Science.gov

Sample records for group organisms isolated

  1. Mutants of Group D1Salmonella Carrying the Somatic Antigen of Group A Organisms: Isolation and Serological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Sasaki, Terukatsu

    1974-01-01

    O antigen mutants were obtained from Salmonella durban, a group D1 organism, by treatment with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Serological studies demonstrated that the mutants lost the O-9 antigen factor of the parent organism but acquired the O-2 factor specific to group A Salmonella. Lipopolysaccharides of the mutant strains contained paratose which determines the specificity of O-2 factor. Tyvelose, present in the wild-type lipopolysaccharide, was not found in the mutants. H antigens and other biological characteristics of the mutant strains were the same as those of the wild-type organism. The present finding implies that group A Salmonella species might be derived from group D1 organisms. PMID:4587616

  2. Isolation of Hypervalent Group-16 Radicals and Their Application in Organic-Radical Batteries.

    PubMed

    Imada, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Ko; Kishi, Ryohei; Nakano, Masayoshi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Sekiguchi, Akira; Ogawa, Masahiro; Ohta, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yohsuke

    2016-01-20

    Using a newly prepared tridentate ligand, we isolated hypervalent sulfur and selenium radicals for the first time and characterized their structures. X-ray crystallography, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations revealed a three-coordinate hypervalent structure. Utilizing the reversible redox reactions between hypervalent radicals and the corresponding anions bearing Li(+), we developed organic radical batteries with these compounds as cathode-active materials. Furthermore, an all-radical battery, with these compounds as the cathode and a silyl radical as the anode, was developed that exhibited a practical discharge potential of ∼ 1.8 V and stable cycle performance, demonstrating the potential of these materials for use in metal-free batteries that can replace conventional Li-ion batteries where Li is used in the metal form. PMID:26721786

  3. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed. PMID:25200723

  4. Enteric group 17 in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Yang, D I; Chen, L C

    1989-11-01

    The Enteric Group 17, a new group of Enterobacteriaceae, has been classified (by the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.) based on its positive methyl-red test as well as its negative response to Voges-Proskauer, motility, rhamnose and melibiose fermentation tests. The isolation rate of Enteric Group 17 among 500 clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae in Taiwan is 1.8% (9/500). This finding recommends that Taiwan's hospital laboratories should pay particular attention to the possible presence of this bacteria when an isolate has reactions similar to that of Enterobacter cloacae or other members of the Enterobacter species. PMID:2700157

  5. The dynamics of isolated Local Group galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Bullock, James S.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Cohen, Judith G.

    2014-03-01

    We measured velocities of 862 individual red giant stars in seven isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group: NGC 6822, IC 1613, VV 124 (UGC 4879), the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy (DDO 216), Leo A, Cetus and Aquarius (DDO 210). We also computed velocity dispersions, taking into account the measurement uncertainties on individual stars. None of the isolated galaxies is denser than the densest Local Group satellite galaxy. Furthermore, the isolated dwarf galaxies have no obvious distinction in the velocity dispersion-half-light radius plane from the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way and M31. The similarity of the isolated and satellite galaxies' dynamics and structural parameters imposes limitations on environmental solutions to the `too big to fail' problem, wherein there are fewer dense dwarf satellite galaxies than would be expected from cold dark matter simulations. This data set also has many other applications for dwarf galaxy evolution, including the transformation of dwarf irregular into dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We intend to explore these issues in future work.

  6. Solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xianlong E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: pbeckman@brynmawr.edu

    2014-05-21

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the {sup 1}H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  7. Solid state 1H spin-lattice relaxation and isolated-molecule and cluster electronic structure calculations in organic molecular solids: The relationship between structure and methyl group and t-butyl group rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianlong; Mallory, Frank B.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Odhner, Hosanna R.; Beckmann, Peter A.

    2014-05-01

    We report ab initio density functional theory electronic structure calculations of rotational barriers for t-butyl groups and their constituent methyl groups both in the isolated molecules and in central molecules in clusters built from the X-ray structure in four t-butyl aromatic compounds. The X-ray structures have been reported previously. We also report and interpret the temperature dependence of the solid state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spin-lattice relaxation rate at 8.50, 22.5, and 53.0 MHz in one of the four compounds. Such experiments for the other three have been reported previously. We compare the computed barriers for methyl group and t-butyl group rotation in a central target molecule in the cluster with the activation energies determined from fitting the 1H NMR spin-lattice relaxation data. We formulate a dynamical model for the superposition of t-butyl group rotation and the rotation of the t-butyl group's constituent methyl groups. The four compounds are 2,7-di-t-butylpyrene, 1,4-di-t-butylbenzene, 2,6-di-t-butylnaphthalene, and 3-t-butylchrysene. We comment on the unusual ground state orientation of the t-butyl groups in the crystal of the pyrene and we comment on the unusually high rotational barrier of these t-butyl groups.

  8. Isolated galaxies, pairs, and groups of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuneva, I.; Kalinkov, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors searched for isolated galaxies, pairs and groups of galaxies in the CfA survey (Huchra et al. 1983). It was assumed that the distances to galaxies are given by R = V/H sub o, where H sub o = 100 km s(exp -1) Mpc(exp -1) and R greater than 6 Mpc. The searching procedure is close to those, applied to find superclusters of galaxies (Kalinkov and Kuneva 1985, 1986). A sphere with fixed radius r (asterisk) is described around each galaxy. The mean spatial density in the sphere is m. Let G (sup 1) be any galaxy and G (sup 2) be its nearest neighbor at a distance R sub 2. If R sub 2 exceeds the 95 percent quintile in the distribution of the distances of the second neighbors, then G (sup 1) is an isolated galaxy. Let the midpoint of G (sup 1) and G (sup 2) be O sub 2 and r sub 2=R sub 2/2. For the volume V sub 2, defined with the radius r sub 2, the density D sub 2 less than k mu, the galaxy G (sup 2) is a single one and the procedure for searching for pairs and groups, beginning with this object is over and we have to pass to another object. Here the authors present the groups - isolated and nonisolated - with n greater than 3, found in the CfA survey in the Northern galactic hemisphere. The parameters used are k = 10 and r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc. Table 1 contains: (1) the group number, (2) the galaxy, nearest to the multiplet center, (3) multiplicity n, (4) the brightest galaxy if it is not listed in (2); (5) and (6) are R.A. and Dec. (1950), (7) - mean distance D in Mpc. Further there are the mean density rho (8) of the multiplet (galaxies Mpc (exp -3), (9) the density rho (asterisk) for r (asterisk) = 5 Mpc and (10) the density rho sub g for the group with its nearest neighbor. The parenthesized digits for densities in the last three columns are powers of ten.

  9. Autonomously Organized and Funded IT Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichol, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Central IT organizations under stress often cannot offer a high level of service to groups with above-average support needs. An example of such a group would be a well-funded, research-oriented computer science department. Several factors contribute to the increased demand on IT organizations. Given the availability of relatively…

  10. Organizing and maintaining peer supervision groups.

    PubMed

    Counselman, Eleanor F; Weber, Robert L

    2004-04-01

    Peer supervision groups (PSGs) are attractive to psychotherapists for many reasons, including ongoing consultation and support, networking, and combating professional isolation. These leaderless groups offer opportunities for interpersonal learning from peers, and the parallel process within PSGs can be an important consultative tool. Unfortunately, many PSGs fail. PSGs benefit from careful attention to contract, task, gatekeeping, and group process, including resistances and dynamics of competition, and shame. PMID:15103999

  11. Organization of an undergraduate research group

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.; Noteboom, E.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally, research groups consist of senior physicists, staff members, and graduate students. The physics department at Creighton University has formed a Relativistic Heavy Ion physics research group consisting primarily of undergraduate students. Although senior staff and graduate students are actively involved, undergraduate research and the education of undergraduates is the focus of the group. The presentation, given by two undergraduate members of the group, will outline progress made in the group`s organization, discuss the benefits to the undergraduate group members, and speak to the balance which must be struck between education concerns and research goals.

  12. Improved methods for typing nontypeable isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Benson, Jeffrey A; Flores, Aurea E; Baker, Carol J; Hillier, Sharon L; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2002-06-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) are classified by capsular polysaccharide (CPS) type and by cell surface-expressed proteins (c and R). Isolates lacking detectable CPS are considered nontypeable (NT) although they frequently express surface proteins. Immunological and genetic methods were used to study 91 NT GBS isolates collected during surveillance studies for invasive disease or colonization in pregnant or non-pregnant women and neonates less than seven days of age. CPS production was upregulated by the addition of glucose and sodium phosphate to Todd-Hewitt broth (THB) and cells were extracted using hot HCl or mutanolysin. Extracts were tested with antisera for specific CPS types Ia, Ib, and II - VIII by double immunodiffusion (DD) in agarose. By mutanolysin extraction, 12 (13.2%) of the 91 isolates were typeable. In contrast, only four of these 12 newly typeable isolates tested positive for CPS with the HCl extracts of cells grown in modified THB. DNA was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI restriction with NT isolates grouped by protein profile to facilitate analysis. PFGE results of the NT isolates were compared to DNA profiles of typeable isolates and were correlated with the DD results. The DNA profiles of the newly typeable isolates were similar to profiles of isolates with corresponding defined CPS type. Of the remaining 78 NT isolates digested by SmaI, 63 (80.8%) had DNA profiles that resembled those of specific types of GBS. These approaches will be useful for classification of NT isolates in continued epidemiological surveillance associated with GBS vaccine trials. PMID:12139427

  13. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  14. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  15. 60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Shock isolator at center, pneumatic control group panel at left, power distribution box at right, all at right of entrance to lcc. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  16. A Distinct Group II Alphabaculovirus Isolated from a Peridroma Species.

    PubMed

    Rohrmann, George F; Erlandson, Martin A; Theilmann, David A

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of an alphabaculovirus isolated from a Peridroma species indicated that it is a novel member of a group II lineage most closely related to alphabaculoviruses from Spodoptera exigua and Agrotis segetum. It contains a genome of 151,110 nucleotides (nt), with a G+C content of 53.3%. PMID:25838477

  17. Isolation and chemical characterization of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.; Leenheer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Commonly used techniques for the concentration and isolation of organic matter from water, such as preparative chromatography, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, and the methods used to analyze the organic matter obtained by these methods are reviewed. The development of methods to obtain organic matter that is associated with fractions of the dissolved organic carbon other than humic substances, such as organic bases, hydrophilic organic acids and colloidal organic matter are discussed. Methods specifically used to study dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorous are also discussed. -from Authors

  18. Galaxies in extreme environments: Isolated galaxies versus compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbala, Adriana

    2009-06-01

    This Dissertation comprises two distinct studies of galaxies in dramatically different environments: extreme isolation versus compact groups. We emphasize empirically how "nature" (i.e. internal, secular processes) plays the dominant role in defining the evolution of isolated galaxies and how "nurture" dictates the fate of galaxies in very crowded environments. Two chapters report on a detailed photometric study of a well-defined sample of N ~100 isolated Sb-Sc spiral galaxies. Data source is Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using i-band images we perform three kinds of measures: (a) bulge/disk/bar decomposition, (b) CAS parametrization (Concentration, Asymmetry, Clumpiness), and (c) Fourier decomposition/analysis of spiral arms and bar properties including dynamical measures of the torque. Having quantified a large set of properties we look for: (i) the interplay between different components of the same galaxy, (ii) trends along the morphological sequence Sb-Sbc-Sc, and (iii) statistical differences between our "isolated" sample and samples of galaxies of similar morphology constructed without regard for isolation. We find that the majority of isolated late-type disk galaxies host pseudobulges rather than classical bulges. The pseudobulges probably form through internal secular processes and bars may play an important role. A clear separation is noted between Sb and Sbc/Sc in various measures, i.e. the former are redder, brighter, have larger disks and bars, more luminous bulges, are more concentrated, more symmetric and dumpier than the latter. Isolated galaxies host larger bars than galaxies in samples defined without isolation constraints. Longer bars are not necessarily stronger, but show a higher contrast in Fourier analysis. Another chapter is a multiwavelength study of Seyfert's Sextet, the highest density galaxy aggregate in the local Universe. Four of its five galaxies are interpreted as remnant bulges of accreted spirals and are now embedded in a luminous halo

  19. Internal character dictates transition dynamics between isolation and cohesive grouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2015-12-01

    We show that accounting for internal character among interacting heterogeneous entities generates rich transition behavior between isolation and cohesive dynamical grouping. Our analytical and numerical calculations reveal different critical points arising for different character-dependent grouping mechanisms. These critical points move in opposite directions as the population's diversity decreases. Our analytical theory may help explain why a particular class of universality is so common in the real world, despite the fundamental differences in the underlying entities. It also correctly predicts the nonmonotonic temporal variation in connectivity observed recently in one such system.

  20. The detection of two antigenic groups among Renibacterium salmoninarum isolates.

    PubMed

    Bandín, I; Santos, Y; Magariños, B; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1992-07-01

    The analysis of the membrane proteins and their antigenic properties in a group of 14 geographically diverse strains of Renibacterium salmoninarum revealed the existence of antigenic diversity within this species. Eleven isolates, including the type strain ATCC 33209, shared a similar protein profile with a major component of 57 kDa whereas three strains showed a common pattern with a major protein of 30 kDa. The quantitative agglutination tests and Western blotting assays seem to indicate the existence of serological heterogeneity, with two distinct groups being detected. PMID:1521757

  1. Synergistes group organisms of human origin.

    PubMed

    Horz, Hans-Peter; Citron, Diane M; Warren, Yumi A; Goldstein, Ellie J C; Conrads, Georg

    2006-08-01

    The bacterial division Synergistes represents a poorly characterized phylotype of which only a few isolates have been cultured, primarily from natural environments. Recent detection of Synergistes-like sequence types in periodontal pockets and caries lesions of humans prompted us to search the R. M. Alden culture collection (Santa Monica, Calif.) for biochemically unidentifiable, slow-growing, obligately anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. Here we report on five clinical isolates cultured from peritoneal fluid and two isolates from soft-tissue infections that together constitute three separate evolutionary lineages within the phylogenetic radiation of the division Synergistes. One of these clusters was formed by the peritoneal isolates and had an 85% similarity to Synergistes jonesii, the first described Synergistes species, which was isolated from the rumen of a goat. The isolates from soft-tissue infections, on the other hand, formed two distinct lineages moderately related to each other with a similarity of approximately 78%. In addition, by using a newly designed 16S rRNA gene-based PCR assay with intended target specificity for Synergistes, we found that the dominant phylotype from a fecal sample was nearly identical to that of the strains obtained from peritonitis. Conversely, sequence types detected in periodontal pockets formed a separate cluster that shared a similarity of only 80% with the soft-tissue isolates. These findings suggest a high diversity of medically important Synergistes clades that apparently are unique to individual ecological niches in the human body. In conclusion, we now have available the first characterized human isolates of the division Synergistes which are colonizing, and probably infecting, several sites in the human body. PMID:16891512

  2. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Mallory, Clelia W.; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 2–12 kJ mol{sup −1} range.

  3. 26 CFR 56.4911-7 - Affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Affiliated group of organizations. 56.4911-7...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE TAXES § 56.4911-7 Affiliated group of organizations... an affiliated group as a single organization for purposes of measuring both lobbying expenditures...

  4. 26 CFR 56.4911-7 - Affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Affiliated group of organizations. 56.4911-7...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE TAXES § 56.4911-7 Affiliated group of organizations... an affiliated group as a single organization for purposes of measuring both lobbying expenditures...

  5. 26 CFR 56.4911-7 - Affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Affiliated group of organizations. 56.4911-7...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE TAXES § 56.4911-7 Affiliated group of organizations... an affiliated group as a single organization for purposes of measuring both lobbying expenditures...

  6. 26 CFR 56.4911-7 - Affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Affiliated group of organizations. 56.4911-7...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE TAXES § 56.4911-7 Affiliated group of organizations... an affiliated group as a single organization for purposes of measuring both lobbying expenditures...

  7. Grouping and Organizing for Instruction in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Flexibility is a key term to emphasize when grouping students for instruction, since a student might be in a different group for one academic area as compared to another academic area. This paper describes grouping for different methods of reading instruction and other disciplines. The paper discusses the following: using basal readers, using…

  8. Organizing and Leading Caregiver Support Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.

    This guide was designed to help individuals interested in developing caregiver support groups. It begins with an overview of the caregiving situation, identifying stresses associated with caregiving and factors which have been shown to moderate stress. Purposes of a support group are discussed; differences between support and therapy groups are…

  9. The effectiveness of group-purchasing organizations.

    PubMed Central

    Cleverley, W O; Nutt, P C

    1984-01-01

    The prices paid for routine medical supply items by six hospital group-purchasing systems and a control group of 24 nonaffiliated hospitals were compared to determine the effects of group purchasing. Each of the six group-purchasing systems obtained lower prices for supply items used in the study, ranging from 12 to 26 percent average savings. The enforcement of written contracts among the plan's members and the percentage of plan member participation appeared to explain effectiveness. Size of the plan and volume of purchases did not influence the percentage of saving realized among the groups. PMID:6724956

  10. Prevalence and characterization of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from conventional and organic vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sara; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2014-10-01

    To compare the characteristics and to identify the epidemiological relationships of Escherichia coli isolated from organic and conventional vegetables, the antimicrobial resistance and genetic properties of E. coli were investigated from 2010 to 2011. E. coli was isolated from 1 of 111 (0.9%) organic vegetables and from 20 of 225 (8.9%) conventional vegetables. The majority of strains were isolated from the surrounding farming environment (n=27/150 vs. 49/97 in organic vs. conventional samples). The majority of the vegetable strains were isolated from the surrounding farming environments. E. coli isolated from organic vegetables showed very low antimicrobial resistance rates except for cephalothin, ranging from 0% to 17.9%, while the resistance rates to cephalothin (71%) were extremely high in both groups. E. coli isolates expressed various resistance genes, which most commonly included blaTEM, tet(A), strA, strB, and qnrS. However, none of the isolates harbored tet(D), tet(E), tet(K), tet(L), tet(M), or qnrA. The transferability of tet gene, tet(A), and tet(B) was identified in tetracycline-resistant E. coli, and the genetic relationship was confirmed in a few cases from different sources. With regard to the lower antimicrobial resistance found in organic produce, this production mode seems able to considerably reduce the selection of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria on vegetables. PMID:25140978

  11. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOEpatents

    Marks, T.J.; Ja, L.; Yang, X.

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetrafluoro-aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  12. Metallocene catalyst containing bulky organic group

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Ja, Li; Yang, Xinmin

    1996-03-26

    An ionic metallocene catalyst for olefin polymerization which comprises: (1) a cyclopentadienyl-type ligand, a Group IVB transition metal, and alkyl, aryl, or hydride substituents, as a cation, and (2) a weakly coordinating anion comprising boron substituted with halogenated, such as tetra fluoro, aryl substituents preferably containing silylalkyl substitution, such as para-silyl t-butyldimethyl.

  13. Efficient isolation and identification of Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Tallent, Sandra M; Kotewicz, Kristin M; Strain, Errol A; Bennett, Reginald W

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a group of ubiquitous facultative anaerobic sporeforming Gram-positive rods commonly found in soil. The spores frequently contaminate a variety of foods, including produce, meat, eggs, and dairy products. Foodborne illnesses associated with toxins produced by B. cereus can result in self-limiting diarrhea or vomiting. Plate enumeration methods recommended by recognized food authorities to detect the presence of B. cereus in potentially contaminated food products do not inhibit other Gram-positive competitive bacteria. This study evaluated the use of Bacara, a new chromogenic agar, as an efficient method to identify and enumerate B. cereus group from food matrixes, even in the presence of background flora. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing was performed using four different selective and differential media for B. cereus, including Mannitol Egg Yolk Polymyxin (MYP), Polymyxin Pyruvate Egg-Yolk Mannitol Bromothymol Blue Agar, Bacillus Chromogenic Media, Brilliance, and Bacara. MYP and Bacara were also used in plate enumeration studies to isolate B. cereus from artificially contaminated foods. PMID:22649932

  14. Ribotyping of Lactobacillus casei group strains isolated from dairy products.

    PubMed

    Svec, P; Dráb, V; Sedlácek, I

    2005-01-01

    A series of lactobacilli isolated from dairy products were characterized using biotyping and ribotyping with EcoRI and HindIII restriction enzymes. Biotyping assigned 14 strains as Lactobacillus casei, 6 strains as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei and 12 as Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The obtained ribotype patterns separated all analyzed strains into two clearly distinguished groups corresponding to L. rhamnosus and L. casei/L. paracasei subsp. paracasei. The HindIII ribotypes of individual strains representing these two groups were visually very similar. In contrast, EcoRI ribotyping revealed high intraspecies variability. All ribotypes of L. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei dairy strains were very close and some strains even shared identical ribotype profiles. The type strains L. casei CCM 7088T (= ATCC 393T) and Lactobacillus zeae CCM 7069T revealing similar ribopatterns formed a separate subcluster using both restriction enzymes. In contrast, the ribotype profile of L. casei CCM 7089 (= ATCC 334) was very close to ribopatterns obtained from the dairy strains. These results support synonymy of L. casei and L. paracasei species revealed by other studies as well as reclassification of the type strain L. casei CCM 7088T as L. zeae and designation of L. casei CCM 7089 as the neotype strain. PMID:16295661

  15. Methods for isolation and viability assessment of biological organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Letant, Sonia Edith; Baker, Sarah Elyse; Bond, Tiziana; Chang, Allan Shih-Ping

    2015-02-03

    Isolation of biological or chemical organisms can be accomplished using a surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) system. The SERS system can be a single or a stacked plurality of photonic crystal membranes with noble-metal lined through pores for flowing analyte potentially containing the biological or chemical organisms. The through pores can be adapted to trap individual biological or chemical organisms and emit SERS spectra, which can then be detected by a detector and further analyzed for viability of the biological or chemical organism.

  16. A conciliation mechanism for self-organizing dynamic small groups.

    PubMed

    Ren, Minglun; Hu, Zhongfeng; Jain, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    A group of individuals, organizations or things in internet of things (IoT) often dynamically self-organizes in small groups to accomplish certain tasks. This is common in virtual organization, social networks and the evolving field of IoT. These small groups have different behavioral characteristics than large groups. Members individually have some requirements and contribute some resources to the group. The organization and operation of such a group requires dynamic identification of group requirements that can be fulfilled by available resources and is approved by the group. We apply design science methods to develop an artifact that helps in conciliation of collective requirements and resources of small groups while maintaining each member's satisfaction. The mechanism also supports dynamic conciliation as members leave and new members join the group. Each member's requirement is specified as an explicit/implicit objective that is feasible/not feasible based on resources available to the group and whether the requirement is in alignment with other members' objectives. We validate the artifact by using it for a manufacturing service group and simulating the change in collective group requirements and resources as group membership changes dynamically. PMID:27390641

  17. Group dynamics during the EXEMSI isolation study. Experimental Campaign for the European Manned Space Infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Cazes, C; Rosnet, E; Bachelard, C; Le Scanff, C; Rivolier, J

    1996-01-01

    stress. Nevertheless, the confinement and isolation were experienced as the major stress factors. The crew members described themselves as a heterogeneous but harmonious group that was successful in their mission. In fact, the team maintained its cohesion by opposing external authority, using management as a scapegoat. Occasionally, in times of crisis, they also criticized ground crew. The Commander supported this attitude. Strongly differences in personality and behavior were noted. Analysis of the sociometric data showed that the asserted harmony was more apparent than real. It is questionable whether the group cohesion would have persisted in a life threatening crisis or even in a prolongation of the experiment. The most reliable instruments for this type of survey seem to be: group methods, non-obstructive tests, indirect instruments, and qualitative tools. The least reliable are: strictly quantitative methods, self-evaluations, standard debriefing techniques, since these reinforced in most cases subjects' defenses in an unconscious avoidance of criticism. Several recommendations were made for the organization, definition of objectives, experiment selection, crew selection, roles of external management and personnel. In particular, it is felt to be necessary to explain the aims of the mission to the subjects, to give clear and complete information, to establish confident and cooperative relations with the crew. It is essential to allow dialogue, to take opinions and suggestions of the crew seriously, and to establish clear rules of confidentiality. PMID:8814802

  18. [New means of isolating restriction endonuclease preparations using organic solvents].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, N N; Votrin, I I; Fitsner, A B; Kirsanova, I D; Dedov, S S

    1980-01-01

    A new procedure is developed for isolation of highly purified preparations of restrictional endonoucleases Bam HI and Eco RI by means of fractionation with isopropyl alcohol. Restrictional endonuclease Bam HI, practically free of unspecific nucleases, was isolated after ultrasonic destruction of cells, precipitation of the restrictases with isopropanol and chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Additional chromatography on hydroxyapatite enabled to obtain the homogenous preparation of Bam HI restrictase, as shown by polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis. Other organic solvents (acetone, ethanol) might be also used for purification of the restrictional endonucleases. PMID:6256963

  19. Isolation of Flavimonas oryzihabitans (CDC group Ve-2) from catheter-induced bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mutters, R; Köppler, H; Krause, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria of the newly proposed genus and combination Flavimonas oryzihabitans, previously known as CDC group Ve-2 or Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, are uncommon pathogens. We report here the first isolation of the organism in Germany from a case of bacteremia and describe the phenotypic characteristics of the strain. PMID:2091948

  20. Fluorescence Characterization of Dissolved Organic Matter Isolates from Sediments and the Association with Phenanthrene Binding Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    In this study, selected spectroscopic characteristics of sediment organic matter (SOM) were compared and discussed with respect to their different isolation methods, the source discrimination capabilities, and the association with the extent of phenanthrene binding. A total of 16 sediments were collected from three categorized locations including a costal lake, industrial areas, and the upper streams, each of which is likely influenced by the organic sources of algal production, industrial effluent, and terrestrial input, respectively. The spectroscopic properties related to aromatic structures and terrestrial humic acids were more pronounced for alkaline extractable organic matter (AEOM) isolates than for the SOM isolates based on water soluble extracts and porewater. The three categorized sampling locations were the most differentiated in the AEOM isolates, suggesting AEOM may be the most representative SOM isolates in describing the chemical properties and the organic sources of SOM. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) based on fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) showed that a combination of four fluorescent groups could represent all the fluorescence features of SOM. The three categorized sampling locations were well discriminated by the percent distributions of terrestrial and microbial humic-like fluorescent groups of the AEOM isolates. The relative distribution of terrestrial humic-like fluorophores was highly correlated with the extent of phenanthrene binding (r=0.676; p<0.01), suggesting that the presence of terrestrial humic acids in SOM may contribute to the enhancement of binding with hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediments. Principal component analysis (PCA) further demonstrated that the extent of SOM's binding affinity might be affected by the degree of biological transformation in SOM as well as the abundance of aromatic carbon structures.

  1. 26 CFR 56.4911-7 - Affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under section 4911, an “electing member organization” is an organization to which the expenditure test... expenditure test is not considered to apply to the organization on any day before the date on which it files the Form 5768 making the expenditure test election. (5) Election of member's year as group's...

  2. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  3. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups.

    PubMed

    Hrv, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  4. Behavioral Groups as Preventive Care in a Health Maintenance Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Joan; And Others

    This paper describes the use of a particular therapeutic modality--behavioral groups--in a relatively new delivery system called a Health Maintenance Organization. The program described, run under the George Washington University Health Plan, offers short-term structured groups designed to aid people at particularly difficult or vulnerable…

  5. Communication Network Integration and Group Uniformity in a Complex Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danowski, James A.; Farace, Richard V.

    This paper contains a discussion of the limitations of research on group processes in complex organizations and the manner in which a procedure for network analysis in on-going systems can reduce problems. The research literature on group uniformity processes and on theoretical models of these processes from an information processing perspective…

  6. Organizing Parent Discussion Groups in Preschools (A How To Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousey, Carol G.

    This series of discussion sessions and suggestions for further reading, was designed to serve as a guide for discussion groups made up of parents of preschool children. The first chapter discusses the organization of groups, leaders' qualifications, the general format of sessions, recordkeeping, and suggestions for the first and final sessions.…

  7. Social Interaction and Isolation Among a Group of Elderly Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisel, Marsel A.

    Presented in this paper is a study undertaken to determine the level of social interaction and isolation in a randomly selected sample of 156 aged blacks in an urban area of New Jersey. The interaction patterns are analyzed in terms of availability, relations with, and reactions toward close and distant relatives and friends. The relation between…

  8. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    DOEpatents

    Giese, R.W.; Wang, P.

    1996-04-30

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula shown in the accompanying diagram. 4 figs.

  9. Single step signal group-imidazole labeling of organic phosphate groups under aqueous conditions

    DOEpatents

    Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang

    1996-01-01

    Compounds and methods for single step, covalent labeling of the phosphate group of an organic substance under aqueous conditions are described. The labeling compound includes any kind of detectable signal group covalently bound to an imidazole moiety, which can be imidazole or a substituted imidazole. A preferred labeling compound has the formula ##STR1##

  10. The internal dynamics of environmental organizations: Movement interest groups, communal advocacy groups, and the policy process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    How do the diverse qualities that movement organizations bring to the policy process affect the representation of particular interests? This question is explored by analyzing environmental organizations across the national, state, and local levels of the American political system. This article suggests that two types of social movement organizations exist: movement interest groups and communal advocacy groups. While this article does not provide direct evidence of the different policy capabilities of the two types of movement organizations, existing research is drawn upon to consider how each type might fare in the policy process. One approach suggests that centralized organizations with incremental goals are better equipped to attain policy success, while the other stresses the need for active member involvement to engage in disruptive politics. To fully assess these divergent views, this article presents a broad review and analysis of the literature.

  11. Pancreatic Ductal Perfusion at Organ Procurement Enhances Islet Yield in Human Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanak, Mazhar A.; Shahbazov, Rauf; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pancreas preservation is a major factor influencing the results of islet cell transplantation. This study evaluated the effects of two different solutions for pancreatic ductal perfusion (PDP) at organ procurement. Methods Eighteen human pancreases were assigned to three groups: non-PDP (control), PDP with ET-Kyoto solution, and PDP with cold storage/purification stock solution. Pancreatic islets were isolated according to the modified Ricordi method. Results No significant differences in donor characteristics, including cold ischemia time, were observed between the three groups. All islet isolations in the PDP groups had >400,000 IEQ in total islet yield post-purification, a significant increase when compared with the control (P = 0.04 and <0.01). The islet quality assessments—including an in vivo diabetic nude mice assay and the response of high-mobility group box protein 1 to cytokine stimulation—also showed no significant differences. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells showing apoptosis in islets in the PDP groups was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Both ET-Kyoto solution and cold storage/purification stock solution are suitable for PDP and consistently resulted in isolation success. Further studies with a larger number of pancreas donors should be done to compare the effects of the PDP solutions. PMID:25058879

  12. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  13. Highly Frequent Mutations in Negative Regulators of Multiple Virulence Genes in Group A Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors. PMID:20368967

  14. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labastide, J. A.; Thompson, H. B.; Marques, S. R.; Colella, N. S.; Briseno, A. L.; Barnes, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n-type organic semiconductor, 7,8,15,16-tetraazaterrylene, generates a significant population of charge-separated polaron pairs along the π-stacking direction. Charge separation was signalled by pronounced power-law photoluminescence decay polarized along the same axis. In the transverse direction, we observed exponential decay associated with excitons localized on individual monomers. We propose that this effect derives from an intrinsic directional charge-transfer interaction that can ultimately be programmed by molecular packing geometry.

  15. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires.

    PubMed

    Labastide, J A; Thompson, H B; Marques, S R; Colella, N S; Briseno, A L; Barnes, M D

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n-type organic semiconductor, 7,8,15,16-tetraazaterrylene, generates a significant population of charge-separated polaron pairs along the π-stacking direction. Charge separation was signalled by pronounced power-law photoluminescence decay polarized along the same axis. In the transverse direction, we observed exponential decay associated with excitons localized on individual monomers. We propose that this effect derives from an intrinsic directional charge-transfer interaction that can ultimately be programmed by molecular packing geometry. PMID:26912040

  16. Directional charge separation in isolated organic semiconductor crystalline nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Labastide, J. A.; Thompson, H. B.; Marques, S. R.; Colella, N. S.; Briseno, A. L.; Barnes, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental design paradigms in organic photovoltaic device engineering is based on the idea that charge separation is an extrinsically driven process requiring an interface for exciton fission. This idea has driven an enormous materials science engineering effort focused on construction of domain sizes commensurate with a nominal exciton diffusion length of order 10 nm. Here, we show that polarized optical excitation of isolated pristine crystalline nanowires of a small molecule n-type organic semiconductor, 7,8,15,16-tetraazaterrylene, generates a significant population of charge-separated polaron pairs along the π-stacking direction. Charge separation was signalled by pronounced power-law photoluminescence decay polarized along the same axis. In the transverse direction, we observed exponential decay associated with excitons localized on individual monomers. We propose that this effect derives from an intrinsic directional charge-transfer interaction that can ultimately be programmed by molecular packing geometry. PMID:26912040

  17. Simple method of isolating humic acids from organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, O. H.; Susilawati, K.; Nik Muhamad, A. B.; Khanif, M. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Humic substances particularly humic acids (HA) play a major role in soil conditioning e.g. erosion control, soil cation exchange capacity, complexation of heavy metal ions and pesticides, carbon and nitrogen cycles, plant growth and reduction of ammonia volatilization from urea. Humified substances such as coal, composts, and peat soils have substantial amounts of HA but the isolation of these acids is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Factors that affect the quality and yield of HA isolated from these materials include extraction, fractionation, and purification periods. This work developed a simple, rapid, and cost effective method of isolating HA from peat soils. There was a quadratic relationship between extraction period and HA yield. Optimum extraction period was estimated at 4 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 48 h. There was no relationship between fractionation period and HA yield. As such 2 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 24 h fractionation period could be considered optimum. Low ash content (5%), remarkable reduction in K, coupled with the fact that organic C, E4/E6, carboxylic COOH, phenolic OH, and total acidity values of the HA were consistent with those reported by other authors suggest that the HA dealt with were free from mineral matter. This was possible because the distilled water used to purify the HA served as Bronsted-Lowry acid during the purification process of the HA. Optimum purification period using distilled waster was 1 h instead of the usual range of 1 and 7 days (uses HF and HCl and dialysis). Humic acids could be isolated from tropical peat soils within 7 h (i.e. 4 h extraction, 2 h fractionation, and 1 h purification) instead of the existing period of 2 and 7 days. This could facilitate the idea of producing organic fertilizers such as ammonium-humate and potassium-humate from humified substances since techniques devised in this study did not alter the true nature of the HA. Besides, the technique is rapid, simple

  18. Antigenic cross-reactivity among isolates of group JK corynebacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, M K; Chaudhry, S; Noble, W C

    1990-08-01

    Using rocket and rocket-line immunoelectrophoresis and immunoblotting it was demonstrated that a group of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including several authenticated Corynebacterium jeikeium strains, shared many cross-reacting antigens. Only weak cross-reactivity was demonstrated with representatives of three other skin corynebacteria, C. bovis, C. hofmanii and C. minutissimum or with non-coryneforms. Differences within C. jeikeium are sufficient to permit the use of immunoblotting as an epidemiological tool. PMID:1976676

  19. Characterization of water-soluble organic matter isolated from atmospheric fine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gyula; Varga, BáLint; Galambos, IstváN.; Ganszky, Ildikó

    2002-11-01

    Atmospheric fine aerosol (dp < 1.5 μm) was collected at a rural site in Hungary from January to September 2000. The total carbon concentration ranged from 5 to 13 μg m-3 and from 3 to 6 μg m-3 in the first three months and the rest of the sampling period, respectively. On average, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) accounted for 66% of the total carbon concentration independent of the season. A variable fraction of the water-soluble organic constituents (38-72% of WSOC depending on the sample) was separated from inorganic ions and isolated in pure organic form by using solid phase extraction on a copolymer sorbent. This fraction was experimentally characterized by an organic matter to organic carbon mass ratio of 1.9, and this value did not change with the seasons. Furthermore, the average elemental composition (molar ratio) of C:H:N:O ≈ 24:34:1:14 of the isolated fraction indicated the predominance of oxygenated functional groups, and the low hydrogen to carbon ratio implied the presence of unsaturated or polyconjugated structures. These conclusions were confirmed by UV, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies. On the basis of theoretical considerations, the organic matter to organic carbon mass ratio was estimated to be 2.3 for the nonisolated water-soluble organic fraction, resulting in an overall ratio of 2.1 for the WSOC. In order to extend the scope of this estimation to the total organic carbon, which is usually required in mass closure calculations, the aqueous extraction was followed by sequential extraction with acetone and 0.01 M NaOH solution. As a result, a total organic matter to total organic carbon mass ratio of 1.9-2.0 was estimated, but largely on the basis of experimental data.

  20. Comparison of the pathogenicity of porcine circovirus type 2 group 1 and group 2 isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Introduction and Objectives Phylogenetically, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) can be divided into two major genotypic groups, PCV2-group 1 and PCV2-group 2 .1 It was noted that PCV2 group designations have no apparent association with disease status or geographic area. Interestingly, all of t...

  1. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  2. A synaptic organizing principle for cortical neuronal groups

    PubMed Central

    Perin, Rodrigo; Berger, Thomas K.; Markram, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal circuitry is often considered a clean slate that can be dynamically and arbitrarily molded by experience. However, when we investigated synaptic connectivity in groups of pyramidal neurons in the neocortex, we found that both connectivity and synaptic weights were surprisingly predictable. Synaptic weights follow very closely the number of connections in a group of neurons, saturating after only 20% of possible connections are formed between neurons in a group. When we examined the network topology of connectivity between neurons, we found that the neurons cluster into small world networks that are not scale-free, with less than 2 degrees of separation. We found a simple clustering rule where connectivity is directly proportional to the number of common neighbors, which accounts for these small world networks and accurately predicts the connection probability between any two neurons. This pyramidal neuron network clusters into multiple groups of a few dozen neurons each. The neurons composing each group are surprisingly distributed, typically more than 100 μm apart, allowing for multiple groups to be interlaced in the same space. In summary, we discovered a synaptic organizing principle that groups neurons in a manner that is common across animals and hence, independent of individual experiences. We speculate that these elementary neuronal groups are prescribed Lego-like building blocks of perception and that acquired memory relies more on combining these elementary assemblies into higher-order constructs. PMID:21383177

  3. [Magnesium level in human organism during 105-day isolation].

    PubMed

    Piruzian, L A; Protasova, O V; Maksimova, I A; Morukov, B V; Protasov, S V; Ushakov, I B

    2012-01-01

    Total and ionized magnesium in blood serum and in daily urine were determined before (baseline values) and on days 30, 60 and 105 of the experiment with 105-d isolation and confinement (Mars-105)/ Magnesium in hair was investigated before (baseline values) and on day-105 of the experiment. The investigations were performed using atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled argon plasma. Changes in magnesium were most significant over the initial 30 days in the experiment. Reduction of serum magnesium was accounted for by the fall in the ionized fraction. In organism magnesium is controlled by the ion-regulatory function of the kidney and varies with individuals. Levels of ionized magnesium in blood serum and excreted with daily urine can serve as indicators of stress resistivity . PMID:23074947

  4. Vibrio alfacsensis sp. nov., isolated from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Roque, Ana; Chimetto, Luciane; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Lang, Elke; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2012-12-01

    Five strains (CAIM 1831(T), CAIM 1832, CAIM 1833, CAIM 1834 and CAIM 1836) were isolated from cultured sole (Solea senegalensis) in two regions of Spain, two strains (CAIM 404 and CAIM 1294) from wild-caught spotted rose snapper (Lutjanus guttatus) in Mexico, and one strain (CAIM 1835) from corals in Brazil. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the novel isolates showed similarity to Vibrio ponticus (98.2-98.3%, GenBank accession no. AJ630103) and to a lesser degree to Vibrio furnissii (97.2-97.3%, X76336) and to Vibrio fluvialis (96.9-97.1%, X74703). Multilocus sequence analysis clustered these strains closely together and clearly separated them from phylogenetically related species of the genus Vibrio. Genomic fingerprinting by rep-PCR clustered the novel strains according to their geographical origin. Phenotypic analyses showed a large variation among the new strains, but many tests enabled them to be differentiated from other species of the genus Vibrio. The mean ΔT(m) values between the strains analysed here and closely related type strains were above 6.79 °C. The values between the novel isolates were below 2.35 °C, well outside the limit suggested for the delineation of a bacterial species. The phenotypic and genotypic data presented here clearly place these new strains as a coherent group within the genus Vibrio, for which we propose the name Vibrio alfacsensis sp. nov. with CAIM 1831(T) ( = DSM 24595(T) = S277(T)) as the type strain. PMID:22286904

  5. Examination of organic compounds from insoluble organic matter isolated from some Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites by heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Harada, K.

    1993-02-01

    Insoluble organic matter isolated from five Antarctic CM2 chondrites was heated in a thermal analyzer from room temperature to 800 C under helium atmosphere. Organic compounds from the thermal decomposition of the Yamato-791198 sample were studied by a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The number of compounds identified was over 120, belonging mainly to the two following groups: (1) benzene and naphthalene, and their alkyl derivatives; and (2) sulfur-containing heterocycles and their alkyl derivatives. Small amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and nitriles were also detected. Relative amounts of compounds released from the five chondrite samples were monitored by the MS with increasing temperature. Yamato-74662 and Yamato-791198 showed organic compounds mainly over the temperature range of 300-600 C, while the other three (Yamato-793321, Yamato-86720, and Belgica-7904) did not show any, except small amounts of benzene. These results indicate that the insoluble organics in Yamato-74662 and Yamato-791198 possess a thermally labile organic fraction, whereas those in Yamato-793321, Yamato-86720, and Belgica-7904 do not and are graphitic. The difference between the insoluble organic fractions may be related to aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism on the parent bodies.

  6. Group dynamics and catecholamines during long-duration confinement in an isolated environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Lyons, Terence J.; Binder, Heidi

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objectives of this study were to investigate possible relationships between catecholamine excretion and long-duration confinement in an isolated environment. METHODS: Stays of long duration were made by Group I (n = 4, all Russian, weeks 1-34), Group II (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 3-18), and Group III (n = 4, mixed nationality, weeks 22-38); other groups joined the residents for 1-wk intervals at weeks #13, #19, and #33. Data were collected from Groups I and III. RESULTS: In both Group I and Group III, the daily epinephrine excretion was significantly elevated during and after confinement compared with the pre-isolation baseline (p < 0.05), but remained mostly within normal limits during the experiment. During isolation, epinephrine excretion was significantly higher, compared with other weeks in isolation, during weeks #19 and #27 for Group I, and during week #30 for Group III. In both Group I and Group II, norepinephrine excretion increased significantly during and after isolation (p < 0.05) and was above the normal range. The daily norepinephrine excretion was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Group I during weeks #12, #13, and #27, and during week #30 for Group III. DISCUSSION: Epinephrine excretion generally remained in the normal range. However, occasional elevations occurred due to psychological stress, which apparently correlate with changes in group dynamics. Norepinephrine excretion was above the normal range and was correlated with social events. These results suggest that to ensure optimum crew performance, entire crews along with their visiting crews should be selected collectively, rather than individually.

