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Sample records for group committee c12

  1. Automatic Target Recognizer Working Group Security Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoch, Suzanne

    1987-09-01

    The ATRWG Security Committee participates in the development of Automatic Target Recognizers (ATRs) and image processing guidelines as related to TEMPEST requirements and policies set forth by the Department of Defense (DoD).

  2. Executive Committee Working Group: Women in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, Francesca; Maddison, Sarah; Primas, Francesca; Aerts, Conny; Clayton, Geoffrey; Combes, Françoise; Elmegreen, Debra; Feretti, Luigina; Jog, Chanda; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Lazzaro, Daniela; Liang, Yanchun; Mandrini, Cristina; Mathews, Brenda; Rovira, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The gender† dimension of science and technology has become one of the most important and debated issues worldwide, impacting society at every level. A variety of international initiatives on the subject have been undertaken, including the continued monitoring of the status of women in science by Unesco Institute for Statistics (UIS) or the annual reports ``Education at a Glance'' by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) as well as field-related working groups and networking in order to collect data in a consistent manner. The majority of the international organizations have made clear statements about their discrimination policies (independently of their main field(s) of action), including the International Council for Science whose regulations are followed by the IAU. Gender equality at large is one of the eight United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which clearly calls for action related to science, technology and gender.

  3. 15 CFR 2002.1 - Trade Policy Committee Review Group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trade Policy Committee Review Group. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements..., December 11, 1971 (15 CFR 2002.1), is abolished and there is hereby established as a subordinate body...

  4. 15 CFR 2002.1 - Trade Policy Committee Review Group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., December 11, 1971 (15 CFR 2002.1), is abolished and there is hereby established as a subordinate body of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade Policy Committee Review Group. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade...

  5. 15 CFR 2002.1 - Trade Policy Committee Review Group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., December 11, 1971 (15 CFR 2002.1), is abolished and there is hereby established as a subordinate body of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trade Policy Committee Review Group. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade...

  6. 15 CFR 2002.1 - Trade Policy Committee Review Group.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., December 11, 1971 (15 CFR 2002.1), is abolished and there is hereby established as a subordinate body of... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trade Policy Committee Review Group. 2002.1 Section 2002.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade...

  7. Theoretical assessment of the electro-optical features of the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12 and Ge12C12) nanoclusters encapsulated with alkali metals (Li, Na and K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmasebi, Elham; Shakerzadeh, Ehsan; Biglari, Zeinab

    2016-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to study the influence of alkali metals (Li, Na and K) encapsulation within the group III nitrides (B12N12, Al12N12 and Ga12N12) and the group IV carbides (C24, Si12C12and Ge12C12) nanoclusters. The encapsulation of Li, Na and K atoms is found to narrow the HOMO-LUMO gaps of the considered clusters. The electronic properties of these clusters, especially the group III nitrides nanoclusters, are strongly sensitive to interaction with the alkali metals. Moreover it is observed that the encapsulation of alkali metals enhances the first hyperpolarizabilities of B12N12 nanocluster. Surprisingly, due to the alkali metals encapsulation within B12N12 nanocluster, the first hyperpolarizability values are remarkably increased to 8505.49 and 122,503.76 a.u. for Na@B12N12 and K@B12N12, respectively. Also the TD-DFT calculations at both CAM-B3LYP/6-311+G(d) and PBE0/6-311+G(d) levels of theory are also performed to investigate the origin of first hyperpolarizabilities.

  8. The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.

    1990-12-31

    This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. A Report on a Practical Instrument for Analyzing Effectiveness and Group Dynamics of Academic Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNulty, Lynda J.; Seagren, Alan J.

    A study was undertaken to analyze the group processes in academic committee meetings, focusing on committee member perceptions of the processes and their effectiveness. Such committees are traditional in higher education, and have long been considered the most efficient and democratic decision-making method. However, they have been criticized as…

  10. EarthCube's Governance Working Group Steering Committee presents roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, James F.; Pearthree, Genevieve M.

    2012-10-01

    June 2012 EarthCube Charrette;Washington, D. C., 12-14 June 2012 EarthCube is a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) initiative sponsored by the Directorate for Geosciences and the Office of Cyberinfrastructure to transform the conduct of research through open, community- guided development of cyberinfrastructure across the geosciences. EarthCube recently held its second organizational charrette (collaborative design event), with the objective of engaging its 190 physical and 60 remote attendees in discussions and workshops on developing EarthCube. One goal of the charrette was to review and integrate draft roadmaps produced by four NSF- funded Community Groups (Governance, Data, Semantics, and Workflow) and five Concept Awards (Brokering, Earth System Models, Layered Architecture, Interoperability, and Web Services), which emerged from the first charrette, held in November 2011. The roadmaps are the culmination of 6 months of research, community outreach, and deliberations in virtual and physical meetings; they identify initial EarthCube stakeholders and cyberinfrastructure components, in addition to key issues related to advancing EarthCube.

  11. 76 FR 30722 - Meeting of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee; Vaccine Safety Working Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Meeting of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee; Vaccine Safety Working Group AGENCY... Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is hereby giving notice that the Vaccine Safety Working Group (VSWG) of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) will hold a meeting. The meeting is open to...

  12. 76 FR 26771 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  13. 76 FR 21073 - NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Task Group of the Science Committee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and...

  14. 77 FR 47630 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Working Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives... Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and Stakeholder...

  15. 77 FR 3765 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members... outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and Stakeholders Meeting January 26,...

  16. 77 FR 21979 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... Working Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) hereby gives... Commission's ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and Stakeholder...

  17. 77 FR 15097 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Working Group and Stakeholders Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that... ongoing outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Working Group and Stakeholders Meeting March...

  18. 75 FR 22561 - Federal Advisory Committee; United States Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group; Charter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; United States Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group... notice that it is renewing the charter for the United States Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group... Management Officer for the Department of Defense, 703-601-6128. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Group is...

  19. 75 FR 8310 - Federal Advisory Committee; Transformation Advisory Group; Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Transformation Advisory Group; Closed Meeting AGENCY... Advisory Group will hold a closed meeting on March 11, 2010. DATES: The meeting will be held on March 11... the Transformation Advisory Group at any time or in response to the stated agenda of a planned...

  20. CTSA Consortium Consensus Scientific Review Committee (SRC) Working Group Report on the SRC Processes.

    PubMed

    Selker, Harry P; Buse, John B; Califf, Robert M; Carter, Robert; Cooper, Dan M; Davis, Jonathan; Ford, Daniel E; Galassetti, Pietro; Guay-Woodford, Lisa; Huggins, Gordon S; Kasper, Amanda; Kieburtz, Karl; Kirby, Aaron; Klein, Andreas K; Kline, Joel; O' Neill, Robert T; Rape, Marie; Reichgott, Douglas J; Rojevsky, Svetlana; Rosenthal, Gary E; Rubinstein, Eric P; Shepherd, Amy; Stacy, Mark; Terrin, Norma; Wallace, Mark; Welch, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Human research projects must have a scientifically valid study design, analytic plan, and be operationally feasible in order to be successfully completed and thus to have translational impact. To ensure this, institutions that conduct clinical research should have a scientific review process prior to submission to the Institutional Review Committee (IRB). This paper reports the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Consortium Scientific Review Committee (SRC) Consensus Working Group's proposed framework for a SRC process. Recommendations are provided for institutional support and roles of CTSAs, multisite research, criteria for selection of protocols that should be reviewed, roles of committee members, application process, and committee process. Additionally, to support the SCR process effectively, and to ensure efficiency, the Working Group recommends information technology infrastructures and evaluation metrics to determine outcomes are provided. PMID:26184433

  1. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    -RESIGA Politehnica University of Timisoara Romania Kazuhiro TANAKA Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Yoshinobu TSUJIMOTO Osaka University Japan Local Organizing Committee Chairman Yulin WU Tsinghua University Beijing Executive Chairman Zhengwei WANG Tsinghua University Beijing Members Shuliang CAO Tsinghua University Beijing Cichang CHEN South West University of Petroleum Chengdu Hongxun CHEN Shanghai University Shanghai Jiang DAI China Sanxia General Co Yichang Huashu DOU National University of Singapore Singapore Fengqin HAN Huanan University of Sci & Tech Guangzhou Kun LI Hefei Inst of General Machinery Hefei Rennian LI Lanzhou University of Sci & Tech Lanzhou Wanhong LI National Natural Science Foundation of China Beijing Chao LIU Yangzhou University Yangzhou Li LU China Inst of Water Resources and Hydropower Research Beijing Xingqi LUO Xi'an University of Tech Xi'an Zhenyue MA Dalian University of Sci & Tech Dalian Jiegang MU Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Daqing QIN Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Fujun WANG China Agriculture University Beijing Guoyu WANG Beijing Institute of Technology (BIT) Beijing Leqin WANG Zhejiang University Hangzhou Yuzhen WU NERCSPV Beijing Hongyuan XU Tsinghua University Beijing Jiandong YANG Wuhan University Wuhan Minguan YANG Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Shouqi YUAN Jiangsu University Zhenjiang Lefu ZHANG Harbin Electric Machinery Group Harbin Lixiang ZHANG Yunnan University of Sci & Tech Kunming Shengchang ZHANG Zhejiang University of Tech Hangzhou Kun ZHAO China Water & Electric Consulting Corp Beijing Yuan ZHENG Hehai University Nanjing Jianzhong ZHOU Huazhong University of Sci & Tech Wuhan Lingjiu ZHOU China Agriculture University Beijing Hongwu ZHU China Petroleum University Beijing Zuchao ZHU Zhejiang Sci-Tech University Hangzhou Secretaries Shuhong LIU (Academic), liushuhong@tsinghua.edu.cn Xianwu LUO (Registration), luoxw@tsinghua.edu.cn Baoshan ZHU (Finance), bszhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

  2. 76 FR 10085 - Membership in the National Parks Overflights Advisory Group Aviation Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ...By Federal Register notice (See 75 FR 68023; November 4, 2010) the National Park Service (NPS) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) invited interested persons to apply to fill two vacant positions on the National Parks Overflights Advisory Group (NPOAG) Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC). These notices invited interested persons to apply to fill two vacancies representing......

  3. Measurement committee of the US cross section evaluation working group. Annual report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1995-08-01

    The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group is a long-standing committee charged with the responsibility for organizing and overseeing the U.S. cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official U.S. evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF; the current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the U.S. nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This was based on recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the U.S. were declining at an alarming rate. The mission of the Committee is to establish a network of experimentalists in the U.S. which would provide encouragement to the national nuclear data measurement effort through improved communication and facilitation of collaborative activities. The Committee currently has 19 members, and interested scientists are welcome to join the network simply by contacting the Chairman. For reference, the names of the current members and contact information are contained in this report. This annual report is the first such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from 10 laboratories in the U.S. which have been prepared by members of the Committee and submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing. This report is being distributed in hard copy and is also available on-line via the National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is hoped that the information provided here on the work that is going on at the reporting laboratories will prove interesting and stimulating to the readers.

  4. 75 FR 20423 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ..., SPAIN, Air Europa Lineas Aereas, S.A., Centro Empresarial Globalia, Ctra. Arenal-- Llucmajor, km 21,5...., Appendix 2), notice is hereby given for a RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air...: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

  5. 76 FR 58078 - Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Thirteenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78.... ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication Services. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the...

  6. 76 FR 62804 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work... outreach efforts. Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and Stakeholder Meeting October 19, 2011 (9...

  7. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.; Revesz, Peter; Arp, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Conference Chairs NameOrganization Gwyn Williams Jefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility Programme Committee NameOrganization Alastair MacDowellAdvanced Light Source Tom ToellnerAdvanced Photon Source Amitava D RoyCenter for Advanced Microstructures and Devices Tom EllisCanadian Light Source Roberta SantarosaLaboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron Jerry (Jerome) HastingsLinac Coherent Light Source Steven HulbertNational Synchrotron Light Source Thomas A RabedeauStanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Mark BissenSynchrotron Radiation Center Gwyn WilliamsJefferson Lab Peter ReveszCornell High Energy Synchrotron Source Uwe ArpSynchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility

  8. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  9. Addendum to Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Frisbie, Troy; Estep, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In the original report dated February 11, 2005, the utility of NASA Earth science data in the air quality activities of other agencies and organizations was assessed by reviewing strategic and mission plans and by conducting personal interviews with agency experts to identify and investigate agencies with the potential for partnership with NASA. The overarching agency strategic plans were reviewed and commonalities such as the desire for partnerships and technology development were noted. This addendum to the original report contains such information about the Tennessee Valley Authority and will be inserted as Section 2.6 of "Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees."

  10. Addendum to Air Quality: Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Frisbie, Troy; Estep, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In the original report dated February 11, 2005, the utility of the NASA Earth science data in the air quality activities of other agencies and organizations was assessed by reviewing strategic and mission plans and by conducting personal interviews with agency experts to identify and investigate agencies with the potential for partnership with NASA. The overarching agency strategic plans were reviewed and commonalities such as the desire for partnerships and technology development were noted. The addendum to the original report contains such information about the Tennessee Valley Authority and will be inserted in Section 2.6 of "Air Quality Decision Support Tools, Partner Plans, Working Groups, Committees".

  11. Fuel cells and university research: the report of the energy committee's working group on fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Callagher-Daggitt, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    A SERC reassessment of fuel cells was prompted by a letter in early August 1981 to Sir Geoffrey Allen, then Chairman of SERC, from the Chief Engineer and Scientist of DoI, Dr Duncan Davies. A copy of the Davies letter was passed on to ERSU with a request for information about university research activity within the UK in this field. The consensus of opinion at these meetings was that the UK should not attempt to repeat the work on first-generation fuel cells being carried out in the USA, Japan, Belgium, and Germany. However, it was felt that universities should be encouraged to strengthen their research efforts in a few fundamental areas that were identified as essential for the materials breakthroughs needed to develop a viable second-generation fuel-cell technology, and it was decided to recommend that the Energy Committee of SERC give ERSU a watching brief with a mandate to review the situation in 18 months. Having considered the recommendations arising out of the Fuel-Cell Appraisal Meeting and the follow-on meeting between SERC and government departments, the Energy Committee set up a Working Group on Fuel Cells and asked it: to identify problems and those areas where work could usefully be carried out in the universities, to consider how university research into identified areas can be initiated and supported, and to prepare a report for the Energy Committee of SERC containing recommendations relating to university research in this field. This report has been prepared in response to that request.

  12. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the U.S. Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group annual report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1997-10-01

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the Us and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  13. Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1930, Alberto Sirlin studied at the University of Buenos Aires from 1948-52, where he carried out research work in classical nonlinear physics, under the guidance of Richard Gans, and in 1953 received the degree of doctor in Physical-Mathematical Sciences. In 1953 he held a fellowship at the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where he did research work and attended some graduate courses, including a memorable and highly influential one taught by Richard Feynman. He spent the academic year 1954-55 at UCLA, where he initiated his work on electroweak physics in collaboration with Robert Finkelstein and Ralph Behrends. His next move was to Cornell University in 1955, earning his PhD there in 1958 for research in electroweak physics in collaboration with Toichiro Kinoshita. Sirlin spent 1957-59 as a research associate at Columbia University, becoming an Assistant Professor of Physics at New York University in 1959, an Associate Professor in 1961, and a full Professor in 1968. It is a remarkable coincidence that one of his fellow post-docs, Steven Weinberg, was to become one of the founders of the Standard Model, which in turn has provided the natural setting for Sirlin's work. During his formative years, he was extremely fortunate to receive guidance and advice from an extraordinary group of distinguished scientists, including R Gans, R P Feynman, R J Finkelstein, H A Bethe and E E Salpeter. He also enjoyed close and fruitful long-term collaborations with a number of brilliant theorists, including R E Behrends, T Kinoshita, T D Lee, M A B Beg, W J Marciano, P Langacker, G Degrassi, P Gambino and B A Kniehl, and has had fourteen excellent, interesting, and highly enterprising graduate students, who have remained close friends. Sirlin's main research interests have been in precision electroweak physics, other topics in weak interaction theory, the search for higher symmetries of the strong interactions

  14. Committee Effectiveness in Higher Education: The Strengths and Weaknesses of Group Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on five models of committee effectiveness for purposes of this assessment will lend insight into the strengths and weaknesses of utilizing a structured action plan as a guide to achieving and maintaining optimum committee effectiveness in higher education. In the compilation of the strengths and weaknesses of committee decision making,…

  15. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: Report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Brian M.; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Ballman, Karla V.; Boyett, James M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Degroot, John F.; Huse, Jason T.; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Prados, Michael D.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L.; Berry, Donald A.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting. PMID:25165194

  16. 75 FR 66828 - Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... for Air Traffic Data Communication Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... Services. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Special Committee 214: Working Group 78: Standards for Air Traffic Data Communication Services. DATES: The...

  17. 76 FR 67727 - Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of FERC Staff Attendance at the Entergy Regional State Committee Work Group and Stakeholder Meeting The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that...

  18. Joint Funding Councils' Libraries Review Group (the "Follett") Report: The Contribution of the Information Technology Sub-Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brindley, Lynne J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to look into a review of library provision in higher education, which was originally set up in 1992 by The Funding Councils of England, Scotland and Wales, and the Department of Education for Northern Ireland. Design/methodology/approach: The review group was structured into three sub-committees, under the umbrella of…

  19. 77 FR 14584 - Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217, Joint With EUROCAE Working Group-44, Terrain and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ...@aviation-civile.grouv.fr , or telephone: 33-5-57- 92-57-81 or mobile, 33-5-57-92-55-55 1150. FOR FURTHER... Federal Aviation Administration Eleventh Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217, Joint With EUROCAE Working... Working Group--44, Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice...

  20. 77 FR 5031 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the Director

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the Advisory Committee to the Director SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the... (WGBDRW). DATES: The meeting will be held on Tuesday, February 14, 2012, from approximately 10 a.m. to...

  1. Effective committees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jannette

    2012-03-01

    A committee is a group of people officially delegated to perform a function, such as investigating, considering, reporting, or acting on a matter. Some committees function like task forces and work on specific, time-limited projects. When the work is finished, the committees are no longer needed. These committees are called ad hoc committees. Other committees are standing committees. They are created by the standing orders, rules, by-laws, or regulations of an organization and exist and function indefinitely (eg, finance, membership, education, nomination). Both types of committees can form subcommittees if the workloads are heavy or complex in nature. Committees can be among the most important working forces of an organization. They serve as work units of the organization, taking work and breaking it into meaningful and manageable chunks. They efficiently carry out the work of the organization. Committee work should be a rewarding experience for both the members and the organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. New or inexperienced members can gain valuable insight into an organization and develop confidence by serving on committees. There are several key elements of effective committees, including (1) a clear, written purpose; (2) an effective committee chair; (3) thoughtfully appointed members; and (4) well-run meetings. PMID:22386164

  2. Measurement and Basic Physics Committee of the US cross-section evaluation working group. Annual report 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; McLane, V.

    1996-11-01

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with the responsibility for organizing and overseeing the U.S. cross-section evaluation effort. It`s main product is the official U.S. evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the U.S. nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the U.S. were declining at an alarming rate and needed all possible encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain a network of experimentalists in the U.S. that would provide needed encouragement to the national nuclear data measurement effort through improved communication and facilitation of collaborative activities. In 1994, an additional charge was added to the responsibilities of this Committee, namely, to serve as an interface between the more applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. This annual report is the second such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from eleven laboratories in the U.S. which have been prepared by members of the Committee and submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing. It is hoped that the information provided here on the work that is going on at the reporting laboratories will prove interesting and stimulating to the readers.

  3. MEASUREMENT AND BASIC PHYSICS COMMITTEE OF THE U.S. CROSS-SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, ANNUAL REPORT 1997

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,D.L.; MCLANE,V.

    1998-10-20

    The Cross-Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) is a long-standing committee charged with responsibility for organizing and overseeing the US cross-section evaluation effort. Its main product is the official US evaluated nuclear data file, ENDF. The current version of this file is Version VI. All evaluations included in ENDF, as well as periodic modifications and updates to the file, are reviewed and approved by CSEWG and issued by the US Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory. CSEWG is comprised of volunteers from the US nuclear data community who possess expertise in evaluation methodologies and who collectively have been responsible for producing most of the evaluations included in ENDF. In 1992 CSEWG added the Measurements Committee to its list of standing committees and subcommittees. This action was based on a recognition of the importance of experimental data in the evaluation process as well as the realization that measurement activities in the US were declining at an alarming rate and needed considerable encouragement to avoid the loss of this resource. The mission of the Committee is to maintain contact with experimentalists in the US and to encourage them to contribute to the national nuclear data effort. Improved communication and the facilitation of collaborative activities are among the tools employed in achieving this objective. In 1994 the Committee was given an additional mission, namely, to serve as an interface between the applied interests represented in CSEWG and the basic nuclear science community. Accordingly, its name was changed to the Measurement and Basic Physics Committee. The present annual report is the third such document issued by the Committee. It contains voluntary contributions from several laboratories in the US. Their contributions were submitted to the Chairman for compilation and editing.

  4. [Freud's committee 1912-1914. A contribution to understanding psychoanalytic group affiliation].

    PubMed

    Schröter, M

    1995-06-01

    With access to new sources the author reconstructs the conditions and circumstances leading in 1912 to what in the literature has come to be known as Freud's "secret committee". Schröter's sociological vantage enables him to pinpoint the mechanisms that made it possible for Freud to seek a resolution of the conflict smouldering between himself and Jung by staging a "palace revolution" which dethroned the institutionalized powerholder (Jung was president of the IPV and editor of the Jahrbuch für psychoanalytische und psychopathologische Forschungen) and established the Viennese group-centering around Freud and standing for his interest in the survival of his work-as an informal, secret body wielding power collectively and thus making it unnecessary for Freud himself to take over direct, personal "rule". At the same time, the author contends, the differences between Vienna and Zurich also need to be understood in terms of local and historical factors. Whereas Freud and Vienna represent a monarchic understanding of power in which power may be delegated but is never shared or relinquished, Jung and Zurich stand for democratic, liberal-bourgeois attitude towards power stemming from a long tradition of anti-monarchism in Switzerland. PMID:7610264

  5. 75 FR 3953 - Notice of Meeting of a Study Group of the U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... of Meeting of a Study Group of the U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law A Study Group of the Department of State Advisory Committee on Private International Law... facilities. Dated: January 15, 2010. Michael J. Dennis, Attorney-Adviser, Office of Private International...

  6. Recruitment, Retention, and Participation of Underrepresented Groups on Pennsylvania Cooperative Extension Advisory Boards and Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Patreese D.; Nyangara, Florence M.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 67 Pennsylvania extension professionals and on-site reviews found minority representation on extension boards and committees ranged from 17-50%. Recruitment and retention problems included time constraints, lack of familiarity, transportation problems, and discomfort. (SK)

  7. Trip report, Interagency Manufacturing Operations Group (IMOG) Steering Committee meeting, November 29, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.R.

    1989-12-06

    As the Subgroup Chairman for the Process Automation Control Technology Subgroup of IMOG, I was requested to attend the annual Steering Committee Meeting held this year at the Allied-Signal Kansas City Plant and summarize the past year's activities of the Subgroup. The next IMOG Steering Committee Meeting will be held November 14 and 15, 1990 in Los Alamos. The next Process Automation Control Technology Subgroup Meeting will be held in June, 1990 in Rocky Flats.

