irit; Granovsky, Yelena; Yarnitsky, David; Coghill, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a highly personal experience that varies substantially among individuals. In search of an anatomical correlate of pain sensitivity we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between grey matter density across the whole brain and inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity in 116 healthy volunteers (62 females, 54 males). Structural MRI and psychophysical data from 10 previous fMRI studies were used. Age, sex, unpleasantness ratings, scanner sequence, and sensory testing location were added to the model as covariates. Regression analysis of grey matter density across the whole brain and thermal pain intensity ratings at 49°C revealed a significant inverse relationship between pain sensitivity and grey matter density in bilateral regions of the posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, intraparietal sulcus, and inferior parietal lobule. Unilateral regions of the left primary somatosensory cortex also exhibited this inverse relationship. No regions exhibited a positive relationship to pain sensitivity. These structural variations occurred in areas associated with the default mode network, attentional direction and shifting, as well as somatosensory processing. These findings underscore the potential importance of processes related to default mode thought and attention in shaping individual differences in pain sensitivity and indicate that pain sensitivity can potentially be predicted on the basis of brain structure. PMID:24333778

  12. Optimization of electrocoagulation process to treat grey wastewater in batch mode using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Discharge of grey wastewater into the ecological system causes the negative impact effect on receiving water bodies. Methods In this present study, electrocoagulation process (EC) was investigated to treat grey wastewater under different operating conditions such as initial pH (4–8), current density (10–30 mA/cm2), electrode distance (4–6 cm) and electrolysis time (5–25 min) by using stainless steel (SS) anode in batch mode. Four factors with five levels Box-Behnken response surface design (BBD) was employed to optimize and investigate the effect of process variables on the responses such as total solids (TS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and fecal coliform (FC) removal. Results The process variables showed significant effect on the electrocoagulation treatment process. The results were analyzed by Pareto analysis of variance (ANOVA) and second order polynomial models were developed in order to study the electrocoagulation process statistically. The optimal operating conditions were found to be: initial pH of 7, current density of 20 mA/cm2, electrode distance of 5 cm and electrolysis time of 20 min. Conclusion These results indicated that EC process can be scale up in large scale level to treat grey wastewater with high removal efficiency of TS, COD and FC. PMID:24410752

  13. Disseminated avian mycobacteriosis in a free-living grey heron (Ardea cinerea).

    PubMed

    Quesada-Canales, Oscar; Díaz-Delgado, Josué; Paz, Yania; Domínguez, Lucas; Bezos, Javier; Calabuig, Pascual; Suárez-Bonnet, Alejandro; Fernández, Antonio; Andrada, Marisa

    2013-09-01

    Wild birds share with humans the capacity for moving fast over large distances. During migratory movements, birds carry pathogens that can be transmitted between species. One of these concerning pathogens is Mycobacterium spp. A necropsy was performed in a grey heron (Ardea cinerea) that had been medically treated for a polyarthritic process. Grossly, firm white-yellowish nodules of various size, resembling granulomas, were observed in right carpal joint, both patellar joints, neck musculature, palate, pharynx, larynx, nasal sinuses, pericardial sac, air sacs, proventriculus and intestinal serosa, pancreas, kidneys, adrenal glands, and oviduct. Microscopically, these lesions were composed of multinucleated giant cells, large macrophages, and lymphocytes, with a central zone of necrosis and in some cases with peripheral fibrosis. Acid-fast bacilli were detected within these lesions. Lesions were cultured and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium was identified. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of mycobacteriosis in grey herons. Although the grey heron is currently considered a least-concern species, avian mycobacteriosis remains a threat on the conservation management of endangered avian species, and constitutes a public health concern as well. PMID:24283143

  14. Rapid increase of the grey seal ( Halichoerus grypus) breeding stock at Helgoland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, K.; Engler, J.