  7. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Weedmark, K A; Mabon, P; Hayden, K L; Lambert, D; Van Domselaar, G; Austin, J W; Corbett, C R

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  8. Clostridium botulinum Group II Isolate Phylogenomic Profiling Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Weedmark, K. A.; Mabon, P.; Hayden, K. L.; Lambert, D.; Van Domselaar, G.; Austin, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group II isolates (n = 163) from different geographic regions, outbreaks, and neurotoxin types and subtypes were characterized in silico using whole-genome sequence data. Two clusters representing a variety of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types and subtypes were identified by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. While one cluster included BoNT/B4/F6/E9 and nontoxigenic members, the other comprised a wide variety of different BoNT/E subtype isolates and a nontoxigenic strain. In silico MLST and core SNP methods were consistent in terms of clade-level isolate classification; however, core SNP analysis showed higher resolution capability. Furthermore, core SNP analysis correctly distinguished isolates by outbreak and location. This study illustrated the utility of next-generation sequence-based typing approaches for isolate characterization and source attribution and identified discrete SNP loci and MLST alleles for isolate comparison. PMID:26116673

  9. Association of social isolation and health across different racial and ethnic groups of older Americans

    PubMed Central

    MIYAWAKI, CHRISTINA E.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation is a social and public health problem that affects people of all ages, especially elders. Previous studies have found that social isolation across numerous industrialised countries is associated with negative health outcomes. However, it is unknown whether and how this association differs by race/ethnicity and age. To begin to address this gap, this study examines the association of social isolation and physical and mental health among Black, White and Hispanic elders in the United States of America. Building on Cornwell and Waite's perceived isolation and social disconnectedness dimension model of social isolation, the author used multi-stage survey data from a nationally representative sample of 3,005 community-residing adults aged 57–85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Tests for association were conducted on health by age, gender, marital status, education and race/ethnicity separately. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to test the association of social isolation and health exclusively and separately among these three groups. Results showed that social isolation is strongly associated with physical and mental health. Both perceived isolation and social disconnectedness had a significant negative association with physical and mental health among White elders. For Blacks, social disconnectedness is negatively associated with their physical health while perceived isolation had a negative association with mental health. Among Hispanic elders, there seemed to be no association between social isolation and physical health, but a significant negative association was found with their mental health. Despite various associated patterns, however, social isolation overall was associated with health outcomes that were similar across three elder groups. By identifying factors influencing social isolation and health among minority older Americans, this study has relevance to the development of culturally sensitive health

  10. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates from equine infectious endometritis belong to a distinct genetic group.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Camilla Dooleweerdt; Haugaard, Maria Mathilde; Petersen, Morten Roenn; Nielsen, Jesper Møller; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is the pathogen most commonly isolated from the uterus of mares. S. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen and part of the resident flora in the caudal reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a genotypically distinct subpopulation of S. zooepidemicus is associated with endometritis in the mare, by genotyping and comparing uterine S. zooepidemicus strains with isolates from the vagina and clitoral fossa. Mares with (n=18) or without (n=11) clinical symptoms of endometritis were included. Uterine samples were obtained using a guarded endometrial biopsy punch, whereas a swab was used to recover samples from the cranial vagina and the clitoral fossa. If S. zooepidemicus was present, up to three colonies were selected from each anatomical location (max. 9 isolates per mare). Bacterial isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. zooepidemicus was isolated from the endometrium of 12 mares. A total of 88 isolates were analyzed by PFGE: 31 from the endometrium, 26 from the cranial vagina and 31 isolates from the clitoral fossa. For MLST 21 isolates were chosen. Results demonstrated a higher genetic similarity of the isolates obtained from infectious endometritis compared to isolates obtained from the caudal reproductive tract. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a genetically distinct group of S. zooepidemicus is associated with infectious endometritis in the mare. PMID:23597033

  11. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates from equine infectious endometritis belong to a distinct genetic group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is the pathogen most commonly isolated from the uterus of mares. S. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen and part of the resident flora in the caudal reproductive tract. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a genotypically distinct subpopulation of S. zooepidemicus is associated with endometritis in the mare, by genotyping and comparing uterine S. zooepidemicus strains with isolates from the vagina and clitoral fossa. Mares with (n = 18) or without (n = 11) clinical symptoms of endometritis were included. Uterine samples were obtained using a guarded endometrial biopsy punch, whereas a swab was used to recover samples from the cranial vagina and the clitoral fossa. If S. zooepidemicus was present, up to three colonies were selected from each anatomical location (max. 9 isolates per mare). Bacterial isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. zooepidemicus was isolated from the endometrium of 12 mares. A total of 88 isolates were analyzed by PFGE: 31 from the endometrium, 26 from the cranial vagina and 31 isolates from the clitoral fossa. For MLST 21 isolates were chosen. Results demonstrated a higher genetic similarity of the isolates obtained from infectious endometritis compared to isolates obtained from the caudal reproductive tract. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a genetically distinct group of S. zooepidemicus is associated with infectious endometritis in the mare. PMID:23597033

  12. Regulatory Organizations and Their Requirements. MAS-113. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to enable trainees to identify regulatory organizations and oversight groups and monitor and provide guidance in the implementation of the requirements of…

  13. Use of Protecting Groups in Carbohydrate Chemistry: An Advanced Organic Synthesis Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Anna C.; Pereira, Leticia O. R.; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    1999-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive three-step reaction sequence for advanced experimental organic chemistry using D-glucosamine hydrochloride as starting material for the synthesis of 2-amino-2-deoxy-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-b-D-glucopyranose hydrochloride is described. D-Glucosamine hydrochloride is a carbohydrate derivative isolated from crab shells. It is inexpensive and readily available from most chemical companies. This reaction sequence is appropriate for teaching undergraduate students the correct use of protecting groups. This is a major concept in organic synthesis and one of the determinant factors in the successful realization of multiple-step synthetic projects. The aim of the experiment is to protect the hydroxyl groups of D-glucosamine leaving its amino group as hydrochloride salt. The experiment deals only with protection and deprotection reactions. All products are crystalline substances. The amino group of d-glucosamine hydrochloride is protected by a condensation reaction with p-methoxybenzaldehyde to produce the Schiff's base as a mixture of a- and b-anomers. The second step involves the protection of all hydroxyl groups by esterification reaction using acetic anhydride, forming the imino-tetraacetate derivative as the b-anomer. The stereospecificity of this reaction at the anomeric center is due to the voluminous imino group at C-2. Removal of the amino protection group of this derivative is the final step, which can be accomplished by a selective acid hydrolysis affording the desired peracylated D-glucosamine hydrochloride.

  14. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Wani, Ajazul H; Boettiger, Alistair N; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E; Francis, Nicole J

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  15. Chromatin topology is coupled to Polycomb group protein subnuclear organization

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Ajazul H.; Boettiger, Alistair N.; Schorderet, Patrick; Ergun, Ayla; Münger, Christine; Sadreyev, Ruslan I.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Kingston, Robert E.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of metazoa are organized at multiple scales. Many proteins that regulate genome architecture, including Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, form subnuclear structures. Deciphering mechanistic links between protein organization and chromatin architecture requires precise description and mechanistic perturbations of both. Using super-resolution microscopy, here we show that PcG proteins are organized into hundreds of nanoscale protein clusters. We manipulated PcG clusters by disrupting the polymerization activity of the sterile alpha motif (SAM) of the PcG protein Polyhomeotic (Ph) or by increasing Ph levels. Ph with mutant SAM disrupts clustering of endogenous PcG complexes and chromatin interactions while elevating Ph level increases cluster number and chromatin interactions. These effects can be captured by molecular simulations based on a previously described chromatin polymer model. Both perturbations also alter gene expression. Organization of PcG proteins into small, abundant clusters on chromatin through Ph SAM polymerization activity may shape genome architecture through chromatin interactions. PMID:26759081

  16. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Marchena, Martin H.; Granada, Mara; Bordoni, Andrea V.; Joselevich, Maria; Troiani, Horacio; Williams, Federico J.; Wolosiuk, Alejandro

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  17. Impaired vasodilator response to organic nitrates in isolated basilar arteries

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Dorothee; Kojda, Georg

    2001-01-01

    The differential responsiveness of various sections and regions in the vascular system to the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates is important for the beneficial antiischaemic effects of these drugs. In this study we examined the vasodilator activity of organic nitrates in cerebral arteries, where vasodilation causes substantial nitrate induced headache. Isolated porcine basilar and coronary arteries were subjected to increasing concentrations of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), isosorbide-5-nitrate (ISMN) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) and endothelium-dependent vasodilation was investigated for comparison purpose. The vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.33±0.1, n=8), ISMN (1.61±0.07, n=7) and PETN (>10 μM, n=7) in basilar arteries was more than 100 fold lower than that of GTN (6.52±0.06, n=12), ISMN (3.66±0.08, n=10) and PETN (6.3±0.13, n=8) observed in coronary arteries. In striking contrast, the vasodilator potency of SNAP (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) was almost similar in basilar (7.76±0.05, n=7) and coronary arteries (7.59±0.05, n=9). Likewise, no difference in endothelium dependent relaxation was observed. Denudation of the endothelium resulted in a small increase of the vasodilator potency (halfmaximal effective concentration in −logM) of GTN (4.84±0.09, n=7, P<0.03) in basilar arteries and similar results were obtained in the presence of the NO-synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine (4.59±0.05, n=9, P<0.03). These results suggest that cerebral conductance blood vessels such as porcine basilar arteries seems to have a reduced expression and/or activity of certain cellular enzymatic electron transport systems such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, which are necessary to bioconvert organic nitrates to NO. PMID:11156558

  18. Group C streptococci in human infection: a study of 308 isolates with clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Barnham, M; Kerby, J; Chandler, R S; Millar, M R

    1989-06-01

    A collection of 308 clinical isolates of beta-haemolytic Lancefield group C streptococci was assembled from laboratories in England, Nigeria and New Zealand. Of these, 276 isolates were Streptococcus equisimilis, 23 S. milleri and nine S. zooepidemicus. Isolates of S. equisimilis in the African collection, though few, gave higher rates of lactose and raffinose fermentation, aesculin hydrolysis and positive alpha-galactosidase reactions than those from elsewhere. Erythromycin resistance was found in 1.9% of the English isolates of S. equisimilis. Strains from superficial infections accounted for 88% of the collection and were most commonly isolated from the upper respiratory tract, skin or wounds. Amongst the 36 patients yielding isolates from deep sites S. equisimilis was found in septicaemia, cellulitis, abscess, peritonitis, septic arthritis, pneumonia, mycotic aneurysm and acute epiglottitis, S. milleri was found in abdominal abscesses, peritonitis, pleural empyema and osteomyelitis and S. zooepidemicus was found in septicaemia, pneumonia, meningitis and septic arthritis. Within the collection an unselected general catchment of 214 isolates of group C streptococci from the laboratories in Yorkshire showed the following species: from 199 superficial infections 94% S. equisimilis, 5% S. milleri and 1% S. zooepidemicus and 15 patients with deeper, more aggressive infections 67, 27 and 6.7% of these species respectively. PMID:2737252

  19. Report of the Organic Contamination Science Steering Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, P. R.; Beaty, D. W.; Anderson, M. S.; Aveni, G.; Bada, J. L.; Clemett, S. J.; DesMaris, D. J.; Douglas, S.; Dworkin, J. P.; Kern, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    The exploration of the possible emergence and duration of life on Mars from landed platforms requires attention to the quality of measurements that address these objectives. In particular, the potential impact of terrestrial contamination on the measurement of reduced carbon with sensitive in situ instruments must be addressed in order to reach definitive conclusions regarding the source of organic molecules. Following the recommendation of the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) at its September 2003 meeting [MEPAG, 2003], the Mars Program Office at NASA Headquarters chartered the Organic Contamination Science Steering Group (OCSSG) to address this issue. The full report of the six week study of the OCSSG can be found on the MEPAG web site [1]. The study was intended to define the contamination problem and to begin to suggest solutions that could provide direction to the engineering teams that design and produce the Mars landed systems. Requirements set by the Planetary Protection Policy in effect for any specific mission do not directly address this question of the potential interference from terrestrial contaminants during in situ measurements.

  20. Use of guinea pig embryo cell cultures for isolation and propagation of group A coxsackieviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Landry, M L; Madore, H P; Fong, C K; Hsiung, G D

    1981-01-01

    The isolation of group A coxsackieviruses from clinical specimens generally requires the use of suckling mice. By using guinea pig embryo cells, the following coxsackieviruses were isolated from throat swabs and stool samples obtained from patients with a variety of illnesses: two of type A2, one each of types A6 and A8, and four of type 10. Distinct cytopathic effects were produced in 3 to 5 days in the guinea pig embryo cells inoculated with the clinical specimens. In addition, a number of prototype group A coxsackieviruses, including types 2--6, 8, 10, and 12, were readily propagated in guinea pig embryo cell cultures. Thus, guinea pig embryo cells appeared to be a sensitive alternative cell culture system for the isolation and propagation of certain types of group A coxsackieviruses. Images PMID:6263943

  1. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  2. Effect of Habitat Size, Quality, and Isolation on Functional Groups of Beetles in Hollow Oaks.

    PubMed

    Pilskog, Hanne Eik; Birkemoe, Tone; Framstad, Erik; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the largest threats to biodiversity is land use change and habitat loss. Hollow oaks (Quercus spp. L.) are well-defined patches that are hotspots for biodiversity and red-listed species, but they are often rare and fragmented in the landscape. We investigated the effect of patch size, habitat quality, and isolation on functional groups and red-listed saproxylic beetles in hollow oaks (n = 40) in Norway. The groups were defined by host tree association, trophic grouping, and red-listed status. Habitat quality, represented by tree form was most important in explaining species richness for most groups. Patch size, represented by circumference and amount of dead branches, was most important in explaining abundance. Isolation, that is single oaks compared with oaks in groups, had a negative effect on the abundance of beetles feeding both on wood and fungi (xylomycethopagous), as well as on species associated with broadleaved trees (oak semi-specialists), but did not affect species richness. This indicates that at this scale and in this landscape, isolated oaks are as species rich and valuable for conservation as other oaks, although some functional groups may be more vulnerable to isolation than others. The red-listed species only responded to patch size, indicating that oaks with large circumference and many dead branches are especially important for red-listed species and for conservation. PMID:26945089

  3. Photobacterium swingsii sp. nov., isolated from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Roque, Ana; Rotllant, Guiomar; Peinado, Lauro; Romalde, Jesus L; Doce, Alejandra; Cabanillas-Beltrán, Hector; Chimetto, Luciane A; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2011-02-01

    Six Gram-negative coccobacilli were isolated from Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) from Mexico and haemolymph of spider crabs (Maja brachydactyla) from Spain. All of the isolates grew as small green colonies on thiosulphate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar and were facultatively anaerobic, oxidase-positive and sensitive to the vibriostatic agent O/129. Repetitive palindromic PCR analysis revealed a high degree of genomic homogeneity among the isolates. Several phenotypic traits differentiated the isolates from the type strains of species of the genus Photobacterium. DNA-DNA relatedness between two representative isolates and their closest phylogenetic neighbours by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, Photobacterium aplysiae CAIM 14(T) and Photobacterium frigidiphilum CAIM 20(T), was 44.01-53.85 %. We propose a novel species of the genus Photobacterium to accommodate the six isolates, with the name Photobacterium swingsii sp. nov. The type strain is CAIM 1393(T) (=CECT 7576(T)). PMID:20228205

  4. Group-specific comparison of four lactobacilli isolated from human sources using differential blast analysis.

    PubMed

    Altermann, Eric; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used in fermentation processes for centuries. More recent applications including the use of LAB as probiotics have significantly increased industrial interest. Here we present a comparative genomic analysis of four completely sequenced Lactobacillus strains, isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract, versus 25 lactic acid bacterial genomes present in the public database at the time of analysis. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533, Lactobacillus gasseri ATCC33323, and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1are all considered probiotic and widely used in industrial applications. Using Differential Blast Analysis (DBA), each genome was compared to the respective remaining three other Lactobacillus and 25 other LAB genomes. DBA highlighted strain-specific genes that were not represented in any other LAB used in this analysis and also identified group-specific genes shared within lactobacilli. Initial comparative analyses highlighted a significant number of genes involved in cell adhesion, stress responses, DNA repair and modification, and metabolic capabilities. Furthermore, the range of the recently identified potential autonomous units (PAUs) was broadened significantly, indicating the possibility of distinct families within this genetic element. Based on in silico results obtained for the model organism L. acidophilus NCFM, DBA proved to be a valuable tool to identify new key genetic regions for functional genomics and also suggested re-classification of previously annotated genes. PMID:21484153

  5. Plasmids in group JK coryneform bacteria isolated in a single hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Kerry-Williams, S. M.; Noble, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation of 39 JK-type coryneform isolates from patients at a single hospital revealed that 23 possessed plasmids, which formed six groups on restriction endonuclease analysis. Four of the groups were associated with production of similar bacteriocin-like substances, and shared a minimum of 6.4 kilobase pairs of DNA. These plasmids, found in isolates from different patients, provide strong direct evidence that person-to-person transmission of JK bacteria had occurred within the hospital. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3023480

  6. Expression of group B protective surface protein (BPS) by invasive and colonizing isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Flores, Aurea E; Chhatwal, G S; Hillier, Sharon L; Baker, Carol J; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Group B protective surface protein (BPS) is expressed on the cell surface of some group B streptococcal (GBS) (Streptococcus agalactiae) strains and adds to the identification by capsular polysaccharide (CPS), and c or R proteins. We investigated the prevalence of BPS among GBS clinical isolates (303 invasive, 4122 colonizing) collected over 11 years in four American cities. Hot HCl cell extracts were tested by immunoprecipitation in agarose with rabbit antisera to BPS; the alpha (α) and beta (β) components of c protein; R1, R3, and R4 species of R protein; and CPS serotypes Ia-VIII. BPS was found in 155 isolates (seven invasive, 148 colonizing). Of these, 87 were Ia, 37 II, 20 V; none were III. BPS was expressed usually with another protein: a species of R by 87 or a component of c by 39. The predominant CPS/protein profiles with BPS were Ia/R1,BPS and II/c(α + β),BPS. Thus, along with CPS serotype and other surface proteins, BPS can be a valuable marker for precise strain characterization of unique GBS clinical isolates with complex surface protein profiles. PMID:25108378

  7. Portability of tag SNPs across isolated population groups: an example from India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar Roy, N; Farheen, S; Roy, N; Sengupta, S; Majumder, P P

    2008-01-01

    Isolated population groups are useful in conducting association studies of complex diseases to avoid various pitfalls, including those arising from population stratification. Since DNA resequencing is expensive, it is recommended that genotyping be carried out at tagSNP (tSNP) loci. For this, tSNPs identified in one isolated population need to be used in another. Unless tSNPs are highly portable across populations this strategy may result in loss of information in association studies. We examined the issue of tSNP portability by sampling individuals from 10 isolated ethnic groups from India. We generated DNA resequencing data pertaining to 3 genomic regions and identified tSNPs in each population. We defined an index of tSNP portability and showed that portability is low across isolated Indian ethnic groups. The extent of portability did not significantly correlate with genetic similarity among the populations studied here. We also analyzed our data with sequence data from individuals of African and European descent. Our results indicated that it may be necessary to carry out resequencing in a small number of individuals to discover SNPs and identify tSNPs in the specific isolated population in which a disease association study is to be conducted. PMID:17627800

  8. [Genetic diversity of group A rotavirus isolates found in Western Siberia in 2007-2011].

    PubMed

    Zhirakovskaia, E V; Aksanova, R Kh; Gorbunova, M G; Tikunov, A Iu; Kuril'shchikov, A M; Sokolov, S N; Netesov, S V; Tikunova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of group A rotavirus recovered from fecal samples of children admitted to hospitals in Novosibirsk and Omsk during four epidemic seasons 2007, 2007/2008, 2009/2010, 2010/2011 was performed. A total of 1416 rotavirus isolates were genotyped using multiplex PCR. The isolates of the most common rotavirus genotypes G1P[8], G4P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8] co-circulated in Western Siberia during 2007-2011. In isolated cases G9P[8], G2P[8], G3P[9], and G4P[6] genotypes were detected. Change of dominant genotype from G1P[8] to G4P[8] occurred in 2008 in Omsk and in Novosibirsk in 2009 as well. Incidence and distribution of rotavirus genotypes differed and changed every epidemic season in both cities. The phylogenetic analysis based on VP4 (VP8*), VP7, and VP6 gene sequences showed that the majority of isolates from Novosibirsk and Omsk were clustered together and demonstrated high level homology with rotavirus isolates found in other regions of Eurasia. In addition, a rare P[8]b (OP354-like) subtype of the VP4 gene was identified in fourteen isolates (G9, G1, and G4) in Novosibirsk and in a single isolate Omsk08-381/G9P[8]b in Omsk. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the necessity of long-term monitoring of rotavirus isolates in Western Siberia. This is important for selection of rotavirus vaccine for immunization of infants, improvement of diagnostic kits and understanding of the epidemiology and the evolution of group A rotaviruses. PMID:23248851

  9. Reproduction of PMWS of high mortality with a porcine circovirus type 2-group 1 isolate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction In late 2005, sporadic cases of an acute onset of high mortality disease were observed in growing pigs among USA swine herds. PCV2-group 1 (Gp1) virus was consistently detected among the affected animals. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the PCV2 isolates from the United States until l...

  10. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  11. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  12. Streptococcus anginosus (milleri) Group Strains Isolated in Poland (1996-2012) and their Antibiotic Resistance Patterns.

    PubMed

    Obszańska, Katarzyna; Kern-Zdanowicz, Izabella; Kozińska, Aleksandra; Machura, Katarzyna; Stefaniuk, Elzbieta; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Sitkiewicz, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus, Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus constellatus form a group of related streptococcal species, namely the Streptococcus Anginosus Group (SAG). The group, previously called "milleri" had been rarely described until 1980/1990 as source of infections. Nowadays SAG bacteria are often described as pathogens causing predominantly purulent infections. The number of infections is highly underestimated, as SAG strains are often classified in the microbiology laboratory as less virulent "viridans streptococci" Epidemiological situation regarding SAG infections in Poland has been unrecognized, therefore we performed a retrospective analysis of strains isolated between 1996 and 2012. Strains suspected of belonging to SAG were re-identified using an automated biochemical approach (Vitek2) and MALDI-TOF MS. We performed first analysis of antibiotic resistance among SAG strains isolated in Poland using automated methods (Vitek2), disk diffusion tests and E-Tests. We also performed PCR detection of resistance determinants in antibiotic resistant strains. Clonal structure of analyzed strains was evaluated with PFGE and MLVF methods. All three species are difficult to distinguish using automated diagnostic methods and the same is true for automated MIC evaluation. Our analysis revealed SAG strains are rarely isolated in Poland, predominantly from purulent infections. All isolates are very diverse on the genomic level as estimated by PFGE and MLVF analyses. All analyzed strains are sensitive to penicillin, a substantial group of strains is resistant to macrolides and the majority of strains are resistant to tetracycline. PMID:27281992

  13. UV light-induced survival response in a highly radiation-resistant isolate of the Moraxella-acinetobacter group

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, L.C.; Thompson, T.L.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1982-02-01

    A highly radiation-resistant member of the Moraxella-Acinetobacter group, isolate 4, obtained from meat, was studied to determine the effect of preexposure to UV radiation on subsequent UV light resistance. Cultures that were preexposed to UV light and incubated for a short time in plate count broth exhibited increased survival of a UV light challenge dose. This response was inhibited in the presence of chloramphenicol. Frequencies of mutation to streptomycin, trimethoprim, and sulfanilamide resistance remained the same after the induction of this survival response and were not altered by treatment with mutagens, with the exception of mutation to streptomycin resistance after ..gamma..-irradiation or nitrosoguanidine or methyl methane sulfonate treatment. The results indicated that isolate 4 has a UV light-inducible UV light resistance mechanism which is not associated with increased mutagenesis. The characteristics of the radiation resistance response in this organism are similar to those of certain other common food contaminants. Therefore, considered as part of the total microflora of meat, isolate 4 and the other radiation-resistant Moraxella-Acinetobacter isolates should not pose unique problems in a proposed radappertizaton process.

  14. Increased prevalence of group A streptococcus isolates in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome cases in Japan from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, T; Tominaga, K; Shima, T; Okuno, R; Kubota, H; Ogata, K; Chiba, K; Katsukawa, C; Ohya, H; Tada, Y; Okabe, N; Watanabe, H; Ogawa, M; Ohnishi, M

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock, multi-organ failure, and high mortality. In Japan, appropriate notification measures based on the Infectious Disease Control law are mandatory for cases of STSS caused by β-haemolytic streptococcus. STSS is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). Although an average of 60-70 cases of GAS-induced STSS are reported annually, 143 cases were recorded in 2011. To determine the reason behind this marked increase, we characterized the emm genotype of 249 GAS isolates from STSS patients in Japan from 2010 to 2012 and performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The predominant genotype was found to be emm1, followed by emm89, emm12, emm28, emm3, and emm90. These six genotypes constituted more than 90% of the STSS isolates. The number of emm1, emm89, emm12, and emm28 isolates increased concomitantly with the increase in the total number of STSS cases. In particular, the number of mefA-positive emm1 isolates has escalated since 2011. Thus, the increase in the incidence of STSS can be attributed to an increase in the number of cases associated with specific genotypes. PMID:25703404

  15. A method of isolating organic compounds present in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calder, G. V.; Fritz, J.; Junk, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Water sample is passed through a column containing macroreticular resin, which absorbs only nonionic organic compounds. These compounds are selectively separated using aqueous eluents of varying pH, or completely exuded with small amount of an organic eluent.

  16. Outbreeding lethality between toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III Alexandrium tamarense spp. isolates: Predominance of heterotypic encystment and implications for mating interactions and biogeography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Kulis, David M.; Solow, Andrew R.; Erdner, Deana L.; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane; Anderson, Donald M.

    2010-02-01

    We report the zygotic encystment of geographically dispersed isolates in the dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense, in particular, successful mating of toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III isolates. However, hypnozygotes produced in Group I/III co-cultures complete no more than three divisions after germinating. Previous reports have suggested a mate recognition mechanism whereby hypnozygotes produced in co-cultures could arise from either homotypic (inbred) or heterotypic (outbred) gamete pairs. To determine the extent to which each occurs, a nested PCR assay was developed to determine parentage of individual hypnozygotes. The vast majority of hypnozygotes from pairwise Group I/III co-cultures were outbred, so that inviability was a result of hybridization, not inbreeding. These findings support the assertion that complete speciation underlies the phylogenetic structure of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex. Additionally, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) copy numbers of both hybrid and single ribotype hypnozygotes were reduced substantially from those of haploid motile cells. The destruction of rDNA loci may be crucial for the successful mating of genetically distant conjugants and appears integral to the process of encystment. The inviability of Group I/III hybrids is important for public health because the presence of hybrid cysts may indicate ongoing displacement of a nontoxic population by a toxic one (or vice versa). Hybrid inviability also suggests a bloom control strategy whereby persistent, toxic Group I blooms could be mitigated by introduction of nontoxic Group III cells. The potential for hybridization in nature was investigated by applying the nested PCR assay to hypnozygotes from Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, a region where Group I and III populations co-occur. Two hybrid cysts were identified in 14 successful assays, demonstrating that Group I and III populations do interbreed in that region. However, an analysis of mating data

  17. Outbreeding lethality between toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III Alexandrium tamarense spp. isolates: Predominance of heterotypic encystment and implications for mating interactions and biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Brosnahan, Michael L.; Kulis, David M.; Solow, Andrew R.; Erdner, Deana L.; Percy, Linda; Lewis, Jane; Anderson, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    We report the zygotic encystment of geographically dispersed isolates in the dinoflagellate species complex Alexandrium tamarense, in particular, successful mating of toxic Group I and nontoxic Group III isolates. However, hypnozygotes produced in Group I/III co-cultures complete no more than three divisions after germinating. Previous reports have suggested a mate recognition mechanism whereby hypnozygotes produced in co-cultures could arise from either homotypic (inbred) or heterotypic (outbred) gamete pairs. To determine the extent to which each occurs, a nested PCR assay was developed to determine parentage of individual hypnozygotes. The vast majority of hypnozygotes from pairwise Group I/III co-cultures were outbred, so that inviability was a result of hybridization, not inbreeding. These findings support the assertion that complete speciation underlies the phylogenetic structure of the Alexandrium tamarense species complex. Additionally, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) copy numbers of both hybrid and single ribotype hypnozygotes were reduced substantially from those of haploid motile cells. The destruction of rDNA loci may be crucial for the successful mating of genetically distant conjugants and appears integral to the process of encystment. The inviability of Group I/III hybrids is important for public health because the presence of hybrid cysts may indicate ongoing displacement of a nontoxic population by a toxic one (or vice versa). Hybrid inviability also suggests a bloom control strategy whereby persistent, toxic Group I blooms could be mitigated by introduction of nontoxic Group III cells. The potential for hybridization in nature was investigated by applying the nested PCR assay to hypnozygotes from Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, a region where Group I and III populations co-occur. Two hybrid cysts were identified in 14 successful assays, demonstrating that Group I and III populations do interbreed in that region. However, an analysis of mating data

  18. Genomic Characterization of Group C Orthobunyavirus Reference Strains and Recent South American Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Solórzano, Víctor Fiestas; Kuschner, Robert A.; Halsey, Eric S.; Jarman, Richard G.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2014-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus), discovered in the 1950s, are vector-borne human pathogens in the Americas. Currently there is a gap in genomic information for group C viruses. In this study, we obtained complete coding region sequences of reference strains of Caraparu (CARV), Oriboca (ORIV), Marituba (MTBV) and Madrid (MADV) viruses, and five clinical isolates from Peru and Bolivia, using an unbiased de novo approach consisting of random reverse transcription, random anchored PCR amplification, and high throughput pyrosequencing. The small, medium, and large segments encode for a 235 amino acid nucleocapsid protein, an approximately 1430 amino acid surface glycoprotein polyprotein precursor, and a 2248 amino acid RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. Additionally, the S segment encodes for an 83 amino acid non-structural protein, although this protein is truncated or silenced in some isolates. Phylogenetically, three clinical isolates clustered with CARV, one clustered with MTBV, and one isolate appeared to be a reassortant or a genetic drift resulted from the high variability of the medium segment which was also seen in a few other orthobunyaviruses. These data represent the first complete coding region sequences for this serocomplex of pathogenic orthobunyaviruses. The genome-wide phylogeny of reference strains is consistent with the antigenic properties of the viruses reported in the original serological studies conducted in the 1960s. Comparative analysis of conserved protein regions across group C virus strains and the other orthobunyavirus groups revealed that these group C viruses contain characteristic domains of potential structural and functional significance. Our results provide the basis for the developments of diagnostics, further genetic analyses, and future epidemiologic studies of group C viruses. PMID:24633174

  19. Population Biology of Intestinal Enterococcus Isolates from Hospitalized and Nonhospitalized Individuals in Different Age Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tedim, Ana P.; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Corander, Jukka; Rodríguez, Concepción M.; Cantón, Rafael; Willems, Rob J.; Baquero, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of enterococcal populations from fecal samples from hospitalized (n = 133) and nonhospitalized individuals (n = 173) of different age groups (group I, ages 0 to 19 years; group II, ages 20 to 59 years; group III, ages ≥60 years) was analyzed. Enterococci were recovered at similar rates from hospitalized and nonhospitalized persons (77.44% to 79.77%) of all age groups (75.0% to 82.61%). Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were predominant, although seven other Enterococcus species were identified. E. faecalis and E. faecium (including ampicillin-resistant E. faecium) colonization rates in nonhospitalized persons were age independent. For inpatients, E. faecalis colonization rates were age independent, but E. faecium colonization rates (particularly the rates of ampicillin-resistant E. faecium colonization) significantly increased with age. The population structure of E. faecium and E. faecalis was determined by superimposing goeBURST and Bayesian analysis of the population structure (BAPS). Most E. faecium sequence types (STs; 150 isolates belonging to 75 STs) were linked to BAPS groups 1 (22.0%), 2 (31.3%), and 3 (36.7%). A positive association between hospital isolates and BAPS subgroups 2.1a and 3.3a (which included major ampicillin-resistant E. faecium human lineages) and between community-based ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates and BAPS subgroups 1.2 and 3.3b was found. Most E. faecalis isolates (130 isolates belonging to 58 STs) were grouped into 3 BAPS groups, BAPS groups 1 (36.9%), 2 (40.0%), and 3 (23.1%), with each one comprising widespread lineages. No positive associations with age or hospitalization were established. The diversity and dynamics of enterococcal populations in the fecal microbiota of healthy humans are largely unexplored, with the available knowledge being fragmented and contradictory. The study offers a novel and comprehensive analysis of enterococcal population landscapes and suggests that E. faecium

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates identify a prevalent sequence type, ST505, and a distinct clonal group of clinical isolates in Toyama Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanatani, Jun-Ichi; Isobe, Junko; Kimata, Keiko; Shima, Tomoko; Shimizu, Miwako; Kura, Fumiaki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Watahiki, Masanori

    2013-08-01

    We performed comparative analyses of Legionella pneumophila serogroup (SG) 1 isolates obtained during 2005-2012 in Toyama Prefecture, Japan, by sequence-based typing (SBT) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Seventy-three isolates of L. pneumophila SG 1, including 17 isolates from patients, 51 from public baths, 4 from cooling towers, and 1 from a shower, were analyzed. The isolates were classified into 43 sequence types (STs) by SBT and 52 types by PFGE. Fourteen STs were unique to Toyama Prefecture, as determined from the SBT database of European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI), as of October 31, 2012. ST505 strain was identified in 4 isolates from patients and 5 isolates from public baths, and these isolates belonged to 2 PFGE types. These, however, were similar because of the difference with only two restriction fragments, indicating that ST505 strain was prevalent among L. pneumophila SG 1 isolates in this area. ST505 strains isolated from patients and public baths were distributed along the river in a western part of Toyama Prefecture. SBT and PFGE profiles of 3 clinical isolates were identical with those of 3 environmental isolates from the suspected origins of the infection in each case, respectively. This finding suggested that SBT and PFGE were useful for epidemiological study. Furthermore, by SBT analysis, we identified a clonal group formed only by 7 clinical isolates that are not associated with bathwater, suggesting that they were derived from unrecognized sources. PMID:23269379

  1. Group extraction of organic compounds present in liquid samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnsen, Vilhelm J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An extraction device is disclosed comprising a tube containing a substantially inert, chemically non-reactive packing material with a large surface area to volume ratio. A sample which consists of organic compounds dissolved in a liquid, is introduced into the tube. As the sample passes through the packing material it spreads over the material's large surface area to form a thin liquid film which is held on the packing material in a stationary state. A particular group or family of compounds is extractable from the sample by passing a particular solvent system consisting of a solvent and selected reagents through the packing material. The reagents cause optimum conditions to exist for the compounds of the particular family to pass through the phase boundary between the sample liquid and the solvent of the solvent system. Thus, the compounds of the particular family are separated from the sample liquid and become dissolved in the solvent of the solvent system. The particular family of compounds dissolved in the solvent, representing an extract, exits the tube together with the solvent through the tube's nozzle, while the rest of the sample remains on the packing material in a stationary state. Subsequently, a different solvent system may be passed through the packing material to extract another family of compounds from the remaining sample on the packing material.

  2. Superantigen genes in group A streptococcal isolates and their relationship with emm types.

    PubMed

    Commons, Robert; Rogers, Susan; Gooding, Travis; Danchin, Margie; Carapetis, Jonathan; Robins-Browne, Roy; Curtis, Nigel

    2008-10-01

    Superantigens are important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of invasive disease caused by group A streptococcus (GAS). There has been a recent re-emergence of this disease worldwide. A number of novel superantigens have been described recently. This study investigated 107 isolates of GAS for possession of each of the 11 currently known superantigen genes to determine the prevalence, co-occurrence and genetic restriction amongst different emm types of GAS. The results were compared with those in previously published studies. Superantigen genes were not randomly distributed amongst GAS isolates. Certain combinations of superantigen genes were more common and the majority of emm types showed restricted superantigen profiles. This is the first prevalence study of GAS isolates to include the complete range of known superantigen genes and their restriction amongst emm types. This study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between superantigen genes and emm types, and highlights the importance of comprehensive studies in different populations. PMID:18809552

  3. Frequency perception of individual and group successes as a function of competition, coaction, and isolation.

    PubMed

    Janssens, L; Nuttin, J R

    1976-11-01

    The frequency perception of successful and unsuccessful outcomes obtained in serial tasks was investigated in two experiments. Subjects were assigned to serial tasks in which the outcome stimuli ("right" and "wrong") immediately followed subjects' responses to each task item. Subjects' perceptual judgment about the number of "rights and wrongs" obtained was requested at the end of the serial task (incidental event perception). In Experiment 1, subjects performing in groups of four were compared with individual performers both in competing and noncompeting (coacting) conditions. In Experiment 2, the influence of verbal communication and competition versus isolation was examined. Significant and predicted differences in frequeency perception were found (a) in group performers as compared with individual performers, (b) in groups with verbal communication as compared with groups without verbal communication, and (c) in competing groups as compared with noncompeting, especially isolated, groups. The frequency perception of success is discussed in the context of impression formation processes, and its impact on person perception and learning is mentioned. A tentative explanation in terms of affective and cognitive processes related to social interaction is submitted. PMID:993983

  4. Isolation of a lytic bacteriophage against virulent Aeromonas hydrophila from an organized equine farm.

    PubMed

    Anand, Taruna; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Bera, Bidhan Ch; Singh, Jitender; Barua, Sanjay; Virmani, Nitin; K, Rajukumar; Yadav, Neeraj Kumar; Nagar, Dinesh; Singh, Raj K; Tripathi, B N

    2016-04-01

    A bacteriophage (VTCCBPA6) against a pathogenic strain of Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from the sewage of an organized equine breeding farm. On the basis of TEM analysis, phage belonged to family Myoviridae. PCR amplification and sequence analysis of gp23 gene (encoding for major capsid protein) revealed phylogenetic resemblance to T4 like virus genus. Protein profiling by SDS-PAGE also indicated its resemblance to T4 like phage group. However, the comparison of its gp23 gene sequence with previously reported phages showed similarity with T4-like phages infecting Enterobacteriaceae instead of Aeromonas spp. Thus, to our knowledge, this report points toward the fact that a novel/evolved phage might exist in equine environment against A. hydrophila, which can be potentially used as a biocontrol agent. PMID:26748732

  5. Presence of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in isolates from avian organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Luís Eduardo S; Puño-Sarmiento, Juan J; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Cyoia, Paula S; da Silveira, Wanderlei D; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2015-12-01

    Poultry litter is commonly used as fertilizer in agriculture. However, this poultry litter must be processed prior to use, since poultry have a large number of pathogenic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to isolate and genotypically and phenotypically characterize Escherichia coli from avian organic fertilizer. Sixty-four E. coli isolates were identified from avian organic fertilizer and characterized for ExPEC virulence factors, pathogenicity islands, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation, and adhesion to HEp-2 cells. Sixty-three isolates (98.4%) showed at least one virulence gene (fimH, ecpA, sitA, traT, iutA, iroN, hlyF, ompT and iss). The predominant phylogenetic groups were groups A (59.3%) and B1 (34.3%). The pathogenicity island CFT073II (51.5%) was the most prevalent among the isolates tested. Thirty-two isolates (50%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Approximately 90% of isolates adhered to HEp-2 cells, and the predominant pattern was aggregative adherence (74.1%). In the biofilm assay, it was observed that 75% of isolates did not produce biofilm. These results lead us to conclude that some E. coli isolates from avian organic fertilizer could be pathogenic for humans. PMID:26476087

  6. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meet the following requirements: (1) Each organization is a member of an affiliated group of... other than national legislative issues. Each organization in a group of organizations that satisfies the... controlling member organization if it controls one or more of the other members of the limited...

  7. Frequency of specific agr groups and antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in the northeast of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Azimian, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is generally regarded as a leading cause of mastitis in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of agr groups and any possible relationship between agr groups and antibiotic resistance among S. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis in Northeast of Iran. For this purpose, a total of 300 bovine mastitic milk samples were taken from dairy industry farms of Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran. S. aureus were isolated and identified according to the standard methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by disk diffusion method. In this study a total of 31 isolates of S. aureus were evaluated for agrD gene polymorphism by specific primers. Most of the isolates belonged to agr group I (54.8%), followed by agr group III (25.8%) and agr group II (19.4%). There was not any isolates belonging to group IV. Resistance to methicillin in agr group I isolates was more than other groups. Agr groups II and III were quite susceptible to methicillin. Due to high prevalent of S. aureus isolates and high antibiotic resistance rate in bovine mastitic isolates, it is important to verify the characteristics of S. aureus strains in Iran. PMID:26973764

  8. Frequency of specific agr groups and antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in the northeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Azimian, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is generally regarded as a leading cause of mastitis in dairy cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of agr groups and any possible relationship between agr groups and antibiotic resistance among S. aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis in Northeast of Iran. For this purpose, a total of 300 bovine mastitic milk samples were taken from dairy industry farms of Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran. S. aureus were isolated and identified according to the standard methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was conducted by disk diffusion method. In this study a total of 31 isolates of S. aureus were evaluated for agrD gene polymorphism by specific primers. Most of the isolates belonged to agr group I (54.8%), followed by agr group III (25.8%) and agr group II (19.4%). There was not any isolates belonging to group IV. Resistance to methicillin in agr group I isolates was more than other groups. Agr groups II and III were quite susceptible to methicillin. Due to high prevalent of S. aureus isolates and high antibiotic resistance rate in bovine mastitic isolates, it is important to verify the characteristics of S. aureus strains in Iran. PMID:26973764

  9. Structural environments of carboxyl groups in natural organic molecules from terrestrial systems. Part 1: Infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Michael B.; Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2007-07-01

    Carboxyls play an important role in the chemistry of natural organic molecules (NOM) in the environment, and their behavior is dependent on local structural environment within the macromolecule. We studied the structural environments of carboxyl groups in dissolved NOM from the Pine Barrens (New Jersey, USA), and IHSS NOM isolates from soils and river waters using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. It is well established that the energies of the asymmetric stretching vibrations of the carboxylate anion (COO -) are sensitive to the structural environment of the carboxyl group. These energies were compiled from previous infrared studies on small organic acids for a wide variety of carboxyl structural environments and compared with the carboxyl spectral features of the NOM samples. We found that the asymmetric stretching peaks for all NOM samples occur within a narrow range centered at 1578 cm -1, suggesting that all NOM samples examined primarily contain very similar carboxyl structures, independent of sample source and isolation techniques employed. The small aliphatic acids containing hydroxyl (e.g., D-lactate, gluconate), ether/ester (methoxyacetate, acetoxyacetate), and carboxylate (malonate) substitutions on the α-carbon, and the aromatic acids salicylate ( ortho-OH) and furancarboxylate ( O-heterocycle), exhibit strong overlap with the NOM range, indicating that similar structures may be common in NOM. The width of the asymmetric peak suggests that the structural heterogeneity among the predominant carboxyl configurations in NOM is small. Changes in peak area with pH at energies distant from the peak at 1578 cm -1, however, may be indicative of a small fraction of other aromatic carboxyls and aliphatic structures lacking α-substitution. This information is important in understanding NOM-metal and mineral-surface complexation, and in building appropriate structural and mechanistic models of humic materials.