  8. COMMITTEES: Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    TAUP STEERING COMMITTEE F T Avignone, University of South Carolina B C Barish, CALTECH E Bellotti, University of Milano, INFN J Bernabeu, University of Valencia A Bottino (Chair), University of Torino, INFN N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN T Kajita, ICRR University of Tokyo C W Kim, Johns Hopkins University, KIAS V Matveev, INR Moscow J Morales, University of Zaragoza G Raffelt, MPI Munchen D Sinclair, University of Carleton M Spiro, IN2P3 TAUP 2009 INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE J J Aubert, CNRS Marseille M Baldo-Ceolin, University of Padova, INFN G Bellini, University of Milano, INFN L Bergstrom, University of Stockholm R Bernabei, University of Roma Tor Vergata, INFN A Bettini, University of Padova, INFN, LSC S Bilenky, JINR Dubna D O Caldwell, UCSB J Cronin, University of Chicago A Dar, Technion Haifa G Domogatsky, INR Moscow J Ellis, CERN E Fernandez, IFAE Barcelona E Fiorini, University of Milano, INFN T Gaisser, University of Delaware G Gelmini, UCLA G Gerbier, CEA Saclay A Giazotto, INFN Pisa F Halzen, University of Wisconsin W Haxton, University of Washington T Kirsten MPI Heidelberg L Maiani, University of Roma La Sapienza, INFN A McDonald, Queen's University K Nakamura, KEK R Petronzio, INFN, University of Roma Tor Vergata L Resvanis, University of Athens F Ronga INFN, LNF C Rubbia INFN, LNGS A Smirnov, ICTP Trieste C Spiering, DESY N Spooner, University of Sheffield A Suzuki, KEK S Ting MIT, CERN M S Turner, FNAL, University of Chicago J W F Valle, IFIC Valencia D Vignaud, APC Paris G Zatsepin, INR Moscow TAUP 2009 ORGANIZING COMMITTEE R Aloisio, LNGS R Antolini, LNGS F Arneodo, LNGS Z Berezhiani, University of L'Aquila, INFN V Berezinsky, LNGS R Cerulli, LNGS E Coccia [Chair], LNGS/INFN, U of Roma Tor Vergata N D'Ambrosio, LNGS N Fornengo, University of Torino, INFN M Laubenstein, LNGS O Palamara, LNGS L Pandola [Scientific Secretary], LNGS

  9. Compaction of DNA using C12EO4 cooperated with Fe(3.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Lu; Li, Guihua; Feng, Lei; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng

    2016-08-01

    Nonionic surfactant, tetraethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12EO4), cannot compact DNA because of its low efficiency in neutralizing the negative charges of the phosphate groups of DNA. It is also well-known that nonionic surfactants as a decompaction agent can help DNA be released from cationic surfactant aggregates. Herein, with the "bridge" Fe(3+) of C12EO4, we found that C12EO4 can efficiently compact DNA molecules into globular states with a narrow size distribution, indicating that the cooperative Fe(3+) can transform C12EO4 molecules from decompaction agents to compaction ones. The mechanism of the interaction of DNA and C12EO4 by "bridge" Fe(3+) is that the Fe(3+)-C12EO4 complexes act as multivalent ions by cooperative and hydrophobic interaction. The improved colloidal-stability and endosome escape effect induced by C12EO4 would provide the potential applications of nonionic surfactant in the physiological characteristics of DNA complexes. Cell viability assay demonstrates that Fe(3+)-C12EO4 complexes possess low cytotoxicity, ensuring good biocompatibility. Another advantage of this system is that the DNA complexes can be de-compacted by glutathione in cell without any other agents. This suggests the metal ion-nonionic surfactant complexes as compaction agent can act as the potential delivery tool of DNA in future nonviral gene delivery systems. PMID:27110911

  10. 75 FR 4904 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... status reports of August 14, 2009 (74 FR 41181). The 40th full RSAC Committee meeting was held September... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275) and was open for comment until... (73 FR 6370). The Task Force met on October 17-18, 2007, and reached consensus on draft rule text...

  11. 77 FR 3030 - Membership in the National Parks Overflights Advisory Group Aviation Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Rulemaking Committee ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: By Federal Register notice (See 76 FR 65319; October 20, 2011... vacancy representing Native American tribal concerns due to the incumbent member's completion of a three...: Background The National Parks Air Tour Management Act of 2000 (the Act) was enacted on April 5, 2000,...

  12. 78 FR 24289 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Airman Testing Standards and Training Working Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... processes that create a structured means of safety risk management decision making to identify, assess, and... the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http://DocketsInfo... ARAC Executive Committee accepted the FAA's assignment of a new task arising from recommendations...

  13. 78 FR 44619 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) Airman Testing Standards and Training Working Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... processes that create a structured means of safety risk management decision making to identify, assess, and... Privacy Act Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478... Executive Committee accepted the FAA's assignment of a new task arising from recommendations of the...

  14. Medically Fragile Children: Report from State Committee on Medically Fragile Child Referent Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Special Education Services.

    This report is the product of a committee charged to define "medically fragile," explore the array of educational services available and/or needed for children in Michigan considered medically fragile, identify current information and gaps in the information, and identify areas of interagency collaboration. The report discusses critical evolving…

  15. Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C12mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine.

    PubMed

    He, Yunfei; Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Zhenhai; Shao, Shuang; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C(12)mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine were investigated in terms of various experimental methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was shown that the aggregation of [C(12)mim]Br on DNA chains is motivated not only by electrostatic attractions between DNA phosphate groups and [C(12)mim]Br headgroups but also by hydrophobic interactions among [C(12)mim]Br alkyl chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis indicated that the [C(12)mim]Br aggregation in the presence and absence of DNA are both thermodynamically favored driven by enthalpy and entropy. DNA undergoes size transition and conformational change induced by [C(12)mim]Br, and the charges of DNA are neutralized by the added [C(12)mim]Br. Various microstructures were observed such as DNA with loose coil conformation in nature state, necklace-like structures, and compact spherical aggregates. MD simulation showed that the polyelectrolyte collapses upon the addition of oppositely charged surfactants and the aggregation of surfactants around the polyelectrolyte was reaffirmed. The simulation predicted the gradual neutralization of the negatively charged polyelectrolyte by the surfactant, consistent with the experimental results. PMID:23010047

  16. 77 FR 43808 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) as established by the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act (ATCA). NMFS is also soliciting.... Commissioners: a Bluefin Tuna Working Group, a Swordfish Working Group, a Sharks Working Group, a Billfish Working Group, and a Bigeye Tuna, Albacore, Yellowfin, and Skipjack (BAYS) Tunas Working Group....

  17. 75 FR 56055 - Advisory Committee and Species Working Group Technical Advisor Appointments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) as established by the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act of 1975 (ATCA). NMFS is also... Bluefin Tuna Working Group, a Swordfish and Sharks Working Group, a Billfish Working Group, and a BAYS (Bigeye, Albacore, Yellowfin, and Skipjack) Tunas Working Group. Technical Advisors to the species...

  18. Ensuring Resident Competence: A Narrative Review of the Literature on Group Decision Making to Inform the Work of Clinical Competency Committees.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Karen E; Cate, Olle Ten; Boscardin, Christy K; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric S; Chesluk, Benjamin; Baron, Robert B; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2016-05-01

    Background The expectation for graduate medical education programs to ensure that trainees are progressing toward competence for unsupervised practice prompted requirements for a committee to make decisions regarding residents' progress, termed a clinical competency committee (CCC). The literature on the composition of these committees and how they share information and render decisions can inform the work of CCCs by highlighting vulnerabilities and best practices. Objective We conducted a narrative review of the literature on group decision making that can help characterize the work of CCCs, including how they are populated and how they use information. Methods English language studies of group decision making in medical education, psychology, and organizational behavior were used. Results The results highlighted 2 major themes. Group member composition showcased the value placed on the complementarity of members' experience and lessons they had learned about performance review through their teaching and committee work. Group processes revealed strengths and limitations in groups' understanding of their work, leader role, and information-sharing procedures. Time pressure was a threat to the quality of group work. Conclusions Implications of the findings include the risks for committees that arise with homogeneous membership, limitations to available resident performance information, and processes that arise through experience rather than deriving from a well-articulated purpose of their work. Recommendations are presented to maximize the effectiveness of CCC processes, including their membership and access to, and interpretation of, information to yield evidence-based, well-reasoned judgments. PMID:27168881

  19. [Reorganization of the procedures and the tasks of the responsible ethics committees after the 12th AMG amendment. Concepts of the permanent working group of the medical ethics committees in Germany].

    PubMed

    Wessler, I; Burger, R; Doppelfeld, E

    2005-02-01

    Since 12(th) of August 2004 the EU Directive 2001/20/EG has been implemented into the national law. The 12th AMG amendment of 30 July 2004 and the good clinical practice decree on the conduct of clinical trials on drugs for human use of 9 August 2004 have been authorized and must be considered for new clinical trials with investigational medical products (drugs). The scope of the changes are to increase the quality of clinical trials and to continue the process of harmonization within the European Community. Based on the new law the sponsor has to apply for approval by the competent authority and for a favourable opinion by the responsible ethics committee. Both procedures are independent; a favourable opinion of the responsible ethics committee is a necessary condition before starting the trial. Thus, the role of the ethics committees has been changed; the committees are considered as an institution comparable to an authority to protect the rights and safety of human subjects involved in clinical trials. The permanent working group of the medical ethics committees in Germany has established a procedure to meet these requirements, particularly in the case of multicentre clinical trials, where only a single opinion shall be given for each member state. This article describes this procedure (application, process of ethical consideration among the leading and local ethics committees in multicentre trials, responsibilities during the trial). PMID:15726456

  20. Facile controlled synthesis of micro/nanostructure MCrO 4 (M = Ba, Pb) by using Gemini surfactant C 12-PEG-C 12 as a soft template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wengui; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Liu, Xue

    2010-04-01

    Gemini surfactants, double sodium α-sulfonic polyethylene glycol laurate (abbreviated C 12-PEG-C 12), were prepared and applied as soft templates in the controlled synthesis of BaCrO 4 and PbCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals. The template effects were investigated by adjusting the length of the spacer, using PEG400 and PEG4000, of the Gemini surfactant. The results indicated that the size and morphology of BaCrO 4 and PbCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals varied with the change in spacer length of C 12-PEG-C 12, suggesting that the different lengths of the polyethylene glycol group spacers in the Gemini surfactants played a key role in determining the size and shape of the MCrO 4 micro/nanoparticles. The dynamic process of the formation of the novel morphology BaCrO 4 crystals showed that the morphology grew from a round-bar polyhedron, to regular polyhedron, to approximate octahedron to a uniform pistachio nut shape. The growth mechanism of the BaCrO 4 micro/nanocrystals was explained that C 12-PEG-C 12 had a greater interfacial adsorption and would effectively control the shape evolution during the crystal growth, while PbCrO 4 could be explained that the Gemini surfactants can undergo liquid-crystalline phase transitions with long channels providing a soft template effect and derived the nanorods formation. Room temperature fluorescence spectra were studied and these showed that the pistachio-shaped BaCrO 4 microcrystals and PbCrO 4 nanorods possess photoactive luminescence properties with emission peaks at 470 and 549 nm, respectively.

  1. 77 FR 58608 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... (77 FR 55372), with comments due by November 6, 2012. No additional System Safety Task Group meetings... announcement of working group activities and status reports of April 23, 2012 (77 FR 24257). The 46th full RSAC... published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The...

  2. 76 FR 72997 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of December 7, 2010 (75 FR 76070). The 44th full..., 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The working group agreed upon... rescue access, was published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR 6370). The task force met on October 17-18,...

  3. Role of Advisory Groups. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., Middletown. Inst. of State and Regional Affairs.

    Presented is an instructor's manual for conducting a learning session about public participation in water quality planning. Participants in the session learn about the purpose, organization, and activities of citizen advisory groups. The manual, a component of the Working for Clean Water Project, is designed for use in conjunction with a…

  4. 75 FR 76070 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... (Railroad Bridge Safety Assurance) regarding bridge failure. Final rule published on July 15, 2010 (75 FR... announcement of working group activities and status reports of August 20, 2010 (75 FR 51525). The 42nd full... Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October...

  5. 77 FR 24257 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of November 28, 2011 (76 FR 72997). The 45th full... Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23... emergency communication, emergency egress, and rescue access, was published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR...

  6. 78 FR 52818 - Notice of Meeting of the National Parks Overflights Advisory Group Aviation Rulemaking Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... NPOAG be a balanced group of representatives of general aviation, commercial air tour operations... how the public may access this conference call in a ``listen mode'' will be posted on the FAA's ATMP.../headquarters_offices/arc/programs/air_tour_management_plan/ or through the Special Programs Staff,...

  7. 75 FR 51525 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of January 29, 2010 (75 FR 4904). The 41st full... October 11, 2005. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275... published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR 6370). The Task Force met on October 17-18, 2007, and reached...

  8. The C-12/C-13 Ratio as a Chemistry Indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirstroem, Eva; Geppert, Wolf; Persson, Carina; Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic ratios of elements are considered powerful tools, e.g. in tracing the origin of solar system body materials, or the degree of nucleosynthesis processing throughout the Galaxy. In interstellar molecules, some isotopic ratios like H/D and C-12/C-13 can also be used as indicators of their chemical origin. Isotope fractionation in gas-phase chemical reactions and gas-dust interaction makes observations of the ratio between C-12 and C-13 isotopologues suitable to distinguish between different formation scenarios. We will present observations of the C-12/C-13 ratio in methanol and formaldehyde towards a sample of embedded, massive young stellar objects. In relation to this we also present results from theoretical modeling showing the usefulness of the C-12/C-13 ratio as a chemistry indicator.

  9. C12 properties with evolved chiral three-nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Calci, A.; Langhammer, J.; Binder, S.; Roth, R.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate selected static and transition properties of C12 using ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) methods with chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions. We adopt the similarity renormalization group (SRG) to assist convergence including up to three-nucleon (3N) contributions. We examine the dependencies of the 12C observables on the SRG evolution scale and on the model-space parameters. We obtain nearly converged low-lying excitation spectra. We compare results of the full NCSM with the importance truncated NCSM in large model spaces for benchmarking purposes. We highlight the effects of the chiral 3N interaction on several spectroscopic observables. The agreement of some observables with experiment is improved significantly by the inclusion of 3N interactions, e.g., the B (M1) from the first JπT=1+1 state to the ground state. However, in some cases the agreement deteriorates, e.g., for the excitation energy of the first 1+0 state, leaving room for improved next-generation chiral Hamiltonians.

  10. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 53: quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B; Doppke, K; Hunt, M; Kutcher, G; Starkschall, G; Stern, R; Van Dyke, J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, the sophistication and complexity of clinical treatment planning and treatment planning systems has increased significantly, particularly including three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems, and the use of conformal treatment planning and delivery techniques. This has led to the need for a comprehensive set of quality assurance (QA) guidelines that can be applied to clinical treatment planning. This document is the report of Task Group 53 of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a comprehensive but viable program of quality assurance for modern radiotherapy treatment planning. The scope of the QA needs for treatment planning is quite broad, encompassing image-based definition of patient anatomy, 3D beam descriptions for complex beams including multileaf collimator apertures, 3D dose calculation algorithms, and complex plan evaluation tools including dose volume histograms. The Task Group recommends an organizational framework for the task of creating a QA program which is individualized to the needs of each institution and addresses the issues of acceptance testing, commissioning the planning system and planning process, routine quality assurance, and ongoing QA of the planning process. This report, while not prescribing specific QA tests, provides the framework and guidance to allow radiation oncology physicists to design comprehensive and practical treatment planning QA programs for their clinics. PMID:9800687

  11. Reports and recommendations from COSPAR Planetary Exploration Committee (PEX) & International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    In response to the growing importance of space exploration, the objectives of the COSPAR Panel on Exploration (PEX) are to provide high quality, independent science input to support the development of a global space exploration program while working to safeguard the scientific assets of solar system bodies. PEX engages with COSPAR Commissions and Panels, science foundations, IAA, IAF, UN bodies, and IISL to support in particular national and international space exploration working groups and the new era of planetary exploration. COSPAR's input, as gathered by PEX, is intended to express the consensus view of the international scientific community and should ultimately provide a series of guidelines to support future space exploration activities and cooperative efforts, leading to outstanding scientific discoveries, opportunities for innovation, strategic partnerships, technology progression, and inspiration for people of all ages and cultures worldwide. We shall focus on the lunar exploration aspects, where the COSPAR PEX is building on previous COSPAR, ILEWG and community conferences. An updated COSPAR PEX report is published and available online (Ehrenfreund P. et al, COSPAR planetary exploration panel report, http://www.gwu.edu/~spi/assets/COSPAR_PEX2012.pdf). We celebrate 20 years after the 1st International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon at Beatenberg in June 1994. The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established the year after in April 1995 at an EGS meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon (http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ ). It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and

  12. Working Group 7.1 on environmental transport, US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Progress report update

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1991-09-07

    This report contains brief summaries of the status of projects of the Environmental Transport Group of the US-USSR Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety. Projects reported on include: Management and Administration; Atmospheric Transport; Resuspension; External Dose; Terrestrial Food Chains; Aquatic Food Chains; Hydrological Transport; and Intercalibration

  13. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle Geiser, William; Heintz, Philip; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-11-15

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography.

  14. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151.

    PubMed

    Jones, A Kyle; Heintz, Philip; Geiser, William; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-11-01

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography. PMID:26520756

  15. Clinical use of electronic portal imaging: report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 58.

    PubMed

    Herman, M G; Balter, J M; Jaffray, D A; McGee, K P; Munro, P; Shalev, S; Van Herk, M; Wong, J W

    2001-05-01

    AAPM Task Group 58 was created to provide materials to help the medical physicist and colleagues succeed in the clinical implementation of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) in radiation oncology. This complex technology has matured over the past decade and is capable of being integrated into routine practice. However, the difficulties encountered during the specification, installation, and implementation process can be overwhelming. TG58 was charged with providing sufficient information to allow the users to overcome these difficulties and put EPIDs into routine clinical practice. In answering the charge, this report provides; comprehensive information about the physics and technology of currently available EPID systems; a detailed discussion of the steps required for successful clinical implementation, based on accumulated experience; a review of software tools available and clinical use protocols to enhance EPID utilization; and specific quality assurance requirements for initial and continuing clinical use of the systems. Specific recommendations are summarized to assist the reader with successful implementation and continuing use of an EPID. PMID:11393467

  16. Estimation of the mutual orientation and intermolecular interaction of C12Ex from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria; Tsoneva, Yana; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia

    2012-04-26

    Nonionic surfactants, such as poly(ethylene glycol) alkyl ethers (abbreviated as CyEx) show a rich phase behavior in aqueous solution, i.e., they form micellar, lamellar, cubic, and so forth phases depending on experimental parameters such as the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chain lengths, temperature, or concentration. The aim of the present study is to determine the nature of the preaggregates, which are inferred to exist before the actual self-assembly process in aqueous solution, and to assess the aptitude to their formation. The target molecules are C12E3, C12E4 and C12E5, surfactants of moderate water solubility. Coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (NPT/293 K) of two molecules of each species with explicit water in periodic boundary conditions are carried out to estimate the mutual orientation and the interaction between the surfactants in their dimers. The force fields are MARTINI and Amber99, the latter with self-derived parameters for the ether groups. The change in the orientation and distance between the molecules in the dimers are discussed based on different structural parameters. In addition, the interaction between the surfactants is evaluated from quantum chemistry calculations in terms of binding energy for the average structures from the cluster analysis. The solvent-solute interaction is quantified by the mean number of hydrogen bonds formed between them. On the basis of combined analysis, a series of different structures for subsequent study of the possible self-assembly patterns of C12E3, C12E4, and C12E5 is outlined. PMID:22448734

  17. Dodecylresorufin (C12R) Outperforms Resorufin in Microdroplet Bacterial Assays.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Ott; Kaminski, Tomasz S; Ruszczak, Artur; Garstecki, Piotr

    2016-05-11

    This paper proves that dodecylresorufin (C12R) outperforms resorufin (the conventional form of this dye) in droplet microfluidic bacterial assays. Resorufin is a marker dye that is widely used in different fields of microbiology and has increasingly been applied in droplet microfluidic assays and experiments. The main concern associated with resorufin in droplet-based systems is dye leakage into the oil phase and neighboring droplets. The leakage decreases the performance of assays because it causes averaging of the signal between the positive (bacteria-containing) and negative (empty) droplets. Here we show that C12R is a promising alternative to conventional resorufin because it maintains higher sensitivity, specificity, and signal-to-noise ratio over time. These characteristics make C12R a suitable reagent for droplet digital assays and for monitoring of microbial growth in droplets. PMID:27100211

  18. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, John P.; Antolak, John A.; Followill, David S.; Huq, M. Saiful; Klein, Eric E.; Lam, Kwok L.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Roback, Donald M.; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M.

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  19. Cyberinfrastructure Initiatives of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, K. R.; Faundeen, J. L.; Petiteville, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) was established in 1984 in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. CEOS participants are Members, who are national or international governmental organizations who operate civil spaceborne Earth observation satellites, and Associates who are governmental organizations with civil space programs in development or international scientific or governmental bodies who have an interest in and support CEOS objectives. The primary objective of CEOS is to optimize benefits of satellite Earth observations through cooperation of its participants in mission planning and in development of compatible data products, formats, services, applications and policies. To pursue its objectives, CEOS establishes working groups and associated subgroups that focus on relevant areas of interest. While the structure of CEOS has evolved over its lifetime, today there are three permanent working groups. One is the Working Group on Calibration and Validation that addresses sensor-specific calibration and validation and geophysical parameter validation. A second is the Working Group on Education, Training, and Capacity Building that facilitates activities that enhance international education and training in Earth observation techniques, data analysis, interpretation and applications, with a particular focus on developing countries. The third permanent working group is the Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS). The purpose of WGISS is to promote collaboration in the development of the systems and services based on international standards that manage and supply the Earth observation data and information from participating agencies' missions. WGISS places great emphasis on the use of demonstration projects involving user groups to solve the critical interoperability issues associated with the

  20. Myostatin stimulates, not inihibits, C2C12 myoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Buel D; Wiedeback, Benjamin D; Hoversten, Knut E; Jackson, Melissa F; Walker, Ryan G; Thompson, Thomas B

    2014-03-01

    The immortal C2C12 cell line originates from dystrophic mouse thigh muscle and has been used to study the endocrine control of muscle cell growth, development, and function, including those actions regulated by myostatin. Previous studies suggest that high concentrations of recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria inhibit C2C12 proliferation and differentiation. Recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotic systems similarly inhibits the proliferation of primary myosatellite cells, but consequently initiates, rather than inhibits, their differentiation and is bioactive at far lower concentrations. Our studies indicate that 2 different sources of recombinant myostatin made in eukaryotes stimulate, not inhibit, C2C12 proliferation. This effect occurred at different cell densities and serum concentrations and in the presence of IGF-I, a potent myoblast mitogen. This stimulatory effect was comparable to that obtained with TGFβ1, a related factor that also inhibits primary myosatellite cell proliferation. Attenuating the myostatin/activin (ie, Acvr2b) and TGFβ1 receptor signaling pathways with the Alk4/5 and Alk5 inhibitors, SB431542 and SB505142, respectively, similarly attenuated proliferation induced by serum, myostatin or TGFβ1 and in a dose-dependent manner. In serum-free medium, both myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulated Smad2 phosphorylation, but not that of Smad3, and a Smad3 inhibitor (SIS3) only inhibited proliferation in cells cultured in high serum. Thus, myostatin and TGFβ1 stimulate C2C12 proliferation primarily via Smad2. These results together question the physiological relevance of the C2C12 model and previous studies using recombinant myostatin generated in bacteria. They also support the alternative use of primary myosatellite cells and recombinant myostatin generated in eukaryotes. PMID:24424069

  1. Technology for improving cognitive function. A workshop sponsored by the US Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR): reports from working groups.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Cathy; Scherer, Marcia J

    2006-12-30

    The U.S. federal Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR) and its Subcommittee on Technology (IST) sponsored a state of the art workshop on "Technology for Improving Cognitive Function", from 29-30 June 2006 in Washington, D.C. This paper summarizes the content of the working groups charged with providing strategic direction for the future of technology for persons with cognitive disabilities. PMID:17178621

  2. High-spin molecular resonances in 12C + 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uegaki, E.; Abe, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Resonances observed in the 12C + 12C collisions are studied with a molecular model. At high spins J = 10-18, a stable dinuclear configuration is found to be an equator-equator touching one. Firstly, normal modes have been solved around the equilibrium, with spin J and K-quantum number being specified for rotation of the whole system. Secondly, with respect to large centrifugal energy, Coriolis coupling has been diagonalized among low-lying 11 states of normal-mode excitations, which brings K-mixing. The analyses of decay widths and excitation functions have been done. The molecular ground state exhibits alignments of the orbital angular momentum and the 12C spins, while some of the molecular excited states exhibit disalignments with small widths. Those results are surprisingly in good agreement with the experiments, which will light up a new physical picture of the highspin 12C + 12C resonances.

