Science.gov

Sample records for ground control

  1. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  2. Ground Control in Mining. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings contain 36 papers on strata control in underground mining. Specific topics include: support pillar design, mathematical modeling of support-rock interactions, deformation of mine roadways, support recovery, roof bolt design and performance, rock burst prediction methods, detection of abandoned shafts, water influx control, rock mechanical property measurements, ground subsidence effects and forecasting, surveying techniques, and stress analyses. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Ground control for highwall mining

    SciTech Connect

    Zipf, R.K.; Mark, C.

    2007-09-15

    Perhaps the greatest risk to both equipment and personnel associated with highwall mining is from ground control. The two most significant ground control hazards are rock falls from highwall and equipment entrapment underground. In the central Appalachians, where the majority of highwall mining occurs in the USA, hillseams (or mountain cracks) are the most prominent structure that affects highwall stability. The article discusses measures to minimise the risk of failure associated with hillstreams. A 'stuck' or trapped highwall miner, and the ensuring retrieval or recovery operation, can be extremely disruptive to the highwall mining process. Most entrapment, are due to roof falls in the hole. The options for recovery are surface retrieval, surface excavation or underground recovery. Proper pillar design is essential to maintain highwall stability and prevent entrapments. NIOSH has developed the Analysis of Retreat Mining Pillar stability-Highwall Mining (ARMPS-HWM) computer program to help mine planners with this process. 10 figs.

  4. Coal mine ground control, second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This revision reflects the enormous progress made in the sciences of coal mine ground control. Many chapters are completely new, and virtually all have been substantially rewritten. Covers common ground control problems underground, rock properties and in situ stresses, geological effects and roof stability classification and investigation, roof bolting, coal pillars, ground control in longwall mining and multiple-seam mining, bumps, instrumentation, special supports and problems, and surface subsidence.

  5. Ground water. [Water pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Costle, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    There is growing evidence that the Nation's ground water is contaminated by a variety of sources. These include unprotected industrial, municipal, and radioactive disposal sites, petroleum exploration and mining activities, agricultural operations such as insecticide spraying, high de-icing salts and others. As of March 1980, more than 8000 chemical tests have been performed on well water, with chlorinated organic solvents found most frequently. Because 100 million Americans may be threatened by unfit drinking water, EPA has developed a new ground water strategy. It will enlist the help of State and local governments who already have programs under way and it will involve broad public debate and participation.

  6. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for LA

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun

    2004-07-09

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). The scope of the work includes determination of input parameter values and loads, selection of appropriate process and methods for the calculation, application of selected methods, such as empirical or analytical, to the calculation, development and execution of numerical models, and evaluation of results. Results from this calculation are limited to use for design of the emplacement drifts and the final ground support system installed in these drifts. The design of non-emplacement openings and their ground support systems is covered in the ''Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA'' (BSC 2004c).

  7. Intelligent resources for satellite ground control operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a cooperative approach to the design of intelligent automation and describes the Mission Operations Cooperative Assistant for NASA Goddard flight operations. The cooperative problem solving approach is being explored currently in the context of providing support for human operator teams and also in the definition of future advanced automation in ground control systems.

  8. Ground Control for Emplacement Drifts for SR

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun

    2000-04-07

    This analysis demonstrates that a satisfactory ground control system can be designed for the Yucca Mountain site, and provides the technical basis for the design of ground support systems to be used in repository emplacement and non-emplacement drifts. The repository ground support design was based on analytical methods using acquired computer codes, and focused on the final support systems. A literature review of case histories, including the lessons learned from the design and construction of the ESF, the studies on the seismic damages of underground openings, and the use of rock mass classification systems in the ground support design, was conducted (Sections 6.3.4 and 6.4). This review provided some basis for determining the inputs and methodologies used in this analysis. Stability of the supported and unsupported emplacement and non-emplacement drifts was evaluated in this analysis. The excavation effects (i.e., state of the stress change due to excavation), thermal effects (i.e., due to heat output from waste packages), and seismic effects (i.e., from potential earthquake events) were evaluated, and stress controlled modes of failure were examined for two in situ stress conditions (k_0=0.3 and 1.0) using rock properties representing rock mass categories of 1 and 5. Variation of rock mass units such as the non-lithophysal (Tptpmn) and lithophysal (Tptpll) was considered in the analysis. The focus was on the non-lithophysal unit because this unit appears to be relatively weaker and has much smaller joint spacing. Therefore, the drift stability and ground support needs were considered to be controlled by the design for this rock unit. The ground support systems for both emplacement and non-emplacement drifts were incorporated into the models to assess their performance under in situ, thermal, and seismic loading conditions. Both continuum and discontinuum modeling approaches were employed in the analyses of the rock mass behavior and in the evaluation of the

  9. Limits to ground control in autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, Alfred D. M.; Braspenning, Peter J.; Vreeswijk, Gerrard A. W.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper the autonomy concept used by ESA and NASA is critically evaluated. Moreover, a more proper ground control/spacecraft organizational structure is proposed on the basis of a new, more elaborated concept of autonomy. In an extended theoretical discussion its definitional properties and functionalities are established. The rather basic property of adaptivity leads to the categorization of behaviour into the modes of satisfaction and avoidance behaviour. However, the autonomy property with the most profound consequences is goal-robustness. The mechanism that implements goal-robustness tests newly generated goals and externally received goals on consistency with high-level goals. If goals appear not to be good instantiations or more acceptable replacements of existing goals, they are rejected. This means that ground control has to cooperate with the spacecraft instead of (intermittently) commanding it.

  10. Coal mine ground control. 3rd ed.

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    2008-09-15

    The third edition not only completely revises and updates the original subject areas, but also is broadened to include a number of new topics such as high horizontal stresses, computer modeling, and highwall stability. The subject areas covered in this book define the current field of coal mine ground control, except for the recently emerging topic of mine seals and some conventional subjects such as coal/rock cutting and impoundment dams. It contains 1,134 references from all published sources, and archived since 1876.

  11. Emissions control for ground power gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudney, R. A.; Priem, R. J.; Juhasz, A. J.; Anderson, D. N.; Mroz, T. S.; Mularz, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The similarities and differences of emissions reduction technology for aircraft and ground power gas turbines is described. The capability of this technology to reduce ground power emissions to meet existing and proposed emissions standards is presented and discussed. Those areas where the developing aircraft gas turbine technology may have direct application to ground power and those areas where the needed technology may be unique to the ground power mission are pointed out. Emissions reduction technology varying from simple combustor modifications to the use of advanced combustor concepts, such as catalysis, is described and discussed.

  12. Proceedings, 25th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.; Tadolini, S.; Wahab Khair, A.; Heasley, K.; Luo, Y.

    2006-07-01

    Topics covered include: computer and physical modelling; geology in ground control; geophysics in ground control; ground control; impoundments stability; longwall gateroad support design; longwall operations; longwall shields and standing supports; mine design; multiple-seam mining interactions; pillar and pillar extraction; roof bolting; roof bolting - resin; and subsidence. Most of the topics include a retrospective paper which summarises the progress of the subject field during the past 25 years.

  13. 24 CFR 3285.204 - Ground moisture control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ground moisture control. 3285.204... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.204 Ground... materials, a vapor retarder must be installed to cover the ground under the home, unless the home...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.204 - Ground moisture control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ground moisture control. 3285.204... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.204 Ground... materials, a vapor retarder must be installed to cover the ground under the home, unless the home...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.204 - Ground moisture control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ground moisture control. 3285.204... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.204 Ground... materials, a vapor retarder must be installed to cover the ground under the home, unless the home...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.204 - Ground moisture control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ground moisture control. 3285.204... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.204 Ground... materials, a vapor retarder must be installed to cover the ground under the home, unless the home...

  17. 24 CFR 3285.204 - Ground moisture control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ground moisture control. 3285.204... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.204 Ground... materials, a vapor retarder must be installed to cover the ground under the home, unless the home...

  18. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 3: Ground control point simulation software design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The software developed to simulate the ground control point navigation system is described. The Ground Control Point Simulation Program (GCPSIM) is designed as an analysis tool to predict the performance of the navigation system. The system consists of two star trackers, a global positioning system receiver, a gyro package, and a landmark tracker.

  19. Frozen Ground Controls on Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzman, L. D.; Kane, D. L.; Woo, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Frozen ground establishes a unique discipline of hydrologic science where the hydrologic regime is intimately coupled with the thermal regime to the extent that one may not be completely understood without correct characterization of the other. In permafrost regions, material properties may change drastically on a scale of centimeters to meters, particularly in the vertical dimension due to distinct changes in soil and thermal characteristics. Properties may vary just as dramatically in the horizontal dimension across the boundary of discontinuous permafrost. Although the spatial extent of permafrost changes on relatively slow time scales in response to disturbance or a changing climate, this too introduces an added level of complexity. Permafrost may nearly eliminate the interactions between near-surface and sub-permafrost aquifers, which in essence defines the hydrologic response of every watershed that is directly influenced by permafrost. Even though the principles governing water movement in permafrost areas are the same as those in more temperate regions, interactions of extremes in climate and the land surface characteristics render permafrost hydrology different from the hydrology of temperate latitudes. Ice-rich permafrost prevents deep percolation of rainfall or snowmelt water, often maintaining a moist to saturated active layer above the permafrost table. Most hydrologic activities are confined above-ground or in the thin active layer, which supplies summer moisture for baseflow and/or plant transpiration. Limited storage capacity of the thawed active layer does not support extended baseflow in a stream, though the proportion of baseflow increases as the percentage of permafrost extent decreases. In areas where permafrost is discontinuous or where it has thawed substantially near the surface, local hydrology may display a markedly different character as there are stronger exchanges between the surface water and the ground water system, or water may drain

  20. Grounding cognitive control in associative learning.

    PubMed

    Abrahamse, Elger; Braem, Senne; Notebaert, Wim; Verguts, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive control covers a broad range of cognitive functions, but its research and theories typically remain tied to a single domain. Here we outline and review an associative learning perspective on cognitive control in which control emerges from associative networks containing perceptual, motor, and goal representations. Our review identifies 3 trending research themes that are shared between the domains of conflict adaptation, task switching, response inhibition, and attentional control: Cognitive control is context-specific, can operate in the absence of awareness, and is modulated by reward. As these research themes can be envisaged as key characteristics of learning, we propose that their joint emergence across domains is not coincidental but rather reflects a (latent) growth of interest in learning-based control. Associative learning has the potential for providing broad-scaled integration to cognitive control theory, and offers a promising avenue for understanding cognitive control as a self-regulating system without postulating an ill-defined set of homunculi. We discuss novel predictions, theoretical implications, and immediate challenges that accompany an associative learning perspective on cognitive control. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148628

  1. A New Definition for Ground Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    LandForm(R) VisualFlight(R) blends the power of a geographic information system with the speed of a flight simulator to transform a user's desktop computer into a "virtual cockpit." The software product, which is fully compatible with all Microsoft(R) Windows(R) operating systems, provides distributed, real-time three-dimensional flight visualization over a host of networks. From a desktop, a user can immediately obtain a cockpit view, a chase-plane view, or an airborne tracker view. A customizable display also allows the user to overlay various flight parameters, including latitude, longitude, altitude, pitch, roll, and heading information. Rapid Imaging Software sought assistance from NASA, and the VisualFlight technology came to fruition under a Phase II SBIR contract with Johnson Space Center in 1998. Three years later, on December 13, 2001, Ken Ham successfully flew NASA's X-38 spacecraft from a remote, ground-based cockpit using LandForm VisualFlight as part of his primary situation awareness display in a flight test at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

  2. Active control landing gear for ground loads alleviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An active landing gear has been created by connecting the hydraulic piston in an oleo strut to a hydraulic supply. A controller modulates the pressure in the oleo to achieve the desired dynamic characteristics. Tests on ground rigs (documented by a film) have demonstrated the successful alleviation of induced structural ground loads and the next step will be a flight test using a fighter aircraft.

  3. Configurable technology development for reusable control and monitor ground systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhrlaub, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The control monitor unit (CMU) uses configurable software technology for real-time mission command and control, telemetry processing, simulation, data acquisition, data archiving, and ground operations automation. The base technology is currently planned for the following control and monitor systems: portable Space Station checkout systems; ecological life support systems; Space Station logistics carrier system; and the ground system of the Delta Clipper (SX-2) in the Single-Stage Rocket Technology program. The CMU makes extensive use of commercial technology to increase capability and reduce development and life-cycle costs. The concepts and technology are being developed by McDonnell Douglas Space and Defense Systems for the Real-Time Systems Laboratory at NASA's Kennedy Space Center under the Payload Ground Operations Contract. A second function of the Real-Time Systems Laboratory is development and utilization of advanced software development practices.

  4. The ACTS NASA Ground Station/Master Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Two of the major components of the ACTS Ground Segment are the NASA Ground Station (NGS) and the Master Control Station (MCS), colocated at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Essentially, the NGS provides the communications links by which the MCS performs its various network control and monitoring functions. The NGS also provides telecommunications links capable of transmission/reception of up to approximately 70 Mbit/s of digital telephonic traffic. Operating as a system, the entire complex of equipment is referred to as the NGS/MCS. This paper provides an 'as-built' description of the NGS/MCS as a system.

  5. Ground controlled robotic assembly operations for Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1991-01-01

    A number of dextrous robotic systems and associated positioning and transportation devices are available on Space Station Freedom (SSF) to perform assembly tasks that would otherwise need to be performed by extravehicular activity (EVA) crewmembers. The currently planned operating mode for these robotic systems during the assembly phase is teleoperation by intravehicular activity (IVA) crewmembers. While this operating mode is less hazardous and expensive than manned EVA operations, and has insignificant control loop time delays, the amount of IVA time available to support telerobotic operations is much less than the anticipated requirements. Some alternative is needed to allow the robotic systems to perform useful tasks without exhausting the available IVA resources; ground control is one such alternative. The issues associated with ground control of SSF robotic systems to alleviate onboard crew time availability constraints are investigated. Key technical issues include the effect of communication time delays, the need for safe, reliable execution of remote operations, and required modifications to the SSF ground and flight system architecture. Time delay compensation techniques such as predictive displays and world model-based force reflection are addressed and collision detection and avoidance strategies to ensure the safety of the on-orbit crew, Orbiter, and SSF are described. Although more time consuming and difficult than IVA controlled teleoperations or manned EVA, ground controlled telerobotic operations offer significant benefits during the SSF assembly phase, and should be considered in assembly planning activities.

  6. Control of ground-borne noise and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. P.; Saurenman, H. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1983-03-01

    Ground-borne noise and vibration created by train operations is one of the major environmental problems faced by rail transit systems. In the past 10-20 years there have been a number of developments in the control and prediction of ground-borne noise and vibration although it is evident that further research is needed. In this paper the focus is on two methods of controlling the vibration radiated by the transit structure. First is the use of floating slab trackbeds, a method that has proven to be very effective at reducing vibration at frequencies above the resonance frequency of the floating slab system. Second is to modify the design of transit car bogies such that the wheel/rail forces are reduced. Although this method is still in the exploratory phase it has been shown that proper design of the bogie suspension can significantly reduce the levels of ground-borne noise and vibration.

  7. VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL (RIGHT) AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF CONTROL PANEL (RIGHT) AT THE GROUND FLOOR LEVEL AND SIDE OF THE MISSILE TUBE (FOREGROUND). VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Ground vehicle control at NIST: From teleoperation to autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Karl N.; Juberts, Maris; Legowik, Steven A.; Nashman, Marilyn; Schneiderman, Henry; Scott, Harry A.; Szabo, Sandor

    1994-01-01

    NIST is applying their Real-time Control System (RCS) methodology for control of ground vehicles for both the U.S. Army Researh Lab, as part of the DOD's Unmanned Ground Vehicles program, and for the Department of Transportation's Intelligent Vehicle/Highway Systems (IVHS) program. The actuated vehicle, a military HMMWV, has motors for steering, brake, throttle, etc. and sensors for the dashboard gauges. For military operations, the vehicle has two modes of operation: a teleoperation mode--where an operator remotely controls the vehicle over an RF communications network; and a semi-autonomous mode called retro-traverse--where the control system uses an inertial navigation system to steer the vehicle along a prerecorded path. For the IVHS work, intelligent vision processing elements replace the human teleoperator to achieve autonomous, visually guided road following.

  9. 7th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 38 papers describing strata control, rock mechanics, and ground subsidence, especially in longwall mining. Other mining methods discussed include room and pillar mining, retreat mining, caving mining, and auger underground mining. Design, performance, and mathematical models of support pillars and other types of strata support systems are described. Most of the studies were done in US coal mines, but several papers describing strata control in India, China, South Africa, and Taiwan are included. All papers have been indexed separately.

  10. Controls, astrophysics, and structures experiment in space ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angelia P.; Jones, Victoria L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the initial configuration of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Controls/Structures Interaction Advanced Development Facility (CSI ADF), which is a ground test facility (GTF) for the proposed Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES). The laboratory has been developed for the purpose of implementing, testing, and evaluating CSI modeling, control system design, failure analysis, and system identification techniques on a representative large space structure. The facility has been configured to represent as closely as possible an actual flight article.

  11. 30 CFR 77.1004 - Ground control; inspection and maintenance; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ground control; inspection and maintenance... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1004 Ground control; inspection and maintenance... unsafe ground conditions shall be corrected promptly, or the area shall be posted....

  12. 30 CFR 77.1004 - Ground control; inspection and maintenance; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ground control; inspection and maintenance... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1004 Ground control; inspection and maintenance... unsafe ground conditions shall be corrected promptly, or the area shall be posted....

  13. 30 CFR 77.1004 - Ground control; inspection and maintenance; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ground control; inspection and maintenance... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1004 Ground control; inspection and maintenance... unsafe ground conditions shall be corrected promptly, or the area shall be posted....

  14. 30 CFR 77.1004 - Ground control; inspection and maintenance; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ground control; inspection and maintenance... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1004 Ground control; inspection and maintenance... unsafe ground conditions shall be corrected promptly, or the area shall be posted....

  15. 30 CFR 77.1004 - Ground control; inspection and maintenance; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ground control; inspection and maintenance... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ground Control § 77.1004 Ground control; inspection and maintenance... unsafe ground conditions shall be corrected promptly, or the area shall be posted....

  16. Recent Developments in Ground-Borne Noise and Vibration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. T.

    1996-05-01

    Vibration control provisions available to the transit designer include (among others) precision straightened rail, ballast mats, floating slabs and very soft direct fixation fasteners, in addition to rail grinding, wheel truing, and continuous welded rail. Recently, the Los Angeles Metro has developed specifications for a soft resilient direct fixation fastener to fit the same base dimensions as the standard direct fixation fastener. In San Francisco, low resonance frequency (8 Hz) floating slabs have been constructed to mitigate predicted ground vibration impacts at nearby residential structures. In Atlanta, low resonance frequency loading slabs have been constructed to maintain a low vibration environment in a medical building planned to be built over the subway structure. In Portland and Pasadena, ballast mats have been recommended to control light rail transit ground vibration impacts on housing located at typically 35 feet from the alignment. Each of these provisions are briefly described in view of recent applications at U.S. transit systems.

  17. Coherent Control of Ground State NaK Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zoe; Park, Jee Woo; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold dipolar molecules exhibit anisotropic, tunable, long-range interactions, making them attractive for the study of novel states of matter and quantum information processing. We demonstrate the creation and control of 23 Na40 K molecules in their rovibronic and hyperfine ground state. By applying microwaves, we drive coherent Rabi oscillations of spin-polarized molecules between the rotational ground state (J=0) and J=1. The control afforded by microwave manipulation allows us to pursue engineered dipolar interactions via microwave dressing. By driving a two-photon transition, we are also able to observe Ramsey fringes between different J=0 hyperfine states, with coherence times as long as 0.5s. The realization of long coherence times between different molecular states is crucial for applications in quantum information processing. NSF, AFOSR- MURI, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, DARPA-OLE

  18. Ground vibration test of the laminar flow control JStar airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, M. W.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Ellison, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A ground vibration test was conducted on a Lockheed JetStar airplane that had been modified for the purpose of conducting laminar flow control experiments. The test was performed prior to initial flight flutter tests. Both sine-dwell and single-point-random excitation methods were used. The data presented include frequency response functions and a comparison of mode frequencies and mode shapes from both methods.

  19. ALLY: An operator's associate for satellite ground control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushman, J. B.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Jones, P. M.; Rubin, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The key characteristics of an intelligent advisory system is explored. A central feature is that human-machine cooperation should be based on a metaphor of human-to-human cooperation. ALLY, a computer-based operator's associate which is based on a preliminary theory of human-to-human cooperation, is discussed. ALLY assists the operator in carrying out the supervisory control functions for a simulated NASA ground control system. Experimental evaluation of ALLY indicates that operators using ALLY performed at least as well as they did when using a human associate and in some cases even better.

  20. Study to eliminate ground resonance using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of active control blade feathering in increasing rotor body damping and the possibility to eliminate ground resonance instabilities were investigated. An analytical model representing rotor flapping and lead-lag degrees of freedom and body pitch, roll, longitudinal and lateral motion is developed. Active control blade feathering is implemented as state variable feedback through a conventional swashplate. The influence of various feedback states, feedback gain, and weighting between the cyclic controls is studied through stability and response analyses. It is shown that blade cyclic inplane motion, roll rate and roll acceleration feedback can add considerable damping to the system and eliminate ground resonance instabilities, which the feedback phase is also a powerful parameter, if chosen properly, it maximizes augmentation of the inherent regressing lag mode damping. It is shown that rotor configuration parameters, like blade root hinge offset, flapping stiffness, and precone considerably influence the control effectiveness. It is found that active control is particularly powerful for hingeless and bearingless rotor systems.

  1. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, James

    2014-01-01

    The Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management plays a key role for future ground operations at NASA. The software that is integrated into this system is called G2 2011 Gensym. The purpose of this report is to describe the Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management with the use of the G2 Gensym software and the G2 NASA toolkit for Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) which is a Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI). The decision rationale for the use of the G2 platform is to develop a modular capability for ISHM and AC. Toolkit modules include knowledge bases that are generic and can be applied in any application domain module. That way, there's a maximization of reusability, maintainability, and systematic evolution, portability, and scalability. Engine modules are generic, while application modules represent the domain model of a specific application. Furthermore, the NASA toolkit, developed since 2006 (a set of modules), makes it possible to create application domain models quickly, using pre-defined objects that include sensors and components libraries for typical fluid, electrical, and mechanical systems.

  2. Factors controlling tungsten concentrations in ground water, Carson Desert, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Stollenwerk, K.G.; Garbarino, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    An investigation of a childhood leukemia cluster by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that residents of the Carson Desert, Nevada, are exposed to high levels of W and this prompted an investigation of W in aquifers used as drinking water sources. Tungsten concentrations in 100 ground water samples from all aquifers used as drinking water sources in the area ranged from 0.27 to 742 ??g/l. Ground water in which W concentrations exceed 50 ??g/l principally occurs SE of Fallon in a geothermal area. The principal sources of W in ground water are natural and include erosion of W-bearing mineral deposits in the Carson River watershed upstream of Fallon, and, possibly, upwelling geothermal waters. Ground water in the Fallon area is strongly reducing and reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides may be releasing W; however, direct evidence that the metal oxides contain W is not available. Although W and Cl concentrations in the Carson River, a lake, and water from many wells, appear to be controlled by evaporative concentration, evaporation alone cannot explain the elevated W concentrations found in water from some of the wells. Concentrations of W exceeding 50 ??g/l are exclusively associated with Na-HCO3 and Na-Cl water types and pH > 8.0; in these waters, geochemical modeling indicates that W exhibits <10% adsorption. Tungsten concentrations are strongly and positively correlated with As, B, F, and P, indicating either common sources or common processes controlling their concentrations. Geochemical modeling indicates W concentrations are consistent with pH-controlled adsorption of W. The geochemical model PHREEQC was used to calculate IAP values, which were compared with published Ksp values for primary W minerals. FeWO4, MnWO4, Na2WO4, and MgWO4 were undersaturated and CaWO4 and SrWO 4 were approaching saturation. These conclusions are tentative because of uncertainty in the thermodynamic data. The similar behavior of As and W observed in

  3. SILEX ground segment control facilities and flight operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demelenne, Benoit; Tolker-Nielsen, Toni; Guillen, Jean-Claude

    1999-04-01

    The European Space Agency is going to conduct an inter orbit link experiment which will connect a low Earth orbiting satellite and a Geostationary satellite via optical terminals. This experiment has been called SILEX (Semiconductor Inter satellite Link Experiment). Two payloads have been built. One called PASTEL (PASsager de TELecommunication) has been embarked on the French Earth observation satellite SPOT4 which has been launched successfully in March 1998. The future European experimental data relay satellite ARTEMIS (Advanced Relay and TEchnology MISsion), which will route the data to ground, will carry the OPALE terminal (Optical Payload Experiment). The European Space Agency is responsible for the operation of both terminals. Due to the complexity and experimental character of this new optical technology, the development, preparation and validation of the ground segment control facilities required a long series of technical and operational qualification tests. This paper is presenting the operations concept and the early results of the PASTEL in orbit operations.