  10. Isolation of Naturally Occurring Viruses of the Murine Leukemia Virus Group in Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Janet W.; Rowe, Wallace P.; Capps, Worth I.; Huebner, Robert J.

    1969-01-01

    A tissue culture cell system for isolation and identification of members of the murine leukemia virus group (the complement fixation for murine leukemia test) was modified to permit the isolation of naturally occurring virus from leukemic and normal mice. The important factors for increasing the sensitivity of the test were the use of National Institutes of Health (NIH) strain Webster Swiss embryo cell cultures and the selection of rat-immune sera having complement-fixing antibodies to tissue culture antigens of both the Gross and FMR subgroups. In all, 163 strains of mouse leukemia virus, from 11 inbred mouse strains, have been isolated. Representative virus isolates were shown to possess the properties of the murine leukemia virus group; i.e., they were chloroform-sensitive, noncytopathic agents which replicated in mouse embryo tissue culture and produced group-reactive, complement-fixing antigen and budding C-type particles visible by electron microscopy. These viruses could serve as helpers in the rescue of Moloney sarcoma virus genome from non-producer hamster sarcoma cells, yielding pseudotypes. All of the 19 field isolates tested were neutralized by Gross passage A antiserum but not by potent antisera to the Moloney, Rauscher, and Friend strains. Virus was recovered regularly from embryos and from the plasma and spleen of adult mice of high leukemic strains. In low leukemic mouse strains, different patterns of virus detection were observed. In C3H/He mice, virus was occasionally present in embryos and was found in 40% of adult spleens. BALB/c mice were virus-negative as fetuses or weanlings, but spleens of more than half of the mice over 6 months of age yielded virus. NIH mice have never yielded virus. In reciprocal matings between AKR and BALB/c mice, virus recovery from embryos was maternally determined. The development of tissue culture isolation procedures made possible for the first time the application of classical infectious disease methods to the

  11. Isolation of organic acids from large volumes of water by adsorption chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations of dissolved organic carbon from most natural waters ranges from 1 to 20 milligrams carbon per liter, of which approximately 75 percent are organic acids. These acids can be chromatographically fractionated into hydrophobic organic acids, such as humic substances, and hydrophilic organic acids. To effectively study any of these organic acids, they must be isolated from other organic and inorganic species, and concentrated. Usually, large volumes of water must be processed to obtain sufficient quantities of material, and adsorption chromatography on synthetic, macroporous resins has proven to be a particularly effective method for this purpose. The use of the nonionic Amberlite XAD-8 and Amberlite XAD-4 resins and the anion exchange resin Duolite A-7 for isolating and concentrating organic acids from water is presented.

  12. Distribution and sequence variations of selected virulence genes among group A streptococcal isolates from western Norway.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, H; Bjorvatn, B; Osland, A

    2000-11-01

    In order to compare the distribution of selected virulence genes among group A streptococci recovered from invasive disease and superficial infections, 42 isolates were screened for mga, speB, speA, ssa and ska, by PCR. The isolates were predominantly of the sequence types emm1, emm3 and emm6, but also included a few of the types emm22, emm28, emm75 and emm78. The phage-mediated speA seemed to be prevalent in emm types 1 and 3, and its distribution was not related to disease severity. The other genes were present in all isolates. The mga, speB and speA were further studied by sequence analysis. Although allotypic associations with invasiveness were not found, allelic specificity to the emm sequence type was observed. In addition, the mga sequences indicated two lineages, related to opacity factor production. A possible recombination between these two main divergent mga genes was observed in isolates of the types emm22 and emm75. A logical nomenclature of the alleles of mga and speB is suggested. PMID:11211972

  13. Antagonism of ampicillin and chloramphenicol for meningeal isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J L; Mason, E O; Baker, C J

    1981-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b has led to the recommendation that ampicillin and chloramphenicol be given as the initial therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis in infants and children. However, during the first 2 months of life, H. influenzae type b is a rare cause of meningitis, whereas group B streptococcus is the most frequently isolated agent. Since ampicillin and chloramphenicol have been shown to be antagonistic for other streptococci, an in vitro study of their effect on group B streptococci was performed. The effect of ampicillin and chloramphenicol, alone and in combination, on 18 meningeal isolates was determined for 2 different inocula of group B streptococci, using microtiter broth dilution and growth kinetic assays. Isoboles, fractional lethal concentration indices, or both indicated antagonism for all strains. Growth kinetic assays for two representative strains demonstrated inhibition of the early bactericidal activity of ampicillin by chloramphenicol. These findings of in vitro antagonism suggest that this combination may be contraindicated for the treatment of infants with group B streptococcal meningitis. PMID:7030197

  14. Characterisation of the first actinobacterial group isolated from a Mexican extremophile environment.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Erika T; Badillo, Ricardo Flores; Maldonado, Luis A

    2013-07-01

    The "Cave of Crystals" (aka 'Naica') in Chihuahua Mexico is a natural unique subterranean ecosystem which mainly consists of crystals made of calcium sulfate. The main system of caves are found at a depth of 300 meters (m) below sea level with crystals that range in size from a few centimeters to 15 m. The crystals date from nearly 400,000 years old and are thought to be formed when the cave was fully covered by water. At present time, this place shows a nearly constant temperature of 55 °C over the year and a humidity of 100 % which makes this place incomparable and unbearable to animal and/or human life. In the present study, two actinobacterial groups were isolated from within this system of caves and subjected to a systematic study to establish their phylogenetic relationship to microorganisms belonging to this vast group of Gram positive bacteria. Phenotypic properties, chemotaxonomic and 16S rRNA gene sequencing show that the microorganisms are members of the family Pseudonocardiaceae and are most closely related to the genus Prauserella. The present study is the first to report the isolation and presence of Actinobacteria or any other microbial form of life in this exceptional place. Moreover, this unexpected biodiversity can also provide an insight of the antibiotic resistome present in the isolates reported in this study. PMID:23640690

  15. Constants for mercury binding by organic matter isolates from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benoit, J.M.; Mason, R.P.; Gilmour, C.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been implicated as an important complexing agent for Hg that can affect its mobility and bioavailability in aquatic ecosystems. However, binding constants for natural Hg-DOM complexes are not well known. We employed a competitive ligand approach to estimate conditional stability constants for Hg complexes with DOM isolates collected from Florida Everglades surface waters. The isolates examined were the hydrophobic fraction of DOM from a eutrophic, sulfidic site (F1-HPoA) and the hydrophilic fraction from an oligotrophic, low-sulfide site (2BS-HPiA). Our experimental determinations utilized overall octanol-water partitioning coefficients (Dow) for 203Hg at 0.01 M chloride and across pH and DOM concentration gradients. Use of this radioisotope allowed rapid determinations of Hg concentrations in both water and octanol phases without problems of matrix interference. Conditional stability constants (1 = 0.06, 23??C) were log K??? = 11.8 for F1-HPoA and log K' = 10.6 for 2BS-HPiA. These are similar to previously published stability constants for Hg binding to low-molecular-weight thiols. Further, F1-HPoA showed a pH-dependent decline in Dow that was consistent with models of Hg complexation with thiol groups as the dominant Hg binding sites in DOM. These experiments demonstrate that the DOM isolates are stronger ligands for Hg than chloride ion or ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid. Speciation calculations indicate that at the DOM concentrations frequently measured in Everglades, 20 to 40 ??M, significant complexation of Hg by DOM would be expected in aerobic (sulfide-free) surface waters. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Team Science: Organizing Classroom Experiments That Develop Group Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Marilyn

    This book contains classroom experiments designed to promote group skills. Each lesson has 4 parts: a 3-minute set-up; 5-minute warm-up, 25-minute experiment, and 5-minute clean-up. During each part, each member of the group is responsible for performing a specific task. Included are 34 labs that cover a range of topics: observations, physical…

  17. Extensive introgressive hybridization within the northern oriole group (Genus Icterus) revealed by three-species isolation with migration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Frode; Omland, Kevin E

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, studies of divergence and gene flow among closely-related taxa were generally limited to pairs of sister taxa. However, organisms frequently exchange genes with other non-sister taxa. The “northern oriole” group within genus Icterus exemplifies this problem. This group involves the extensively studied hybrid zone between Baltimore oriole (Icterus galbula) and Bullock's oriole (I. bullockii), an alleged hybrid zone between I. bullockii and black-backed oriole (I. abeillei), and likely mtDNA introgression between I. galbula and I. abeillei. Here, we examine the divergence population genetics of the entire northern oriole group using a multipopulation Isolation-with-Migration (IM) model. In accordance with Haldane's rule, nuclear loci introgress extensively beyond the I. galbula–I. bullockii hybrid zone, while mtDNA does not. We found no evidence of introgression between I. bullockii and I. abeillei or between I. galbula and I. abeillei when all three species were analyzed together in a three-population model. However, traditional pairwise analysis suggested some nuclear introgression from I. abeillei into I. galbula, probably reflecting genetic contributions from I. bullockii unaccounted for in a two-population model. Thus, only by including all members of this group in the analysis was it possible to rigorously estimate the level of gene flow among these three closely related species. PMID:23145328

  18. Group Participation in the Organization: Social Loafing as a Limitation of Group Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallmark, James R.; Downs, Timothy M.

    Organizational studies traditionally take the position that the more people involved in group decision making the more ideas will be generated. Recent studies demonstrate that people have a tendency to "loaf" in group situations and thus decrease the level of effort exerted by individual group members. This paper first reviews the literature on…

  19. Differentiation and grouping of isolates of the Ganoderma lucidum complex by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR compared with grouping on the basis of internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, R S; Wang, H H; Wang, H F; Moncalvo, J M

    1996-01-01

    Laccate polypores of the Ganoderma lucidum species complex are widespread white rot fungi of economic importance, but isolates cannot be identified by traditional taxonomic methods. Parsimony analysis of nucleotide sequences from the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of the ribosomal gene (rDNA) distinguished six lineages in this species complex. Each ITS lineage may represent one or more putative species. While some isolates have identical ITS sequences, all of them could be clearly differentiated by genetic fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). To investigate the suitability of RAPD markers for taxonomic identification and grouping of isolates of the G. lucidum complex, RAPD fragments (RAPDs) were used as phenotypic characters in numerical and parsimony analyses. Results show that data from RAPDS do not distinguish the same clades as ITS data do. Groupings based on analysis of RAPD data were very sensitive to the choice of the grouping method used, and no consistent grouping of isolates could be proposed. However, analysis with RAPDs did resolve several robust terminal clades containing putatively conspecific isolates, suggesting that RAPDs might be helpful for systematics at the lower taxonomic levels that are unresolved by ITS sequence data. The limitations of RAPDs for systematics are briefly discussed. The conclusion of this study is that ITS sequences can be used to identify isolates of the G. lucidum complex, whereas RAPDs can be used to differentiate between isolates having identical ITS sequences. The practical implications of these results are briefly illustrated. PMID:8919797

  20. Isolation and characterization of a unique group of slowly growing mycobacteria: description of Mycobacterium lentiflavum sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Wu, W K; Bodmer, T; Haase, G; Pfyffer, G E; Kroppenstedt, R M; Schröder, K H; Emler, S; Kilburn, J O; Kirschner, P; Telenti, A; Coyle, M B; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    A distinct group of slowly growing mycobacteria was identified on the basis of growth characteristics, biochemical and lipid profiles, and nucleic acid analyses. The isolates showed growth at 22 to 37 degrees C, yellow pigmentation, and negative tests for Tween 80 hydrolysis, nicotinic acid, nitrate reductase, and urease; tests for arylsulfatase, pyrazinamidase, and heat-stable catalase were variable. Analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography and mycolic acids by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography indicated a distinctive pattern which was unlike those of other species. Determination of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed a unique sequence closely related to Mycobacterium simiae and M. genavense. On the basis of DNA homology studies, we suggest that these organisms are representatives of a novel species, for which the name M. lentiflavum sp. nov. is proposed. PMID:8727884

  1. [Experience of using bacterial lysate IRS 19 for the prophylaxis of the diseases of respiratory organs in organized groups].

    PubMed

    Volgin, A R; Demina, Iu V

    2005-01-01

    To solve the problem of unfavorable sanitary and epidemiological situation in diseases of respiratory organs in one of the organized groups in the Moscow region, a preparation prepared from a group of curative vaccines, IRS 19, was used. For controlling the effectiveness of its prophylactic action two groups of 250 persons were formed. As a result, morbidity rate in respiratory diseases decreased 2.5-3 times. In 1.5 months after the use of the preparation was started the coefficient of protection against the whole group of diseases of respiratory organs was 70%. PMID:16028523

  2. Seeking Shared Practice: A Juxtaposition of the Attributes and Activities of Organized Fossil Groups with Those of Professional Paleontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippen, Kent J.; Ellis, Shari; Dunckel, Betty A.; Hendy, Austin J. W.; MacFadden, Bruce J.

    2016-05-01

    This study sought to define the attributes and practices of organized fossil groups (e.g., clubs, paleontological societies) as amateur paleontologists, as well as those of professional paleontologists, and explore the potential for these two groups to work collaboratively as a formalized community. Such an investigation is necessary to develop design principles for an online environment that supports this community and encourages communication and shared practice among individuals with different backgrounds in paleontology and who are geographically isolated. A national survey of fossil group representatives and professional paleontologists was used to address the research questions. The results provide a rich description of the attributes and activities of both groups and are discussed in terms of three design principles for supporting the two groups in a form of collaboration and fellowship via a coherent shared practice within an online learning community.

  3. A new Streptococcus group A M-29 variant isolated during a suspected common-source epidemic.

    PubMed

    Gillis, D; Cohen, D; Beck, A; Rouach, T; Katzenelson, E; Green, M

    1992-06-01

    In the summer of 1988, a large epidemic of acute pharyngitis occurred in an Israeli military base. The clinical features were those of acute pharyngitis. The epidemic curve was characteristic of a common-source outbreak, possibly food-borne. Throat swabs from a sample of cases were positive for group A streptococci. Nine isolates from the epidemic were further evaluated at the local reference laboratory and serotyping showed that all were of the same strain with a distinct M protein that is a hitherto undescribed variant of M-29. We discuss the significance of unusual strains of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus appearing in food-borne outbreaks. PMID:1620392

  4. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Members of a limited affiliated group of... Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations. (a) Scope. This section provides additional rules for members of a limited affiliated group of organizations, as defined in paragraph (b) of...

  5. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Members of a limited affiliated group of... Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations. (a) Scope. This section provides additional rules for members of a limited affiliated group of organizations, as defined in paragraph (b) of...

  6. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Members of a limited affiliated group of... Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations. (a) Scope. This section provides additional rules for members of a limited affiliated group of organizations, as defined in paragraph (b) of...

  7. Organization of the cpe Locus in CPE-Positive Clostridium perfringens Type C and D Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sayeed, Sameera; McClane, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (encoded by the cpe gene) contributes to several important human, and possibly veterinary, enteric diseases. The current study investigated whether cpe locus organization in type C or D isolates resembles one of the three (one chromosomal and two plasmid-borne) cpe loci commonly found amongst type A isolates. Multiplex PCR assays capable of detecting sequences in those type A cpe loci failed to amplify products from cpe-positive type C and D isolates, indicating these isolates possess different cpe locus arrangements. Therefore, restriction fragments containing the cpe gene were cloned and sequenced from two type C isolates and one type D isolate. The obtained cpe locus sequences were then used to construct an overlapping PCR assay to assess cpe locus diversity amongst other cpe-positive type C and D isolates. All seven surveyed cpe-positive type C isolates had a plasmid-borne cpe locus partially resembling the cpe locus of type A isolates carrying a chromosomal cpe gene. In contrast, all eight type D isolates shared the same plasmid-borne cpe locus, which differed substantially from the cpe locus present in other C. perfringens by containing two copies of an ORF with 67% identity to a transposase gene (COG4644) found in Tn1546, but not previously associated with the cpe gene. These results identify greater diversity amongst cpe locus organization than previously appreciated, providing new insights into cpe locus evolution. Finally, evidence for cpe gene mobilization was found for both type C and D isolates, which could explain their cpe plasmid diversity. PMID:20532170

  8. Molecular characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes group A isolates from a tertiary hospital in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Karaky, Nathalie M; Araj, George F; Tokajian, Sima T

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes [Group A Streptococcus (GAS)] is one of the most important human pathogens, responsible for numerous diseases with diverse clinical manifestations. As the epidemiology of GAS infections evolves, a rapid and reliable characterization of the isolates remains essential for epidemiological analysis and infection control. This study investigated the epidemiological patterns and genetic characteristics of 150 GAS isolates from a tertiary hospital in Lebanon by emm typing, superantigens (SAgs) detection, PFGE and antibiotic profiling. The results revealed 41 distinct emm types, the most prevalent of which were emm89 (16 %), emm12 (10 %), emm2 (9 %) and emm1 (8 %). Testing for the presence of superantigens showed that speB (87 %), ssa (36 %) and speG (30 %) were predominant. PFGE detected 39 pulsotypes when a similarity cut-off value of 80 % was implemented. Antibiotic-susceptibility testing against seven different classes of antibiotics showed that 9 % of the isolates were resistant to clindamycin, 23 % were resistant to erythromycin and 4 % showed the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype. The emergence of tetracycline-resistant strains (37 %) was high when compared with previous reports from Lebanon. This study provided comprehensive evidence of the epidemiology of GAS in Lebanon, highlighting the association between emm types and toxin genes, and providing valuable information about the origin and dissemination of this pathogen. PMID:24980572

  9. Isolation and purification of blood group antigens using immuno-affinity chromatography on short monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Mönster, Andrea; Hiller, Oliver; Grüger, Daniela; Blasczyk, Rainer; Kasper, Cornelia

    2011-02-01

    Monolithic columns have gained increasing attention as stationary phases for the separation of biomolecules and biopharmaceuticals. In the present work the performance of monolithic convective interaction media (CIM(®)) chromatography for the purification of blood group antigens was established. The proteins employed in this study are derived from blood group antigens Knops, JMH and Scianna, equipped both with a His-tag and with a V5-tag by which they can be purified. In a first step a monoclonal antibody directed against the V5-tag was immobilized on a CIM(®) Disk with epoxy chemistry. After this, the immobilized CIM(®) Disk was used in immuno-affinity chromatography to purify the three blood group antigens from cell culture supernatant. Up-scaling of the applied technology was carried out using CIM(®) Tubes. In comparison to conventional affinity chromatography, blood group antigens were also purified via His-tag using a HiTrap(®) metal-affinity column. The two purifications have been compared regarding purity, yield and purification speed. Using the monolithic support, it was possible to isolate the blood group antigens with a higher flow rate than using the conventional bed-packed column. PMID:21194702

  10. Viridans Group Streptococci Clinical Isolates: MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry versus Gene Sequence-Based Identification

    PubMed Central

    Angeletti, Silvia; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Avola, Alessandra; Crea, Francesca; Dedej, Etleva; Vailati, Francesca; Farina, Claudio; De Florio, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Viridans Group Streptococci (VGS) species-level identification is fundamental for patients management. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization—time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been used for VGS identification but discrimination within the Mitis group resulted difficult. In this study, VGS identifications with two MALDI-TOF instruments, the Biotyper (Bruker) and the VITEK MS (bioMérieux) have been compared to those derived from tuf, soda and rpoB genes sequencing. VGS isolates were clustered and a dendrogram constructed using the Biotyper 3.0 software (Bruker). RpoB gene sequencing resulted the most sensitive and specific molecular method for S. pneumonia identification and was used as reference method. The sensitivity and the specificity of the VITEK MS in S. pneumonia identification were 100%, while the Biotyper resulted less specific (92.4%). In non pneumococcal VGS strains, the group-level correlation between rpoB and the Biotyper was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 61% after database upgrading (than 37% before upgrading). The group-level correlation between rpoB and the VITEK MS was 100%, while the species-level correlation was 36% and increases at 69% if isolates identified as S. mitis/S. oralis are included. The less accurate performance of the VITEK MS in VGS identification within the Mitis group was due to the inability to discriminate between S. mitis and S. oralis. Conversely, the Biotyper, after the release of the upgraded database, was able to discriminate between the two species. In the dendrogram, VGS strains from the same group were grouped into the same cluster and had a good correspondence with the gene-based clustering reported by other authors, thus confirming the validity of the upgraded version of the database. Data from this study demonstrated that MALDI-TOF technique can represent a rapid and cost saving method for VGS identification even within the Mitis group but improvements of spectra database are

  11. Prediction of crystal densities of organic explosives by group additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, J R

    1981-08-01

    The molar volume of crystalline organic compound is assumed to be a linear combination of its constituent volumes. Compounds consisting only of the elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine are considered. The constituent volumes are taken to be the volumes of atoms in particular bonding environments and are evaluated from a large set of crystallographic data. The predicted density has an expected error of about 3%. These results are applied to a large number of explosives compounds.

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and prevalence of group B Streptococcus isolated from pregnant women in Misiones, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, M.; Pegels, E.; Oviedo, P.; Pereyra, E.; Vergara, M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the susceptibility patterns and the colonization rate of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in a population of pregnant women. From January 2004 to December 2006, vaginal-rectal swabs were obtained from 1105 women attending Dr. Ramón Madariaga Hospital, in Posadas, Misiones, Argentina. The carriage rate of GBS among pregnant women was 7.6%. A total of 62 GBS strains were randomly selected for in vitro susceptibility testing to penicillin G, ampicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, vancomycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim- sulfametoxazol, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, clindamycin and erythromycin, and determination of resistance phenotypes. No resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, and vancomycin was found. Of the isolates examined 96.8%, 98.3%, 46.8%, and 29.0% were susceptible to rifampicin, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazol and tetracycline, respectively. Rank order of susceptibility for the quinolones was: gatifloxacin (98.4%) > levofloxacin (93.5%) > ciprofloxacin (64.5%). The rate of resistance to erythromycin (9.7%) was higher than that of other reports from Argentina. High-level resistance to gentamicin was not detected in any of the isolates. Based on our finding of 50% of GBS isolates with MIC to gentamicin equal o lower than 8 μg/ml, a concentration used in one of the selective media recommended for GBS isolation, we suggested, at least in our population, the use of nalidixic acid and colistin in selective media with the aim to improve the sensitivity of screening cultures for GBS carriage in women. PMID:24031210

  13. Assignment of Colletotrichum coccodes isolates into vegetative compatibility groups using infrared spectroscopy: a step towards practical application.

    PubMed

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Lapidot, I; Tsror, L; Moreh, R; Mordechai, S; Huleihel, M

    2015-05-01

    Colletotrichum coccodes (C. coccodes) is a pathogenic fungus that causes anthracnose on tomatoes and black dot disease in potatoes. It is considered as a seed tuber and soil-borne pathogen that is difficult to control. C. coccodes isolates are classified into Vegetative Compatibility Groups (VCGs). Early classification of isolates into VCGs is of great importance for a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and improving its control. Moreover, the differentiation among these isolates and the assignment of newly-discovered isolates enable control of the disease at its early stages. Distinguishing between isolates using microbiological or genetic methods is time-consuming and not readily available. Our results show that it is possible to assign the isolates into their VCGs and to classify them at the isolate level with a high success rate using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA). PMID:25790802

  14. Multispacer Typing (MST) of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae Isolated from Humans and Rats in Chengmai County, Hainan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xueqin; Jin, Yuming; Lao, Shijun; Huang, Changhe; Huang, Fang; Jia, Pengben; Zhang, Lijuan

    2014-09-01

    Spotted fever caused by spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR) is found throughout China. During 2007-2008, 28 human SFGR isolates and 34 rat SFGR isolates including 15 isolates from Rattus fulvescens, 5 isolates from R. edwardsi, 7 isolates from Callosciurus erythraeus roberti and 7 isolates from Dremomys rufigenis) were obtained from L929 cell culture. Previous research indicated that the 62 strains of SFGR mentioned above shared not only the same serophenotype but also 100% of identity sequences of 16S rRNA, gltA, ompA, groEL and 17KD, which enabled us to apply multispacer typing (MST) to the 62 SFGR isolates in the study. Six primer pairs, which were used for typing of Rickettsia rickettsii and Rickettsia conorii, were chosen, and the results exhibited greater nucleotide polymorphisms among the 62 isolates tested. A total of 48 distinct genotypes were identified. The dominant genotype, represented by h3 isolates, accounted for 21.7% (13/60) of the isolates tested, and the remaining 47 genotypes were all unique. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all the 48 genotypes could be classified in the same clade, while the genetically related strain, R. heilongjiangensis, was close but not the same as the cluster. We concluded that the genetically diverse of spotted fever group rickettsiae strains are endemic in Chengmai County, Hainan Province, China. PMID:25324688

  15. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  16. Population structure and characterization of viridans group streptococci (VGS) isolated from the upper respiratory tract of patients in the community

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takuya; Nakanishi, Shigeyuki; Mason, Charlene; Montgomery, Janice; Leggett, Paul; Matsuda, Motoo; Coulter, Wilson A.; Millar, B. Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin E.; Moore, John E.

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the population structure of viridans group streptococci (VGS) isolated the upper respiratory tract of adult and paediatric patients within the community. VGS are common commensal bacterial inhabitants of the upper respiratory tract and valuable sentinel reporters of underlying antibiotic resistance (AR). Laboratory examination of the colonising VGS species may provide a valuable ecological description of the species isolated from the upper respiratory tract and their antibiotic susceptibility, including an estimation of the AR reservoir in this population. Freshly obtained nasal and oropharyngeal swabs from 84 patients were examined by selective conventional culture on Mitis-Salivarius agar and yielded 363 isolates of VGS. Sequence analyses of the rpnB and 16–23S rRNA ITS genes identified these isolates to belong to 10 species of VGS and included S. anginosus, S. australis, S. constellatus, S. infantis, S. mitis, S. oralis, S. parasanguinis, S. salivarius, S. sanguinis and S. vestibularis. The most frequent VGS organisms isolated was S. salivarius (282/363; 78.0%), followed by S. sanguinis (23/363; 6.3%), S. parasanguinis (21/363; 5.8%), S. mitis (18/363; 5.0%), S. anginosus (5/363; 1.4%), S. vestibularis (5/363; 1.4%), S. australis (3/363; 0.8%), S. oralis (3/363; 0.8%), S. infantis (1/363; 0.3%) and S. constellatus (1/363; 0.3%). All patients examined carried at least one VGS organism, where there were 17 combination patterns of carriage of the 10 species of VGS species isolated, where 54.2%, 37.3%, 7.2% and 1.2% of patients harboured one, two, three and four different VGS species, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by standard disk diffusion assay testing against four classes of antibiotics, including the b-lactams [cefotaxime, cefuroxime], the tetracyclines [doxycycline], the fluoroquinolones [levofloxacin] and the macrolides [erythromycin]. Overall, there was no resistance to levofloxacin and cefuroxime

  17. Phylogenetic grouping and pathotypic comparison of urine and fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Navidinia, Masoumeh; Peerayeh, Shahin Najar; Fallah, Fatemeh; Bakhshi, Bita; Sajadinia, Raheleh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic background and to assess hlyD (involved in the secretion of haemolysin A) and intI1 (encoding a class 1 integrase) in Escherichia coli isolates derived from urinary and fecal specimens. A total of 200 E. coli isolates was collected from patients presenting with urinary tract infection (UTI) during September 2009 to September 2010 and screened for hlyD and intI1 genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Phylogenetic analysis showed that E. coli is composed of four main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D) and that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates mainly belong to groups B2 (54%) and D (34%) whereas group A (44%) and D (26%) are predominant among commensal E. coli isolates. In this study, hlyD was present in 26% of UPEC and 2% of commensal E. coli isolates. However, hemolytic activity was detected for 42% of UPEC and 6% of commensal E. coli isolates (p < 0.05). intI1 gene was more frequently expressed in UPEC (24%) in comparison with commensal E. coli isolates (12%). Resistance to aztreonam, co-trimoxazole and cefpodoxime were frequently found among UPEC isolates whereas commensal E. coli isolates were commonly resistant to co-trimoxazole, nalidixic acid and cefotaxime. Concluding, a considerable difference between UPEC and commensal E. coli isolates was observed regarding their phylogenetic groups, presence of class 1 integron and hlyD gene, hemolysin activity and resistance pattern. The detection of class 1 integrons and hlyD gene was higher among UPEC compared with commensal E. coli isolates. These findings may contribute for a better understanding of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of UPEC. PMID:25242935

  18. Virulence Gene Pool Detected in Bovine Group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae Isolates by Use of a Group A S. pyogenes Virulence Microarray ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rato, Márcia G.; Nerlich, Andreas; Bergmann, René; Bexiga, Ricardo; Nunes, Sandro F.; Vilela, Cristina L.; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Chhatwal, Gursharan S.

    2011-01-01

    A custom-designed microarray containing 220 virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) was used to test group C Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae (GCS) field strains causing bovine mastitis and group C or group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (GCS/GGS) isolates from human infections, with the latter being used for comparative purposes, for the presence of virulence genes. All bovine and all human isolates carried a fraction of the 220 genes (23% and 39%, respectively). The virulence genes encoding streptolysin S, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the plasminogen-binding M-like protein PAM, and the collagen-like protein SclB were detected in the majority of both bovine and human isolates (94 to 100%). Virulence factors, usually carried by human beta-hemolytic streptococcal pathogens, such as streptokinase, laminin-binding protein, and the C5a peptidase precursor, were detected in all human isolates but not in bovine isolates. Additionally, GAS bacteriophage-associated virulence genes encoding superantigens, DNase, and/or streptodornase were detected in bovine isolates (72%) but not in the human isolates. Determinants located in non-bacteriophage-related mobile elements, such as the gene encoding R28, were detected in all bovine and human isolates. Several virulence genes, including genes of bacteriophage origin, were shown to be expressed by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Phylogenetic analysis of superantigen gene sequences revealed a high level (>98%) of identity among genes of bovine GCS, of the horse pathogen Streptococcus equi subsp. equi, and of the human pathogen GAS. Our findings indicate that alpha-hemolytic bovine GCS, an important mastitis pathogen and considered to be a nonhuman pathogen, carries important virulence factors responsible for virulence and pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21525223

  19. Resource limitation drives spatial organization in microbial groups.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Sara; Clarke, Ellen; Foster, Kevin R

    2016-06-01

    Dense microbial groups such as bacterial biofilms commonly contain a diversity of cell types that define their functioning. However, we have a limited understanding of what maintains, or purges, this diversity. Theory suggests that resource levels are key to understanding diversity and the spatial arrangement of genotypes in microbial groups, but we need empirical tests. Here we use theory and experiments to study the effects of nutrient level on spatio-genetic structuring and diversity in bacterial colonies. Well-fed colonies maintain larger well-mixed areas, but they also expand more rapidly compared with poorly-fed ones. Given enough space to expand, therefore, well-fed colonies lose diversity and separate in space over a similar timescale to poorly fed ones. In sum, as long as there is some degree of nutrient limitation, we observe the emergence of structured communities. We conclude that resource-driven structuring is central to understanding both pattern and process in diverse microbial communities. PMID:26613343

  20. A study of psychrophilic organisms isolated from the manufacture and assembly areas of spacecraft to be used in the Viking mission, 1 January - 30 June 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. L.; Winans, L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Soil samples from the areas associated with the Viking spacecraft were analyzed for major generic groups of microorganisms and the percentage of obligate psychrophiles. Results are presented which show the distribution of organisms isolated at low temperatures and the methods employed for subjecting samples to simulated Martian conditions. Emphasis is placed on application of these results to the objectives of the quarantine program.

  1. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate. PMID:27497132

  2. The enhancement of biofilm formation in Group B streptococcal isolates at vaginal pH.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yueh-Ren; Li, Chien-Ming; Yu, Chen-Hsiang; Lin, Yuh-Jyh; Wu, Ching-Ming; Harn, I-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Chen, Yi-Ting; Shen, Fang-Chi; Lu, Chien-Yi; Tsai, Tai-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2013-04-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a common asymptomatic colonizer in acidic vagina of pregnant women and can transmit to newborns, causing neonatal pneumonia and meningitis. Biofilm formation is often associated with bacterial colonization and pathogenesis. Little is known about GBS biofilm and the effect of environmental stimuli on their growth along with biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to investigate the survival and biofilm formation of GBS, isolated from pregnant women, in nutrient-limited medium under various pH conditions. Growth and survival experiments were determined by optical density and viable counts. Crystal violet staining, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the capacity of biofilm production. Our results showed that GBS isolates proliferated with increasing pH with highest maximum specific growth rate (μmax) at pH 6.5, but survived at pH 4.5 for longer than 48 h. Biofilm formation of the 80 GBS isolates at pH 4.5 was significantly higher than at pH 7.0. This difference was confirmed by two other methods. The low elastic modulus obtained from samples at pH 4.5 by AFM revealed the softness of biofilm; in contrast, little or no biofilm was measured at pH 7.0. Under acidic pH, the capability of biofilm formation of serotypes III and V showed statistically significant difference from serotypes Ia and Ib. Our finding suggested that survival and enhanced biofilm formation at vaginal pH are potentially advantageous for GBS in colonizing vagina and increase the risk of vaginosis and neonatal infection. PMID:22797522

  3. Chromatographic methods for the isolation, separation and characterisation of dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Sandron, Sara; Rojas, Alfonso; Wilson, Richard; Davies, Noel W; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Kelleher, Brian P; Paull, Brett

    2015-09-01

    This review presents an overview of the separation techniques applied to the complex challenge of dissolved organic matter characterisation. The review discusses methods for isolation of dissolved organic matter from natural waters, and the range of separation techniques used to further fractionate this complex material. The review covers both liquid and gas chromatographic techniques, in their various modes, and electrophoretic based approaches. For each, the challenges that the separation and fractionation of such an immensely complex sample poses is critically reviewed. PMID:26290053

  4. PCR detection of cytK gene in Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from food samples.

    PubMed

    Oltuszak-Walczak, Elzbieta; Walczak, Piotr

    2013-11-01

    A method for detection of the cytotoxin K cytK structural gene and its active promoter preceded by the PlcR-binding box, controlling the expression level of this enterotoxin, was developed. The method was applied for the purpose of the analysis of 47 bacterial strains belonging to the Bacillus cereus group isolated from different food products. It was found that the majority of the analyzed strains carried the fully functional cytK gene with its PlcR regulated promoter. The cytK gene was not detected in four emetic strains of Bacillus cereus carrying the cesB gene and potentially producing an emetic toxin - cereulide. The cytotoxin K gene was detected in 4 isolates classified as Bacillus mycoides and one reference strain B. mycoides PCM 2024. The promoter region and the N-terminal part of the cytK gene from two strains of B. mycoides (5D and 19E) showed similarities to the corresponding sequences of Bacillus cereus W23 and Bacillus thuringiensis HD-789, respectively. It was shown for the first time that the cytK gene promoter region from strains 5D and 19E of Bacillus mycoides had a similar arrangement to the corresponding sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. The presence of the cytK gene in Bacillus mycoides shows that this species, widely recognized as nonpathogenic, may pose potential biohazard to human beings. PMID:24060693

  5. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of marine dissolved organic matter isolated using coupled reverse osmosis-electrodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprivnjak, J.-F.; Pfromm, P. H.; Ingall, E.; Vetter, T. A.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Hertkorn, N.; Frommberger, M.; Knicker, H.; Perdue, E. M.

    2009-07-01

    The coupled reverse osmosis-electrodialysis (RO/ED) method was used to isolate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from 16 seawater samples. The average yield of organic carbon was 75 ± 12%, which is consistently greater than the yields of organic carbon that have been commonly achieved using XAD resins, C 18 adsorbents, and cross-flow ultrafiltration. UV-visible absorbance spectra and molar C/N ratios of isolated samples were consistent with the corresponding properties of DOM in the original seawater samples, indicating that DOM samples can be isolated using the coupled RO/ED method without any bias for/against these two properties. Five of the samples were desalted sufficiently that reliable measurements of their 13C and 1HNMR spectra and their Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectra could be obtained. The 13C and 1HNMR spectra of RO/ED samples differed distinctly from those of samples that have been isolated in much lower yields by other methods. In particular, RO/ED samples contained a relatively lower proportion of carbohydrate carbon and a relatively greater proportion of alkyl carbon than samples that have been isolated using cross-flow ultrafiltration. From the FTICR mass spectra of RO/ED samples, samples from the open ocean contained a much lower proportion of unsaturated compounds and a much higher proportion of fatty acids than coastal samples.

  6. Trihalomethanes formed from natural organic matter isolates: Using isotopic and compositional data to help understand sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.A.; Fram, M.S.; Fujii, R.; Aiken, G.R.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    Over 20 million people drink water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta despite problematic levels of natural organic matter (NOM) and bromide in Delta water, which can form trihalomethanes (THMs) during the treatment process. It is widely believed that NOM released from Delta peat islands is a substantial contributor to the pool of THM precursors present in Delta waters. Dissolved NOM was isolated from samples collected at five channel sites within the Sacramento-San Joaquin Rivers and Delta, California, USA, and from a peat island agricultural drain. To help understand the sources of THM precursors, samples were analyzed to determine their chemical and isotopic composition, their propensity to form THMs, and the isotopic composition of the THMs. The chemical composition of the isolates was quite variable, as indicated by significant differences in carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and carbon-to-nitrogen concentration ratios. The lowest propensity to form THMs per unit of dissolved organic carbon was observed in the peat island agricultural drain isolate, even though it possessed the highest fraction of aromatic material and the highest specific ultraviolet absorbance. Changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of the isolates and the isotopic composition of the THMs suggest that the source of the THMs precursors was different between samples and between isolates. The pattern of variability in compositional and isotopic data for these samples was not consistent with simple mixing of river- and peat-derived organic material.

  7. Group A streptococcal strains isolated in Lao People's Democratic Republic from 2004 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Rattanavong, S; Dance, D A B; Davong, V; Baker, C; Frost, H; Phetsouvanh, R; Vongsouvath, M; Newton, P N; Steer, A C; Smeesters, P R

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data regarding group A streptococcal (GAS) infections in South East Asia are scarce with no information from Laos. We characterized emm types, emm clusters and the antibiotic resistance profile of 124 GAS isolates recovered in Laos during 2004-2013. Most strains were recovered from skin and invasive infections (76% and 19%, respectively). Thirty-four emm types were identified as belonging to 12 emm clusters and no novel emm types were identified. No significant differences were observed in the distribution of emm types or emm clusters according to age or site of recovery (skin or invasive infections). There was moderate strain diversity in this country but considerable differences in emm-type distribution between Laos, Thailand and Cambodia. Vaccine coverage was high for the J8 vaccine candidate. The theoretical coverage for the 30-valent vaccine candidate needs further investigation. Antibiotic resistance was moderate to erythromycin and chloramphenicol (8% and 7%, respectively) and low to ofloxacin (<1%). PMID:26645633

  8. 76 FR 60495 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Patient Safety Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Patient Safety Group AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... relinquishment from The Patient Safety Group of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The...

  9. Method of loading organic materials with group III plus lanthanide and actinide elements

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Huei-Ho, Chuen; Brown, Gilbert M.; Hurlbut, Charles

    2003-04-08

    Disclosed is a composition of matter comprising a tributyl phosphate complex of a group 3, lanthanide, actinide, or group 13 salt in an organic carrier and a method of making the complex. These materials are suitable for use in solid or liquid organic scintillators, as in x-ray absorption standards, x-ray fluorescence standards, and neutron detector calibration standards.

  10. Enhanced dissolution of cinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1998-11-01

    Organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades caused a dramatic increase in mercury release from cinnabar (HgS), a solid with limited solubility. Hydrophobic (a mixture of both humic and fulvic) acids dissolved more mercury than hydrophilic acids and other nonacid fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cinnabar dissolution by isolated organic matter and natural water samples was inhibited by cations such as Ca{sup 2+}. Dissolution was independent of oxygen content in experimental solutions. Dissolution experiments conducted in Dl water had no detectable dissolved mercury. The presence of various inorganic (chloride, sulfate, or sulfide) and organic ligands (salicylic acid, acetic acid, EDTA, or cysteine) did not enhance the dissolution of mercury from the mineral. Aromatic carbon content in the isolates correlated positively with enhanced cinnabar dissolution. {zeta}-potential measurements indicated sorption of negatively charged organic matter to the negatively charged cinnabar at pH 6.0. Possible mechanisms of dissolution include surface complexation of mercury and oxidation of surface sulfur species by the organic matter.

  11. ISOLATION AND CONCENTRATION OF ORGANIC SUBSTANCES FROM WATER - USING SYNTHETIC RESINS AND GRAPHITIZED CARBON BLACK

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research program was initiated with the overall objective of developing a practical method for the concentration of trace amounts of organic compounds in water for use in biological testing. The principle behind the isolation-fractionation scheme developed in this program is...

  12. Genome Sequences of Three Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from the Feces of Organically Raised Chickens.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Victoria; Van Laar, Tricia A; Aleru, Omoshola; Thomas, Michael; Ganci, Michelle; Rawat, Mamta

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic feed supplements have been implicated in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria. An alternative to antibiotics is probiotics. Here, we report the genome sequences of two Bacillus and one Solibacillus species, all spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria, isolated from the feces organically raised chicken feces, with potential to serve as probiotics. PMID:27587809

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a New Zealand Rickettsia-Like Organism Isolated from Farmed Chinook Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Jenny; Brosnahan, Cara L.; Orr, Della; McFadden, Andrew; Jones, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a rickettsia-like organism, isolated from a New Zealand Chinook salmon farm experiencing high mortality. The genome is approximately 3 Mb in size, has a G+C content of approximately 39.2%, and is predicted to contain 2,870 coding sequences. PMID:27365345

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of a New Zealand Rickettsia-Like Organism Isolated from Farmed Chinook Salmon.

    PubMed

    Gias, Edna; Draper, Jenny; Brosnahan, Cara L; Orr, Della; McFadden, Andrew; Jones, Brian

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a rickettsia-like organism, isolated from a New Zealand Chinook salmon farm experiencing high mortality. The genome is approximately 3 Mb in size, has a G+C content of approximately 39.2%, and is predicted to contain 2,870 coding sequences. PMID:27365345

  15. Genome Sequences of Three Spore-Forming Bacteria Isolated from the Feces of Organically Raised Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Victoria; Van Laar, Tricia A.; Aleru, Omoshola; Thomas, Michael; Ganci, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic feed supplements have been implicated in the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria. An alternative to antibiotics is probiotics. Here, we report the genome sequences of two Bacillus and one Solibacillus species, all spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria, isolated from the feces organically raised chicken feces, with potential to serve as probiotics. PMID:27587809

  16. Organizing. MAS-108. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This module is part of a set of management and supervisor training (MAST) materials developed by the Department of Energy for the Waste Isolation Division. Its stated purpose is to enable trainees to organize work activities efficiently and effectively. The first section of the module is an introduction that includes a terminal objective and…

  17. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Lynn M.; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA. PMID:21317360

  18. Molecular Analysis of Group A Streptococcus Type emm18 Isolates Temporally Associated with Acute Rheumatic Fever Outbreaks in Salt Lake City, Utah

    PubMed Central

    Smoot, James C.; Korgenski, E. Kent; Daly, Judy A.; Veasy, L. George; Musser, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and subsequent rheumatic heart disease are rare but serious sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections in most western countries. Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, and the surrounding intermountain region experienced a resurgence of ARF in 1985 which has persisted. The largest numbers of cases were encountered in 1985-1986 and in 1997-1998. Organisms with a mucoid colony phenotype when grown on blood agar plates were temporally associated with the higher incidence of ARF. To develop an understanding of the molecular population genetic structure of GAS strains associated with ARF in the SLC region, 964 mucoid and nonmucoid pharyngeal isolates recovered in SLC from 1984 to 1999 were studied by sequencing the emm gene. Isolates with an emm18 allele were further characterized by sequencing the spa, covR, and covS genes. Peak periods of ARF were associated with GAS isolates possessing an emm18 allele encoding the protein found in serotype M18 isolates. Among the serotype M18 isolates, the difference in the number of C repeats produced three size variants. Variation was limited in spa, a gene that encodes a streptococcal protective antigen, and covR and covS, genes that encode a two-component regulatory system that, when inactivated, results in a mucoid phenotype and enhanced virulence in mouse infection models. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a single restriction profile for serotype M18 organisms isolated during both peak periods of ARF. In SLC, the incidence of ARF coresurged with the occurrence of GAS serotype M18 isolates that have very restricted genetic variation. PMID:11980963

  19. Molecular analysis of group A Streptococcus type emm18 isolates temporally associated with acute rheumatic fever outbreaks in Salt Lake City, Utah.