  3. 75 FR 51827 - Notice of a Meeting of a Working Group of the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Committee to the Director The purpose of this notice is to inform the public about a meeting of the NIH Blue... 3:30 p.m. This meeting is the third in a series of public meetings between the Blue Ribbon Panel and... Fennington, Senior Health Policy Analyst, Office of Biotechnology Activities, Office of Science...

  4. Committee of the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics Geometry Conference, Part III: Geometric Transformation Groups and Other Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Lincoln K., Ed.

    This is Part III of the first volume of the proceedings of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM) Geometry Conference, held at Santa Barbara in June, 1967. The purpose of the conference was to consider the status of geometry in colleges at the undergraduate level. The conference, attended by undergraduate mathematics…

  5. 41 CFR 102-3.40 - What types of committees or groups are not covered by the Act and this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... or this Federal Advisory Committee Management part: (a) Committees created by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). Any committee created by NAS...

  6. 41 CFR 102-3.40 - What types of committees or groups are not covered by the Act and this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or this Federal Advisory Committee Management part: (a) Committees created by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). Any committee created by NAS...

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.40 - What types of committees or groups are not covered by the Act and this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or this Federal Advisory Committee Management part: (a) Committees created by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). Any committee created by NAS...

  8. 40 CFR 721.3025 - Fatty acids C12-18, C18 unsaturated, C12-18 alkyl esters (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., C12-18 alkyl esters (generic). 721.3025 Section 721.3025 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... alkyl esters (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids C12-18, C18 unsaturated, C12-18 alkyl esters...

  9. The management of cancer-related breakthrough pain: recommendations of a task group of the Science Committee of the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew N; Dickman, Andrew; Reid, Colette; Stevens, Anna-Marie; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2009-04-01

    A task group of the Science Committee of the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland (APM) was convened to produce some up-to-date, evidence-based, practical, clinical guidelines on the management of cancer-related breakthrough pain in adults. On the basis of a review of the literature, the task group was unable to make recommendations about any individual interventions, but was able to make a series of 12 recommendations about certain generic strategies. However, most of the aforementioned recommendations are based on limited evidence (i.e., case series, expert opinion). The task group also proposed a definition of breakthrough pain, and some diagnostic criteria for breakthrough pain. PMID:18707904

  10. The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in Comet Halley

    SciTech Connect

    Wyckoff, S.; Lindholm, E.; Wehinger, P.A.; Peterson, B.A.; Zucconi, J.M.

    1989-04-01

    The individual (C-13)N rotational lines in Comet Halley are resolved using high-resolution spectra of the CN B2Sigma(+)-X2Sigma(+) (0,0) band. The observe C-12/C-13 abundance ratio excludes a site of origin for the comet near Uranus and Neptune and suggests a condensation environment quite distinct from other solar system bodies. Two theories are presented for the origin of Comet Halley. One theory suggest that the comet originated 4.5 Gyr ago in an inner Oort cloud at a heliocentric distance greater than 100 AU where chemical fractionation led to the C-13 enrichment in the CN parent molecule prior to condensation of the comet nucleus. According to the other, more plausible theory, the comet nucleus condensed relatively recently from the interstellar medium which has become enriches in C-13 and was subsequently gravitationally captured by the solar system. 107 refs.

  11. Effects of electrical stimulation in C2C12 muscle constructs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoungshin; Bhalla, Rajat; Saigal, Rajiv; Radisic, Milica; Watson, Nicki; Langer, Robert; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Electrical stimulation affects the deposition of extracellular matrices and cellular differentiation. Type I collagen is one of the most abundant extracellular matrix proteins; however, not much is known about the effects of electrical stimulation on collagen type I deposition in C2C12 cells. Thus, we studied the effects of electrical voltage and stimulation frequency in 3D cultured C2C12 muscle cells in terms of metabolic activity, type I collagen deposition and cell morphology. Electrically excitable C2C12 muscle cells were seeded in collagen scaffolds and stimulated with rectangular signals of voltage (2, 5, 7 V) and frequency (1, 2 Hz), using parallel carbon electrodes spaced 1 cm apart. Metabolic activity was quantified by the glucose: lactate concentration ratio in the medium. Apoptotic activity was assessed by TUNEL staining and changes in collagen deposition were identified by immunohistology. The ultrastructure of the tissue was examined by TEM. Glucose and lactate analysis indicated that all groups had similar metabolic activity. TUNEL stain showed no significant difference in apoptotic damage induced by electrical stimulation compared to the control. Samples stimulated at 2 Hz exhibited reduced collagen deposition compared to the control and 1 Hz stimulated samples. Muscle-protein marker desmin was highly expressed in constructs stimulated with 1 Hz/5 V sample. TEM revealed that the stimulated samples developed highly organized sarcomeres, which coincided with improved contractile properties in the 1 Hz/5 V- and 2 Hz/5 V-stimulated groups. Our data implicate that a specific electrical frequency may modulate type I collagen accumulation and a specific voltage may affect the differentiation of muscle sarcomeres in excitable cells. PMID:18512267

  12. 40 CFR 721.10007 - Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohols, C12-14-secondary... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10007 Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated... identified as alcohols, C12-14- secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated (PMN P-00-11; CAS No. 103331-86-8)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10007 - Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohols, C12-14-secondary... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10007 Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated... identified as alcohols, C12-14- secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated (PMN P-00-11; CAS No. 103331-86-8)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  15. 40 CFR 721.644 - Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates... Substances § 721.644 Amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as amines, C12-14-tert-alkyl, sulfonates...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10007 - Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohols, C12-14-secondary... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10007 Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated... identified as alcohols, C12-14- secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated (PMN P-00-11; CAS No. 103331-86-8)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10007 - Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohols, C12-14-secondary... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10007 Alcohols, C12-14-secondary, ethoxylated... identified as alcohols, C12-14- secondary, ethoxylated propoxylated (PMN P-00-11; CAS No. 103331-86-8)...

  18. Stability of C(12)E(j) Bilayers Probed with Adhesive Droplets.

    PubMed

    Astafyeva, Ksenia; Urbach, Wladimir; Garroum, Nabil; Taulier, Nicolas; Thiam, Abdou R

    2015-06-23

    The stability of model surfactant bilayers from the poly(ethylene glycol) mono-n-dodecyl ether (C12Ej) family was probed. The surfactant bilayers were formed by the adhesion of emulsion droplets. We generated C12Ej bilayers by forming water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions with saline water droplets, covered by the surfactant, in a silicone and octane oil mixture. Using microfluidics, we studied the stability of those bilayers. C12E1 allowed only short-lived bilayers whereas C12E2 bilayers were stable over a wide range of oil mixtures. At high C12E2 concentration, a two-phase region was displayed in the phase diagram: bilayers formed by the adhesion of two water droplets and Janus-like particles consisting of adhering aqueous and amphiphilic droplets. C12E8 and C12E25 did not mediate bilayer formation and caused phase inversion leading to o/w emulsion. With intermediate C12E4 and C12E5 surfactants, both w/o and o/w emulsions were unstable. We provided the titration of the C12E2 bilayer with C12E4 and C12E5 to study and predict their stability behavior. PMID:26035626

  19. Secondary organic aerosol composition from C12 alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schilling Fahnestock, Katherine A; Yee, Lindsay D; Loza, Christine L; Coggon, Matthew M; Schwantes, Rebecca; Zhang, Xuan; Dalleska, Nathan F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-05-14

    The effects of structure, NOx conditions, relative humidity, and aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are reported for the photooxidation of three C12 alkanes: n-dodecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane. Acidity was modified through seed particle composition: NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4 + H2SO4. Off-line analysis of SOA was carried out by solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry. We report here 750 individual masses of SOA products identified from these three alkane systems and 324 isomers resolved by GC/MS analysis. The chemical compositions for each alkane system provide compelling evidence of particle-phase chemistry, including reactions leading to oligomer formation. Major oligomeric species for alkane SOA are peroxyhemiacetals, hemiacetals, esters, and aldol condensation products. Furans, dihydrofurans, hydroxycarbonyls, and their corresponding imine analogues are important participants in these oligomer-producing reactions. Imines are formed in the particle phase from the reaction of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol with carbonyl-bearing compounds present in all the SOA systems. Under high-NO conditions, organonitrate products can lead to an increase of aerosol volume concentration by up to a factor of 5 over that in low-NO conditions. Structure was found to play a key role in determining the degree of functionalization and fragmentation of the parent alkane, influencing the mean molecular weight of the SOA produced and the mean atomic O:C ratio. PMID:24814371

  20. 76 FR 60811 - Notice of Advisory Committee Closed Meeting; U.S. Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    .... SUMMARY: On August 23, 2011 (76 FR 52642), the United States Strategic Command Strategic Advisory Group... Center, Building 432, 906 SAC Boulevard, Offutt Air Force Base (AFB), Nebraska 68113. Pursuant to...

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy of metallocarbohedrenes M8C12- (M=Ti, V, Cr, ZR, NB)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, San; Wu, Hongbin; Li, Xi; Ding, Chuanfan

    1997-12-31

    Photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have been performed on five metallocarbohedrene (met-car) anions, Ti8C12-, V8C12-, Cr8C12-, Zr8C12-, Nb8C12-. These met-car anions were produced by two different methods. We found that the Ti and Zr met-cars show unusually low electron affinities (EAs) and the EAs increase from Ti to Cr met-cars. The observed photoelectron spectra and the electronic structure of the met-cars are interpreted using existing theoretical calculations.

  2. Astragalus Polysaccharide Inhibits Autophagy and Apoptosis from Peroxide-Induced Injury in C2C12 Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi; Lu, Lu; Wang, Dongtao; Shi, Ying; Wang, Ming; Huang, Yanfeng; Chen, Dexiu; Deng, Cong; Chen, Jiebin; Lv, Peijia; Wang, Yanjing; Li, Chengjie; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2015-11-01

    The aim is to study the effects and underlying mechanisms of astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on the peroxide-induced injury in C2C12 myoblasts in vitro. Cell viability in the presence or absence of APS was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay. The autophagosomes were observed by electron microscopy to examine the influence of APS on autophagy caused by H2O2 in C2C12 cells, and the percentage of apoptosis cells was measured by flow cytometry. To further confirm the effect of H2O2 on C2C12 cells, the protein expression of LC3 and RARP, which are the markers of autophagy and apoptosis, respectively, was analyzed by Western blot, as well as the expression levels of p-p70S6K, p70S6K, Bcl-2, Bax, cyto-C, and Caspase-3, to reveal the underlying mechanisms. We observed multiple effects of APS on C2C12 functionality. APS treatment of C2C12 cells at 1 mg/mL reduced cell viability to less than 70 %, and analysis by electron microscopy revealed that APS also reduced the number of H2O2-induced autophagosome formation. Similarly, APS abated the H2O2-mediated increase in cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the inhibition of LC3 II and RARP that are normally upregulated by H2O2. The expression of p-p70S6K and p70S6K, however, remained unchanged in C2C12 cells in the Control, H2O2 and H2O2 + APS groups. In addition, APS promoted the expression of protein Bcl-2 in H2O2-treated C2C12 cells, but did not change Bax, thus reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio that in turn prevented the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3. APS inhibits the autophagy and apoptosis induced by peroxide injury in C2C12 myoblasts through two independent signaling pathways: the mTOR-independent pathway for the inhibition of autophagy, and the caspase-3-dependent pathway for the suppression of apoptosis. PMID:27352334

  3. AGU Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Administrative Committees are responsible for those functions required for the overall performance or well-being of AGU as an organization. These committees are Audit and Legal Affairs, Budget and Finance*, Development, Nominations*, Planning, Statutes and Bylaws*, Tellers.Operating Committees are responsible for the policy direction and operational oversight of AGU's primary programs. The Operating Committees are Education and Human Resources, Fellows*, Information Technology, International Participation*, Meetings, Public Affairs, Public Information, Publications*.

  4. Progress report, Working Group 7.1 on Environmental Transport, US- USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1992-04-01

    Working Group 7.1 on Environmental Transport began functioning in preparation for the first joint meeting with Soviet scientists in September 1989. Progress is described in the following areas: Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling; Wind-Driven Resuspension of Toxic Aerosols; External Exposure and Dose from Deposited Radionuclides; Transfer of Radionuclides Through Terrestrial Food Chains and the Resulting Dose to Man; Long-Term Dose from the Contamination of Aquatic Food Chains; Modeling the Behavior of Radionuclides in a Soil-Aquatic System Including Rivers and Reservoirs; Intercalibration of Methods for Measuring Radioactive Contaminants in the Environment.

  5. Progress report, Working Group 7. 1 on Environmental Transport, US- USSR Joint Coordinating Committee on Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.

    1992-04-01

    Working Group 7.1 on Environmental Transport began functioning in preparation for the first joint meeting with Soviet scientists in September 1989. Progress is described in the following areas: Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling; Wind-Driven Resuspension of Toxic Aerosols; External Exposure and Dose from Deposited Radionuclides; Transfer of Radionuclides Through Terrestrial Food Chains and the Resulting Dose to Man; Long-Term Dose from the Contamination of Aquatic Food Chains; Modeling the Behavior of Radionuclides in a Soil-Aquatic System Including Rivers and Reservoirs; Intercalibration of Methods for Measuring Radioactive Contaminants in the Environment.

  6. Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72.

    PubMed

    Beddar, A Sam; Biggs, Peter J; Chang, Sha; Ezzell, Gary A; Faddegon, Bruce A; Hensley, Frank W; Mills, Michael D

    2006-05-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT, (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems. PMID:16752582

  7. Conference Committees: Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-09-01

    International Programm Committee (IPC) Harald Ade NCSU Sadao Aoki University Tsukuba David Attwood Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/CXRO Christian David Paul Scherrer Institut Peter Fischer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Adam Hitchcock McMaster University Chris Jacobsen SUNY, Stony Brook Denis Joyeux Lab Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique Yasushi Kagoshima University of Hyogo Hiroshi Kihara Kansai Medical University Janos Kirz SUNY Stony Brook Maya Kiskinova ELETTRA Ian McNulty Argonne National Lab/APS Alan Michette Kings College London Graeme Morrison Kings College London Keith Nugent University of Melbourne Zhu Peiping BSRF Institute of High Energy Physics Francois Polack Soleil Christoph Quitmann Paul Scherrer Institut Günther Schmahl University Göttingen Gerd Schneider Bessy Hyun-Joon Shin Pohang Accelerator Lab Jean Susini ESRF Mau-Tsu Tang NSRRC Tony Warwick Lawrence Berkeley Lab/ALS Local Organizing Committee Christoph Quitmann Chair, Scientific Program Charlotte Heer Secretary Christian David Scientific Program Frithjof Nolting Scientific Program Franz Pfeiffer Scientific Program Marco Stampanoni Scientific Program Robert Rudolph Sponsoring, Financials Alfred Waser Industry Exhibition Robert Keller Public Relation Markus Knecht Computing and WWW Annick Cavedon Proceedings and Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Margrit Eichler Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Kathy Eikenberry Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program Marlies Locher Excursions and Accompanying Persons Program

  8. Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems: Report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 68

    SciTech Connect

    Lightstone, A.W.; Benedict, Stanley H.; Bova, Frank J.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Stern, Robin L.

    2005-07-15

    Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems (ISPSs) are used to position patients prior to precise radiation treatment of localized lesions of the brain. Often, the lesion is located in close proximity to critical anatomic features whose functions should be maintained. Many types of ISPSs have been described in the literature and are commercially available. These are briefly reviewed. ISPS systems provide two critical functions. The first is to establish a coordinate system upon which a guided therapy can be applied. The second is to provide a method to reapply the coordinate system to the patient such that the coordinates assigned to the patient's anatomy are identical from application to application. Without limiting this study to any particular approach to ISPSs, this report introduces nomenclature and suggests performance tests to quantify both the stability of the ISPS to map diagnostic data to a coordinate system, as well as the ISPS's ability to be realigned to the patient's anatomy. For users who desire to develop a new ISPS system, it may be necessary for the clinical team to establish the accuracy and precision of each of these functions. For commercially available systems that have demonstrated an acceptable level of accuracy and precision, the clinical team may need to demonstrate local ability to apply the system in a manner consistent with that employed during the published testing. The level of accuracy and precision required of an individual ISPS system is dependent upon the clinical protocol (e.g., fractionation, margin, pathology, etc.). Each clinical team should provide routine quality assurance procedures that are sufficient to support the assumptions of accuracy and precision used during the planning process. The testing of ISPS systems can be grouped into two broad categories, type testing, which occurs prior to general commercialization, and site testing, performed when a commercial system is installed at a clinic. Guidelines to help select

  9. Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems: Report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group no. 68.

    PubMed

    Lightstone, A W; Benedict, Stanley H; Bova, Frank J; Solberg, Timothy D; Stern, Robin L

    2005-07-01

    Intracranial stereotactic positioning systems (ISPSs) are used to position patients prior to precise radiation treatment of localized lesions of the brain. Often, the lesion is located in close proximity to critical anatomic features whose functions should be maintained. Many types of ISPSs have been described in the literature and are commercially available. These are briefly reviewed. ISPS systems provide two critical functions. The first is to establish a coordinate system upon which a guided therapy can be applied. The second is to provide a method to reapply the coordinate system to the patient such that the coordinates assigned to the patient's anatomy are identical from application to application. Without limiting this study to any particular approach to ISPSs, this report introduces nomenclature and suggests performance tests to quantify both the stability of the ISPS to map diagnostic data to a coordinate system, as well as the ISPS's ability to be realigned to the patient's anatomy. For users who desire to develop a new ISPS system, it may be necessary for the clinical team to establish the accuracy and precision of each of these functions. For commercially available systems that have demonstrated an acceptable level of accuracy and precision, the clinical team may need to demonstrate local ability to apply the system in a manner consistent with that employed during the published testing. The level of accuracy and precision required of an individual ISPS system is dependent upon the clinical protocol (e.g., fractionation, margin, pathology, etc.). Each clinical team should provide routine quality assurance procedures that are sufficient to support the assumptions of accuracy and precision used during the planning process. The testing of ISPS systems can be grouped into two broad categories, type testing, which occurs prior to general commercialization, and site testing, performed when a commercial system is installed at a clinic. Guidelines to help select

  10. Prevalence and Clinical Impact of Anaplasia in Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee for the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Qualman, Stephen; Lynch, James; Bridge, Julia; Parham, David; Teot, Lisa; Meyer, William; Pappo, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Anapalsia is rare in childhood rhabdomyosarcoma and has not been included in the International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma (ICR). A recent review of cases from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) suggests that anaplasia might be more common than previously reported and may impact clinical outcome. Materials and Methods The prevalence of anaplasia (focal or diffuse) was prospectively assessed in 546 eligible cases who were registered in an Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group (IRSG) or COG therapeutic trial from 1995–1998. The incidence of anaplasia in tumor samples and its impact in predicting clinical outcome was assessed. Results Overall 71 (13%) of all samples analyzed had anaplasia. Anaplasia was more common in patients with tumors in favorable sites and was less commonly seen in younger patients and in those with stage 2, 3 or clinical Group III disease. Regardless of its distribution (focal or diffuse), on univariate analysis the presence of anaplasia had a significant negative impact for both failure-free survival (FFS: 63% vs 77% at 5 years) and survival (S: 68% vs 82% at 5 years) in patients with embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. This effect was most pronounced in children with intermediate risk disease. Using multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio was 1.6 for FFS (p=0.085) and 1.7 for overall survival (p=0.081). Anaplasia did not affect outcome in patients with alveolar tumors. Conclusion The incidence of anaplasia in rhabdomyosarcoma is higher than previously described and may be of prognostic significance in children with intermediate risk embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:18985676

  11. Monte Carlo reference data sets for imaging research: Executive summary of the report of AAPM Research Committee Task Group 195.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Ali, Elsayed S M; Badal, Andreu; Badano, Aldo; Boone, John M; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McMillan, Kyle L; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Rogers, D W O; Samei, Ehsan; Turner, Adam C

    2015-10-01

    The use of Monte Carlo simulations in diagnostic medical imaging research is widespread due to its flexibility and ability to estimate quantities that are challenging to measure empirically. However, any new Monte Carlo simulation code needs to be validated before it can be used reliably. The type and degree of validation required depends on the goals of the research project, but, typically, such validation involves either comparison of simulation results to physical measurements or to previously published results obtained with established Monte Carlo codes. The former is complicated due to nuances of experimental conditions and uncertainty, while the latter is challenging due to typical graphical presentation and lack of simulation details in previous publications. In addition, entering the field of Monte Carlo simulations in general involves a steep learning curve. It is not a simple task to learn how to program and interpret a Monte Carlo simulation, even when using one of the publicly available code packages. This Task Group report provides a common reference for benchmarking Monte Carlo simulations across a range of Monte Carlo codes and simulation scenarios. In the report, all simulation conditions are provided for six different Monte Carlo simulation cases that involve common x-ray based imaging research areas. The results obtained for the six cases using four publicly available Monte Carlo software packages are included in tabular form. In addition to a full description of all simulation conditions and results, a discussion and comparison of results among the Monte Carlo packages and the lessons learned during the compilation of these results are included. This abridged version of the report includes only an introductory description of the six cases and a brief example of the results of one of the cases. This work provides an investigator the necessary information to benchmark his/her Monte Carlo simulation software against the reference cases included here

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-associated homoserine lactone C12 rapidly activates apoptosis in airway epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, Christian; Fu, Zhu; Patanwala, Maria; Hum, Lauren; Lopez-Guzman, Mirielle; Illek, Beate; Kong, Weidong; Lynch, Susan V.; Machen, Terry E.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) forms biofilms in lungs of cystic fibrosis CF) patients, a process regulated by quorum sensing molecules including N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone, C12. C12 (10–100 μM) rapidly triggered events commonly associated with the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in JME (CFΔF508CFTR, nasal surface) epithelial cells: depolarization of mitochondrial (mito) membrane potential (Δψmito) and release of cytochrome C (cytoC) from mitos into cytosol and activation of caspases 3/7, 8 and 9. C12 also had novel effects on the endoplasmic reticulum (release of both Ca2+ and ER-targeted GFP and oxidized contents into the cytosol). Effects began within 5 minutes and were complete in 1–2 hrs. C12 caused similar activation of caspases and release of cytoC from mitos in Calu-3 (wtCFTR, bronchial gland) cells, showing that C12-triggered responses occurred similarly in different airway epithelial types. C12 had nearly identical effects on three key aspects of the apoptosis response (caspase 3/7, depolarization of Δψmito and reduction of redox potential in the ER) in JME and CFTR-corrected JME cells (adenoviral expression), showing that CFTR was likely not an important regulator of C12-triggered apoptosis in airway epithelia. Exposure of airway cultures to biofilms from PAO1wt caused depolarization of Δψmito and increases in Cacyto like 10–50 μM C12. In contrast, biofilms from PAO1ΔlasI (C12 deficient) had no effect, suggesting that C12 from P. aeruginosa biofilms may contribute to accumulation of apoptotic cells that cannot be cleared from CF lungs. A model to explain the effects of C12 is proposed. PMID:22233488

  13. A Novel Compound C12 Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Protects from Inflammatory Injury In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Li, Jianling; Zhang, Yali; Ye, Faqing; Yang, Shulin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases. Although steroids and cyclooxygenase inhibitors are main anti-inflammatory therapeutical agents, they may cause serious side effects. Therefore, developing non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents is urgently needed. A novel hydrosoluble compound, C12 (2,6-bis(4-(3-(dimethylamino)-propoxy)benzylidene)cyclohexanone), has been designed and synthesized as an anti-inflammatory agent in our previous study. In the present study, we investigated whether C12 can affect inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo. In mouse primary peritoneal macrophages, C12 potently inhibited the production of the proinflammatory gene expression including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and PGE synthase. The activity of C12 was partly dependent on inhibition of ERK/JNK (but p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. In vivo, C12 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in plasma and liver, attenuated lung histopathology, and significantly reduced mortality in endotoxemic mice. In addition, the pre-treatment with C12 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Taken together, C12 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects. These findings, coupled with the low toxicity and hydrosolubility of C12, suggests that this agent may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:21931698

  14. Independent ethical review of studies involving personal medical records. Report of a working group to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    There is a duty to use available information for the general good where this can be done without detriment. It is, in principle, ethically acceptable to use personal medical records without approaching or involving the patients concerned, provided that confidentiality and anonymity are preserved; such use does not require independent ethical approval provided that confidentiality is assured and subject to safeguards described below. Epidemiologists have a special interest in the use of personal medical records in their work (in this context the use of health-related registers and existing biological samples may be included), though access to such data involves professional staff in all medical specialties, not only those in epidemiology. The following guidance is based on a report of a working group (which included non-medical members) to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine. Activities such as medical audit, epidemiological surveillance, inquiries designed to establish indices of morbidity and mortality and outbreak investigations all constitute medical practice and as such do not require independent ethical review. Research involving access to medical records, health-related registers, or existing biological samples only, without direct patient involvement, requires neither explicit individual patient consent nor independent ethical review provided that: a) explicit consent to access a person's records is obtained either from official custodians of the records (who have a duty to satisfy themselves as to the bona fides and competence of the investigator) or from the patient's clinician: the decision to access personal medical information should not be left to the sole discretion of the investigator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7807434

  15. Structures and electronic properties of C12Si8X8 (X = H, F, and Cl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, F.