  4. Control of Asymmetric Cell Divisions during Root Ground Tissue Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Won; Lim, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the production of diverse cell/tissue types is essential for the development of multicellular organisms such as animals and plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana root, which contains distinct cells/tissues along longitudinal and radial axes, has served as an elegant model to investigate how genetic programs and environmental signals interact to produce different cell/tissue types. In the root, a series of asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) give rise to three ground tissue layers at maturity (endodermis, middle cortex, and cortex). Because the middle cortex is formed by a periclinal (parallel to the axis) ACD of the endodermis around 7 to 14 days post-germination, middle cortex formation is used as a parameter to assess maturation of the root ground tissue. Molecular, genetic, and physiological studies have revealed that the control of the timing and extent of middle cortex formation during root maturation relies on the interaction of plant hormones and transcription factors. In particular, abscisic acid and gibberellin act synergistically to regulate the timing and extent of middle cortex formation, unlike their typical antagonism. The SHORT-ROOT, SCARECROW, SCARECROW-LIKE 3, and DELLA transcription factors, all of which belong to the plant-specific GRAS family, play key roles in the regulation of middle cortex formation. Recently, two additional transcription factors, SEUSS and GA- AND ABA-RESPONSIVE ZINC FINGER, have also been characterized during ground tissue maturation. In this review, we provide a detailed account of the regulatory networks that control the timing and extent of middle cortex formation during post-embryonic root development. PMID:27306644

  5. Automatic Scheduling and Planning (ASAP) in future ground control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlin, Sam

    1988-01-01

    This report describes two complementary approaches to the problem of space mission planning and scheduling. The first is an Expert System or Knowledge-Based System for automatically resolving most of the activity conflicts in a candidate plan. The second is an Interactive Graphics Decision Aid to assist the operator in manually resolving the residual conflicts which are beyond the scope of the Expert System. The two system designs are consistent with future ground control station activity requirements, support activity timing constraints, resource limits and activity priority guidelines.

  6. Automatic ground control point recognition with parallel associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Tahir, Raid; Toth, Charles K.; Schenck, Anton F.

    1990-01-01

    The basic principle of the associative memory is to match the unknown input pattern against a stored training set, and responding with the 'closest match' and the corresponding label. Generally, an associative memory system requires two preparatory steps: selecting attributes of the pattern class, and training the system by associating patterns with labels. Experimental results gained from using Parallel Associative Memory are presented. The primary concern is an automatic search for ground control points in aerial photographs. Synthetic patterns are tested followed by real data. The results are encouraging as a relatively high level of correct matches is reached.

  7. Ground control failures. A pictorial view of case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    2007-07-01

    The book shows, in pictorial views, many forms and/or stages of types of failures in mines, for instance, cutter, roof falls, and cribs. In each case, the year of occurrence is stated in the beginning so that the environment or technological background under which it occurred are reflected. The narrative than begins with the mining and geological conditions, followed by a description of the ground control problems and recommended solutions and results, if any. The sections cover failure of pillars, roof falls, longwall, roof bolting, multiple-seam mining, floor heave, longwall, flooding and weathering of coal, old workings, and shortwall and thin-seam plow longwall.

  8. The 18th Annual Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition: trends and influences for intelligent ground vehicle control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Bernard L.; Frederick, Philip; Smuda, William

    2011-01-01

    The Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC) is one of four, unmanned systems, student competitions that were founded by the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI). The IGVC is a multidisciplinary exercise in product realization that challenges college engineering student teams to integrate advanced control theory, machine vision, vehicular electronics and mobile platform fundamentals to design and build an unmanned system. Teams from around the world focus on developing a suite of dual-use technologies to equip ground vehicles of the future with intelligent driving capabilities. Over the past 18 years, the competition has challenged undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students with real world applications in intelligent transportation systems, the military and manufacturing automation. To date, teams from over 75 universities and colleges have participated. This paper describes some of the applications of the technologies required by this competition and discusses the educational benefits. The primary goal of the IGVC is to advance engineering education in intelligent vehicles and related technologies. The employment and professional networking opportunities created for students and industrial sponsors through a series of technical events over the four-day competition are highlighted. Finally, an assessment of the competition based on participation is presented.

  9. Lessons learned on the Ground Test Accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When we initiated the control system design for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), we envisioned a system that would be flexible enough to handle the changing requirements of an experimental project. This control system would use a developers` toolkit to reduce the cost and time to develop applications for GTA, and through the use of open standards, the system would accommodate unforeseen requirements as they arose. Furthermore, we would attempt to demonstrate on GTA a level of automation far beyond that achieved by existing accelerator control systems. How well did we achieve these goals? What were the stumbling blocks to deploying the control system, and what assumptions did we make about requirements that turned out to be incorrect? In this paper we look at the process of developing a control system that evolved into what is now the ``Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System`` (EPICS). Also, we assess the impact of this system on the GTA project, as well as the impact of GTA on EPICS. The lessons learned on GTA will be valuable for future projects.

  10. De-tabooing dying control - a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dying is inescapable yet remains a neglected issue in modern health care. The research question in this study was “what is going on in the field of dying today?” What emerged was to eventually present a grounded theory of control of dying focusing specifically on how people react in relation to issues about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Methods Classic grounded theory was used to analyze interviews with 55 laypersons and health care professionals in North America and Europe, surveys on attitudes to PAS among physicians and the Swedish general public, and scientific literature, North American discussion forum websites, and news sites. Results Open awareness of the nature and timing of a patient’s death became common in health care during the 1960s in the Western world. Open dying awareness contexts can be seen as the start of a weakening of a taboo towards controlled dying called de-tabooing. The growth of the hospice movement and palliative care, but also the legalization of euthanasia and PAS in the Benelux countries, and PAS in Montana, Oregon and Washington further represents de-tabooing dying control. An attitude positioning between the taboo of dying control and a growing taboo against questioning patient autonomy and self-determination called de-paternalizing is another aspect of de-tabooing. When confronted with a taboo, people first react emotionally based on “gut feelings” - emotional positioning. This is followed by reasoning and label wrestling using euphemisms and dysphemisms - reflective positioning. Rarely is de-tabooing unconditional but enabled by stipulated positioning as in soft laws (palliative care guidelines) and hard laws (euthanasia/PAS legislation). From a global perspective three shapes of dying control emerge. First, suboptimal palliative care in closed awareness contexts seen in Asian, Islamic and Latin cultures, called closed dying. Second, palliative care and sedation therapy, but not euthanasia

  11. Feasibility of Automated Adaptive GCA (Ground Controlled Approach) Controller Training System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuge, Robert L.; And Others

    An analysis of the conceptual feasibility of using automatic speech recognition and understanding technology in the design of an advanced training system was conducted. The analysis specifically explored application to Ground Controlled Approach (GCA) controller training. A systems engineering approach was followed to determine the feasibility of…

  12. Path planning and Ground Control Station simulator for UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajami, A.; Balmat, J.; Gauthier, J.-P.; Maillot, T.

    In this paper we present a Universal and Interoperable Ground Control Station (UIGCS) simulator for fixed and rotary wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), and all types of payloads. One of the major constraints is to operate and manage multiple legacy and future UAVs, taking into account the compliance with NATO Combined/Joint Services Operational Environment (STANAG 4586). Another purpose of the station is to assign the UAV a certain degree of autonomy, via autonomous planification/replanification strategies. The paper is organized as follows. In Section 2, we describe the non-linear models of the fixed and rotary wing UAVs that we use in the simulator. In Section 3, we describe the simulator architecture, which is based upon interacting modules programmed independently. This simulator is linked with an open source flight simulator, to simulate the video flow and the moving target in 3D. To conclude this part, we tackle briefly the problem of the Matlab/Simulink software connection (used to model the UAV's dynamic) with the simulation of the virtual environment. Section 5 deals with the control module of a flight path of the UAV. The control system is divided into four distinct hierarchical layers: flight path, navigation controller, autopilot and flight control surfaces controller. In the Section 6, we focus on the trajectory planification/replanification question for fixed wing UAV. Indeed, one of the goals of this work is to increase the autonomy of the UAV. We propose two types of algorithms, based upon 1) the methods of the tangent and 2) an original Lyapunov-type method. These algorithms allow either to join a fixed pattern or to track a moving target. Finally, Section 7 presents simulation results obtained on our simulator, concerning a rather complicated scenario of mission.

  13. Developing satellite ground control software through graphical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney; Henderson, Scott; Paterra, Frank; Truszkowski, Walt

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a program of investigation into software development as graphical modeling. The goal of this work is a more efficient development and maintenance process for the ground-based software that controls unmanned scientific satellites launched by NASA. The main hypothesis of the program is that modeling of the spacecraft and its subsystems, and reasoning about such models, can--and should--form the key activities of software development; by using such models as inputs, the generation of code to perform various functions (such as simulation and diagnostics of spacecraft components) can be automated. Moreover, we contend that automation can provide significant support for reasoning about the software system at the diagram level.

  14. Next Generation GPS Ground Control Segment (OCX) Navigation Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertiger, Willy; Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Harvey, Nate; Miller, Kevin; Romans, Larry; Weiss, Jan; Doyle, Larry; Solorzano, Tara; Petzinger, John; Stell, Al

    2010-01-01

    In February 2010, a Raytheon-led team was selected by The Air Force to develop, implement, and operate the next generation GPS ground control segment (OCX). To meet and exceed the demanding OCX navigation performance requirements, the Raytheon team partnered with ITT (Navigation lead) and JPL to adapt major elements of JPL's navigation technology, proven in the operations of the Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. Key design goals for the navigation subsystem include accurate ephemeris and clock accuracy (user range error), ease of model upgrades, and a smooth and safe transition from the legacy system to OCX.We will describe key elements of the innovative architecture of the OCX navigation subsystem,and demonstrate the anticipated performance of the system through high fidelity simulations withactual GPS measurements.

  15. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f < 1 mHz and which by extension is suitable for in-flight thermal control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  16. Ground Operations Autonomous Control and Integrated Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Walker, Mark; Wilkins, Kim; Johnson, Robert; Sass, Jared; Youney, Justin

    2014-01-01

    An intelligent autonomous control capability has been developed and is currently being validated in ground cryogenic fluid management operations. The capability embodies a physical architecture consistent with typical launch infrastructure and control systems, augmented by a higher level autonomous control (AC) system enabled to make knowledge-based decisions. The AC system is supported by an integrated system health management (ISHM) capability that detects anomalies, diagnoses causes, determines effects, and could predict future anomalies. AC is implemented using the concept of programmed sequences that could be considered to be building blocks of more generic mission plans. A sequence is a series of steps, and each executes actions once conditions for the step are met (e.g. desired temperatures or fluid state are achieved). For autonomous capability, conditions must consider also health management outcomes, as they will determine whether or not an action is executed, or how an action may be executed, or if an alternative action is executed instead. Aside from health, higher level objectives can also drive how a mission is carried out. The capability was developed using the G2 software environment (www.gensym.com) augmented by a NASA Toolkit that significantly shortens time to deployment. G2 is a commercial product to develop intelligent applications. It is fully object oriented. The core of the capability is a Domain Model of the system where all elements of the system are represented as objects (sensors, instruments, components, pipes, etc.). Reasoning and decision making can be done with all elements in the domain model. The toolkit also enables implementation of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), which are represented as root cause trees. FMEA's are programmed graphically, they are reusable, as they address generic FMEA referring to classes of subsystems or objects and their functional relationships. User interfaces for integrated awareness by

  17. Active control of shocks and sonic boom ground signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagiz, Bedri

    The manipulation of a flow field to obtain a desired change is a much heightened subject. Active flow control has been the subject of the major research areas in fluid mechanics for the past two decades. It offers new solutions for mitigation of shock strength, sonic boom alleviation, drag minimization, reducing blade-vortex interaction noise in helicopters, stall control and the performance maximization of existing designs to meet the increasing requirements of the aircraft industries. Despite the wide variety of the potential applications of active flow control, the majority of studies have been performed at subsonic speeds. The active flow control cases were investigated in transonic speed in this study. Although the active flow control provides significant improvements, the sensibility of aerodynamic performance to design parameters makes it a nontrivial and expensive problem, so the designer has to optimize a number of different parameters. For the purpose of gaining understanding of the active flow control concepts, an automated optimization cycle process was generated. Also, the optimization cycle reduces cost and turnaround time. The mass flow coefficient, location, width and angle were chosen as design parameters to maximize the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. As the main contribution of this study, a detailed parametric study and optimization process were presented. The second step is to appraise the practicability of weakening the shock wave and thereby reducing the wave drag in transonic flight regime using flow control devices such as two dimensional contour bump, individual jet actuator, and also the hybrid control which includes both control devices together, thereby gaining the desired improvements in aerodynamic performance of the air-vehicle. After this study, to improve the aerodynamic performance, the flow control and shape parameters are optimized separately, combined, and in a serial combination. The remarkable part of all these

  18. Multimedia computer support for a course in ground control

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.; Unal, A.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype multimedia compact disc (CD) was created using the facilities at the Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center (RMERC) of the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) to teach a portion of a course in Ground Control. Multimedia computers offer an environment where audio-visual presentations can be made in an interactive fashion. Together with relevant animation clips, video clips, and 3-D representations, the difficulties in describing mining processes and earth structures can be overcome. This paper describes the experience gained in preparing interactive multimedia lectures on computers. The hardware and software used in creating the sound commentary, 3-D graphics, animation clips, video clips, and movies are listed. The structure of the program and how interactivity was achieved is explained in detail. Such an instructional tool is not only an excellent supplement to regular courses but it also is an inexpensive and effective way of providing distance education for mining engineers working at remote locations scattered all over the country.

  19. Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1999-01-01

    This grant, Intelligent Command and Control Systems for Satellite Ground Operations, funded by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, has spanned almost a decade. During this time, it has supported a broad range of research addressing the changing needs of NASA operations. It is important to note that many of NASA's evolving needs, for example, use of automation to drastically reduce (e.g., 70%) operations costs, are similar requirements in both government and private sectors. Initially the research addressed the appropriate use of emerging and inexpensive computational technologies, such as X Windows, graphics, and color, together with COTS (commercial-off-the-shelf) hardware and software such as standard Unix workstations to re-engineer satellite operations centers. The first phase of research supported by this grant explored the development of principled design methodologies to make effective use of emerging and inexpensive technologies. The ultimate performance measures for new designs were whether or not they increased system effectiveness while decreasing costs. GT-MOCA (The Georgia Tech Mission Operations Cooperative Associate) and GT-VITA (Georgia Tech Visual and Inspectable Tutor and Assistant), whose latter stages were supported by this research, explored model-based design of collaborative operations teams and the design of intelligent tutoring systems, respectively. Implemented in proof-of-concept form for satellite operations, empirical evaluations of both, using satellite operators for the former and personnel involved in satellite control operations for the latter, demonstrated unequivocally the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed modeling and design strategy underlying both research efforts. The proof-of-concept implementation of GT-MOCA showed that the methodology could specify software requirements that enabled a human-computer operations team to perform without any significant performance differences from the standard two-person satellite

  20. Ground control system for the midcourse space experiment UTC clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragonette, Richard

    1994-01-01

    One goal of the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) spacecraft Operations Planning Center is to maintain the onboard satellite UTC clock (UTC(MSX)) to within 1 millisecond of UTC(APL) (the program requirement is 10 msec). The UTC(MSX) clock employs as its time base an APL built 5 MHz quartz oscillator, which is expected to have frequency instabilities (aging rate + drift rate + frequency offset) that will cause the clock to drift approximately two to ten milliseconds per day. The UTC(MSX) clock can be advanced or retarded by the APL MSX satellite ground control center by integer multiples of 1 millisecond. The MSX Operations Planning Center is developing software which records the drift of UTC(MSX) relative to UTC(APL) and which schedules the time of day and magnitude of UTC(MSX) clock updates up to 48 hours in advance. Because of the manner in which MSX spacecraft activities are scheduled, MSX clock updates are planned 24 to 48 hours in advance, and stored in the satellite's computer controller for later execution. Data will be collected on the drift of UTC(MSX) relative to UTC(APL) over a three to five day period. Approximately six times per day, the time offset between UTC(MSX) and UTC(APL) will be measured by APL with a resolution of less than 100 microseconds. From this data a second order analytical model of the clock's drift will be derived. This model will be used to extrapolate the offset of the MSX clock in time from the present to 48 hours in the future. MSX clock updates will be placed on the spacecraft's daily schedule whenever the predicted clock offset exceeds 0.5 milliseconds. The paper includes a discussion of how the empirical model of the MSX clock is derived from satellite telemetry data, as well as the algorithm used to schedule MSX clock updates based on the model.

  1. Proceedings, 24th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.; Mark, C.; Finfinger, G.; Tadolini, S.; Wahab Khair, A.; Heasley, K.

    2005-07-01

    Topics covered: longwall mining; multiple seam mining; pillar/pillar extraction; surface subsidence; roof falls; geology; high horizontal stresses; highwall mining/slope stability; mine/roof support design; roof bolting; and detection of ground conditions.

  2. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A joint simulation was carried out using a piloted simulator and an advanced-concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the ground-based four-dimensional descent advisor (DA), an automation aid based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes and were able to achieve an arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 s at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in a further enhancement of the DA algorithm.

  3. Grounding, bonding and shielding for safety and signal interference control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, T. J.; Bautista, Al

    Aircraft models and other aerodynamic tests are conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC). The models, tested in NFAC's wind tunnels, are sometimes heavily instrumented and are connected to a data acquisition system. Besides recording data for evaluation, certain critical information must be monitored to be sure the model is within operational limits. The signals for these parameters are for the most part low-level signals that require good instrumentation amplification. These amplifiers need to be grounded and shielded for common mode rejection and noise reduction. The instrumentation also needs to be grounded to prevent electrical shock hazards. The purpose of this paper is to present an understanding of the principles and purpose of grounding, bonding, and shielding.

  4. Regional ground deformation and its controlling measures in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhifang; Zhu, Haisheng; Huang, Yong

    2006-12-01

    With the development of construction of China Cities, there exist a lot of environmental geological problems involved in the geofracture, land subsidence, collapse, landslide, devolution, mudrock flow, floating sand, piping and soft ground deformation. Of big cities whose population is over one million in China, about 30 cities appears the land subsidence region. Other cities locate in the regions of collapse yellow earth or expand soil of strong swell-shrink charasteristic, soft ground and karst. In the paper, the cause and hazard of regionality ground deformation is summed up. The causes of regional land deformation caused by the natural geological effect and activities of human being are analyzed. According to the length of deformation course and endanger of society, economy and life, land deformation involves three types, that is, the delay, rapid and break land deformation. And the concrete countermeasure and method are provided.

  5. Ground-borne vibrations caused by trams, and control measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, J.

    1988-01-01

    Ground-borne vibrations caused by trams in streets within cities are a special problem. The vibrations propagating to the buildings close to the track and within these buildings may be felt by the inhabitants and may be heard via the structure-borne sound radiated to the rooms. In quiet sites during night-time the relevant limits are often exceeded, if the tracks are laid in the normal manner. Experiments with tracks on floating concrete slabs on mineral wool and with "barriers" in the ground alongside the track show that the vibrations reaching buildings near the track may be reduced considerably.

  6. Definition of ground test for Large Space Structure (LSS) control verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    An overview for the definition of a ground test for the verification of Large Space Structure (LSS) control is given. The definition contains information on the description of the LSS ground verification experiment, the project management scheme, the design, development, fabrication and checkout of the subsystems, the systems engineering and integration, the hardware subsystems, the software, and a summary which includes future LSS ground test plans. Upon completion of these items, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center will have an LSS ground test facility which will provide sufficient data on dynamics and control verification of LSS so that LSS flight system operations can be reasonably ensured.

  7. A ground test program to support condition monitoring of a spacecraft attitude control propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Douglas J.; Lester, Robert W.; Baroth, Edmund C.; Coleman, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    The Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission involves seven years of flight from 0.6 to 4.57 Astronomical Units (AU), followed by about 915 days of maneuvering around a comet. Ground testing will characterize the very critical attitude control system thrusters' fuel consumption and performance for all anticipated fuel temperatures over thruster life. The ground test program characterization will support flight condition monitoring. A commercial software application hosted on a commercial microcomputer will control ground test operations and data acquisition using a newly designed thrust stand. The data acquisition and control system uses a graphics-based language and features a visual interface to integrate data acquisition and control.

  8. Control performance evaluation of railway vehicle MR suspension using fuzzy sky-ground hook control algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, G. S.; Yoo, W. H.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents control performance evaluation of railway vehicle featured by semi-active suspension system using magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper. In order to achieve this goal, a nine degree of freedom of railway vehicle model, which includes car body and bogie, is established. The wheel-set data is loaded from measured value of railway vehicle. The MR damper system is incorporated with the governing equation of motion of the railway vehicle model which includes secondary suspension. To illustrate the effectiveness of the controlled MR dampers on suspension system of railway vehicle, the control law using the sky-ground hook controller is adopted. This controller takes into account for both vibration control of car body and increasing stability of bogie by adopting a weighting parameter between two performance requirements. The parameters appropriately determined by employing a fuzzy algorithm associated with two fuzzy variables: the lateral speed of the car body and the lateral performance of the bogie. Computer simulation results of control performances such as vibration control and stability analysis are presented in time and frequency domains.

  9. System and method for transferring telemetry data between a ground station and a control center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Timothy J. (Inventor); Ly, Vuong T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems, computer-implemented methods, and tangible computer-readable media for coordinating communications between a ground station, a control center, and a spacecraft. The method receives a call to a simple, unified application programmer interface implementing communications protocols related to outer space, when instruction relates to receiving a command at the control center for the ground station generate an abstract message by agreeing upon a format for each type of abstract message with the ground station and using a set of message definitions to configure the command in the agreed upon format, encode the abstract message to generate an encoded message, and transfer the encoded message to the ground station, and perform similar actions when the instruction relates to receiving a second command as a second encoded message at the ground station from the control center and when the determined instruction type relates to transmitting information to the control center.

  10. A controlled experiment in ground water flow model calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, M.C.; Cooley, R.L.; Pollock, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear regression was introduced to ground water modeling in the 1970s, but has been used very little to calibrate numerical models of complicated ground water systems. Apparently, nonlinear regression is thought by many to be incapable of addressing such complex problems. With what we believe to be the most complicated synthetic test case used for such a study, this work investigates using nonlinear regression in ground water model calibration. Results of the study fall into two categories. First, the study demonstrates how systematic use of a well designed nonlinear regression method can indicate the importance of different types of data and can lead to successive improvement of models and their parameterizations. Our method differs from previous methods presented in the ground water literature in that (1) weighting is more closely related to expected data errors than is usually the case; (2) defined diagnostic statistics allow for more effective evaluation of the available data, the model, and their interaction; and (3) prior information is used more cautiously. Second, our results challenge some commonly held beliefs about model calibration. For the test case considered, we show that (1) field measured values of hydraulic conductivity are not as directly applicable to models as their use in some geostatistical methods imply; (2) a unique model does not necessarily need to be identified to obtain accurate predictions; and (3) in the absence of obvious model bias, model error was normally distributed. The complexity of the test case involved implies that the methods used and conclusions drawn are likely to be powerful in practice.Nonlinear regression was introduced to ground water modeling in the 1970s, but has been used very little to calibrate numerical models of complicated ground water systems. Apparently, nonlinear regression is thought by many to be incapable of addressing such complex problems. With what we believe to be the most complicated synthetic

  11. Eurobot Ground Prototype Control System Overview & Tests Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, Andrea; Martelli, Andrea; Pensavalle, Emanuele; Ferraris, Simona; Didot, Frederic

    2010-08-01

    In the planned missions on Moon and Mars, robotics can play a key role, as robots can both assist astronauts and, above all, relieve them of dangerous or too difficult tasks. To this aim, both cooperative capabilities and a great level of autonomy are needed: the robotic crew assistant must be able to work on its own, without supervision by humans, and to help astronauts to accomplish tasks otherwise unfeasible for them. Within this context, a project named Eurobot Ground Prototype, conducted in conjunction with ESA and Thales Alenia Space, is presented. EGP is a dual-arm mobile manipulator and exploits both stereo cameras and force/torque sensors in order to rely on visual and force feedback. This paper provides an overview of the performed and on going activities within the Eurobot Ground Prototype project.

  12. Antenna testing for the Inmarsat 2 ground control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, C.

    1992-02-01

    This article describes how the antennas of the Inmarsat 2 TT&C and IOT ground stations were tested and calibrated. It explains the main test methods used, giving the theory behind the tests and indicates some of the practical difficulties encountered during testing. Techniques described include the use of radio stars, boresight antennas and satellite verification testing using Intelsat and Inmarsat satellites. Parameters tested include gain, G/T (figure of merit), sidelobe patterns, cross polar discrimination and isolation.

  13. JF-104 ground testing reaction control system (RCS) jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    JF-104A (formerly YF-104A, serial # 55-2961) was modifed with a hydrogen peroxide reaction control system (RCS). Following a zoom climb to altitudes in the vicinity of 80,000 feet, the RCS system gave the aircraft controllability in the thin upper atmosphere where conventional control surfaces are ineffective.

  14. Load control system. [for space shuttle external tank ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosse, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The load control system developed for the shuttle external structural tests is described. The system consists of a load programming/display module, and a load control module along with the following hydraulic system components: servo valves, dump valves, hydraulic system components, and servo valve manifold blocks. One load programming/display subsystem can support multiple load control subsystem modules.

  15. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  16. Remote and Local Display Applications for the Launch Control System and the Kennedy Ground Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordillo, Orlando Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This spring 2016 semester, I interned through the OSSI Intern program, sponsored by USRA, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. I worked under the Engineering Directorate (NE-ES), under the software branch. We are creating the future Launch Control System (LCS). The system monitors, manages and sends commands to ground or flight subsystems. I worked on both the remote applications, which reside in the firing room, and local applications that are in Panel Views. The two kinds of applications have completely different development environments but work in parallel. For each project I was assigned to work with a specific subsystems team. I worked with the Launch Release Subsystem (LRS) on the remote side and with the Environmental Control Subsystem (ECS) on the Local side.