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 25 years, the grey seal ( Halichoerus grypus) population in the North Sea increased on average at 5% per year, while founding a number of new colonies. Based on published data, this note compares recent trends in pup production at nine breeding sites, with focus on the German island of Helgoland. Since 1997, numbers born at Helgoland increased at 35% per year (95% CI: 29-42), reaching an all-time high of 53 in 2007. Yet, this was less than 1% of all grey seal offspring in the North Sea area. Some other small stocks had similarly high growth rates of 20-50%, which must be explained by immigration from the larger colonies, as sustained autochthonous increase cannot exceed 13% per year in the species. Further, the Helgoland breeding stock increased significantly faster than the neighbouring colonies at Amrum (13%) and in the Dutch Wadden Sea (20%), indicating higher offspring survival and/or higher relative influx of migrants. This is attributed to the fact that at Helgoland newborn seals are safe from floodwater. In the other two sites, in contrast, pups are born on sandbanks and are thus often hit by winterly storm tides, which poses a risk to their survival. Because of the favourable breeding conditions at Helgoland, this new colony is expected to soon become an important stronghold of the grey seal in the Dutch-German North Sea area.

  15. White and grey matter relations to simple, choice, and cognitive reaction time in spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Maureen; Cirino, Paul T; Simic, Nevena; Juranek, Jenifer; Taylor, W Pat; Fletcher, Jack M

    2016-03-01

    Elevated reaction time (RT) is common in brain disorders. We studied three forms of RT in a neurodevelopmental disorder, spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM), characterized by regional alterations of both white and grey matter, and typically developing individuals aged 8 to 48 years, in order to establish the nature of the lifespan-relations of RT and brain variables. Cognitive accuracy and RT speed and variability were all impaired in SBM relative to the typically developing group, but the most important effects of SBM on RT are seen on tasks that require a cognitive decision rule. Individuals with SBM are impaired not only in speeded performance, but also in the consistency of their performance on tasks that extend over time, which may contribute to poor performance on a range of cognitive tasks. The group with SBM showed smaller corrected corpus callosum proportions, larger corrected cerebellar white matter proportions, and larger corrected proportions for grey matter in the Central Executive and Salience networks. There were clear negative relations between RT measures and corpus callosum, Central Executive, and Default Mode networks in the group with SBM; relations were not observed in typically developing age peers. Statistical mediation analyses indicated that corpus callosum and Central Executive Network were important mediators. While RT is known to rely heavily on white matter under conditions of typical development and in individuals with adult-onset brain injury, we add the new information that additional involvement of grey matter may be important for a key neuropsychological function in a common neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26040977

  16. Multiresponse Optimization of Laser Cladding Steel + VC Using Grey Relational Analysis in the Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Laser cladding of metal matrix composite coatings (MMCs) has become an effective and economic method to improve the wear resistance of mechanical components. The clad quality characteristics such as clad height, carbide fraction, carbide dissolution, and matrix hardness in MMCs determine the wear resistance of the coatings. These clad quality characteristics are influenced greatly by the laser cladding processing parameters. In this study, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 420 + 20% vanadium carbide (VC) was deposited on mild steel with a high powder direct diode laser. The Taguchi-based Grey relational method was used to optimize the laser cladding processing parameters (laser power, scanning speed, and powder feed rate) with the consideration of multiple clad characteristics related to wear resistance (clad height, carbide volume fraction, and Fe-matrix hardness). A Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was designed to study the effects of processing parameters on each response. The contribution and significance of each processing parameter on each clad characteristic were investigated by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Grey relational grade acquired from Grey relational analysis was used as the performance characteristic to obtain the optimal combination of processing parameters. Based on the optimal processing parameters, the phases and microstructure of the laser-cladded coating were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

  17. Motor fMRI and cortical grey matter volume in adults born very preterm.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, E J; Froudist-Walsh, S; Neilan, R; Nam, K W; Giampietro, V; McGuire, P; Murray, R M; Nosarti, C