    2016-07-01

    The structural stabilities and electronic properties of C12Si8X8 where X = H, F, and Cl are probed on the basis of density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G**//B3LYP/6-31+G* level. Vibrational frequency calculations show that all the systems are true minima. The infrared spectra of the most stable C12Si8X8 molecules are simulated to assist further experimental characterization. The functionalized structures and energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital, HOMO, and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, LUMO, have been systematically investigated. It seems that C12Si8H8 has more stability against electronic excitations via increasing the HOMO-LUMO gap comparing with C12Si8Cl8 and C12Si8F8. High charge transfer on the surfaces of our stable compounds, provokes further investigations on their possible application for hydrogen storage. The addition reaction energies of C12Si8X8 are high exothermic, and C12Si8F8 is more thermodynamically accessible.

  16. Glycogenome expression dynamics during mouse C2C12 myoblast differentiation suggests a sequential reorganization of membrane glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Janot, Mathilde; Audfray, Aymeric; Loriol, Céline; Germot, Agnès; Maftah, Abderrahman; Dupuy, Fabrice

    2009-01-01

    Background Several global transcriptomic and proteomic approaches have been applied in order to obtain new molecular insights on skeletal myogenesis, but none has generated any specific data on glycogenome expression, and thus on the role of glycan structures in this process, despite the involvement of glycoconjugates in various biological events including differentiation and development. In the present study, a quantitative real-time RT-PCR technology was used to profile the dynamic expression of 375 glycogenes during the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. Results Of the 276 genes expressed, 95 exhibited altered mRNA expression when C2C12 cells differentiated and 37 displayed more than 4-fold up- or down-regulations. Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Component Analysis of the expression dynamics identified three groups of coordinately and sequentially regulated genes. The first group included 12 down-regulated genes, the second group four genes with an expression peak at 24 h of differentiation, and the last 21 up-regulated genes. These genes mainly encode cell adhesion molecules and key enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glycosaminoglycans and glycolipids (neolactoseries, lactoseries and ganglioseries), providing a clearer indication of how the plasma membrane and extracellular matrix may be modified prior to cell fusion. In particular, an increase in the quantity of ganglioside GM3 at the cell surface of myoblasts is suggestive of its potential role during the initial steps of myogenic differentiation. Conclusion For the first time, these results provide a broad description of the expression dynamics of glycogenes during C2C12 differentiation. Among the 37 highly deregulated glycogenes, 29 had never been associated with myogenesis. Their biological functions suggest new roles for glycans in skeletal myogenesis. PMID:19843320

  17. C-13O-16/C-12O-18 ratios in nine H II regions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penzias, A. A.; Jefferts, K. B.; Wilson, R. W.; Liszt, H. S.; Solomon, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of carbon monoxide spectra in sources where the C-12O-18 line is observed at an intensity typically about one-sixth that of the C-13O-16 line. This pair of lines affords the opportunity of studying the relative abundance of their constituents, especially the astrophysically important C-12/C-13 ratio. Data are presented on a total of nine sources which together constitute a reasonable sample of the regions with strong molecular spectra.

  18. How to Teach Small Group Decision-Making in a Basic Business Communication Class. 1981 American Business Communication Association National Committee Report. Unit III. Research and Methodology. Teaching Methodology and Concepts Committee--Subcommittee--3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Business Communication Association, Urbana, IL.

    College business communication courses should assist students to learn both how small groups make decisions and how to facilitate small group discussions. Through a unit on small group decision making, the student should be able to understand the role of small groups in organizations, the process of decision making in groups, and the importance of…

  19. CRF Type 2 Receptors Mediate the Metabolic Effects of Ghrelin in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Eran; Vale, Wylie W

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ghrelin is known to regulate appetite control and cellular metabolism. The Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) family is also known to regulate energy balance. In this study, we investigated the links between ghrelin and the CRF family in C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line. Design and methods C2C12 cells were treated with ghrelin in the presence or absence of CRF receptor antagonists and then subjected to different metabolic analyses. Results Ghrelin enhanced glucose uptake by C2C12 cells, induced GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and decreased RBP4 expression. A CRF-R2 selective antagonist, anti-sauvagine-30, blocked ghrelin-induced glucose uptake, Ghrelin upregulated CRF-R2 but not CRF-R1 levels. Moreover, ghrelin-treated C2C12 cells displayed a cAMP and pERK activation in response to Ucn3, a CRF-R2 specific ligand, but not in response to CRF or stressin, CRF-R1 specific ligands. Ghrelin also induced UCP2 and UCP3 expression, which were blocked by anti-sauvagine-30. Ghrelin did not induce fatty acids uptake by C2C12 cells or ACC expression. Even though C2C12 cells clearly exhibited responses to ghrelin, the known ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, was not detectable in C2C12 cells. Conclusion Our results suggest that, ghrelin plays a role in regulating muscle glucose and, raise the possibility that suppression of the CRF-R2 pathway might provide benefits in high ghrelin states. PMID:23804489

  20. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  1. Folic acid promotes the myogenic differentiation of C2C12 murine myoblasts through the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kang, Yong Jung; Sung, Bokyung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Yujin; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Kim, Cheol Min; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-10-01

    Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin in the B-complex group, and an exogenous intake is required for health, growth and development. As a precursor to co-factors, folic acid is required for one-carbon donors in the synthesis of DNA bases and other essential biomolecules. A lack of dietary folic acid can lead to folic acid deficiency and can therefore result in several health problems, including macrocytic anemia, elevated plasma homocysteine levels, cardiovascular disease, birth defects, carcinogenesis, muscle weakness and difficulty in walking. Previous studies have indicated that folic acid exerts a positive effect on skeletal muscle functions. However, the precise role of folic acid in skeletal muscle cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Thus, in the present study, we examined the effects of folic acid on neo-myotube maturation and differentiation using C2C12 murine myoblasts. We found that folic acid promoted the formation of multinucleated myotubes, and increased the fusion index and creatine kinase (CK) activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that the expression levels of the muscle-specific marker, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as those of the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), MyoD and myogenin, were increased in the folic acid-treated myotubes during myogenic differentiation. Folic acid also promoted the activation of the Akt pathway, and this effect was inhibited by treatment of the C2C12 cells with LY294002 (Akt inhibitor). Blocking of the Akt pathway with a specific inhibitor revealed that it was necessary for mediating the stimulatory effects of folic acid on muscle cell differentiation and fusion. Taken together, our data suggest that folic acid promotes the differentiation of C2C12 cells through the activation of the Akt pathway. PMID:26310574

  2. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  7. First direct measurement of 12C(12C,n)23Mg at stellar energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Fang, X.; Heger, A.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Alongi, A.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Beard, M.; Best, A.; Browne, J.; Cahillane, C.; Couder, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Kontos, A.; Lamm, L.; Li, Y. J.; Long, A.; Lu, W.; Lyons, S.; Notani, M.; Patel, D.; Paul, N.; Pignatari, M.; Roberts, A.; Robertson, D.; Smith, K.; Stech, E.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W. P.; Wiescher, M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    Neutrons produced by the carbon fusion reaction 12C(12C,n)23Mg play an important role in stellar nucleosynthesis. Past studies have shown large discrepancies between experimental data and theory, leading to an uncertain cross section extrapolation at astrophysical energies. We present the first direct measurement which extends deep into the astrophysical energy range along with a new and improved extrapolation technique based on experimental data from the mirror reaction 12C(12C,p)23Na. The new reaction rate has been determined with a well-defined uncertainty which exceeds the precision required by astrophysics models. Using our constrained rate, we find that 12C(12C,n)23Mg is crucial to the production of Na and Al in Pop-III Pair Instability Supernovae.

  8. The closo-Si12C12 molecule from cluster to crystal: A theoretical prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2016-03-01

    The structure of closo-Si12C12 is unique among stable SinCm isomers (n, m > 4) because of its high symmetry, π-π stacking of C6 rings and unsaturated silicon atoms at symmetrical peripheral positions. Dimerization potential surfaces reveal various dimerization reactions that form between two closo-Si12C12 molecules through Si-Si bonds at unsaturated Si atoms. As a result the closo-Si12C12 molecule is capable of polymerization to form stable 1D polymer chains, 2D crystal layers, and 3D crystals. 2D crystal structures formed by side-side polymerization satisfy eight Si valences on each monomer without large distortion of the monomer structure. 3D crystals are formed by stacking 2D structures in the Z direction, preserving registry of C6 rings in monomer moiety.

  9. Modeling Myotonic Dystrophy 1 in C2C12 Myoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Dong, Wei; Shen, Xiaopeng; Peng, Xiaoping; Aceves, Angie G; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a common form of muscular dystrophy. Although several animal models have been established for DM1, myoblast cell models are still important because they offer an efficient cellular alternative for studying cellular and molecular events. Though C2C12 myoblast cells have been widely used to study myogenesis, resistance to gene transfection, or viral transduction, hinders research in C2C12 cells. Here, we describe an optimized protocol that includes daily maintenance, transfection and transduction procedures to introduce genes into C2C12 myoblasts and the induction of myocyte differentiation. Collectively, these procedures enable best transfection/transduction efficiencies, as well as consistent differentiation outcomes. The protocol described in establishing DM1 myoblast cell models would benefit the study of myotonic dystrophy, as well as other muscular diseases. PMID:27501221

  10. Fusion measurements of 12C+12C at energies of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Alcorta, M.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Avila, M. L.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Back, B. B.; Bourgin, D.; Bucher, B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Courtin, S.; David, H. M.; Deibel, C. M.; Dickerson, C.; DiGiovine, B.; Fang, X.; Greene, J. P.; Haas, F.; Henderson, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Jenkins, D.; Lai, J.; Lauritsen, T.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Montanari, D.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Tang, X. D.; Ugalde, C.; Zhu, S.

    2016-05-01

    The cross section of the 12C+12C fusion reaction at low energies is of paramount importance for models of stellar nucleosynthesis in different astrophysical scenarios, such as Type Ia supernovae and Xray superbursts, where this reaction is a primary route for the production of heavier elements. In a series of experiments performed at Argonne National Laboratory, using Gammasphere and an array of Silicon detectors, measurements of the fusion cross section of 12C+12C were successfully carried out with the γ and charged-particle coincidence technique in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 MeV. These were the first background-free fusion cross section measurements for 12C+12C at energies of astrophysical interest. Our results are consistent with previous measurements in the high-energy region; however, our lowest energy measurement indicates a fusion cross section slightly lower than those obtained with other techniques.

  11. Characterization of an acute muscle contraction model using cultured C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Miyatake, Shouta; Takagi, Mayumi; Nakamura, Mio; Okeda, Ai; Nakano, Taemi; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2012-01-01

    A cultured C2C12 myotube contraction system was examined for application as a model for acute contraction-induced phenotypes of skeletal muscle. C2C12 myotubes seeded into 4-well rectangular plates were placed in a contraction system equipped with a carbon electrode at each end. The myotubes were stimulated with electric pulses of 50 V at 1 Hz for 3 ms at 997-ms intervals. Approximately 80% of the myotubes were observed to contract microscopically, and the contractions lasted for at least 3 h with electrical stimulation. Calcium ion (Ca²⁺) transient evoked by the electric pulses was detected fluorescently with Fluo-8. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt (Akt), 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)1/2, which are intracellular signaling proteins typically activated in exercised/contracted skeletal muscle, was observed in the electrically stimulated C2C12 myotubes. The contractions induced by the electric pulses increased glucose uptake and depleted glycogen in the C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 myotubes that differentiated after exogenous gene transfection by a lipofection or an electroporation method retained their normal contractile ability by electrical stimulation. These findings show that our C2C12 cell contraction system reproduces the muscle phenotypes that arise invivo (exercise), in situ (hindlimb muscles in an anesthetized animal), and invitro (dissected muscle tissues in incubation buffer) by acute muscle contraction, demonstrating that the system is applicable for the analysis of intracellular events evoked by acute muscle contraction. PMID:23300713

  12. 7 CFR 610.23 - State Technical Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... governing the operation of State Technical Committees and Local Working Groups in its directive system. The..., organizing, and effectively utilizing State Technical Committees and Local Working Groups; direction on publication of State Technical Committee and Local Working Group meeting notices and agendas; State...

  13. Effect of mitochondrial fission inhibition on C2C12 differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The differentiation of skeletal muscle is commonly examined in cell culture using the C2C12 line of mouse skeletal myoblasts. This process shares many similarities with that which occurs during embryonic development, such as the transient activation of caspases. Here, we examined the effect of inhibiting mitochondrial fission, using mdivi-1, on the ability of C2C12 cells to terminally differentiate. This was performed using immunofluorescent identification of cell morphology and myosin expression, as well as immunoblotting for markers of muscle differentiation. Furthermore, the effect of mdivi-1 administration on activation of caspase-2 and -3 was assessed using spectrofluorometric measurement of specific enzyme activity. PMID:27054170

  14. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals. PMID:27054179

  15. Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management, Eugene, OR.

    This chapter of "The Best of the Best of ERIC," Volume 2, contains 14 summaries of documents and journal articles on citizen advisory committees, all of which are indexed in either "Resources in Education" or "Current Index to Journals in Education." The materials included deal with various aspects of this topic, such as the role of the school…

  16. Microwave frequency effects on dielectric properties of some common solvents and on microwave-assisted syntheses: 2-Allylphenol and the C12-C2-C12 Gemini surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Matsuzaki, Shohei; Mitani, Tomohiko; Serpone, Nick

    2012-12-01

    Microwave radiation emitted at a frequency of 915 MHz and 5.8 GHz from a newly fabricated single-mode resonance microwave apparatus is herein proposed for use in microwave-assisted organic syntheses. The usefulness of 5.8-GHz microwaves is demonstrated by the solvent-free synthesis of 2-allylphenol through a Claisen rearrangement process, and by the synthesis of the C12-C2-C12 Gemini surfactant in ethanol solvent undertaken to verify the usefulness of the 915-MHz frequency. These two model reactions have shown the advantage of these two microwave frequencies in that the observed efficiencies were greater than when employing the more commonly used 2.45-GHz microwaves. Dielectric parameters (dissipation factor: tan δ, dielectric constant: ɛ', and dielectric loss: ɛ'') have also been assessed for water and 22 common organic solvents typically used in organic syntheses, together with the temperature dependence of the dielectric parameters. Temperature-time profiles have been determined and rates of increase of temperature computed. The 5.8-GHz microwaves were effective in heating non-polar solvents, while the 915-MHz microwave frequency was most suitable for heating the alcohols.

  17. C-12/C-13 Ratio in Ethane on Titan and Implications for Methane's Replenishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Sada, Pedro V.; Nixon, Conor A.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Boyle, Robert J.; Hesman, Brigette E.; McCabe, George H.

    2009-01-01

    The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in ethane in the atmosphere of Titan has been measured at 822 cm(sup -1) from high spectral resolution ground-based observations. The value 89(8), coincides with the telluric standard and also agrees with the ratio seen in the outer planets. It is almost identical to the result for ethane on Titan found by the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini. The C-12/C-13 ratio for ethane is higher than the ratio measured in atmospheric methane by Cassini/Huygens GCMS, 82.3(l), representing an enrichment of C-12 in the ethane that might be explained by a kinetic isotope effect of approximately 1.1 in the formation of methyl radicals. If methane is being continuously resupplied to balance photochemical destruction, then we expect the isotopic composition in the ethane product to equilibrate at close to the same C-12/C-13 ratio as that in the supply. The telluric value of the ratio in ethane then implies that the methane reservoir is primordial.

  18. 13. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE VISIBLE IN ID31C12 ISIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. TIP TOP MINE. WOODEN STRUCTURE VISIBLE IN ID-31-C-12 ISIN UPPER LEFT. ALSO VISIBLE ARE TWO VERTICALLY BURIED LOGS ASSOCIATED WITH CABLES, ONE OF WHICH IS VISIBLE IN LOWER RIGHT. CAMERA POINTED SOUTH. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  19. Nanoparticle-mediated intracellular lipid accumulation during C2C12 cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} HTT2800 has a significant effect on intracellular lipid accumulation. {yields} HTT2800 reduced muscle-specific genes and led to the emergence of adipocyte-related genes. {yields} HT2800 converts the differentiation pathway of C2C12 myoblasts to that of adipoblast-like cells. -- Abstract: In this report, we sought to elucidate whether multiwall carbon nanotubes are involved in the modulation of the proliferation and differentiation of the skeletal muscle cell line C2C12. Skeletal muscle is a major mass peripheral tissue that accounts for 40% of total body weight and 50% of energy consumption. We focused on the differentiation pathway of myoblasts after exposure to a vapor-grown carbon fiber, HTT2800, which is one of the most highly purified carbon nanotubes. This treatment leads in parallel to the expression of a typical adipose differentiation program. We found that HTT2800 stimulated intracellular lipid accumulation in C2C12 cells. We have also shown by quantified PCR analysis that the expression of adipose-related genes was markedly upregulated during HTT2800 exposure. Taken together, these results suggest that HTT2800 specifically converts the differentiation pathway of C2C12 myoblasts to that of adipoblast-like cells.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. Link to an... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction products of formalin (37... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9285 - Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9285 Reaction products of formalin (37%) with amine C12. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction products of formalin...

  5. Identification of novel GH-regulated genes in C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    Resmini, E; Morte, B; Sorianello, E; Gallardo, E; de Luna, N; Illa, I; Zorzano, A; Bernal, J; Webb, S M

    2011-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the main regulator of longitudinal growth before puberty, and treatment with human recombinant (rh) GH can increase muscle strength. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms responsible remain mostly unknown. Many physiological effects of GH require hormone-mediated changes in gene expression. In an attempt to gain insight into the mechanism of GH action in muscle cells we evaluated the effects of rhGH on gene expression profile in a murine skeletal muscle cell line C2C12. The objective of the work was to identify changes in gene expression in the murine skeletal muscle cell line C2C12 after rGH treatment using microarray assays. C2C12 murine skeletal muscle cell cultures were differentiated during 4 days. After 16 h growing in serum-free medium, C2C12 myotubes were stimulated during 6 h with 500 ng/ml rhGH. Four independent sets of experiments were performed to identify GH-regulated genes. Total RNA was isolated and subjected to analysis. To validate changes candidate genes were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and fifty-four differentially expressed genes were identified; 90 upregulated and 64 downregulated. Many had not been previously identified as GH-responsive. Real-time PCR in biological replicates confirmed the effect of rGH on 15 genes: Cish, Serpina3g, Socs2, Bmp4, Tnfrsf11b, Rgs2, Tgfbr3, Ugdh, Npy1r, Gbp6, Tgfbi, Tgtp, Btc, Clec3b, and Bcl6. This study shows modifications in the gene expression profile of the C2C12 cell line after rhGH exposure. In vitro and gene function analysis revealed genes involved in skeletal and muscle system as well as cardiovascular system development and function. PMID:22072432

  6. Selective alpha particle decay of 12C+12C resonances to excited 20Ne rotational bands observed in the 12C(12C,α)20Ne reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, R. J.; Ordon¯Ez, C. E.; Bechara, M. J.; Al-Juwair, H. A.; Lavelle, G.; Cosman, E. R.

    1984-09-01

    Excitation functions of the 12C(12C,α)20Ne reaction were measured at θlab=7.5° between Ec.m.=14-40 MeV and angular distributions were measured from Ec.m.=17.8 to 20.6 MeV. Summed yields reveal prominent intermediate structure resonances over the entire range which correlate well to resonances previously observed in elastic data. The resonances show enhanced decays to excited rotational bands in 20Ne with reduced widths comparable to those for the elastic channel and an order of magnitude greater than those for the 20Ne ground state band. A discussion is given of the resonances as shape-isomeric states in a shell model secondary minimum in 24Mg, and of the selective alpha decay as being transitions to states of related configuration in 20Ne.

  7. Cobalt triggers necrotic cell death and atrophy in skeletal C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rovetta, Francesca; Stacchiotti, Alessandra; Faggi, Fiorella; Catalani, Simona; Apostoli, Pietro; Fanzani, Alessandro; Aleo, Maria Francesca

    2013-09-01

    Severe poisoning has recently been diagnosed in humans having hip implants composed of cobalt–chrome alloys due to the release of particulate wear debris on polyethylene and ceramic implants which stimulates macrophagic infiltration and destroys bone and soft tissue, leading to neurological, sensorial and muscular impairments. Consistent with this premise, in this study, we focused on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of Co(II) ions on skeletal muscle using mouse skeletal C2C12 myotubes as an in vitro model. As detected using propidium iodide incorporation, increasing CoCl{sub 2} doses (from 5 to 200 μM) affected the viability of C2C12 myotubes, mainly by cell necrosis, which was attenuated by necrostatin-1, an inhibitor of the necroptotic branch of the death domain receptor signaling pathway. On the other hand, apoptosis was hardly detectable as supported by the lack of caspase-3 and -8 activation, the latter resulting in only faint activation after exposure to higher CoCl{sub 2} doses for prolonged time points. Furthermore, CoCl{sub 2} treatment resulted in atrophy of the C2C12 myotubes which was characterized by the increased expression of HSP25 and GRP94 stress proteins and other typical 'pro-atrophic molecular hallmarks, such as early activation of the NF-kB pathway and down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation, followed by the activation of the proteasome and autophagy systems. Overall, these results suggested that cobalt may impact skeletal muscle homeostasis as an inducer of cell necrosis and myofiber atrophy. - Highlights: • The effects of cobalt on muscle myofibers in vitro were investigated. • Cobalt treatment mainly causes cell necrosis in skeletal C2C12 myotubes. • Cobalt impacts the PI3K/AKT and NFkB pathways and induces cell stress markers. • Cobalt induces atrophy of C2C12 myotubes through the activation of proteasome and autophagy systems. • Co treatment triggers NF-kB and PI3K/AKT pathways in C2C12 myotubes.