  17. Commercial off the Shelf Ground Control Supports Calibration and Conflation from Ground to Space Based Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielová, M.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    The need for rapid deployment of aerial and satellite imagery in support of GIS and engineering integration projects require new sources of geodetic control to ensure the accuracy for geospatial projects. In the past, teams of surveyors would need to deploy to project areas to provide targeted or photo identifiable points that are used to provide data for orthorecificaion, QA/QC and calibration for multi-platform sensors. The challenge of integrating street view, UAS, airborne and Space based sensors to produce the common operational picture requires control to tie multiple sources together. Today commercial off the shelf delivery of existing photo identifiable control is increasing the speed of deployment of this data without having to revisit sites over and over again. The presentation will discuss the processes developed by CompassData to build a global library of 40,000 control points available today. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) based processes and initiatives ensure consistent quality of survey data, photo identifiable features selected and meta data to support photogrammetrist, engineers and GIS professionals to quickly deliver projects with better accuracy.

  18. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for aiding air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting scheduled arrival times at a metering fix was developed and tested in a real time simulation. The automation aid, referred to as the ground based 4-D descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent-point and speed-profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is used by the air traffic controller to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. A joint simulation was conducted using a piloted simulator and an advanced concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the DA automation aid from both the pilot's and the air traffic controller's perspectives. The results of the piloted simulation are examined. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller issued descent advisories along standard curved path arrival routes, and were able to achieve an arrival time precision of + or - 20 sec at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of the algorithm to improve the predictive accuracy. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for the concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  19. Method of Controlling Steering of a Ground Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Andrew D. (Inventor); Bluethmann, William J. (Inventor); Lee, Chunhao J. (Inventor); Vitale, Robert L. (Inventor); Guo, Raymond (Inventor); Atluri, Venkata Prasad (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of controlling steering of a vehicle through setting wheel angles of a plurality of modular electronic corner assemblies (eModules) is provided. The method includes receiving a driving mode selected from a mode selection menu. A position of a steering input device is determined in a master controller. A velocity of the vehicle is determined, in the master controller, when the determined position of the steering input device is near center. A drive mode request corresponding to the selected driving mode to the plurality of steering controllers is transmitted to the master controller. A required steering angle of each of the plurality of eModules is determined, in the master controller, as a function of the determined position of the steering input device, the determined velocity of the vehicle, and the selected first driving mode. The eModules are set to the respective determined steering angles.

  20. Ground Control for Non-Emplacement Drifts for LA

    SciTech Connect

    D. Tang

    2004-02-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to analyze the stability of repository non-emplacement drifts during the preclosure period, and to provide a final ground support method for non-emplacement drifts for the License Application (LA). This calculation will provide input for the development of LA documents. The scope of this calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts including access mains, ramps, exhaust mains, turnouts, intersections between access mains and turnouts, and intersections between exhaust mains and emplacement drifts, portals, TBM launch chambers, observation drift and test alcove in the performance confirmation (PC) facilities, etc. The calculation is limited to the non-emplacement drifts subjected to a combined loading of in-situ stress, seismic stress, and/or thermal stress. Other effects such as hydrological and chemical effects are not considered in this analysis.

  1. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Operation of a navigation system, centered around image correction, was simulated and the system performance was analyzed. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction is summarized. Simulation results, and recommendations for future mission requirements are presented.

  2. Use of synthetic ground covers to control weeds in blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in blackberries (Rubus spp.) is a serious problem for organic producers and those who wish to reduce their reliance on herbicides. Three landscape fabrics (Dewitt, Texel, and a white polyester weave) and one industrial grade white on black plastic were used for weed control in conjucti...

  3. Ground facility for large space structures dynamics and control verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, Henry

    1986-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a facility in which closed loop control of Large Space Structures (LSS) can be demonstrated and verified. The main objective of the facility is to verify LSS control system techniques so that on-orbit performance can be unsured. The facility consists of an LSS test article or payload which is connected to a 3-axis angular pointing mount assembly that provides control torque commands. The angular pointing mount assembly is attached to a base excitation system which will simulate disturbances most likely to occur for Orbiter and DOD payloads. The control computer contains the calibration software, the reference systems, the alignment procedures, the telemetry software, and the control algorithms. The total system is suspended in such a fashion that the LSS test article has the characteristics common to all LSS.

  4. Definition of ground test for Large Space Structure (LSS) control verification, appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A Large Space Structure (LSS) ground test facility was developed to help verify LSS passive and active control theories. The facility also perform: (1) subsystem and component testing; (2) remote sensing and control; (3) parameter estimation and model verification; and (4) evolutionary modeling and control. The program is examined as is and looks at the first experiment to be performed in the laboratory.

  5. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Cryogenics Test Lab Control System Upgrade Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janice Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project will outfit the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at KSC's Cryogenics Test Laboratory with a new programmable logic control system. The control system upgrade enables the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenace Element Integration Team and other users of the SPLS to conduct testing in a controls environment similar to that used at the launch pad.

  6. Ground-water contamination control: Detection and remedial planning

    SciTech Connect

    Woldt, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    The dissertation is divided into three main sections that correspond to a typical sequence of actions resulting in a final remedial action plan for handling contamination at a particular site. The first section develops a methodology for detecting and mapping suspected contamination using multiple sources of data. Different data types are combined by using a modified form of kriging with uncertain data, termed compound kriging. In addition, the use of fuzzy set theory merged with geostatistics is explored as a possible mapping technique when variogram parameters are difficult to quantify. A decision support system for observation network design is presented in the second section. Network design is approached from a multiple objective decision making perspective. The objective is to identify the most cost-effective network design while considering the trade-off between performance and cost. Geostatistical variance reduction analysis and prior knowledge related to the site are used as performance measures in the decision support system. A remedial action design support system is described in the third section. Three dimensional geostatistical simulation and analytical ground water modeling are used to assess the need for further remedial action planning. In addition, a methodology for measuring the performance of candidate remediation systems under conditions of uncertainty in aquifer parameters and plume location is presented. These performance measures, combined with cost factors, are used in a multiple-criteria decision making system to determine the preferred clean up system for a site being investigated.

  7. Preliminary Design of Monitoring and Control Subsystem for GNSS Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Seongkyun; Lee, Jae-Eun; Park, Hanearl; Lee, Sanguk; Kim, Jaehoon

    2008-06-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) Ground Station monitors navigation satellite signal, analyzes navigation result, and uploads correction information to satellite. GNSS Ground Station is considered as a main object for constructing GNSS infra-structure and applied in various fields. ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute) is developing Monitoring and Control subsystem, which is subsystem of GNSS Ground Station. Monitoring and Control subsystem acquires GPS and Galileo satellite signal and provides signal monitoring data to GNSS control center. In this paper, the configurations of GNSS Ground Station and Monitoring and Control subsystem are introduced and the preliminary design of Monitoring and Control subsystem is performed. Monitoring and Control subsystem consists of data acquisition module, data formatting and archiving module, data error correction module, navigation solution determination module, independent quality monitoring module, and system operation and maintenance module. The design process uses UML (Unified Modeling Language) method which is a standard for developing software and consists of use-case modeling, domain design, software structure design, and user interface structure design. The preliminary design of Monitoring and Control subsystem enhances operation capability of GNSS Ground Station and is used as basic material for detail design of Monitoring and Control subsystem.

  8. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study addresses both ground operational data and technical requirements that span the Tug planning phase and operations phase. A similar study covering mission operations (by others) provides the complimentary flight operations details. The two studies provide the planning data requirements, resource allocation, and control milestones for supporting the requirements of the STS program. This Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls Study incorporates the basic ground operations requirements and concepts provided by previous studies with the interrelationships of the planning, IUS transition, and Tug fleet operations phases. The interrelationships of these phases were studied as a system to optimize overall program benefits and minimize operational risk factors.

  9. Intelligent command and control systems for satellite ground operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1994-01-01

    The Georgia Tech portion of the Intelligent Control Center project includes several complementary activities. Two major activities entail thesis level research; the other activities are either support activities or preliminary explorations (e.g., task analyses) to support the research. The first research activity is the development of principles for the design of active interfaces to support monitoring during real-time supports. It is well known that as the operator's task becomes less active, i.e., more monitoring and less active control, there is concern that the operator will be less involved and less able to rapidly identify anomalous or failure situations. The research project to design active monitoring interfaces is an attempt to remediate this undesirable side-effect of increasingly automated control systems that still depend ultimately on operator supervision. The second research activity is the exploration of the use of case-based reasoning as a way to accumulate operator experience and make it available in computational form.

  10. Ground Control Setup of the (LIF) Large Isothermal Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Large Isothermal Furnace (LIF) was flown on a mission in cooperation with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. LIF is a vacuum-heating furnace designed to heat large samples uniformly. The furnace consists of a sample container and heating element surrounded by a vacuum chamber. A crewmemeber will insert a sample cartridge into the furnace. The furnace will be activated and operations will be controlled automatically by a computer in response to an experiment number entered on the control panel. At the end of operations, helium will be discharged into the furnace, allowing cooling to start. Cooling will occur through the use of a water jacket while rapid cooling of samples can be accomplished through a controlled flow of helium. Data from experiments will help scientists better understand this important process which is vital to the production of high-quality semiconductor crystals.

  11. Ground control requirements for precision processing of ERTS images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, Thomas C.

    1972-01-01

    When the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-A) flies in 1972, NASA expects to receive and bulk-process 9,000 images a week. From this deluge of images, a few will be selected for precision processing; that is, about 5 percent will be further treated to improve the geometry of the scene, both in the relative and absolute sense. Control points are required for this processing. This paper describes the control requirements for relating ERTS images to a reference surface of the earth. Enough background on the ERTS-A satellite is included to make the requirements meaningful to the user.

  12. Weed control in blackberries using synthetic ground covers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in blackberries (Rubus spp.) is a serious problem for organic producers and those who wish to reduce their reliance on herbicides. Three landscape fabrics (Dewitt, Texel, and a white polyester weave) and one industrial grade white on black plastic were used in conjuction with newly pla...

  13. Ground control requirements for precision processing of ERTS images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, Thomas C.

    1973-01-01

    With the successful flight of the ERTS-1 satellite, orbital height images are available for precision processing into products such as 1:1,000,000-scale photomaps and enlargements up to 1:250,000 scale. In order to maintain positional error below 100 meters, control points for the precision processing must be carefully selected, clearly definitive on photos in both X and Y. Coordinates of selected control points measured on existing ½ and 15-minute standard maps provide sufficient accuracy for any space imaging system thus far defined. This procedure references the points to accepted horizontal and vertical datums. Maps as small as 1:250,000 scale can be used as source material for coordinates, but to maintain the desired accuracy, maps of 1:100,000 and larger scale should be used when available.

  14. 9th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    This conference provides papers related to strata control in underground mining environments. The bulk of these text are directly applicable to coal mining although some are applied to hard rock minerals. Performance testing of roof bolts, trusses, and other support devices are discussed. Information on computer software for stress and stability analyses are also provided. Case studies and discussions on mine roadway safety is provided.

  15. 1997 annual ground control operating plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This plan presents background information and a working guide to assist Mine Operations and Engineering in developing strategies for addressing ground control issues at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). With the anticipated receipt of waste in late 1997, this document provides additional detail to Panel 1 activities and options. The plan also serves as a foundation document for development and revision of the annual long-term ground control plan. Section 2.0 documents the current status of all underground excavations with respect to location, geology, geometry, age, ground support, operational use, projected life, and physical conditions. Section 3.0 presents the methods used to evaluate ground conditions, including visual observations of the roof, ribs, and floor, inspection of observation holes, and review of instrumentation data. Section 4.0 lists several ground support options and specific applications of each. Section 5.0 discusses remedial ground control measures that have been implemented to date. Section 6.0 presents projections and recommendations for ground control actions based on the information in Sections 2.0 through 5.0 of this plan and on a rating of the critical nature of each specific area. Section 7.0 presents a summary statement, and Section 8.0 includes references. Appendix A provides an overview and critique of ground control systems that have been, or may be, used at the site. Because of the dynamic nature of the underground openings and associated geotechnical activities, this plan will be revised as additional data are incorporated.

  16. Pushing the Limits of Cubesat Attitude Control: A Ground Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Devon S.; Heater, Daniel L.; Peeples, Steven R.; Sules. James K.; Huang, Po-Hao Adam

    2013-01-01

    A cubesat attitude control system (ACS) was designed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide sub-degree pointing capabilities using low cost, COTS attitude sensors, COTS miniature reaction wheels, and a developmental micro-propulsion system. The ACS sensors and actuators were integrated onto a 3D-printed plastic 3U cubesat breadboard (10 cm x 10 cm x 30 cm) with a custom designed instrument board and typical cubesat COTS hardware for the electrical, power, and data handling and processing systems. In addition to the cubesat development, a low-cost air bearing was designed and 3D printed in order to float the cubesat in the test environment. Systems integration and verification were performed at the MSFC Small Projects Rapid Integration & Test Environment laboratory. Using a combination of both the miniature reaction wheels and the micro-propulsion system, the open and closed loop control capabilities of the ACS were tested in the Flight Robotics Laboratory. The testing demonstrated the desired sub-degree pointing capability of the ACS and also revealed the challenges of creating a relevant environment for development testin

  17. Definition of ground test for verification of large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doane, G. B., III; Glaese, J. R.; Tollison, D. K.; Howsman, T. G.; Curtis, S. (Editor); Banks, B.

    1984-01-01

    Control theory and design, dynamic system modelling, and simulation of test scenarios are the main ideas discussed. The overall effort is the achievement at Marshall Space Flight Center of a successful ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test experiment of a large space structure. A simplified planar model of ground test verification was developed. The elimination from that model of the uncontrollable rigid body modes was also examined. Also studied was the hardware/software of computation speed.

  18. Factors controlling the regional distribution of vanadium in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Although the ingestion of vanadium (V) in drinking water may have possible adverse health effects, there have been relatively few studies of V in groundwater. Given the importance of groundwater as a source of drinking water in many areas of the world, this study examines the potential sources and geochemical processes that control the distribution of V in groundwater on a regional scale. Potential sources of V to groundwater include dissolution of V rich rocks, and waste streams from industrial processes. Geochemical processes such as adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, and chemical transformations control V concentrations in groundwater. Based on thermodynamic data and laboratory studies, V concentrations are expected to be highest in samples collected from oxic and alkaline groundwater. However, the extent to which thermodynamic data and laboratory results apply to the actual distribution of V in groundwater is not well understood. More than 8400 groundwater samples collected in California were used in this study. Of these samples, high (> or = 50 μg/L) and moderate (25 to 49 μg/L) V concentrations were most frequently detected in regions where both source rock and favorable geochemical conditions occurred. The distribution of V concentrations in groundwater samples suggests that significant sources of V are mafic and andesitic rock. Anthropogenic activities do not appear to be a significant contributor of V to groundwater in this study. High V concentrations in groundwater samples analyzed in this study were almost always associated with oxic and alkaline groundwater conditions, which is consistent with predictions based on thermodynamic data.

  19. Open solutions to distributed control in ground tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, William Randy

    1994-01-01

    The advent of high speed local area networks has made it possible to interconnect small, powerful computers to function together as a single large computer. Today, distributed computer systems are the new paradigm for large scale computing systems. However, the communications provided by the local area network is only one part of the solution. The services and protocols used by the application programs to communicate across the network are as indispensable as the local area network. And the selection of services and protocols that do not match the system requirements will limit the capabilities, performance, and expansion of the system. Proprietary solutions are available but are usually limited to a select set of equipment. However, there are two solutions based on 'open' standards. The question that must be answered is 'which one is the best one for my job?' This paper examines a model for tracking stations and their requirements for interprocessor communications in the next century. The model and requirements are matched with the model and services provided by the five different software architectures and supporting protocol solutions. Several key services are examined in detail to determine which services and protocols most closely match the requirements for the tracking station environment. The study reveals that the protocols are tailored to the problem domains for which they were originally designed. Further, the study reveals that the process control model is the closest match to the tracking station model.

  20. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, K. A.; Holinski, B. J.; Everaert, D. G.; Stein, R. B.; Etienne-Cummings, R.; Mushahwar, V. K.

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future.

  1. Feed forward and feedback control for over-ground locomotion in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, K A; Holinski, B J; Everaert, D G; Stein, R B; Etienne-Cummings, R; Mushahwar, V K

    2012-04-01

    The biological central pattern generator (CPG) integrates open and closed loop control to produce over-ground walking. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically based algorithm capable of mimicking the biological system to control multiple joints in the lower extremities for producing over-ground walking. The algorithm used state-based models of the step cycle each of which produced different stimulation patterns. Two configurations were implemented to restore over-ground walking in five adult anaesthetized cats using intramuscular stimulation (IMS) of the main hip, knee and ankle flexor and extensor muscles in the hind limbs. An open loop controller relied only on intrinsic timing while a hybrid-CPG controller added sensory feedback from force plates (representing limb loading), and accelerometers and gyroscopes (representing limb position). Stimulation applied to hind limb muscles caused extension or flexion in the hips, knees and ankles. A total of 113 walking trials were obtained across all experiments. Of these, 74 were successful in which the cats traversed 75% of the 3.5 m over-ground walkway. In these trials, the average peak step length decreased from 24.9 ± 8.4 to 21.8 ± 7.5 (normalized units) and the median number of steps per trial increased from 7 (Q1 = 6, Q3 = 9) to 9 (8, 11) with the hybrid-CPG controller. Moreover, within these trials, the hybrid-CPG controller produced more successful steps (step length ≤ 20 cm; ground reaction force ≥ 12.5% body weight) than the open loop controller: 372 of 544 steps (68%) versus 65 of 134 steps (49%), respectively. This supports our previous preliminary findings, and affirms that physiologically based hybrid-CPG approaches produce more successful stepping than open loop controllers. The algorithm provides the foundation for a neural prosthetic controller and a framework to implement more detailed control of locomotion in the future. PMID:22328615

  2. Eccentricity and argument of perigee control for orbits with repeat ground tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to gain an understanding into the problem of eccentricity (e) and argument of perigee (omega) control for TOPEX/Poseidon, the two cases where the highest latitude crossing time and one of the equator crossings are held constant are investigated. Variations in e and omega cause a significant effect on the satellite's ground-track repeatability. Maintaining e and omega near their frozen values will minimize this variation. Analytical expressions are found to express this relationship while keeping an arbitrary point of the ground track fixed. The initial offset of the ground track from its nominal path determines the subsequent evolution of e and omega about their frozen values. This long-term behavior is numerically determined using an earth gravitational field including the first 17 zonal harmonics. The numerical results are plotted together with the analytical constraints to see if the later values of e and omega cause unacceptable deviation in the ground track.

  3. Maneuver Planning for Conjunction Risk Mitigation with Ground-track Control Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David

    2008-01-01

    The planning of conjunction Risk Mitigation Maneuvers (RMM) in the presence of ground-track control requirements is analyzed. Past RMM planning efforts on the Aqua, Aura, and Terra spacecraft have demonstrated that only small maneuvers are available when ground-track control requirements are maintained. Assuming small maneuvers, analytical expressions for the effect of a given maneuver on conjunction geometry are derived. The analytical expressions are used to generate a large trade space for initial RMM design. This trade space represents a significant improvement in initial maneuver planning over existing methods that employ high fidelity maneuver models and propagation.

  4. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C no. and Visual Basic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Scripting languages have become a common method for implementing command and control solutions in space ground operations. The Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL), the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Scripting Language Processor (SLP), and the Spacecraft Control Language (SCL) offer script-commands that wrap tedious operations tasks into single calls. Since script-commands are interpreted, they also offer a certain amount of hands-on control that is highly valued in space ground operations. Although compiled programs seem to be unsuited for interactive user control and are more complex to develop, Marshall Space flight Center (MSFC) has developed a product called the Enhanced and Redesign Scripting (ERS) that makes use of the graphical and logical richness of a programming language while offering the hands-on and ease of control of a scripting language. ERS is currently used by the International Space Station (ISS) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) Cadre team members. ERS integrates spacecraft command mnemonics, telemetry measurements, and command and telemetry control procedures into a standard programming language, while making use of Microsoft's Visual Studio for developing Visual Basic (VB) or C# ground operations procedures. ERS also allows for script-style user control during procedure execution using a robust graphical user input and output feature. The availability of VB and C# programmers, and the richness of the languages and their development environment, has allowed ERS to lower our "script" development time and maintenance costs at the Marshall POIC.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Old Burial Ground (OBG) source control technology and inventory study

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.; Rehder, T.E.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1996-10-02

    This report has been developed to support information needs for wastes buried in the Burial Ground Complex. Information discussed is presented in a total of four individual attachments. The general focus of this report is to collect information on estimated source inventories, leaching studies, source control technologies, and to provide information on modeling parameters and associated data deficiencies.

  6. The Ground Control Room as an Enabling Technology in the Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gear, Gary; Mace, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of the ground control room as an required technology for the use of an Unmanned Aerial system. The Unmanned Aerial system is a strategic component of the Global Observing System, which will serve global science needs. The unmanned aerial system will use the same airspace as manned aircraft, therefore there will be unique telemetry needs.

  7. 77 FR 26046 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Ground Control for Surface Coal Mines and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... for Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... related to this safety standard on ground control plans for surface coal mines and surface work areas of... for Surface Coal Mines and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines. OMB Number:...

  8. First conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Chugh, Y. P.; Van Besien, A.

    1980-06-01

    The first conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin was held at the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Illinois, August 22-24, 1979. Twenty-one papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. Geometric Calibration of ZIYUAN-3 Three-Line Cameras Combining Ground Control Points and Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinshan; Yuan, Xiuxiao; Gong, Jianya

    2016-06-01

    Due to the large biases between the laboratory-calibrated values of the orientation parameters and their in-orbit true values, the initial direct georeferencing accuracy of the Ziyuan-3 (ZY-3) three-line camera (TLC) images can only reach the kilometre level. In this paper, a point-based geometric calibration model of the ZY-3 TLCs is firstly established by using the collinearity constraint, and then a line-based geometric calibration model is established by using the coplanarity constraint. With the help of both the point-based and the line-based models, a feasible in-orbit geometric calibration approach for the ZY-3 TLCs combining ground control points (GCPs) and ground control lines (GCLs) is presented. Experimental results show that like GCPs, GCLs can also provide effective ground control information for the geometric calibration of the ZY-3 TLCs. The calibration accuracy of the look angles of charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors achieved by using the presented approach reached up to about 1.0''. After the geometric calibration, the direct georeferencing accuracy of the ZY-3 TLC images without ground controls was significantly improved from the kilometre level to better than 11 m in planimetry and 9 m in height. A more satisfactory georeferencing accuracy of better than 3.5 m in planimetry and 3.0 m in height was achieved after the block adjustment with four GCPs.

  10. Proposed ground-based control of accelerometer on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the innovative control of an accelerometer to support the needs of the scientists operating science experiments that are on-board Space Station Freedom (SSF). Accelerometers in support of science experiments on the shuttle have typically been passive, record-only devices that present data only after the mission or that present limited data to the crew or ground operators during the mission. With the advent of science experiment operations on SSF, the principal investigators will need microgravity acceleration data during, as well as after, experiment operations. Because their data requirements may change during the experiment operations, the principal investigators will be allocated some control of accelerometer parameters. This paper summarizes the general-purpose Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) operation that supports experiments on the shuttle and describes the control of the SAMS for Space Station Freedom. Emphasis is placed on the proposed ground-based control of the accelerometer by the principal investigators.

  11. The deep space network, volume 18. [Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, Ground Communication Facility, and Network Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The objectives, functions, and organization of the Deep Space Network are summarized. The Deep Space Instrumentation Facility, the Ground Communications Facility, and the Network Control System are described.

  12. Apollo experience report: Flight-control data needs, terminal display devices, and ground system configuration requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of flight-control facilities for the Apollo program is reviewed from the viewpoint of the user organization. These facilities are treated in three categories: data systems, ground-based display and control systems, and configuration management. The effects of certain Apollo program factors on the selection, sizing, and configuration management of these systems are discussed. Recommendations are made regarding improvement of the systems and the reduction of system sensitivity to the program factors.