    PubMed

    Smoot, James C; Korgenski, E Kent; Daly, Judy A; Veasy, L George; Musser, James M

    2002-05-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and subsequent rheumatic heart disease are rare but serious sequelae of group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections in most western countries. Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, and the surrounding intermountain region experienced a resurgence of ARF in 1985 which has persisted. The largest numbers of cases were encountered in 1985-1986 and in 1997-1998. Organisms with a mucoid colony phenotype when grown on blood agar plates were temporally associated with the higher incidence of ARF. To develop an understanding of the molecular population genetic structure of GAS strains associated with ARF in the SLC region, 964 mucoid and nonmucoid pharyngeal isolates recovered in SLC from 1984 to 1999 were studied by sequencing the emm gene. Isolates with an emm18 allele were further characterized by sequencing the spa, covR, and covS genes. Peak periods of ARF were associated with GAS isolates possessing an emm18 allele encoding the protein found in serotype M18 isolates. Among the serotype M18 isolates, the difference in the number of C repeats produced three size variants. Variation was limited in spa, a gene that encodes a streptococcal protective antigen, and covR and covS, genes that encode a two-component regulatory system that, when inactivated, results in a mucoid phenotype and enhanced virulence in mouse infection models. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed a single restriction profile for serotype M18 organisms isolated during both peak periods of ARF. In SLC, the incidence of ARF coresurged with the occurrence of GAS serotype M18 isolates that have very restricted genetic variation. PMID:11980963

  20. Adolescents' Information Behavior When Isolated from Peer Groups: Lessons from New Immigrant Adolescents' Everyday Life Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koo, Joung Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate how isolated immigrant adolescents seek and use necessary information when they are not able to use significant information sources--their peer groups--in the period of transition before new peer groups are established. Method: To achieve the study's purpose, sixteen recently arrived (three…

  1. Antimicrobial resistance among Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group isolated from Danish agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L B; Baloda, S; Boye, M; Aarestrup, F M

    2001-06-01

    From four Danish pig farms, bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. and the Bacillus cereus group were isolated from soil and susceptibility towards selected antimicrobials was tested. From each farm, soil samples representing soil just before and after spread of animal waste and undisturbed agricultural soil, when possible, were collected. Soil from a well-characterized Danish farm soil (Højbakkegaard) was collected for comparison. The Pseudomonas spp. and B. cereus were chosen as representative for Gram-negative and Gram-positive indigenous soil bacteria to test the effect of spread of animal waste on selection of resistance among soil bacteria. No variations in resistance levels were observed between farms; but when the four differently treated soils were compared, resistance was seen for carbadox, chloramphenicol, nalidixan (nalidixic acid), nitrofurantoin, streptomycin and tetracycline for Pseudomonas spp., and for bacitracin, erythromycin, penicillin and streptomycin for the B. cereus group. Variations in resistance levels were observed when soil before and after spread of animal waste was compared, indicating an effect from spread of animal waste. PMID:11485227

  2. [The suicide phenomenon and fermentative metabolic activity in strains of the Aeromonas group isolated from feces].

    PubMed

    Reina, J; Serra, A; Borrell, N; Gómez, J

    1992-11-01

    We study the "suicide" phenomena as well as metabolic pathways of mixed acids (methyl red test, MR) and butylene glycol (Voges-Proskauer, VP), in 107 strains belonging to mesophilic Aeromonas group, isolated from stools. The strains have been identified as A. hydrophila, 28 cases (26.1%), A. sobria 26 cases (24.3%) and A. caviae 53 cases (49.6%). All A. caviae strains behave homogeneously as F+, RM+ and VP-, independently of temperature (30 or 37 degrees C). A. hydrophila strains only showed their trend to "suicide" at 37 degrees C, being this behavior linked to RM test positivity. At 30 degrees C all strains were NS and RM-, keeping always positive the VP test (both temperatures). In A. sobria we have recorded changes in their behavior related to the temperature of incubation. At 37 degrees C, 57.7% were NS, whereas at 30 degrees C, 69.2% showed the same phenotype. The metabolic activity had remained stable, therefore F+ strains were VP and RM+, and NS strains were VP+ and RM-. It seems that FS is a phenotypic behavior of this bacterial group species and temperature-dependent, and also is related to a fermentative metabolic activity modulation of each of them. PMID:1489794

  3. A novel structure of directly patterned isolating layer for organic thin-film transistor-driven organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Kai; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yan, Jing-Yi; Lee, Tzu-Wei; Shen, Yu-Yuan; Yeh, Shu-Tang; Tseng, Mei-Rurng; Wu, Po-Sheng; Lin, Kuo-Tong; Chen, Chia-Hsun; Ho, Jia-Chong

    2007-09-01

    Mono-chrome phosphorescence Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) operated by organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with a 32×32 array are fabricated with a novel method, and the results reveal a fabulous demonstration. The later isolation, which segregated source/drain electrodes and an OLED cathode, was designed in our OTFT-OLED pixel. In the OTFT-OLED process; we used the polymer isolating layer which was deposited by spin coating and patterned by traditional photo-lithography before the organic semiconductor and OLED deposition. However, the residue polymer affect of OTFT electric properties which have poor mobility (5×10-4 cm2/V-s), a lower on/off ratio (~103), and a positive threshold voltage (4.5 V), and devices, have poor uniformity. Using UV-Ozone treatment could enhance OTFT mobility (2×10-2 cm2/V-s) and permit higher devices uniformity, but the threshold voltage would still have a positive 5.1 V. This threshold voltage was not a good operation mode for display application because this operation voltage was not fit for our driving systems. In order to overcome this problem, a new structure of OTFT-OLED pixel was designed and combined with a new-material isolating layer process. This new process could fabricate an OTFT-OLED array successfully and have a nice uniformity. After the isolating layer process, OTFT devices have a higher mobility (0.1×10-2 cm2/V-s), a higher on-off ratio (~107) a lower threshold voltage (-9.7 V), and a higher devices uniformity.

  4. [Identification in organizations and its relationship with prototypicality and conflict between organizational groups].

    PubMed

    Yubero, Santiago; Morales, J Francisco

    2006-08-01

    The scope and nature of the identification process of 282 workers representative of an important professional group of a university organization is analyzed in an attempt to ascertain if they identify mainly with their organization as a whole or with their professional group. A strong rivalry between the group object of the study and another professional group of the same organization manifests itself through a remarkable differentiation of group prototypes, which precludes the possibility of an overarching, supraordinate organizational identification. In addition, the degree of group prototypicality is related to the intensity of the negative attitude toward the rival group and can be taken as a predictor of a likely intra-organizational conflict. PMID:17296063

  5. Content-Related Interactions and Methods of Reasoning within Self-Initiated Organic Chemistry Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of…

  6. Edge-Region Grouping in Figure-Ground Organization and Depth Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen E.; Brooks, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    Edge-region grouping (ERG) is proposed as a unifying and previously unrecognized class of relational information that influences figure-ground organization and perceived depth across an edge. ERG occurs when the edge between two regions is differentially grouped with one region based on classic principles of similarity grouping. The ERG hypothesis…

  7. Use of radiocarbon and spectroscopic analyses to characterise soil organic matter pools isolated using different fractionation techniques.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gemma; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Sohi, Saran; Rees, Robert; Griffiths, Bryan

    2015-04-01

    Experimental division of soil organic matter (SOM) into functional pools has the potential to improve soil C modelling. Soil physical fractionation techniques seek to quantify these pools, however the fractions isolated vary in number, size, ecological role and composition. The use of different techniques to quantify soil C fractions in different studies presents a question - do similar fractions isolated by different methods fit the same conceptual definition? This study examined a sandy loam from the south-west of Scotland, sampled in summer, which had been under grassland management for at least 20 years. We compared average 14C ages of SOM fractions isolated using three published and frequently applied physical fractionation methods (1) a density separation technique isolating three fractions - free light (FLF) < 1.8 cm 3, intra-aggregate light (IALF) < 1.8 cm-3 after aggregate disruption, and organo-mineral (O-min) > 1.8 g cm 3 (Sohi et al, 2001); (2) a combined physical and chemical separation isolating five fractions: sand and aggregates (S+A) > 63 µm and > 1.8 g cm-3, particulate organic matter (POM) > 63 µm and < 1.8 g cm 3, silt and clay (s+c) < 63 but > 45 µm, residual organic carbon (rSOC) the residue left after s+c is oxidised with NaOCl, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) < 45 µm (Zimmermann et al, 2007); and (3) a hot water extraction method isolating two fractions: water soluble C (WSC) at 20 °C and hot water extractable C (HWEC) at 80 °C (Ghani et al, 2003). The fractions from Method 1 had the most distinct average 14C ages with O-min, FLF and IALF assessed as 206, 1965 and 6172 years before present (BP) respectively. The fractions from Method 2 fell into two age groups, < ~1000 years BP for s+c, rSOC and S+A and > 4000 years BP for DOC and POM. Both Method 3 fractions were dominated by modern C. The average 14C ages of FLF, IALF, DOC and POM were surprisingly higher than the mineral bound fractions, although they made up a relatively small

  8. No Boundaries: Genomes, Organisms, and Ecological Interactions Responsible for Divergence and Reproductive Isolation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the genetic basis of traits that cause reproductive isolation, particularly premating or sexual isolation, usually involves the same challenges as most attempts at genotype–phenotype mapping and so requires knowledge of how these traits are expressed in different individuals, populations, and environments, particularly under natural conditions. Genetic dissection of speciation phenotypes thus requires understanding of the internal and external contexts in which underlying genetic elements are expressed. Gene expression is a product of complex interacting factors internal and external to the organism including developmental programs, the genetic background including nuclear–cytotype interactions, epistatic relationships, interactions among individuals or social effects, stochasticity, and prevailing variation in ecological conditions. Understanding of genomic divergence associated with reproductive isolation will be facilitated by functional expression analysis of annotated genomes in organisms with well-studied evolutionary histories, phylogenetic affinities, and known patterns of ecological variation throughout their life cycles. I review progress and prospects for understanding the pervasive role of host plant use on genetic and phenotypic expression of reproductive isolating mechanisms in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis and suggest how this system can be used as a model for revealing the genetic basis for species formation in organisms where speciation phenotypes are under the joint influences of genetic and environmental factors. PMID:25149252

  9. Domesticated horses differ in their behavioural and physiological responses to isolated and group housing.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Kelly; Hall, Carol; Royle, Chris; Walker, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    The predominant housing system used for domestic horses is individual stabling; however, housing that limits social interaction and requires the horse to live in semi-isolation has been reported to be a concern for equine welfare. The aim of the current study was to compare behavioural and physiological responses of domestic horses in different types of housing design that provided varying levels of social contact. Horses (n = 16) were divided equally into four groups and exposed to each of four housing treatments for a period of five days per treatment in a randomized block design. The four housing treatments used were single housed no physical contact (SHNC), single housed semi-contact (SHSC), paired housed full contact (PHFC) and group housed full contact (GHFC). During each housing treatment, adrenal activity was recorded using non-invasive faecal corticosterone metabolite analysis (fGC). Thermal images of the eye were captured and eye temperature was assessed as a non-invasive measure of the stress response. Behavioural analysis of time budget was carried out and an ease of handling score was assigned to each horse in each treatment using video footage. SHNC horses had significantly higher (p = 0.01) concentrations of fGC and were significantly (p = 0.003) more difficult to handle compared to the other housing types. GHFC horses, although not significantly different, had numerically lower concentrations of fGC and were more compliant to handling when compared to all other housing treatments. Eye temperature was significantly (p = 0.0001) lower in the group housed treatment when compared to all other treatments. These results indicate that based on physiological and behavioural measures incorporating social contact into the housing design of domestic horses could improve the standard of domestic equine welfare. PMID:25725117

  10. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William; Nemec, Alexandr

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171(T) and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171(T) ( = CIP 110486(T) = CCUG 26390(T) = CCM 8555(T)). PMID:25510976

  11. Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. (formerly DNA group 15 sensu Tjernberg & Ursing), isolated from humans and animals

    PubMed Central

    Krizova, Lenka; McGinnis, Jana; Maixnerova, Martina; Nemec, Matej; Poirel, Laurent; Mingle, Lisa; Sedo, Ondrej; Wolfgang, William

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to define the taxonomic status of 16 strains which were phenetically congruent with Acinetobacter DNA group 15 described by Tjernberg & Ursing in 1989. The strains were isolated from a variety of human and animal specimens in geographically distant places over the last three decades. Taxonomic analysis was based on an Acinetobacter-targeted, genus-wide approach that included the comparative sequence analysis of housekeeping, protein-coding genes, whole-cell profiling based on matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), an array of in-house physiological and metabolic tests, and whole-genome comparative analysis. Based on analyses of the rpoB and gyrB genes, the 16 strains formed respective, strongly supported clusters clearly separated from the other species of the genus Acinetobacter. The distinctness of the group at the species level was indicated by average nucleotide identity values of ≤82 % between the whole genome sequences of two of the 16 strains (NIPH 2171T and NIPH 899) and those of the known species. In addition, the coherence of the group was also supported by MALDI-TOF MS. All 16 strains were non-haemolytic and non-gelatinase-producing, grown at 41 °C and utilized a rather limited number of carbon sources. Virtually every strain displayed a unique combination of metabolic and physiological features. We conclude that the 16 strains represent a distinct species of the genus Acinetobacter, for which the name Acinetobacter variabilis sp. nov. is proposed to reflect its marked phenotypic heterogeneity. The type strain is NIPH 2171T ( = CIP 110486T = CCUG 26390T = CCM 8555T). PMID:25510976

  12. Antibiotic Susceptibility Evaluation of Group A Streptococcus Isolated from Children with Pharyngitis: A Study from Iran

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of Group A streptococcus (GAS) to antibiotics usually used in Iran for treatment of GAS pharyngitis in children. Materials and Methods From 2011 to 2013, children 3-15 years of age with acute tonsillopharyngitis who attended Mofid Children's Hospital clinics and emergency ward and did not meet the exclusion criteria were enrolled in a prospective study in a sequential manner. The isolates strains from throat culture were identified as GAS by colony morphology, gram staining, beta hemolysis on blood agar, sensitivity to bacitracin, a positive pyrrolidonyl aminopeptidase (PYR) test result, and the presence of Lancefield A antigen determined by agglutination test. Antimicrobial susceptibility was identified by both disk diffusion and broth dilution methods. Results From 200 children enrolled in this study, 59 (30%) cases were culture positive for GAS. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin G. The prevalence of erythromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin resistance by broth dilution method was 33.9%, 57.6%, and 33.9%, respectively. Surprisingly, 8.4% of GAS strains were resistant to rifampin. In this study, 13.5% and 32.2% of the strains were resistant to clindamycin and ofloxacin, respectively. Conclusion The high rate of resistance of GAS to some antibiotics in this study should warn physicians, especially in Iran, to use antibiotics restrictedly and logically to prevent the rising of resistance rates in future. It also seems that continuous local surveillance is necessary to achieve the best therapeutic option for GAS treatment. PMID:26788405

  13. The Isolation of Rubber from Milkweed Leaves. An Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volaric, Lisa; Hagen, John P.

    2002-01-01

    We present an introductory organic chemistry lab in which students isolate rubber from the leaves of milkweed plants (Asclepias syriaca). Students isolated rubber with a recovery of 2.4 ± 1.8% and 1.8 ± 0.7% for the microscale and macroscale procedures, respectively. Infrared spectra of their products were compared with the spectrum of synthetic rubber, cis-polyisoprene. Students tested for elasticity of their product by twisting it on a spatula and pulling; all students found some degree of elasticity.

  14. Antimicrobial effect of bee honey in comparison to antibiotics on organisms isolated from infected burns.

    PubMed

    Abd-El Aal, A M; El-Hadidy, M R; El-Mashad, N B; El-Sebaie, A H

    2007-06-30

    Despite recent advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and burn wound management, infection continues to be an important problem in burns. Honey is the most famous rediscovered remedy that is used to treat infected wounds and promote healing. The present study aims to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of bee honey on organisms isolated from infected burns in comparison to the antibiotics used in treatment of burn infection, and to evaluate the effects produced when bee honey is added to antibiotic discs. Thirty patients with burn infection were selected for this study. The collected specimens were cultured on blood agar plates. The isolated colonies were identified by different methods. The isolated organisms were inoculated onto Müller-Hinton agar. Each agar plate was divided by a marker pen into two halves - in one half the antibiotic discs were plated while on the opposite side each antibiotic disc, immersed in honey, was plated opposite to the same antibiotic disc. At the centre of the agar, a sterile filter paper disc immersed in honey was applied. The most frequently isolated organism was Pseudomonas aeruginosa, representing 53.3% of the isolates. The mean inhibition zones (in mm) produced by honey (18.2 ± 2.5 mm) when applied to isolated gram-negative bacteria were significantly higher than amoxicillin/clavulinic acid, sulbactam/ampicillin, and ceftriaxone (p1 = 0.005 for each). When honey was added to the antibiotic discs there was highly significant increased sensitivity of isolated gram-negative bacteria compared with each of the antibiotic discs alone and with honey alone. The susceptibility of isolated staphylococci revealed the synergistic effect of added honey to the antibiotic discs tested. The antimicrobial effect of honey (18.7 ± 2.2 mm) was significantly higher than antibiotics - ciprofloxacin, sulbactam/ampicillin, ceftriaxone, and vancomycin (p1 ≤ 0.05 for each). After the addition of honey to the tested antibiotic discs there were highly

  15. Comprehensive isolation of natural organic matter from water for spectral characterizations and reactivity testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Croue, J.-P.; Benjamin, M.; Korshin, G.V.; Hwang, C.J.; Bruchet, A.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of approaches were tested to comprehensively isolate natural organic matter (NOM) from water. For waters with high NOM concentrations such as the Suwannee River, Georgia, approaches that used combinations of membrane concentrations, evaporative concentrations, and adsorption on nonionic XAD resins, ion exchange resins and iron oxide coated sand isolated over 90% of the NOM. However, for waters with low NOM concentrations, losses of half of the NOM were common and desalting of NOM isolates was a problem. A new comprehensive approach was devised and tested on the Seine River, France in which 100 L of filtered water was sodium softened by ion exchange and vacuum evaporated to 100 mL. Colloids (32% of the NOM) were isolated using a 3,500 Dalton membrane by dialysis against 0.1 M HCl and 0.2 M HF to remove salts and silica. On the membrane permeate, hydrophobic NOM (42%) was isolated using XAD-8 resin and hydrophilic NOM (26%) was isolated using a variety of selective desalting precipitations. The colloid fraction was characterized by IR and NMR spectroscopy as N-acetylamino sugars. ?? 2000 American Chemical Society.

  16. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  17. Identification, genetic diversity and cereulide producing ability of Bacillus cereus group strains isolated from Beninese traditional fermented food condiments.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Line; Azokpota, Paulin; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hounhouigan, D Joseph; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2010-08-15

    Bacillus cereus sensu lato is often detected in spontaneously fermented African foods but is rarely identified to species level. Only some of the B. cereus group species are reported to be pathogenic to humans and identification to species level is necessary to estimate the safety of these products. In the present study, a total of 19 Bacillus cereus group spp. isolated from afitin, iru and sonru, three spontaneously fermented African locust (Parkia biglobosa) bean based condiments produced in Benin, were investigated. The strains were isolated at 6, 12, 18, 24 and 48 h fermentation time. By using phenotypic and genotypic methods all of the isolates could be identified as B. cereus sensu stricto. The isolates were grouped according to their PM13 PCR (random amplification of polymorphic DNA PCR) fingerprint and formed two major clusters, one of which contained eight strains isolated from afitin (cluster 1). Highly similar PM13 profiles were obtained for seven of the isolates, one from afitin, one from iru and five from sonru (cluster 2). Four of the isolates, one from afitin and three from sonru, did not form any particular cluster. The PM13 profiles of cluster 2 isolates were identical to those which are specific to emetic toxin producers. Cereulide production of these isolates was confirmed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. This is the first report on cereulide producing B. cereus in African fermented foods. Occurrence of the opportunistic human pathogen B. cereus, which is able to produce emetic toxin in afitin, iru and sonru, could impose a health hazard. Interestingly, no reports on food poisoning from the consumption of the fermented condiments exist. PMID:20599285

  18. Isolation of hydrophilic organic acids from water using nonionic macroporous resins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.; McKnight, Diane M.; Thorn, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    A method has been developed for the isolation of hydrophilic organic acids from aquatic environments using Amberlite* * Use of trade names in this report is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey. XAD-4 resin. The method uses a two column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in series. The hydrophobic organic acids, composed primarily of aquatic fulvic acid, are removed from the sample on XAD-8, followed by the isolation of the more hydrophilic organic acids on XAD-4. For samples from a number of diverse environments, more of the dissolved organic carbon was isolated on the XAD-8 resin (23-58%) than on the XAD-4 resin (7-25%). For these samples, the hydrophilic acids have lower carbon and hydrogen contents, higher oxygen and nitrogen contents, and are lower in molecular weight than the corresponding fulvic acids. 13C NMR analyses indicate that the hydrophilic acids have a lower concentration of aromatic carbon and greater heteroaliphatic, ketone and carboxyl content than the fulvic acid. ?? 1992.

  19. Activities of potential therapeutic and prophylactic antibiotics against blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci from neutropenic patients receiving ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    McWhinney, P H; Patel, S; Whiley, R A; Hardie, J M; Gillespie, S H; Kibbler, C C

    1993-01-01

    All 47 sequential blood culture isolates of viridans group streptococci obtained from febrile neutropenic patients receiving quinolone prophylaxis were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin, and imipenem. Resistance to benzylpenicillin (MIC for 50% of isolates [MIC50], 0.125 microgram/ml) and ceftazidime (MIC50, 4 micrograms/ml) was common. Most isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin-clavulanic acid at a 2:1 ratio by weight), azlocillin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin, with azithromycin showing comparable activity. The MIC90 of sparfloxacin was 1 microgram/ml; those for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were > 16 and 16 micrograms/ml, respectively. PMID:8285642

  20. Inter-group aggression: the multi-individual organism and the survival instinct.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Jones, N

    2000-01-01

    Inter-group aggression, carried out at the level of the in-groups and out-groups of ethnocentric theory, continued unabated throughout the twentieth century. Its frequency, together with its ferocity, indicates a potent biological cause. We have evolved as social animals, and it is postulated that evolution has proceeded to such an extent that 'multi-individual social organisms', that is, 'social groups that fight each other are self-sustaining, self-replicating whole containing interdependent parts'. This results from the total integration of individuals into the social structure and culture of the in-group; individuals are inseparable from their society and evidence for this proposal is given. Cohesion is given through the collective consciousness and collective memory. The analogy is to multicellular organisms that evolved from the association of single cell organisms. All biological organisms are subject to the survival instinct, which is thus the potent biological cause of inter-group aggression. Groups compete for territory and see other groups as a threat. Prevention of inter-group aggression should come from the insight that threatening behaviour endangers the integrity of the society of out-groups, initiating conflict. PMID:10893943

  1. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments. PMID:26439615

  2. Increasing verbal interaction among elderly socially isolated mentally retarded adults: a group language training procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Kleitsch, E C; Whitman, T L; Santos, J

    1983-01-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of a group language training procedure for directly increasing and generalizing the rate of verbal interaction among four elderly, socially isolated, moderately mentally retarded men. A withdrawal of treatment design was used to examine the effect of the procedure that used verbal prompts. behavioral rehearsal, and contingent social praise. Changes in behavior were examined in two generalization settings, one similar to the training environment (Generalization I) and the other arranged as part of the subjects' daily routine (Generalization II). Baseline data indicated no verbal interaction among the subjects. During treatment the training procedure increased the rate of subjects' verbal interactions not only in the training situation, but also in the two generalization settings. An analysis of the data obtained during the Generalization II situation indicated that subjects' verbal interaction increased not only among themselves, but with nonsubject peers present in this setting. Follow-up data showed that increases in rates of verbal interaction were maintained four months after the cessation of training. The implications of the results for program generalization and work with the language deficient individual is discussed. PMID:6885671

  3. A self organizing map approach to physiological data analysis for enhanced group performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Doser, Adele Beatrice; Merkle, Peter Benedict

    2004-10-01

    A Self Organizing Map (SOM) approach was used to analyze physiological data taken from a group of subjects participating in a cooperative video shooting game. The ultimate aim was to discover signatures of group cooperation, conflict, leadership, and performance. Such information could be fed back to participants in a meaningful way, and ultimately increase group performance in national security applications, where the consequences of a poor group decision can be devastating. Results demonstrated that a SOM can be a useful tool in revealing individual and group signatures from physiological data, and could ultimately be used to heighten group performance.

  4. A porous metal-organic framework with -COOH groups for highly efficient pollutant removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Yu, Jiancan; Cai, Jianfeng; Song, Ruijing; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Chen, Banglin; Qian, Guodong

    2014-11-28

    A new metal-organic framework with -COOH groups has been realized and demonstrates strong interactions with methylene blue and thus the complete removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution. PMID:25303384

  5. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  6. Method of identification and isolation of organs of endocrine secretion in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kashirina, N.K.

    1987-10-01

    The authors describe a procedure based on electron autoradiography for isolating and determining the morphology of the adrenal, pituitary, and thyroid glands in albino mice, and use the procedure to give a description, in this paper, of the configuration, location, and physiological interaction of these glands relative to the other organs in these laboratory animals. The procedure overcomes the difficulties encountered in such determinations owing to factors such as smallness.

  7. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2010-04-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is being investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS). The determinations of the three functional groups' contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups) and precursor ion (nitro groups) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photo-oxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounted for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photo-oxidation) of the organic carbon. The diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively differentiate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to distinguish the sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assesses a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional group mass spectra of all

  8. Chemkarta: A Card Game for Teaching Functional Groups in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudtson, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate organic chemistry courses are frequently overwhelmed by the volume and complexity of information they are expected to learn. To aid in students' learning of organic functional groups, a novel card game "ChemKarta" is reported that can serve as a useful alternative to flashcards. This pedagogy is a simple…

  9. Affective Commitment to the Organization, Supervisor, and Work Group: Antecedents and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Christian; Bentein, Kathleen; Stinglhamber, Florence

    2004-01-01

    Three longitudinal studies investigated the usefulness of distinguishing among employees' affective commitments to the organization, the supervisor, and the work group. Study 1, with 199 employees from various organizations, found that affective commitments to these entities were factorially distinct and related differentially to their theorized…

  10. Interfaces Leading Groups of Learners to Make Their Shared Problem-Solving Organization Explicit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moguel, P.; Tchounikine, P.; Tricot, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider collective problem-solving challenges and a particular structuring objective: lead groups of learners to make their shared problem-solving organization explicit. Such an objective may be considered as a way to lead learners to consider building and maintaining a shared organization, and/or as a way to provide a basis for…

  11. Perceptions of the Role and Effectiveness of Special Interest Groups within a Professional Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, W. James; Shiflett, K. Holly; Gaulee, Uttam; de Klaver, Lila; Lee, Che-Wei; Kamolpun, Somkiat; Okhidoi, Otgonjargal; Rattananuntapat, Malinee

    2013-01-01

    Professional organizations exist to provide specialized networking and development opportunities to a specific profession, group of individuals or field of study. These organizations are generally broad in scope and may have a wide range of interests among its members. To support specialized research and communication, smaller subgroups within the…

  12. Genetic variability of the coat protein sequence of pea seed-borne mosaic virus isolates and the current relationship between phylogenetic placement and resistance groups.

    PubMed

    Wylie, S J; Coutts, B A; Jones, R A C

    2011-07-01

    Nucleotide sequences of complete or partial coat protein (CP) genes were determined for 11 isolates of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) from Australia and one from China, and compared with known sequences of 20 other isolates. On phylogenetic analysis, the isolates from Australia and China grouped into 2 of 3 clades. Clade A contained three sub-clades (Ai, Aii and Aiii), Australian isolates were in Ai or Aiii, and the Chinese isolate in Aii. Clade A contained isolates in pathotypes P-1, P-2 and U-2; clade B, one isolate in P-2; and clade C, only isolates in P-4. PMID:21519930

  13. Nasal Histopathology and Intracage Ammonia Levels in Female Groups and Breeding Mice Housed in Static Isolation Cages

    PubMed Central

    Mexas, Angela M; Brice, Angela K; Caro, Adam C; Hillanbrand, Troy S

    2015-01-01

    Many factors influence ammonia levels in rodent cages, and high intracage ammonia has been associated with specific types of abnormal nasal pathology in mice. The use of autoclaved corncob bedding and the maintenance of low room humidity reduce the accumulation of ammonia in mouse cages. However, there are no engineering standards that define the limits of ammonia exposure for mice housed in static isolation cages. Regulatory guidance indicates that solid bottom cages must be sanitized at least weekly and that cage components in direct contact with animals must be sanitized at least every 2 wk. Common practice is to replace the bottoms and bedding of static isolation cages once weekly. To determine whether changing static isolation cages once weekly is an appropriate performance standard for mice, we prospectively evaluated the relationship between ammonia levels, nasal histopathology, and housing densities in various grouping strategies of mice housed in static isolation cages. Here, we report that the average nasal pathology score per cage and intracage ammonia levels were correlated, but nasal pathology scores did not differ among mice housed in breeding pairs, breeding trios, or female groups. In light of ammonia levels and histopathology scores as performance standards, these results suggest that a weekly cage-change frequency for static isolation cages does not result in adverse effects. Our results provide evidence to support current practices in the use of static isolation cages for housing laboratory mice in modern vivaria. PMID:26424245

  14. Pattern classification and recognition of invertebrate functional groups using self-organizing neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, WenJun

    2007-07-01

    Self-organizing neural networks can be used to mimic non-linear systems. The main objective of this study is to make pattern classification and recognition on sampling information using two self-organizing neural network models. Invertebrate functional groups sampled in the irrigated rice field were classified and recognized using one-dimensional self-organizing map and self-organizing competitive learning neural networks. Comparisons between neural network models, distance (similarity) measures, and number of neurons were conducted. The results showed that self-organizing map and self-organizing competitive learning neural network models were effective in pattern classification and recognition of sampling information. Overall the performance of one-dimensional self-organizing map neural network was better than self-organizing competitive learning neural network. The number of neurons could determine the number of classes in the classification. Different neural network models with various distance (similarity) measures yielded similar classifications. Some differences, dependent upon the specific network structure, would be found. The pattern of an unrecognized functional group was recognized with the self-organizing neural network. A relative consistent classification indicated that the following invertebrate functional groups, terrestrial blood sucker; terrestrial flyer; tourist (nonpredatory species with no known functional role other than as prey in ecosystem); gall former; collector (gather, deposit feeder); predator and parasitoid; leaf miner; idiobiont (acarine ectoparasitoid), were classified into the same group, and the following invertebrate functional groups, external plant feeder; terrestrial crawler, walker, jumper or hunter; neustonic (water surface) swimmer (semi-aquatic), were classified into another group. It was concluded that reliable conclusions could be drawn from comparisons of different neural network models that use different distance

  15. Isolation of a citrus promoter specific for reproductive organs and its functional analysis in isolated juice sacs and tomato.

    PubMed

    Sorkina, Alina; Bardosh, Gabriel; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Fridman, Ifat; Schlizerman, Ludmila; Zur, Naftali; Or, Etti; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2011-09-01

    While searching for genes expressed in acid lemon but not in acidless lime pulp, we isolated clone Cl111 which showed the following expression phenotypes: (1) while it was expressed in the ovaries in both varieties, its mRNA was detected only in the pulp of the acid fruit, (2) no or very low expression of the gene was detected in vegetative organs. These expression patterns suggested that Cl111 is an ovary- and pulp-specific gene. The ability of ~2-kb fragments upstream of the transcription start site of the lemon and lime genes to confer reporter-gene activity was investigated by transient expression in isolated juice vesicles of both varieties. Whereas Cl111 promoter from lemon showed faint activity in lemon and lime juice vesicles, no activity was evident with the lime promoter. The activities of the 2-kb fragments and their delimited fragments were further investigated in tomato. The results indicated that the promoters were active in a manner similar to that in acid lemon and acidless lime: the lemon promoter generated activity in the fruit endocarp, analogous to citrus fruit pulp. The delimitation analyses identified an expression-conferring region which, in the lemon promoter, contained a sequence homologous to a fruit-specific element of the melon cucumisin gene. Another region, which reduced promoter activity, contained an I-Box-like sequence, identified as a fruit-specific negative element. Taken together, Cl111 promoter was confirmed to be pulp- and flower-specific. Differences in the expression of Cl111 between the two varieties could be attributable to changes in the gene promoter region. PMID:21538100

  16. Effects of polar and nonpolar groups on the solubility of organic compounds in soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Vapor sorption capacities on a high-organic-content peat, a model for soil organic matter (SOM), were determined at room temperature for the following liquids: n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane, nitroethane, acetone, acetonitrile, 1-propanol, ethanol, and methanol. The linear organic vapor sorption is in keeping with the dominance of vapor partition in peat SOM. These data and similar results of carbon tetrachloride (CT), trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME), and water on the same peat from earlier studies are used to evaluate the effect of polarity on the vapor partition in SOM. The extrapolated liquid solubility from the vapor isotherm increases sharply from 3-6 wt % for low-polarity liquids (hexane, CT, and benzene) to 62 wt % for polar methanol and correlates positively with the liquid's component solubility parameters for polar interaction (??P) and hydrogen bonding (??h). The same polarity effect may be expected to influence the relative solubilities of a variety of contaminants in SOM and, therefore, the relative deviations between the SOM-water partition coefficients (Kom) and corresponding octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) for different classes of compounds. The large solubility disparity in SOM between polar and nonpolar solutes suggests that the accurate prediction of Kom from Kow or Sw (solute water solubility) would be limited to compounds of similar polarity.

  17. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Petroleum Solvent Groups 6 Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content..., Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.) 3...

  18. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Petroleum Solvent Groups 6 Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content..., Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.) 3...

  19. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Petroleum Solvent Groups 6 Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Petroleum Solvent Groups As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent..., Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.) 3 1% Xylene,...

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Petroleum Solvent Groups 6 Table 6 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Contents of Petroleum Solvent Groups As specified in § 63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content..., Naphthol Spirits, Petroleum Spirits, Petroleum Oil, Petroleum Naphtha, Solvent Naphtha, Solvent Blend.) 3...

  1. Preferential Acquisition and Activation of Plasminogen Glycoform II by PAM Positive Group A Streptococcal Isolates.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, David M P; Law, Ruby H P; Ly, Diane; Cook, Simon M; Quek, Adam J; McArthur, Jason D; Whisstock, James C; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2015-06-30

    Plasminogen (Plg) circulates in the host as two predominant glycoforms. Glycoform I Plg (GI-Plg) contains glycosylation sites at Asn289 and Thr346, whereas glycoform II Plg (GII-Plg) is exclusively glycosylated at Thr346. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that Plg binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM) exhibits comparative equal affinity for GI- and GII-Plg in the "closed" conformation (for GII-Plg, KD = 27.4 nM; for GI-Plg, KD = 37.0 nM). When Plg was in the "open" conformation, PAM exhibited an 11-fold increase in affinity for GII-Plg (KD = 2.8 nM) compared with that for GI-Plg (KD = 33.2 nM). The interaction of PAM with Plg is believed to be mediated by lysine binding sites within kringle (KR) 2 of Plg. PAM-GI-Plg interactions were fully inhibited with 100 mM lysine analogue ε-aminocaproic acid (εACA), whereas PAM-GII-Plg interactions were shown to be weakened but not inhibited in the presence of 400 mM εACA. In contrast, binding to the KR1-3 domains of GII-Plg (angiostatin) by PAM was completely inhibited in the presence 5 mM εACA. Along with PAM, emm pattern D GAS isolates express a phenotypically distinct SK variant (type 2b SK) that requires Plg ligands such as PAM to activate Plg. Type 2b SK was able to generate an active site and activate GII-Plg at a rate significantly higher than that of GI-Plg when bound to PAM. Taken together, these data suggest that GAS selectively recruits and activates GII-Plg. Furthermore, we propose that the interaction between PAM and Plg may be partially mediated by a secondary binding site outside of KR2, affected by glycosylation at Asn289. PMID:26029848

  2. Summary of presentation for research on social structure, agreement, and conflict in groups in extreme and isolated environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Despite a vast amount of research, little is known concerning the effect of group structure, and individuals' understanding of that structure, on conflict in Antarctic groups. The overall objective of the research discussed is to determine the interrelationships of group structure, social cognition, and group function and conflict in isolated and extreme environments. In the two decades following WWII, a large body of research focused on the physiological, psychological, and social psychological factors affecting the functioning of individuals and groups in a variety of extreme and isolated environments in both the Arctic and Antarctic. There are two primary reasons for further research of this type. First, Antarctic polar stations are considered to be natural laboratories for the social and behavioral sciences and provide an opportunity to address certain theoretical and empirical questions concerned with agreement and conflict in social groups in general and group behavior in extreme, isolated environments in particular. Recent advances in the analysis of social networks and intracultural variation have improved the methods and have shifted the theoretical questions. The research is motivated by three classes of questions: (1) What are the characteristics of the social relations among individuals working and living together in extreme and isolated environments?; (2) What do individuals understand about their group, how does that understanding develop, and how is it socially distributed?; and (3) What is the relationship between that understanding and the functioning of the social group? Answers to these questions are important if we are to advance our knowledge of how individuals and groups adapt to extreme environments. Second, although Antarctic winter-over candidates may be evaluated as qualified on the basis of individual characteristics, they may fail to adapt because of certain characteristics of the social group. Consequently, the ability of winter-over-groups

  3. Managing the conflict between individual needs and group interests--ethical leadership in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Shale, Suzanne

    2008-03-01

    This paper derives from a grounded theory study of how Medical Directors working within the UK National Health Service manage the moral quandaries that they encounter as leaders of health care organizations. The reason health care organizations exist is to provide better care for individuals through providing shared resources for groups of people. This creates a paradox at the heart of health care organization, because serving the interests of groups sometimes runs counter to serving the needs of individuals. The paradox presents ethical dilemmas at every level of the organization, from the boardroom to the bedside. Medical Directors experience these organizational ethical dilemmas most acutely by virtue of their position in the organization. As doctors, their professional ethic obliges them to put the interests of individual patients first. As executive directors, their role is to help secure the delivery of services that meet the needs of the whole patient population. What should they do when the interests of groups of patients, and of individual patients, appear to conflict? The first task of an ethical healthcare organization is to secure the trust of patients, and two examples of medical ethical leadership are discussed against this background. These examples suggest that conflict between individual and population needs is integral to health care organization, so dilemmas addressed at one level of the organization inevitably re-emerge in altered form at other levels. Finally, analysis of the ethical activity that Medical Directors have described affords insight into the interpersonal components of ethical skill and knowledge. PMID:18382123

  4. Species identification of members of the Streptococcus milleri group isolated from the vagina by ID 32 Strep system and differential phenotypic characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmet, Z; Warren, M; Houang, E T

    1995-01-01

    The importance of bacterial vaginosis as a risk factor in obstetric and gynecological infections has recently been recognized. The bacterial vaginosis group of organisms includes members of the Streptococcus milleri group, the identification of which has caused much confusion. We prospectively surveyed the rates of carriage of S. milleri group organisms in 397 high vaginal swabs received in our laboratory. For the identification of 99 clinical isolates and 23 control strains, we compared the results obtained by the rapid ID 32 Strep system (Analytab Products) and by a scheme utilizing six differential phenotypic characteristics (presence of beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, alpha-glucosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, and beta-glucosidase) as described by Whiley et al. (R. A. Whiley, H. Fraser, J. M. Hardie, and D. Beighton, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:1497-1501, 1990). We identified Streptococcus anginosus in 18% and Streptococcus constellatus in 0.05% of the specimens examined. Of the isolates of S. anginosus that reacted with grouping antisera, 20 of 25 belonged to Lancefield group F. The incubation conditions for bacterial cultures and for reaction mixtures affected the results of phenotypic characterization in the production of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, and beta-glucosidase. However, by using bacterial cultures grown under hypercapnic conditions and incubating the reaction mixtures aerobically, consistent phenotypic characteristics were obtained, allowing identification similar to that obtained by the ID 32 Strep system. We therefore recommend the phenotypic scheme as an inexpensive, reliable, and convenient method for the initial identification of species of the S. milleri group. PMID:7650193

  5. Characterization of some efficient cellulase producing bacteria isolated from paper mill sludges and organic fertilizers

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Miranda L; Broere, Michael; Leung, Kam Tin; Qin, Wensheng

    2011-01-01

    The wide variety of bacteria in the environment permits screening for more efficient cellulases to help overcome current challenges in biofuel production. This study focuses on the isolation of efficient cellulase producing bacteria found in organic fertilizers and paper mill sludges which can be considered for use in large scale biorefining. Pure isolate cultures were screened for cellulase activity. Six isolates: S1, S2, S3, S4, E2, and E4, produced halos greater in diameter than the positive control (Cellulomonas xylanilytica), suggesting high cellulase activities. A portion of the 16S rDNA genes of cellulase positive isolates were amplified and sequenced, then BLASTed to determine likely genera. Phylogenetic analysis revealed genera belonging to two major Phyla of Gram positive bacteria: Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. All isolates were tested for the visible degradation of filter paper; only isolates E2 and E4 (Paenibacillus species) were observed to completely break down filter paper within 72 and 96 h incubation, respectively, under limited oxygen condition. Thus E2 and E4 were selected for the FP assay for quantification of total cellulase activities. It was shown that 1% (w/v) CMC could induce total cellulase activities of 1652.2±61.5 and 1456.5±30.7 μM of glucose equivalents for E2 and E4, respectively. CMC could induce cellulase activities 8 and 5.6X greater than FP, therefore CMC represented a good inducing substrate for cellulase production. The genus Paenibacillus are known to contain some excellent cellulase producing strains, E2 and E4 displayed superior cellulase activities and represent excellent candidates for further cellulase analysis and characterization. PMID:21969070

  6. Antibiotic susceptibilities, streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene profiles among clinical isolates of group C or G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis & of group G S. anginosus group at a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Bijayini; Mathur, Purva; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Jain, Neetu; Misra, M. C.; Kapil, Arti; Singh, Sarman

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Group C and group G streptococci (together GCGS) are often regarded as commensal bacteria and their role in streptococcal disease burden is under-recognized. While reports of recovery of GCGS from normally sterile body sites are increasing, their resistance to macrolides, fluoroquinolone further warrants all invasive β haemolytic streptococci to be identified to the species level and accurately tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. This study was aimed to determine the prevalence, clinical profile, antimicrobial susceptibility and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin gene profile (speA, speB, speC, speF, smeZ, speI, speM, speG, speH and ssa) of GCGS obtained over a period of two years at a tertiary care centre from north India. Methods: The clinical samples were processed as per standard microbiological techniques. β-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) were characterized and grouped. Antimicrobial susceptibility of GCGS was performed using disk diffusion method. All GCGS were characterized for the presence of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxins (spe) and spe genes were amplified by PCR method. Results: GCGS (23 GGS, 2GCS) comprised 16 per cent of β haemolytic streptococci (25/142 βHS, 16%) isolated over the study period. Of the 25 GCGS, 22 (88%) were recovered from pus, two (8%) from respiratory tract, whereas one isolate was recovered from blood of a fatal case of septicaemia. Of the total 23 GGS isolates, 18 (78%) were identified as Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp equisimilis (SDSE, large-colony phenotype), five (21%) were Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG, small-colony phenotype). The two GCS were identified as SDSE. All GCGS isolates were susceptible to penicillin, vancomycin, and linezolid. Tetracycline resistance was noted in 50 per cent of SDSE isolates. The rates of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance in SDSE were low. Twelve of the 20 SDSE isolates were positive for one or more spe genes, with five of the SDSE isolates

  7. Assessing Site-Isolation of Amine Groups on Aminopropyl-Functionalized SBA-15 Materials via Spectroscopic and Reactivity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, Jason C; Dabestani, Reza T; Buchanan III, A C; Jones, Christopher W

    2008-01-01

    The average degree of separation and the accessibility of aminopropyl groups on SBA-15 silica materials prepared using different silane grafting approaches are compared. Three specific synthetic approaches are used: (1) the traditional grafting of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in toluene, (2) a protection/deprotection method using benzyl- or trityl-spacer groups, and (3) a cooperative dilution method where 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane and methyltrimethoxysilane are co-condensed on the silica surface as a silane mixture. The site-isolation and accessibility of the amine groups are probed via three methods: (a) evaluation of pyrene groups adsorbed onto the solids using fluorescence spectroscopy, (b) the reactions of chlorodimethyl(2,3,4,5-tetramethyl-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)silane (Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}Cl) and chloro(cyclopenta-2,4-dienyl)dimethylsilane (CpSi(Me){sub 2}Cl) with the tethered amine sites, and (c) comparison of the reactivity of zirconium constrained-geometry-inspired catalysts (CGCs) prepared using the Cp'Si(Me){sub 2}-modified aminosilicas in the catalytic polymerization of ethylene to produce poly(ethylene). The spectroscopic probe of site-isolation suggests that both the protection/deprotection method and the cooperative dilution method yield similarly isolated amine sites that are markedly more isolated than sites on traditional aminosilica. In contrast, both reactivity probes show that the protection/deprotection strategy leads to more uniformly accessible amine groups. It is proposed that the reactivity probes are more sensitive tests for accessibility and site-isolation in this case.