  8. Crystallographic characterization of the α,γ C12 helix in hybrid peptide sequences.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Madhusudana M B; Basuroy, Krishnayan; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Balaram, Padmanabhan

    2016-08-01

    The solid-state conformations of two αγ hybrid peptides Boc-[Aib-γ(4) (R)Ile]4 -OMe 1 and Boc-[Aib-γ(4) (R)Ile]5 -OMe 2 are described. Peptides 1 and 2 adopt C12 -helical conformations in crystals. The structure of octapeptide 1 is stabilized by six intramolecular 4 → 1 hydrogen bonds, forming 12 atom C12 motifs. The structure of peptide 2 reveals the formation of eight successive C12 hydrogen-bonded turns. Average backbone dihedral angles for αγ C12 helices are peptide 1, Aib; φ (°) = -57.2 ± 0.8, ψ (°) = -44.5 ± 4.7; γ(4) (R)Ile; φ (°) = -127.3 ± 7.3, θ1 (°) = 58.5 ± 12.1, θ2 (°) = 67.6 ± 10.1, ψ (°) = -126.2 ± 16.1; peptide 2, Aib; φ (°) = -58.8 ± 5.1, ψ (°) = -40.3 ± 5.5; ψ(4) (R)Ile; φ (°) = -123.9 ± 2.7, θ1 (°) = 53.3 θ 4.9, θ 2 (°) = 61.2 ± 1.6, ψ (°) = -121.8 ± 5.1. The tendency of γ(4) -substituted residues to adopt gauche-gauche conformations about the C(α) -C(β) and C(β) -C(γ) bonds facilitates helical folding. The αγ C12 helix is a backbone expanded analog of α peptide 310 helix. The hydrogen bond parameters for α peptide 310 and α-helices are compared with those for αγ hybrid C12 helix. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons. PMID:27443975

  9. Bioconcentration and toxicity of dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C12LAS) to aquatic organisms exposed in experimental streams.

    PubMed

    Versteeg, D J; Rawlings, J M

    2003-02-01

    Fish, mollusks, and crustaceans were caged in the tail pool of streams during a C(12)LAS (dodecyl benzene sulfonate) model ecosystem experimental program. Bioconcentration of total C(12)LAS and individual isomers and acute and chronic toxicity were investigated during this study. Toxicity endpoints were based on water and tissue (i.e., body burden) concentrations at which adverse effects were observed. At 32 days, total C(12)LAS bioconcentration factors (BCFs) for the fathead minnow and three invertebrate species ranged from 9 to 116. In general, bioconcentration was affected by isomer position, exposure concentration, and species. BCF values tended to decrease as isomer position moved from external (e.g., 2-phenyl) to internal (e.g., 5,6-phenyl). BCFs also decreased as exposure concentration increased. Mean acute 4-d LC(50) values ranged from 1.5 to >3.0 mg/L for the six species tested. Lethal body burdens associated with 50% mortality (LBB(50)) varied from 0.21 to 0.60 mmole/kg (wet weight). During the 32-day chronic exposures, the EC(20) values were 0.27 (0.204-0.352), 0.95 (0.597-1.29), and approximately 1.0 mg/L for Corbicula (length), Hyalella (survival), and fathead minnow (survival), respectively. At these EC(20) values, C(12)LAS body burdens were 0.035, 0.23, and 0.19 mmoles/kg wet weight in Corbicula, Hyalella, and fathead minnow, respectively. Fish exposed to wastewater treatment plant effluent had total C(12)LAS tissue concentrations ranging from 0.0005 to 0.0039 mmoles/kg wet weight. These concentrations are approximately 45-360 times below the tissue concentration associated with subtle effects in the model ecosystem stream exposures. Total C(12)LAS body burdens in feral and caged Corbicula exposed to WWTP effluents were approximately 0.0013 mmoles/kg; approximately 25-fold below concentrations associated with effects in stream exposures. PMID:12520396

  10. Medical ethics committees in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Blasszauer, B

    1991-01-01

    Hungarian medical ethics committees were established at the end of the 1950s. They came into being on the Communist Party's initiative. They could hardly be called "interdisciplinary" since their membership was made up of high-ranking physicians and a few head nurses. Their main task was to counter the practice of "tipping." Medical ethics and "tipping" were practically synonymous. These committees did not confront or try to resolve ethical problems concerning such issues as patient rights, informed consent, refusal of treatment, human experimentation, abortion, etc. These committees - whether it is believable or not - belonged to the Physicians Health Workers Trade Union. They were under the guidance and supervision of this social organization. The public was excluded from their meetings, and the committees' duty was to follow the health laws which were supposed to have given excellent ethical guidance. Even in a textbook on medical ethics used at one of the medical universities, written by a psychiatrist, the health laws were presented and explained back and forth. Of the 88 pages only 23 dealt with morals in general and the Hippocratic tradition. The Hungarian National Health Service as well as its medical ethics committees are similar in many respects to the Soviet and Eastern European countries' health care system and ethics committees. Since radical changes have taken place in these so-called "former" communist countries, it can only be hoped that these committees will eventually develop into groups who will deal directly with the moral questions or medicine and health care. PMID:10115138

  11. 29 CFR 42.4 - Structure of the National Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... directing the necessary staff work required by the Committee. (c) The National Committee shall meet on a... time as determined by the Under Secretary to be necessary to carry out the National Committee's... Secretary shall be the director of the staff level working group. (f) The staff level working group...

  12. Experimental study of the 13C+12C fusion reaction at deep sub-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudor, D.; Chilug, A. I.; Straticiuc, M.; Trache, L.; Chesneanu, D.; Toma, S.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Gomoiu, C.; Zhang, N. T.; Tang, X.; Li, Y. J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy-ion fusion reactions between light nuclei such as carbon and oxygen isotopes have been studied because of their significance for a wide variety of stellar burning scenarios. One important stellar reaction is 12C+12C, but it is difficult to measure it in the Gamow window because of very low cross sections and several resonances occurring. Hints can be obtained from the study of 13C+12C reaction. We have measured this process by an activation method for energies down to Ecm=2.5 MeV using 13C beams from the Bucharest 3 MV tandetron and gamma-ray deactivation measurements in our low and ultralow background laboratories, the latter located in a salt mine about 100 km north of Bucharest. Results obtained so far are shown and discussed in connection with the possibility to go even further down in energy and with the interpretation of the reaction mechanism at such deep sub-barrier energies.

  13. C-13/C-12 ratio in methane from the flooded Amazon forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Stanley C.; Blake, Donald R.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1987-01-01

    The C1-C4 hydrocarbon concentrations and the C-13/C-12 ratio in CH4 detected in air samples collected in the Amazon region (3.5 deg S latitude and 5.9 deg W longitude) are analyzed. It is observed that the CH4 concentrations of each sample are enhanced over the background concentration for remote locations, and the C-13/C-12 ratio in this biogenic methane is depleted in C-13 relative to atmospheric CH4. It is concluded, from the C2-C4 hydrocarbon data, that minor yields of C2-C4 hyrocarbons are released coincident with CH4; however, the minor yields do not contribute to the regionally enhanced concentrations of hydrocarbons found in Amazonia and the global atmosphere release of C2-C4 compounds.

  14. Ribbon structure stabilized by C10 and C12 turns in αγ hybrid peptide.

    PubMed

    Wani, Naiem Ahmad; Kant, Rajni; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Aravinda, Subrayashastry; Rai, Rajkishor

    2016-04-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and crystallographic analysis of αγ hybrid peptides, Boc-Gpn-L-Pro-NHMe (1), Boc-Aib-Gpn-L-Pro-NHMe (2), and Boc-L-Pro-Aib-Gpn-L-Pro-NHMe (3). Peptides 1 and 2 adopt expanded 12-membered (C12 ) helical turn over γα segment. Peptide 3 promotes the ribbon structure stabilized by type II β-turn (C10 ) followed by the expanded C12 helical γα turn. Both right-handed and left-handed helical conformations for Aib residue are observed in peptides 2 and 3, respectively Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27028205

  15. The (C-12)O/(C-13)O ratio toward Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. L.; Mauersberger, R.; Langer, W. D.; Glassgold, A. E.; Wilson, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    A tentative detection of the J = 1 - 0 emission line of (C-13)O has been obtained with SEST from a 24.4 hour integration. The velocity resolution used was 0.23 km/s and the FWHP beamwidth was 45 arcsec. If the (C-13)O line data are conservatively interpreted as an upper limit, the (C-12)O/(C-13)O ratio is not less than 60. Our result supports the previous determination of a large value of the isotope ratio in this cloud, made using radio emission lines with a 1.6-arcmin beam, and extends the ratio based on emission lines to a smaller region. When interpreted as a lower limit, our data is consistent with the ratio obtained from UV absorption line data for (C-12)O and (C-13)O.

  16. The C-12/C-13 ratio in Jupiter from the Voyager infrared investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Courtin, R.; Gautier, D.; Marten, A.; Kunde, V.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the v(4) band of CH4 in the spectra recorded by the Voyager 1 IRIS experiment has yielded a C-12/C-13 ratio in Jupiter that is 160 plus 40 or minus 55, or 1.8 plus 0.4 or minus 0.6 times the terrestrial value. It is noted that while no plausible theory predicts such a difference between the C-12/C-13 ratio values of Jupiter and the inner solar system, values of this ratio in the solar neighborhood 4.5 million years ago, inferred from recent interstellar medium measurements, are compatible with the present determination in Jupiter. The Jovian, rather than the terrestrial value, would then be representative of the carbon isotope ratio in the primitive solar nebula.

  17. 78 FR 14401 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC). DATES:...

  18. 77 FR 35102 - Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee; Public Teleconference AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Commercial Space Transportation... Working Group (OWG) of the Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee (COMSTAC)....

  19. 75 FR 2858 - Department of Defense Historical Advisory Committee Charter

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... of the Secretary Department of Defense Historical Advisory Committee Charter AGENCY: Department of... intends to renew the charter for the Department of Defense Historical Advisory Committee (hereafter... standards, historical methodology, program priorities, liaison with professional groups and...

  20. Two Categories of 13C/12C Ratios for Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce N.; Epstein, Samuel

    1971-01-01

    13C/12C ratios have been determined for plant tissue from 104 species representing 60 families. Higher plants fall into two categories, those with low δPDBI13C values (—24 to —34‰) and those with high δ 13C values (—6 to —19‰). Algae have δ 13C values of —12 to —23‰. Photosynthetic fractionation leading to such values is discussed. PMID:16657626

  1. Recombinant adenoviral microRNA-206 induces myogenesis in C2C12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Tao; Su, Yongping; Li, Wang; Frame, Lynn T.; Ai, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The expression of microRNA-206 (miR-206) is high in skeletal muscle but low in most other tissues. The expression of miR-206 is increased in muscular dystrophy, suggesting its involvement in the pathogenesis of muscle diseases. To determine the role of miR-206 in muscle cell differentiation and explore a possible gene therapy vector, we constructed a miR-206 adenoviral expression vector (AdvmiR-206) and tested for transfection into C2C12 stem cells. Material/Methods A 355-bp PCR amplicon from C57B6 mouse skeletal muscle genomic DNA was inserted into the adenoviral shuttle vector pAdTrack-CMV, which was then co-transformed with the adenoviral backbone plasmid pAdEasy-1 into competent E. coli BJ5183 bacteria. The specificity and function of this recombinant adenoviral MiR-206 were studied in C2C12 cells by Northern blot, immunofluorescence, Western blot, and flow cytometry. Results Increased expression of miR-206 in AdvmiR-206 transfected C2C12 cells (P<0.001) and resulted in morphological and biochemical changes over time that were similar to serum deprivation, including elongated cells and increased myosin heavy chain proteins. Even in the absence of serum deprivation, miR-206 overexpression accounted for a 50% reduction of S-phase cells (P<0.01). Moreover, in untransfected C2C12 cells, the introduction of miR-206-specific antisense oligoribonucleotides inhibited the normal response to serum deprivation. Twenty-four hours after lipofection of antisense oligoribonucleotides, the number of elongated cells was reduced by half (P<0.01). Conclusions Collectively, these data support a role for miR-206 in myoblast differentiation. We foresee potential applications for the AdvmiR-206 vector in research and therapy. PMID:22129894

  2. First Direct Measurement of (12)C((12)C,n)(23)Mg at Stellar Energies.

    PubMed

    Bucher, B; Tang, X D; Fang, X; Heger, A; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Alongi, A; Ayangeakaa, A D; Beard, M; Best, A; Browne, J; Cahillane, C; Couder, M; deBoer, R J; Kontos, A; Lamm, L; Li, Y J; Long, A; Lu, W; Lyons, S; Notani, M; Patel, D; Paul, N; Pignatari, M; Roberts, A; Robertson, D; Smith, K; Stech, E; Talwar, R; Tan, W P; Wiescher, M; Woosley, S E

    2015-06-26

    Neutrons produced by the carbon fusion reaction (12)C((12)C,n)(23)Mg play an important role in stellar nucleosynthesis. However, past studies have shown large discrepancies between experimental data and theory, leading to an uncertain cross section extrapolation at astrophysical energies. We present the first direct measurement that extends deep into the astrophysical energy range along with a new and improved extrapolation technique based on experimental data from the mirror reaction (12)C((12)C,p)(23)Na. The new reaction rate has been determined with a well-defined uncertainty that exceeds the precision required by astrophysics models. Using our constrained rate, we find that (12)C((12)C,n)(23)Mg is crucial to the production of Na and Al in pop-III pair instability supernovae. It also plays a nonnegligible role in the production of weak s-process elements, as well as in the production of the important galactic γ-ray emitter (60)Fe. PMID:26197115

  3. Leptin rapidly activates PPARs in C2C12 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bendinelli, Paola; Piccoletti, Roberta . E-mail: Roberta.Piccoletti@unimi.it; Maroni, Paola

    2005-07-08

    Experimental evidence suggests that leptin operates on the tissues, including skeletal muscle, also by modulating gene expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have shown that physiological doses of leptin promptly increase the binding of C2C12 cell nuclear extracts to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) response elements in oligonucleotide probes and that all three PPAR isoforms participate in DNA-binding complexes. We pre-treated C2C12 cells with AACOCF{sub 3}, a specific inhibitor of cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}), an enzyme that supplies ligands to PPARs, and found that it abrogates leptin-induced PPAR DNA-binding activity. Leptin treatment significantly increased cPLA{sub 2} activity, evaluated as the release of [{sup 3}H]arachidonic acid from pre-labelled C2C12 cells, as well as phosphorylation. Further, using MEK1 inhibitor PD-98059 we showed that leptin activates cPLA{sub 2} through ERK induction. These results support a direct effect of leptin on skeletal muscle cells, and suggest that the hormone may modulate muscle transcription also by precocious activation of PPARs through ERK-cPLA{sub 2} pathway.

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid Stimulates MCP-1 Secretion from C2C12 Myoblast.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Haniu, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are regulatory proteins that play an important role in muscle cell migration and proliferation. In this study, C2C12 cells treated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) showed an increase in endogenous monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and secretion. LPA is a naturally occurring bioactive lysophospholipid with hormone- and growth-factor-like activities. LPA is produced by activated platelets, cytokine-stimulated leukocytes, and possibly by other cell types. However, the LPA analog cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) had no effect on the expression and secretion of MCP-1. LPA, although similar in structure to cPA, had potent inducing effects on MCP-1 expression in C2C12 cells. In this study, we showed that LPA enhanced MCP-1 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA enhances MCP-1 secretion in C2C12 cells and thus may play an important role in cell proliferation. PMID:24049655

  5. Mutations in C12orf65 in Patients with Encephalomyopathy and a Mitochondrial Translation Defect

    PubMed Central

    Antonicka, Hana; Østergaard, Elsebet; Sasarman, Florin; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Wibrand, Flemming; Pedersen, Anne Marie B.; Rodenburg, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Smeitink, Jan A.M.; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M.; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the genetic basis for a global and uniform decrease in mitochondrial translation in fibroblasts from patients in two unrelated pedigrees who developed Leigh syndrome, optic atrophy, and ophthalmoplegia. Analysis of the assembly of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes showed severe decreases of complexes I, IV, and V and a smaller decrease in complex III. The steady-state levels of mitochondrial mRNAs, tRNAs, and rRNAs were not reduced, nor were those of the mitochondrial translation elongation factors or the protein components of the mitochondrial ribosome. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified a 1 bp deletion in C12orf65 in one patient, and DNA sequence analysis showed a different 1 bp deletion in the second patient. Both mutations predict the same premature stop codon. C12orf65 belongs to a family of four mitochondrial class I peptide release factors, which also includes mtRF1a, mtRF1, and Ict1, all characterized by the presence of a GGQ motif at the active site. However, C12orf65 does not exhibit peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase activity in an in vitro assay with bacterial ribosomes. We suggest that it might play a role in recycling abortive peptidyl-tRNA species, released from the ribosome during the elongation phase of translation. PMID:20598281

  6. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  7. Mismatched double-stranded RNA: polyI:polyC12U.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Ampligen [polyI:polyC12U] is a mismatched double-stranded RNA that acts by inducing interferon production (immunomodulator) and by activating an intracellular enzyme (RNase-L) against viral RNA transcripts (antiviral). Ampligen, currently under development by Hemispherx Biopharma in the US, acts on the immunological system through T-lymphocyte stimulation and is indicated for the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome and acquired immunodeficiency deficiency syndrome (AIDS), as part of the combined therapy. Ampligen is available for licensing worldwide. In February 2004, Fujisawa Deutschland GmbH, a subsidiary of Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co., entered into an option agreement with Hemispherx Biopharma with the intent of becoming a distributor for Ampligen for the potential treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome in Germany, Switzerland and Austria. An option fee of 400,000 euros was paid pursuant to the terms of the option agreement and upon execution of the Distribution Agreement, Fujisawa will pay Hemispherx fees and milestone payments with a potential worth of several millions of dollars. In September 2003, Hemispherx Biopharma Inc. entered into an agreement with Guangdong Medicine Group Corporation to organise clinical trials, marketing, sales and distribution for both of its lead compounds, Ampligen and Alferon N in the People's Republic of China. The agreement stipulates that the Guangdong Medicine Group Corporation (GMC) will conduct clinical trials with Ampligen for the treatment of HIV. All costs related to the trials are to be covered by GMC. Additionally, GMC has to develop and implement marketing and promotional programmes. In May 2003, Hemispherx Biopharma and the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy entered into a research project agreement that will see Ampligen implemented in a protocol used in patients with relapsed EBV-positive Hodgkin's Lymphoma. In March 2002, Esteve and Hemispherx Biopharma entered into a collaborative agreement under which Esteve will

  8. Framework for development of physician competencies in genomic medicine: report of the Competencies Working Group of the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics.

    PubMed

    Korf, Bruce R; Berry, Anna B; Limson, Melvin; Marian, Ali J; Murray, Michael F; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Passamani, Eugene R; Relling, Mary V; Tooker, John; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rodriguez, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Completion of the Human Genome Project, in conjunction with dramatic reductions in the cost of DNA sequencing and advances in translational research, is gradually ushering genomic discoveries and technologies into the practice of medicine. The rapid pace of these advances is opening up a gap between the knowledge available about the clinical relevance of genomic information and the ability of clinicians to include such information in their medical practices. This educational gap threatens to be rate limiting to the clinical adoption of genomics in medicine. Solutions will require not only a better understanding of the clinical implications of genetic discoveries but also training in genomics at all levels of professional development, including for individuals in formal training and others who long ago completed such training. The National Human Genome Research Institute has convened the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics (ISCC) to develop and share best practices in the use of genomics in medicine. The ISCC has developed a framework for development of genomics practice competencies that may serve as a starting point for formulation of competencies for physicians in various medical disciplines. PMID:24763287

  9. Executive Committee. AGB Standing Committee Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Richard T.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and functions of the college executive committee are discussed. This committee is pivotal to the effective functioning of the board and to the support of the chairperson and the chief executive in their leadership roles. The committee can act on its own provided it does not assume powers specifically reserved for the board. The…

  10. The Investment Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an AGB series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices included in this text support the objectives of board committees:…

  11. Executive committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    ChairVice Chair Toshiyuki AzumaRoberto Rivarola Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics LabUniversidad Nacional de Rosario and Advanced Science InstituteInstituto de Fisica Rosario RIKEN, JapanRosario, Argentina SecretaryMembers Dominique VernhetJoachim Burgdörfer, Austria Institut des NanoSciences de Paris Birgit Lohmann, Australia Université Pierre et Marie Curie Hossein Sadeghpour, USA Paris, FranceThomas Stöhlker, Germany Past ChairJim McCann, UK Barry DunningGuoqing Xiao, China Physics & AstronomyXiaohong Cai, China Rice University, HoustonXinwen Ma, China Texas, USAYongtao Zhao, China TreasurerFernando Martin, Spain Henrik CederquistLuis Mendez, Spain Alba Nova University CenterAnatoli Kheifets, Australia Stockholm University Stockholm, Sweden Details of the general committee are available in the PDF

  12. Advice for an IT Advisory Committee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Advisory committees can be valuable to any part of the IT organization. The insights one can derive from such groups about perceptions of service levels and beliefs (or myths) about technology, as well as the interchange of communication between technical staff and users, can be helpful. But to derive the maximum value from advisory committees,…

  13. Surface rheology and foaming properties of sodium oleate and C12(EO)6 aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Beneventi, Davide; Pugh, Robert J; Carré, Bruno; Gandini, Alessandro

    2003-12-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) and the surface viscoelastic modulus of sodium oleate aqueous solutions at different concentrations were measured using an image analysis tensiometer based on the oscillating bubble technique. The diffusion coefficient of oleate moieties was calculated from DST measurements and the surface viscoelastic modulus using the Langmuir-Szyszkowski and the diffusion-controlled adsorption models. The viscoelastic moduli obtained from model calculations were compared with the corresponding experimental values. The diffusion coefficient of C(12)(EO)(6) in water and the parameters of the Langmuir-Szyszkowski adsorption isotherm were taken from the literature and used to calculate the surface viscoelastic modulus of its aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The foaming properties of both C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions, viz., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction in the foam, were measured using a commercial Foamscan device. Foaming experiments with C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions were carried out either under static conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured as a function of time after the generation of a fixed volume of foam, or under dynamic conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured during foam formation. The variations in the foam permeability as a function of surfactant concentration were related to the viscoelastic properties of the air/water interface and to the presence of micelles in the foam films. With foams in which the water volume fraction was higher than 0.05, the foam electrical conduction could be described using a simple parallel resistor model and their conductance measurements were related to the foam water volume fraction. The results related to water drainage under static conditions were used to interpret water drainage under dynamic conditions. Preliminary conjectures on the influence of foam

  14. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage

  15. Delineation of C12orf65-related phenotypes: a genotype–phenotype relationship

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Ronen; Mandel, Hanna; Saada, Ann; Lerer, Issy; Burger, Ayala; Shaag, Avraham; Shalev, Stavit A; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Goldsher, Dorit; Gomori, John M; Lossos, Alex; Elpeleg, Orly; Meiner, Vardiella