  13. Walking or Waiting? Topologies of the Breeding Ground in Malaria Control

    PubMed Central

    Lezaun, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Few places bear as much historical and scientific significance as the breeding ground, the accumulation of stagnant water where disease-carrying insects lay their eggs. Since the turn of the twentieth century, when mosquitoes of the Anopheles genus were identified as the vector of malaria transmission, these aquatic habitats have been a key object of epidemiological research and public health intervention against the disease. Yet the breeding ground can be incorporated into a number of different topologies, each implying a different spatialization of malaria and a distinct imagination of what kind of mosquito control is ‘doable'. A contemporary example of malaria control in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, illuminates an essential tension between what we characterize as territorial and bionomic approaches to the breeding ground—that is, between control strategies premised on treating all mosquito habitats within a given region, and those that prioritize certain sites on the basis of their position within ecological networks. Each topology localizes the breeding ground by reference to a distinct set of relations, and thus advances an idiosyncratic understanding of what sort of research is worthwhile conducting and what kinds of intervention are sustainable. The multiple ways in which the breeding ground can become an object of research and action clarifies the role of topology as an infra-logic of public health, and makes explicit the politics implicit in efforts to bring different orders of the local to scale. PMID:25937707

  14. Factors controlling As and U in shallow ground water, southern Carson Desert, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A.H.; Lico, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Unusually high As and U concentrations (> 100 ??g/L) are widespread in shallow ground water beneath the southern Carson Desert. The high concentrations, which locally exceed 1000 ??g/L, are of concern from a human health standpoint because the shallow ground water is used for domestic supply. Possible affects on wildlife are also of concern because the ground water flows into shallow lakes and marshes within wildlife refuges. Arsenic and U concentrations in ground water of the southern Carson Desert appear to be affected by evaporative concentration, redox reactions, and adsorption. The relation of these elements with Cl suggest that most of the high concentrations can be attributed to evaporative concentration of Carson River water, the primary source of recharge. Some ground water contains higher As and U concentrations that cannot be explained by evaporative concentration alone. Oxidation-reduction reactions, involving metal oxides and sedimentary-organic matter, appear to contribute As, U, inorganic C, Fe and Mn to the ground water. Arsenic in Fe-oxide was confirmed by chemical extraction and is consistent with laboratory adsorption studies. Uranium in both sedimentary-organic C and Fe-oxide coatings has been confirmed by fission tracks and petrographic examination. Arsenic concentrations in the ground water and chemical extracts of aquifer sediments are broadly consistent with adsorption as a control on some dissolved As concentrations. An apparent loss of As from some ground water as evaporative concentration proceeds is consistent with adsorption as a control on As. However, evidence for adsorption should be viewed with caution, because the adsorption model used values for the adsorbent that have not been shown to be valid for the aquifer sediments throughout the southern Carson Desert. Hydrologic and geochemical conditions in the Carson Desert are similar to other areas with high As and U concentrations in ground water, including the Salton Sea basin and

  15. Vibrating barrier: a novel device for the passive control of structures under ground motion

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, P.; Tombari, A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel device, called vibrating barrier (ViBa), that aims to reduce the vibrations of adjacent structures subjected to ground motion waves is proposed. The ViBa is a structure buried in the soil and detached from surrounding buildings that is able to absorb a significant portion of the dynamic energy arising from the ground motion. The working principle exploits the dynamic interaction among vibrating structures due to the propagation of waves through the soil, namely the structure–soil–structure interaction. The underlying theoretical aspects of the novel control strategy are scrutinized along with its numerical modelling. Closed-form solutions are also derived to design the ViBa in the case of harmonic excitation. Numerical and experimental analyses are performed in order to investigate the efficiency of the device in mitigating the effects of ground motion waves on the structural response. A significant reduction in the maximum structural acceleration of 87% has been achieved experimentally. PMID:26345731

  16. Control and learning for intelligent mobility of unmanned ground vehicles in complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, M.; Beckman, B.; Digney, B.

    2005-05-01

    The Autonomous Intelligent Systems program at Defence R&D Canada-Suffield envisions autonomous systems contributing to decisive operations in the urban battle space. Creating effective intelligence for these systems demands advances in perception, world representation, navigation, and learning. In the land environment, these scientific areas have garnered much attention, while largely ignoring the problem of locomotion in complex terrain. This is a gap in robotics research, where sophisticated algorithms are needed to coordinate and control robotic locomotion in unknown, highly complex environments. Unlike traditional control problems, intuitive and systematic control tools for robotic locomotion do not readily exist thus limiting their practical application. This paper addresses the mobility problem for unmanned ground vehicles, defined here as the autonomous maneuverability of unmanned ground vehicles in unknown, highly complex environments. It discusses the progress and future direction of intelligent mobility research at Defence R&D Canada-Suffield and presents the research tools, topics and plans to address this critical research gap.

  17. Controls on ground water chemistry in the central Couloir Sud Rifain, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benaabidate, Lahcen; Fryar, Alan E

    2010-01-01

    Irrigation, urbanization, and drought pose challenges for the sustainable use of ground water in the central Couloir sud rifain, a major agricultural region in north-central Morocco, which includes the cities of Fès and Meknès. The central Couloir is underlain by unconfined and confined carbonate aquifers that have suffered declines in hydraulic head and reductions in spring flow in recent decades. Previous studies have surveyed ground water flow and water quality in wells and springs but have not comprehensively addressed the chemistry of the regional aquifer system. Using graphical techniques and saturation index calculations, we infer that major ion chemistry is controlled (1) in the surficial aquifer by cation exchange, calcite dissolution, mixing with deep ground water, and possibly calcite precipitation and (2) in the confined aquifer and warm springs by calcite dissolution, dolomite dissolution, mixing with water that has dissolved gypsum and halite, and calcite precipitation. Analyses of (2)H and (18)O indicate that shallow ground water is affected by evaporation during recharge (either of infiltrating precipitation or return flow), whereas deep ground water is sustained by meteoric recharge with little evaporation. Mechanisms of recharge and hydrochemical evolution are broadly consistent with those delineated for similar regional aquifer systems elsewhere in Morocco and in southern Spain. PMID:19210561

  18. Fracture control of ground water flow and water chemistry in a rock aquitard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, T.T.; Anderson, M.P.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2007-01-01

    There are few studies on the hydrogeology of sedimentary rock aquitards although they are important controls in regional ground water flow systems. We formulate and test a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of ground water flow and hydrochemistry in a fractured sedimentary rock aquitard to show that flow dynamics within the aquitard are more complex than previously believed. Similar conceptual models, based on regional observations and recently emerging principles of mechanical stratigraphy in heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, have previously been applied only to aquifers, but we show that they are potentially applicable to aquitards. The major elements of this conceptual model, which is based on detailed information from two sites in the Maquoketa Formation in southeastern Wisconsin, include orders of magnitude contrast between hydraulic diffusivity (K/Ss) of fractured zones and relatively intact aquitard rock matrix, laterally extensive bedding-plane fracture zones extending over distances of over 10 km, very low vertical hydraulic conductivity of thick shale-rich intervals of the aquitard, and a vertical hydraulic head profile controlled by a lateral boundary at the aquitard subcrop, where numerous surface water bodies dominate the shallow aquifer system. Results from a 3D numerical flow model based on this conceptual model are consistent with field observations, which did not fit the typical conceptual model of strictly vertical flow through an aquitard. The 3D flow through an aquitard has implications for predicting ground water flow and for planning and protecting water supplies. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  19. Is Ground Cover Vegetation an Effective Biological Control Enhancement Strategy against Olive Pests?

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Daniel; Cayuela, Luis; Gurr, Geoff M.; Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history), the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard), or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae) in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain) from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention. PMID:25646778

  20. Obstacle negotiation control for a mobile robot suspended on overhead ground wires by optoelectronic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li; Yi, Ruan

    2009-11-01

    Power line inspection and maintenance already benefit from developments in mobile robotics. This paper presents mobile robots capable of crossing obstacles on overhead ground wires. A teleoperated robot realizes inspection and maintenance tasks on power transmission line equipment. The inspection robot is driven by 11 motor with two arms, two wheels and two claws. The inspection robot is designed to realize the function of observation, grasp, walk, rolling, turn, rise, and decline. This paper is oriented toward 100% reliable obstacle detection and identification, and sensor fusion to increase the autonomy level. An embedded computer based on PC/104 bus is chosen as the core of control system. Visible light camera and thermal infrared Camera are both installed in a programmable pan-and-tilt camera (PPTC) unit. High-quality visual feedback rapidly becomes crucial for human-in-the-loop control and effective teleoperation. The communication system between the robot and the ground station is based on Mesh wireless networks by 700 MHz bands. An expert system programmed with Visual C++ is developed to implement the automatic control. Optoelectronic laser sensors and laser range scanner were installed in robot for obstacle-navigation control to grasp the overhead ground wires. A novel prototype with careful considerations on mobility was designed to inspect the 500KV power transmission lines. Results of experiments demonstrate that the robot can be applied to execute the navigation and inspection tasks.

  1. Is ground cover vegetation an effective biological control enhancement strategy against olive pests?

    PubMed

    Paredes, Daniel; Cayuela, Luis; Gurr, Geoff M; Campos, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Ground cover vegetation is often added or allowed to generate to promote conservation biological control, especially in perennial crops. Nevertheless, there is inconsistent evidence of its effectiveness, with studies reporting positive, nil or negative effects on pest control. This might arise from differences between studies at the local scale (e.g. orchard management and land use history), the landscape context (e.g. presence of patches of natural or semi-natural vegetation near the focal orchard), or regional factors, particularly climate in the year of the study. Here we present the findings from a long-term regional monitoring program conducted on four pest species (Bactrocera oleae, Prays oleae, Euphyllura olivina, Saissetia oleae) in 2,528 olive groves in Andalusia (Spain) from 2006 to 2012. Generalized linear mixed effect models were used to analyze the effect of ground cover on different response variables related to pest abundance, while accounting for variability at the local, landscape and regional scales. There were small and inconsistent effects of ground cover on the abundance of pests whilst local, landscape and regional variability explained a large proportion of the variability in pest response variables. This highlights the importance of local and landscape-related variables in biological control and the potential effects that might emerge from their interaction with practices, such as groundcover vegetation, implemented to promote natural enemy activity. The study points to perennial vegetation close to the focal crop as a promising alternative strategy for conservation biological control that should receive more attention. PMID:25646778

  2. Review of Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Tools for Verifying Command and Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, Michael L.; Bonanne, Kevin H.; Favretto, Jeffrey A.; Jackson, Maddalena M.; Jones, Stephanie L.; Mackey, Ryan M.; Sarrel, Marc A.; Simpson, Kimberly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Standing Review Board (SRB) requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) conduct an independent review of the plan developed by Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) for identifying models and emulators to create a tool(s) to verify their command and control software. The NESC was requested to identify any issues or weaknesses in the GSDO plan. This document contains the outcome of the NESC review.

  3. Shuttle Payload Ground Command and Control: An Experiment Implementation Combustion Module-2 Software Development, STS-107

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carek, David Andrew

    2003-01-01

    This presentation covers the design of a command and control architecture developed by the author for the Combustion Module-2 microgravity experiment, which flew aboard the STS-107 Shuttle mission, The design was implemented to satisfy a hybrid network that utilized TCP/IP for both the onboard segment and ground segment, with an intermediary unreliable transport for the space to ground segment. With the infusion of Internet networking technologies into Space Shuttle, Space Station, and spacecraft avionics systems, comes the need for robust methodologies for ground command and control. Considerations of high bit error links, and unreliable transport over intermittent links must be considered in such systems. Internet protocols applied to these systems, coupled with the appropriate application layer protections, can provide adequate communication architectures for command and control. However, there are inherent limitations and additional complexities added by the use of Internet protocols that must be considered during the design. This presentation will discuss the rationale for the: framework and protocol algorithms developed by the author. A summary of design considerations, implantation issues, and learned lessons will be will be presented. A summary of mission results using this communications architecture will be presented. Additionally, areas of further needed investigation will be identified.

  4. Interior noise control ground test studies for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Cannon, Mark R.; Burge, Paul L.; Boyd, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement and analysis procedures are documented, and the results of interior noise control ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are summarized. The objectives of these tests were to study the fuselage response characteristics of treated and untreated aircraft with aft-mount advanced turboprop engines and to analyze the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise on these aircraft. The results of fuselage structural mode surveys, cabin cavity surveys and sound intensity surveys are presented. The performance of various structural and cabin sidewall treatments is assessed, based on measurements of the resulting interior noise levels under simulated advanced turboprop excitation.

  5. Criteria for Side-Force Control in Air-to-Ground Target Acquisition and Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammonds, Robert I.; McNeill, Walter E.; Bunnell, John W.

    1982-01-01

    A moving-base simulator experiment conducted at Ames Research Center demonstrated that a wings-level-turn control mode improved flying qualities for air-to-ground weapons delivery compared with those of a conventional aircraft. Evaluations of criteria for dynamic response for this system have shown that pilot ratings correlate well with equivalent time constant of the initial response and with system bandwidth. Ranges of this time constant, as well as digital-system transport delays and lateral-acceleration control authorities that encompassed level 1 through level 3 handling qualities, were determined.

  6. The Next Generation of Ground Operations Command and Control; Scripting in C Sharp and Visual Basic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Pedoto, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of scripting languages in Ground Operations Command and Control. It describes the use of scripting languages in a historical context, the advantages and disadvantages of scripts. It describes the Enhanced and Redesigned Scripting (ERS) language, that was designed to combine the features of a scripting language and the graphical and IDE richness of a programming language with the utility of scripting languages. ERS uses the Microsoft Visual Studio programming environment and offers custom controls that enable an ERS developer to extend the Visual Basic and C sharp language interface with the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) telemetry and command system.

  7. Proceedings of 13th international conference on ground control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Ground Control in Mining held August 2-4, 1994 is presented. The papers include information on bolting and entry stability; coal pillars; longwall overburden movement; longwall roof control, production and maintenance aids; longwall shield selection; longwall tailgate support; mining operations, mine and support design; multiple seam mining; roof/rib quality determination; stress determination; and surface subsidence. Separate abstracts and indexing were prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Evaluation of SAR Data as Source of Ground Control Information: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassilaki, D. I.; Ioannidis, C.; Stamos, A. A.

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution imaging modes of modern SAR sensors has made SAR data compatible with optical images. SAR data offers various capabilities which can enhance the geometric correction process of optical images (accurate, direct and ground-independent georeferencing capabilities and global DEM products). In this paper the first results of an on-going study on the evaluation of SAR data as source of ground control information for the georeferencing of optical images are presented. The georeferencing of optical images using SAR data is in fact a co-registration problem which involves multimodal, mutitemporal, and multiresolution data. And although 2D transformations have proved to be insufficient for the georeferencing process, as they can not account for the distortions due to terrain, quite a few approaches on the registration of optical to SAR data using 2D-2D transformations can still be found in the literature. In this paper the performance of 2D-2D transformations is compared to the 3D-2D projective transformation over a greater area of Earth's surface with arbitrary terrain type. Two alternative forms of ground control information are used: points and FFLFs. The accuracy of the computed results is obtained using independent CPs and it is compared to the geolocation accuracy specification of the optical image, as well as to the accuracy of exhaustive georeferencing done by third parties.

  9. Ground-level ozone influenced by circadian control of isoprene emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, C. N.; Ashworth, K.; Boynard, A.; Guenther, A.; Langford, B.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Misztal, P. K.; Nemitz, E.; Owen, S. M.; Possell, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.; Ryan, A. C.; Wild, O.

    2011-10-01

    The volatile organic compound isoprene is produced by many plant species, and provides protection against biotic and abiotic stresses. Globally, isoprene emissions from plants are estimated to far exceed anthropogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds. Once in the atmosphere, isoprene reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals to form peroxy radicals, which can react with nitrogen oxides to form ground-level ozone. Here, we use canopy-scale measurements of isoprene fluxes from two tropical ecosystems in Malaysia--a rainforest and an oil palm plantation--and three models of atmospheric chemistry to explore the effects of isoprene fluxes on ground-level ozone. We show that isoprene emissions in these ecosystems are under circadian control on the canopy scale, particularly in the oil palm plantation. As a result, these ecosystems emit less isoprene than present emissions models predict. Using local-, regional- and global-scale models of atmospheric chemistry and transport, we show that accounting for circadian control of isoprene emissions brings model predictions of ground-level ozone into better agreement with measurements, especially in isoprene-sensitive regions of the world.

  10. Fracture control of ground water flow and water chemistry in a rock aquitard.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Timothy T; Anderson, Mary P; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2007-01-01

    There are few studies on the hydrogeology of sedimentary rock aquitards although they are important controls in regional ground water flow systems. We formulate and test a three-dimensional (3D) conceptual model of ground water flow and hydrochemistry in a fractured sedimentary rock aquitard to show that flow dynamics within the aquitard are more complex than previously believed. Similar conceptual models, based on regional observations and recently emerging principles of mechanical stratigraphy in heterogeneous sedimentary rocks, have previously been applied only to aquifers, but we show that they are potentially applicable to aquitards. The major elements of this conceptual model, which is based on detailed information from two sites in the Maquoketa Formation in southeastern Wisconsin, include orders of magnitude contrast between hydraulic diffusivity (K/S(s)) of fractured zones and relatively intact aquitard rock matrix, laterally extensive bedding-plane fracture zones extending over distances of over 10 km, very low vertical hydraulic conductivity of thick shale-rich intervals of the aquitard, and a vertical hydraulic head profile controlled by a lateral boundary at the aquitard subcrop, where numerous surface water bodies dominate the shallow aquifer system. Results from a 3D numerical flow model based on this conceptual model are consistent with field observations, which did not fit the typical conceptual model of strictly vertical flow through an aquitard. The 3D flow through an aquitard has implications for predicting ground water flow and for planning and protecting water supplies. PMID:17760586

  11. Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Scaled Composites' Doug Shane examines the screen of his ground control station during tests in New Mexico. Shane used this configuration as the ground control station to remotely pilot the Proteus aircraft during a NASA sponsored series of test flights. The unique Proteus aircraft served as a test bed for NASA-sponsored flight tests designed to validate collision-avoidance technologies proposed for uninhabited aircraft. The tests, flown over southern New Mexico in March, 2002, used the Proteus as a surrogate uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) while three other aircraft flew toward the Proteus from various angles on simulated collision courses. Radio-based 'detect, see and avoid' equipment on the Proteus successfully detected the other aircraft and relayed that information to a remote pilot on the ground at Las Cruces Airport. The pilot then transmitted commands to the Proteus to maneuver it away from the potential collisions. The flight demonstration, sponsored by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, New Mexico State University, Scaled Composites, the U.S. Navy and Modern Technology Solutions, Inc., were intended to demonstrate that UAVs can be flown safely and compatibly in the same skies as piloted aircraft.

  12. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing in Support of Launch Vehicle Loads and Controls Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce R.; Davis, Susan R.; Salyer, Blaine H.; Tuma, Margaret L.

    2008-01-01

    All structural systems possess a basic set of physical characteristics unique to that system. These unique physical characteristics include items such as mass distribution and damping. When specified, they allow engineers to understand and predict how a structural system behaves under given loading conditions and different methods of control. These physical properties of launch vehicles may be predicted by analysis or measured by certain types of tests. Generally, these properties are predicted by analysis during the design phase of a launch vehicle and then verified by testing before the vehicle becomes operational. A ground vibration test (GVT) is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of launch vehicles during various phases of flight. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. These data will then be used to calibrate loads and control systems analysis models for verifying analyses of the launch vehicle. NASA manned launch vehicles have undergone ground vibration testing leading to the development of successful launch vehicles. A GVT was not performed on the inaugural launch of the unmanned Delta III which was lost during launch. Subsequent analyses indicated had a GVT been performed, it would have identified instability issues avoiding loss of the vehicle. This discussion will address GVT planning, set-up, execution and analyses, for the Saturn and Shuttle programs, and will also focus on the current and on-going planning for the Ares I and V Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT).

  13. Ground Control Point - Wireless System Network for UAV-based environmental monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have seen widespread civil applications including usage for survey and monitoring services in areas such as agriculture, construction and civil engineering, private surveillance and reconnaissance services and cultural heritage management. Most aerial monitoring services require the integration of information acquired during the flight (such as imagery) with ground-based information (such as GPS information or others) for improved ground truth validation. For example, to obtain an accurate 3D and Digital Elevation Model based on aerial imagery, it is necessary to include ground-based information of coordinate points, which are normally acquired with surveying methods based on Global Position Systems (GPS). However, GPS surveys are very time consuming and especially for longer time series of monitoring data repeated GPS surveys are necessary. In order to improve speed of data collection and integration, this work presents an autonomous system based on Waspmote technologies build on single nodes interlinked in a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) star-topology for ground based information collection and later integration with surveying data obtained by UAV. Nodes are designed to be visible from the air, to resist extreme weather conditions with low-power consumption. Besides, nodes are equipped with GPS as well as Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), accelerometer, temperature and soil moisture sensors and thus provide significant advantages in a broad range of applications for environmental monitoring. For our purpose, the WSN transmits the environmental data with 3G/GPRS to a database on a regular time basis. This project provides a detailed case study and implementation of a Ground Control Point System Network for UAV-based vegetation monitoring of dry mountain grassland in the Matsch valley, Italy.

  14. Ground-based rodent control in a remote Hawaiian rainforest on Maui

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, T.R.; Swinnerton, K.J.; Groombridge, J.J.; Sparklin, B.D.; Brosius, C.N.; Vetter, J.P.; Foster, J.T.

    2008-01-01

    Effective control of introduced mammalian predators is essential to the recovery of native bird species in Hawai'i. Between August 1996 and December 2004, introduced rodents were controlled within three home ranges of the Po'ouli Melamprosops phaeosoma, a critically endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper. Rats were controlled using a combination of ground-based rodenticide (0.005% diphacinone) application and snap traps. Beginning in August 2001, we monitored the effectiveness of these rodent control efforts. Relative abundances of Black Rats Rattus rattus and Polynesian Rats R. exulans were measured in each of five snap-trapping grids seven times over a 35-month period. Rat populations decreased inside of the rodent control areas, but control effectiveness differed between rat species. During the first year of monitoring, target control levels for R. rattus were consistently achieved in only one of the rodent control areas. Control techniques were refined in areas failing to meet targets. Subsequently, we achieved target control levels for R. rattus more consistently in all three rodent control areas. However, relative abundances of R. exulans did not differ between rodent control and reference areas, indicating that our rodent control techniques were insufficient to reduce population levels of this species. These findings signify a need for further improvement of rodent control methods in Hawai'i, especially for Polynesian Rats, and demonstrate the critical importance of periodic monitoring of the response of rodent populations to management. In the future, managers may need to design rodent control operations targeting R. rattus and R. exulans independently to achieve best results.

  15. Robust H∞ output-feedback control for path following of autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuan; Jing, Hui; Wang, Rongrong; Yan, Fengjun; Chadli, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a robust H∞ output-feedback control strategy for the path following of autonomous ground vehicles (AGVs). Considering the vehicle lateral velocity is usually hard to measure with low cost sensor, a robust H∞ static output-feedback controller based on the mixed genetic algorithms (GA)/linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach is proposed to realize the path following without the information of the lateral velocity. The proposed controller is robust to the parametric uncertainties and external disturbances, with the parameters including the tire cornering stiffness, vehicle longitudinal velocity, yaw rate and road curvature. Simulation results based on CarSim-Simulink joint platform using a high-fidelity and full-car model have verified the effectiveness of the proposed control approach.

  16. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 2: part 2, addenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study to assess the tug safing requirements at postlanding are presented. The study considered the normal (green light) conditions from orbiter landing to completion of preparations for the next launch. Normal tug ground turnaround operations include handling and transportation activities and the performance of inspections, tests, and checkout functions. These activities dictate that hazards to ground personnel, the tug, GSE, facilities, and ecology be reduced to the lowest practical level consistent with program objectives, cost, and schedules. During flight operations, the tug contains energy sources that constitute potential hazards but are required for mission accomplishment. These potential hazards have been reduced to an acceptable level for flight operation by design features and by providing for control of energy sources.

  17. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  18. Design and implementation of a microcomputer-based user interface controller for bursted data communications satellite ground terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalkhauser, Mary Jo W.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is developing a laboratory-based satellite communications test bed for evaluation of state-of-the-art communications hardware and systems. Most of the digital components of the ground terminals are being constructed in-house at NASA Lewis. One of the ground terminal subsystems, the user interface controller, controls the connection and disconnection of all users to the communication network. The role of the user interface controller in the ground terminal is described and the design and implementation of the microcomputer-based subsystem is discussed.

  19. Flight validation of ground-based assessment for control power requirements at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Ross, Holly M.; Foster, John V.; Pahle, Joseph W.; Sternberg, Charles A.; Traven, Ricardo; Lackey, James B.; Abbott, Troy D.

    1994-01-01

    A review is presented in viewgraph format of an ongoing NASA/U.S. Navy study to determine control power requirements at high angles of attack for the next generation high-performance aircraft. This paper focuses on recent flight test activities using the NASA High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), which are intended to validate results of previous ground-based simulation studies. The purpose of this study is discussed, and the overall program structure, approach, and objectives are described. Results from two areas of investigation are presented: (1) nose-down control power requirements and (2) lateral-directional control power requirements. Selected results which illustrate issues and challenges that are being addressed in the study are discussed including test methodology, comparisons between simulation and flight, and general lessons learned.