  8. [Investigation of the serotype distribution, biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibilities of group B streptococci isolated from urinary samples].

    PubMed

    Baba, Sevinç; Aydın, Mustafa Derya

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS), a member of normal flora of human gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, is a leading cause of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia particularly in newborn. GBS can also cause severe infections in pregnant women and adults with underlying disease, as well as mild diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). GBS strains exhibit 10 different serotypes, and the identification of serotype distribution is important epidemiologically. The role of biofilm production is one of the virulence factors that has been discussed in the pathogenesis of GBS infections. Although resistance to penicillin and ampicillin has not been documented in GBS, different rates of resistance has been reported for the alternative antibiotics to penicillin. The aim of this study was to investigate the serotype distribution, the ability of biofilm formation and the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.agalactiae strains isolated from urine cultures. A total of 60 strains were included in the study, 40 of them were isolated from patients (38 female 2 male; mean age: 36.7 years) with urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded single type of colonies in the number of ≥ 50.000 cfu/ml, whereas 20 of them were isolated from patients (19 female 1 male; mean age: 37.2 years) without urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded mixed colonies in the number of ≤ 20.000 cfu/ml. Chromogenic media were used for the isolation and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. The isolates were then serotyped by latex agglutination method and their antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion method recommended by CLSI documents. Biofilm formation of the strains were investigated by microplate and Congo red agar (CRA) methods. In our study, the most frequently detected serotypes were V (n= 18; 30%) and II (n= 14; 23.3%), followed by serotype Ia (n= 10; 16.7%), III (n= 9; 15%), Ib (n= 3; 5%), VI (n= 1; 1.7%) and VII (n

  9. In vitro effects of sulbactam combinations with different antibiotic groups against clinical Acinetobacter baumannii isolates.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Aydin; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Acicbe, Ozlem; Tanyel, Esra; Yaman, Gorkem; Durupinar, Belma

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii infections causes some problems as a result of possessing various antibacterial resistance mechanisms against available antibiotics. Combination of antibiotics, acting by different mechanisms, is used for the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. It is an important factor to determine synergy or antagonism between agents in the combination for the constitution of effective therapy. The study aimed to determine In vitro interactions interpreted according to calculated fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index between sulbactam and ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, meropenem, tigecycline, and colistin. Ten clinical isolates of A. baumannii were tested for determination of synergistic effects of sulbactam with different antimicrobial combinations. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of both sulbactam and combined antibiotics decreased 2- to 128-fold. Synergy and partial synergy were determined in combination of sulbactam with ceftazidime and gentamicin (FIC index: ≤ 0.5 or >0.5 to <1) and MIC values of both ceftazidime and gentamicin for five isolates fell down below the susceptibility break point. Similarly, MIC value of ciprofloxacin for six ciprofloxacin resistant isolates was determined as below the susceptibility break point in combination. However, all isolates were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline, MIC values of both were decreased in combination with sulbactam. Although synergistic and partial synergistic effects were observed in the combination of sulbactam and ceftriaxone, all isolates remained resistant to ceftriaxone. The effect of cefepime-sulbactam combination was synergy in five, partial synergy in one and indifferent in four isolates. Meropenem and sulbactam showed a partial synergistic effect (FIC index: >0.5 to <1) in three, an additive effect (FIC index: 1) in one and an indifferent effect (FIC index: >1-2) in six isolates

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Identification and Quantification of Organic Functional Groups in Aqueous Phase Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, K.; Ruthenburg, T. C.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Dillner, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere influence visibility, climate, and human health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from chemical reactions in the atmosphere constitute a portion of total organic particle mass. Most research on SOA has focused on gas phase reactions; however, reactions taking place in cloud and fog drops may be significant. One group of water-soluble compounds that participate in these reactions is phenols. Phenols, emitted from biomass burning, react in the aqueous phase to form low-volatility SOA products. The products formed from these reactions are currently poorly characterized. In order to characterize laboratory-generated samples, we are developing an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) technique to identify and quantify organic functional groups in SOA. Aqueous SOA is made in the laboratory by illuminating solutions of phenolic compounds with an oxidant. The illuminated solution is then blown to dryness in order to determine the mass of SOA produced. The dry SOA is reconstituted in water and drops of this solution are placed onto a single-reflection ATR accessory. In order to identify and quantify functional groups in the complex SOA samples, it is necessary to calibrate with compounds and mixtures of compounds containing bond types similar to those found in the laboratory-generated SOA. Initially, focus has been placed on multiple peaks located in the region between 1800 cm-1 and 800 cm-1, including peaks for C=O and C-O. We distinguish between characteristic absorbances to begin determining the organic functional group composition of the SOA samples. This ATR-FTIR technique complements information from mass spectrometry measurements and allows us to quantify organic mass for non-volatile SOA products.

  11. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  12. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  13. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Kohler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. Furthermore, the model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  14. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2015-09-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. The model combines Köhler theory with semi-empirical group contribution methods to estimate molar volumes, activity coefficients and liquid-liquid phase boundaries to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of two. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging testbeds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger scale models.

  15. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    SciTech Connect

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  16. Classification of Colletotrichum coccodes isolates into vegetative compatibility groups using infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Tsror, L; Moreh, R; Mordechai, S; Huleihel, M

    2014-07-01

    In this study the potential of infrared (IR) spectroscopy for the classification of Colletotrichum coccodes (C. coccodes) isolates into vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) was evaluated. Isolates which belong to the same VCG may have similar pathological and physiological traits that differ from those that are not assigned to the same VCG. Early classification of isolates into VCGs is of a great importance for a better understanding of the epidemiology of the disease and improves its control. The main goal of the present study was to classify 14 isolates of C. coccodes into VCGs and differentiate between them, based on their IR absorption spectra as obtained by the FTIR-ATR sampling technique. Advanced statistical and mathematical methods, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), were applied to the spectra after manipulation. The results show that it is possible to assign the isolates into VCGs with more than 90% success based on the wavenumber low region (1800-800 cm(-1)) and using 15 PCs. However, on the isolate level, the best differentiation results were obtained using PCA (15 PCs) and LDA for the combined regions (2990-2800 cm(-1), 1800-800 cm(-1)), with identification success rates of 87.2%. PMID:24582779

  17. Genetic polymorphism of Malassezia furfur isolates from Han and Tibetan ethnic groups in China using DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Ruifeng; Ran, Yuping; Dai, Yaling; Lu, Yao; Wang, Peng

    2010-12-01

    Reported isolation rates of Malassezia yeast from human skin show geographic variations. In China, the populations of the Han (1,182.95 million) and Tibetan (5.41 million) ethnic groups are distributed over 9.6 and 3.27 million square kilometers respectively, making biodiversity research feasible and convenient. Malassezia furfur clinical strains (n = 29) isolated from different individuals, with or without associated dermatoses, of these two ethnic groups (15 Han and 12 Tibetan) were identified and analyzed with DNA fingerprinting using single primers specific to minisatellites. Using the Bionumerics software, we found that almost all M. furfur clinical isolates and type strains formed five distinct group clusters according to their associated skin diseases and the ethnic groups of the patients. These findings are the first to focus on the genetic diversity and relatedness of M. furfur in the Tibetan and Han ethnic groups in China and reveal genetic variation associated with related diseases, host ethnicity and geographic origin. PMID:20507265

  18. Genetic and antigenic typing of border disease virus (BDV) isolates from Italy reveals the existence of a novel BDV group.

    PubMed

    Giammarioli, Monica; La Rocca, Severina Anna; Steinbach, Falko; Casciari, Cristina; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2011-01-27

    Border disease virus belongs to the Pestivirus genus, within the family Flaviviridae. Genetic analysis of pestiviruses isolated from sheep in continental Europe have led to the proposal that BDV isolates are segregated into at least seven clusters. In 2005 the molecular analysis of an Italian caprine BDV strain provided evidence for the presence of an atypical pestivirus, which may represent the first member of a putative novel pestivirus sub-group. To further build on this study, ovine pestivirus strains were isolated from small ruminant flocks and characterized both genetically and antigenically. A defined section of the 5'UTR and the complete N(pro) coding region were amplified and used for phylogenetic analysis. This revealed that these pestiviruses belong to the BDV species but differed significantly from all previously described ovine pestiviruses providing evidence for the presence of a novel genetic group. Four of the five isolates were also typed antigenically with a panel of pestivirus specific mAbs directed against NS2/3, E(rns) and E2 proteins. The four isolates reacted with a distinct set of mAbs, in particular against the BDV-E2 and the BDV-E(rns) epitopes. The isolates were greatly reactive for E(rns) and NS2/3 mAbs, which are otherwise typical for BVDV-2, and one E2 mAb that typically stains BVDV-1. The Italian pestiviruses analysed in this study, according to their antigenic and genetic properties, clustered into a novel phylogenetic group, that we propose to term BDV-7. PMID:20656426

  19. Nest-Gallery Development and Caste Composition of Isolated Foraging Groups of the Drywood Termite, Incisitermes minor (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Himmi, S Khoirul; Yoshimura, Tsuyoshi; Yanase, Yoshiyuki; Oya, Masao; Torigoe, Toshiyuki; Akada, Masanori; Imadzu, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray computed-tomographic examination of nest-gallery development from timbers naturally infested by foraging groups of Incisitermes minor colonies was conducted. This study documents the colonization process of I. minor to new timbers and how the isolated groups maintain their nest-gallery system. The results suggested that development of a nest-gallery within a suitable wood item is not random, but shows selection for softer substrate and other adaptations to the different timber environments. Stigmergic coordinations were expressed in dynamic changes of the nest-gallery system; indicated by fortification behavior in sealing and re-opening a tunnel approaching the outer edge of the timber, and accumulating fecal pellets in particular chambers located beneath the timber surface. The study also examines the caste composition of isolated groups to discover how I. minor sustains colonies with and without primary reproductives. PMID:27455332

  20. Allocation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Isolates into Four Distinct Groups by ompK36 Typing in a Taiwanese University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wang, Li-Rong; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The OmpK36 porin plays a role in carbapenem resistance and may contribute to bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of different groups of K. pneumoniae separated by ompK36 typing. Among 226 nonduplicate K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates collected at a Taiwanese hospital in 2011, four ompK36 types, designated types A, B, C, and D, were identified by PCR in 61, 28, 100, and 36 isolates, respectively; 1 isolate was untypeable. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher rates of antimicrobial resistance (all tested antibiotics except meropenem), extended-spectrum β-lactamases or DHA-1 (47.5% together), Qnr-type quinolone resistance determinants (50.8%), and IncFIIA-type plasmids (49.2%) in group A than in others. Seventeen isolates were identified as belonging to 3 international high-risk clones (4 sequence type 11 [ST11], 10 ST15, and 3 ST147 isolates); all isolates but 1 ST15 isolate were classified in group A. The significant characteristics of group C were hypermucoviscosity (62.0%) and a higher virulence gene content. This group included all serotype K1 (n = 30), K2 (n = 25), and K5 (n = 3) isolates, 6 of 7 K57 isolates, all isolates of major clones associated with pyogenic liver abscesses (29 ST23, 11 ST65, 5 ST86, 7 ST373, and 1 ST375 isolates), and 16 (94.1%) of 17 isolates causing bacteremic liver abscesses. Twelve (42.9%) of the group B isolates were responsible for bacteremic biliary tract infections. Group D was predominant (83.3%) among 12 K20 isolates. This study suggests that most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates can be allocated into four groups with distinct characteristics based on ompK36 types. PMID:26224840

  1. Comparison of structural features of dissolved organic matter isolated from rainwater with those of aquatic humic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, P.; Santos, E.; Duarte, A.

    2012-04-01

    The complexity of rainwater dissolved organic matter (DOM), a large percentage of which remains uncharacterized, has made difficult to determine the role of rainwater DOM in regional and global carbon budgets. Recent studies have focused on determining the structural characteristics of the bulk DOM in rainwater, reporting the prevalence of DOM with characteristics resembling those of natural humic substances due to its polyacidic nature. However, it is important to investigate the structural features of humic-like DOM isolated from rainwater and to evaluate whether such features differ from those found in aquatic humic substances, namely in what concerns the relative content of aliphacity and aromaticity. In this work, rainwater samples were collected for about one year, in Aveiro (Portugal). Humic-like DOM was extracted from rainwater by a procedure based on adsorption onto DAX-8 resin. The International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) (http://www.ihss.gatech.edu) operationally defined dissolved humic substances (HSs) on the base of adsorption onto a XAD-8 like resin. The isolation and extraction procedure adopted in the present work for the extraction of DOM from rainwater was slightly modified from the procedure recommended by the IHSS as suggested by Santos et al. (2009). Then, humic-like DOM isolated from rainwater was analysed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Due to the small amounts of DOM extracted from rainwater, the DOM fractions extracted from rainwater samples were combined for each sampling season, and the 1H NMR results were compared between seasons and also with spectra of aquatic humic substances from available literature. Similar structural characteristics were observed for extracted DOM from the different seasons: high content of aliphatic structures, of hydroxy and alkoxy groups, of carbonyl groups and unsaturated carbon atoms, and low content in aromatic structures when compared with aliphatic structures. Moreover, results suggest that the DOM extracted

  2. Characterization and copper binding of humic and nonhumic organic matter isolated from the South Platte River: evidence for the presence of nitrogenous binding site.

    PubMed

    Croué, J P; Benedetti, M F; Violleau, D; Leenheer, J A

    2003-01-15

    Humic substances typically constitute 40-60% of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters. However, little information is available regarding the metal binding properties of the nonhumic hydrophilic portion of the DOM. In this study, humic and nonhumic DOM samples were isolated from the South Platte River (Colorado, DOC = 2.6 mg x L(-1), SUVA254 = 2.4 L/mg x m) using a two-column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The three major isolated fractions of DOM, which accounted for 57% of the bulk DOM,were characterized using a variety of analytical tools. Proton and copper binding properties were studied for each fraction. The main objective of this work was to compare the structural and chemical characteristics of the isolated fractions and test models describing DOM reactivity toward metal ions. The characterization work showed significant structural differences between the three isolated fractions of DOM. The hydrophobic acid fraction (i.e., humic substances isolated from the XAD-8 resin) gave the largest C/H, C/O, and C/N ratios and aromatic carbon content among the three isolated fractions. The transphilic acid (TPHA) fraction ("transphilic" meaning fraction of intermediate polarity isolated from the XAD-4 resin) was found to incorporate the highest proportion of polysaccharides, whereas the transphilic neutral (TPHN) fraction was almost entirely proteinaceous. The gradual increase of the charge with pH for the three DOM fractions is most likely caused by a large distribution of proton affinity constants for the carboxylic groups, as well as a second type of group more generally considered to be phenolic. In the case of the DOM fraction enriched in proteinaceous material (i.e., TPHN fraction), the results showed that the amino groups are responsible for the charge reversal. For low copper concentrations, nitrogen-containing functional groups similar to those of amino acids are likely to be involved in complexation, in agreement with previously published

  3. Characterization and copper binding of humic and nonhumic organic matter isolated from the South Platte River: Evidence for the presence of nitrogenous binding site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croue, J.-P.; Benedetti, M.F.; Violleau, D.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Humic substances typically constitute 40-60% of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters. However, little information is available regarding the metal binding properties of the nonhumic hydrophilic portion of the DOM. In this study, humic and nonhumic DOM samples were isolated from the South Platte River (Colorado, DOC = 2.6 mg??L-1, SUVA254 = 2.4 L/mg??m) using a two-column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins. The three major isolated fractions of DOM, which accounted for 57% of the bulk DOM, were characterized using a variety of analytical tools. Proton and copper binding properties were studied for each fraction. The main objective of this work was to compare the structural and chemical characteristics of the isolated fractions and test models describing DOM reactivity toward metal ions. The characterization work showed significant structural differences between the three isolated fractions of DOM. The hydrophobic acid fraction (i.e., humic substances isolated from the XAD-8 resin) gave the largest C/H, C/O, and C/N ratios and aromatic carbon content among the three isolated fractions. The transphilic acid (TPHA) fraction ("transphilic" meaning fraction of intermediate polarity isolated from the XAD-4 resin) was found to incorporate the highest proportion of polysaccharides, whereas the transphilic neutral (TPHN) fraction was almost entirely proteinaceous. The gradual increase of the charge with pH for the three DOM fractions is most likely caused by a large distribution of proton affinity constants for the carboxylic groups, as well as a second type of group more generally considered to be phenolic. In the case of the DOM fraction enriched in proteinaceous material (i.e., TPHN fraction), the results showed that the amino groups are reponsible for the charge reversal. For low copper concentrations, nitrogen-containing functional groups similar to those of amino acids are likely to be involved in complexation, in agreement with previously published data.

  4. Isolation of nonvolatile, organic solutes from natural waters by zeotrophic distillation of water from N,N-dimethylformamide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Brown, P.A.; Stiles, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    Nonvolatile, organic solutes that comprise the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in saline waters were isolated by removal of the water by distillation from a N,N-dimethylformamideformic acid-acetonitrile mixture. Salts isolated with the DOC were removed by crystallization of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate from the solvent mixture, removal of silicic acid by acidification and precipitation, removal of boric acid by methylation and volatilization, and removal of phosphate by zinc acetate precipitation. Chemical alteration of the organic solutes was minimized during evaporative concentration steps by careful control of acid concentrations in the solvent mixture and was minimized during drying by conversion of the samples to pyridinium and sodium salts. Recoveries of various hydrophilic organic standards from aqueous salt solutions and recoveries of natural organic solutes from various water samples varied from 60 to 100%. Losses of organic solutes during the isolation procedure were nonselective and related to the number of salt- and precipitate-washing cycles in the procedure.

  5. Membrane filtration of agro-industrial wastewaters and isolation of organic compounds with high added values.

    PubMed

    Zagklis, Dimitris P; Paraskeva, Christakis A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was the exploitation of agro-industrial wastes or by-products such as olive mill wastewater (OMW) and defective wines. A cost-effective system for their maximum exploitation is suggested, using a combined process of membrane filtration and other physicochemical processes. Wastewaters are first treated in a membrane system (prefiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, and reverse osmosis) where pure water and other organic fractions (by-products) are obtained. Organic fractions, called hereafter byproducts and not wastes, are further treated for the separation of organic compounds and isolation of high added value products. Experiments were performed with OMW and defective wines as characteristic agro-industrial wastewaters. Profit from the exploitation of agro-industrial wastewaters can readily help the depreciation of the indeed high cost process of membrane filtration. The simple phenolic fraction of the OMW was successfully isolated from the rest of the waste, and problems occurring during winemaking, such as high volatile acidity and odours, were tackled. PMID:24434988

  6. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria Isolated from the Internal Organs of Edible Snow Crabs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Misoon; Kwon, Tae-Hyung; Jung, Su-Mi; Cho, Seung-Hak; Jin, Seon Yeong; Park, Nyun-Ho; Kim, Choong-Gon; Kim, Jong-Shik

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance and microbiota within edible snow crabs are important for the Chionoecetes (snow crab) fishing industry. We investigated these parameters using culture methods and antibiotic susceptibility tests with six internal organs from three species of Chionoecetes. Each sample revealed many unexpected microbial species within Chionoecetes internal organs. On the basis of 16S rRNA sequence analysis of 381 isolates, the most abundant genera identified in Chionoecetes opilio were Acinetobacter spp. (24%), Bacillus spp. (4%), Pseudomonas spp. (34%), Stenotrophomonas spp. (28%), and Agreia spp. (11%). In Chionoecetes sp. crabs, Acinetobacter spp. (23%), Bacillus spp. (12%), and Psychrobacter spp. (20%) were most prevalent, while Agreia spp. (11%), Bacillus spp. (31%), Microbacterium spp. (10%), Rhodococcus spp. (12%), and Agrococcus spp. (6%) were most abundant in C. japonicus. Our antibiotic resistance test found resistance to all nine antibiotics tested in 19, 14, and two of the isolates from C. opilio, Chionoecetes sp., and, C. japonicus respectively. Our results are the first to show that microbes with antibiotic resistance are widely distributed throughout the internal organs of natural snow crabs. PMID:23990916

  7. Genotypic diversity of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis strains isolated from French organic sourdoughs.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Emilie; Onno, Bernard; Chuat, Victoria; Durand, Karine; Orain, Servane; Valence, Florence; Dousset, Xavier; Jacques, Marie-Agnès

    2016-06-01

    Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis is the predominant key lactic acid bacterium in traditionally fermented sourdoughs. Despite its prevalence, sourdough and their related breads could be different regarding their physicochemical and sensorial characteristics. The intraspecific diversity of L. sanfranciscensis might explain these observations. Fifty-nine strains isolated from French sourdoughs were typed by a polyphasic approach including Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE), in order to study their genotypic diversity. MLST scheme can be reduced from six to four gene fragments (gdh, gyrA, nox and pta) without a major loss of discrimination between strains. The genes mapA and pgmA are not good candidates for inclusion in an MLST scheme to type L. sanfranciscensis strains, as they could not be amplified for a set of 18 strains among the 59 studied. This method revealed 20 sequence types (STs). Of these, 19 STs were grouped in one clonal complex, showing a strong relatedness between these strains. PFGE using SmaI discriminated 41 pulsotypes and so distinguished isolates better than the MLST scheme. Both genotypic methods indicate a low diversity between strains isolated from the same sourdough and a higher diversity between strains isolated from different sourdoughs, suggesting an influence of baker practices and/or environmental conditions on the selection of strains. The use of these two methods targeting genetic variations gives an optimal genotypic characterization of L.sanfranciscensis strains. PMID:27015297

  8. Working with Organized Groups. Section 2, Improving Your School-Community Relations Program. Successful School Administration Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusco, Gene C.

    Working with organized groups can be an effective way of improving school-community relations. Under proper conditions two types of organized efforts have proved to be successful -- parent-teacher groups and citizens' committees for better schools. Basic to the wise use of organized citizens groups is the need for the school staff to have…

  9. Social integration of robots into groups of cockroaches to control self-organized choices.

    PubMed

    Halloy, J; Sempo, G; Caprari, G; Rivault, C; Asadpour, M; Tâche, F; Saïd, I; Durier, V; Canonge, S; Amé, J M; Detrain, C; Correll, N; Martinoli, A; Mondada, F; Siegwart, R; Deneubourg, J L

    2007-11-16

    Collective behavior based on self-organization has been shown in group-living animals from insects to vertebrates. These findings have stimulated engineers to investigate approaches for the coordination of autonomous multirobot systems based on self-organization. In this experimental study, we show collective decision-making by mixed groups of cockroaches and socially integrated autonomous robots, leading to shared shelter selection. Individuals, natural or artificial, are perceived as equivalent, and the collective decision emerges from nonlinear feedbacks based on local interactions. Even when in the minority, robots can modulate the collective decision-making process and produce a global pattern not observed in their absence. These results demonstrate the possibility of using intelligent autonomous devices to study and control self-organized behavioral patterns in group-living animals. PMID:18006751

  10. Effect of concentration of dispersed organic matter on optical maturity parameters: Interlaboratory results of the organic matter concentration working group of the ICCP.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Borrego, A.G.; Cook, A.; Flores, D.; Hackley, P.; Hower, J.C.; Kern, M.L.; Kommeren, K.; Kus, J.; Mastalerz, Maria; Mendonca, J.O.; Menezes, T.R.; Newman, J.; Ranasinghe, P.; Souza, I.V.A.F.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Ujiie, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to study the effect of the kerogen isolation procedures on maturity parameters of organic matter using optical microscopes. This work represents the results of the Organic Matter Concentration Working Group (OMCWG) of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) during the years 2008 and 2009. Four samples have been analysed covering a range of maturity (low and moderate) and terrestrial and marine geological settings. The analyses comprise random vitrinite reflectance measured on both kerogen concentrate and whole rock mounts and fluorescence spectra taken on alginite. Eighteen participants from twelve laboratories from all over the world performed the analyses. Samples of continental settings contained enough vitrinite for participants to record around 50 measurements whereas fewer readings were taken on samples from marine setting. The scatter of results was also larger in the samples of marine origin. Similar vitrinite reflectance values were in general recorded in the whole rock and in the kerogen concentrate. The small deviations of the trend cannot be attributed to the acid treatment involved in kerogen isolation but to reasons related to components identification or to the difficulty to achieve a good polish of samples with high mineral matter content. In samples difficult to polish, vitrinite reflectance was measured on whole rock tended to be lower. The presence or absence of rock fabric affected the selection of the vitrinite population for measurement and this also had an influence in the average value reported and in the scatter of the results. Slightly lower standard deviations were reported for the analyses run on kerogen concentrates. Considering the spectral fluorescence results, it was observed that the ??max presents a shift to higher wavelengths in the kerogen concentrate sample in comparison to the whole-rock sample, thus revealing an influence of preparation methods (acid treatment) on

  11. Screening for probiotic properties of strains isolated from feces of various human groups.

    PubMed

    Sathyabama, Sathyaseelan; Vijayabharathi, Rajendran; Bruntha Devi, Palanisamy; Ranjith Kumar, Manohar; Priyadarisini, Venkatesan Brindha

    2012-08-01

    The present study searched for potential probiotic strains from various human fecal samples. A total of 67 aerobic and 38 anaerobic strains were isolated from 5 different categories of human feces. Systematic procedures were used to evaluate the probiotic properties of the isolated strains. These showed about 75-97% survivability in acidic and bile salt environments. Adhesion to intestinal cell line Caco-2 was also high. The isolates exhibited hydrophobic properties in hexadecane. The culture supernatants of these strains showed antagonistic effects against pathogens. The isolates were resistant to a simulated gastrointestinal environment in vitro. Of the 4 best isolates, MAbB4 (Staphylococcus succinus) and FIdM3 (Enterococcus fecium), were promising candidates for a potential probiotic. S. succinus was found to be a probiotic strain, which is the second such species reported to date in this particular genus. A substantial zone of inhibition was found against Salmonella spp., which adds further support to the suggestion that the probiotic strain could help prevent intestinal infection. This study suggested that the human flora itself is a potential source of probiotics. PMID:22923108

  12. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Patricia A; Pullin, Michael J; Cabaniss, Stephen E; Zhou, Qunhui; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, Ksenija; Aiken, George R

    2002-05-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (rho), absorbance at 280 nm normalized to moles C (epsilon280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO > XAD-8 > RFW > XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between

  13. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurice, P.A.; Pullin, M.J.; Cabaniss, S.E.; Zhou, Q.; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, K.; Aiken, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (??), absorbance at 280nm normalized to moles C (??280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO>XAD-8>RFW>XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between XAD and RO

  14. Influence of functional groups on organic aerosol cloud condensation nucleus activity.

    PubMed

    Suda, Sarah R; Petters, Markus D; Yeh, Geoffrey K; Strollo, Christen; Matsunaga, Aiko; Faulhaber, Annelise; Ziemann, Paul J; Prenni, Anthony J; Carrico, Christian M; Sullivan, Ryan C; Kreidenweis, Sonia M

    2014-09-01

    Organic aerosols in the atmosphere are composed of a wide variety of species, reflecting the multitude of sources and growth processes of these particles. Especially challenging is predicting how these particles act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Previous studies have characterized the CCN efficiency for organic compounds in terms of a hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Here we extend these studies by systematically testing the influence of the number and location of molecular functional groups on the hygroscopicity of organic aerosols. Organic compounds synthesized via gas-phase and liquid-phase reactions were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with scanning flow CCN analysis and thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometry. These experiments quantified changes in κ with the addition of one or more functional groups to otherwise similar molecules. The increase in κ per group decreased in the following order: hydroxyl ≫ carboxyl > hydroperoxide > nitrate ≫ methylene (where nitrate and methylene produced negative effects, and hydroperoxide and nitrate groups produced the smallest absolute effects). Our results contribute to a mechanistic understanding of chemical aging and will help guide input and parametrization choices in models relying on simplified treatments such as the atomic oxygen:carbon ratio to predict the evolution of organic aerosol hygroscopicity. PMID:25118824

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Bacteria That Grow on Methane and Organic Compounds as Sole Sources of Carbon and Energy

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Tom E.; Cole, Gloria C.; Bland, Judith; Hanson, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Bacteria capable of growth on methane and a variety of complex organic substrates as sole sources of carbon and energy have been isolated. Conditions used to rigorously establish the purity of the cultures are described. One facultative methylotroph has been studied in detail. This organism has peripherally arranged pairs of intracytoplasmic membranes characteristic of obligate methylotrophs. This isolate apparently utilizes the serine pathway of formaldehyde fixation. The location of methane oxidizers in a dimictic lake indicates that these organisms prefer less than saturating levels of dissolved oxygen. Laboratory experiments confirmed the preference of these organisms for atmospheres containing less oxygen than air. Images PMID:4142033

  16. Antibacterial activity of diketopiperazines isolated from a marine fungus using t-butoxycarbonyl group as a simple tool for purification.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Bahaa El-Dien M; Rateb, Mostafa E

    2015-08-15

    Nine diketopiperazines were characterized from the culture of marine fungal isolate MR2012 which based on DNA amplification and sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region was identified as Aspergillus fumigatus. The isolated fungal metabolites 4-12 were unambiguously identified as a series of simple and re-arranged diketopiperazines by analysis of spectroscopic data. t-Butoxycarbonyl group (BOC) derivatization was used to separate the intractable mixture of 4 and 5. When all compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against gram positive bacteria, the isolated metabolites showed moderate to weak effects, while the semisynthetic derivatives 4a and 5a displayed strong activity comparable to the positive control, tetracycline against gram positive bacteria. PMID:26099531

  17. Organic functional group transformations in water at elevated temperature and pressure: Reversibility, reactivity, and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, Jessie; Gould, Ian R.; Herckes, Pierre; Shock, Everett L.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2013-03-01

    Many transformation reactions involving hydrocarbons occur in the presence of H2O in hydrothermal systems and deep sedimentary systems. We investigate these reactions using laboratory-based organic chemistry experiments at high temperature and pressure (300 °C and 100 MPa). Organic functional group transformation reactions using model organic compounds based on cyclohexane with one or two methyl groups provided regio- and stereochemical markers that yield information about reversibility and reaction mechanisms. We found rapidly reversible interconversion between alkanes, alkenes, dienes, alcohols, ketones, and enones. The alkane-to-ketone reactions were not only completely reversible, but also exhibited such extensive reversibility that any of the functional groups along the reaction path (alcohol, ketone, and even the diene) could be used as the reactant and form all the other groups as products. There was also a propensity for these ring-based structures to dehydrogenate; presumably from the alkene, through a diene, to an aromatic ring. The product suites provide strong evidence that water behaved as a reactant and the various functional groups showed differing degrees of reactivity. Mechanistically-revealing products indicated reaction mechanisms that involve carbon-centered cation intermediates. This work therefore demonstrates that a wide range of organic compound types can be generated by abiotic reactions at hydrothermal conditions.

  18. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2010-08-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS). The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-Ŕ respectively) and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO2) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation) of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional group mass

  19. Paleoenvironmental Controls on Early Cementation of Organic-Rich Shales in the Eagle Ford Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, K.; Tice, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Early carbonate cements have the potential to alter fracture toughness, and carbonate can be either promoted or inhibited by microbial processes in different redox zones. It is therefore possible that basin redox evolution could indirectly control early diagenesis and modify reservoir properties of corresponding shale units. The goals of this study are to analyze geochemical characteristics of the Late Cretaceous Eagle Ford Group in McMullen County, Texas in order to test the hypotheses that (1) the redox state of the water column controlled carbonate cement abundance and (2) carbonate cement lowered organic matter content by volumetric dilution. An X-ray analytical microscope was used to map elemental compositions of fresh core samples spanning the Eagle Ford Group. Resultant maps were used to characterize carbonate cements and to estimate the redox state of the overlying water column during deposition as proxied by the relative abundances of the trace metals Mo, V, Cr, and Zn. Preliminary results indicate that cementation occurred early relative to compaction. Ti-Kα1-normalized Mo Kα1 and Ca Kα1 fluorescence intensities are positively correlated throughout the unit, suggesting that carbonate cementation was promoted by basin euxinia. Total organic carbon is negatively correlated with (Ca Kα1)/(Ti Kα1) fluorescence ratio in the upper Eagle Ford Group, consistent with volumetric dilution of sedimentary organic matter by diagenetic cementation prior to compaction. In contrast, there is no significant correlation between total organic carbon and carbonate content in the more organic-rich lower Eagle Ford Group, suggesting that variations in organic matter production, preservation, or dilution by siliciclastic input were also important in controlling final organic content.

  20. Enterotoxin production in relation to taxonomic grouping and source of isolation of Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, P C; Lee, J V; Miliotis, M D; Van de Walle, S; Koornhof, H J; Jeffery, L; Bryant, T N

    1984-02-01

    A total of 19 of 20 (95%) strains of Aeromonas hydrophila biovar hydrophila and 16 of 17 (94%) strains of Aeromonas sobria isolated from a variety of clinical and environmental sources were found to be enterotoxin positive. Only 2 of 18 (11%) A. hydrophila biovar anaerogenes and 2 of 13 (15%) unidentified Aeromonas strains from a similar variety of sources produced enterotoxin. No association was apparent between the source of isolation, in particular diarrheal stools, and enterotoxigenicity; 41% of the isolates from diarrheal stools were enterotoxin negative. A strong correlation was noted between ability to produce enterotoxin and positive results in six characters: lysine decarboxylase and Voges-Proskauer reactions, production of gas from glucose, gluconate oxidation, xanthine hydrolysis, and hemolysis of human erythrocytes. In the majority of cases (35 of 39 strains), enterotoxigenicity was detected using cell-free filtrates of brain heart infusion broth cultures grown at 36 degrees C for 15; however, the other four positive isolates were detected after growth in the same broth at 30 degrees C or in Casamino Acids-yeast extract broth at 30 or 37 degrees C. It is recommended that for enterotoxin tests, strains should be grown in both media at both temperatures. The infant mouse test was found to be a simple and reliable method for detection of the enterotoxin. The toxin proved to be heat labile and not neutralized by cholera antitoxin. PMID:6699147

  1. Bonded-phase extraction column isolation of organic compounds in groundwater at a hazardous waste site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Pereira, W.E.; Ratcliff, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure for isolation of hazardous organic compounds from water for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis Is presented and applied to creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater resulting from wood-treatment processes. This simple procedure involved passing a 50-100-mL sample through a bonded-phase extraction column, eluting the trapped organic compounds from the column with 2-4 mL of solvent, and evaporating the sample to 100 ??L with a stream of dry nitrogen, after which the sample was ready for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Representative compounds indicative of creosote contamination were used for recovery and precision studies from the cyclohexyl-bonded phase. Recovery of these compounds from n-octyl-, n-octadecyl-, cyclohexyl-, and phenyl-bonded phases was compared. The bonded phase that exhibited the best recovery and least bias toward acidic or basic cmpounds was the n-octadecyl phase. Detailed compound Identification Is given for compounds Isolated from creosote- and pentachlorophenol-contaminated groundwater using the cyclohexyl-bonded phase.

  2. A Simple, Semiselective Medium for Anaerobic Isolation of Anginosus Group Streptococci from Patients with Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Richard D.; Wareham, David W.; Gardiner, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic isolation of anginosus group streptococci (AGS) from respiratory specimens containing diverse microbiota using a semiselective blood agar medium incorporating nalidixic acid and sulfamethazine (NAS) is described. AGS were detected in 60% of tested sputa from patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis. This demonstrates NAS to be a diagnostic tool for detecting AGS within the complex microbial communities associated with chronic lung disorders. PMID:22238446

  3. A FUNCTIONAL GROUP CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC PM 2.5 EXPOSURE: RESULTS FROM THE RIOPA STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The functional group (FG) composition of urban residential outdoor, indoor, and personal fine particle (PM2.5) samples is presented and used to provide insights relevant to organic PM2.5 exposure. PM2.5 samples (48 h) were collected during the Rel...

  4. A microporous metal-organic framework with polarized trifluoromethyl groups for high methane storage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Li, Bin; Wang, Hailong; Bao, Zongbi; Yildirim, Taner; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Banglin

    2015-10-11

    A novel NbO-type metal-organic framework UTSA-88a with polarized trifluoromethyl groups exhibits a notably high methane storage capacity of 248 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3) (at room temperature and 65 bar) and a working capacity of 185 cm(3) (STP) cm(-3). PMID:26300179

  5. 26 CFR 56.4911-9 - Application of section 501(h) to affiliated groups of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application of section 501(h) to affiliated groups of organizations. 56.4911-9 Section 56.4911-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE...

  6. 26 CFR 56.4911-9 - Application of section 501(h) to affiliated groups of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of section 501(h) to affiliated groups of organizations. 56.4911-9 Section 56.4911-9 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PUBLIC CHARITY EXCISE...

  7. 2001-2002 NATIONAL SURVEY OF MENTAL HEALTH MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUPS AND SELF HELP ORGANIZATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of the Mutual Support/Self-Help Survey are to provide a national estimate of the number of mutual support groups, self-help organizations, and businesses and services run by and for consumers and/or their family members and to describe their structure, types of activiti...

  8. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  9. The Referential Function of Internal Communication Groups in Complex Organizations: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, James A.; Farace, Richard V.

    This paper argues that people who interact regularly and repetitively among themselves create a conjoint information space wherein common values, attitudes, and beliefs arise through the process of information transmission among the members in the space. Three major hypotheses concerning informal communication groups in organizations were tested…

  10. An Annotated Bibliography of Materials Designed and Organized for Adult Use in Discussion Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, John W.

    This first annotated bibliography of materials designed and organized for adult use in disucssion groups includes both book and nonbook material. Areas dealt with are: art, censorship, change, child guidance, communication, crime, democracy, economics, education, evolution, food, foreign affairs, forgetting, generation gap, gold, good and evil,…

  11. Use of the Sequence Rule for Indexing Functional Groups in Organic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudrlik, Paul F.

    1973-01-01

    A new method of indexing functional groups in organic compounds is described, utilizing the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog sequence rule. Functional carbon atoms are first classified by functionality, a measure of the oxidation state, then ordered by means of a modified sequence rule. Substructure searching and other applications are discussed. (30…

  12. Introduction of two lithiooxycarbonyl groups enhances cyclability of lithium batteries with organic cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Akihiro; Kuramoto, Hiroki; Tsujii, Yutaka; Nokami, Toshiki; Inatomi, Yuu; Hojo, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Hirotetsu; Yoshida, Jun-ichi

    2014-08-01

    To increase the cyclability of lithium batteries using organic cathode materials of low molecular weights, two lithiooxycarbonyl (-CO2Li) groups was introduced to p- and o-quinones. The introduction of two -CO2Li groups does not strongly affect the redox potentials of quinones. Lithium batteries using p- and o-quinones with two -CO2Li groups as cathode materials exhibit excellent cyclability compared to their parent quinones. In particular, pyrene-4,5,9,10-tetraone having two lithiooxycarbonyl groups (LCPYT) exhibited high energy density, high cyclability, and fast charge ability. These results indicate that introduction of two lithiooxycarbonyl groups to quinones serves as a simple and effective way to decrease the solubility of various quinones in electrolyte solutions without significant decrease in the voltage.