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the functional neuroanatomy of motor planning, initiation and execution in a cohort of young adults (mean age 20 years) who were born very preterm (VPT; <33 weeks of gestation), as these individuals are at increased risk of experiencing neuromotor difficulties compared to controls. A cued motor task was presented to 20 right-handed VPT individuals and 20 controls within a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm. Whole-brain grey matter volume was also quantified and associations with functional data were examined. Despite comparable task performance, fMRI results showed that the VPT group displayed greater brain activation compared to controls in a region comprising the right cerebellum and the lingual, parahippocampal and middle temporal gyri. The VPT group also displayed decreased grey matter volume in the right superior frontal/premotor cortex and left middle temporal gyri. Grey matter volume in the premotor and middle temporal clusters was significantly negatively correlated with BOLD activation in the cerebellum. Overall, these data suggest that preterm birth is associated with functional neuronal differences that persist into adulthood, which are likely to reflect neural reorganisation following early brain injury. PMID:25016248

  18. A geometric network model of intrinsic grey-matter connectivity of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Yi-Ping; O'Dea, Reuben; Crofts, Jonathan J.; Han, Cheol E.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-10-01

    Network science provides a general framework for analysing the large-scale brain networks that naturally arise from modern neuroimaging studies, and a key goal in theoretical neuroscience is to understand the extent to which these neural architectures influence the dynamical processes they sustain. To date, brain network modelling has largely been conducted at the macroscale level (i.e. white-matter tracts), despite growing evidence of the role that local grey matter architecture plays in a variety of brain disorders. Here, we present a new model of intrinsic grey matter connectivity of the human connectome. Importantly, the new model incorporates detailed information on cortical geometry to construct ‘shortcuts’ through the thickness of the cortex, thus enabling spatially distant brain regions, as measured along the cortical surface, to communicate. Our study indicates that structures based on human brain surface information differ significantly, both in terms of their topological network characteristics and activity propagation properties, when compared against a variety of alternative geometries and generative algorithms. In particular, this might help explain histological patterns of grey matter connectivity, highlighting that observed connection distances may have arisen to maximise information processing ability, and that such gains are consistent with (and enhanced by) the presence of short-cut connections.

  19. Connectivity in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) determined using empirical and simulated genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Momigliano, Paolo; Harcourt, Robert; Robbins, William D.; Stow, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) can be one of the numerically dominant high order predators on pristine coral reefs, yet their numbers have declined even in the highly regulated Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Knowledge of both large scale and fine scale genetic connectivity of grey reef sharks is essential for their effective management, but no genetic data are yet available. We investigated grey reef shark genetic structure in the GBR across a 1200 km latitudinal gradient, comparing empirical data with models simulating different levels of migration. The empirical data did not reveal any genetic structuring along the entire latitudinal gradient sampled, suggesting regular widespread dispersal and gene flow of the species throughout most of the GBR. Our simulated datasets indicate that even with substantial migrations (up to 25% of individuals migrating between neighboring reefs) both large scale genetic structure and genotypic spatial autocorrelation at the reef scale were maintained. We suggest that present migration rates therefore exceed this level. These findings have important implications regarding the effectiveness of networks of spatially discontinuous Marine Protected Areas to protect reef sharks. PMID:26314287

  20. Single house on-site grey water treatment using a submerged membrane bioreactor for toilet flushing.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, M S; Markakis, N; Petousi, I; Manios, T

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater recycling has been and continues to be practiced all over the world for a variety of reasons including: increasing water availability, combating water shortages and drought, and supporting environmental and public health protection. Nowadays, one of the most interesting issues for wastewater recycling is the on-site treatment and reuse of grey water. During this study the efficiency of a compact Submerged Membrane Bioreactor (SMBR) system to treat real grey water in a single house in Crete, Greece, was examined. In the study, grey water was collected from a bathtub, shower and washing machine containing significant amounts of organic matter and pathogens. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in the system was approximately 87%. Total suspended solids (TSS) were reduced from 95mgL(-1) in the influent to 8mgL(-1) in the effluent. The efficiency of the system to reduce anionic surfactants was about 80%. Fecal and total coliforms decreased significantly using the SMBR system due to rejection, by the membrane, used in the study. Overall, the SMBR treatment produces average effluent values that would satisfy international guidelines for indoor reuse applications such as toilet flushing. PMID:26901745