  20. Controls on coral-ground development along the northern Mesoamerican Reef tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Rosa E; Jordán-Garza, Adán G; Maldonado, Miguel A; Blanchon, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Coral-grounds are reef communities that colonize rocky substratum but do not form framework or three-dimensional reef structures. To investigate why, we used video transects and underwater photography to determine the composition, structure and status of a coral-ground community located on the edge of a rocky terrace in front of a tourist park, Xcaret, in the northern Mesoamerican Reef tract, Mexico. The community has a relatively low coral, gorgonian and sponge cover (<10%) and high algal cover (>40%). We recorded 23 species of Scleractinia, 14 species of Gorgonacea and 30 species of Porifera. The coral community is diverse but lacks large coral colonies, being dominated instead by small, sediment-tolerant, and brooding species. In these small colonies, the abundance of potentially lethal interactions and partial mortality is high but decreases when colonies are larger than 40 cm. Such characteristics are consistent with an environment control whereby storm waves periodically remove larger colonies and elevate sediment flux. The community only survives these storm conditions due to its slope-break location, which ensures lack of burial and continued local recruitment. A comparison with similar coral-ground communities in adjacent areas suggests that the narrow width of the rock terrace hinders sediment stabilization, thereby ensuring that communities cannot escape bottom effects and develop into three-dimensional reef structures on geological time scales. PMID:22194839

  1. Controls on Coral-Ground Development along the Northern Mesoamerican Reef Tract

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Rosa E.; Jordán-Garza, Adán G.; Maldonado, Miguel A.; Blanchon, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Coral-grounds are reef communities that colonize rocky substratum but do not form framework or three-dimensional reef structures. To investigate why, we used video transects and underwater photography to determine the composition, structure and status of a coral-ground community located on the edge of a rocky terrace in front of a tourist park, Xcaret, in the northern Mesoamerican Reef tract, Mexico. The community has a relatively low coral, gorgonian and sponge cover (<10%) and high algal cover (>40%). We recorded 23 species of Scleractinia, 14 species of Gorgonacea and 30 species of Porifera. The coral community is diverse but lacks large coral colonies, being dominated instead by small, sediment-tolerant, and brooding species. In these small colonies, the abundance of potentially lethal interactions and partial mortality is high but decreases when colonies are larger than 40 cm. Such characteristics are consistent with an environment control whereby storm waves periodically remove larger colonies and elevate sediment flux. The community only survives these storm conditions due to its slope-break location, which ensures lack of burial and continued local recruitment. A comparison with similar coral-ground communities in adjacent areas suggests that the narrow width of the rock terrace hinders sediment stabilization, thereby ensuring that communities cannot escape bottom effects and develop into three-dimensional reef structures on geological time scales. PMID:22194839

  2. Resetting transcription factor control circuitry toward ground-state pluripotency in human.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-09-11

    Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, and are karyotypically intact. They differentiate in vitro and form teratomas in vivo. Metabolism is reprogrammed with activation of mitochondrial respiration as in ESC. DNA methylation is dramatically reduced and transcriptome state is globally realigned across multiple cell lines. Depletion of ground-state transcription factors, TFCP2L1 or KLF4, has marginal impact on conventional human pluripotent stem cells but collapses the reset state. These findings demonstrate feasibility of installing and propagating functional control circuitry for ground-state pluripotency in human cells. PMID:25215486

  3. Mission specification and control for unmanned aerial and ground vehicles for indoor target discovery and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulam, Patrick D.; Kira, Zsolt; Arkin, Ronald C.; Collins, Thomas R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes ongoing research by Georgia Tech into the challenges of tasking and controlling heterogonous teams of unmanned vehicles in mixed indoor/outdoor reconnaissance scenarios. We outline the tools and techniques necessary for an operator to specify, execute, and monitor such missions. The mission specification framework used for the purposes of intelligence gathering during mission execution are first demonstrated in simulations involving a team of a single autonomous rotorcraft and three ground-based robotic platforms. Preliminary results including robotic hardware in the loop are also provided.

  4. Hydrogeologic controls on ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River near the Hanford Townsite

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, S.P.; Newcomer, D.R.; Teel, S.S.; Vermeul, V.R.

    1992-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify ground-water and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River in the Hanford Townsite vicinity. The primary objectives of the work are to: describe the hydrogeologic setting and controls on ground-water movement and contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; understand the river/aquifer relationship and its effects on contaminant discharge to the Columbia River; quantify the ground-water and contaminant mass discharge to the Columbia River; and provide data that may be useful for a three-dimensional model of ground-water flow and contaminant transport in the Hanford Townsite study area. The majority of ground-water contamination occurs within the unconfined aquifer; therefore, ground-water and contaminant discharge from the unconfined aquifer is the emphasis of this study. The period of study is primarily from June 1990 through March 1992.

  5. Form control in atmospheric pressure plasma processing of ground fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo; Wang, Bo; Xin, Qiang; Jin, Huiliang; Wang, Jun; Dong, Wenxia

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing (APPP) using inductively coupled plasma has demonstrated that it can achieve comparable removal rate on the optical surface of fused silica under the atmosphere pressure and has the advantage of inducing no sub-surface damage for its non-contact and chemical etching mechanism. APPP technology is a cost effective way, compared with traditional mechanical polishing, magnetorheological finishing and ion beam figuring. Thus, due to these advantages, this technology is being tested to fabricate large aperture optics of fused silica to help shorten the polishing time in optics fabrication chain. Now our group proposes to use inductively coupled plasma processing technology to fabricate ground surface of fused silica directly after the grinding stage. In this paper, form control method and several processing parameters are investigated to evaluate the removal efficiency and the surface quality, including the robustness of removal function, velocity control mode and tool path strategy. However, because of the high heat flux of inductively coupled plasma, the removal depth with time can be non-linear and the ground surface evolvement will be affected. The heat polishing phenomenon is founded. The value of surface roughness is reduced greatly, which is very helpful to reduce the time of follow-up mechanical polishing. Finally, conformal and deterministic polishing experiments are analyzed and discussed. The form error is less 3%, before and after the APPP, when 10μm depth of uniform removal is achieved on a 60×60mm ground fused silica. Also, a basin feature is fabricated to demonstrate the figuring capability and stability. Thus, APPP is a promising technology in processing the large aperture optics.

  6. A ground track control algorithm for the Topographic Mapping Laser Altimeter (TMLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaes, V.; Mcintosh, R.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    The results of an analysis of an algorithm that will provide autonomous onboard orbit control using orbits determined with Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The algorithm uses the GPS data to (1) compute the ground track error relative to a fixed longitude grid, and (2) determine the altitude adjustment required to correct the longitude error. A program was written on a personal computer (PC) to test the concept for numerous altitudes and values of solar flux using a simplified orbit model including only the J sub 2 zonal harmonic and simple orbit decay computations. The algorithm was then implemented in a precision orbit propagation program having a full range of perturbations. The analysis showed that, even with all perturbations (including actual time histories of solar flux variation), the algorithm could effectively control the spacecraft ground track and yield more than 99 percent Earth coverage in the time required to complete one coverage cycle on the fixed grid (220 to 230 days depending on altitude and overlap allowance).

  7. Optimal Flight for Ground Noise Reduction in Helicopter Landing Approach: Optimal Altitude and Velocity Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Ishii, Hirokazu; Uchida, Junichi; Gomi, Hiromi; Matayoshi, Naoki; Okuno, Yoshinori

    This study aims to obtain the optimal flights of a helicopter that reduce ground noise during landing approach with an optimization technique, and to conduct flight tests for confirming the effectiveness of the optimal solutions. Past experiments of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) show that the noise of a helicopter varies significantly according to its flight conditions, especially depending on the flight path angle. We therefore build a simple noise model for a helicopter, in which the level of the noise generated from a point sound source is a function only of the flight path angle. Using equations of motion for flight in a vertical plane, we define optimal control problems for minimizing noise levels measured at points on the ground surface, and obtain optimal controls for specified initial altitudes, flight constraints, and wind conditions. The obtained optimal flights avoid the flight path angle which generates large noise and decrease the flight time, which are different from conventional flight. Finally, we verify the validity of the optimal flight patterns through flight experiments. The actual flights following the optimal paths resulted in noise reduction, which shows the effectiveness of the optimization.

  8. Reconstructing 3D coastal cliffs from airborne oblique photographs without ground control points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewez, T. J. B.

    2014-05-01

    Coastal cliff collapse hazard assessment requires measuring cliff face topography at regular intervals. Terrestrial laser scanner techniques have proven useful so far but are expensive to use either through purchasing the equipment or through survey subcontracting. In addition, terrestrial laser surveys take time which is sometimes incompatible with the time during with the beach is accessible at low-tide. By comparison, structure from motion techniques (SFM) are much less costly to implement, and if airborne, acquisition of several kilometers of coastline can be done in a matter of minutes. In this paper, the potential of GPS-tagged oblique airborne photographs and SFM techniques is examined to reconstruct chalk cliff dense 3D point clouds without Ground Control Points (GCP). The focus is put on comparing the relative 3D point of views reconstructed by Visual SFM with their synchronous Solmeta Geotagger Pro2 GPS locations using robust estimators. With a set of 568 oblique photos, shot from the open door of an airplane with a triplet of synchronized Nikon D7000, GPS and SFM-determined view point coordinates converge to X: ±31.5 m; Y: ±39.7 m; Z: ±13.0 m (LE66). Uncertainty in GPS position affects the model scale, angular attitude of the reference frame (the shoreline ends up tilted by 2°) and absolute positioning. Ground Control Points cannot be avoided to orient such models.

  9. Definition of ground test for verification of large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Under this contract, the Large Space Structure Ground Test Verification (LSSGTV) Facility at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was developed. Planning in coordination with NASA was finalized and implemented. The contract was modified and extended with several increments of funding to procure additional hardware and to continue support for the LSSGTV facility. Additional tasks were defined for the performance of studies in the dynamics, control and simulation of tethered satellites. When the LSSGTV facility development task was completed, support and enhancement activities were funded through a new competitive contract won by LCD. All work related to LSSGTV performed under NAS8-35835 has been completed and documented. No further discussion of these activities will appear in this report. This report summarizes the tether dynamics and control studies performed.

  10. Validation of space/ground antenna control algorithms using a computer-aided design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gantenbein, Rex E.

    1995-01-01

    The validation of the algorithms for controlling the space-to-ground antenna subsystem for Space Station Alpha is an important step in assuring reliable communications. These algorithms have been developed and tested using a simulation environment based on a computer-aided design tool that can provide a time-based execution framework with variable environmental parameters. Our work this summer has involved the exploration of this environment and the documentation of the procedures used to validate these algorithms. We have installed a variety of tools in a laboratory of the Tracking and Communications division for reproducing the simulation experiments carried out on these algorithms to verify that they do meet their requirements for controlling the antenna systems. In this report, we describe the processes used in these simulations and our work in validating the tests used.

  11. The visual control of stability in children and adults: postural readjustments in a ground optical flow.

    PubMed

    Baumberger, Bernard; Isableu, Brice; Flückiger, Michelangelo

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the development of postural reactions to approaching (AOF) and receding (ROF) ground rectilinear optical flows. Optical flows were shaped by a pattern of circular spots of light projected on the ground surface by a texture flow generator. The geometrical structure of the projected scenes corresponded to the spatial organisation of visual flows encountered in open outdoor settings. Postural readjustments of 56 children, ranging from 7 to 11 years old, and 12 adults were recorded by the changes of the centre of foot pressure (CoP) on a force platform during 44-s exposures to the moving texture. Before and after the optical flows exposure, a 24-s motionless texture served as a reference condition. Effect of ground rectilinear optical flows on postural control development was assessed by analysing sway latencies (SL), stability performances and postural orientation. The main results that emerge from this experiment show that postural responses are directionally specific to optical flow pattern and that they vary as a function of the motion onset and offset. Results showed that greater developmental changes in postural control occurred in an AOF (both at the onset and offset of the optical flow) than in an ROF. Onset of an approaching flow induced postural instability, canonical shifts in postural orientation and long latencies in children which were stronger than in the receding flow. This pattern of responses evolved with age towards an improvement in stability performances and shorter SL. The backward decreasing shift of the CoP in children evolved in adults towards forward postural tilt, i.show $132#e. in the opposite direction of the texture's motion. Offset of an AOF motion induced very short SL in children (which became longer in adult subjects), strong postural instability, but weaker shift of orientation compared to the receding one. Postural stability improved and orientation shift evolved to forward inclinations with

  12. Distributed pheromone-based swarming control of unmanned air and ground vehicles for RSTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, John A.; Mathews, Robert S.; Yinger, Andrew; Robinson, Joshua S.; Moody, John; Riddle, Stephanie

    2008-04-01

    The use of unmanned vehicles in Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA) applications has received considerable attention recently. Cooperating land and air vehicles can support multiple sensor modalities providing pervasive and ubiquitous broad area sensor coverage. However coordination of multiple air and land vehicles serving different mission objectives in a dynamic and complex environment is a challenging problem. Swarm intelligence algorithms, inspired by the mechanisms used in natural systems to coordinate the activities of many entities provide a promising alternative to traditional command and control approaches. This paper describes recent advances in a fully distributed digital pheromone algorithm that has demonstrated its effectiveness in managing the complexity of swarming unmanned systems. The results of a recent demonstration at NASA's Wallops Island of multiple Aerosonde Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) and Pioneer Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) cooperating in a coordinated RSTA application are discussed. The vehicles were autonomously controlled by the onboard digital pheromone responding to the needs of the automatic target recognition algorithms. UAVs and UGVs controlled by the same pheromone algorithm self-organized to perform total area surveillance, automatic target detection, sensor cueing, and automatic target recognition with no central processing or control and minimal operator input. Complete autonomy adds several safety and fault tolerance requirements which were integrated into the basic pheromone framework. The adaptive algorithms demonstrated the ability to handle some unplanned hardware failures during the demonstration without any human intervention. The paper describes lessons learned and the next steps for this promising technology.

  13. A framework for the natural-language-perception-based creative control of unmanned ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Masoud; Liao, Xiaoqun; Hall, Ernest L.

    2004-09-01

    Mobile robots must often operate in an unstructured environment cluttered with obstacles and with many possible action paths. That is why mobile robotics problems are complex with many unanswered questions. To reach a high degree of autonomous operation, a new level of learning is required. On the one hand, promising learning theories such as the adaptive critic and creative control have been proposed, while on other hand the human brain"s processing ability has amazed and inspired researchers in the area of Unmanned Ground Vehicles but has been difficult to emulate in practice. A new direction in the fuzzy theory tries to develop a theory to deal with the perceptions conveyed by the natural language. This paper tries to combine these two fields and present a framework for autonomous robot navigation. The proposed creative controller like the adaptive critic controller has information stored in a dynamic database (DB), plus a dynamic task control center (TCC) that functions as a command center to decompose tasks into sub-tasks with different dynamic models and multi-criteria functions. The TCC module utilizes computational theory of perceptions to deal with the high levels of task planning. The authors are currently trying to implement the model on a real mobile robot and the preliminary results have been described in this paper.

  14. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This study presents Tug Fleet and Ground Operations Schedules and Controls plan. This plan was developed and optimized out of a combination of individual Tug program phased subplans, special emphasis studies, contingency analyses and sensitivity analyses. The subplans cover the Tug program phases: (1) Tug operational, (2) Interim Upper Stage (IUS)/Tug fleet utilization, (3) and IUS/Tug payload integration, (4) Tug site activation, (5) IUS/Tug transition, (6) Tug acquisition. Resource requirements (facility, GSE, TSE, software, manpower, logistics) are provided in each subplan, as are appropriate Tug processing flows, active and total IUS and Tug fleet requirements, fleet management and Tug payload integration concepts, facility selection recommendations, site activation and IUS to Tug transition requirements. The impact of operational concepts on Tug acquisition is assessed and the impact of operating Tugs out of KSC and WTR is analyzed and presented showing WTR as a delta. Finally, cost estimates for fleet management and ground operations of the DDT&E and operational phases of the Tug program are given.

  15. The development of an UAV borne direct georeferenced photogrammetric platform for Ground Control Point free applications.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  16. The Development of an UAV Borne Direct Georeferenced Photogrammetric Platform for Ground Control Point Free Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Chu, Chien-Hsun

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate applications such as environment detection or disaster monitoring, the development of rapid low cost systems for collecting near real time spatial information is very critical. Rapid spatial information collection has become an emerging trend for remote sensing and mapping applications. In this study, a fixed-wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)-based spatial information acquisition platform that can operate in Ground Control Point (GCP) free environments is developed and evaluated. The proposed UAV based photogrammetric platform has a Direct Georeferencing (DG) module that includes a low cost Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Inertial Navigation System (INS)/Global Positioning System (GPS) integrated system. The DG module is able to provide GPS single frequency carrier phase measurements for differential processing to obtain sufficient positioning accuracy. All necessary calibration procedures are implemented. Ultimately, a flight test is performed to verify the positioning accuracy in DG mode without using GCPs. The preliminary results of positioning accuracy in DG mode illustrate that horizontal positioning accuracies in the x and y axes are around 5 m at 300 m flight height above the ground. The positioning accuracy of the z axis is below 10 m. Therefore, the proposed platform is relatively safe and inexpensive for collecting critical spatial information for urgent response such as disaster relief and assessment applications where GCPs are not available. PMID:23012538

  17. Optimal control of the population dynamics of the ground vibrational state of a polyatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Clercq, Ludwig E.; Botha, Lourens R.; Rohwer, Erich G.; Uys, Hermann; Du Plessis, Anton

    2011-03-01

    Simulating coherent control with femtosecond pulses on a polyatomic molecule with anharmonic splitting was demonstrated. The simulation mimicked pulse shaping of a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) and the interaction was described with the Von Neumann equation. A transform limited pulse with a fluence of 600 J/m2 produced 18% of the population in an arbitrarily chosen upper vibrational state, n =2. Phase only and amplitude only shaped pulse produced optimum values of 60% and 40% respectively, of the population in the vibrational state, n=2, after interaction with the ultra short pulse. The combination of phase and amplitude shaping produced the best results, 80% of the population was in the targeted vibrational state, n=2, after interaction. These simulations were carried out with all the population initially in the ground vibrational level. It was found that even at room temperatures (300 Kelvin) that the population in the selected level is comparable with the case where all population is initially in the ground vibrational state. With a 10% noise added to the amplitude and phase masks, selective excitation of the targeted vibrational state is still possible.

  18. Interoperability of unattended ground sensors with an open architecture controller using SensorML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Jon; Fairgrieve, Scott

    2010-04-01

    Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) from a wide range of manufacturers have difficulty interoperating with each other and common control and dissemination points. Typically, sensor data is transmitted via RF or wired connections to a central location where the data can be fused together and transmitted further via satellite to a Processing, Exploitation and Dissemination (PED) system. These PED's are charged with analyzing the data to create real time actionable intelligence for the war fighter. However, when several disparate sensors from different manufacturers are used, interoperability problems arise. Therefore, a central UGS controller that accepts data from a wide range of sensors and helps them interoperate is essential. This paper addresses benefits derived from using the Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Sensor Model Language (SensorML) sensor descriptions for an UGS controller. SensorML 1.0 is an approved OGC standard and is one of the major components within the OGC Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) suite of standards. SensorML provides standard models and an XML encoding for describing any process, including the process of measurement by sensors. By incorporating SensorML, an UGS controller can accept data from various sensors from different manufacturers, and interpret that data with the SensorML descriptions to allow the controller to take programmed actions and interoperate between sensors. Furthermore, SensorML can be used to translate the native sensor formats once the original data has been transmitted to the PED. Therefore, this makes a SensorML enabled UGS controller an extremely powerful tool that provides situational awareness by combining multiple sensors to form a single common operational picture (COP).

  19. A new approach for automatic matching of ground control points in urban areas from heterogeneous images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Chao; Liu, Dingsheng; Zhao, Lingjun

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses a new method for the automatic matching of ground control points (GCPs) between satellite remote sensing Image and digital raster graphic (DRG) in urban areas. The key of this method is to automatically extract tie point pairs according to geographic characters from such heterogeneous images. Since there are big differences between such heterogeneous images respect to texture and corner features, more detail analyzations are performed to find similarities and differences between high resolution remote sensing Image and (DRG). Furthermore a new algorithms based on the fuzzy-c means (FCM) method is proposed to extract linear feature in remote sensing Image. Based on linear feature, crossings and corners extracted from these features are chosen as GCPs. On the other hand, similar method was used to find same features from DRGs. Finally, Hausdorff Distance was adopted to pick matching GCPs from above two GCP groups. Experiences shown the method can extract GCPs from such images with a reasonable RMS error.

  20. Controls on the distribution and isotopic composition of helium in deep ground-water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, X.; Fritzel, T.L.B.; Quinodoz, H.A.M.; Bethke, C.M.; Torgersen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The distribution and isotopic composition of helium in sedimentary basins can be used to interpret the ages of very old ground waters. The piston-flow model commonly used in such interpretation, how ever, does not account for several important factors and as such works well only in very simple flow regimes. In this study of helium transport in a hypothetical sedimentary basin, we develop a numerical model that accounts for the magnitude and distribution of the basal helium flux, hydrodynamic dispersion, and complexities in flow regimes such as subregional flow cells. The modeling shows that these factors exert strong controls on the helium distribution and isotopic composition. The simulations may provide a basis for more accurate interpretations of observed helium concentrations and isotopic ratios in sedimentary basins.

  1. A ground based phase control system for the solar power satellite. Executive summary, volume 1, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chie, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Power Satellite (SPS) concept and the reference phase control system investigated in earlier efforts are reviewed. A summary overview of the analysis and selection of the pilot signal and power transponder design is presented along with the SOLARSIM program development and the simulated SPS phase control performance. Evaluations of the ground based phase control system as an alternate phase control concept are summarized.

  2. Monitoring controlled graves representing common burial scenarios with ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, John J.; Martin, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Implementing controlled geophysical research is imperative to understand the variables affecting detection of clandestine graves during real-life forensic searches. This study focused on monitoring two empty control graves (shallow and deep) and six burials containing a small pig carcass (Sus scrofa) representing different burial forensic scenarios: a shallow buried naked carcass, a deep buried naked carcass, a deep buried carcass covered by a layer of rocks, a deep buried carcass covered by a layer of lime, a deep buried carcass wrapped in an impermeable tarpaulin and a deep buried carcass wrapped in a cotton blanket. Multi-frequency, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected monthly over a 12-month monitoring period. The research site was a cleared field within a wooded area in a humid subtropical environment, and the soil consisted of a Spodosol, a common soil type in Florida. This study compared 2D GPR reflection profiles and horizontal time slices obtained with both 250 and 500 MHz dominant frequency antennae to determine the utility of both antennae for grave detection in this environment over time. Overall, a combination of both antennae frequencies provided optimal detection of the targets. Better images were noted for deep graves, compared to shallow graves. The 250 MHz antenna provided better images for detecting deep graves, as less non-target anomalies were produced with lower radar frequencies. The 250 MHz antenna also provided better images detecting the disturbed ground. Conversely, the 500 MHz antenna provided better images when detecting the shallow pig grave. The graves that contained a pig carcass with associated grave items provided the best results, particularly the carcass covered with rocks and the carcass wrapped in a tarpaulin. Finally, during periods of increased soil moisture levels, there was increased detection of graves that was most likely related to conductive decompositional fluid from the carcasses.

  3. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  4. Application of radio control cars as intelligent unmanned ground vehicles with collaborative and independent behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Kouns, John; Bruder, Stephen; Wedeward, Kevin; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Simple radio control cars commonly sold as toys can provide a viable starting platform for the development of low-cost intelligent Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) for the study of robot collectives. In a collaborative effort, Sandia National Labs and New Mexico Tech have successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept by utilizing low-cost radio control cars manufactured by Nikko. Initial tests have involved using a small number (two to ten) of these UGVs to successfully demonstrate both collaborative and independent behavior simultaneously. In the tests individuals share their locations with the collective to cover an area, thus demonstrating collaborative behavior. Independent behavior is demonstrated as each member of the collective maintains a desired compass heading while simultaneously avoiding obstacles in its path. These UGVs are powered by high-capacity rechargeable batteries and equipped with a custom-designed microcontroller board with a stackable modular interface and wireless communication. The initial modular sensor configuration includes a digital compass and GPS unit for navigation as well as ultrasonic sensors for obstacle avoidance. This paper describes the design and operations of these UGVs, their possible uses, and the advantages of using a radio control car platform as a low-cost starting point for the development of intelligent UGV collectives.

  5. Reactive Iron deposition and ground water inflow control neutralization processes in acidic mine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodau, C.

    2002-12-01

    The controls on the internal neutralization of highly acidified waters by iron sulphide accumulation are yet poorly understood. To elucidate the influence of ground water inflow on neutralization processes, inventories of solid phase iron and sulphur, pore water profiles and rates of ferrous iron and sulphate production and consumption were analyzed in different areas of an acidic mine lake. Ground water inflow had previously been determined by ground water modelling and chamber measurements (Knoll et al., 1999). The investigated sediments adjacent to mine tailings, which were subject to the inflow of groundwater (10-30 L d-1 m-2), were richer in dissolved ferrous iron iron (30 vs. 5 mmol L-1) and sulphate (30 vs. 10 mmol L-1) and showed higher pH values (6 vs. 4) than the sediments in areas of the lake not being influenced by groundwater inflow. Sediments adjacent to the mine tailings also showed higher rates of sulphate reduction and iron sulphide accumulation (Fig. 1). From these data it is suggested that neutralization processes in iron rich, acidic mine lakes neutralization processes primarily occur in areas influenced by the inflow of acid mine groundwater. These waters usually have considerably higher pH values than the surface waters in the lakes due to buffering processes in the tailings. The seepage of this water through the sediment might thus lead to higher pH values and thus to a higher thermodynamic competitiveness of sulfate reduction vs. iron reduction (Blodau and Peiffer 2002). This causes increased neutralization rates. These findings have consequences for remediation measures in highly acidic lakes. In areas influenced by the inflow of mine drainage increases in carbon availability, for example by the deposition of particulate organic matter, should enhance iron sulphide formation rates, whereas in other areas increases in carbon availability would only result in enhanced rates of iron reduction without a lasting gain in alkalinity. Blodau, C

  6. Controlling laser beam irradiation area using an optical duplicate system to improve satellite–ground laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Kodate, Kashiko

    2016-08-01

    To improve the quality of ground to satellite laser communications, we propose an optical duplicate system of the optical ground station. Our proposed approach can be used to control the beam irradiation area for a satellite position without changing the total power of the output beam and the mechanical drive unit; this is performed by controlling the input pattern of a liquid crystal filter inserted in the input plane of the optical duplicate system. Most of the power of the diffracted laser beam emitted from the ground is focused on the optical axis. By distributing the power to side lobes, it is possible to extend the coverage area for a satellite position. This system allows the laser beam irradiation area to be controlled by a sufficient degree by adjusting the threshold of the satellite reception level. We verify the efficacy of the system using wave optics numerical calculations.