  13. Phylogenetic groups, extended-spectrum β-lactamases and metallo-β-lactamase in Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of patients with diarrhea in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alizade, Hesam; Fallah, Fatemeh; Ghanbarpour, Reza; Aflatoonian, Mohammad Reza; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sharifi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this study were to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) and determine phylogenetic background E. coli isolates from fecal samples of patients with diarrhea in Kerman, southeast of Iran Background: The emergence of ESBLs and MBLs-producing E. coli caused problems in antibiotic treatments. E. coli strains can be assigned to four main phylog-groups, including: A, B1, B2 and D. Patients and methods: E. coli isolates (n=216) were obtained from fecal samples of patients with diarrhea between June and December 2013. ESBLs and MBLs were confirmed by disk-diffusion and broth micro-dilution methods. Using PCR, the ESBL-positive isolates were screened to determine the phylo-groups and the presence of blaCTX-M-15, blaOXA-1, blaPER-1, blaVIM and blaIMP genes. Results: ESBL-positive isolates (n= 56) were detected. Among ESBL-positive isolates, 51 isolates were positive for blaCTX-M15 and one isolate was positive for both blaCTX-M-15 and blaOXA-1 genes. None of the isolates were positive for blaPER-1, blaVIM and blaIMP genes. PCR assay for phylotyping of isolates indicated that the isolates were belonged to groups A (54.16%), B1 (11.11%), B2 (12.96%) and D (21.75%). The isolates possessed blaCTX-M-15 gene were belonged to A (35 isolates), B1 (5), B2 (3) and D (8) phylo-groups. Conclusion: Our results indicate that blaCTX-M-15 gene is widespread among diarrheagenic E. coli isolates. ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were disseminated among a diversity of phylo-groups. Further studies are necessary to identify the ESBL genes in relation to phylogenetic groups. PMID:26328043

  14. A snapshot of the predominant single nucleotide polymorphism cluster groups of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Varma-Basil, Mandira; Narang, Anshika; Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Garima, Kushal; Gupta, Shraddha; Kumar Sharma, Naresh; Giri, Astha; Zozio, Thierry; Couvin, David; Hanif, Mahmud; Bhatnagar, Anuj; Menon, Balakrishnan; Niemann, Stefan; Rastogi, Nalin; Alland, David; Bose, Mridula

    2016-09-01

    Several attempts have been made to associate phylogenetic differences among Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains to variations in the clinical outcome of the disease and to drug resistance. We genotyped 139 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis obtained from patients of pulmonary tuberculosis in North Delhi region. The isolates were analyzed using nine Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTRs; and the results were correlated with their drug susceptibility profile. Results of SNP cluster group (SCG) analysis (available for 138 isolates) showed that the most predominant cluster was SCG 3a, observed in 58.7% (81/138) of the isolates with 44.4% (36/81) of these being drug susceptible, while 16% (13/81) were multidrug resistant (MDR). Of the ancestral cluster SCG 1 observed in 19.5% (27/138) of the isolates, 14.8% (4/27) were MDR while 44.4% (12/27) were drug susceptible. SCG 2 formed 5.79% (8/138) of the isolates and 50% (4/8) of these were multidrug resistant (MDR). Spoligotyping subdivided the strains into 45 shared types (n = 125) and 14 orphan strains. The orphan strains were mostly associated with SCG 3a or SCG 1, reflecting the principal SCGs found in the Indian population. SCG 1 and SCG 2 genotypes were concordant with the East African Indian (EAI) and Beijing families respectively. Central Asian (CAS) clade and its sublineages were predominantly associated with SCG 3a. No consistent association was seen between the SCGs and Harlem, T or X clades. The 15 loci MIRU-VNTR typing revealed 123/136 isolates to be unclustered, while 13 isolates were present in 6 clusters of 2-3 isolates each. However, correlating the cluster analysis with patient details did not suggest any evidence of recent transmission. In conclusion, though our study revealed the preponderance of SCG 1 and 3a in the M. tuberculosis population circulating in the region, the diversity of strains highlights the changes occurring within lineages and reemphasizes the

  15. Temporal isolation explains host-related genetic differentiation in a group of widespread mycoparasitic fungi.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Levente; Pintye, Alexandra; Kovács, Gábor M; Jankovics, Tünde; Fontaine, Michael C; Harvey, Nick; Xu, Xiangming; Nicot, Philippe C; Bardin, Marc; Shykoff, Jacqui A; Giraud, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for divergence and specialization of pathogens on different hosts is of fundamental importance, especially in the context of the emergence of new diseases via host shifts. Temporal isolation has been reported in a few plants and parasites, but is probably one of the least studied speciation processes. We studied whether temporal isolation could be responsible for the maintenance of genetic differentiation among sympatric populations of Ampelomyces, widespread intracellular mycoparasites of powdery mildew fungi, themselves plant pathogens. The timing of transmission of Ampelomyces depends on the life cycles of the powdery mildew species they parasitize. Internal transcribed spacer sequences and microsatellite markers showed that Ampelomyces populations found in apple powdery mildew (Podosphaera leucotricha) were genetically highly differentiated from other Ampelomyces populations sampled from several other powdery mildew species across Europe, infecting plant hosts other than apple. While P. leucotricha starts its life cycle early in spring, and the main apple powdery mildew epidemics occur before summer, the fungal hosts of the other Ampelomyces cause epidemics mainly in summer and autumn. When two powdery mildew species were experimentally exposed to Ampelomyces strains naturally occurring in P. leucotricha in spring, and to strains naturally present in other mycohost species in autumn, cross-infections always occurred. Thus, the host-related genetic differentiation in Ampelomyces cannot be explained by narrow physiological specialization, because Ampelomyces were able to infect powdery mildew species they were unlikely to have encountered in nature, but instead appears to result from temporal isolation. PMID:21261766

  16. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas syringae facilitated by a PCR targeting the whole P. syringae group.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Caroline; Morris, Cindy E; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Berge, Odile

    2016-01-01

    We present a reliable PCR-based method to avoid the biases related to identification based on the conventional phenotypes currently used in the identification of Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato, a ubiquitous environmental bacterium including plant pathogens. We identified a DNA target suitable for this purpose by applying a comparative genomic pipeline to Pseudomonas genomes. We designed primers and developed PCR conditions that led to a clean and strong PCR product from 97% of the 185 strains of P. syringae strains tested and gave a clear negative result for the 31 non-P. syringae strains tested. The sensitivity of standard PCR was determined with pure strains to be 10(6) bacteria mL(-1) or 0.4 ng of DNA μL(-1). Sensitivity could be improved with the touchdown method. The new PCR-assisted isolation of P. syringae was efficient when deployed on an environmental sample of river water as compared to the isolation based on phenotypes. This innovation eliminates the need for extensive expertise in isolating P. syringae colonies, was simpler, faster and very reliable. It will facilitate discovery of more diversity of P. syringae and research on emergence, dispersion and evolution to understand the varied functions of this environmental bacterium. PMID:26610434

  17. SIPCAn (Separation, Isolation, Purification, Characterization, and Analysis): A One-Term, Integrated Project for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly A.; Arena, Anthony F.

    2011-01-01

    SIPCAn, an acronym for separation, isolation, purification, characterization, and analysis, is presented as a one-term, integrated project for the first-term undergraduate organic laboratory course. Students are assigned two mixtures of unknown organic compounds--a mixture of two liquid compounds and a mixture of two solid compounds--at the…

  18. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  19. Unusual groups of Morganella ("Proteus") morganii isolated from clinical specimens: lysine-positive and ornithine-negative biogroups.

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, F W; Framer, J J; Steigerwalt, A G; Brenner, D J

    1980-01-01

    Morganella ("Proteus") morganii is the only species in the recently proposed genus Morganella, but we suspect there are yet undescribed species in the genus. Two candidates for new species were recently investigated. Nineteen strains isolated from clinical specimens resembled M. morganii but were lysine positive and nonmotile and fermented glycerol within 24 h. Typical M. morganii are lysine negative and motile and ferment glycerol slowly or not at all. The three-test variance from typical M. morganii suggested that this new group might be a new Morganella species; however, strains of the group were closely related to typical M. morganii by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-DNA hybridization. A second group of 14 strains isolated from clinical specimens was ornithine negative but was otherwise very similar to M. morganii. This group was also closely related to M. morganii by DNA hybridization. Both sets of strains clearly belong in the species Morganella morganii as distinct biogroups; they are not separate species as originally suspected. Initially both biogroups posed a problem in identification until their true relationship to M. morganii was determined. PMID:6775010

  20. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M.; Bergman, Nicholas H.; Turell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  1. Identification and Genomic Analysis of a Novel Group C Orthobunyavirus Isolated from a Mosquito Captured near Iquitos, Peru.

    PubMed

    Treangen, Todd J; Schoeler, George; Phillippy, Adam M; Bergman, Nicholas H; Turell, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Group C orthobunyaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses found in both South and North America. Until very recently, and despite their status as important vector-borne human pathogens, no Group C whole genome sequences containing all three segments were available in public databases. Here we report a Group C orthobunyavirus, named El Huayo virus, isolated from a pool of Culex portesi mosquitoes captured near Iquitos, Peru. Although initial metagenomic analysis yielded only a handful of reads belonging to the genus Orthobunyavirus, single contig assemblies were generated for L, M, and S segments totaling over 200,000 reads (~0.5% of sample). Given the moderately high viremia in hamsters (>107 plaque-forming units/ml) and the propensity for Cx. portesi to feed on rodents, it is possible that El Huayo virus is maintained in nature in a Culex portesi/rodent cycle. El Huayo virus was found to be most similar to Peruvian Caraparu virus isolates and constitutes a novel subclade within Group C. PMID:27074162

  2. Comparison of Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Organic and Conventional Dairy Herds in Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, K.; Bartlett, P. C.; Kaneene, J. B.; Downes, F. P.

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Campylobacter spp. isolates from bovine feces were compared between organic and conventional dairy herds. Thirty organic dairy herds, where antimicrobials are rarely used for calves and never used for cows, were compared with 30 neighboring conventional dairy farms, where antimicrobials were routinely used for animals for all ages. Fecal specimens from 10 cows and 10 calves on 120 farm visits yielded 332 Campylobacter isolates. The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in organic and conventional farms was 26.7 and 29.1%, and the prevalence was not statistically different between the two types of farms. Campylobacter prevalence was significantly higher in March than in September, higher in calves than in cows, and higher in smaller farms than in large farms. The rates of retained placenta, pneumonia, mastitis, and abortion were associated with the proportion of Campylobacter isolation from fecal samples. The gradient disk diffusion MIC method (Etest) was used for testing susceptibility to four antimicrobial agents: ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Two isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, and none of isolates was resistant to gentamicin or erythromycin. Resistance to tetracycline was 45% (148 of 332 isolates). Tetracycline resistance was found more frequently in calves than in cows (P = 0.042), but no difference was observed between organic and conventional farms. When we used Campylobacter spp. as indicator bacteria, we saw no evidence that restriction of antimicrobial use on dairy farms was associated with prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. PMID:15006764

  3. Differential expression of cytoprotective and apoptotic genes in an ischaemia-reperfusion isolated organ perfusion model of the transplanted kidney.

    PubMed

    Waller, Helen L; Harper, Simon J F; Hosgood, Sarah A; Bagul, Atul; Kay, Mark D; Kaushik, Monika; Yang, Bin; Bicknell, Gareth R; Nicholson, Michael L

    2007-07-01

    The optimal kidney preservation system and methods to ameliorate reperfusion injury are major factors in accomplishing successful graft function following transplantation. Ischaemia and reperfusion lead to cellular stress and the adaptive response may include the activation of genes involved in cellular protection and/or cell death by apoptosis. We investigated the expression of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic Bax after 6 h isolated organ perfusion in porcine kidneys that had been given 10 and 40 min warm ischaemic time. The level of HO-1 was shown to be significantly higher in the 10-min warm ischaemic group compared with 40-min group (0.90 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.83 +/- 0.03; P = 0.002). The levels of HO-1 showed a significant positive correlated with parameters of renal function, creatinine clearance, and renal blood flow and urine output (AUC; r = 0.8042, P = 0.03; r = 0.6028, P = 0.04; r = 0.6055, P = 0.04), demonstrating a possible protective role of this gene in this model of renal transplantation. PMID:17639610

  4. A 2D zinc-organic network being easily exfoliated into isolated sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guihong; Li, Ruiqing; Leng, Zhihua; Gan, Shucai

    2016-08-01

    A metal-organic aggregate, namely {Zn2Cl2(BBC)}n (BBC = 4,4‧,4‧‧-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl))tribenzoate) was obtained by solvothermal synthesis. Its structure is featured with the Zn2(COO)3 paddle-wheels with two chloride anions on axial positions and hexagonal pores in the layers. The exclusion of water in the precursor and the solvent plays a crucial role in the formation of target compound. This compound can be easily dissolved in alkaline solution and exfoliated into isolated sheets, which shows a novel way for the preparation of 2D materials.

  5. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC-MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  6. A Novel Peptide from Soybean Protein Isolate Significantly Enhances Resistance of the Organism under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heran; Liu, Rui; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhang, Zhixian; Cao, Yue; Ma, Yudan; Guo, Yi; Xu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that protein hydrolysates have broad biological effects. In the current study we describe a novel antioxidative peptide, FDPAL, from soybean protein isolate (SPI). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize an antioxidative peptide from SPI and determine its antioxidative mechanism. LC–MS/MS was used to isolate and identify the peptide from SPI. The sequence of the peptide was determined to be Phe-Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu (FDPAL, 561 Da). FDPAL can cause significant enhancement of resistance to oxidative stress both in cells as well as simple organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), FDPAL can up-regulate the expression of certain genes associated with resistance. The antioxidant activity of this peptide can be attributed to the presence of a specific amino acid sequence. Results from our work suggest that FDPAL can facilitate potential applications of proteins carrying this sequence in the nutraceutical, bioactive material and clinical medicine areas, as well as in cosmetics and health care products. PMID:27455060

  7. Intense, hyperthermal source of organic radicals for matrix-isolation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Friderichsen, Anders V.; Nandi, Sreela; Ellison, G. Barney; David, Donald E.; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Lindeman, Theodore G.; Dayton, David C.; Nimlos, Mark R.

    2003-06-01

    We have incorporated a pulsed, hyperthermal nozzle with a cryostat to study the matrix-isolated infrared spectroscopy of organic radicals. The radicals are produced by pyrolysis in a heated, narrow-bore (1-mm-diam) SiC tube and then expanded into the cryostat vacuum chamber. The combination of high nozzle temperature (up to 1800 K) and near-sonic flow velocities (on the order of 104cm s-1) through the length of the 2 cm tube allows for high yield of radicals (approximately 1013 radicals pulse-1) and low residence time (on the order of 10 μs) in the nozzle. We have used this hyperthermal nozzle/matrix isolation experiment to observe the IR spectra of complex radicals such as allyl radical (CH2CHCH2), phenyl radical (C6H5), and methylperoxyl radical (CH3OO). IR spectra of samples produced with a hyperthermal nozzle are remarkably clean and relatively free of interfering radical chemistry. By monitoring the unimolecular thermal decomposition of allyl ethyl ether in the nozzle using matrix IR spectroscopy, we have derived the residence time (τnozzle) of the gas pulse in the nozzle to be around 30 μs.

  8. Genetic survey of an isolated community in Bali, Indonesia. I. Blood groups, serum proteins and hepatitis B serology.

    PubMed

    Breguet, G; Ney, R; Grimm, W; Hope, S L; Kirk, R L; Blake, N M; Narendra, I B; Toha, A

    1982-01-01

    320 adults and children of an isolated community of Bali, Indonesia, have been tested for blood groups ABO, Rh, MNS, P, Lewis, Duffy, Kell, for haptoglobin and transferrin and for hepatitis B surface antigen and antibodies. Phenotype distribution and gene frequencies are given for the total population tested and for two subgroups representative of the inbred population of the isolate and of the non-inbred part of the population. Significant differences between the two subgroups show a clear genetic drift in the inbred population. The study brings biological support to the ethnological hypothesis of population migrations in this area. Tests for hepatitis B surface antigen reveal a lower prevalence of the disease than in most other south-east Asian populations. PMID:7068159

  9. Evaluation of four chromogenic media for the isolation of Group B Streptococcus from vaginal specimens in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Salem, Nahim; Anderson, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    Direct culture onto four commercial chromogenic media, selective for the isolation of Group B Streptococcus (GBS), were compared with the conventional pre-enrichment Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) method for the ability to isolate GBS from 242 pregnant women's self-collected vaginal/perineal swabs. The sensitivities and specificities for direct culture on to chromogenic agar were 92% and 100% for StrepBSelect (Bio-Rad Laboratories), 96% and 100% for Brilliance GBS (Thermo-Fisher Scientific), 94% and 100% for CHROMagar StrepB (CHROMagar, Dutec Diagnostics), 86% and 100% for ChromID Strepto B (bioMerieux). CDC recommended broth pre-enrichment then culture on blood containing selective agar had a sensitivity and specificity of 90.0% and 100% respectively. The chromogenic agar tested produced comparable results to the pre-enrichment CDC method. PMID:26308132

  10. Spread of consensus in self-organized groups of individuals: Hydrodynamics matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosis, A.; Lévêque, E.; Ubertini, S.; Succi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Nature routinely presents us with spectacular demonstrations of organization and orchestrated motion in living species. Efficient information transfer among the individuals is known to be instrumental to the emergence of spatial patterns (e.g. V-shaped formations for birds or diamond-like shapes for fishes), responding to a specific functional goal such as predatory avoidance or energy savings. Such functional patterns materialize whenever individuals appoint one of them as a leader with the task of guiding the group towards a prescribed target destination. It is here shown that, under specific conditions, the surrounding hydrodynamics plays a critical role in shaping up a successful group dynamics to reach the desired target.

  11. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  13. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1 You May Use the Mass Fraction Values in the...: Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic percent HAP, by mass Aliphatic 2 0.03...

  15. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  17. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1 You May Use the Mass Fraction Values in the...: Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic percent HAP, by mass Aliphatic 2 0.03...

  18. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for...—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in... formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data. Solvent type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  1. Identification of Strategies to Facilitate Organ Donation among African Americans using the Nominal Group Technique

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Haiyan; Shewchuk, Richard; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Gaston, Robert; Segev, Dorry L.; Mannon, Elinor C.; Martin, Michelle Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives African Americans are disproportionately affected by ESRD, but few receive a living donor kidney transplant. Surveys assessing attitudes toward donation have shown that African Americans are less likely to express a willingness to donate their own organs. Studies aimed at understanding factors that may facilitate the willingness of African Americans to become organ donors are needed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A novel formative research method was used (the nominal group technique) to identify and prioritize strategies for facilitating increases in organ donation among church-attending African Americans. Four nominal group technique panel interviews were convened (three community and one clergy). Each community panel represented a distinct local church; the clergy panel represented five distinct faith-based denominations. Before nominal group technique interviews, participants completed a questionnaire that assessed willingness to become a donor; 28 African-American adults (≥19 years old) participated in the study. Results In total, 66.7% of participants identified knowledge- or education-related strategies as most important strategies in facilitating willingness to become an organ donor, a view that was even more pronounced among clergy. Three of four nominal group technique panels rated a knowledge-based strategy as the most important and included strategies, such as information on donor involvement and donation-related risks; 29.6% of participants indicated that they disagreed with deceased donation, and 37% of participants disagreed with living donation. Community participants’ reservations about becoming an organ donor were similar for living (38.1%) and deceased (33.4%) donation; in contrast, clergy participants were more likely to express reservations about living donation (33.3% versus 16.7%). Conclusions These data indicate a greater opposition to living donation compared with donation after one’s death

  2. Genetic heterogeneity in wild isolates of cellular slime mold social groups.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Santosh; Kaushik, Sonia; Lalremruata, Albert; Aggarwal, Ramesh K; Cavender, James C; Nanjundiah, Vidyanand

    2010-07-01

    This study addresses the issues of spatial distribution, dispersal, and genetic heterogeneity in social groups of the cellular slime molds (CSMs). The CSMs are soil amoebae with an unusual life cycle that consists of alternating solitary and social phases. Because the social phase involves division of labor with what appears to be an extreme form of "altruism", the CSMs raise interesting evolutionary questions regarding the origin and maintenance of sociality. Knowledge of the genetic structure of social groups in the wild is necessary for answering these questions. We confirm that CSMs are widespread in undisturbed forest soil from South India. They are dispersed over long distances via the dung of a variety of large mammals. Consistent with this mode of dispersal, most social groups in the two species examined for detailed study, Dictyostelium giganteum and Dictyostelium purpureum, are multi-clonal. PMID:20179919

  3. Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Cary; LeMay, Nancy; Rodway, Greg; Tracy, Allison; Galer, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA), was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location). The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality. PMID:16223447

  4. Derivations and Comparisons of Three Groups ofSelf-Organization Theories for Magnetohydrodynamic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Sato, Tetsuya

    1994-04-01

    A theoretical investigation on self-organization theories ofdissipative MHD plasmas is presented to derive three groups oftheories that lead to the same relaxed state of ∇ × B=λ B, in order to find more essential physicalpicture embedded in self-organization phenomena due to nonlinear anddissipative processes. Comparisons among all of the theories treatedand derived here suggest that a theory standing upon spectrumspreadings and selective dissipations of eigenmodes for thedissipative operator -∇ ×η j and leading toself-organized relaxed states of ∇ ×ηj=α B/2 with the minimum dissipation rate is the most agreeable to various results obtained by experiments and by 3-D MHD simulations reported so far.

  5. In vitro activity of dalbavancin and five comparator agents against common and uncommon Gram-positive organisms isolated from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Wang, Weiqun; Nesher, Lior; Shelburne, Samuel A; Prince, Randall A

    2016-05-01

    Dalbavancin is a long acting, bactericidal lipoglycopeptide. Its in vitro activity was compared with that of vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) and levofloxacin against 241 Gram-positive organisms isolated from cancer patients. The rank order of potency for the glycopeptides based on MIC90 (μg ml(-1)), that is, the concentration of antimicrobial agent required to inhibit 90% of isolates tested was dalbavancin (0.12 μg ml(-1))>daptomycin (1.0 μg ml(-1))>vancomycin (2.0 μg ml(-1)) for coagulase-negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus isolates (including methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains). Dalbavancin had potent activity against staphylococcal isolates with vancomycin MICs⩾1.0 μg ml(-1). TMP/SMX also had potent activity against staphylococci including methicillin-resistant strains, whereas levofloxacin had moderate to poor anti-staphylococcal activity. Dalbavancin also exhibited more potent activity than vancomycin and daptomycin against Bacillus spp., Corynebacterium spp., Micrococcus spp. and various streptococci (including Streptococcus pneumoniae, viridans group streptococci (VGS), beta-hemolytic streptococci and gamma-hemolytic streptococci). MBC determinations showed that dalbavancin had potent bactericidal activity against MRSA with no tolerance being detected. These data suggest that dalbavancin may be considered as an alternative to vancomycin, especially in institutions wherein a substantial proportion of infections are caused by organisms with vancomycin MICs⩾1.0 μg ml(-1). PMID:26626876

  6. Acyclovir susceptibilities of herpes simplex virus strains isolated from solid organ transplant recipients after acyclovir or ganciclovir prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, G; Erice, A; Crane, D D; Dunn, D L; Balfour, H H

    1993-01-01

    We determined the acyclovir (ACV) susceptibilities of herpes simplex virus (HSV) isolates (n = 18) recovered from solid organ transplant patients after antiviral prophylaxis with ACV or ganciclovir. All isolates tested were susceptible to ACV (50% inhibitory concentration, < 1 microM). A clinical review of patients with HSV disease showed that all improved with specific anti-HSV therapy, and no recurrences were reported. PMID:8383946

  7. Structural characterization of neutral oligosaccharides with blood-group A and H activity isolated from bovine submaxillary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A V; D'Arcy, S M; Donoghue, C M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated the structures of 11 neutral oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin by alkaline borohydride treatment and isolated by h.p.l.c. One hexa-, one penta-, three tetra-, four tri- and two di-saccharides containing core types 1, 2, 3 or 4 were obtained. We report their structures, determined by a combination of one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy at 270 MHz and methylation analysis involving g.l.c.-m.s., along with their approximate molar ratios. Only three of these oligosaccharides have previously been reported in this source. Of the new oligosaccharides, one contains the blood-group-A antigenic determinant, two contain the blood-group-H type 2 determinant, while another contains the blood-group-H type 3 determinant. The oligosaccharide GlcNAc beta (1----6)[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAcol, although previously found as a core structure, has been isolated here as a novel trisaccharide. PMID:1718265

  8. Resistance to penicillin of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with high somatic cell counts in organic and conventional dairy herds in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Bennedsgaard, Torben W; Thamsborg, Stig M; Aarestrup, Frank M; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Vaarst, Mette; Christoffersen, Anna B

    2006-01-01

    Background Quarter milk samples from cows with high risk of intramammary infection were examined to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and penicillin resistant SA (SAr) in conventional and organic dairy herds and herds converting to organic farming in a combined longitudinal and cross-sectional study. Methods 20 conventional herds, 18 organic herds that converted before 1995, and 19 herds converting to organic farming in 1999 or 2000 were included in the study. Herds converting to organic farming were sampled three times one year apart; the other herds were sampled once. Risk of infection was estimated based on somatic cell count, milk production, breed, age and lactation stage. Results The high-risk cows represented about 49 % of the cows in the herds. The overall prevalence of SA and SAr among these cows was 29% (95% confidence interval: 24%–34%) and 4% (95% confidence interval: 2%–5%) respectively. The prevalence of penicillin resistance among SA infected cows was 12% (95% confidence interval: 6%–19%) when calculated from the first herd visits. No statistically significant differences were observed in the prevalence of SAr or the proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin between herd groups. Conclusion The proportion of isolates resistant to penicillin was low compared to studies in other countries except Norway and Sweden. Based on the low prevalence of penicillin resistance of SA, penicillin should still be the first choice of antimicrobial agent for treatment of bovine intramammary infection in Denmark. PMID:17125515

  9. Technical Note: Development of chemoinformatic tools to enumerate functional groups in molecules for organic aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Giulia; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Functional groups (FGs) can be used as a reduced representation of organic aerosol composition in both ambient and controlled chamber studies, as they retain a certain chemical specificity. Furthermore, FG composition has been informative for source apportionment, and various models based on a group contribution framework have been developed to calculate physicochemical properties of organic compounds. In this work, we provide a set of validated chemoinformatic patterns that correspond to (1) a complete set of functional groups that can entirely describe the molecules comprised in the α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene MCMv3.2 oxidation schemes, (2) FGs that are measurable by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (3) groups incorporated in the SIMPOL.1 vapor pressure estimation model, and (4) bonds necessary for the calculation of carbon oxidation state. We also provide example applications for this set of patterns. We compare available aerosol composition reported by chemical speciation measurements and FTIR for different emission sources, and calculate the FG contribution to the O : C ratio of simulated gas-phase composition generated from α-pinene photooxidation (using the MCMv3.2 oxidation scheme).

  10. Technical Note: Development of chemoinformatic tools to enumerate functional groups in molecules for organic aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Takahama, S.

    2015-11-01

    Functional groups (FGs) can be used as a reduced representation of organic aerosol composition in both ambient and environmental controlled chamber studies, as they retain a certain chemical specificity. Furthermore, FG composition has been informative for source apportionment, and various models based on a group contribution framework have been developed to calculate physicochemical properties of organic compounds. In this work, we provide a set of validated chemoinformatic patterns that correspond to: (1) groups incorporated in the SIMPOL.1 vapor pressure estimation model, (2) FGs that are measurable by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), (3) a complete set of functional groups that can entirely describe the molecules comprised in the α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene MCMv3.2 oxidation schemes, and (4) bonds necessary for the calculation of carbon oxidation state. We also provide example applications for this set of patterns. We compare available aerosol composition reported by chemical speciation measurements and FTIR for different emission sources, and calculate the FG contribution to the O : C ratio of simulated gas phase composition generated from α-pinene photooxidation (using MCMv3.2 oxidation scheme).

  11. Self-organized flexible leadership promotes collective intelligence in human groups

    PubMed Central

    Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Wolf, Max; Naguib, Marc; Krause, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision-makers. At present, relatively little is known about the mechanisms promoting collective intelligence in natural systems. We here test a novel mechanism generating collective intelligence: self-organization according to information quality. We tested this mechanism by performing simulated predator detection experiments using human groups. By continuously tracking the personal information of all members prior to collective decisions, we found that individuals adjusted their response time during collective decisions to the accuracy of their personal information. When individuals possessed accurate personal information, they decided quickly during collective decisions providing accurate information to the other group members. By contrast, when individuals had inaccurate personal information, they waited longer, allowing them to use social information before making a decision. Individuals deciding late during collective decisions had an increased probability of changing their decision leading to increased collective accuracy. Our results thus show that groups can self-organize according to the information accuracy of their members, thereby promoting collective intelligence. Interestingly, we find that individuals flexibly acted both as leader and as follower depending on the quality of their personal information at any particular point in time. PMID:27019718

  12. Self-organized flexible leadership promotes collective intelligence in human groups.

    PubMed

    Kurvers, Ralf H J M; Wolf, Max; Naguib, Marc; Krause, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision-makers. At present, relatively little is known about the mechanisms promoting collective intelligence in natural systems. We here test a novel mechanism generating collective intelligence: self-organization according to information quality. We tested this mechanism by performing simulated predator detection experiments using human groups. By continuously tracking the personal information of all members prior to collective decisions, we found that individuals adjusted their response time during collective decisions to the accuracy of their personal information. When individuals possessed accurate personal information, they decided quickly during collective decisions providing accurate information to the other group members. By contrast, when individuals had inaccurate personal information, they waited longer, allowing them to use social information before making a decision. Individuals deciding late during collective decisions had an increased probability of changing their decision leading to increased collective accuracy. Our results thus show that groups can self-organize according to the information accuracy of their members, thereby promoting collective intelligence. Interestingly, we find that individuals flexibly acted both as leader and as follower depending on the quality of their personal information at any particular point in time. PMID:27019718

  13. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from High-Somatic-Cell-Count Cows and the Environment of an Organic Dairy Farm in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E. M.; Green, L. E.; Medley, G. F.; Bird, H. E.; Dowson, C. G.

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections on an organic dairy farm was monitored for 10 months. Environmental and milk samples were collected from a total of 26 cows and a group of 21 purchased heifers about to be introduced into the milking herd. There was variation in the rate of isolation of S. aureus (9.5 to 43.8%) from individual mammary quarters, although no S. aureus isolates were detected in the milk samples collected from the heifers. One hundred ninety-one S. aureus isolates were detected from cow milk samples (n = 182), milking machine clusters (n = 4), farm personnel (n = 4), and the environment (n = 1). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) had a typeability of 100% when it was applied to the 191 isolates. Among the 191 isolates there was limited strain diversity, with seven sequence types (STs) dominated by two strains with closely related STs that differed at a single locus. Within individual mammary quarters there were naturally occurring dual infections, although this was identified in only 0.4% of milk samples. Different strains were associated with variable persistence within quarters. MLST is clearly a very suitable tool for the differentiation and analysis of S. aureus populations detected on dairy cattle farms. PMID:16145134

  14. Symmetry breaking in the opinion dynamics of a multi-group project organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen-Tao; Zhou, Jing; Li, Ping; Chen, Xing-Guang

    2012-10-01

    A bounded confidence model of opinion dynamics in multi-group projects is presented in which each group's opinion evolution is driven by two types of forces: (i) the group's cohesive force which tends to restore the opinion back towards the initial status because of its company culture; and (ii) nonlinear coupling forces with other groups which attempt to bring opinions closer due to collaboration willingness. Bifurcation analysis for the case of a two-group project shows a cusp catastrophe phenomenon and three distinctive evolutionary regimes, i.e., a deadlock regime, a convergence regime, and a bifurcation regime in opinion dynamics. The critical value of initial discord between the two groups is derived to discriminate which regime the opinion evolution belongs to. In the case of a three-group project with a symmetric social network, both bifurcation analysis and simulation results demonstrate that if each pair has a high initial discord, instead of symmetrically converging to consensus with the increase of coupling scale as expected by Gabbay's result (Physica A 378 (2007) p. 125 Fig. 5), project organization (PO) may be split into two distinct clusters because of the symmetry breaking phenomenon caused by pitchfork bifurcations, which urges that apart from divergence in participants' interests, nonlinear interaction can also make conflict inevitable in the PO. The effects of two asymmetric level parameters are tested in order to explore the ways of inducing dominant opinion in the whole PO. It is found that the strong influence imposed by a leader group with firm faith on the flexible and open minded follower groups can promote the formation of a positive dominant opinion in the PO.

  15. Isolation of Renewable Phenolics by Adsorption on Ultrastable Hydrophobic MIL-140 Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Van de Voorde, Ben; Damasceno Borges, Daiane; Vermoortele, Frederik; Wouters, Robin; Bozbiyik, Belgin; Denayer, Joeri; Taulelle, Francis; Martineau, Charlotte; Serre, Christian; Maurin, Guillaume; De Vos, Dirk

    2015-09-21

    The isolation and separation of phenolic compounds from aqueous backgrounds is challenging and will gain in importance as we become more dependent on phenolics from lignocellulose-derived bio-oil to meet our needs for aromatic compounds. Herein, we show that highly stable and hydrophobic Zr metal-organic frameworks of the MIL-140 type are effective adsorbent materials for the separation of different phenolics and far outperform other classes of porous solids (silica, zeolites, carbons). The mechanism of the hydroquinone-catechol separation on MIL-140C was studied in detail by combining experimental results with computational techniques. Although the differences in adsorption enthalpy between catechol and hydroquinone are negligible, the selective uptake of catechol in MIL-140C is explained by its dense π-π stacking in the pores. The interplay of enthalpic and entropic effects allowed separation of a complex, five-compound phenol mixture through breakthrough over a MIL-140C column. Unlike many other metal-organic frameworks, MIL-140C is remarkably stable and maintained structure, porosity and performance after five adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:26373364

  16. Purification and Characterization of Haloalkaline, Organic Solvent Stable Xylanase from Newly Isolated Halophilic Bacterium-OKH

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Gaurav; Jivrajani, Mehul; Patel, Nirav; Jivrajani, Heta; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Patel, Shivani

    2014-01-01

    A novel, alkali-tolerant halophilic bacterium-OKH with an ability to produce extracellular halophilic, alkali-tolerant, organic solvent stable, and moderately thermostable xylanase was isolated from salt salterns of Mithapur region, Gujarat, India. Identification of the bacterium was done based upon biochemical tests and 16S rRNA sequence. Maximum xylanase production was achieved at pH 9.0 and 37°C temperature in the medium containing 15% NaCl and 1% (w/v) corn cobs. Sugarcane bagasse and wheat straw also induce xylanase production when used as carbon source. The enzyme was active over a range of 0–25% sodium chloride examined in culture broth. The optimum xylanase activity was observed at 5% sodium chloride. Xylanase was purified with 25.81%-fold purification and 17.1% yield. Kinetic properties such as Km and Vmax were 4.2 mg/mL and 0.31 μmol/min/mL, respectively. The enzyme was stable at pH 6.0 and 50°C with 60% activity after 8 hours of incubation. Enzyme activity was enhanced by Ca2+, Mn2+, and Mg2+ but strongly inhibited by heavy metals such as Hg2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Xylanase was found to be stable in organic solvents like glutaraldehyde and isopropanol. The purified enzyme hydrolysed lignocellulosic substrates. Xylanase, purified from the halophilic bacterium-OKH, has potential biotechnological applications. PMID:27350996

  17. The formation of halogen-specific TOX from chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter isolates.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Gallard, Hervé; Joll, Cynthia; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2009-09-01

    The formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) is a public health concern. An important way to evaluate the presence of DBPs is in terms of the total organic halogen (TOX), which can be further specified into total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr), and iodine (TOI). The formation and distribution of halogen-specific TOX during chlorination and chloramination of natural organic matter (NOM) isolates in the presence of bromide and iodide ions were studied. As expected, chloramination produced significantly less TOX than chlorination. TOCl was the dominant species formed in both chlorination and chloramination. TOI was always produced in chloramination, but not in chlorination when high chlorine dose was used, due to the limited presence of HOI in chlorination as a result of the oxidation of iodide to iodate in the presence of excess chlorine. The formation of TOI during chloramination increased as the initial iodide ion concentration increased, with a maximum of approximately 60% of the initial iodide ion becoming incorporated into NOM. Iodine incorporation in NOM was consistently higher than bromine incorporation, demonstrating that the competitive reactions between bromine and iodine species in chloramination favoured the formation of HOI and thus TOI, rather than TOBr. Correlations between the aromatic character of the NOM isolates (SUVA(254) and % aromatic C) and the concentrations of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination were observed. This indicates that the aromatic moieties in NOM, as indicated by SUVA(254) and % aromatic C, play an important role in the formation of overall TOX and halogen-specific TOX in chloramination. THMs comprised only a fraction of TOX, up to 7% in chloramination and up to 47% in chlorination. Although chloramine produces less TOX than chlorine, it formed proportionally more non-THM DBPs than chlorine. These non-THM DBPs are mostly unknown, corresponding to unknown health risks. Considering the higher

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines can be divided in two distinct groups, including one displaying phenotypes similar to isolates from cystic fibrosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Myriam M.; Leduc, Annie; Nadeau, Christine; Barbeau, Jean; Charette, Steve J.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays broad genetic diversity, giving it an astonishing capacity to adapt to a variety of environments and to infect a wide range of hosts. While many P. aeruginosa isolates of various origins have been analyzed, isolates from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have received the most attention. Less is known about the genetic and phenotypic diversity of P. aeruginosa isolates that colonize other environments where flourishing biofilms can be found. In the present study, 29 P. aeruginosa isolates from dental unit waterlines and CF patients were collected and their genetic and phenotypes profiles were compared to determine whether environmental and clinical isolates are related. The isolates were first classified using the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. This made it possible to distribute the isolates into one clinical cluster and two environmental clusters. The isolates in the environmental cluster that were genetically closer to the clinical cluster also displayed phenotypes similar to the clinical isolates. The isolates from the second environmental cluster displayed opposite phenotypes, particularly an increased capacity to form biofilms. The isolates in this cluster were also the only ones harboring genes that encoded specific epimerases involved in the synthesis of lipopolysaccharides, which could explain their increased ability to form biofilms. In conclusion, the isolates from the dental unit waterlines could be distributed into two clusters, with some of the environmental isolates resembled the clinical isolates. PMID:25653647

  19. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's report on the Organic Geochemistry of Deep Groundwaters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Fenster, D.F.; Brookins, D.G.; Harrison, W.; Seitz, M.G.; Lerman, A.; Stamoudis, V.C.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes Argonne's review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's (ONWI's) final report entitled The Organic Geochemistry of Deep Ground Waters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas, dated September 1983. Recommendations are made for improving the ONWI report. The main recommendation is to make the text consistent with the title and with the objective of the project as stated in the introduction. Three alternatives are suggested to accomplish this.

  20. Diversity of DIS, SD and psi hairpins in HIV-1 isolates of group M: in silico study.

    PubMed

    Zarudnaya, M I; Potyahaylo, A L; Kolomiets, I N; Hovorun, D M

    2007-01-01

    The primary sequence and secondary structure of the region encompassing DIS, SD and psi hairpins in HIV-1 genomic RNAs have been analyzed for 731 group M isolates from NCBI database. The secondary structures have been predicted by the m fold program (M. Zuker). Though the primary sequence of the region studied was found to be highly heterogeneous, this region is folded into DIS, SD and psi hairpins (DIS-, SD- and psi-like hairpins) in 96% of the isolates studied. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the most frequent variants of DIS hairpin (DIS(Lai), DIS(Mal) and DIS(C)) tolerate certain base changes. Particularly, base changes at stem position 23 occur 5 and 33 times more frequently in DIS(Lai) than in DIS(Mal) and DIS(C), respectively, while A insertion at the 5'end of apical loop is tolerated in DIS(Mal) and DIS(C) but not in DIS(Lai). We have revealed that the bottom base pair substitution G-C --> A-U in SD hairpin is highly specific for subtype D isolates. All variants of DIS, SD and psi hairpins found in our database are discussed, systematized and presented in schemes of hypothetical transitions between variants via a single base change. Most variants of DIS and psi hairpins were found to adopt several conformations. PMID:18030736

  1. Isolation and characterization of a novel thermophilic-organic solvent stable lipase from Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Uttatree, Sasithorn; Winayanuwattikun, Pakorn; Charoenpanich, Jittima

    2010-11-01

    The benzene tolerant Acinetobacter baylyi isolated from marine sludge in Angsila, Thailand could constitutively secrete lipolytic enzymes. The enzyme was successfully purified 21.89-fold to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel-permeable column chromatography with a relative molecular mass as 30 kDa. The enzyme expressed maximum activity at 60 degrees C and pH 8.0 with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as a substrate and found to be stable in pH and temperature ranging from 6.0-9.0 to 60-80 degrees C, respectively. A study on solvent stability revealed that the enzyme was highly resisted to many organic solvents especially benzene and isoamyl alcohol, but 40% inhibited by decane, hexane, acetonitrile, and short-chain alcohols. Lipase activity was completely inhibited in the presence of Fe(2+), Mn(2+), EDTA, SDS, and Triton X-100 while it was suffered detrimentally by Tween 80. The activity was enhanced by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), Na(+), and Mg(2+) and no significant effect was found in the presence of Ca(2+) and Li(+). Half of an activity was retained by Ba(2+), Ag(+), Hg(+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), and DTT. The enzyme could hydrolyze a wide range of p-nitrophenyl esters, but preferentially medium length acyl chains (C(8)-C(12)). Among natural oils and fats, the enzyme 11-folds favorably catalyzed the hydrolysis of rice bran oil, corn oil, sesame oil, and coconut oil in comparison to palm oil. Moreover, the transesterification activity of palm oil to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) revealed 31.64 +/- 1.58% after 48 h. The characteristics of novel A. baylyi lipase, as high temperature stability, organic solvent tolerance, and transesterification capacity from palm oil to FAMEs, indicate that it could be a vigorous biocatalyzer in the prospective fields as bioenergy industry or even in organic synthesis and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20177822

  2. [Study on virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings in Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients with cystitis].

    PubMed

    Tiba, Monique Ribeiro; Nogueira, Gustavo Prado; Leite, Domingos da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli samples isolated from female patients with cystitis were characterized with regard to the presence of virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and phylogenetic groupings. Polymerase chain reaction results demonstrated that all the samples were positive for the gene fimH (type 1 fimbriae), 91 for fliC (flagellins), 50 for papC (P fimbriae), 44 for kpsMTII (capsules) and 36 for flu (antigen 43). The results from assays to quantify the biofilm formation demonstrated that 44 samples produced biofilm on polystyrene microplates and 56 samples produced weak or no biofilm. We also confirmed that Escherichia coli samples were present in phylogenetic groups B2 and D. PMID:19287937

  3. Risk groups in children under six months of age using self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Schilithz, A O C; Kale, P L; Gama, S G N; Nobre, F F

    2014-06-01

    Fetal and infant growth tends to follow irregular patterns and, particularly in developing countries, these patterns are greatly influenced by unfavorable living conditions and interactions with complications during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to identify groups of children with different risk profiles for growth development. The study sample comprised 496 girls and 508 boys under six months of age from 27 pediatric primary health care units in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were obtained through interviews with the mothers and by reviewing each child's health card. An unsupervised learning, know as a self-organizing map (SOM) and a K-means algorithm were used for cluster analysis to identify groups of children. Four groups of infants were identified. The first (139) consisted of infants born exclusively by cesarean delivery, and their mothers were exclusively multiparous; the highest prevalences of prematurity and low birthweight, a high prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding and a low proportion of hospitalization were observed for this group. The second (247 infants) and the third (298 infants) groups had the best and worst perinatal and infant health indicators, respectively. The infants of the fourth group (318) were born heavier, had a low prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding, and had a higher rate of hospitalization. Using a SOM, it was possible to identify children with common features, although no differences between groups were found with respect to the adequacy of postnatal weight. Pregnant women and children with characteristics similar to those of group 3 require early intervention and more attention in public policy. PMID:24725333

  4. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius group bacteria and emergence of MRSP in the UK.