    2014-01-01

    C12orf65 participates in the process of mitochondrial translation and has been shown to be associated with a spectrum of phenotypes, including early onset optic atrophy, progressive encephalomyopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic paraparesis.We used whole-genome homozygosity mapping as well as exome sequencing and targeted gene sequencing to identify novel C12orf65 disease-causing mutations in seven affected individuals originating from two consanguineous families. In four family members affected with childhood-onset optic atrophy accompanied by slowly progressive peripheral neuropathy and spastic paraparesis, we identified a homozygous frame shift mutation c.413_417 delAACAA, which predicts a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal portion. In the second family, we studied three affected individuals who presented with early onset optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic gait in addition to moderate intellectual disability. Muscle biopsy in two of the patients revealed decreased activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and IV. In these patients, we identified a homozygous splice mutation, g.21043 T>A (c.282+2 T>A) which leads to skipping of exon 2. Our study broadens the phenotypic spectrum of C12orf65 defects and highlights the triad of optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy and spastic paraparesis as its key clinical features. In addition, a clear genotype–phenotype correlation is anticipated in which deleterious mutations which disrupt the GGQ-containing domain in the first coding exon are expected to result in a more severe phenotype, whereas down-stream C-terminal mutations may result in a more favorable phenotype, typically lacking cognitive impairment. PMID:24424123

  16. Transcriptional activity of acetylcholinesterase gene is regulated by DNA methylation during C2C12 myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kei M; Gong, Amy G W; Xu, Miranda L; Lam, Candy T W; Zhang, Laura M L; Bi, Cathy W C; Cui, D; Cheng, Anthony W M; Dong, Tina T X; Tsim, Karl W K; Lin, Huangquan

    2016-07-01

    The expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme hydrolyzes neurotransmitter acetylcholine at vertebrate neuromuscular junction, is regulated during myogenesis, indicating the significance of muscle intrinsic factors in controlling the enzyme expression. DNA methylation is essential for temporal control of myogenic gene expression during myogenesis; however, its role in AChE regulation is not known. The promoter of vertebrate ACHE gene carries highly conserved CG-rich regions, implying its likeliness to be methylated for epigenetic regulation. A DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), was applied onto C2C12 cells throughout the myotube formation. When DNA methylation was inhibited, the promoter activity, transcript expression and enzymatic activity of AChE were markedly increased after day 3 of differentiation, which indicated the putative role of DNA methylation. By bisulfite pyrosequencing, the overall methylation rate was found to peak at day 3 during C2C12 cell differentiation; a SP1 site located at -1826bp upstream of mouse ACHE gene was revealed to be heavily methylated. The involvement of transcriptional factor SP1 in epigenetic regulation of AChE was illustrated here: (i) the SP1-driven transcriptional activity was increased in 5-Aza-treated C2C12 culture; (ii) the binding of SP1 onto the SP1 site of ACHE gene was fully blocked by the DNA methylation; and (iii) the sequence flanking SP1 sites of ACHE gene was precipitated by chromatin immuno-precipitation assay. The findings suggested the role of DNA methylation on AChE transcriptional regulation and provided insight in elucidating the DNA methylation-mediated regulatory mechanism on AChE expression during muscle differentiation. PMID:27021952

  17. The formation of choline O-sulphate by Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, John W.

    1973-01-01

    Pseudomonas C12B and other Pseudomonas species released larger amounts of a 35S-labelled metabolite into the medium when cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of Na2SO4 as opposed to growth in SO42−-sufficient media. The metabolite was found at all stages of the culture cycle of Pseudomonas C12B and maximum quantities occurred in stationary-phase culture supernatants. The metabolite was not detected when the bacterium was cultured on growth-limiting concentrations of potassium phosphate. The amount of the metabolite present in the medium greatly exceeded that which could be extracted from intact cells and, except for choline chloride, it was independent of the carbon source used for growth. If choline chloride was present in high concentration, then larger amounts of the metabolite were found in the culture medium. The metabolite was not detected extracellularly or intracellularly when the bacterium was grown in SO42−-deficient media containing 5mm-l-cysteine. The same metabolite was also synthesized in vitro only when Pseudomonas C12B extracts were incubated with choline chloride, ATP, MgCl2 and Na235SO4. The metabolite-forming system was not subject to repression by Na2SO4 and was completely inhibited by 0.5mm-l-cysteine and activated by Na2SO4 (up to 1.0mm). The metabolite was identified as choline O-sulphate by electrophoresis, chromatography and isotope-dilution analysis. Another 35S-labelled metabolite was also detected in culture supernatants, but was not identified. PMID:4590202

  18. Conference Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-11-01

    Scientific Committee Silvia Arrese-Igor Irigoyen (CFM, CSIC - UPV/EHU, Donostia), Javier Campo (ICMA-CSIC, Zaragoza), Carlos Frontera (ICMAB-CSIC, Barcelona), Victoria García Sakai (ISIS, Chilton), Cristina Gómez-Polo (UPNa, Pamplona), Miguel Ángel González (ILL, Grenoble), Pedro Gorría (Universidad Oviedo), Jon Gutiérrez Echevarría (EHU/UPV, Bilbao), J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (UPNa, Pamplona), Vicente Recarte (UPNa, Pamplona), Jesús Ruíz Hervías (UPM, Madrid), Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos (UPNa, Pamplona), Antonio Urbina (UPC, Cartagena) Organizing Committee J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal (Co-Chair), Vicente Recarte ( Co-Chair), Cristina Gómez-Polo, Silvia Larumbe Abuin, Vicente Sánchez-Alarcos Editors of the Proceedings J. Iñaki Pérez Landazábal, Vicente Recarte Plenary speakers Charles Simon (Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France), Miguel Angel Alario Franco (Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain), Dieter Richter (Jülich Centre for Neutron Science, Jülich, Germany), James Yeck (European Spallation Source, Lund, Sweden) Invited speakers Manu Barandiarán (BCMaterials & EHU/UPV), Arantxa Arbe (MFC, CSIC- UPV/EHU), José Luis Martínez (Consorcio ESS-Bilbao), Marta Castellote, IETcc-CSIC), Josep Lluis Tamarit (UPC), Diego Alba-Venero (ISIS), Elizabeth Castillo (CIC Energigune), Josu M. Igartua (EHU/UPV), Antonio Dos Santos (UPM), Alex Masalles (Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya), José Abad (UPCT), Claudia Mondelli (ILL), Oscar Fabelo (ILL), Aurora Nogales (IEM-CSIC), Jesús Rodríguez (UC), Gerardo

  19. What Makes Groups Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allcorn, Seth

    1985-01-01

    By reviewing this analysis of the behavior of both groups and individuals in groups, human resources managers can learn to tell whether committees, task forces, and departments may be encouraging or inhibiting the work they set out to do. (Author)

  20. C12/C13-ratio determination in nanodiamonds by atom-probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Josiah B; Isheim, Dieter; Floss, Christine; Seidman, David N

    2015-12-01

    The astrophysical origins of ∼ 3 nm-diameter meteoritic nanodiamonds can be inferred from the ratio of C12/C13. It is essential to achieve high spatial and mass resolving power and minimize all sources of signal loss in order to obtain statistically significant measurements. We conducted atom-probe tomography on meteoritic nanodiamonds embedded between layers of Pt. We describe sample preparation, atom-probe tomography analysis, 3D reconstruction, and bias correction. We present new data from meteoritic nanodiamonds and terrestrial standards and discuss methods to correct isotopic measurements made with the atom-probe tomograph. PMID:26095824

  1. Citizen Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leann R.

    This guide, describing community involvement through citizen advisory committees, is a summary of the literature on such committees. Its main concern is district committees created by school boards. Citations in the bibliography contain all points of view on committees and present many alternatives on most of the topics covered in the guide.…

  2. PUGNAc induces protein ubiquitination in C2C12 myotube cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ja-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2015-12-01

    O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) regulates many cellular processes including the cell cycle, cell signaling, and protein trafficking. Dysregulation of O-GlcNAcylation may be involved in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, it is necessary to identify cellular proteins that are induced by elevated O-GlcNAcylation. Here, using adenosine 5'-triphosphate affinity chromatography, we employed a proteomic approach in order to identify differentially expressed proteins in response to treatment with the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor, O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene)amino-N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), in mouse C2C12 myotube cells. Among 205 selected genes, we identified 68 nucleotide-binding proteins, 14 proteins that have adenosinetriphosphatase activity, and 10 proteins with ligase activity. Upregulation of proteins, including ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1, proteasome subunit 20S, cullin-associated NEDD8-dissociated protein 1, ezrin, and downregulation of the protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase B, were confirmed by western blot analysis. In particular, we found that the protein ubiquitination level in C2C12 cells was increased by PUGNAc treatment. This is the first report of quantitative proteomic profiles of myotube cells after treatment with PUGNAc, and our results demonstrate the potential to enhance understanding of the relationship between insulin resistance, O-GlcNAc, and PUGNAc in the future. PMID:26531776

  3. Solubilisation of triolein by microemulsions containing C12E4/hexadecane/water: equilibrium and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Peter R; Carr, Denise; Giles, Dennis; Pierre-Louis, Gina; Staples, Edward; Miller, Clarence A; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2008-09-15

    Increasing triolein content of oil-in-water microemulsions in the pure C(12)E(4)/water/n-hexadecane/triolein system while maintaining a fixed surfactant concentration and volume fraction of drops raises the temperature of the solubilisation boundary, where excess oil separates, but has only a slight effect on the (higher) cloud point temperature, where excess water appears. Thus, the temperature range of the single-phase microemulsion shrinks and ultimately disappears. When such microemulsions are in equilibrium with excess oil, the hexadecane/triolein ratio is greater in the microemulsion, probably because the larger triolein molecules are unable to penetrate the hydrocarbon chain region of the surfactant films of the microemulsion droplets. Indeed, monolayer studies and calculations based on microemulsion and excess oil compositions indicate that the films have minimal triolein and similar ratios of hexadecane to surfactant. Triolein drops brought into contact with hexadecane-in-water microemulsions first swell as they incorporate hexadecane, then shrink owing to solubilisation. Interfacial tension decreases during this process until it becomes almost constant near 0.01 mN m(-1), suggesting that the drops in the final stages of solubilisation have high hexadecane contents. A microemulsion containing 10 wt% C(12)E(4) and 15 wt% hexadecane was able to remove over 50% of triolein from polyester fabric at 25 degrees C, more than twice that removed by an oil-free solution with the same surfactant concentration in similar experiments. PMID:18597762

  4. Vibrational dynamics of a non-degenerate ultrafast rotor: The (C12,C13)-oxalate ion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Abdo, Mohannad; Chuntonov, Lev; Smith, Amos B.; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular ions undergoing ultrafast conformational changes on the same time scale of water motions are of significant importance in condensed phase dynamics. However, the characterization of systems with fast molecular motions has proven to be both experimentally and theoretically challenging. Here, we report the vibrational dynamics of the non-degenerate (C12,C13)-oxalate anion, an ultrafast rotor, in aqueous solution. The infrared absorption spectrum of the (C12,C13)-oxalate ion in solution reveals two vibrational transitions separated by approximately 40 cm−1 in the 1500–1600 cm−1 region. These two transitions are assigned to vibrational modes mainly localized in each of the carboxylate asymmetric stretch of the ion. Two-dimensional infrared spectra reveal the presence and growth of cross-peaks between these two transitions which are indicative of coupling and population transfer, respectively. A characteristic time of sub-picosecond cross-peaks growth is observed. Ultrafast pump-probe anisotropy studies reveal essentially the same characteristic time for the dipole reorientation. All the experimental data are well modeled in terms of a system undergoing ultrafast population transfer between localized states. Comparison of the experimental observations with simulations reveal a reasonable agreement, although a mechanism including only the fluctuations of the coupling caused by the changes in the dihedral angle of the rotor, is not sufficient to explain the observed ultrafast population transfer. PMID:24182056

  5. Theoretical investigation of stabilities and optical properties of Si12C12 clusters.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaofeng F; Burggraf, Larry W

    2015-01-21

    By sorting through hundreds of globally stable Si12C12 isomers using a potential surface search and using simulated annealing, we have identified low-energy structures. Unlike isomers knit together by Si-C bonds, the lowest energy isomers have segregated carbon and silicon regions that maximize stronger C-C bonding. Positing that charge separation between the carbon and silicon regions would produce interesting optical absorption in these cluster molecules, we used time-dependent density functional theory to compare the calculated optical properties of four isomers representing structural classes having different types of silicon and carbon segregation regions. Absorptions involving charge transfer between segregated carbon and silicon regions produce lower excitation energies than do structures having alternating Si-C bonding for which frontier orbital charge transfer is exclusively from separated carbon atoms to silicon atoms. The most stable Si12C12 isomer at temperatures below 1100 K is unique as regards its high symmetry and large optical oscillator strength in the visible blue. Its high-energy and low-energy visible transitions (1.15 eV and 2.56 eV) are nearly pure one-electron silicon-to-carbon transitions, while an intermediate energy transition (1.28 eV) is a nearly pure carbon-to-silicon one-electron charge transfer. PMID:25612705

  6. 12C+ 12C elastic scattering excitation functions and phase shift analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, R. J.; Bechara, M. J.; Ordonez, C. E.; Al-Juwair, H. A.; Cosman, E. R.

    1983-03-01

    The 12C+ 12C elastic scattering has been measured for Ec.m.=14.6-31.3 MeV, θc.m.=30°-110°. The elastic data have been analyzed via a phase shift analysis, enabling the extraction of model independent sets of phase shift parameters. The extracted Jπ values for the intermediate structure resonances at Ec.m.=18.4, 19.3, and 20.3 MeV are 12+, 12+, and 12+ or 14+, respectively. The questions of ambiguities in the phase shift analysis and the comparison with Jπ values deduced from other experiments are discussed. Evidence is presented for the existence of gross structure resonances. The elastic scattering has also been analyzed using the sum-of-differences method to directly extract the total reaction cross section. The results of these analyses are compared to existing models of the origin of intermediate structure resonances. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Measured the 12C+ 12C elastic scattering, Ec.m.=14.6-31.3 MeV, θc.m.=30°-110°. Phase shift analysis, sum-of-differences analysis.

  7. Measurement of the ^12C+^12C Fusion Reaction with MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Henderson, D.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Esbensen, H.; Fernandez-Niello, J. O.; Jiang, C. L.; Lighthall, J. C.; Marley, S. T.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.

    2012-10-01

    The fusion of the ^12C+^12C system is of great interest in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. Above the Coulomb barrier, the excitation function of this system exhibits oscillations, which are not well understood. There is also a significant discrepancy between the experimental fusion cross-section and recent coupled-channel calculations that is not present in other carbon systems. To address these issues, we have re-measured the fusion excitation function for ^12,13C+^12C in the energy range of 10 MeV < Ecm < 20 MeV using a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) detector. The gas of the ionization chamber (CH4) served as both the target material and the counter gas. One of the main advantages of this method is that the excitation function is measured over a large range of energies using only one beam energy. This method has been proven to be successful and it will be used to measure fusion reactions in other light systems. The experimental results will be presented and compared to previous experimental data and theoretical models.

  8. Further evidence for a dynamically generated secondary bow in 13C+12C rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ogloblin, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of a secondary bow is confirmed for 13C+12C nuclear rainbow scattering in addition to the 16O+12C system. This is found by studying the experimental angular distribution of 13C+12C scattering at the incident 13C energy EL=250 MeV with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic wave functions for 12C using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The Airy minimum at θ ≈70°, which is not reproduced by a conventional folding potential, is revealed to be a secondary bow generated dynamically by a coupling to the excited state 2+ (4.44 MeV) of 12C. The essential importance of the quadruple Y 2 term (reorientation term) of potential of the excited state 2+ of 12C for the emergence of a secondary bow is found. The mechanism of the secondary bow is intuitively explained by showing how the trajectories are refracted dynamically into the classically forbidden angular region beyond the rainbow angle of the primary rainbow.

  9. Taking Charge: Kindergartners' Planning and Leadership Talk During Committee Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Peggy G.

    This study delineates features of the planning and leadership talk of kindergartners involved in committee work done in small groups. Subjects were 66 kindergarten children in 3 classes of one teacher. Committees were composed of four or five students and met during a 10-month period across 2 school years. the tasks of the committees were to: (1)…

  10. Actin-associated protein palladin is required for migration behavior and differentiation potential of C2C12 myoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ngoc Uyen Nhi; Liang, Vincent Roderick; Wang, Hao-Ven

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Palladin is involved in myogenesis in vitro. • Palladin knockdown by siRNA increases myoblast proliferation, viability and differentiation. • Palladin knockdown decreases C2C12 myoblast migration ability. - Abstract: The actin-associated protein palladin has been shown to be involved in differentiation processes in non-muscle tissues. However, but its function in skeletal muscle has rarely been studied. Palladin plays important roles in the regulation of diverse actin-related signaling in a number of cell types. Since intact actin-cytoskeletal remodeling is necessary for myogenesis, in the present study, we pursue to investigate the role of actin-associated palladin in skeletal muscle differentiation. Palladin in C2C12 myoblasts is knocked-down using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The results show that down-regulation of palladin decreased migratory activity of mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts. Furthermore, the depletion of palladin enhances C2C12 vitality and proliferation. Of note, the loss of palladin promotes C2C12 to express the myosin heavy chain, suggesting that palladin has a role in the modulation of C2C12 differentiation. It is thus proposed that palladin is required for normal C2C12 myogenesis in vitro.

  11. Job Training Coordination Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royall, Robert V., Jr.

    A governor-appointed committee examined South Carolina's job training systems and developed recommendations on providing more effective and efficient job training. A consensus was first developed on conditions that currently exist in the areas of job training, job training's relationship to economic development, and services to target groups.…

  12. Autobody Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in autobody technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings and are used as…

  13. Electronic Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in electronic technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are used…

  14. Automotive Technology. Technical Committee Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Technical Committee Report prepared by industry representatives in Idaho lists the skills currently necessary for an employee in that state to obtain a job in automotive technology, retain a job once hired, and advance in that occupational field. (Task lists are grouped according to duty areas generally used in industry settings, and are used…

  15. Dose calculation formalisms and consensus dosimetry parameters for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry: Recommendations of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 149

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Schaart, Dennis R.; Soares, Christopher G.; Nath, Ravinder

    2007-11-15

    Since the publication of AAPM Task Group 60 report in 1999, a considerable amount of dosimetry data for the three coronary brachytherapy systems in use in the United States has been reported. A subgroup, Task Group 149, of the AAPM working group on Special Brachytherapy Modalities (Bruce Thomadsen, Chair) was charged to develop recommendations for dose calculation formalisms and the related consensus dosimetry parameters. The recommendations of this group are presented here. For the Cordis {sup 192}Ir and Novoste {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y systems, the original TG-43 formalism in spherical coordinates should be used along with the consensus values of the dose rate constant, geometry function, radial dose function, and anisotropy function for the single seeds. Contributions from the single seeds should be added linearly for the calculation of dose distributions from a source train. For the Guidant {sup 32}P wire system, the modified TG-43 formalism in cylindrical coordinates along with the recommended data for the 20 and 27 mm wires should be used. Data tables for the 6, 10, 14, 18, and 22 seed trains of the Cordis system, 30, 40, and 60 mm seed trains of the Novoste system, and the 20 and 27 mm wires of the Guidant system are presented along with our rationale and methodology for selecting the consensus data. Briefly, all available datasets were compared with each other and the consensus dataset was either an average of available data or the one obtained from the most densely populated study; in most cases this was a Monte Carlo calculation.

  16. Delayed primary excision with subsequent modification of radiotherapy dose for intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee.

    PubMed

    Rodeberg, David A; Wharam, Moody D; Lyden, Elizabeth R; Stoner, Julie A; Brown, Kenneth; Wolden, Suzanne L; Paidas, Charles N; Donaldson, Sarah S; Hawkins, Douglas S; Spunt, Sheri L; Arndt, Carola A

    2015-07-01

    The majority of intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) patients have gross residual disease (Group III) after their first operative procedure. It is currently not known if local control rates can be maintained when, following induction chemotherapy, the radiation therapy (RT) dose is decreased after a delayed primary excision (DPE). To answer this question we evaluated patients enrolled on COG D9803 (1999-2005) who had Group III tumors of the bladder dome, extremity or trunk (thorax, abdomen and pelvis) were candidates for DPE at Week 12 if the primary tumor appeared resectable. RT dose was then adjusted by the completeness of DPE: no evidence of disease 36 Gy, microscopic residual 41.4 Gy and gross residual disease (GRD) 50.4 Gy. A total of 161 Group III patients were evaluated (24 bladder dome, 63 extremity and 74 trunk). Seventy-three patients (45%) underwent DPE which achieved removal of all gross disease in 61 (84%) who were then eligible for reduced RT dose (43/73 received 36 Gy, 19/73 received 41.4 Gy). The local 5-year failure rate (0% for bladder dome, 7% for extremity and 20% for trunk) was similar to IRS-IV, which did not encourage DPE and did not allow for DPE adapted RT dose reduction. In conclusion, DPE was performed in 45% of Group III RMS patients with tumors at select anatomic sites (bladder dome, extremity and trunk) and 84% of those who had DPE were eligible for RT dose reduction. Local control outcomes were similar to historic results with RT alone. PMID:25418440

  17. Photobiomodulation Protects and Promotes Differentiation of C2C12 Myoblast Cells Exposed to Snake Venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Aline; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Cogo, José Carlos; Zamuner, Stella Regina

    2016-01-01

    Background Snakebites is a neglected disease and in Brazil is considered a serious health problem, with the majority of the snakebites caused by the genus Bothrops. Antivenom therapy and other first-aid treatments do not reverse local myonecrose which is the main sequel caused by the envenomation. Several studies have shown the effectiveness of low level laser (LLL) therapy in reducing local myonecrosis induced by Bothropic venoms, however the mechanism involved in this effect is unknown. In this in vitro study, we aimed to analyze the effect of LLL irradiation against cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops jararacussu venom on myoblast C2C12 cells. Methodology C2C12 were utilized as a model target and were incubated with B. jararacussu venom (12.5 μg/mL) and immediately irradiated with LLL at wavelength of red 685 nm or infrared 830 nm with energy density of 2.0, 4.6 and 7.0 J/cm2. Effects of LLL on cellular responses of venom-induced cytotoxicity were examined, including cell viability, measurement of cell damage and intra and extracellular ATP levels, expression of myogenic regulatory factors, as well as cellular differentiation. Results In non-irradiated cells, the venom caused a decrease in cell viability and a massive release of LDH and CK levels indicating myonecrosis. Infrared and red laser at all energy densities were able to considerably decrease venom-induced cytotoxicity. Laser irradiation induced myoblasts to differentiate into myotubes and this effect was accompanied by up regulation of MyoD and specially myogenin. Moreover, LLL was able to reduce the extracellular while increased the intracellular ATP content after venom exposure. In addition, no difference in the intensity of cytotoxicity was shown by non-irradiated and irradiated venom. Conclusion LLL irradiation caused a protective effect on C2C12 cells against the cytotoxicity caused by B. jararacussu venom and promotes differentiation of these cells by up regulation of myogenic factors. A modulatory

  18. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Schueler, Beth A.; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J.; Wunderle, Kevin A.; LaFrance, M. Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H.; Shepard, S. Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H.