  7. A new method to obtain uniform distribution of ground control points based on regional statistical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; An, Wei; Deng, Xinpu

    2015-10-01

    The Ground Control Points (GCPs) is an important source of fundamental data in geometric correction for remote sensing imagery. The quantity, accuracy and distribution of GCPs are three factors which may affect the accuracy of geometric correction. It is generally required that the distribution of GCP should be uniform, so they can fully control the accuracy of mapping regions. In this paper, we establish an objective standard of evaluating the uniformity of the GCPs' distribution based on regional statistical information (RSI), and get an optimal distribution of GCPs. This sampling method is called RSIS for short in this work. The Amounts of GCPs in different regions by equally partitioning the image in regions in different manners are counted which forms a vector called RSI vector in this work. The uniformity of GCPs' distribution can be evaluated by a mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. An optimal distribution of GCPs is obtained by searching the RSI vector with the minimum mathematical quantity. In this paper, the simulation annealing is employed to search the optimal distribution of GCPs that have the minimum mathematical quantity of the RSI vector. Experiments are carried out to test the method proposed in this paper, and sampling designs compared are simple random sampling and universal kriging model-based sampling. The experiments indicate that this method is highly recommended as new GCPs sampling design method for geometric correction of remotely sensed imagery.

  8. Ground Laboratory Soft X-Ray Durability Evaluation of Aluminized Teflon FEP Thermal Control Insulation. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Hall, Rachelle L.

    1998-01-01

    Metallized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control insulation is mechanically degraded if exposed to a sufficient fluence of soft x-ray radiation. Soft x-ray photons (4-8 A in wavelength or 1.55 - 3.2 keV) emitted during solar flares have been proposed as a cause of mechanical properties degradation of aluminized Teflon FEP thermal control insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such degradation can be characterized by a reduction in elongation-to-failure of the Teflon FEP. Ground laboratory soft x-ray exposure tests of aluminized Teflon FEP were conducted to assess the degree of elongation degradation which would occur as a result of exposure to soft x-rays in the range of 3-10 keV. Tests results indicate that soft x-ray exposure in the 3-10 keV range, at mission fluence levels, does not alone cause the observed reduction in elongation of flight retrieved samples. The soft x-ray exposure facility design, mechanical properties degradation results and implications will be presented.

  9. Ground Laboratory Soft X-Ray Durability Evaluation of Aluminized Teflon FEP Thermal Control Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    1998-01-01

    Metallized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) thermal control insulation is mechanically degraded if exposed to a sufficient fluence of soft x-ray radiation. Soft x-ray photons (4-8 A in wavelength or 1.55 - 3.2 keV) emitted during solar flares have been proposed as a cause of mechanical properties degradation of aluminized Teflon FEP thermal control insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Such degradation can be characterized by a reduction in elongation-to-failure of the Teflon FER Ground laboratory soft x-ray exposure tests of aluminized Teflon FEP were conducted to assess the degree of elongation degradation which would occur as a result of exposure to soft x-rays in the range of 3-10 keV. Tests results indicate that soft x-ray exposure in the 3-10 keV range, at mission fluence levels, does not alone cause the observed reduction in elongation of flight retrieved samples. The soft x-ray exposure facility design, mechanical properties degradation results and implications will be presented.

  10. Ground Simulator Studies of the Effects of Valve Friction, Stick Friction, Flexibility, and Backwash on Power Control System Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, B Porter

    1958-01-01

    Report presents results of tests made on a power control system by means of a ground simulator to determine the effects of various combinations of valve friction and stick friction on the ability of the pilot to control the system. Various friction conditions were simulated with a rigid control system, a flexible system, and a rigid system having some backlash. For the tests, the period and damping of the simulated airplane were held constant.

  11. Technologies for low-bandwidth high-latency unmanned ground vehicle control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Teresa; Cogan, Ken; Hunt, Lee; Restine, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Automation technology has evolved at a rapid pace in recent years; however, many real-world problems require contextual understanding, problem solving, and other forms of higher-order thinking that extends beyond the capabilities of robots for the foreseeable future. This limits the complexity of automation which can be supplied to modern unmanned ground robots (UGV) and necessitates human-in-the-loop monitoring and control for some portions of missions. In order for the human operator to make decisions and provide tasking during key portions of the mission, existing solutions first derive significant information from a potentially dense reconstruction of the scene utilizing LIDAR, video, and other onboard sensors. A dense reconstruction contains too much data for real-time transmission over a modern wireless data link, so the robot electronics must first condense the scene representation prior to transmission. The control station receives this condensed scene representations and provides visual information to the human operator; the human operator then provides tele-operation commands in real-time to the robot. This paper discusses approaches to dense scene reduction of the data required to transmit to a human-in-the loop as well as the challenges associated with them. In addition, the complex and unstructured nature of real-world environments increases the need for tele-operation. Furthermore, many environments reduce the bandwidth and increase the latency of the link. Ultimately, worsening conditions will cause the tele-operation control process to break down, rendering the robot ineffective. In a worst-case scenario, extreme conditions causing a complete loss-of-communications could result in mission failure and loss of the vehicle.

  12. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing in Support of NASA Launch Vehicle Loads and Controls Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Davis, Susan R.; Askins, Bruce R.; Salyer, Blaine H.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ares Projects Office (APO) is continuing to make progress toward the final design of the Ares I crew launch vehicle and Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Ares I and V will form the space launch capabilities necessary to fulfill NASA's exploration strategy of sending human beings to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As with all new space vehicles there will be a number of tests to ensure the design can be Human Rated. One of these is the Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Test (IVGVT) that will be measuring responses of the Ares I as a system. All structural systems possess a basic set of physical characteristics unique to that system. These unique characteristics include items such as mass distribution, frequency and damping. When specified, they allow engineers to understand and predict how a structural system like the Ares I launch vehicle behaves under given loading conditions. These physical properties of launch vehicles may be predicted by analysis or measured through certain types of tests. Generally, these properties are predicted by analysis during the design phase of a launch vehicle and then verified through testing before the vehicle is Human Rated. The IVGVT is intended to measure by test the fundamental dynamic characteristics of Ares I during various phases of operational/flight. This testing includes excitations of the vehicle in lateral, longitudinal, and torsional directions at vehicle configurations representing different trajectory points. During the series of tests, properties such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and transfer functions are measured directly. These data will then be used to calibrate loads and Guidance, Navigation, and Controls (GN&C) analysis models for verifying analyses of Ares I. NASA launch vehicles from Saturn to Shuttle have undergone Ground Vibration Tests (GVTs) leading to successful launch vehicles. A GVT was not performed on the unmanned Delta III. This vehicle was

  13. Image processing and computer controls for video profile diagnostic system in the ground test accelerator (GTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Zander, M.E.; Brown, S.K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Gibson, H.E.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the application of video image processing to beam profile measurements on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). A diagnostic was needed to measure beam profiles in the intermediate matching section (IMS) between the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and the drift tube linac (DTL). Beam profiles are measured by injecting puffs of gas into the beam. The light emitted from the beam-gas interaction is captured and processed by a video image processing system, generating the beam profile data. A general purpose, modular and flexible video image processing system, imagetool, was used for the GTA image profile measurement. The development of both software and hardware for imagetool and its integration with the GTA control system (GTACS) will be discussed. The software includes specialized algorithms for analyzing data and calibrating the system. The underlying design philosophy of imagetool was tested by the experience of building and using the system, pointing the way for future improvements. The current status of the system will be illustrated by samples of experimental data.

  14. Image processing and computer controls for video profile diagnostic system in the ground test accelerator (GTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Zander, M.E.; Brown, S.K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Gibson, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the application of video image processing to beam profile measurements on the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA). A diagnostic was needed to measure beam profiles in the intermediate matching section (IMS) between the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and the drift tube linac (DTL). Beam profiles are measured by injecting puffs of gas into the beam. The light emitted from the beam-gas interaction is captured and processed by a video image processing system, generating the beam profile data. A general purpose, modular and flexible video image processing system, imagetool, was used for the GTA image profile measurement. The development of both software and hardware for imagetool and its integration with the GTA control system (GTACS) will be discussed. The software includes specialized algorithms for analyzing data and calibrating the system. The underlying design philosophy of imagetool was tested by the experience of building and using the system, pointing the way for future improvements. The current status of the system will be illustrated by samples of experimental data.

  15. Kennedy Space Center Timing and Countdown Interface to Kennedy Ground Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS) engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are developing a time-tagging process to enable reconstruction of the events during a launch countdown. Such a process can be useful in the case of anomalies or other situations where it is necessary to know the exact time an event occurred. It is thus critical for the timing information to be accurate. KGCS will synchronize all items with Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) obtained from the Timing and Countdown (T&CD) organization. Network Time Protocol (NTP) is the protocol currently in place for synchronizing UTC. However, NTP has a peak error that is too high for today's standards. Precision Time Protocol (PTP) is a newer protocol with a much smaller peak error. The focus of this project has been to implement a PTP solution on the network to increase timing accuracy while introducing and configuring the implementation of a firewall between T&CD and the KGCS network.

  16. Inactivation of foodborne pathogens in ground beef by cooking with highly controlled radio frequency energy.

    PubMed

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kalily, Emmanuel; Kisluk, Guy; Karniel, Ohad; Yaron, Sima

    2013-01-01

    The consumer demand for fresh tasting, high quality, low salt, preservative-free meals which require minimal preparation time magnifies the safety concern and emphasizes the need to use innovative technologies for food processing. A modern technique to uniformly heat and cook foods is based on a combination of convection and controlled radio frequency (RF) energy. However any advantage conferred on meat cooked by this method would be lost if application of the technology results in decreased safety. Our main goal was to study the inactivation efficacy of this method of cooking against pathogens in ground meat in comparison to standard convection cooking. Meat balls were artificially inoculated with GFP expressing Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes as well as spores of Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis and cooked by convection heating (220°C, 40 min), by using energy generated from frequencies in the RF bandwidth (RF cooking, 7.5 min) or by combined heating (5.5 min), until the center temperature of each sample reached 73°C. The mean reductions in total indigenous bacteria obtained by RF and convection were 2.8 and 2.5 log CFU/g, respectively. Cooking of meat balls with convection reduced the E. coli population (8 log CFU/g) by 5.5 log CFU/g, whilst treatment with RF reduced E. coli population to undetectable levels. The mean reductions of S. Typhimurium obtained by RF and convection were 5.7 and 6.5 log CFU/g, respectively. The combined treatment reduced the Salmonella population to undetectable levels. In contrast, L. monocytogenes was poorly affected by RF cooking. The mean reduction of L. monocytogenes obtained by RF energy was 0.4 log CFU/g, while convection cooking resulted in undetectable levels. Interestingly, the combined treatment also resulted with undetectable levels of Listeria although time of cooking was reduced by 86%. One-step cooking had negligible effects on the Bacillus spores and therefore a 2-step

  17. The Design of Ground Operation Control System Based on Red5 & Flex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilin, Zhou; Chunlin, Li; Houyi

    According to the ground production of Beijing branch of China Southern Airlines, a production monitoring ground system was designed. The system is mainly used for ground monitoring of aircraft loading and production activities at the airfield, and use the event mechanism to coordinate the production work of SOC, CGS, cargo and aircraft maintenance factory. The system will provide strong support for SOC's work and has great significance for the protection of normal flights and investigation of delays. This innovative design proposed the online games conception and architecture to deal the production problems, and satisfy the front-line operational unit's strong demand of real-time, ease use and ease deployment.

  18. Design opimization in underground coal systems. Volume X. Underground longwall ground control simulator (LONGWALGRCON-SIM). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-28

    A detailed literature review was conducted with particular reference to the ground-control mechanisms of longwall mining systems in the United States. In addition a longwall simulator program was constructed to facilitate equipment selection and design on the longwall face and the support requirements that might be needed in the head and tail entries. The mechanics of ground behavior around the longwall face and the head and tail entries were analyzed and formed the basis for the computer program. The computer simulator LONGWALGRCON-SIM to represent face behavior and specify face equipment capacities was completed. Roof classification for the head and tail entries can be included in the simulator output if optioned. A user manual for the program was produced, including typical program input and output together with the logic used in the program. The major application of the research lies in the application of the computer program to facilitiate design of new longwall operations. Significant conclusions are as follows: insufficient information exists for US longwall mining operations to derive totally reliable ground-control relationships; the longwall simulator does establish the practicality of computer-assisted design of longwall operations; the data requirements of LONGWALGRCON-SIM provide a framework for the collection of ground-control data necessary for face-and-entry design; and face-support requirements can be specified using the computer-assisted, longwall-face simulator.

  19. FROZEN GROUND CONTROL ON SNOWMELT FLOWPATHS AND SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY IN TWO ALPINE BASINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will increase our understanding of how snowmelt flowpaths are influenced by frozen ground in mid-latitude alpine basins. It also will elucidate how these flowpaths dictate surface water chemistry in relation to snowmelt.

  20. Remote-Controlled Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Concurrent Ground-Penetrating Radar Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, A.; Daniels, J. J.; Yeh, T. J.; Zhu, J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Mansheim, T. J.; Hart, T. R.; Shaelek, K. S.; Illman, W. A.; Craig, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    A team of researchers at The University of Iowa, Ohio State University, and the University of Arizona have developed an over-the-internet experimental setup that enables researchers and educators at remote locations to make concurrent electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements. The setup is comprised of a carefully constructed sandbox with known layers of sand with embedded wells and ERT electrodes. A GPR transmitter and receiver are mounted on an xy-traverse scanner. Computers control all the components. Computer software and communications interfaces allow remote users to perform concurrent ERT and GPR measurements and retrieve the measured results in real- time over the internet. A camera enables each internet user to view the active experiment. The users can then apply various inversion- and post-processing algorithms to the data, fuse their results, interpret the data, and adjust the data collection for additional data runs. The system allows for flexible and rapid ERT measurements by researchers developing inversion algorithms, and near real-time 3D images of dielectric constant variations (moisture and water concentrations) in the model. It also has utility in geophysics education, enabling real-time demonstration of ERT and GPR measurements. The distributed arrangement allows institutions at different locations to collaborate and leverage their individual strengths: experimental and cyberinfrastructure knowledge, ERT expertise, and GPR expertise. Large subsystems in the laboratory were designed as stand-alone equipment without any network capability, and this posed major technical obstacles. Our plans include extending the system to interface with pumps and pressure transducers to facilitate hydrologic tomography experiments and possibly offer the research setup to other investigators who do not have access to a laboratory system.

  1. Instrument Display Visual Angles for Conventional Aircraft and the MQ-9 Ground Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg A.; Kamine, Tovy Haber

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft instrument panels should be designed such that primary displays are in optimal viewing location to minimize pilot perception and response time. Human Factors engineers define three zones (i.e. "cones") of visual location: 1) "Easy Eye Movement" (foveal vision); 2) "Maximum Eye Movement" (peripheral vision with saccades), and 3) "Head Movement" (head movement required). Instrument display visual angles were measured to determine how well conventional aircraft (T-34, T-38, F- 15B, F-16XL, F/A-18A, U-2D, ER-2, King Air, G-III, B-52H, DC-10, B747-SCA) and the MQ-9 ground control station (GCS) complied with these standards, and how they compared with each other. Methods: Selected instrument parameters included: attitude, pitch, bank, power, airspeed, altitude, vertical speed, heading, turn rate, slip/skid, AOA, flight path, latitude, longitude, course, bearing, range and time. Vertical and horizontal visual angles for each component were measured from the pilot s eye position in each system. Results: The vertical visual angles of displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement" for all but three of the parameters measured, and almost all of the horizontal visual angles fell within this range. All conventional vertical and horizontal visual angles lay within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". However, most instrument vertical visual angles of the MQ-9 GCS lay outside the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though all were within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". All the horizontal visual angles for the MQ-9 GCS were within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement". Discussion: Most instrument displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though mission-critical instruments sometimes displaced less important instruments outside this area. Many of the MQ-9 GCS systems lay outside this area. Specific training for MQ-9 pilots may be needed to avoid increased response time and potential error during flight.

  2. Tools for automating spacecraft ground systems: The Intelligent Command and Control (ICC) approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffel, A. William; Mclean, David

    1996-01-01

    The practical application of scripting languages and World Wide Web tools to the support of spacecraft ground system automation, is reported on. The mission activities and the automation tools used at the Goddard Space Flight Center (MD) are reviewed. The use of the Tool Command Language (TCL) and the Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) scripting tools for automating mission operations is discussed together with the application of different tools for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory ground system.

  3. Intelligent tutoring and aiding in satellite ground control. Ph.D. Thesis - Georgia Inst. of Tech., 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Rose W.; Mitchell, Christine M.

    1993-01-01

    In supervisory control systems such as satellite ground control, there is a need for human-centered automation where the focus is to understand and enhance the human-system interaction experience in the complex task environment. Operator support in the form of off-line intelligent tutoring and on-line intelligent aiding is one approach towards this effort. The tutor/aid paradigm is proposed here as a design approach that integrates the two aspects of operator support in one system for technically oriented adults in complex domains. This paper also presents GT-VITA, a proof-of-concept graphical, interactive, intelligent tutoring system that is a first attempt to illustrate the tutoring aspect of the tutor/aid paradigm in the domain of satellite ground control. Evaluation on GT-VITA is conducted with NASA personnel with very positive results. GT-VITA is presented being fielded as it is at Goddard Space Flight Center.

  4. The cost of developing and maintain the monitoring and control software of large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Juan Carlos; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Bridger, Alan; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    There are several large ground-based telescopes currently under development such as the SKA and CCAT in radio as well as several 30m-class in the optical. A common challenge that all of these telescopes are facing is estimating the cost of design, construction and maintenance of their required software. This paper will present a cost breakdown of the monitoring and control software packages implemented for ASKAP including the effort spent to develop and maintain the in-house code and the effort saved by using third-party software, such as EPICS. The costing for ASKAP will be compared to those for the monitoring and control software of other large ground-based telescopes such as ALMA and VLT. This comparison will highlight trends and commonalities in the costing and provides a useful guide for costing future telescope control software builds or upgrades and the ongoing maintenance cost.

  5. Integrated optimal dynamics control of 4WD4WS electric ground vehicle with tire-road frictional coefficient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongrong; Hu, Chuan; Wang, Zejiang; Yan, Fengjun; Chen, Nan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents an integrated optimal dynamics control of four-wheel driving and four-wheel steering (4WD4WS) electric ground vehicles via hierarchical control methodology. In the higher-level design, an LQR controller is proposed to obtain the integrated lateral force and yaw moment, according to their respective reference values. The lower-level controller is designed to ensure all the tires work in the stable region while realizing the tracking control of the vehicle dynamics. The tire-road friction coefficient is estimated through the integrated longitudinal force and lateral force, respectively, using a brush tire model. To reduce the estimation error, a novel data fusion function is employed to generate the final estimation value. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control and estimation strategies is validated via CarSim-Simulink joint simulation.

  6. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  7. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  8. Instrument Display Visual Angles for Conventional Aircraft and the MQ-9 Ground Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Bendrick, Gregg A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft instrument panels should be designed such that primary displays are in optimal viewing location to minimize pilot perception and response time. Human Factors engineers define three zones (i.e. cones ) of visual location: 1) "Easy Eye Movement" (foveal vision); 2) "Maximum Eye Movement" (peripheral vision with saccades), and 3) "Head Movement (head movement required). Instrument display visual angles were measured to determine how well conventional aircraft (T-34, T-38, F- 15B, F-16XL, F/A-18A, U-2D, ER-2, King Air, G-III, B-52H, DC-10, B747-SCA) and the MQ-9 ground control station (GCS) complied with these standards, and how they compared with each other. Selected instrument parameters included: attitude, pitch, bank, power, airspeed, altitude, vertical speed, heading, turn rate, slip/skid, AOA, flight path, latitude, longitude, course, bearing, range and time. Vertical and horizontal visual angles for each component were measured from the pilot s eye position in each system. The vertical visual angles of displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement" for all but three of the parameters measured, and almost all of the horizontal visual angles fell within this range. All conventional vertical and horizontal visual angles lay within the cone of Maximum Eye Movement. However, most instrument vertical visual angles of the MQ-9 GCS lay outside the cone of Easy Eye Movement, though all were within the cone of Maximum Eye Movement. All the horizontal visual angles for the MQ-9 GCS were within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement". Most instrument displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of Easy Eye Movement, though mission-critical instruments sometimes displaced less important instruments outside this area. Many of the MQ-9 GCS systems lay outside this area. Specific training for MQ-9 pilots may be needed to avoid increased response time and potential error during flight. The learning objectives include: 1) Know three

  9. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: an update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for early detection and site-specific management of CRR (cotton root rot). Early detection could facilitate a more economical solution than those that might be used after plant infection had become more severe and widespread. ...

  10. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control: Results from a three-year experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for disease detection and mapping which can maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of CRR (cotton root rot) treatments. Accurately mapping CRR could facilitate a much more economical solution than treating entire fields. Th...

  11. NUTRIENT, BACTERIAL, AND VIRUS CONTROL AS RELATED TO GROUND-WATER CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general introduction provides something of the history of groundwater, its present use, and the means by which it can become contaminated. A priority listing of sources of ground-water contamination is presented for four geographical areas of the United States. Phosphorus is di...

  12. Migration of Contaminated Ground Water Under Control at High-Priority Cleanup Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator describes the percentage of National Priority List (NPL) or Superfund Indicator Baseline sites and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Cleanup Baseline sites from 2000 to 2007 where government officials have determined that contaminated ground water is...

  13. The SAX Italian scientific satellite. The on-board implemented automation as a support to the ground control capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martelli, Andrea

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the capabilities implemented in the SAX system for an efficient operations management during its in-flight mission. SAX is an Italian scientific satellite for x-ray astronomy whose major mission objectives impose quite tight constraints on the implementation of both the space and ground segment. The most relevant mission characteristics require an operative lifetime of two years, performing scientific observations both in contact and in noncontact periods, with a low equatorial orbit supported by one ground station, so that only a few minutes of communications are available each orbit. This operational scenario determines the need to have a satellite capable of performing the scheduled mission automatically and reacting autonomously to contingency situations. The implementation approach of the on-board operations management, through which the necessary automation and autonomy are achieved, follows a hierarchical structure. This has been achieved adopting a distributed avionic architecture. Nine different on-board computers, in fact, constitute the on-board data management system. Each of them performs the local control and monitors its own functions while the system level control is performed at a higher level by the data handling applications software. The SAX on-board architecture provides the ground operators with different options of intervention by three classes of telecommands. The management of the scientific operations will be scheduled by the operation control center via dedicated operating plans. The SAX satellite flight mode is presently being integrated at Alenia Spazio premises in Turin for a launch scheduled for the end of 1995. Once in orbit, the SAX satellite will be subject to intensive check-out activities in order to verify the required mission performances. An overview of the envisaged procedure and of the necessary on-ground activities is therefore depicted as well.

  14. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  15. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; et al

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  16. What Controls Methane in Potable Ground Water in the Appalachian Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. I.; Smith, B.; Perry, A. E.; Bothun, R.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of baseline (pre-drilling) sampling for methane in 13,040 potable ground water samples in Northeastern Pennsylvania and 8,004 samples from a "Western Area" (southwest Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, and north-central West Virginia) that were collected on behalf of Chesapeake Energy Corporation as part of its monitoring program prior to drilling unconventional oil and gas wells in the Marcellus and Utica Formations, as well as the results of a year-long study on temporal variability of methane in ground water at 12 locations in NE Pennsylvania We found dissolved methane common in potable ground water in the Appalachian Basin. In NE Pennsylvania, measureable dissolved methane occurred in 24% of our samples with 3.4% naturally exceeding the PADEP methane notification level of 7 mg/L. In the western area, dissolved methane occurred naturally in 36% of groundwater sampled and in Ohio, 4.1% of samples exceeded the Ohio dissolved methane action level of 10 mg/L. More methane is associated with hydrogeochemical facies trending towards Na-Cl and Na-HCO3 type waters in valleys and along hill flanks. We found no relationship occurs between the concentration of methane and proximity to pre-existing gas wells. Concentrations of methane in domestic wells can naturally vary by factors, depending on pumping regime and time of year.