    PubMed

    Beever, L; Bond, R; Graham, P A; Jackson, B; Lloyd, D H; Loeffler, A

    2015-02-14

    Frequencies of antimicrobial resistance were determined amongst 14,555 clinical Staphylococcus intermedius group (SIG) isolates from UK dogs and cats to estimate resistance trends and quantify the occurrence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP). Reports from two diagnostic laboratories (13,313 general submissions, 1242 referral centre only submissions) were analysed retrospectively (2003/2006-2012). MRSP were defined by phenotypic resistance to meticillin and concurrent broad β-lactam resistance; a subset was confirmed genetically (SIG-specific nuc and mecA). Trends were analysed by Cochran-Armitage test. Resistance remained below 10 per cent for cefalexin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and the fluoroquinolones. Increasing resistance trends were seen in both laboratories for ampicillin/amoxicillin (both P<0.001), cefovecin (both P<0.046) and enrofloxacin (both P<0.02). Resistance to cefalexin increased over time in referral hospital isolates (P<0.001) to clindamycin (P=0.01) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (P=0.001) amongst general laboratory submissions. Overall, 106 MRSP were isolated (0.7 per cent of submissions) including 32 (2.6 per cent of submissions, all genetically confirmed) from the referral centre population (inter-laboratory difference P<0.001). Against a background of widely susceptible SIG isolates, a new trend of increasing resistance to important antimicrobials was identified overtime and the emergence of MRSP from UK clinical cases was confirmed. Attention to responsible use of antibacterial therapy in small animal practice is urgently needed. PMID:25376505

  5. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in fecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy urban children of two age groups in relation to their antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Literak, Ivan; Petro, Radim; Dolejska, Monika; Gruberova, Erika; Dobiasova, Hana; Petr, Jan; Cizek, Alois

    2011-06-01

    The study was performed in the Czech Republic during 2007 to 2009. Of Escherichia coli isolates from 275 children aged 6 weeks, 36% (n = 177) were resistant to 1 to 7 antibiotics. Of isolates from 253 children aged 6 to 17 years, 24% (n = 205) were resistant to 1 to 5 antibiotics. There was no significant difference in the prevalences of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates between these groups of children, even though the consumptions of antibiotics were quite different. PMID:21464246

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance in Fecal Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Urban Children of Two Age Groups in Relation to Their Antibiotic Therapy▿

    PubMed Central

    Literak, Ivan; Petro, Radim; Dolejska, Monika; Gruberova, Erika; Dobiasova, Hana; Petr, Jan; Cizek, Alois

    2011-01-01

    The study was performed in the Czech Republic during 2007 to 2009. Of Escherichia coli isolates from 275 children aged 6 weeks, 36% (n = 177) were resistant to 1 to 7 antibiotics. Of isolates from 253 children aged 6 to 17 years, 24% (n = 205) were resistant to 1 to 5 antibiotics. There was no significant difference in the prevalences of antibiotic-resistant E. coli isolates between these groups of children, even though the consumptions of antibiotics were quite different. PMID:21464246

  8. Social organization and space use of a wild mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) group.

    PubMed

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Kappeler, Peter M; Willaume, Eric; Benoit, Laure; Mboumba, Sylvère; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2015-10-01

    Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are enigmatic Old World primates whose social organization and ecology remain poorly known. Previous studies indicated, for example, that groups are composed of only adult females and their young or that several units composed of one adult male and several females make up larger permanent social units. Here, we present the first data on group composition and male ranging patterns from the only habituated wild mandrill group and examine how home range size and daily path length varied with environmental and demographic factors over a 15-month period. Our study site is located in southern Gabon where we followed the group on a daily basis, collecting data on presence, ranging, behavior, and parasite load of its individual members. Throughout the study, the group was made up of about 120 individuals, including several non-natal and natal adult and sub-adult males. One-male units were never observed. The mandrills traveled an estimated 0.44-6.50 km/day in a home range area of 866.7 ha. Exploratory analyses revealed that precipitation, the number of adult males present, and the richness of protozoan parasites were all positively correlated with daily path length. These results clarify the social system of mandrills and provide first insights into the factors that shape their ranging patterns. PMID:26235675

  9. Systems Approach to Studying Animal Sociality: Individual Position versus Group Organization in Dynamic Social Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Karlo; Ng, Kah Loon; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2010-01-01

    Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against) social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively) fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness. PMID:21203425

  10. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  11. Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Beach, J.V.; Baugher, B.M.; Assink, R.A.; Shea, K.J.; Tran, J.; Small, J.H.

    1999-04-21

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using post-processing modification of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or by chemical means after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, volubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylenecarbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)carbonate (1) and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl)-carbonate (2). Thermal treatment of the resulting non-porous xerogels and aerogels at 300-350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylenecarbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that can not be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

  12. Phylogenentic and enzymatic characterization of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant marine bacteria belong to γ-Proteobacteria group isolated from the sub-Antarctic Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal, Héctor A; Benito, Juliana; Lovrich, Gustavo A; Abate, Carlos M

    2015-05-01

    The phylogenetic and physiological characteristics of cultivable-dependent approaches were determined to establish the diversity of marine bacteria associated with the intestines of benthonic organisms and seawater samples from the Argentina's Beagle Channel. A total of 737 isolates were classified as psychrophlic and psychrotolerant culturable marine bacteria. These cold-adapted microorganisms are capable of producing cold-active glycosyl hydrolases, such as β-glucosidases, celulases, β-galactosidases, xylanases, chitinases, and proteases. These enzymes could have potential biotechnological applications for use in low-temperature manufacturing processes. According to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S ribosomal DNA (ARDRA) and DNA gyrase subunit B (gyrB-RFLP), 11 operational taxonomic units (OTU) were identified and clustered in known genera using InfoStat software. The 50 isolates selected were sequenced based on near full sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and gyrB sequences and identified by their nearest neighbors ranging between 96 and 99 % of identities. Phylogenetic analyses using both genes allowed relationships between members of the cultured marine bacteria belonging to the γ-Proteobacteria group (Aeromonas, Halteromonas, Pseudomonas, Pseudoalteromonas, Shewanella, Serratia, Colwellia, Glacielocola, and Psychrobacter) to be evaluated. Our research reveals a high diversity of hydrolytic bacteria, and their products actuality has an industrial use in several bioprocesses at low-temperature manufacturing. PMID:25344742

  13. [Hazardous health effect of isolation. A clinical study of 2 groups of persons in custody].

    PubMed

    Gamman, T

    1995-08-10

    The possible effects of solitary confinement on prisoners' health were studied using a prospective design. 27 secluded prisoners were compared with 27 others who were held in custody. The latter group of prisoners was able to see other prisoners, visitors, friends and family members, and could participate in prison activities. The results showed that secluded prisoners had more health problems than prisoners serving less restrictive prison sentences did. The most usual complaints were headache, pain in the neck, stomach and shoulders, anxiety and depression. Psychotic symptoms were rare. The complaints tended to last for the whole period of solitary confinement and were difficult to treat while the prisoners remained secluded. Patients with chronic somatic diseases tended to deteriorate in solitary confinement. Most patients recovered when the seclusion was terminated. PMID:7652720

  14. Expression of group XIIA phospholipase A2 in human digestive organs.

    PubMed

    Peuravuori, Heikki; Kollanus, Sinikka; Nevalainen, Timo J

    2014-12-01

    Cellular distribution of group XIIA phospholipase A2 (GXIIA PLA2) was studied in human digestive organs by immunohistochemistry. GXIIA PLA2 protein was detected in epithelial cells of normal gastrointestinal tract, gallbladder and pancreatic acinar cells. The GXIIA PLA2 protein was evenly distributed in the cytoplasm in contrast to secretory granular distribution of GIB PLA2 and GIIA PLA2 in pancreatic acinar cells and small intestinal Paneth cells respectively. Epithelial cells of intestinal glands in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis expressed abundant GXIIA PLA2 , whereas inflammatory cells were devoid of the enzyme protein. Tumour cells in colonic adenomas and carcinomas and pancreatic ductogenic carcinomas expressed GXIIA PLA2 protein at varying intensity levels. The putative functions of GXIIA PLA2 remain to be investigated and its role in healthy and diseased digestive organs can only be speculated on at present. PMID:24862647

  15. Soft skills: an important asset acquired from organizing regional student group activities.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Meysman, Pieter; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Abeel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Contributing to a student organization, such as the International Society for Computational Biology Student Council (ISCB-SC) and its Regional Student Group (RSG) program, takes time and energy. Both are scarce commodities, especially when you are trying to find your place in the world of computational biology as a graduate student. It comes as no surprise that organizing ISCB-SC-related activities sometimes interferes with day-to-day research and shakes up your priority list. However, we unanimously agree that the rewards, both in the short as well as the long term, make the time spent on these extracurricular activities more than worth it. In this article, we will explain what makes this so worthwhile: soft skills. PMID:24992198

  16. From Grouping to Coupling: A New Perceptual Organization in Vision, Psychology, and Biology.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Porcheddu, Daniele; Deiana, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In this work, perceptual organization has been studied with the same spirit and phenomenological methods used by Gestalt psychologists. This was accomplished through new conditions that cannot be explained in terms of the classical principles of grouping. Perceptual grouping represents the way through which our visual system builds integrated elements on the basis of the maximal homogeneity among the components of the stimulus pattern. Our results demonstrated the inconsistency of organization by grouping, and more importantly, the inconsistency of the principle of similarity. On the contrary, they suggested the unique role played by the principle of dissimilarity among elements that behaves like an accent or a visual emphasis within a whole. The principle of accentuation was here considered as imparting a directional structure to the elements and to the whole object thus creating new phenomena. The salience of the resulting phenomena reveals the supremacy of dissimilarity in relation to similarity and the fact that it belongs to a further organization dynamics that we called "coupling." In biology, coupling and its principle of accentuation are very strongly related to disruptive camouflage. Moreover, they are source of sexual attraction. They advertise the presence and elicit species identification/communication. In human beings accentuation is needed to show ourselves to others, to understand the way we dress, choose, and create clothes or invent fashion, the way we change our body accentuating several parts and hiding some others, the way we use maquillage. The existence of maquillage itself is derived from the need to accentuate something with the purpose to increase sexual attraction, to exhibit physical strength and beauty, to show or hide social status (e.g., being the king, a warrior, a priest, etc.). Last but not least, accentuation plays a basic role also in making it easier or difficult to read and understand written words. PMID:27471483

  17. From Grouping to Coupling: A New Perceptual Organization in Vision, Psychology, and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Baingio; Porcheddu, Daniele; Deiana, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In this work, perceptual organization has been studied with the same spirit and phenomenological methods used by Gestalt psychologists. This was accomplished through new conditions that cannot be explained in terms of the classical principles of grouping. Perceptual grouping represents the way through which our visual system builds integrated elements on the basis of the maximal homogeneity among the components of the stimulus pattern. Our results demonstrated the inconsistency of organization by grouping, and more importantly, the inconsistency of the principle of similarity. On the contrary, they suggested the unique role played by the principle of dissimilarity among elements that behaves like an accent or a visual emphasis within a whole. The principle of accentuation was here considered as imparting a directional structure to the elements and to the whole object thus creating new phenomena. The salience of the resulting phenomena reveals the supremacy of dissimilarity in relation to similarity and the fact that it belongs to a further organization dynamics that we called “coupling.” In biology, coupling and its principle of accentuation are very strongly related to disruptive camouflage. Moreover, they are source of sexual attraction. They advertise the presence and elicit species identification/communication. In human beings accentuation is needed to show ourselves to others, to understand the way we dress, choose, and create clothes or invent fashion, the way we change our body accentuating several parts and hiding some others, the way we use maquillage. The existence of maquillage itself is derived from the need to accentuate something with the purpose to increase sexual attraction, to exhibit physical strength and beauty, to show or hide social status (e.g., being the king, a warrior, a priest, etc.). Last but not least, accentuation plays a basic role also in making it easier or difficult to read and understand written words. PMID:27471483

  18. Mesopontine organization of cholinergic and catecholaminergic cell groups in the normal and narcoleptic dog.

    PubMed

    Tafti, M; Nishino, S; Liao, W; Dement, W C; Mignot, E

    1997-03-10

    Canine narcolepsy is a unique experimental model of a human sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. There is a consensus recognition of an imbalance between cholinergic and catecholaminergic systems in narcolepsy although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Possible substrates could be an abnormal organization, numbers and/or ratio of cholinergic to catecholaminergic cells in the brain of narcoleptic dogs. Therefore, we sought to characterize the corresponding neuronal populations in normal and narcoleptic dogs (Doberman Pinscher) by using choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH). Cholinergic cell groups were found in an area extending from the central to the gigantocellular tegmental field and the periventricular gray corresponding to the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT), the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), and the parabrachial nucleus. An almost perfect co-localization of ChAT and NADPH-diaphorase was also observed. Catecholaminergic cell groups detected included the ventral tegmental area, the substantia nigra, and the locus coeruleus nucleus (LC). The anatomical distribution of catecholaminergic neurons was unusual in the dog in two important aspects: i) TH- and/or DBH-immunoreactive neurons of the LC were found almost exclusively in the reticular formation and not within the periventricular gray, ii) very few, if any TH-positive neurons were found in the central gray and dorsal raphe. Quantitative analysis did not reveal any significant differences in the organization and the number of cells identified in the LDT, PPT, and LC of normal and narcoleptic dogs. Moreover, the cholinergic to catecholaminergic ratio was found identical in the two groups. In conclusion, the present results do not support the hypothesis that the neurochemical imbalance in narcolepsy could result from

  19. Acid soluble bio-organic substances isolated from urban bio-waste. Chemical composition and properties of products.

    PubMed

    Montoneri, Enzo; Boffa, Vittorio; Savarino, Piero; Perrone, Daniele; Ghezzo, Marzia; Montoneri, Corrado; Mendichi, Raniero

    2011-01-01

    As previous work proposed commercial expectations for soluble bio-organic substances (SBO) isolated from compost of urban food, gardening and park trimming residues as chemical auxiliaries, nine urban bio-wastes (BW) treated by aerobic and anaerobic digestion for 0-360 days were used to extract SBO and investigate source variability effects on product chemical composition and properties. The bio-wastes were collected over a 13732 km(2) area populated by 2.9 millions from 565 municipalities. The SBO were characterized by their content of different C types and functional groups and by their distribution coefficient (K(PEGW)) between polyethylene glycol and water. A significant linear correlation was found between K(PEGW) and the lipophilic/hydrophilic C ratio. The investigated SBO exhibited up to sixfold change of K(PEGW) demonstrating that BW available from densely populated urban areas are an interesting exploitable source of a wide variety of potential products for the chemical market. PMID:20888748

  20. Comparison of Healthcare Quality Outcomes Between Accountable Care Organizations and Physician Group Practices.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Sandeep; Sethi, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) were created under the Affordable Care Act to deliver better quality of care at reduced cost compare with the traditional fee-for-service model. But their effectiveness in achieving healthcare quality metrics is unclear. We analyzed ACO and physician group practice (PGP) performance rates for the single coronary artery disease measure and four diabetes mellitus measures now publicly reported on the Medicare Physician Compare Web site for program year 2012. There was no statistically significant difference in reported quality measures between ACOs and PGPs. Our study shows that PGPs can achieve outcomes at par with ACOs. PMID:26223106

  1. Introduction of bridging and pendant organic groups into mesoporous alumina materials.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stacy M; Woods, Stephan M; Gericke, Arne; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2011-11-01

    Incorporation of organic functionalities into soft-templated mesoporous alumina was performed via organosilane-assisted evaporation induced self-assembly using aluminum alkoxide precursors and block copolymer templates. This strategy permits one to obtain mesoporous alumina-based materials with tailorable adsorption, surface and structural properties. Isocyanurate, ethane, mercaptopropyl, and ureidopropyl-functionalized mesoporous alumina materials were synthesized with relatively high surface area and large pore volume with uniform and wormhole-like mesopores. The presence of organosilyl groups within these hybrid materials was confirmed by IR or Raman spectroscopy and their concentration was determined by elemental analysis. PMID:21988174

  2. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  3. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  4. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the following... type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1%...

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  6. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the following... type Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03 1%...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... OOOO of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  8. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... OOOO of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  10. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... OOOO of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data: Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  13. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass... manufacturer's formulation data Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent...

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  16. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  17. Interfacing with External Organizations and the Public. MAS-128. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to communicate effectively with external organizations and the public. The following topics are covered in the module's individual…

  18. EFFECTS OF REVERSE OSMOSIS ISOLATION ON REACTIVITY OF NATURALLY OCCURRING DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROCESSES. (R828045)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field reverse osmosis system was used to isolate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two lacustrine and two riverine surface water sources. The rejection of DOM was on the order of 99% and did not vary significantly with pressure. A simple mass balance model using a single m...

  19. EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MATRIX ISOLATION INFRARED SPECTROMETRY FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR SAMPLE EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capabilities of gas chromatography/matrix isolation-infrared (GC/MI-IR) spectrometry for determination of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in air sample extracts were evaluated. ystematic experiment, using xylene isomers as test compounds, were conducted to determine th...

  20. Brief communication genotyping of Burkholderia pseudomallei revealed high genetic variability among isolates from a single population group

    PubMed Central

    Zueter, Abdelrahman Mohammad; Rahman, Zaidah Abdul; Yean, Chan Yean; Harun, Azian

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a soil dwelling Gram-negative bacteria predominates in Southeast Asia zone and the tropical part of Australia. Genetic diversity has been explored among various populations and environments worldwide. To date, little data is available on MLST profiling of clinical B. pseudomallei isolates in peninsular Malaysia. In this brief report, thirteen culture positive B. pseudomallei cases collected from a single population of Terengganu state in the Western Peninsular Malaysia and were confirmed by In-house TTS1-PCR. Isolates were subjected for multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to explore their genotypic diversity and to investigate for possible clonal clustering of a certain sequence type. Patient’s clinical information was examined to investigate for clinical correlation among the different genotypes. In spite of small sample set, MLST results indicated predictive results; considerable genotypic diversity, predominance and novelty among B. pseudomallei collected over a single geographically-located population in Malaysia. Massive genotypic heterogeneity was observed; 8 different sequence types with predominance of sequence type 54 and discovery of two novel sequence types. However, no clear pathogenomic or organ tropism clonal relationships were predicted. PMID:26417404

  1. Antipoliovirus Activity of the Organic Extract of Eupatorium buniifolium: Isolation of Euparin as an Active Compound

    PubMed Central

    Visintini Jaime, María Florencia; Campos, Rodolfo H.; Martino, Virginia S.; Cavallaro, Lucía V.; Muschietti, Liliana V.

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of the organic extract (OE) of Eupatorium buniifolium against poliovirus type 1 was determined by in vitro assays with an effective concentration 50 (EC50) of 23.3 ± 3.3 µg/mL. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the OE allowed the isolation of an active principle that was identified by spectroscopic methods (1H- and 13C-NMR, EI-MS, UV, and IR spectroscopy) as the benzofuran euparin. The plaque reduction assay in Vero cells was used to assess the antiviral activity of euparin against poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 with EC50 values of 0.47, 0.12, and 0.15 µg/mL, respectively. Moreover, this compound showed high selectivity indexes of 284.9, 1068, and 854.7, respectively. In order to identify the mechanism by which euparin exerts its antiviral activity, the virucidal effect, the pretreatment of Vero cells, and the time of action on one viral replication cycle were evaluated. Results obtained demonstrated that euparin exerts its effect during the early events of the replication cycle, from the virus adsorption to cells up to the first twenty minutes after infection. This is the first report on the presence of euparin in E. buniifolium and its antiviral activity. PMID:23956770

  2. Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group Regarding Payments to Families of Deceased Organ Donors.

    PubMed

    Capron, Alexander Morgan; Delmonico, Francis L; Dominguez-Gil, Beatriz; Martin, Dominique Elizabeth; Danovitch, Gabriel M; Chapman, Jeremy

    2016-09-01

    Governmental and private programs that pay next of kin who give permission for the removal of their deceased relative's organs for transplantation exist in a number of countries. Such payments, which may be given to the relatives or paid directly for funeral expenses or hospital bills unrelated to being a donor, aim to increase the rate of donation. The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group-in alignment with the World Health Organization Guiding Principles and the Council of Europe Convention Against Trafficking in Human Organs-has adopted a new policy statement opposing such practices. Payment programs are unwise because they produce a lower rate of donations than in countries with voluntary, unpaid programs; associate deceased donation with being poor and marginal in society; undermine public trust in the determination of death; and raise doubts about fair allocation of organs. Most important, allowing families to receive money for donation from a deceased person, who is at no risk of harm, will make it impossible to sustain prohibitions on paying living donors, who are at risk. Payment programs are also unethical. Tying coverage for funeral expenses or healthcare costs to a family allowing organs to be procured is exploitative, not "charitable." Using payment to overcome reluctance to donate based on cultural or religious beliefs especially offends principles of liberty and dignity. Finally, while it is appropriate to make donation "financially neutral"-by reimbursing the added medical costs of evaluating and maintaining a patient as a potential donor-such reimbursement may never be conditioned on a family agreeing to donate. PMID:27355820

  3. Aeromonas jandaei (formerly genospecies DNA group 9 A. sobria), a new sucrose-negative species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Carnahan, A; Fanning, G R; Joseph, S W

    1991-01-01

    . The esculin-, sucrose-, and cellobiose-negative and colistin-resistant profile distinguished A. jandaei from other Aeromonas species. These A. jandaei strains were isolated from blood (two strains), wounds (two strains), diarrheal stools (four strains), and a prawn (one strain). The blood and wound isolates, in particular, suggest that there is a possible clinical significance for this species and justify identification of and further research on this group of motile aeromonads. PMID:2037673

  4. Nanocomposites prepared from acrylonitrile butadiene rubber and organically modified montmorillonite with vinyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Mijeong; Kim, Hoonjung; Kim, Eunkyoung

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites were prepared from acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), vinyl groups containing organically modified montmorillonite and additives, such as zinc oxide, stearic acid, and sulfur. The organically modified montmorillonites used in these nanocomposites were prepared by ion exchange reactions of N,N'-dimethylalkyl-(p-vinylbenzyl)-ammonium chlorides (DAVBAs, alkyl = octyl, dodecyl, and octadecyl) with sodium montmorillonite (Na+-MMT). NBR nanocomposites were obtained by controlling both the mixing and vulcanization conditions, by using a Brabender mixer and hot-press process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that, depending on the amount of montmorillonite that is added, both exfoliated and intercalated nanocomposite structures are formed. The NBR/DAVBA-MMT nanocomposites exhibit much higher mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength, Young's modulus, 300% modulus, and hardness) as well as gas barrier properties as compared to NBR Na+-MMT or NBR composites generated from modified montmorillonites without vinyl groups. Consistent with the results of XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the intercalation and exfoliation structures of the nanocomposites coexist and that the DAVBA-MMT layers are well dispersed in NBR.

  5. Versatile Oxidation Methods for Organic and Inorganic Substrates Catalyzed by Platinum-Group Metals on Carbons.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Asai, Shota; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2016-02-01

    Platinum-group metals on activated carbon catalysts, represented by Pd/C, Ru/C, Rh/C, etc., are widely utilized to accomplish green and sustainable organic reactions due to their favorable features, such as easy handling, recoverability, and reusability. The efficient oxidation methods of various organic compounds using heterogeneous platinum-group metals on carbons with or without added oxidants are summarized in this Personal Account. The oxidation of internal alkynes into diketones was effectively catalyzed by Pd/C in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide and molecular oxygen or pyridine N-oxide. The Pd/C-catalyzed mild combustion of gaseous hydrogen with molecular oxygen provided hydrogen peroxide, which could be directly utilized for the oxidation of sulfide derivatives into sulfoxides. Furthermore, the Ru/C-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols gave the corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. On the other hand, the dehydrogenative oxidation of secondary alcohols into ketones was achieved using Rh/C in water, and primary alcohols were effectively dehydrogenated by Pd/C in water under mildly reduced pressure to produce carboxylic acids. PMID:26666634

  6. Cooperative Networks: Altruism, Group Solidarity, Reciprocity, and Sanctioning in Ugandan Producer Organizations.

    PubMed

    Baldassarri, Delia

    2015-09-01

    Repeated interaction and social networks are commonly considered viable solutions to collective action problems. This article identifies and systematically measures four general mechanisms--that is, generalized altruism, group solidarity, reciprocity, and the threat of sanctioning--and tests which of them brings about cooperation in the context of Ugandan producer organizations. Using an innovative methodological framework that combines "lab-in-the-field" experiments with survey interviews and complete social networks data, the article goes beyond the assessment of a relationship between social networks and collective outcomes to study the mechanisms that favor cooperative behavior. The article first establishes a positive relationship between position in the network structure and propensity to cooperate in the producer organization and then uses farmers' behavior in dictator and public goods games to test different mechanisms that may account for such a relationship. Results show that cooperation is induced by patterns of reciprocity that emerge through repeated interaction rather than other-regarding preferences like altruism or group solidarity. PMID:26594712

  7. Contribution of effluent organic matter (EfOM) to ultrafiltration (UF) membrane fouling: isolation, characterization, and fouling effect of EfOM fractions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xing; Khan, Muhammad Tariq; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2014-11-15

    EfOM has been regarded as a major organic foulant resulting in UF membrane fouling in wastewater reclamation. To investigate fouling potential of different EfOM fractions, the present study isolated EfOM into hydrophobic neutrals (HPO-N), colloids, hydrophobic acids (HPO-A), transphilic neutrals and acids (TPI), and hydrophilics (HPI), and tested their fouling effect in both salt solution and pure water during ultrafiltration (UF). Major functional groups and chemical structure of the isolates were identified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) analysis. The influence of the isolation process on the properties of EfOM fractions was minor because the raw and reconstituted secondary effluents were found similar with respect to UV absorbance, molecular size distribution, and fluorescence character. In membrane filtration tests, unified membrane fouling index (UMFI) and hydraulic resistance were used to quantify irreversible fouling potential of different water samples. Results show that under similar DOC level in feed water, colloids present much more irreversible fouling than other fractions. The fouling effect of the isolates is related to their size, chemical properties, and solution chemistry. Further investigations have identified that the interaction between colloids and other fractions also influences the performance of colloids in fouling phenomena. PMID:25173435

  8. Reaction mechanisms of oxygen plasma interaction with organosilicate low-k materials containing organic crosslinking groups

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mrunalkumar; Du Jincheng

    2012-11-15

    Integration of low dielectric constant (k) materials such as organosilicate glasses (OSG) into microelectronic processing demands a better of understanding the plasma/OSG interactions during plasma etching and ashing of these materials, based on which low-k materials with higher radiation resistance and better mechanical behaviors can be developed and optimized plasma processing conditions can be introduced to ensure continued miniaturization of semiconductor devices. Introducing organic crosslinking (e.g., -CH{sub 2}-) in OSG has been shown to be an effective measure to improve the mechanical properties but their effect on plasma interaction is still not fully understood. In this paper, ab initio based molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to investigate the effect of the oxygen plasma on the carbon-bridged silicate networks in the OSG material. The results show that organic crosslinking in the Si-O-Si network leads to lower energy reaction pathways with atomic oxygen radicals that result in breakage of Si-CH{sub 2}-Si linkages instead of Si-CH{sub 3} bonds and, consequently, a decrease in carbon removal. The incorporation of organic crosslinking groups can thus improve the resistance to oxygen plasma damage of OSG and, together with better mechanical properties, can lead to the design of stronger low-k dielectric films.

  9. Chemical history of isolated dwarf galaxies of the Local Group - I. dSphs: Cetus and Tucana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Vergara, N.; Carigi, L.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Durazo, R.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, we obtain chemical evolution models (CEMs) for Tucana and Cetus, two isolated dwarf spheroidal galaxies of the Local Group. The CEMs have been built from the star formation histories (SFHs) and the metallicity histories, both obtained independently by the Local Cosmology from Isolated Dwarfs (LCID) project from deep colour-magnitude diagrams. Based on our models, we find that the chemical histories were complex and can be divided into different epochs and scenarios. In particular, during 75 per cent of the SFH, the galaxies behaved as closed boxes and, during the remaining 25 per cent, either received a lot of primordial gas by accretion or they lost metals through metal-rich winds. In order to discriminate between these two scenarios, abundances ratios in old stars are needed. At t ˜ 4.5 Gyr, the galaxies lost most of their gas due to a short-strong, well-mixed wind. We obtain very similar CEMs for both galaxies, although Cetus is twice as massive as Tucana. We conclude that the star formation in both galaxies began with only 1.5 per cent of the baryonic mass fraction predicted by Λ cold dark matter.

  10. Niemeyer Virus: A New Mimivirus Group A Isolate Harboring a Set of Duplicated Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Arantes, Thalita S.; Silva, Lorena C. F.; Assis, Felipe L.; Kroon, Erna G.; La Scola, Bernard; Abrahão, Jônatas S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that gene duplication/acquisition is a key factor for molecular evolution, being directly related to the emergence of new genetic variants. The importance of such phenomena can also be expanded to the viral world, with impacts on viral fitness and environmental adaptations. In this work we describe the isolation and characterization of Niemeyer virus, a new mimivirus isolate obtained from water samples of an urban lake in Brazil. Genomic data showed that Niemeyer harbors duplicated copies of three of its four aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes (cysteinyl, methionyl, and tyrosyl RS). Gene expression analysis showed that such duplications allowed significantly increased expression of methionyl and tyrosyl aaRS mRNA by Niemeyer in comparison to APMV. Remarkably, phylogenetic data revealed that Niemeyer duplicated gene pairs are different, each one clustering with a different group of mimivirus strains. Taken together, our results raise new questions about the origins and selective pressures involving events of aaRS gain and loss among mimiviruses. PMID:26635738

  11. Preservation of martian organic and environmental records: final report of the Mars biosignature working group.

    PubMed

    Summons, Roger E; Amend, Jan P; Bish, David; Buick, Roger; Cody, George D; Des Marais, David J; Dromart, Gilles; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Knoll, Andrew H; Sumner, Dawn Y

    2011-03-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) has an instrument package capable of making measurements of past and present environmental conditions. The data generated may tell us if Mars is, or ever was, able to support life. However, the knowledge of Mars' past history and the geological processes most likely to preserve a record of that history remain sparse and, in some instances, ambiguous. Physical, chemical, and geological processes relevant to biosignature preservation on Earth, especially under conditions early in its history when microbial life predominated, are also imperfectly known. Here, we present the report of a working group chartered by the Co-Chairs of NASA's MSL Project Science Group, John P. Grotzinger and Michael A. Meyer, to review and evaluate potential for biosignature formation and preservation on Mars. Orbital images confirm that layered rocks achieved kilometer-scale thicknesses in some regions of ancient Mars. Clearly, interplays of sedimentation and erosional processes govern present-day exposures, and our understanding of these processes is incomplete. MSL can document and evaluate patterns of stratigraphic development as well as the sources of layered materials and their subsequent diagenesis. It can also document other potential biosignature repositories such as hydrothermal environments. These capabilities offer an unprecedented opportunity to decipher key aspects of the environmental evolution of Mars' early surface and aspects of the diagenetic processes that have operated since that time. Considering the MSL instrument payload package, we identified the following classes of biosignatures as within the MSL detection window: organism morphologies (cells, body fossils, casts), biofabrics (including microbial mats), diagnostic organic molecules, isotopic signatures, evidence of biomineralization and bioalteration, spatial patterns in chemistry, and biogenic gases. Of these, biogenic organic molecules and biogenic atmospheric gases are

  12. Disrupted topological organization of structural and functional brain connectomes in clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Ni; Duan, Yunyun; Xia, Mingrui; Schoonheim, Menno M; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Sun, Zheng; Ye, Jing; Dong, Huiqing; Shi, Fu-Dong; Barkhof, Frederik; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Yaou

    2016-01-01

    The brain connectome of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been investigated by several previous studies; however, it is still unknown how the network changes in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), the earliest stage of MS, and how network alterations on a functional level relate to the structural level in MS disease. Here, we investigated the topological alterations of both the structural and functional connectomes in 41 CIS and 32 MS patients, compared to 35 healthy controls, by combining diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional MRI with graph analysis approaches. We found that the structural connectome showed a deviation from the optimal pattern as early as the CIS stage, while the functional connectome only showed local changes in MS patients, not in CIS. When comparing two patient groups, the changes appear more severe in MS. Importantly, the disruptions of structural and functional connectomes in patients occurred in the same direction and locally correlated in sensorimotor component. Finally, the extent of structural network changes was correlated with several clinical variables in MS patients. Together, the results suggested early disruption of the structural brain connectome in CIS patients and provided a new perspective for investigating the relationship of the structural and functional alterations in MS. PMID:27403924

  13. Disrupted topological organization of structural and functional brain connectomes in clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Ni; Duan, Yunyun; Xia, Mingrui; Schoonheim, Menno M.; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Sun, Zheng; Ye, Jing; Dong, Huiqing; Shi, Fu-Dong; Barkhof, Frederik; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Yaou

    2016-01-01

    The brain connectome of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been investigated by several previous studies; however, it is still unknown how the network changes in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), the earliest stage of MS, and how network alterations on a functional level relate to the structural level in MS disease. Here, we investigated the topological alterations of both the structural and functional connectomes in 41 CIS and 32 MS patients, compared to 35 healthy controls, by combining diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional MRI with graph analysis approaches. We found that the structural connectome showed a deviation from the optimal pattern as early as the CIS stage, while the functional connectome only showed local changes in MS patients, not in CIS. When comparing two patient groups, the changes appear more severe in MS. Importantly, the disruptions of structural and functional connectomes in patients occurred in the same direction and locally correlated in sensorimotor component. Finally, the extent of structural network changes was correlated with several clinical variables in MS patients. Together, the results suggested early disruption of the structural brain connectome in CIS patients and provided a new perspective for investigating the relationship of the structural and functional alterations in MS. PMID:27403924

  14. A Century of Gestalt Psychology in Visual Perception I. Perceptual Grouping and Figure-Ground Organization

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Johan; Elder, James H.; Kubovy, Michael; Palmer, Stephen E.; Peterson, Mary A.; Singh, Manish; von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    In 1912, Max Wertheimer published his paper on phi motion, widely recognized as the start of Gestalt psychology. Because of its continued relevance in modern psychology, this centennial anniversary is an excellent opportunity to take stock of what Gestalt psychology has offered and how it has changed since its inception. We first introduce the key findings and ideas in the Berlin school of Gestalt psychology, and then briefly sketch its development, rise, and fall. Next, we discuss its empirical and conceptual problems, and indicate how they are addressed in contemporary research on perceptual grouping and figure-ground organization. In particular, we review the principles of grouping, both classical (e.g., proximity, similarity, common fate, good continuation, closure, symmetry, parallelism) and new (e.g., synchrony, common region, element and uniform connectedness), and their role in contour integration and completion. We then review classic and new image-based principles of figure-ground organization, how it is influenced by past experience and attention, and how it relates to shape and depth perception. After an integrated review of the neural mechanisms involved in contour grouping, border-ownership, and figure-ground perception, we conclude by evaluating what modern vision science has offered compared to traditional Gestalt psychology, whether we can speak of a Gestalt revival, and where the remaining limitations and challenges lie. A better integration of this research tradition with the rest of vision science requires further progress regarding the conceptual and theoretical foundations of the Gestalt approach, which will be the focus of a second review paper. PMID:22845751

  15. A century of Gestalt psychology in visual perception: I. Perceptual grouping and figure-ground organization.

    PubMed

    Wagemans, Johan; Elder, James H; Kubovy, Michael; Palmer, Stephen E; Peterson, Mary A; Singh, Manish; von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    2012-11-01

    In 1912, Max Wertheimer published his paper on phi motion, widely recognized as the start of Gestalt psychology. Because of its continued relevance in modern psychology, this centennial anniversary is an excellent opportunity to take stock of what Gestalt psychology has offered and how it has changed since its inception. We first introduce the key findings and ideas in the Berlin school of Gestalt psychology, and then briefly sketch its development, rise, and fall. Next, we discuss its empirical and conceptual problems, and indicate how they are addressed in contemporary research on perceptual grouping and figure-ground organization. In particular, we review the principles of grouping, both classical (e.g., proximity, similarity, common fate, good continuation, closure, symmetry, parallelism) and new (e.g., synchrony, common region, element and uniform connectedness), and their role in contour integration and completion. We then review classic and new image-based principles of figure-ground organization, how it is influenced by past experience and attention, and how it relates to shape and depth perception. After an integrated review of the neural mechanisms involved in contour grouping, border ownership, and figure-ground perception, we conclude by evaluating what modern vision science has offered compared to traditional Gestalt psychology, whether we can speak of a Gestalt revival, and where the remaining limitations and challenges lie. A better integration of this research tradition with the rest of vision science requires further progress regarding the conceptual and theoretical foundations of the Gestalt approach, which is the focus of a second review article. PMID:22845751

  16. Reproductive Performance, Udder Health, and Antibiotic Resistance in Mastitis Bacteria isolated from Norwegian Red cows in Conventional and Organic Farming

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study were to investigate whether there were differences between Norwegian Red cows in conventional and organic farming with respect to reproductive performance, udder health, and antibiotic resistance in udder pathogens. Methods Twenty-five conventional and 24 organic herds from south-east and middle Norway participated in the study. Herds were matched such that geographical location, herd size, and barn types were similar across the cohorts. All organic herds were certified as organic between 1997 and 2003. All herds were members of the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System. The herds were visited once during the study. The relationship between the outcomes and explanatory variables were assessed using mixed linear models. Results There were less > 2nd parity cows in conventional farming. The conventional cows had higher milk yields and received more concentrates than organic cows. Although after adjustment for milk yield and parity, somatic cell count was lower in organic cows than conventional cows. There was a higher proportion of quarters that were dried off at the herd visit in organic herds. No differences in the interval to first AI, interval to last AI or calving interval was revealed between organic and conventional cows. There was no difference between conventional and organic cows in quarter samples positive for mastitis bacteria from the herd visit. Milk yield and parity were associated with the likelihood of at least one quarter positive for mastitis bacteria. There was few S. aureus isolates resistance to penicillin in both management systems. Penicillin resistance against Coagulase negative staphylococci isolated from subclinically infected quarters was 48.5% in conventional herds and 46.5% in organic herds. Conclusion There were no large differences between reproductive performance and udder health between conventional and organic farming for Norwegian Red cows. PMID:20141638

  17. Adult Male Mice Emit Context-Specific Ultrasonic Vocalizations That Are Modulated by Prior Isolation or Group Rearing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ey, Elodie; Bellier, Ludovic; Aubin, Thierry; Bourgeron, Thomas; Granon, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions in mice are frequently analysed in genetically modified strains in order to get insight of disorders affecting social interactions such as autism spectrum disorders. Different types of social interactions have been described, mostly between females and pups, and between adult males and females. However, we recently showed that social interactions between adult males could also encompass cognitive and motivational features. During social interactions, rodents emit ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), but it remains unknown if call types are differently used depending of the context and if they are correlated with motivational state. Here, we recorded the calls of adult C57BL/6J male mice in various behavioral conditions, such as social interaction, novelty exploration and restraint stress. We introduced a modulator for the motivational state by comparing males maintained in isolation and males maintained in groups before the experiments. Male mice uttered USVs in all social and non-social situations, and even in a stressful restraint context. They nevertheless emitted the most important number of calls with the largest diversity of call types in social interactions, particularly when showing a high motivation for social contact. For mice maintained in social isolation, the number of calls recorded was positively correlated with the duration of social contacts, and most calls were uttered during contacts between the two mice. This correlation was not observed in mice maintained in groups. These results open the way for a deeper understanding and characterization of acoustic signals associated with social interactions. They can also help evaluating the role of motivational states in the emission of acoustic signals. PMID:22238608

  18. The central role of ketones in reversible and irreversible hydrothermal organic functional group transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ziming; Gould, Ian R.; Williams, Lynda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Shock, Everett L.

    2012-12-01

    Studies of hydrothermal reactions involving organic compounds suggest complex, possibly reversible, reaction pathways that link functional groups from reduced alkanes all the way to oxidized carboxylic acids. Ketones represent a critical functional group because they occupy a central position in the reaction pathway, at the point where Csbnd C bond cleavage is required for the formation of the more oxidized carboxylic acids. The mechanisms for the critical bond cleavage reactions in ketones, and how they compete with other reactions are the focus of this experimental study. We studied a model ketone, dibenzylketone (DBK), in H2O at 300 °C and 70 MPa for up to 528 h. Product analysis was performed as a function of time at low DBK conversions to reveal the primary reaction pathways. Reversible interconversion between ketone, alcohol, alkene and alkane functional groups is observed in addition to formation of radical coupling products derived from irreversible Csbnd C and Csbnd H homolytic bond cleavage. The product distributions are time-dependent but the bond cleavage products dominate. The major products that accumulate at longer reaction times are toluene and larger, dehydrogenated structures that are initially formed by radical coupling. The hydrogen atoms generated by dehydrogenation of the coupling products are predominantly consumed in the formation of toluene. Even though bond cleavage products dominate, no carboxylic acids were observed on the timescale of the reactions under the chosen experimental conditions.