    2015-12-15

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  19. Micropatterning C2C12 myotubes for orderly recording of intracellular calcium transients.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuzo; Wagatsuma, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of skeletal muscle myotubes in vitro using myogenic cell lines have been widely carried out to study functional properties and disease-related biological changes of myotubes, such as intracellular calcium dynamics. However, the analysis of biological signals in isolated single myotubes or interactions among several myotubes is quite difficult problem because of the randomness in size, morphology and orientation of differentiated myotubes cultured on a conventional tissue culture dish. In the present study, we attempted to form uniform-size myotubes and detect intracellular calcium dynamics from the fabricated myotubes. We modified surfaces of culture dishes using a poly(-dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp and a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer solution to form line patterns for myotube formation. We could form uniform-size and -orientation C2C12 myotubes and detect intracellular calcium dynamics from it. This simple method would be a useful for studying properties in myotubes with specific sizes and morphologies. PMID:24111271

  20. Cytoprotective Role of Nrf2 in Electrical Pulse Stimulated C2C12 Myotube

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Masaki; Warabi, Eiji; Komine, Shoichi; Oh, Sechang; Shoda, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical exercise is central to a healthy lifestyle. However, exercise-related muscle contraction can induce reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) production in skeletal muscle. The nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) transcription factor is a cellular sensor for oxidative stress. Regulation of nuclear Nrf2 signaling regulates antioxidant responses and protects organ structure and function. However, the role of Nrf2 in exercise- or contraction-induced ROS/RNS production in skeletal muscle is not clear. In this study, using differentiated C2C12 cells and electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) of muscle contraction, we explored whether Nrf2 plays a role in the skeletal muscle response to muscle contraction-induced ROS/RNS. We found that EPS (40 V, 1 Hz, 2 ms) stimulated ROS/RNS accumulation and Nrf2 activation. We also showed that expression of NQO1, HO-1 and GCLM increased after EPS-induced muscle contraction and was remarkably suppressed in cells with Nrf2 knockdown. We also found that the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated Nrf2 activation after EPS, whereas the nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) did not. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown after EPS markedly decreased ROS/RNS redox potential and cell viability and increased expression of the apoptosis marker Annexin V in C2C12 myotubes. These results indicate that Nrf2 activation and expression of Nrf2 regulated-genes protected muscle against the increased ROS caused by EPS-induced muscle contraction. Thus, our findings suggest that Nrf2 may be a key factor for preservation of muscle function during muscle contraction. PMID:26658309

  1. Sphere versus cylinder: the effect of packing on the structure of nonionic C12E6 micelles.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Briganti, G; Pierleoni, C

    2009-08-18

    Two independent series of calculations are performed simulating spherical and cylindrical C12E6 micelles in a temperature range around the experimental sphere-to-rod transition temperature for surfactant concentrations less than 20% by weight. A comparative analysis of these systems helps to shed light on the microscopic details of the micelle sphere-to-rod transition. In agreement with theoretical models, we find that spherical and cylindrical micelles have a different oil core packing; the core radius of a cylindrical micelle is reduced by a factor of 0.87 with respect to the core radius of a spherical micelle. Despite this contraction, the specific volume of the alkyl tails is larger in a cylindrical micelle than in a spherical micelle. In both geometries, this specific volume follows the same linear increase with temperature. Density measurement experiments are also performed in order to evaluate the specific volume of the hydrophobic tail of surfactants of the C12Ej family with j ranging from 5 to 8. We observe a good agreement between experimental data and simulation results. Our simulations also show that the spatial distribution of the head groups in the interface is more effective in screening the oil core in the cylindrical aggregate than in the spherical aggregate, reducing by a factor of 2 the oil surface per monomer exposed to water. This screening accounts for a free-energy difference of Deltafs=fssph-fscyl approximately +2.5kBT per monomer and mirrors the essential role that the hydrophobic interactions have on the shape transition. We also find that the different interface packing correlates with different conformations and flexibility of the hydrophilic fragments E6, that appear as an entropic reservoir for the transition. Finally, comparing the degree of hydration of a spherical micelle at T=283 K with that of a cylindrical micelle at T=318 K, we observe an amount of dehydration in agreement with reported experimental data across the sphere

  2. Local Control and Outcome in Children with Localized Vaginal Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report from the Soft Tissue Sarcoma Committee of the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Walterhouse, David O.; Meza, Jane L.; Breneman, John C.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Pappo, Alberto S.; Arndt, Carola; Raney, R. Beverly; Meyer, William H.; Hawkins, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The local control approach for girls with non-resected vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) enrolled onto Intergroup RMS Study Group (IRSG)/Children’s Oncology Group (COG) studies has differed from that used at other primary sites by delaying or eliminating radiotherapy (RT) based on response achieved with chemotherapy and delayed primary resection. Procedures We reviewed locoregional treatment and outcome for patients with localized RMS of the vagina on the two most recent COG low-risk RMS studies. Results Forty-one patients with localized vaginal RMS were enrolled: 25 onto D9602 and 16 onto Subset 2 of ARST0331. Only four of the 39 with non-resected tumors received RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 26% on D9602, and the 2-year cumulative incidence of local recurrence was 43% on ARST0331. Increased local failure rates appeared to correlate with chemotherapy regimens that incorporated lower cumulative doses of cyclophosphamide. Estimated 5-year and 2-year failure free survival rates were 70% (95% CI: 46%, 84%) on D9602 and 42% (95% CI: 11%, 70%) on ARST0331, respectively. Conclusions To prevent local recurrence, we recommend a local control approach for patients with non-resected RMS of the vagina that is similar to that used for other primary sites and includes RT. We recognize that potential long-term effects of RT are sometimes unacceptable, especially for children less than 24 months of age. However, when making the decision to eliminate RT, the risk of local recurrence must be considered especially when using a chemotherapy regimen with a total cumulative cyclophosphamide dose of ≤ 4.8 g/m2. PMID:21298768

  3. 77 FR 7576 - Farm, Ranch, and Rural Communities Committee (FRRCC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... racial and ethnic groups. In selecting Committee members, EPA will seek candidates who possess: Extensive professional knowledge of agricultural issues and environmental policy; a demonstrated ability to examine...

  4. 77 FR 16316 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting The Shipping Coordinating Committee (SHC) will conduct an... . Dated: March 9, 2012. Brian Robinson, Executive Secretary, Shipping Coordinating Committee,...

  5. Unambiguous Identification of the Second 2+ State in C12 and the Structure of the Hoyle State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, W. R.; Ahmed, M. W.; Bromberger, B.; Stave, S. C.; Breskin, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Delbar, Th.; Gai, M.; Henshaw, S. S.; Mueller, J. M.; Sun, C.; Tittelmeier, K.; Weller, H. R.; Wu, Y. K.

    2013-04-01

    The second Jπ=2+ state of C12, predicted over 50 years ago as an excitation of the Hoyle state, has been unambiguously identified using the C12(γ,α0)Be8 reaction. The alpha particles produced by the photodisintegration of C12 were detected using an optical time projection chamber. Data were collected at beam energies between 9.1 and 10.7 MeV using the intense nearly monoenergetic gamma-ray beams at the HIγS facility. The measured angular distributions determine the cross section and the E1-E2 relative phases as a function of energy leading to an unambiguous identification of the second 2+ state in C12 at 10.03(11) MeV, with a total width of 800(130) keV and a ground state gamma-decay width of 60(10) meV; B(E2:22+→01+)=0.73(13)e2fm4 [or 0.45(8) W.u.]. The Hoyle state and its rotational 2+ state that are more extended than the ground state of C12 presents a challenge and constraints for models attempting to reveal the nature of three alpha-particle states in C12. Specifically, it challenges the ab initio lattice effective field theory calculations that predict similar rms radii for the ground state and the Hoyle state.

  6. Developmental Changes is Expression of Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Cultures of C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Vaughn, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists have been reported to modulate growth in several mammalian and avian species, and bAR agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through this receptor. Because of the importance of bAR regulation on muscle protein metabolism in muscle cells, the objectives of this study were to determine the developmental expression pattern of the bAR population in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, and to analyze changes in both the quantity and isoform expression of the major muscle protein, myosin. The number of bAR in mononucleated C2C12 cells was approximately 8,000 bAR per cell, which is comparable with the population reported in several other nonmuscle cell types. However, the bar population increased after myoblast fusion to greater than 50,000 bAR per muscle cell equivalent. The reasons for this apparent over-expression of bAR in C2C12 cells is not known. The quantity of myosin also increased after C2C12 myoblast fusion, but the quantity of myosin was less than that reported in primary muscle cell cultures. Finally, at least five different isoforms of myosin heavy chain could be resolved in C2C12 cells, and three of these exhibited either increased or decreased developmental regulation relative to the others. Thus, C2C12 myoblasts undergo developmental regulation of bAR population and myosin heavy chain isoform expression.

  7. Perspectives and practical applications of medical oncologists on defensive medicine (SYSIPHUS study): a study of the Palliative Care Working Committee of the Turkish Oncology Group (TOG).

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Cay-Senler, Filiz; Yavuzsen, Tugba; Turhal, Serdar; Akman, Tulay; Komurcu, Seref; Cehreli, Ruksan; Ozyilkan, Ozgur

    2015-04-01

    Defensive medicine occasionally indulges unnecessary treatment requests to defend against lawsuits for medical errors and the use of unapproved medical applications. This study determines the attitudes and orientations of medical oncologists on defensive medicine. A cross-sectional survey was sent by e-mail to medical oncologists. The survey was designed to determine the participants' demographic characteristics and defensive medicine practices. The survey measured the attitudes about defensive medicine practices of the oncologists based on a five-point Likert scale (never, rarely, sometimes, often, and always). One hundred and forty-six of a total of 402 physicians serving in oncology were fully filled, and the rate of return invitation was 36 %. The majority of participants were male, with a duration of between 7 and 9 years of work as university hospital officials, and the mean age was 46 ± 9 (years). International guidelines were followed in the most common is NCCN, and the majority of respondents felt that the application of these guidelines improves their defensive medicine. All participants of defensive medicine who stand on the basis of the definition were found to be more afraid of complaints by patients' relatives. Physicians of 45 % was noted that applying defensive medicine. Among the participants were the most frequent checkups of positive defensive approach is defined as increasing or shortening the follow-up period, while avoiding high-risk patients were detected as described in the definition of negative defensive medicine. Both professional groups in both the positive and negative defensive medicine approach defensive medicine approach, academic tasks, work experience and job time, there was a significant correlation between the location. Made in single- and multi-variable analyses, positions were identified both positive and negative defensive medicine is an independent risk factor for direction. Improving the working conditions of young

  8. Response of bacterial pdo1, nah, and C12O genes to aged soil PAH pollution in a coke factory area.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue-Mei; Liu, Yu-Rong; Zheng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Xia; He, Ji-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Soil pollution caused by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is threatening human health and environmental safety. Investigating the relative prevalence of different PAH-degrading genes in PAH-polluted soils and searching for potential bioindicators reflecting the impact of PAH pollution on microbial communities are useful for microbial monitoring, risk evaluation, and potential bioremediation of soils polluted by PAHs. In this study, three functional genes, pdo1, nah, and C12O, which might be involved in the degradation of PAHs from a coke factory, were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and clone library approaches. The results showed that the pdo1 and C12O genes were more abundant than the nah gene in the soils. There was a significantly positive relationship between the nah or pdo1 gene abundances and PAH content, while there was no correlation between C12O gene abundance and PAH content. Analyses of clone libraries showed that all the pdo1 sequences were grouped into Mycobacterium, while all the nah sequences were classified into three groups: Pseudomonas, Comamonas, and Polaromonas. These results indicated that the abundances of nah and pdo1 genes were positively influenced by levels of PAHs in soil and could be potential microbial indicators reflecting the impact of soil PAH pollution and that Mycobacteria were one of the most prevalent PAHs degraders in these PAH-polluted soils. Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation analyses between microbial parameters and environmental factors revealed that total carbon (TC), total nitrogen (TN), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) had positive effects on the abundances of all PAH-degrading genes. It suggests that increasing TC, TN, and DOC inputs could be a useful way to remediate PAH-polluted soils. PMID:24777329

  9. The Investment Committee. Effective Committees. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, John H.

    1997-01-01

    The investment committee of the college or university governing board is charged with determining, overseeing, and assessing the policies and processes by which institutional funds are invested. The committee has fiduciary duty to ensure that the terms of investment of donors' gifts are met and to maximize investment returns within an appropriate…

  10. The Executive Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legon, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  11. The Audit Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staisloff, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  12. The Compensation Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, Thomas K.

    2013-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  13. The Facilities Committee. AGB Effective Committee Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Harvey H.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is part of an Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) series devoted to strengthening the role of key standing committees of governing boards. While there is no optimum committee system for institutions of higher education, certain principles, practices, and procedures prevail. The best practices…

  14. In the long run...longitudinal studies of psychopathology in children. Committee on Child Psychology. Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry. Report no.143.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Longitudinal studies are difficult to do well. Too short a study and the results may be meaningless. Too long a study and the subjects cannot be found, money runs out, and research methods become seriously out of date. Despite these problems, there have been some longitudinal studies done that have greatly advanced our understanding of the nature and the treatment of psychopathology in childhood. Without these studies, much less would be known about the clinical course of important disorders, the effects of treatments, and the various risk and protective factors. None of these studies has been perfect. Some longitudinal studies did not focus on quite the right questions, some produced contradictory results, and others produced results that were hard to interpret. What have we learned from the longitudinal studies reviewed in this Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry (GAP) report? Many of the things that we have learned have been surprising--even counterintuitive. Pre- and perinatal insults need not necessarily lead to serious consequences in later life. Premature infants, if raised in nondeprived settings, are not likely to be mentally retarded or learning disabled. Today, of course, premature infants who would not have been kept alive 15 years ago are surviving. Will this advancement led to an untoward outcome? We do not know. New longitudinal studies need to be done. Certain serious illnesses emerging later in childhood may be associated with a greater risk of psychopathology. This risk is true at least for those with asthma. Psychological factors, such as psychological stress, also may lead to exacerbation of asthmatic attacks. Whether other illnesses are associated with a greater risk of psychopathology simply has not been studied adequately. Infant temperamental characteristics can be classified and measured; however, they appear to predict little in terms of later personality development or psychopathology. Although temperamental characteristics measured

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta1 upregulates myostatin expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Budasz-Rwiderska, M; Jank, M; Motyl, T

    2005-06-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) belong to the same TGF-beta superfamily of proteins. They are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle growth and development as well as muscle catabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MSTN and TGF-beta1 expression in proliferating and differentiating mouse C2C12 myoblasts cultured in normal and catabolic conditions and to evaluate the effect of exogenous TGF-beta1 as well as "knock down" of TGF-beta1 receptor type II on MSTN expression in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells. The direct effect of TGF-beta1 on myostatin was also examined. Myostatin expression increased gradually with cell confluency in proliferating cultures, while the level of TGF-beta1, detected in the form of a 100 kDa small latent complex diminished. Myostatin expression was accompanied by a partial cell cycle arrest. Three forms of myostatin were found: a 52 kDa precursor, a 40 kDa latency associated propeptide, and a 26 kDa active peptide. A decrease in myostatin and TGF-beta1 levels was observed during the first three days of differentiation, which was subsequently followed by significant increase of their expression during next three to four days of differentiation. Catabolic state induced by dexamethasone significantly increased the level of all forms of myostatin as well as latent (100 kDa) and active (25 kDa) forms of TGF-beta1 in differentiating myoblasts in a dose dependent manner. Exogenous TGF-beta1 (2 ng/ml) significantly increased myostatin levels both in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, whereas silencing of the TGF-beta1 receptor II gene significantly lowered myostatin level in examined cells. The presented results indicate that TGF-beta1 may control myostatin-related regulation of myogenesis through up-regulation of myostatin, predominantly in the course of terminal differentiation and glucocorticoid-dependent catabolic stimulation. PMID

  16. G3-C12 Peptide Reverses Galectin-3 from Foe to Friend for Active Targeting Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Li, Lian; Yang, Qingqing; Shan, Wei; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Galectin-3 is overexpressed by numerous carcinomas and is a potential target for active tumor treatments. On the other hand, galectin-3 also plays a key role in cancer progression and prevents cells from undergoing apoptosis, thereby offsetting the benefits of active targeting drugs. However, the relative contribution of the protective antiapoptotic effects of galectin-3 and the proapoptotic effects of galectin-3-targeted therapies has remained yet unrevealed. Here, we show that a galectin-3-binding peptide G3-C12 could reverse galectin-3 from foe to friend for active targeting delivery system. Results showed G3-C12 modified N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymer doxorubicin conjugates (G3-C12-HPMA-Dox) could internalize into galectin-3 overexpressed PC-3 cells via a highly specific ligand-receptor pathway (2.2 times higher cellular internalization than HPMA-Dox). The internalized Dox stimulated the translocation of galectin-3 to the mitochondria to prevent from apoptosis. In turn, this caused G3-C12-HPMA-Dox to concentrate into the mitochondria after binding to galectin-3 intracellularly. Initially, mitochondrial galectin-3 weakened Dox-induced mitochondrial damage; however, as time progressed, G3-C12 active-mediation allowed increasing amounts of Dox to be delivered to the mitochondria, which eventually induced higher level of apoptosis than nontargeted copolymers. In addition, G3-C12 downregulates galectin-3 expression, 0.43 times lower than control cells, which could possibly be responsible for the suppressed cell migration. Thus, G3-C12 peptide exerts sequential targeting to both cell membrane and mitochondria via regulating galectin-3, and eventually reverses and overcomes the protective effects of galectin-3; therefore, it could be a promising agent for the treatment of galectin-3-overexpressing cancers. PMID:26393405

  17. Lists of committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Lists of the members of the International Programme Advisory Committee of the 21st IAEA Technical Meeting on Research using Small Fusion Devices(RUSFD), the International Advisory Committee of the 15th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP) and the Local Organizing Committee of the Joint RUSFD, LAWPP Meeting can be found in the PDF.

  18. Advisory Committee Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Hawk Coll., Moline, IL.

    An advisory committee is generally comprised of persons outside the education profession who have specialized knowledge in a given area. The committee advises, makes recommendations, and gives service to the college and its students, instructors, and administrators. At Black Hawk College, there are four types of advisory committees: community,…

  19. Summary of the Review of Committee Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Carol K.

    Additional perspective on the program proposals developed by members of the Committee for National Program Priorities in Teacher Education was provided by a group of external reviewers representing community groups, school administrators and teachers, critics of teacher education, associations for professional groups in education, and university…

  20. Melatonin behavior in restoring chemical damaged C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Salucci, Sara; Baldassarri, Valentina; Canonico, Barbara; Burattini, Sabrina; Battistelli, Michela; Guescini, Michele; Papa, Stefano; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2016-06-01

    It is known that, besides a wide range of functions, melatonin provides protection against oxidative stress, thanks to its ability to act, directly, as a free radical scavenger and, indirectly, by stimulating antioxidant enzymes production and mitochondrial electron transport chain efficiency. Oxidative stress is one of the major players in initiating apoptotic cell death in skeletal muscle, as well as in other tissues. Apoptosis is essential for skeletal muscle development and homeostasis; nevertheless, its misregulation has been frequently observed in several myopathies, in sarcopenia, as well as in denervation and disuse. Melatonin activity was investigated in undifferentiated C2C12 skeletal muscle cells, after exposure to various apoptotic chemical triggers, chosen for their different mechanisms of action. Cells were pretreated with melatonin and then exposed to hydrogen peroxide, etoposide and staurosporine. Morphofunctional and molecular analyses show that in myoblasts melatonin prevents oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by chemicals following, at least in part, the mitochondria pathway. These results confirm melatonin ability to act as an antioxidant and antiapoptotic molecule in skeletal muscle cells, thus suggesting a possible therapeutic strategy for myopathies involving apoptosis misregulation. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:532-540, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059940

  1. 13C /12C Fractionation of methane during oxidation in a temperate forested soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Stanley C.; Crill, Patrick M.; Brailsford, Gordon W.

    1994-03-01

    We have made measurements of the 13C /12C fractionation of methane (CH 4) during microbial oxidation by an upland temperate soil from College Woods, New Hampshire, using both in situ and laboratory incubation measurements. Uptake rates of 1-4.8 mg CH 4/m 2/d were measured during the active season in New Hampshire while rates of uptake were 2.6-6.8 mg CH 4/m 2/d in jars used for incubation studies. The fractionation factor, calculated from field measurements, was α = 0.978 ± .004. This corresponds to a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of ki 2/k 13 = 1.022 ± .004 . Only a small dependence on temperature was noted for air temperatures between 281 and 296 K. Our results indicate that the KIE of soil CH 4 oxidation is controlled by physical parameters based on gaseous diffusion into the soil. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the global CH 4 budget and balancing CH 4 sources and sinks through the use of δ13CH 4 measurements.

  2. Carbon isotope ratio (13C/12C) of pine honey and detection of HFCS adulteration.

    PubMed

    Çinar, Serap B; Ekşi, Aziz; Coşkun, İlknur

    2014-08-15

    Carbon isotope ratio ((13)C/(12)C=δ(13)C) of 100 pine honey samples collected from 9 different localities by Mugla region (Turkey) in years 2006, 2007 and 2008 were investigated. The δ(13)Cprotein value of honey samples ranged between -23.7 and -26.6‰, while the δ(13)Choney value varied between -22.7 and -27‰. For 90% of the samples, the difference in the C isotope ratio of protein and honey fraction (δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon) was -1.0‰ and/or higher. Therefore, it can be said that the generally anticipated minimum value of C isotope difference (-1.0‰) for honey is also valid for pine honey. On the other hand, C4 sugar value (%), which was calculated from the δ(13)Cpro-δ(13)Chon difference, was found to be linearly correlated with the amount of adulterant (HFCS) in pine honey. These results indicate that C4 sugar value is a powerful criteria for detecting HFCS adulteration in pine honey. The δ(13)Choney and δ(13)Cprotein-δ(13)Choney values of the samples did not show any significant differences in terms of both year and locality (P>0.05), while the δ(13)Cprotein values showed significant differences due to year (P<0.05) but not due to locality (P>0.05). PMID:24679745

  3. Synthesis and antileishmanial activity of C7- and C12-functionalized dehydroabietylamine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, M Auxiliadora; Bilbao-Ramos, Pablo; Bolás-Fernández, Francisco; González-Cardenete, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    Abietane-type diterpenoids, either naturally occurring or synthetic, have shown a wide range of pharmacological actions, including antiprotozoal properties. In this study, we report on the antileishmanial evaluation of a series of (+)-dehydroabietylamine derivatives functionalized at C7 and/or C12. Thus, the activity in vitro against Leishmania infantum, Leishmania donovani, Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania guyanensis, was studied. Most of the benzamide derivatives showed activities at low micromolar concentration against cultured promastigotes of Leishmania spp. (IC50 = 2.2-46.8 μM), without cytotoxicity on J774 macrophage cells. Compound 15, an acetamide, was found to be the most active leishmanicidal agent, though it presented some cytotoxicity on J774 cells. Among the benzamide derivatives, compounds 8 and 10, were also active against L. infantum intracellular amastigotes, being 18- and 23-fold more potent than the reference compound miltefosine, respectively. Some structure-activity relationships have been identified for the antileishmanial activity in these dehydroabietylamine derivatives. PMID:27318121

  4. Assessment of the GECKO-A modeling tool using chamber observations for C12 alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; La, S.; Ouzebidour, F.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Yee, L. D.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zhang, X.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production and ageing is the result of atmospheric oxidation processes leading to the progressive formation of organic species with higher oxidation state and lower volatility. Explicit chemical mechanisms reflect our understanding of these multigenerational oxidation steps. Major uncertainties remain concerning the processes leading to SOA formation and the development, assessment and improvement of such explicit schemes is therefore a key issue. The development of explicit mechanism to describe the oxidation of long chain hydrocarbons is however a challenge. Indeed, explicit oxidation schemes involve a large number of reactions and secondary organic species, far exceeding the size of chemical schemes that can be written manually. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is a computer program designed to overcome this difficulty. GECKO-A generates gas phase oxidation schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In this study, we examine the ability of the generated schemes to explain SOA formation observed in the Caltech Environmental Chambers from various C12 alkane isomers and under high NOx and low NOx conditions. First results show that the model overestimates both the SOA yields and the O/C ratios. Various sensitivity tests are performed to explore processes that might be responsible for these disagreements.