  17. Hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of river subsurface solutes under agriculturally enhanced ground water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildman, R.A., Jr.; Domagalski, J.L.; Hering, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The relative influences of hydrologic processes and biogeochemistry on the transport and retention of minor solutes were compared in the riverbed of the lower Merced River (California, USA). The subsurface of this reach receives ground water discharge and surface water infiltration due to an altered hydraulic setting resulting from agricultural irrigation. Filtered ground water samples were collected from 30 drive point locations in March, June, and October 2004. Hydrologic processes, described previously, were verified by observations of bromine concentrations; manganese was used to indicate redox conditions. The separate responses of the minor solutes strontium, barium, uranium, and phosphorus to these influences were examined. Correlation and principal component analyses indicate that hydrologic processes dominate the distribution of trace elements in the ground water. Redox conditions appear to be independent of hydrologic processes and account for most of the remaining data variability. With some variability, major processes are consistent in two sampling transects separated by 100 m. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  18. Faulting arrested by control of ground-water withdrawal in Houston, Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.; Gabrysch, R.K.; Verbeek, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    More than 86 historically active faults with an aggregate length of 150 miles have been identified within and adjacent to the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. Although scarps of these faults grow gradually and without causing damaging earthquakes, historical fault offset has cost millions of dollars in damage to houses and other buildings, utilities, and highways that were built on or across the faults. The historical fault activity results from renewed movement along preexisting faults and appears to be caused principally by withdrawal of ground water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses in the Houston area. Approximately one-half of the area's water supply is obtained from local ground water. Monitoring by the US Geological Survey of heights of fault scarps indicates that many of the scarps have recently stopped increasing in height. The area where faulting has ceased coincides with the area where ground-water pumping was cut back in the mid-1970s to slow the damage caused by land subsidence along Galveston Bay and the Houston Ship Channel. Thus, it appears that efforts to halt land subsidence in the coastal area have provided the additional benefit of arresting damaging surface faulting. -from Authors

  19. Using Ground Penetrating Radar to Image Paleotopography and Structural Controls at Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Kane County, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozar, E. J.; Bradford, J. H.; Ford, R. L.; Wilkins, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Coral Pink Sand Dunes (CPSD) are one of the largest dune fields in the Great Basin-Colorado Plateau Transition Zone. The dune field rests on Navajo Sandstone, and is bisected by the Sevier Normal Fault, which also forms the bedrock escarpment along the eastern boundary of the lower dune field (LDF). Limited ground penetrating radar (GPR) collected previously, as well as recent ground-based LiDAR data and geomorphic observations, suggest that underlying bedrock is topographically lower in the center of the LDF than on its margins. In order to image the dune-bedrock interface and any structures contained within the bedrock, including buried faults, 50-MHz and 100-MHz GPR antennae with 400-V transmitters were used to conduct over 25 transects, totaling several kilometers, across the LDF. We recorded radar reflections at depths of up to 30 m within the bedrock beneath the modern dunes. Outcrops and/or shallow boreholes along some transects provide ground truth for dune-bedrock contacts. The resulting radar profiles suggest at least two antithetic fault zones within the LDF that, in places, appear to control the location of smaller dunes. Further examination of the relationship between these fault zones and dune forms, as imaged with LiDAR, will help inform whether or not these structural controls affect variation in dune type and patterning across the LDF, and may also explain why the CPSD exist in this location.

  20. Design and evaluation of an advanced air-ground data-link system for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denbraven, Wim

    1992-01-01

    The design and evaluation of the ground-based portion of an air-ground data-link system for air traffic control (ATC) are described. The system was developed to support the 4D Aircraft/ATC Integration Study, a joint simulation experiment conducted at NASA's Ames and Langley Research Centers. The experiment focused on airborne and ground-based procedures for handling aircraft equipped with a 4D-Flight Management System (FMS) and the system requirements needed to ensure conflict-free traffic flow. The Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) at Ames was used for the ATC part of the experiment, and the 4D-FMS-equipped aircraft was simulated by the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) simulator at Langley. The data-link system supported not only conventional ATC communications, but also the communications needed to accommodate the 4D-FMS capabilities of advanced aircraft. Of great significance was the synergism gained from integrating the data link with CTAS. Information transmitted via the data link was used to improve the monitoring and analysis capability of CTAS without increasing controller input workload. Conversely, CTAS was used to anticipate and create prototype messages, thus reducing the workload associated with the manual creation of data-link messages.

  1. TDRSS data handling and management system study. Ground station systems for data handling and relay satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results of a two-phase study of the (Data Handling and Management System DHMS) are presented. An original baseline DHMS is described. Its estimated costs are presented in detail. The DHMS automates the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) ground station's functions and handles both the forward and return link user and relay satellite data passing through the station. Direction of the DHMS is effected via a TDRSS Operations Control Central (OCC) that is remotely located. A composite ground station system, a modified DHMS (MDHMS), was conceptually developed. The MDHMS performs both the DHMS and OCC functions. Configurations and costs are presented for systems using minicomputers and midicomputers. It is concluded that a MDHMS should be configured with a combination of the two computer types. The midicomputers provide the system's organizational direction and computational power, and the minicomputers (or interface processors) perform repetitive data handling functions that relieve the midicomputers of these burdensome tasks.

  2. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining.

  3. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining. PMID:26549926

  4. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost data for the tug DDT&E and operations phases are presented. Option 6 is the recommended option selected from seven options considered and was used as the basis for ground processing estimates. Option 6 provides for processing the tug in a factory clean environment in the low bay area of VAB with subsequent cleaning to visibly clean. The basis and results of the trade study to select Option 6 processing plan is included. Cost estimating methodology, a work breakdown structure, and a dictionary of WBS definitions is also provided.

  5. Environmental hazards of mobile ground spraying with cyanophos and fenthion for quelea control in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mullié, W C; Diallo, A O; Gadji, B; Ndiaye, M D

    1999-05-01

    Seven roosts of red-billed quelea, Quelea quelea, in the Senegal River Valley and Delta were visited during and after aerial or terrestrial treatments with either Cyanox (cyanophos 500 g a.i. liter-1, five roosts) or Queletox (fenthion 640 g a.i. liter-1, two roosts). The primary goal of the observations was to provide data on environmental effects of cyanophos after mobile ground spraying operations. Twenty-six species of vertebrates (birds, reptile, fish) were found dead or debilitated near the spray sites. Effects on nontarget fauna were most pronounced among owls (cyanophos and fenthion) and blue-naped mousebirds, Urocolius macrourus (fenthion). Among terrestrial invertebrates ants and carabid, and tenebrionid beetles were the most conspicuously affected. Among aquatic invertebrates affected tadpole shrimps, Triops cancriformis, dominated. Extremely high residues were found immediately after spraying on tree leaves in the spillway of a vehicle-mounted Berthoud Super Puma airblast sprayer (up to 1380 mg kg-1) and on birds found dying under these trees (125-11,277 microg bird-1, average 2720 microg bird-1) in two roosts treated with cyanophos. Blue-naped mousebirds were identified as being particularly at risk. Side effects were not dose related. They were most severe after routinely practiced mobile ground spraying applications which led to overdosing. These application methods impose severe environmental hazards, and should be abandoned. PMID:10330314

  6. A Controller-in-the Loop Simulation of Ground-Based Automated Separation Assurance in a NextGen Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homola, J.; Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey S.; Brasil, Connie L.; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Cabrall, C.

    2010-01-01

    A controller-in-the-loop simulation was conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory (AOL) at the NASA Ames Research Center to investigate the functional allocation aspects associated with ground-based automated separation assurance in a far-term NextGen environment. In this concept, ground-based automation handled the detection and resolution of strategic and tactical conflicts and alerted the controller to deferred situations. The controller was responsible for monitoring the automation and managing situations by exception. This was done in conditions both with and without arrival time constraints across two levels of traffic density. Results showed that although workload increased with an increase in traffic density, it was still manageable in most situations. The number of conflicts increased similarly with a related increase in the issuance of resolution clearances. Although over 99% of conflicts were resolved, operational errors did occur but were tied to local sector complexities. Feedback from the participants revealed that they thought they maintained reasonable situation awareness in this environment, felt that operations were highly acceptable at the lower traffic density level but were less so as it increased, and felt overall that the concept as it was introduced here was a positive step forward to accommodating the more complex environment envisioned as part of NextGen.

  7. In flight ground control of high drag satellites utilizing on-board accelerometer data and rapid orbit prediction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, A. J.; Velez, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    High drag satellites frequently require precise verification of orbital maneuvers and the accurate prediction of perigee height. An in-flight ground support system designed to monitor and compute orbital state and maneuvers is described. The use of on-board three-axis accelerometer data in a flight support software system to perform on-line maneuver analysis and atmospheric model updating is discussed. In addition, automated analytic techniques to rapidly and accurately predict perigee height following a maneuver are described, as well as semianalytic averaging techniques designed to predict a decaying orbital state for mission control.

  8. Low-Speed Stability-and-Control and Ground-Effects Measurements on the Industry Reference High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemmerly, Guy T.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Banks, Daniel W.; Yaros, Steven F.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of a national effort to develop an economically feasible High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), a single configuration has been accepted as the testing baseline by the organizations working in the High Speed Research (HSR) program. The configuration is based on a design developed by the Boeing Company and is referred to as the Reference H (Ref H). The data contained in this report are low-speed stability-and-control and ground-effect measurements obtained on a 0.06 scale model of the Ref H in a subsonic tunnel.

  9. Investigation of soil contamination at the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ying-Ya; Yuen, C.R.; Martino, L.

    1996-05-01

    A remedial investigation was conducted to identify soil contamination in the Riot Control Burning Pit area in J-field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The investigation included geophysical surveys to delineate the filled section of the pit, soil-gas surveys to locate the organic contamination area, field X-ray fluorescence measurements along the burning pit to identify the major metal contamination, and surface and subsurface soil analyses to investigate the nature and extent of contamination. This paper presents the results of this investigation

  10. Indicators Developed to Evaluate the International Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in Iran; A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Rabiei, Katayoun; Abedi, Heidarali; Kelishadi, Roya; Fereydoun Mohaseli, Khadijeh; Alavi, Mousa; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop indicators for evaluating the implementation of The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) in Iran. We used the “grounded theory” framework. Totally, 265 policy-makers, stakeholders, and community members were recruited by purposeful sampling in 2008. After analyzing the gathered data, 251 indicators, including 82 indicators as “applied indicators”, were derived from second-level codes for three groups. A suitable evaluation questionnaire can be designed based on the extracted indicators for policy makers, stakeholders, and the community to follow the implementation of the FCTC in Iran. PMID:24753645

  11. Spaceborne Autonomous and Ground Based Relative Orbit Control for the TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardaens, J. S.; D'Amico, S.; Kazeminejad, B.; Montenbruck, O.; Gill, E.

    2007-01-01

    . The goal of the ground segment is thus to regularly correct this configuration by performing small orbit correction maneuvers on TDX. The ground station contacts are limited due to the geographic position of the station and the costs for contact time. Only with a polar ground station a contact visibility is possible every orbit for LEO satellites. TSX and TDX use only the Weilheim ground station (in the southern part of Germany) during routine operations. This station allows two scheduled contact per day for the nominal orbit configuration, meaning that the satellite conditions can be checked with an interval of 12 hours. While this limitation is usually not critical for single satellite operations, the visibility constraints drive the achievable orbit control accuracy for a LEO formation if a ground based approach is chosen. Along-track position uncertainties and maneuver execution errors affect the relative motion and can be compensated only after a ground station contact.

  12. The use of oxygen scavengers to prevent the transient discolouration of ground beef packaged under controlled, oxygen-depleted atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C

    1995-01-01

    Rates of O(2) absorption from air were determined for a type of commercial O(2) scavenger that is formulated for rapid O(2) absorption at chiller temperatures. Rates of O(2) absorption from N(2) atmospheres containing 600 ppm O(2) were determined for trays that each contained 350 g of ground beef. Packs with controlled atmospheres of N(2) that contained ground beef and O(2) scavengers were prepared, to determine the conditions under which the scavengers could prevent the transient discolouration of the meat which arises from its reaction with the residual O(2) initially present in pack atmospheres. The rates of O(2) absorption by individual scavengers varied from the average by ±50%. The rate of O(2) absorption declined with decreasing oxygen concentration, from an average value per scavenger of about 12 ml h(-1) when O(2) concentrations were between 20 and 10%. At O(2) concentrations <1% (10,000 ppm) the rate of O(2) absorption was directly proportioned to the O(2) concentration so that the O(2) concentration in an atmosphere in a gas-impermeable pouch declined exponentially with time. The absorption of O(2) by ground beef was similarly dependent on the O(2) concentration. At 2 °C, the transient discolouration of beef in atmospheres initially containing about 50 ppm O(2) was prevented by the presence of 17.5 scavengers per l of atmosphere. At -15 °C, discolouration was prevented by 5 scavengers per l. The findings indicate that the O(2) concentration in pack atmospheres has to be reduced below 10 ppm within 30 min at 2 °C, or 2 h at -1.5 °C if ground beef is not to transiently discolour. It is unlikely that the required rates of O(2) absorption could be obtained economically with currently available, commercial O(2) scavengers. PMID:22060109

  13. Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

    1996-07-01

    The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

  14. Spin-orbit coupling controlled ground state in Sr2ScOsO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, A. E.; Morrow, R.; Fishman, R. S.; Calder, S.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Lumsden, M. D.; Woodward, P. M.; Christianson, A. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report neutron scattering experiments which reveal a large spin gap in the magnetic excitation spectrum of weakly-monoclinic double perovskite Sr2ScOsO6 . The spin gap is demonstrative of appreciable spin-orbit-induced anisotropy, despite nominally orbitally-quenched 5 d3Os5 + ions. The system is successfully modeled including nearest neighbor interactions in a Heisenberg Hamiltonian with exchange anisotropy. We find that the presence of the spin-orbit-induced anisotropy is essential for the realization of the type I antiferromagnetic ground state. This demonstrates that physics beyond the LS or JJ coupling limits plays an active role in determining the collective properties of 4 d3 and 5 d3 systems and that theoretical treatments must include spin-orbit coupling.

  15. Spin-orbit coupling controlled ground state in Sr2ScOsO6

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, A. E.; Morrow, R.; Fishman, R. S.; Calder, S.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Lumsden, M. D.; Woodward, P. M.; Christianson, A. D.

    2016-06-27

    In this paper, we report neutron scattering experiments which reveal a large spin gap in the magnetic excitation spectrum of weakly-monoclinic double perovskite Sr2ScOsO6. The spin gap is demonstrative of appreciable spin-orbit-induced anisotropy, despite nominally orbitally-quenched 5d3Os5+ ions. The system is successfully modeled including nearest neighbor interactions in a Heisenberg Hamiltonian with exchange anisotropy. We find that the presence of the spin-orbit-induced anisotropy is essential for the realization of the type I antiferromagnetic ground state. Finally, this demonstrates that physics beyond the LS or JJ coupling limits plays an active role in determining the collective properties of 4d3 and 5d3more » systems and that theoretical treatments must include spin-orbit coupling.« less

  16. Systems engineering and integration of control centers in support of multiple programs. [ground control for STS payloads and unmanned vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center's new Multiprogram Control Center (MPCC) addresses the control requirements of complex STS payloads as well as unmanned vehicles. An account is given of the relationship of the MPCC to the STS Mission Control Center, with a view to significant difficulties that may be encountered and solutions thus far devised for generic problems. Examples of MPCC workstation applications encompass telemetry decommutation, engineering unit conversion, data-base management, trajectory processing, and flight design.

  17. NASA/MSFC ground experiment for large space structure control verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Seltzer, S. M.; Tollison, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a facility in which closed loop control of Large Space Structures (LSS) can be demonstrated and verified. The main objective of the facility is to verify LSS control system techniques so that on orbit performance can be ensured. The facility consists of an LSS test article which is connected to a payload mounting system that provides control torque commands. It is attached to a base excitation system which will simulate disturbances most likely to occur for Orbiter and DOD payloads. A control computer will contain the calibration software, the reference system, the alignment procedures, the telemetry software, and the control algorithms. The total system will be suspended in such a fashion that LSS test article has the characteristics common to all LSS.

  18. Use of COTS in the Multimission Advanced Ground Intelligent Control (MAGIC) program

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, N.L.

    1997-11-01

    This tutorial will discuss the experiences of the Space System Technologies Division of the USAF Phillips Laboratory (PL/VTS) in developing a COTS-based satellite control system. The system`s primary use is a testbed for new technologies that are intended for future integration into the operational satellite control system. As such, the control system architecture must be extremely open and flexible so we can integrate new components and functions easily and also provide our system to contractors for their component work. The system is based on commercial hardware, is based on Windows NT, and makes the maximum use of COTS components and industry standards.

  19. On shaky ground - A study of security vulnerabilities in control protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Byres, E. J.; Huffman, D.; Kube, N.

    2006-07-01

    The recent introduction of information technologies such as Ethernet R into nuclear industry control devices has resulted in significantly less isolation from the outside world. This raises the question of whether these systems could be attacked by malware, network hackers or professional criminals to cause disruption to critical operations in a manner similar to the impacts now felt in the business world. To help answer this question, a study was undertaken to test a representative control protocol to determine if it had vulnerabilities that could be exploited. A framework was created in which a test could express a large number of test cases in very compact formal language. This in turn, allowed for the economical automation of both the generation of selectively malformed protocol traffic and the measurement of device under test's (DUT) behavior in response to this traffic. Approximately 5000 protocol conformance tests were run against two major brands of industrial controller. More than 60 categories of errors were discovered, the majority of which were in the form of incorrect error responses to malformed traffic. Several malformed packets however, caused the device to respond or communicate in inappropriate ways. These would be relatively simple for an attacker to inject into a system and could result in the plant operator losing complete view or control of the control device. Based on this relatively small set of devices, we believe that the nuclear industry urgently needs to adopt better security robustness testing of control devices as standard practice. (authors)

  20. Ground demonstration of an optical control system for a space-based sparse-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, David B.; Dillow, James; Corcoran, Stephen P.; Andrews, Edwina V.; Yellowhair, Julius; Devries, Kevin

    1998-08-01

    SVS has recently completed a phase II small business innovative research (SBIR) project called low cost space imager (LCSI). As part of the SBIR project, a sparse aperture telescope design concept was developed. This design includes an optical control system capable of correcting the primary segments to within 38 nm piston and 17 nrad tilt as required by the optical tolerance analysis. The optical system utilizes a common secondary and primaries arranged in a Golay-6 configuration. The primaries are spherical, which eliminates the need for translation and rotation control. A laboratory experiment to validate the controls concept has been completed. This experiment culminated in the demonstration of autonomous capture, alignment, and phasing of an optical system with a three segment primary to tolerances consistent with the space optical system. The implementation of the controls scheme in the laboratory experiment is done using Matlab/Simulink for controller design and code generation the code is implemented real-time on a VME based computer system. Closed loop piston control, which utilizes a four-bin sensing scheme, of an actuated mirror to 25 nm RMS mirror motion has been demonstrated. Additionally, autonomous capture and phasing of three segmented primaries has been demonstrated. The technique for the phasing capture involves real-time implementation of image processing techniques to measure the white light fringe visibility in the far field.

  1. Ground demonstration of an optical control system for a space-based sparse aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Young, David B.; Dillow, James; Corcoran, Stephen; Andrews, Edwina V.; Yellowhair, Julius; Devries, Kevin

    1998-09-01

    SVS has recently completed a phase II small business innovative research (SBIR) project called Low Cost Space Imager. As part of the SBIR project, a sparse aperture telescope design concept was developed. This design includes an optical control system capable of correcting the primary segments to within 38 nm piston and 17 nrad tilt as required by the optical tolerance analysis. The optical system utilizes a common secondary and primaries arranged in a Golay-6 configuration. The primaries are spherical, which eliminates the need for translation and rotation control. A laboratory experiment to validate the controls concept has ben completed. This experiment culminated in the demonstration of autonomous capture, alignment, and phasing of an optical system with a three segment primary to tolerances consistent with the space optical system. The implementation of the controls scheme in the laboratory experiment is done using Matlab/Simulink for controller design and code generation. The code is implemented real- time on a VME based computer system. Closed loop piston control, which utilizes a four-bin sensing scheme, of an actuated mirror to 25 nm RMS mirror motion has been demonstrated. Additionally, autonomous capture and phasing of three segmented primaries has been demonstrated. The technique for the phasing capture involves real-time implementation of image processing techniques to measure the white light fringe visibility in the far field.

  2. The role of unattended ground sensors (UGS) in regional confidence building and arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R.

    1997-03-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, the world has not become more peaceful. Without the stability provided by an international system dominated by two super-powers, local conflicts are more likely to escalate. Agreements to counter destabilizing pressures in regional conflicts can benefit from the use of cooperative monitoring. Cooperative monitoring is the collecting, analyzing, and sharing of information among parties to an agreement. Ground sensor technologies can contribute to the collection of relevant information. If implemented with consideration for local conditions, cooperative monitoring can build confidence, strengthen existing agreements, and set the stage for continued progress. This presentation describes two examples: the Israeli-Egyptian Sinai agreements of the 1970s and a conceptual example for the contemporary Korean Peninsula. The Sinai was a precedent for the successful use of UGS within the context of cooperative monitoring. The Korean Peninsula is the world`s largest military confrontation. Future confidence building measures that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for a peace agreement.

  3. Migration strategies for service-enabling ground control stations for unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroculick, Joseph B.

    2011-06-01

    Future unmanned systems will be integrated into the Global Information Grid (GIG) and support net-centric data sharing, where information in a domain is exposed to a wide variety of GIG stakeholders that can make use of the information provided. Adopting a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach to package reusable UAV control station functionality into common control services provides a number of benefits including enabling dynamic plug and play of components depending on changing mission requirements, supporting information sharing to the enterprise, and integrating information from authoritative sources such as mission planners with the UAV control stations data model. It also allows the wider enterprise community to use the services provided by unmanned systems and improve data quality to support more effective decision-making. We explore current challenges in migrating UAV control systems that manage multiple types of vehicles to a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA). Service-oriented analysis involves reviewing legacy systems and determining which components can be made into a service. Existing UAV control stations provide audio/visual, navigation, and vehicle health and status information that are useful to C4I systems. However, many were designed to be closed systems with proprietary software and hardware implementations, message formats, and specific mission requirements. An architecture analysis can be performed that reviews legacy systems and determines which components can be made into a service. A phased SOA adoption approach can then be developed that improves system interoperability.

  4. Transportable Payload Operations Control Center reusable software: Building blocks for quality ground data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmot, Ron; Koslosky, John T.; Beach, Edward; Schwarz, Barbara

    1994-01-01

    The Mission Operations Division (MOD) at Goddard Space Flight Center builds Mission Operations Centers which are used by Flight Operations Teams to monitor and control satellites. Reducing system life cycle costs through software reuse has always been a priority of the MOD. The MOD's Transportable Payload Operations Control Center development team established an extensive library of 14 subsystems with over 100,000 delivered source instructions of reusable, generic software components. Nine TPOCC-based control centers to date support 11 satellites and achieved an average software reuse level of more than 75 percent. This paper shares experiences of how the TPOCC building blocks were developed and how building block developer's, mission development teams, and users are all part of the process.

  5. Thermal control for the ground simulation of a space IR sensor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, E.; Warren, A.; Gasser, G.; Tierney, M.

    1990-01-01

    Active and passive thermal controls for simulations of a space IR sensor system operating in cryogenic temperatures were designed, built, and tested from a component level to a system level. The test results from component tests and integrated system tests have compared very well with theoretical predictions, and thus verify component and integrated thermal math models. These verified models can be modified for use to predict flight systems thermal performance. Thermal vacuum simulations and demonstrations of a space IR system consisted of a target and background scene generator, telescope mirrors supported by a graphite-epoxy metering structure, and an IR sensor. These components are required to operate at cryogenic temperature levels. Each component has its unique thermal control needs. Descriptions are presented of thermal control systems for the test article from component design level to integrated system level along with discussions of component and integrated demonstration tests, and correlation of test data with thermal finite difference models.

  6. Preliminary estimates of range measurements to a spacecraft by means of ground digitally controlled oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A.; Pease, G.

    1974-01-01

    Range measurements to the Pioneer 10 and Mariner 10 spacecraft were made, without the use of a ranging system per se, by using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Deep Space Network's new digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) device. These measurements were accomplished by controlling the linear ramps of the transmitted carrier frequency with a recently installed DCO instrument at the Goldstone facility and analyzing the received linearly ramped Doppler data with a computer program. The accuracy of these range measurements is on the order of 1.5 km.

  7. The control system of the 12-m medium-size telescope prototype: a test-ground for the CTA array control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Anguner, E. A.; Behera, B.; Birsin, E.; Fuessling, M.; Lindemann, R.; Melkumyan, D.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schwanke, U.; Sternberger, R.; Wegner, P.; Wiesand, S.

    2014-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation ground-based very-high energy -ray observatory. CTA will consist of two arrays: one in the Northern hemisphere composed of about 20 telescopes, and the other one in the Southern hemisphere composed of about 100 telescopes, both arrays containing telescopes of different sizes and types and in addition numerous auxiliary devices. In order to provide a test-ground for the CTA array control, the steering software of the 12-m medium size telescope (MST) prototype deployed in Berlin has been implemented using the tools and design concepts under consideration to be used for the control of the CTA array. The prototype control system is implemented based on the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Common Software (ACS) control middleware, with components implemented in Java, C++ and Python. The interfacing to the hardware is standardized via the Object Linking and Embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture (OPC UA). In order to access the OPC UA servers from the ACS framework in a common way, a library has been developed that allows to tie the OPC UA server nodes, methods and events to the equivalents in ACS components. The front-end of the archive system is able to identify the deployed components and to perform the sampling of the monitoring points of each component following time and value change triggers according to the selected configurations. The back-end of the archive system of the prototype is composed by two different databases: MySQL and MongoDB. MySQL has been selected as storage of the system configurations, while MongoDB is used to have an efficient storage of device monitoring data, CCD images, logging and alarm information. In this contribution, the details and conclusions on the implementation of the control software of the MST prototype are presented.

  8. Environmental Impact of Controlled-Source Explosions in Ethiopia (Project EAGLE): Surface Shaking, Ground Velocities, and Effects on Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Les, A.; Klemperer, S. L.; Keranen, K.; Khan, A.; Maguire, P.