  5. Hes6 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Caroline M.P.; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Dunham, Ian; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H.

    2011-07-01

    Hes6 is a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors that regulate proliferating cell fate in development and is known to be expressed in developing muscle. Here we investigate its function in myogenesis in vitro. We show that Hes6 is a direct transcriptional target of the myogenic transcription factors MyoD and Myf5, indicating that it is integral to the myogenic transcriptional program. The localization of Hes6 protein changes during differentiation, becoming predominantly nuclear. Knockdown of Hes6 mRNA levels by siRNA has no effect on cell cycle exit or induction of myosin heavy chain expression in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, but F-actin filament formation is disrupted and both cell motility and myoblast fusion are reduced. The knockdown phenotype is rescued by expression of Hes6 cDNA resistant to siRNA. These results define a novel role for Hes6 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics in post mitotic myoblasts.

  6. Rotenone induces reductive stress and triacylglycerol deposition in C2C12 cells.

    PubMed

    He, Quan; Wang, Miao; Petucci, Christopher; Gardell, Stephen J; Han, Xianlin

    2013-12-01

    Environmental rotenone is associated with Parkinson's disease due to its inhibitory property to the complex I of mitochondrial respiration chain. Although environmental pollution has been postulated as a causal factor for the increasing prevalence of obesity, the role of rotenone in the pathogenesis of obesity has not been studied. We employed muscle-derived cell C2C12 as a model and shotgun lipidomics as a tool for lipid analysis and found that treatment with rotenone led to the profound deposition of intracellular triacylglycerol (TAG) in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. The TAG deposition resulted from complex I inhibition. Further studies revealed that rotenone induced mitochondrial stress as shown by decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate, increased NADH/NAD+ ratio (i.e., reductive stress) and mitochondrial metabolites. We demonstrated that rotenone activated fatty acid de novo synthesis and TAG synthesis and ultimately resulted in intracellular TAG deposition. These studies suggested that increased mitochondrial stresses might be an underlying mechanism responsible for TAG accumulation manifest in obesity. PMID:24104397

  7. Mitochondria dysfunction in lung cancer-induced muscle wasting in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Julie B.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Cancer cachexia is a syndrome which results in severe loss of muscle mass and marked fatigue. Conditioned media from cachexia-inducing cancer cells triggers metabolic dysfunction in skeletal muscle, including decreased mitochondrial respiration, which may contribute to fatigue. We hypothesized that Lewis lung carcinoma conditioned medium (LCM) would impair the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) and increase production of reactive oxygen species, ultimately leading to decreased mitochondrial respiration. We incubated C2C12 myotubes with LCM for 30 min, 2, 4, 24 or 48 h. We measured protein content by western blot; oxidant production by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF), and MitoSox; cytochrome c oxidase activity by oxidation of cytochrome c substrate; and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of intact myotubes by Seahorse XF Analyzer. Results: LCM treatment for 2 or 24 h decreased basal OCR and ATP-related OCR, but did not alter the content of mitochondrial complexes I, III, IV and V. LCM treatment caused a transient rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS). In particular, mitochondrial superoxide (MitoSOX) was elevated at 2 h. 4-Hydroxynonenal, a marker of oxidative stress, was elevated in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of cell lysates after LCM treatment. Conclusion: These data show that lung cancer-conditioned media alters electron flow in the ETC and increases mitochondrial ROS production, both of which may ultimately impair aerobic metabolism and decrease muscle endurance. PMID:25566096

  8. Optogenetic induction of contractile ability in immature C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Toshifumi; Ishizuka, Toru; Morishima, Keisuke; Yawo, Hiromu

    2015-01-01

    Myoblasts can be differentiated into multinucleated myotubes, which provide a well-established and reproducible muscle cell model for skeletal myogenesis in vitro. However, under conventional differentiation conditions, each myotube rarely exhibits robust contraction as well as sarcomere arrangement. Here, we applied trains of optical stimulation (OS) to C2C12 myotubes, which were genetically engineered to express a channelrhodopsin variant, channelrhodopsin-green receiver (ChRGR), to investigate whether membrane depolarization facilitates the maturation of myotubes. We found that light pulses induced membrane depolarization and evoked action potentials in ChRGR-expressing myotubes. Regular alignments of sarcomeric proteins were patterned periodically after OS training. In contrast, untrained control myotubes rarely exhibited the striated patterns. OS-trained and untrained myotubes also differed in terms of their resting potential. OS training significantly increased the number of contractile myotubes. Treatment with nifedipine during OS training significantly decreased the fraction of contractile myotubes, whereas tetrodotoxin was less effective. These results suggest that oscillations of membrane potential and intracellular Ca2+ accompanied by OS promoted sarcomere assembly and the development of contractility during the myogenic process. These results also suggest that optogenetic techniques could be used to manipulate the activity-dependent process during myogenic development. PMID:25661648

  9. Engineering Escherichia coli for production of C12–C14 polyhydroxyalkanoate from glucose

    PubMed Central

    Agnew, Daniel E.; Stevermer, Amanda K.; Youngquist, J. Tyler; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Demand for sustainable materials motivates the development of microorganisms capable of synthesizing products from renewable substrates. A challenge to commercial production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), microbially derived polyesters, is engineering metabolic pathways to produce a polymer with the desired monomer composition from an unrelated and renewable source. Here, we demonstrate a metabolic pathway for converting glucose into medium-chain-length (mcl)-PHA composed primarily of 3-hydroxydodecanoate monomers. This pathway combines fatty acid biosynthesis, an acyl-ACP thioesterase to generate desired C12 and C14 fatty acids, β-oxidation for conversion of fatty acids to (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoAs, and a PHA polymerase. A key finding is that Escherichia coli expresses multiple copies of enzymes involved in β-oxidation under aerobic conditions. To produce polyhydroxydodecanoate, an acyl-ACP thioesterase (BTE), an enoyl-CoA hydratase (phaJ3), and mcl-PHA polymerase (phaC2) were overexpressed in E. coli ΔfadRABIJ. Yields were improved through expression of an acyl-CoA synthetase resulting in production over 15% CDW – the highest reported production of mcl-PHA of a defined composition from an unrelated carbon source. PMID:23141473

  10. Organocatalytic Upgrading of Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethyl Furfural to C10 and C12 Furoins with Quantitative Yield and Atom-Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Hongjun; Chen, Eugene Y. X.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the upgrading of C5 furfural (FF) and C6 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) into C10 and C12 furoins as higher energy-density intermediates for renewable chemicals, materials, and biofuels. This work utilizes the organocatalytic approach, using the in situ generated N,S-heterocyclic carbene catalyst derived from thiazolium ionic liquids (ILs), to achieve highly efficient self-coupling reactions of FF and HMF. Specifically, variations of the thiazolium IL structure have led to the most active and efficient catalyst system of the current series, which is derived from a new thiazolium IL carrying the electron-donating acetate group at the 5-ring position. For FF coupling by this IL (0.1 mol %, 60 °C, 1 h), when combined with Et3N, furoin was obtained in >99% yield. A 97% yield of the C12 furoin was also achieved from the HMF coupling by this catalyst system (10 mol % loading, 120 °C, 3 h). On the other hand, the thiazolium IL bearing the electron-withdrawing group at the 5-ring position is the least active and efficient catalyst. The mechanistic aspects of the coupling reaction by the thiazolium catalyst system have also been examined and a mechanism has been proposed. PMID:25830482

  11. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers, t10c12 and c9t11, are differentially incorporated into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Goedecke, Julia H; Rae, Dale E; Smuts, Cornelius M; Lambert, Estelle V; O'Shea, Marianne

    2009-11-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a popular supplement believed to enhance immune function, body composition and insulin sensitivity, but results of scientific studies investigating its effects are conflicting. The isomer- and tissue-specific effects of CLA may explain these conflicting results. Therefore, this study quantified the incorporation of the c9t11 and t10c12 CLA isomers into adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in response to supplementation in healthy, regularly-exercising, non-obese persons. The CLA group (n = 14) ingested 3.9 g per day CLA (50:50 t9c11:c10t12) and the placebo group (n = 11) 3.9 g per day high-oleic-acid sunflower oil for 12 weeks. Following supplementation, the t10c12 isomer was incorporated into adipose tissue triacylglycerol (P < 0.001), and the c9t11 isomer tended to increase in skeletal muscle phospholipids (P = 0.056). Therefore, human adipose tissue and skeletal muscle are enriched with CLA in an isomer-specific manner. PMID:19851798

  12. Cultured C2C12 cell lines as a model for assessment of bacterial attachment to bovine primary muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark L

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms of bacterial attachment to meat tissues need to be understood to enhance meat safety interventions. However, little is known about attachment of foodborne pathogens to meat muscle cells. In this study, attachment of six Escherichia coli and two Salmonella strains to primary bovine muscle cells and a cultured muscle cell line, C2C12, was measured, including the effect of temperature. At 37°C, all but one strain (EC623) attached to C2C12 cells, whereas only five of eight strains (M23Sr, H10407, EC473, Sal1729a and Sal691) attached to primary cells. At 10 °C, two strains (H10407 and EC473) attached to C2C12 cells, compared to four strains (M23Sr, EC614, H10407 and Sal1729a) of primary cells. Comparing all strains at both temperatures, EC614 displayed the highest CFU per C2C12 cell (4.60±2.02CFU/muscle cell at 37 °C), whereas greater numbers of M23Sr attached per primary cell (51.88±39.43CFU/muscle cell at 37 °C). This study indicates that primary bovine muscle cells may provide a more relevant model system to study bacterial attachment to beef carcasses compared to cell lines such as C2C12. PMID:23501253

  13. Acute toxicity of the cationic surfactant C12-benzalkonium in different bioassays: how test design affects bioavailability and effect concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Geurts, Marc; Sjollema, Sascha B; Kramer, Nynke I; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2014-03-01

    Using an ion-exchange-based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method, the freely dissolved concentrations of C12-benzalkonium were measured in different toxicity assays, including 1) immobilization of Daphnia magna in the presence or absence of dissolved humic acid; 2) mortality of Lumbriculus variegatus in the presence or absence of a suspension of Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) sediment; 3) photosystem II inhibition of green algae Chlorella vulgaris; and 4) viability of in vitro rainbow trout gill cell line (RTgill-W1) in the presence or absence of serum proteins. Furthermore, the loss from chemical adsorption to the different test vessels used in these tests was also determined. The C12-benzalkonium sorption isotherms to the different sorbent phases were established as well. Our results show that the freely dissolved concentration is a better indicator of the actual exposure concentration than the nominal or total concentration in most test assays. Daphnia was the most sensitive species to C12-benzalkonium. The acute Daphnia and Lumbriculus tests both showed no enhanced toxicity from possible ingestion of sorbed C12-benzalkonium in comparison with water-only exposure, which is in accordance with the equilibrium partitioning theory. Moreover, the present study demonstrates that commonly used sorbent phases can strongly affect bioavailability and observed effect concentrations for C12-benzalkonium. Even stronger effects of decreased actual exposure concentrations resulting from sorption to test vessels, cells, and sorbent phases can be expected for more hydrophobic cationic surfactants. PMID:24273010

  14. Potentiated Osteoinductivity via Cotransfection with BMP-2 and VEGF Genes in Microencapsulated C2C12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Qiao, Han; Fan, Qiming; Zhang, Shuhong; Tang, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Microcapsules with entrapped cells hold great promise for repairing bone defects. Unfortunately, the osteoinductivity of microcapsules has been restricted by many factors, among which the deficiency of functional proteins is a significant priority. We potentiated the osteoinductivity of microencapsulated cells via cotransfection with BMP-2 and VEGF genes. Various tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and cell lines were compared for BMP-2 and VEGF cotransfection. Ethidium bromide (EB)/Calcein AM staining revealed that all of the cell categories could survive for 4 weeks after microencapsulation. An ELISA assay indicated that all microencapsulated BMP-2 or VEGF transfected cells could secrete gene products constitutively for 1 month. Particularly, the recombinant microencapsulated C2C12 cells released the most desirable level of BMP-2 and VEGF. Further experiments demonstrated that microencapsulated BMP-2 and VEGF cotransfected C2C12 cells generated both BMP-2 and VEGF for 4 weeks. Additionally, the cotransfection of BMP-2 and VEGF in microencapsulated C2C12 cells showed a stronger osteogenic induction against BMSCs than individual BMP-2-transfected microencapsulated C2C12 cells. These results demonstrated that the cotransfection of BMP-2 and VEGF into microencapsulated C2C12 cells is of potent utility for the potentiation of bone regeneration, which would provide a promising clinical strategy for cellular therapy in bone defects. PMID:26451370

  15. 11 CFR 116.2 - Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and authorized committees. 116.2 Section 116.2 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL DEBTS OWED BY CANDIDATES AND POLITICAL COMMITTEES § 116.2 Debts owed by terminating committees, ongoing committees, and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  17. 40 CFR 721.3152 - Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates (salts). 721.3152 Section 721... Ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl sulfates... ethanaminium, N-ethyl-2-hydroxy-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-, diester with C12-18 fatty acids, ethyl...

  18. Chronic reactive oxygen species exposure inhibits glucose uptake and causes insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongwen; Heng, Baoli; He, Wenfang; Shi, Liping; Lai, Caiyong; Xiao, Long; Ren, Haolin; Mo, Shijie; Su, Zexuan

    2016-09-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important regulator in cellular signaling transduction, and many previous studies have indicated that acute ROS stimulation improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. In the study, we found that chronic ROS treatment caused serious insulin resistance in C2C12 myotubes. Glucose uptake and consumption assay indicated that pretreatment with 80 μM H2O2 for 2 h inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes, and the reason for it, is that chronic H2O2 treatment decreased insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation from cell plasma to cell membrane. Moreover, Akt2 phosphorylation depended on insulin was reduced in C2C12 myotubes of chronic H2O2 treatment. Together, this study provides further demonstration that chronic ROS stress is associated with insulin resistance of skeletal muscle in the progression of type 2 diabetes. PMID:27501754

  19. Using teams and committees effectively.

    PubMed

    Spilker, B

    1998-09-01

    In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals. PMID:15616679

  20. Investigating 13C +12C reaction by the activation method. Sensitivity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesneanu, Daniela; Trache, L.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D.; Straticiuc, M.; Burducea, I.; Blebea-Apostu, A. M.; Gomoiu, C. M.; Tang, X.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed experiments to check the limits of sensitivity of the activation method using the new 3 MV Tandetron accelerator and the low and ultra-low background laboratories of the "Horia Hulubei" National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). We have used the 12C +13C reaction at beam energies Elab= 6, 7 and 8 MeV. The knowledge of this fusion cross section at deep sub-barrier energies is of interest for astrophysical applications, as it provides an upper limit for the fusion cross section of 12C +12C over a wide energy range. A 13C beam with intensities 0.5-2 particleμA was provided by the accelerator and used to bombard graphite targets, resulting in activation with 24Na from the 12C (13C ,p) reaction. The 1369 and 2754 keV gamma-rays from 24Na de-activation were clearly observed in the spectra obtained in two different laboratories used for measurements at low and ultralow background: one at the surface and one located underground in the Unirea salt mine from Slanic Prahova, Romania. In the underground laboratory, for Elab = 6 MeV we have measured an activity of 0.085 ± 0.011 Bq, corresponding to cross sections of 1-3 nb. This demonstrates that it is possible to measure 12C targets irradiated at lower energies for at least 10 times lower cross sections than before β-γ coincidences will lead us another factor of 10 lower, proving that this installations can be successfully used for nuclear astrophysics measurements.

  1. Line Positions and Intensities for the ν12 Band of 13C12CH_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2014-06-01

    High-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of mono-substituted 13C-ethane (13C12CH_6) in the 12.2 μm region were recorded with a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The spectra were obtained for four sample pressures at three different temperatures between 130 and 208 K using a 99% 13C-enriched ethane sample contained in a 20.38-cm long coolable absorption cell. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique was used to fit the same intervals in the four spectra simultaneously to determine line positions and intensities. Similar to our previous analyses of 12C_2H_6 spectra in this same region, constraints were applied to accurately fit each pair of doublet components arising from torsional Coriolis interaction of the excited ν12 = 1 state with the nearby torsional ν_6 = 3 state. Line intensities corresponding to each spectrum temperature (130 K, 178 K and 208 K) are reported for 1660 ν12 absorption lines for which the assignments are known, and integrated intensities are estimated as the summation of the measured values. The measured line positions and intensities (re-scaled to 296 K) are compared with values in recent editions of spectroscopic databases. K. Sung, A. W. Mantz, L. R. Brown, et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc., 162 (2010) 124-134. D. C. Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. Malathy Devi, M. A. H. Smith and D. Atkins, JQSRT, 53 (1995) 705-721. V. Malathy Devi, C. P. Rinsland, D. Chris Benner, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 1234-1251 V. Malathy Devi, D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, et al., JQSRT, 111 (2010) 2481-2504. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Synthesis of Mitochondrial DNA Precursors during Myogenesis, an Analysis in Purified C2C12 Myotubes*

    PubMed Central

    Frangini, Miriam; Franzolin, Elisa; Chemello, Francesco; Laveder, Paolo; Romualdi, Chiara; Bianchi, Vera; Rampazzo, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    During myogenesis, myoblasts fuse into multinucleated myotubes that acquire the contractile fibrils and accessory structures typical of striated skeletal muscle fibers. To support the high energy requirements of muscle contraction, myogenesis entails an increase in mitochondrial (mt) mass with stimulation of mtDNA synthesis and consumption of DNA precursors (dNTPs). Myotubes are quiescent cells and as such down-regulate dNTP production despite a high demand for dNTPs. Although myogenesis has been studied extensively, changes in dNTP metabolism have not been examined specifically. In differentiating cultures of C2C12 myoblasts and purified myotubes, we analyzed expression and activities of enzymes of dNTP biosynthesis, dNTP pools, and the expansion of mtDNA. Myotubes exibited pronounced post-mitotic modifications of dNTP synthesis with a particularly marked down-regulation of de novo thymidylate synthesis. Expression profiling revealed the same pattern of enzyme down-regulation in adult murine muscles. The mtDNA increased steadily after myoblast fusion, turning over rapidly, as revealed after treatment with ethidium bromide. We individually down-regulated p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase, thymidine kinase 2, and deoxyguanosine kinase by siRNA transfection to examine how a further reduction of these synthetic enzymes impacted myotube development. Silencing of p53R2 had little effect, but silencing of either mt kinase caused 50% mtDNA depletion and an unexpected decrease of all four dNTP pools independently of the kinase specificity. We suggest that during development of myotubes the shortage of even a single dNTP may affect all four pools through dysregulation of ribonucleotide reduction and/or dissipation of the non-limiting dNTPs during unproductive elongation of new DNA chains. PMID:23297407

  3. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  4. Structure activity relationships in alkylammonium C12-gemini surfactants used as dermal permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sérgio M C; Sousa, João J S; Marques, Eduardo F; Pais, Alberto A C C; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability and the safety of a series of alkylammonium C12-gemini surfactants to act as permeation enhancers for three model drugs, namely lidocaine HCl, caffeine, and ketoprofen. In vitro permeation studies across dermatomed porcine skin were performed over 24 h, after pretreating the skin for 1 h with an enhancer solution 0.16 M dissolved in propylene glycol. The highest enhancement ratio (enhancement ratio (ER)=5.1) was obtained using G12-6-12, resulting in a cumulative amount of permeated lidocaine HCl of 156.5 μg cm−2. The studies with caffeine and ketoprofen revealed that the most effective gemini surfactant was the one with the shorter spacer, G12-2-12. The use of the latter resulted in an ER of 2.4 and 2.2 in the passive permeation of caffeine and ketoprofen, respectively. However, Azone was found to be the most effective permeation enhancer for ketoprofen, attaining a total of 138.4 μg cm−2 permeated, 2.7-fold over controls. This work demonstrates that gemini surfactants are effective in terms of increasing the permeation of drugs, especially in the case of hydrophilic ionized compounds, that do not easily cross the stratum corneum. Skin integrity evaluation studies did not indicate the existence of relevant changes in the skin structure after the use of the permeation enhancers, while the cytotoxicity studies allowed establishing a relative cytotoxicity profile including this class of compounds, single chain surfactants, and Azone. A dependence of the toxicity to HEK and to HDF cell lines on the spacer length of the various gemini molecules was found. PMID:23959685

  5. Change in viability of C2C12 myoblasts under compression, shear and oxidative challenges.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ye; Yao, Yifei; Wong, Singwan; Bian, Liming; Mak, Arthur F T

    2016-05-24

    Skeletal and epidermal loadings can damage muscle cells and contribute to the development of deep tissue injury (DTI) - a severe kind of pressure ulcers affecting many people with disability. Important predisposing factors include the multiaxial stress and strain fields in the internal tissues, particularly the vulnerable muscles around bony prominences. A careful study of the mechanical damage thresholds for muscle cell death is critical not only to the understanding of the formation of DTI, but also to the design of various body support surfaces for prevention. In this paper, we measured the mechanical damage thresholds of C2C12 myoblasts under prescribed compressive strains (15% and 30%) and shear strains (from 0% to 100%), and studied how oxidative stress, as caused potentially by reperfusion or inflammation, may affect such damage thresholds. A flat plate was used to apply a uniform compressive strain and a radially increasing shear strain on disks of Gelatin-methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogel with myoblasts encapsulated within. The percentages of cell death were estimated with propidium iodide (PI) and calcein AM staining. Results suggested that cell death depended on both the level and duration of the applied strain. There seemed to be a non-linear coupling between compression and shear. Muscle cells often need to function biomechanically in challenging oxidative environments. To study how oxidative stress may affect the mechanical damage thresholds of myoblasts, cell viability under compressive and shear strains was also studied after the cells were pre-treated for different durations (1h and 20h) with different concentrations (0.1mM and 0.5mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress can either compromise or enhance the cellular resistance to shear damage, depending on the level and duration of the oxidative exposure. PMID:27017299

  6. The Mouse C2C12 Myoblast Cell Surface N-Linked Glycoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Gundry, Rebekah L.; Raginski, Kimberly; Tarasova, Yelena; Tchernyshyov, Irina; Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Elliott, Steven T.; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous regeneration and repair mechanisms are responsible for replacing dead and damaged cells to maintain or enhance tissue and organ function, and one of the best examples of endogenous repair mechanisms involves skeletal muscle. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation of satellite cells and myoblasts toward myofibers are not fully understood, cell surface proteins that sense and respond to their environment play an important role. The cell surface capturing technology was used here to uncover the cell surface N-linked glycoprotein subproteome of myoblasts and to identify potential markers of myoblast differentiation. 128 bona fide cell surface-exposed N-linked glycoproteins, including 117 transmembrane, four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored, five extracellular matrix, and two membrane-associated proteins were identified from mouse C2C12 myoblasts. The data set revealed 36 cluster of differentiation-annotated proteins and confirmed the occupancy for 235 N-linked glycosylation sites. The identification of the N-glycosylation sites on the extracellular domain of the proteins allowed for the determination of the orientation of the identified proteins within the plasma membrane. One glycoprotein transmembrane orientation was found to be inconsistent with Swiss-Prot annotations, whereas ambiguous annotations for 14 other proteins were resolved. Several of the identified N-linked glycoproteins, including aquaporin-1 and β-sarcoglycan, were found in validation experiments to change in overall abundance as the myoblasts differentiate toward myotubes. Therefore, the strategy and data presented shed new light on the complexity of the myoblast cell surface subproteome and reveal new targets for the clinically important characterization of cell intermediates during myoblast differentiation into myotubes. PMID:19656770

  7. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  8. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  9. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...

  10. 50 CFR 453.05 - Committee meetings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.05 Committee meetings. (a) The committee shall meet at the call of...