    2003-12-01

    In January 2003, as part of the Ethiopia-Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE) we conducted a refraction and wide-angle reflection survey of the Main Ethiopian Rift. 757 RefTek "Texan" seismographs with vertical geophones were deployed in 400 km-long axial and cross-rift lines, with another 231 in a central 3D array 100 km in diameter. An 80-instrument passive array of intermediate and broadband sensors was active during our experiment. We recorded 19 borehole shots loaded in nominal 50-meter boreholes, 2 quarry shots, and 2 lake shots. The shots ranged in size from 50-5750 kg, with the most common shot size being 1 tonne. Prior to loading each shot-hole, we measured distances between shots and the nearest structure, typically un-reinforced mud-and-wood houses, occasionally concrete irrigation ditches and aqueducts. We then used semi-empirical formulae derived by Oriard (Hendron and Oriard, 1972) to calculate expected maximum and minimum bounds on ground velocity at these structures, and selected an appropriate shot size to keep the predicted velocity below the "threshold for cosmetic damage", or 2 inches per second, at the most vulnerable structure. The Oriard formulae are derived from measurements associated with blasting for mining and civil engineering purposes and may not accurately predict the ground velocity from the source depths and explosive type used in the EAGLE and other controlled-source experiments. A detailed, trace-by-trace analysis of maximum ground velocities at our closest seismographs can provide data that will be useful in planning future large-scale seismic experiments. Preliminary results from traces within 20 km of our borehole shots suggest that maximum recorded ground velocities were within or below the maximum-minimum range predicted by Oriard, and hence that larger shot sizes could have been used with acceptable risks. A lake shot fired at the optimum depth (84 m for a 1 tonne shot) produced ground velocities that exceeded

  9. The administration`s arms control agenda: Gaining ground under fire

    SciTech Connect

    Holum, J.D.

    1996-03-01

    Its perhaps too easy to forget that Russia is still one country that could inflict overwhelming nuclear devastation on the United States. Russia`s Dumas elections and presidential elections speaks of changes in Russia, but this transformation will take many years and requires our consistent engagement and steady support. The author examines the Clinton Administration`s arms control agenda.

  10. Ground Truthing the ‘Conventional Wisdom’ of Lead Corrosion Control Using Mineralogical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    For drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with lead-bearing plumbing materials some form of corrosion control is typically necessary, with the goal of mitigating lead release by forming adherent, stable corrosion scales composed of low-solubility mineral phases. Conventional...

  11. Ground Truthing the 'Conventional Wisdom' of Lead Corrosion Control Using Mineralogical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    For drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with lead-bearing plumbing materials some form of corrosion control is typically necessary, with the goal of mitigating lead release by forming adherent, stable corrosion scales composed of low-solubility mineral phases. Conventional...

  12. Investigating Hydrogeologic Controls on Sandhill Wetlands in Covered Karst with 2D Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, C. M.; Nowicki, R. S.; Rains, M. C.; Kruse, S.

    2015-12-01

    In west-central Florida, wetland and lake distribution is strongly controlled by karst landforms. Sandhill wetlands and lakes are sand-filled upland basins whose water levels are groundwater driven. Lake dimensions only reach wetland edges during extreme precipitation events. Current wetland classification schemes are inappropriate for identifying sandhill wetlands due to their unique hydrologic regime and ecologic expression. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether or not a wetland is impacted by groundwater pumping, development, and climate change. A better understanding of subsurface structures and how they control the hydrologic regime is necessary for development of an identification and monitoring protocol. Long-term studies record vegetation diversity and distribution, shallow ground water levels and surface water levels. The overall goals are to determine the hydrologic controls (groundwater, seepage, surface water inputs). Most recently a series of geophysical surveys was conducted at select sites in Hernando and Pasco County, Florida. Electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar were employed to image sand-filled basins and the top of the limestone bedrock and stratigraphy of wetland slopes, respectively. The deepest extent of these sand-filled basins is generally reflected in topography as shallow depressions. Resistivity along inundated wetlands suggests the pools are surface expressions of the surficial aquifer. However, possible breaches in confining clay layers beneath topographic highs between depressions are seen in resistivity profiles as conductive anomalies and in GPR as interruptions in otherwise continuous horizons. These data occur at sites where unconfined and confined water levels are in agreement, suggesting communication between shallow and deep groundwater. Wetland plants are observed outside the historic wetland boundary at many sites, GPR profiles show near-surface layers dipping towards the wetlands at a shallower

  13. Response of ground-water levels of flood control operations in three basins, south-eastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A.J.

    1974-01-01

    Three basins in southeastern Florida were investigated to determine the changes in ground-water levels and canal flows that occurred in response to operation of coastal water-control structures in each canal. All three basins are underlain by the Biscayne aquifer. They are, Snapper Creek Canal basin, where the Biscayne aquifer is of high permeability; the Snake Creek Canal basin, where the aquifer is of moderate permeability; and the Pompano-Cypress Canal basin, where the aquifer is of low permeability. In each basin, drainage is a function of permeability; thus, where the permeability of the aquifer is high, drainage is excellent. The coastal water-conrol structures are intended to afford flood protection in the three basins. In general the control operation criteria for flood control in newly developing areas in southeastern Florida do not provide adequate protection from flooding because of the time required for the aquifer to respond to changes in the controls. Adequate protection would require increasing the density of secondary drainage canals, but this could achieved only by reducing the quantity of water available for recharging those segments of the Biscayne aquifer adjacent to the canals. (Woodrad-USGS)

  14. Effect of spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of ground control mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, Ted; Lloyd, Shane; Dunlap, Alex; Ferguson, Virginia; Simske, Steven; Stodieck, Louis; Livingston, Eric

    Introduction: Spaceflight experiments using mouse or rat models require habitats that are specifically designed for the microgravity environment. During spaceflight, rodents are housed in a specially designed stainless steel meshed cage with gravity-independent food and water delivery systems and constant airflow to push floating urine and feces towards a waste filter. Differences in the housing environment alone, not even considering the spaceflight environment itself, may lead to physiological changes in the animals contained within. It is important to characterize these cage differences so that results from spaceflight experiments can be more reliably compared to studies from other laboratories. Methods: For this study, we examined the effect of NASA's Animal Enclosure Module (AEM) spaceflight hardware on the skeletal properties of 8-week-old female C57BL/6J mice. This 13-day experiment, conducted on the ground, modeled the flight experiment profile of the CBTM-01 payload on STS-108, with standard vivarium-housed mice being compared to AEM-housed mice (n = 12/group). Functional differences were compared via mechanical testing, micro-hardness indentation, microcomputed tomography, and mineral/matrix composition. Cellular changes were examined by serum chemistry, histology, quantitative histomorphometry, and RT-PCR. A Student's t-test was utilized, with the level of Type I error set at 95 Results: There was no change in elastic, maximum, or fracture force mechanical properties at the femur mid-diaphysis, however, structural stiffness was -17.5 Conclusions: Housing mice in the AEM spaceflight hardware had minimal effects on femur cortical bone properties. However, trabecular bone at the proximal tibia in AEM mice experi-enced large increases in microarchitecture and mineral composition. Increases in bone density were accompanied by reductions in bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts, representing a general decline in bone turnover at this site

  15. IT Security Support for the Spaceport Command Control Systems Development Ground Support Development Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Drew A.

    2014-01-01

    Security is one of the most if not the most important areas today. After the several attacks on the United States, security everywhere has heightened from airports to the communication among the military branches legionnaires. With advanced persistent threats (APT's) on the rise following Stuxnet, government branches and agencies are required, more than ever, to follow several standards, policies and procedures to reduce the likelihood of a breach. Attack vectors today are very advanced and are going to continue to get more and more advanced as security controls advance. This creates a need for networks and systems to be in an updated and secured state in a launch control system environment. FISMA is a law that is mandated by the government to follow when government agencies secure networks and devices. My role on this project is to ensure network devices and systems are in compliance with NIST, as outlined in FISMA. I will achieve this by providing assistance with security plan documentation and collection, system hardware and software inventory, malicious code and malware scanning, and configuration of network devices i.e. routers and IDS's/IPS's. In addition, I will be completing security assessments on software and hardware, vulnerability assessments and reporting, and conducting patch management and risk assessments. A guideline that will help with compliance with NIST is the SANS Top 20 Critical Controls. SANS Top 20 Critical Controls as well as numerous security tools, security software and the conduction of research will be used to successfully complete the tasks given to me. This will ensure compliance with FISMA and NIST, secure systems and a secured network. By the end of this project, I hope to have carried out the tasks stated above as well as gain an immense knowledge about compliance, security tools, networks and network devices, as well as policies and procedures.

  16. IT Security Support for the Spaceport Command Control Systems Development Ground Support Development Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branch, Drew

    2013-01-01

    Security is one of the most if not the most important areas today. After the several attacks on the United States, security everywhere was heightened from Airports to the communication among the military branches legionnaires. With advanced persistent threats (APTs) on the rise following Stuxnet, government branches and agencies are required, more than ever, to follow several standards, policies and procedures to reduce the likelihood of a breach. Attack vectors today are very advanced and are going to continue to get more and more advanced as security controls advance. This creates a need for networks and systems to be in an updated and secured state in a launch control system environment. FISMA is a law that is mandated by the government to follow when government agencies secure networks and devices. My role on this project is to ensure network devices and systems are in compliance with NIST, as outlined in FISMA. I will achieve this by providing assistance with security plan documentation and collection, system hardware and software inventory, malicious code and malware scanning and configuration of network devices i.e. routers and IDSsIPSs. In addition I will be completing security assessments on software and hardware, vulnerability assessments and reporting, conducting patch management and risk assessments. A guideline that will help with compliance with NIST is the SANS Top 20 Critical Controls. SANS Top 20 Critical Controls as well as numerous security tools, security software and the conduction of research will be used to successfully complete the tasks given to me. This will ensure compliance with FISMA and NIST, secure systems and a secured network. By the end of this project, I hope to have carried out stated above as well as gain an immense knowledge about compliance, security tools, networks and network devices, policies and procedures.

  17. Dried, ground banana plant leaves (Musa spp.) for the control of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gregory, L; Yoshihara, E; Ribeiro, B L M; Silva, L K F; Marques, E C; Meira, E B S; Rossi, R S; Sampaio, P H; Louvandini, H; Hasegawa, M Y

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the anthelmintic effect of Musa spp. leaves, 12 animals were artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus, and another 12 animals were infected with Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Then, both treatment groups were offered 400 g of dried ground banana plant leaves, and the control animals were offered only 1000 g of coast cross hay. During the trials, the animals received weekly physical examinations. The methods used to evaluate the efficiency of this treatment were packed cell volume, total plasma protein and faecal egg counts, and egg hatchability tests were performed on days -2, +3, +6, +9, +13 and +15. Coproculture tests were performed on day -2 to confirm monospecific infections. In the FEC and EHT, a statistically significant difference (0.04, 0.005; p < 0.05) was noted for T. colubriformis. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) for Haemochus contortus group in all tests. Our results confirmed previous findings suggesting that dried ground banana plant leaves possess anthelmintic activity. PMID:26350377

  18. Integrated Vehicle Ground Vibration Testing in Support of Launch Vehicle Loads and Controls Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has conducted dynamic tests on each major launch vehicle during the past 45 years. Each test provided invaluable data to correlate and correct analytical models. GVTs result in hardware changes to Saturn and Space Shuttle, ensuring crew and vehicle safety. Ares I IVGT will provide test data such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and damping to support successful Ares I flights. Testing will support controls analysis by providing data to reduce model uncertainty. Value of testing proven by past launch vehicle successes and failures. Performing dynamic testing on Ares vehicles will provide confidence that the launch vehicles will be safe and successful in their missions.

  19. Pockels cover for switchable control of the reflection from a grounded, isotropic, lossy dielectric slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagiannopoulos, C. A.; Tsitsas, N. L.; Lakhtakia, A.; Burger, A.

    2015-02-01

    Theoretical analysis indicates that the reflection of obliquely incident light with arbitrary polarization state in the mid-wavelength (3-8 μm) and long-wavelength (8-15 μm) infrared regimes by a lossy, isotropic, dielectric slab backed by a perfect electric conductor can be electrically controlled by covering the dielectric slab by an epitaxial layer of cubic noncentrosymmetric materials, which are normally isotropic dielectric but display the Pockels effect. The reflectances change on the application of a dc electric field parallel to thickness direction of the Pockels cover, without causing depolarization.

  20. Optimising UAV topographic surveys processed with structure-from-motion: Ground control quality, quantity and bundle adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.; Robson, Stuart; d'Oleire-Oltmanns, Sebastian; Niethammer, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Structure-from-motion (SfM) algorithms are greatly facilitating the production of detailed topographic models based on images collected by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). However, SfM-based software does not generally provide the rigorous photogrammetric analysis required to fully understand survey quality. Consequently, error related to problems in control point data or the distribution of control points can remain undiscovered. Even if these errors are not large in magnitude, they can be systematic, and thus have strong implications for the use of products such as digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthophotos. Here, we develop a Monte Carlo approach to (1) improve the accuracy of products when SfM-based processing is used and (2) reduce the associated field effort by identifying suitable lower density deployments of ground control points. The method highlights over-parameterisation during camera self-calibration and provides enhanced insight into control point performance when rigorous error metrics are not available. Processing was implemented using commonly-used SfM-based software (Agisoft PhotoScan), which we augment with semi-automated and automated GCPs image measurement. We apply the Monte Carlo method to two contrasting case studies - an erosion gully survey (Taurodont, Morocco) carried out with an fixed-wing UAV, and an active landslide survey (Super-Sauze, France), acquired using a manually controlled quadcopter. The results highlight the differences in the control requirements for the two sites, and we explore the implications for future surveys. We illustrate DEM sensitivity to critical processing parameters and show how the use of appropriate parameter values increases DEM repeatability and reduces the spatial variability of error due to processing artefacts.

  1. Experiences with a Requirements-Based Programming Approach to the Development of a NASA Autonomous Ground Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Gracanin, Denis; Erickson, John

    2005-01-01

    Requirements-to-Design-to-Code (R2D2C) is an approach to the engineering of computer-based systems that embodies the idea of requirements-based programming in system development. It goes further; however, in that the approach offers not only an underlying formalism, but full formal development from requirements capture through to the automatic generation of provably-correct code. As such, the approach has direct application to the development of systems requiring autonomic properties. We describe a prototype tool to support the method, and illustrate its applicability to the development of LOGOS, a NASA autonomous ground control system, which exhibits autonomic behavior. Finally, we briefly discuss other areas where the approach and prototype tool are being considered for application.

  2. Ergonomic problems regarding the interactive touch input via screens in onboard and ground-based flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzhausen, K. P.; Gaertner, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    A significant problem concerning the integration of display and switching functions is related to the fact that numerous informative data which have to be processed by man must be read from only a few display devices. A satisfactory ergonomic design of integrated display devices and keyboards is in many cases difficult, because not all functions which can be displayed and selected are simultaneously available. A technical solution which provides an integration of display and functional elements on the basis of the highest flexibility is obtained by using a cathode ray tube with a touch-sensitive screen. The employment of an integrated data input/output system is demonstrated for the cases of onboard and ground-based flight control. Ergonomic studies conducted to investigate the suitability of an employment of touch-sensitive screens are also discussed.

  3. Estimating porosity with ground-penetrating radar reflection tomography: A controlled 3-D experiment at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, John H.; Clement, William P.; Barrash, Warren

    2009-04-01

    To evaluate the uncertainty of water-saturated sediment velocity and porosity estimates derived from surface-based, ground-penetrating radar reflection tomography, we conducted a controlled field experiment at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS). The BHRS is an experimental well field located near Boise, Idaho. The experimental data set consisted of 3-D multioffset radar acquired on an orthogonal 20 × 30 m surface grid that encompassed a set of 13 boreholes. Experimental control included (1) 1-D vertical velocity functions determined from traveltime inversion of vertical radar profiles (VRP) and (2) neutron porosity logs. We estimated the porosity distribution in the saturated zone using both the Topp and Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) equations and found the CRIM estimates in better agreement with the neutron logs. We found that when averaged over the length of the borehole, surface-derived velocity measurements were within 5% of the VRP velocities and that the porosity differed from the neutron log by less than 0.05. The uncertainty, however, is scale dependent. We found that the standard deviation of differences between ground-penetrating-radar-derived and neutron-log-derived porosity values was as high as 0.06 at an averaging length of 0.25 m but decreased to less than 0.02 at length scale of 11 m. Additionally, we used the 3-D porosity distribution to identify a relatively high-porosity anomaly (i.e., local sedimentary body) within a lower-porosity unit and verified the presence of the anomaly using the neutron porosity logs. Since the reflection tomography approach requires only surface data, it can provide rapid assessment of bulk hydrologic properties, identify meter-scale anomalies of hydrologic significance, and may provide input for other higher-resolution measurement methods.

  4. Ground-based LiDAR integration with avalanche control operations: target planning and assessment of control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deems, J. S.; LeWinter, A.; Gadomski, P. J.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The varying distribution of snow depth in avalanche starting zones exerts a strong influence on avalanche potential and character. Extreme depth changes over short distances are common, especially in wind-affected, above-treeline environments. Snow depth also affects the ease of avalanche triggering. Experience shows that avalanche reduction efforts are often more successful when targeting shallow trigger point areas near deeper slabs with explosives or ski cutting. We are exploring the use of high resolution snow depth and depth change maps from differential LiDAR scans to quantify loading patterns for use in both pre-control planning and in post-control assessment. We present results from our ongoing work at the Arapahoe Basin and Aspen Highlands ski areas in Colorado, USA, and from a new collaboration with the Colorado Department of Transportation. At Arapahoe Basin we have tested rapid snow depth product generation for use in planning placement of explosives for artificial avalanche triggering. At Aspen Highlands we have explored measurement of minimum disturbance depth from bootpacking. In a new application, we are assessing avalanche hazard reduction with new Gazex exploder arrays on Loveland and Berthoud Passes.

  5. Ground tests for vision based determination and control of formation flying spacecraft trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarri, P.; Sabatini, M.; Palmerini, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    The advances in the computational capabilities and in the robustness of the dedicated algorithms are suggesting vision based techniques as a fundamental asset in performing space operations such as rendezvous, docking and on-orbit servicing. This paper discusses a vision based technique in a scenario where the chaser satellite must identify a non-cooperative target, and use visual information to estimate the relative kinematic state. A hardware-in-the-loop experiment is performed to test the possibility to perform a space rendezvous using the camera as a standalone sensor. This is accomplished using a dedicated test bed constituted by a dark room hosting a robotic manipulator. The camera is mounted on the end effector that moves replicating the satellite formation dynamics, including the control actions, which depend at each time step by the state estimation based on the visual algorithm, thus realizing a closed GNC loop.

  6. A wind-tunnel investigation of parameters affecting helicopter directional control at low speeds in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeager, W. T., Jr.; Young, W. H., Jr.; Mantay, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to measure the performance of several helicopter tail-rotor/fin configurations with regard to directional control problems encountered at low speeds in ground effect. Tests were conducted at wind azimuths of 0 deg to 360 deg in increments of 30 deg and 60 deg and at wind speeds from 0 to 35 knots. The results indicate that at certain combinations of wind speed and wind azimuth, large increases in adverse fin force require correspondingly large increases in the tail-rotor thrust, collective pitch, and power required to maintain yaw trim. Changing the tail-rotor direction of rotation to top blade aft for either a pusher tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing away from fin) or a tractor tail rotor (tail-rotor wake blowing against fin) will alleviate this problem. For a pusher tail rotor at 180 deg wind azimuth, increases in the fin/tail-rotor gap were not found to have any significant influence on the overall vehicle directional control capability. Changing the tail rotor to a higher position was found to improve tail-rotor performance for a fin-off configuration at a wind azimuth of 180 deg. A V-tail configuration with a pusher tail rotor with top blade aft direction of rotation was found to be the best configuration with regard to overall directional control capability.

  7. Autonomous and Remote-Controlled Airborne and Ground-Based Robotic Platforms for Adaptive Geophysical Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spritzer, J. M.; Phelps, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    Low-cost autonomous and remote-controlled robotic platforms have opened the door to precision-guided geophysical surveying. Over the past two years, the U.S. Geological Survey, Senseta, NASA Ames Research Center, and Carnegie Mellon University Silicon Valley, have developed and deployed small autonomous and remotely controlled vehicles for geophysical investigations. The purpose of this line of investigation is to 1) increase the analytical capability, resolution, and repeatability, and 2) decrease the time, and potentially the cost and map-power necessary to conduct near-surface geophysical surveys. Current technology has advanced to the point where vehicles can perform geophysical surveys autonomously, freeing the geoscientist to process and analyze the incoming data in near-real time. This has enabled geoscientists to monitor survey parameters; process, analyze and interpret the incoming data; and test geophysical models in the same field session. This new approach, termed adaptive surveying, provides the geoscientist with choices of how the remainder of the survey should be conducted. Autonomous vehicles follow pre-programmed survey paths, which can be utilized to easily repeat surveys on the same path over large areas without the operator fatigue and error that plague man-powered surveys. While initial deployments with autonomous systems required a larger field crew than a man-powered survey, over time operational experience costs and man power requirements will decrease. Using a low-cost, commercially available chassis as the base for autonomous surveying robotic systems promise to provide higher precision and efficiency than human-powered techniques. An experimental survey successfully demonstrated the adaptive techniques described. A magnetic sensor was mounted on a small rover, which autonomously drove a prescribed course designed to provide an overview of the study area. Magnetic data was relayed to the base station periodically, processed and gridded. A

  8. Controls on variability in surface and ground waters in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Hilary; Srinivasan, MS

    2014-05-01

    Hydrologists recognise the importance of vertical drainage and deep flow paths in runoff generation, even in headwater catchments. Therefore, characterisation of the joint surfacewater-groundwater system is needed to improve hydrological understanding and model representation. Both soil and groundwater stores are highly variable over multiple scales, and the distribution of water has a strong control on flow rates and timing. In this study, we instrumented an upland headwater catchment in New Zealand to measure the spatial variation in unsaturated and saturated-zone responses. Over a period of 16 months we measured continuous soil moisture at 32 locations and near-surface water table (< 2 m) at 14 locations, with varied aspects, hillslope position and distance from stream, as well as recording streamflow at 3 gauges. In this presentation we describe the controls, types and implications of variability. Our results showed several distinct causes of variability in water stores. Some types of variability involve a response of only part of the catchment to a rainfall event, e.g. partial response of deep soils in the summer months. Other types of variability involve differences in dynamics, e.g. recession shapes; or differences in response rates in different parts of the catchment, e.g. timing of winter wet-up, and a distinctive split between slow and fast groundwater responses. A further type of variability occurs when some parts of the catchment respond more strongly than others, as in the partial saturation responses seen in winter. Soil moisture and water table show different variability characteristics. Soil moisture on the North facing slope is qualitatively different to that on the South facing slope: it does not have the long winter plateau seen on the South facing slope. Groundwater variability appears to be more location specific, with both North and South facing slopes showing a combination of fast and slow water table responses to rainfall events. The many

  9. An Ecological Approach to the Design of UAV Ground Control Station (GCS) Status Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Susan; Morphew, Ephimia; Shively, Jay

    2003-01-01

    Use of UAVs in military and commercial applications will continue to increase. However, there has been limited research devoted to UAV GCS design. The current study employed an ecological approach to interfac e design. Ecological Interface Design (EID) can be characterized as r epresenting the properties of a system, such that an operator is enco uraged to use skill-based behavior when problem solving. When more ef fortful cognitive processes become necessary due to unfamiliar situations, the application of EID philosophy supports the application of kn owledge-based behavior. With advances toward multiple UAV command and control, operators need GCS interfaces designed to support understan ding of complex systems. We hypothesized that use of EID principles f or the display of UAV status information would result in better opera tor performance and situational awareness, while decreasing workload. Pilots flew a series of missions with three UAV GCS displays of statu s information (Alphanumeric, Ecological, and Hybrid display format). Measures of task performance, Situational Awareness, and workload dem onstrated the benefits of using an ecological approach to designing U AV GCS displays. The application of ecological principles to the design of UAV GCSs is a promising area for improving UAV operations.

  10. Collaborative air/ground command and control for responsive persistent ISR operations using unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordower, Rick; Dixon, Lee; Lynch, Nick

    2010-04-01

    "The foundation for integrating ISR planning and direction is the information network, including the appropriate ISR services and applications oriented toward the [commanders] needs. By combining global visibility of available information and intelligence needs with the tools to maximize platform/sensor/target management, the network will improve efficiency and maximize persistence. Inherent within this concept is the idea of integrating and synchronizing a mix of sensing systems and platforms rather than relying on a single system. The second concept embedded within this concept is the ability to capture the activity/information as it occurs rather than forensically reconstructing after the fact. This requires the ability for the [commander] to adjust collection priorities of the entire collection suite to a level appropriate to the activity of interest. Individual sensors, platforms and exploitation nodes will become more efficient as part of an integrated system. Implementing this fully integrated ISR Enterprise will result in improved persistence, and ultimately better ISR for the warfighter."[3] Over the last 6 years, SAIC has been working with CERDEC and AMRDEC to introduce Battle Command aids supporting (semi) autonomous execution and collaboration of unmanned assets. This paper presents an operational context and a distributed command and control architecture aiming to reduce workload and increase Persistent ISR effectiveness. This architecture has been implemented and demonstrated in field tests and as part of FY'09 C4ISR OTM testbed.