  19. Electric organ discharge patterns during group hunting by a mormyrid fish

    PubMed Central

    Arnegard, Matthew E; Carlson, Bruce A

    2005-01-01

    Weakly electric fish emit and receive low-voltage electric organ discharges (EODs) for electrolocation and communication. Since the discovery of the electric sense, their behaviours in the wild have remained elusive owing to their nocturnal habits and the inaccessible environments in which they live. The transparency of Lake Malawi provided the first opportunity to simultaneously observe freely behaving mormyrid fish and record their EODs. We observed a piscivorous mormyrid, Mormyrops anguilloides, hunting in small groups in Lake Malawi while feeding on rock-frequenting cichlids of the largest known vertebrate species flock. Video recordings yielded the novel and unexpected finding that these groups resembled hunting packs by being largely composed of the same individuals across days. We show that EOD accelerations accompany prey probing and size estimation by M. anguilloides. In addition, group members occasionally synchronize bursts of EODs with an extraordinary degree of precision afforded by the mormyrid echo response. The characteristics and context of burst synchronization suggest that it may function as a pack cohesion signal. Our observations highlight the potential richness of social behaviours in a basal vertebrate lineage, and provide a framework for future investigations of the neural mechanisms, behavioural rules and ecological significance of social predation in M. anguilloides. PMID:16006329

  20. Genome sequence of the Roseovarius mucosus type strain (DSM 17069T), a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing representative of the marine Roseobacter group isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Roseovarius mucosus Biebl et al. 2005 is a bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the marine Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, which was isolated from the dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii. The marine Roseobacter group was found to be abundant in the ocean and plays an important role for global and biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the features of the R. mucosus strain DFL-24T together with its genome sequence and annotation generated from a culture of DSM 17069T. The 4,247,724 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,194 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. In addition to the presence of four plasmids, genome analysis revealed the presence of genes associated with host colonization, DMSP utilization, cytotoxins, and quorum sensing that could play a role in the interrelationship of R. mucosus with the dinoflagellate A. ostenfeldii and other marine organisms. Furthermore, the genome encodes genes associated with mixotrophic growth, where both reduced inorganic compounds for lithotrophic growth and a photoheterotrophic lifestyle using light as additional energy source could be used. PMID:26203330

  1. Isolated nocturnal hypertension and subclinical target organ damage: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Anne Marie; Madden, Jamie M; Russell, Audrey J; Curtin, Ronan J; Kearney, Patricia M

    2015-08-01

    Isolated nocturnal hypertension (INH) is associated with greater mortality and cardiovascular events. Subclinical target organ damage (TOD) is a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Our objective is to systematically summarize evidence on the association between INH and subclinical TOD. Observational population studies were considered. INH was defined as nighttime blood pressure (BP) ⩾120 and/or 70 mm Hg with daytime BP <135/85 mm Hg. We systematically searched Pubmed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. Abstracts were reviewed by two assessors. Potentially eligible articles were compared with inclusion criteria. The search yielded 954 titles, 13 abstracts were selected for review and four articles fulfilled inclusion criteria. INH was associated with higher ambulatory arterial stiffness index (0.4 unit vs. 0.35 unit, P<0.05), pulse wave velocity (16.2 m s(-1) vs. 14.7 m s(-1), P<0.05), central (140.4% vs. 134.0%, P<0.05) and peripheral (82.6% vs. 76.5%, P<0.01) augmentation index in a Chinese study. In the same population there was no association with left ventricular hypertrophy documented by electrocardiogram. INH was not associated with increased arterial stiffness or left venticular mass index in a Swedish study. An American study demonstrated higher left ventricular mass (152.46 g vs. 136.16 g, P=0.01) and greater odds of left ventricular hypertrophy (odds ratio 3.03, 95% confidence interval 1.02-9.05) in unadjusted analysis. There was no association with proteinuria. Evidence is inconclusive regarding the association between INH and subclinical TOD. Future research should focus on trying to elucidate the mechanisms that generate INH and contribute to the higher mortality associated with this BP pattern. PMID:25832917

  2. Thiol groups controls on arsenite binding by organic matter: new experimental and modeling evidence.

    PubMed

    Catrouillet, Charlotte; Davranche, Mélanie; Dia, Aline; Bouhnik-Le Coz, Martine; Pédrot, Mathieu; Marsac, Rémi; Gruau, Gérard

    2015-12-15

    Although it has been suggested that several mechanisms can describe the direct binding of As(III) to organic matter (OM), more recently, the thiol functional group of humic acid (HA) was shown to be an important potential binding site for As(III). Isotherm experiments on As(III) sorption to HAs, that have either been grafted with thiol or not, were thus conducted to investigate the preferential As(III) binding sites. There was a low level of binding of As(III) to HA, which was strongly dependent on the abundance of the thiols. Experimental datasets were used to develop a new model (the modified PHREEQC-Model VI), which defines HA as a group of discrete carboxylic, phenolic and thiol sites. Protonation/deprotonation constants were determined for each group of sites (pKA=4.28±0.03; ΔpKA=2.13±0.10; pKB=7.11±0.26; ΔpKB=3.52±0.49; pKS=5.82±0.052; ΔpKS=6.12±0.12 for the carboxylic, phenolic and thiols sites, respectively) from HAs that were either grafted with thiol or not. The pKS value corresponds to that of single thiol-containing organic ligands. Two binding models were tested: the Mono model, which considered that As(III) is bound to the HA thiol site as monodentate complexes, and the Tri model, which considered that As(III) is bound as tridentate complexes. A simulation of the available literature datasets was used to validate the Mono model, with logKMS=2.91±0.04, i.e. the monodentate hypothesis. This study highlighted the importance of thiol groups in OM reactivity and, notably, determined the As(III) concentration bound to OM (considering that Fe is lacking or at least negligible) and was used to develop a model that is able to determine the As(III) concentrations bound to OM. PMID:26348657

  3. Functional group composition of organic aerosol from combustion emissions and secondary processes at two contrasted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Haddad, Imad; Marchand, Nicolas; D'Anna, Barbara; Jaffrezo, Jean Luc; Wortham, Henri

    2013-08-01

    The quantification of major functional groups in atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) provides a constraint on the types of compounds emitted and formed in atmospheric conditions. This paper presents functional group composition of organic aerosol from two contrasted urban environments: Marseille during summer and Grenoble during winter. Functional groups were determined using a tandem mass spectrometry approach, enabling the quantification of carboxylic (RCOOH), carbonyl (RCOR‧), and nitro (RNO2) functional groups. Using a multiple regression analysis, absolute concentrations of functional groups were combined with those of organic carbon derived from different sources in order to infer the functional group contents of different organic aerosol fractions. These fractions include fossil fuel combustion emissions, biomass burning emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Results clearly highlight the differences between functional group fingerprints of primary and secondary OA fractions. OA emitted from primary sources is found to be moderately functionalized, as about 20 carbons per 1000 bear one of the functional groups determined here, whereas SOA is much more functionalized, as in average 94 carbons per 1000 bear a functional group under study. Aging processes appear to increase both RCOOH and RCOR‧ functional group contents by nearly one order of magnitude. Conversely, RNO2 content is found to decrease with photochemical processes. Finally, our results also suggest that other functional groups significantly contribute to biomass smoke and SOA. In particular, for SOA, the overall oxygen content, assessed using aerosol mass spectrometer measurements by an O:C ratio of 0.63, is significantly higher than the apparent O:C* ratio of 0.17 estimated based on functional groups measured here. A thorough examination of our data suggests that this remaining unexplained oxygen content can be most probably assigned to alcohol (ROH), organic peroxides (ROOH

  4. Magnetic and Non-Magnetic Nanoparticles from a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts

    PubMed Central

    Tesfai, Aaron; El-Zahab, Bilal; Kelley, Algernon T.; Li, Min; Garno, Jayne C.; Baker, Gary A.; Warner, Isiah M.

    2009-01-01

    The size and uniformity of magnetic nanoparticles developed from a Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts (GUMBOS) were controlled using an in situ ion exchange, water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion preparation. Most of these nanoGUMBOS are in fact ionic liquids (i.e., melting points less than 100 °C), while others have melting points above the conventional 100 °C demarcation. Simple variations in the reagent concentrations following a w/o approach allowed us to smoothly and predictably vary nanoparticle dimensions across a significant size regime with excellent uniformity. Average sizes of GUMBOS ranging from 14 to 198 nm were achieved by manipulation of the reagent concentration for example. Controllable formation of this new breed of nanoparticles is important for numerous potential applications and will open up interesting new opportunities in drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and protein separations, among other areas. PMID:19780529

  5. Accountable Care Organizations and Clinical Commissioning Groups Face an Uncertain Challenge for Improving Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) in the United States of America (USA) and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are newly proposed cross-organisational structures in health services both tasked with a role which includes improving public health. Although there are very significant differences between the UK and USA health systems, there appears to be some similar confusion as to how ACOs and CCGs will regard and address public or population health. This short perspective article gives an overview of ACOs in the USA and CCGs in the UK, with the underlying context of possible public health functions. It concludes by considering the challenges facing both countries and highlighting the opportunity for shared learning. Acknowledgments this article was based on a research proposal prepared for the Commonwealth Fund’s Harkness Fellowship in Health Care Policy and Practice 2012/2013. PMID:25170452

  6. Employed Family Physician Satisfaction and Commitment to Their Practice, Work Group, and Health Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Beasley, John W; Brown, Roger L

    2010-01-01

    Objective Test a model of family physician job satisfaction and commitment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data were collected from 1,482 family physicians in a Midwest state during 2000–2001. The sampling frame came from the membership listing of the state's family physician association, and the analyzed dataset included family physicians employed by large multispecialty group practices. Study Design and Data Collection A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data about physician working conditions, job satisfaction, commitment, and demographic variables. Principal Findings The response rate was 47 percent. Different variables predicted the different measures of satisfaction and commitment. Satisfaction with one's health care organization (HCO) was most strongly predicted by the degree to which physicians perceived that management valued and recognized them and by the extent to which physicians perceived the organization's goals to be compatible with their own. Satisfaction with one's workgroup was most strongly predicted by the social relationship with members of the workgroup; satisfaction with one's practice was most strongly predicted by relationships with patients. Commitment to one's workgroup was predicted by relationships with one's workgroup. Commitment to one's HCO was predicted by relationships with management of the HCO. Conclusions Social relationships are stronger predictors of employed family physician satisfaction and commitment than staff support, job control, income, or time pressure. PMID:20070386

  7. Organic Crystal Growth Facility (OCGF) and Radiation Monitoring Container Device (RMCD) Groups in

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities of the Organic Crystal Growth Facility (OCGF) and Radiation Monitoring Container Device (RMCD) groups in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  8. The occurrence and distribution of a group of organic micropollutants in Mexico City's water sources.

    PubMed

    Félix-Cañedo, Thania E; Durán-Álvarez, Juan C; Jiménez-Cisneros, Blanca

    2013-06-01

    The occurrence and distribution of a group of 17 organic micropollutants in surface and groundwater sources from Mexico City was determined. Water samples were taken from 7 wells, 4 dams and 15 tanks where surface and groundwater are mixed and stored before distribution. Results evidenced the occurrence of seven of the target compounds in groundwater: salicylic acid, diclofenac, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP), butylbenzylphthalate (BBP), triclosan, bisphenol A (BPA) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP). In surface water, 11 target pollutants were detected: same found in groundwater as well as naproxen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen and gemfibrozil. In groundwater, concentration ranges of salicylic acid, 4-NP and DEHP, the most frequently found compounds, were 1-464, 1-47 and 19-232 ng/L, respectively; while in surface water, these ranges were 29-309, 89-655 and 75-2,282 ng/L, respectively. Eleven target compounds were detected in mixed water. Concentrations in mixed water were higher than those determined in groundwater but lower than the detected in surface water. Different to that found in ground and surface water, the pesticide 2,4-D was found in mixed water, indicating that some pollutants can reach areas where they are not originally present in the local water sources. Concentration of the organic micropollutants found in this study showed similar to lower to those reported in water sources from developed countries. This study provides information that enriches the state of the art on the occurrence of organic micropollutants in water sources worldwide, notably in megacities of developing countries. PMID:23542484

  9. Functional Group Composition of Semivolatile Compounds Present in Submicron Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Modini, R. L.; Iannarelli, R.; Rossi, M. J.; Takahama, S.

    2014-12-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds can partition between gas and particle phase in atmospheric conditions and can be volatilized and lost when the aerosol sampling is performed onto PTFE filters (Eatough et al., 1993). In this work, semivolatile compounds are collected onto carbon impregnated glass fiber-cellulose filters placed in series after an activated carbon denuder and PTFE filter which collects submicron aerosol particles of low volatility (Subramanian et al., 2004). The semivolatile compounds accumulated on the cellulose-glass fiber filters are desorbed by vacuum and injected into a stainless steel chamber that enables cold-trapping. The vapors in this chamber are condensed onto a low-temperature silicon window, and the composition of deposited vapors are analysed by transmission-mode Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy (Delval and Rossi, 2004). Functional group composition of semivolatile compounds that can be desorbed from the aerosol phase and its relationship with the apparent low-volatile fraction composition will be presented. Eatough, D.J., Wadsworth, A., Eatough, D.A., Crawford, J.W., Hansen, L.D., Lewis, E.A., 1993. A multiple-system, multi-channel diffusion denuder sampler for the determination of fine-particulate organic material in the atmosphere. Atmospheric Environment. Part A. General Topics 27, 1213-1219. Subramanian, R., Khlystov, A.Y., Cabada, J.C., Robinson, A.L., 2004. Positive and negative artifacts in particulate organic carbon measurements with denuded and undenuded sampler configurations. Aerosol Science and Technology 38, 27-48. Delval, C., Rossi, M.J., 2004. The kinetics of condensation and evaporation of H2O from pure ice in the range 173-223 K: a quartz crystal microbalance study. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 6, 4665-4676.

  10. Complete sequence of three plasmids from Bacillus thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4 environmental isolate and comparison with related plasmids from the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Ariel F; Benintende, Graciela B; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen used worldwide as a bioinsecticide. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group as well as Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus. Plasmids from this group of organisms have been implicated in pathogenicity as they carry the genes responsible for different types of diseases that affect mammals and insects. Some plasmids, like pAW63 and pBT9727, encode a functional conjugation machinery allowing them to be transferred to a recipient cell. They also share extensive homology with the non-functional conjugation apparatus of pXO2 from B. anthracis. In this study we report the complete sequence of three plasmids from an environmental B. thuringiensis isolate from Argentina, obtained by a shotgun sequencing method. We obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pFR12 (12,095bp), pFR12.5 (12,459bp) and pFR55 (55,712bp) from B. thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4. pFR12 and pFR12.5 were classified as cryptic as they do not code for any obvious functions besides replication and mobilization. Both small plasmids were classified as RCR plasmids due to similarities with the replicases they encode. Plasmid pFR55 showed a structural organization similar to that observed for plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. pFR55 also shares a tra region with these plasmids, containing genes related to T4SS and conjugation. A comparison between pFR55 and conjugative plasmids led to the postulation that pFR55 is a conjugative plasmid. Genes related to replication functions in pFR55 are different to those described for plasmids with known complete sequences. pFR55 is the first completely sequenced plasmid with a replication machinery related to that of ori44. The analysis of the complete sequence of plasmids from an environmental isolate of B. thuringiensis permitted the identification of a near complete conjugation apparatus in pFR55, resembling those of plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. The availability of this sequence is a step forward in the study

  11. MLVA-16 typing of 295 marine mammal Brucella isolates from different animal and geographic origins identifies 7 major groups within Brucella ceti and Brucella pinnipedialis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Since 1994, Brucella strains have been isolated from a wide range of marine mammals. They are currently recognized as two new Brucella species, B. pinnipedialis for the pinniped isolates and B. ceti for the cetacean isolates in agreement with host preference and specific phenotypic and molecular markers. In order to investigate the genetic relationships within the marine mammal Brucella isolates and with reference to terrestrial mammal Brucella isolates, we applied in this study the Multiple Loci VNTR (Variable Number of Tandem Repeats) Analysis (MLVA) approach. A previously published assay comprising 16 loci (MLVA-16) that has been shown to be highly relevant and efficient for typing and clustering Brucella strains from animal and human origin was used. Results 294 marine mammal Brucella strains collected in European waters from 173 animals and a human isolate from New Zealand presumably from marine origin were investigated by MLVA-16. Marine mammal Brucella isolates were shown to be different from the recognized terrestrial mammal Brucella species and biovars and corresponded to 3 major related groups, one specific of the B. ceti strains, one of the B. pinnipedialis strains and the last composed of the human isolate. In the B. ceti group, 3 subclusters were identified, distinguishing a cluster of dolphin, minke whale and porpoise isolates and two clusters mostly composed of dolphin isolates. These results were in accordance with published analyses using other phenotypic or molecular approaches, or different panels of VNTR loci. The B. pinnipedialis group could be similarly subdivided in 3 subclusters, one composed exclusively of isolates from hooded seals (Cystophora cristata) and the two others comprising other seal species isolates. Conclusion The clustering analysis of a large collection of marine mammal Brucella isolates from European waters significantly strengthens the current view of the population structure of these two species, and their

  12. Survey of the bp/tee genes from clinical group A streptococcus isolates in New Zealand - implications for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Steemson, John D; Moreland, Nicole J; Williamson, Deborah; Morgan, Julie; Carter, Philip E; Proft, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is responsible for a wide range of diseases ranging from superficial infections, such as pharyngitis and impetigo, to life-threatening diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome and acute rheumatic fever (ARF). GAS pili are hair-like extensions protruding from the cell surface and consist of highly immunogenic structural proteins: the backbone pilin (BP) and one or two accessory pilins (AP1 and AP2). The protease-resistant BP builds the pilus shaft and has been recognized as the T-antigen, which forms the basis of a major serological typing scheme that is often used as a supplement to M typing. A previous sequence analysis of the bp gene (tee gene) in 39 GAS isolates revealed 15 different bp/tee types. In this study, we sequenced the bp/tee gene from 100 GAS isolates obtained from patients with pharyngitis, ARF or invasive disease in New Zealand. We found 20 new bp/tee alleles and four new bp/tee types/subtypes. No association between bp/tee type and clinical outcome was observed. We confirmed earlier reports that the emm type and tee type are associated strongly, but we also found exceptions, where multiple tee types could be found in certain M/emm type strains, such as M/emm89. We also reported, for the first time, the existence of a chimeric bp/tee allele, which was assigned into a new subclade (bp/tee3.1). A strong sequence conservation of the bp/tee gene was observed within the individual bp/tee types/subtypes (>97 % sequence identity), as well as between historical and contemporary New Zealand and international GAS strains. This temporal and geographical sequence stability provided further evidence for the potential use of the BP/T-antigen as a vaccine target. PMID:25190737

  13. Trace elements in organisms of different trophic groups in the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budko, D. F.; Demina, L. L.; Martynova, D. M.; Gorshkova, O. M.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Cd, As, Co, and Se) have been studied in different trophic groups of organisms: primary producers (seston, presented mostly by phytoplankton), primary consumers (mesozooplankton, macrozooplankton, and bivalves), secondary consumers (predatory macrozooplankton and starfish), and consumers of higher trophic levels (fish species), inhabiting the coastal zone of Kandalaksha Bay and the White Sea (Cape Kartesh). The concentrations of elements differ significantly for the size groups of Sagitta elegans (zooplankton) and blue mussel Mytilus edulis, as well as for the bone and muscle tissues of studied fish species, Atlantic cod Gadus morhua marisalbi and Atlantic wolffish Anarhichas lupus. The concentrations of all the studied elements were lower among the primary consumers and producers, but increased again at higher trophic levels, from secondary consumers to tertiary consumers ("mesozooplankton → macrozooplankton Sagitta elegans" and "mussels → starfish"). Ni and Pb tended to decline through the food chains seston→…→cod and mesozooplankton→…→stickleback. Only the concentrations of Fe increased in all the trophic chains along with the increase of the trophic level.

  14. Workgroup Report: Developing Environmental Health Indicators for European Children: World Health Organization Working Group

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Kathy; Kim, Rokho; Carroquino, Maria-Jose; Pirard, Philippe; Gore, Fiona; Cucu, Alexandra; Nemer, Leda; MacKay, Morag; Smedje, Greta; Georgellis, Antonis; Dalbokova, Dafina; Krzyzanowski, Michal

    2007-01-01

    A working group coordinated by the World Health Organization developed a set of indicators to protect children’s health from environmental risks and to support current and future European policy needs. On the basis of identified policy needs, the group developed a core set of 29 indicators for implementation plus an extended set of eight additional indicators for future development, focusing on exposure, health effects, and action. As far as possible, the indicators were designed to use existing information and are flexible enough to be developed further to meet the needs of policy makers and changing health priorities. These indicators cover most of the priority topic areas specified in the Children’s Environment and Health Action Plan for Europe (CEHAPE) as adopted in the Fourth Ministerial Conference on Health and Environment in 2004, and will be used to monitor the implementation of CEHAPE. This effort can be viewed as an integral part of the Global Initiative on Children’s Environmental Health Indicators, launched at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002. PMID:17805431

  15. Using multidimensional gas chromatography to group secondary organic aerosol species by functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2014-10-01

    A carbon number-functionality grid (CNFG) for a complex mixture of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors and oxidation products was developed from the theoretical retention index diagram of a multidimensional gas chromatographic (GC × 2GC) analysis of a mixture of SOA precursors and derivatized oxidation products. In the GC × 2GC analysis, comprehensive separation of the complex mixture was achieved by diverting the modulated effluent from a polar primary column into 2 polar secondary columns. Column stationary phases spanned the widest range of selectivity of commercially available GC analytic columns. In general, separation of the species by the polar primary column was by the number of carbon atoms in the molecule (when the homologous series of reference compounds was selected to have molecular volumes and functionalities similar to the target analytes) and the polar secondary columns provided additional separation according to functionality. An algebraic transformation of the Abraham solvation parameter model was used to estimate linear retention indices of solutes relative to elution of a homologous series of methyl diesters on the primary and secondary columns to develop the theoretical GC × 2GC retention diagram. Retention indices of many of the oxidation products of SOA precursors were estimated for derivatized forms of the solutes. The GC stationary phases selected for the primary column [(50%-Trifluoropropyl)-methylpolysiloxane] and secondary columns (90% Cyanopropyl Polysilphenylene-siloxane and Polyethylene Glycol in a Sol-Gel matrix) provided a theoretical separation of 33 SOA precursors and 98 derivatized oxidation products into 35 groups by molecular volume and functionality. Comprehensive analysis of extracts of vapor and aerosol samples containing semivolatile SOA precursors and oxidation products, respectively, is best accomplished by (1) separating the complex mixture of the vapor and underivatized aerosol extracts with a (50

  16. An Effective Computerized Reminder for Contact Isolation of Patients Colonized or Infected with Resistant Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Abel N.; Dexter, Paul R.; Warvel, Jeff S.; Belsito, Anne W.; Commiskey, Marie; Wilson, Stephen J.; Hui, Siu L.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To improve contact isolation rates among patients admitted to the hospital with a known history of infection with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). Methods A before and after interventional study implementing computerized reminders for contact isolation between February 25th of 2005 and February 28th of 2006. We measured rates of appropriate contact isolation, and time to isolation for the four month pre-intervention period, and the 12 month intervention period. We conducted a survey of ordering physicians at the midpoint of the intervention period. Results Implementing a computerized reminder increased the rate of patients appropriately isolated from 33% to fully 89% (P < 0.0001). The median time to writing contact isolation orders decreased from 16.6 hours to 0.0 hours (P < 0.0001). Physicians accepted the order 80% of the time on the first or second presentation. 95% of physicians felt the reminder had no impact on workflow, or saved them time. Conclusion A human reviewed computerized reminder can achieve high rates of compliance with infection control recommendations for contact isolation, and dramatically reduce the time to orders being written upon admission. PMID:17398145

  17. The abundance and organization of polypeptides associated with antigens of the Rh blood group system.

    PubMed

    Gardner, B; Anstee, D J; Mawby, W J; Tanner, M J; von dem Borne, A E

    1991-06-01

    Twelve murine monoclonal antibodies, which react with human red cells of common Rh phenotype but give weak or negative reactions with Rh null erythrocytes, were used in quantitative binding assays and competitive binding assays to investigate the abundance and organization of polypeptides involved in the expression of antigens of the Rh blood group system. Antibodies of the R6A-type (R6A, BRIC-69, BRIC-207) and the 2D10-type (MB-2D10, LA18.18, LA23.40) recognize related structures and 100,000-200,000 molecules of each antibody bind maximally to erythrocytes of common Rh phenotype. Antibodies of the BRIC-125 type (BRICs 32, 122, 125, 126, 168, 211) recognize structures that are unrelated to those recognized by R6A-type and 2D10-type antibodies and between 10,000 and 50,000 antibody molecules bind maximally to erythrocytes of the common Rh phenotype. The binding of antibodies of the R6A-type and the 2D10-type, but not of antibodies of the BRIC-125-type could be partially inhibited by human anti-D antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) and a murine anti-e-like antibody. These results are consistent with evidence (Moore & Green 1987; Avent et al., 1988b) that the Rh blood group antigens are associated with a complex that comprises two groups of related polypeptides of M(r) 30,000 and M(r) 35,000-100,000, respectively, and suggest that there are 1-2 x 10(5) copies of this complex per erythrocyte. The polypeptide recognized by antibodies of the BRIC-125 type is likely to be associated with this complex. PMID:9259831

  18. Fluid Forces Enhance the Performance of an Aspirant Leader in Self-Organized Living Groups

    PubMed Central

    De Rosis, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the performance of an individual aiming at guiding a self-organized group is numerically investigated. A collective behavioural model is adopted, accounting for the mutual repulsion, attraction and orientation experienced by the individuals. Moreover, these represent a set of solid particles which are supposed to be immersed in a fictitious viscous fluid. In particular, the lattice Boltzmann and Immersed boundary methods are used to predict the fluid dynamics, whereas the effect of the hydrodynamic forces on particles is accounted for by solving the equation of the solid motion through the time discontinuous Galerkin scheme. Numerical simulations are carried out by involving the individuals in a dichotomous process. On the one hand, an aspirant leader (AL) additional individual is added to the system. AL is forced to move along a prescribed direction which intersects the group. On the other hand, these tend to depart from an obstacle represented by a rotating lamina which is placed in the fluid domain. A numerical campaign is carried out by varying the fluid viscosity and, as a consequence, the hydrodynamic field. Moreover, scenarios characterized by different values of the size of the group are investigated. In order to estimate the AL's performance, a proper parameter is introduced, depending on the number of individuals following AL. Present findings show that the sole collective behavioural equations are insufficient to predict the AL's performance, since the motion is drastically affected by the presence of the surrounding fluid. With respect to the existing literature, the proposed numerical model is enriched by accounting for the presence of the encompassing fluid, thus computing the hydrodynamic forces arising when the individuals move. PMID:25501965

  19. High CO2-capture ability of a porous organic polymer bifunctionalized with carboxy and triazole groups.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lin-Hua; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2013-08-26

    A new porous organic polymer, SNU-C1, incorporating two different CO2 -attracting groups, namely, carboxy and triazole groups, has been synthesized. By activating SNU-C1 with two different methods, vacuum drying and supercritical-CO2 treatment, the guest-free phases, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, respectively, were obtained. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca are 595 and 830 m(2) g(-1), respectively, as estimated by the N2-adsorption isotherms at 77 K. At 298 K and 1 atm, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca show high CO2 uptakes, 2.31 mmol  g(-1) and 3.14 mmol  g(-1), respectively, the high level being due to the presence of abundant polar groups (carboxy and triazole) exposed on the pore surfaces. Five separation parameters for flue gas and landfill gas in vacuum-swing adsorption were calculated from single-component gas-sorption isotherms by using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The data reveal excellent CO2-separation abilities of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, namely high CO2-uptake capacity, high selectivity, and high regenerability. The gas-cycling experiments for the materials and the water-treated samples, experiments that involved treating the samples with a CO2-N2 gas mixture (15:85, v/v) followed by a pure N2 purge, further verified the high regenerability and water stability. The results suggest that these materials have great potential applications in CO2 separation. PMID:23881821

  20. Advanced solid-state NMR characterization of marine dissolved organic matter isolated using the coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jingdong; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J; Perdue, E Michael

    2012-06-01

    Advanced (13)C solid-state techniques were employed to investigate the major structural characteristics of two surface-seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples isolated using the novel coupled reverse osmosis/electrodialysis method. The NMR techniques included quantitative (13)C direct polarization/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) and DP/MAS with recoupled dipolar dephasing, (13)C cross-polarization/total sideband suppression (CP/TOSS), (13)C chemical shift anisotropy filter, CH, CH(2), and CH(n) selection, two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear correlation NMR (2D HETCOR), 2D HETCOR combined with dipolar dephasing, and (15)N cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS). The two samples (Coastal and Marine DOM) were collected at the mouth of the Ogeechee River and in the Gulf Stream, respectively. The NMR results indicated that they were structurally distinct. Coastal DOM contained significantly more aromatic and carbonyl carbons whereas Marine DOM was markedly enriched in alkoxy carbon (e.g., carbohydrate-like moieties). Both samples contained significant amide N, but Coastal DOM had nitrogen bonded to aromatic carbons. Our dipolar-dephased spectra indicated that a large fraction of alkoxy carbons were not protonated. For Coastal DOM, our NMR results were consistent with the presence of the major structural units of (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) lignin residues, (3) peptides or amino sugars, and (4) COO-bonded alkyls. For Marine DOM, they were (1) carbohydrate-like moieties, (2) peptides or amino sugars, and (3) COO-bonded alkyls. In addition, both samples contained significant amounts of nonpolar alkyl groups. The potential sources of the major structural units of DOM were discussed in detail. Nonprotonated O-alkyl carbon content was proposed as a possible index of humification. PMID:22553962

  1. Firing range soils yield a diverse array of fungal isolates capable of organic acid production and Pb mineral solubilization.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Tarah S; Gottel, Neil R; Basta, Nicholas; Jardine, Philip M; Schadt, Christopher W

    2012-09-01

    Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in soils include mining and smelting activities, effluents and wastes, agricultural pesticides, domestic garbage dumps, and shooting ranges. While Pb is typically considered relatively insoluble in the soil environment, some fungi may potentially contribute to mobilization of heavy metal cations by means of secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs). We sought to better understand the potential for metal mobilization within an indigenous fungal community at an abandoned shooting range in Oak Ridge, TN, where soil Pb contamination levels ranged from 24 to >2,700 mg Pb kg dry soil(-1). We utilized culture-based assays to determine organic acid secretion and Pb-carbonate dissolution of a diverse collection of soil fungal isolates derived from the site and verified isolate distribution patterns within the community by 28S rRNA gene analysis of whole soils. The fungal isolates examined included both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that excreted high levels (up to 27 mM) of a mixture of LMWOAs, including oxalic and citric acids, and several isolates demonstrated a marked ability to dissolve Pb-carbonate at high concentrations up to 10.5 g liter(-1) (18.5 mM) in laboratory assays. Fungi within the indigenous community of these highly Pb-contaminated soils are capable of LMWOA secretion at levels greater than those of well-studied model organisms, such as Aspergillus niger. Additionally, these organisms were found in high relative abundance (>1%) in some of the most heavily contaminated soils. Our data highlight the need to understand more about autochthonous fungal communities at Pb-contaminated sites and how they may impact Pb biogeochemistry, solubility, and bioavailability, thus consequently potentially impacting human and ecosystem health. PMID:22729539

  2. Firing Range Soils Yield a Diverse Array of Fungal Isolates Capable of Organic Acid Production and Pb Mineral Solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Tarah S.; Gottel, Neil R.; Basta, Nicholas; Jardine, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of lead contamination in soils include mining and smelting activities, effluents and wastes, agricultural pesticides, domestic garbage dumps, and shooting ranges. While Pb is typically considered relatively insoluble in the soil environment, some fungi may potentially contribute to mobilization of heavy metal cations by means of secretion of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs). We sought to better understand the potential for metal mobilization within an indigenous fungal community at an abandoned shooting range in Oak Ridge, TN, where soil Pb contamination levels ranged from 24 to >2,700 mg Pb kg dry soil−1. We utilized culture-based assays to determine organic acid secretion and Pb-carbonate dissolution of a diverse collection of soil fungal isolates derived from the site and verified isolate distribution patterns within the community by 28S rRNA gene analysis of whole soils. The fungal isolates examined included both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that excreted high levels (up to 27 mM) of a mixture of LMWOAs, including oxalic and citric acids, and several isolates demonstrated a marked ability to dissolve Pb-carbonate at high concentrations up to 10.5 g liter−1 (18.5 mM) in laboratory assays. Fungi within the indigenous community of these highly Pb-contaminated soils are capable of LMWOA secretion at levels greater than those of well-studied model organisms, such as Aspergillus niger. Additionally, these organisms were found in high relative abundance (>1%) in some of the most heavily contaminated soils. Our data highlight the need to understand more about autochthonous fungal communities at Pb-contaminated sites and how they may impact Pb biogeochemistry, solubility, and bioavailability, thus consequently potentially impacting human and ecosystem health. PMID:22729539

  3. The Organization of Collective Group Movements in Wild Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus): Social Structure Drives Processes of Group Coordination in Macaques.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Anne; Majolo, Bonaventura; Schülke, Oliver; Ostner, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Social animals have to coordinate activities and collective movements to benefit from the advantages of group living. Animals in large groups maintain cohesion by self-organization processes whereas in smaller groups consensus decisions can be reached. Where consensus decisions are relevant leadership may emerge. Variation in the organization of collective movements has been linked to variation in female social tolerance among macaque species ranging from despotic to egalitarian. Here we investigated the processes underlying group movements in a wild macaque species characterized by a degree of social tolerance intermediate to previously studied congeneric species. We focused on processes before, during and after the departure of the first individual. To this end, we observed one group of wild Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus) in the Middle Atlas, Morocco using all-occurrence behaviour sampling of 199 collective movements. We found that initiators of a collective movement usually chose the direction in which more individuals displayed pre-departure behavior. Dominant individuals contributed to group movements more than subordinates, especially juveniles, measured as frequencies of successful initiations and pre-departure behaviour. Joining was determined by affiliative relationships and the number of individuals that already joined the movement (mimetism). Thus, in our study group partially shared consensus decisions mediated by selective mimetism seemed to be prevalent, overall supporting the suggestion that a species' social style affects the organization of group movements. As only the most tolerant species show equally shared consensus decisions whereas in others the decision is partially shared with a bias to dominant individuals the type of consensus decisions seems to follow a stepwise relation. Joining order may also follow a stepwise, however opposite, relationship, because dominance only determined joining in highly despotic, but not in intermediate and

  4. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Metal Furniture Pt. 63, Subpt. RRRR, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups 1 You May Use the Mass Fraction Values in the Following Fable...

  5. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typicalorganic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  6. 40 CFR Table 7 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Petroleum Solvent Groups a You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent type Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typicalorganic HAP, percent by mass Aliphatic b 0.03...

  7. The Complete Genome Phylogeny of Geographically Distinct Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Isolates (1944-2013) Supports Further Groupings within the Cosmopolitan Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhtar; Ali, Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) isolates have been implicated in deadly outbreaks of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in several regions of the world. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV-2 isolates collected from particular countries has been performed using partial or individual genes but only a few studies have examined complete whole-genome sequences collected worldwide. Herein, 50 complete genome sequences of DENV-2 isolates, reported over the past 70 years from 19 different countries, were downloaded from GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted and evolutionary distances of the 50 DENV-2 isolates were determined using maximum likelihood (ML) trees or Bayesian phylogenetic analysis created from complete genome nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequences or individual gene sequences. The results showed that all DENV-2 isolates fell into seven main groups containing five previously defined genotypes. A Cosmopolitan genotype showed further division into three groups (C-I, C-II, and C-III) with the C-I group containing two subgroups (C-IA and C-IB). Comparison of the aa sequences showed specific mutations among the various groups of DENV-2 isolates. A maximum number of aa mutations was observed in the NS5 gene, followed by the NS2A, NS3 and NS1 genes, while the smallest number of aa substitutions was recorded in the capsid gene, followed by the PrM/M, NS4A, and NS4B genes. Maximum evolutionary distances were found in the NS2A gene, followed by the NS4A and NS4B genes. Based on these results, we propose that genotyping of DENV-2 isolates in future studies should be performed on entire genome sequences in order to gain a complete understanding of the evolution of various isolates reported from different geographical locations around the world. PMID:26414178

  8. Pulsatile release of acetylcholine by nerve terminals (synaptosomes) isolated from Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed Central

    Girod, R; Eder-Colli, L; Medilanski, J; Dunant, Y; Tabti, N; Poo, M M

    1992-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological detection of acetylcholine (ACh) release by synaptosomes from the electric organ of Torpedo was searched for by laying the isolated nerve terminals on a culture of Xenopus embryonic muscle cells (myocytes), and by recording the ACh-induced inward currents in the myocytes. 2. Whole-cell recording in one of the myocytes revealed rapid inward currents that where generated soon after synaptosome application. These pulsatile events strongly resembled those occurring normally during the early phase of synaptogenesis after nerve-muscle contact in Xenopus cell cultures. They were called spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs). 3. The SSCs produced by the synaptosomes had a rapid time course, with mean time-to-peak and half-decay times of 2.6 +/- 0.4 ms and 6.0 +/- 1.1 ms, respectively. Most events had a falling phase that could be fitted with a single exponential. The mean time constant of decay was 6.2 +/- 1.1 ms. More than half of the SSCs (approximately 60%) constituted a rather homogenous population in which the time-to-peak versus amplitude showed a positive relationship, the smallest events displaying a shorter time course. The rest of the SSCs had a more variable and slower time course. Such events are also observed in young and mature junctions in situ. 4. The amplitudes of SSCs had a wide distribution which was skewed towards the smallest values. The mean amplitude was 65.2 +/- 16.1 pA. 5. During the minutes following an application of synaptosomes, the frequency of the SSCs tended to decrease, but their mean amplitude remained constant. Such behaviour could be reproduced during several successive additions of synaptosomes while recording in the same myocyte. 6. Just after synaptosome application, the SSCs were superposed to a noisy inward current that lasted for 20-60 s. Noise analysis of this current gave the values of 0.7 +/- 0.1 pA for the mean amplitude of the elementary event, and 4.7 +/- 0.2 ms for its mean duration, values that compare

  9. Model of molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter isolated from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2010-09-01

    The molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from Murchison meteorite has been investigated by our group for several years using a large set of analytical methods including various spectroscopies (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy), high resolution electron microscopy, and thermal (pyrolyses in the presence or not of tetramethylammonium hydroxide) and chemical (RuO4 oxidation) degradations. Taken together, these techniques provided a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information, from which we derived 11 elemental and molecular parameters on the same IOM residue. In addition to the basic elemental composition, these parameters describe the distribution of the different types of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms as well as the size of the polyaromatic units. For this molecular structure, we therefore propose a model which fits with these 11 molecular quantitative parameters. Several cosmochemical implications are derived from this structure. Based on the fact that aromatic moieties are highly substituted and aliphatic chains highly branched, it can be anticipated that the synthesis of this IOM occurred through successive additions of single carbon units in the gas-phase ending by a spontaneous cyclization for chain length ≥7 C. As a whole, these observations favor an organosynthesis in the solar T-Tauri disk.

  10. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Mutations in the parC, parE, and gyrA Genes of Clinical Isolates of Viridans Group Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    González, Irene; Georgiou, Marios; Alcaide, Fernando; Balas, Delia; Liñares, Josefina; de la Campa, Adela G.

    1998-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of the parC and gyrA genes from seven ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cpr) isolates of viridans group streptococci (two high-level Cpr Streptococcus oralis and five low-level Cpr Streptococcus mitis isolates) were determined and compared with those obtained from susceptible isolates. The nucleotide sequences of the QRDRs of the parE and gyrB genes from the five low-level Cpr S. mitis isolates and from the NCTC 12261 type strain were also analyzed. Four of these low-level Cpr isolates had changes affecting the subunits of DNA topoisomerase IV: three in Ser-79 (to Phe or Ile) of ParC and one in ParE at a position not previously described to be involved in quinolone resistance (Pro-424). One isolate did not show any mutation. The two high-level Cpr S. oralis isolates showed mutations affecting equivalent residue positions of ParC and GyrA, namely, Ser-79 to Phe and Ser-81 to Phe or Tyr, respectively. The parC mutations were able to transform Streptococcus pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin resistance, while the gyrA mutations transformed S. pneumoniae only when mutations in parC were present. These results suggest that DNA topoisomerase IV is a primary target of ciprofloxacin in viridans group streptococci, DNA gyrase being a secondary target. PMID:9797205

  11. Observing Engineering Student Teams from the Organization Behavior Perspective Using Linguistic Analysis of Student Reflections and Focus Group Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Damron, Rebecca; Sohoni, Sohum

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates group/team development in computer engineering courses at a University in the Central USA from the perspective of organization behavior theory, specifically Tuckman's model of the stages of group development. The investigation, conducted through linguistic analysis of student reflection essays, and through focus group…

  12. Anion Binding in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2006-01-01

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups has been synthesized and structurally analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion coordination by urea within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea{hor_ellipsis}urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolecular CH{hor_ellipsis}O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N'-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N'-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded tapes compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, ZnSO{sub 4}, Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, Cu(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2}, AgNO{sub 3}, and AgSO{sub 3}CH{sub 3}. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion coordination by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate.

  13. ISOLATING AND FRACTIONATING ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most solid-phase sediment TIE techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on solid phase sorptive techniques, such as amending contaminated sediments with the carbonaceousresin, Ambersorb coconut charcoal, or XAD resin to reduce toxicity caused by organic contaminants. Cha...

  14. Tofla virus: A newly identified Nairovirus of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group isolated from ticks in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Fuxun, Yu; Kurosaki, Yohei; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Miako; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Ono, Hokuto; Nishi, Kodai; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Uchida, Leo; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit several important viral pathogens. We isolated a new virus (Tofla virus: TFLV) from Heamaphysalis flava and Heamaphysalis formsensis in Japan. The full-genome sequences revealed that TFLV belonged to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Phylogenetic analyses and neutralization tests suggested that TFLV is closely related to the Hazara virus and that it is classified into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group. TFLV caused lethal infection in IFNAR KO mice. The TFLV-infected mice exhibited a gastrointestinal disorder, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images showed a significant uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the intestinal tract. TFLV was able to infect and propagate in cultured cells of African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells and human-derived SK-N-SH, T98-G and HEK-293 cells. Although TFLV infections in humans and animals are currently unknown, our findings may provide clues to understand the potential infectivity and to develop of pre-emptive countermeasures against this new tick-borne Nairovirus. PMID:26863911

  15. Tofla virus: A newly identified Nairovirus of the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group isolated from ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Satoshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Fuxun, Yu; Kurosaki, Yohei; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Miako; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Ono, Hokuto; Nishi, Kodai; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Uchida, Leo; Takamatsu, Yuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Fujita, Hiromi; Morita, Kouichi; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit several important viral pathogens. We isolated a new virus (Tofla virus: TFLV) from Heamaphysalis flava and Heamaphysalis formsensis in Japan. The full-genome sequences revealed that TFLV belonged to the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Phylogenetic analyses and neutralization tests suggested that TFLV is closely related to the Hazara virus and that it is classified into the Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever group. TFLV caused lethal infection in IFNAR KO mice. The TFLV-infected mice exhibited a gastrointestinal disorder, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography images showed a significant uptake of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose in the intestinal tract. TFLV was able to infect and propagate in cultured cells of African green monkey-derived Vero E6 cells and human-derived SK-N-SH, T98-G and HEK-293 cells. Although TFLV infections in humans and animals are currently unknown, our findings may provide clues to understand the potential infectivity and to develop of pre-emptive countermeasures against this new tick-borne Nairovirus. PMID:26863911

  16. [Genetic Characteristics of Coxsackievirus Group A Type 4 Isolated from Patients with Acute Flaccid Paralysis in Shaanxi, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongyan; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Shuangli; Si, Yuan; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Qian; Ji, Tianjiao; Xu, Wenbo

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the genetic characteristics of coxsackievirus A4 (CV-A4) based on the entire VP1 coding region. Samples were isolated from patients with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) in Shaanxi, China from 2006 to 2010. We wished to ascertain the predominant genotype and the relationship between CV-A4 infection and AFP. Sixty-eight non-polio enteroviruses were inoculated onto RD cells (to increase the virus titer) and molecular typing was undertaken. The entire VP1 coding region was amplified. Percentage of CV-A4 was 10.3% (7/68). Analyses of genetic identify and creation of phylogenetic trees revealed that CV-A4 could be classified into A, B and C genotypes. Seven CV-A4 strains from Shaanxi and other CV-A4 strains from China formed an independent evolution lineage located in group 4 and belonged to the C2 sub-genotype. These data suggested that CV-A4 strains of sub-genotype C2 were the predominant genotypes in China. These strains co-evolved and co-circulated with those from other provinces in China, so continued monitoring of CV-A4 (by clinical and genetic surveillance) should be enhanced. PMID:27396156

  17. Synthesis of nine-atom deltahedral Zintl ions of germanium and their functionalization with organic groups.

    PubMed

    Gillett-Kunnath, Miriam M; Sevov, Slavi C

    2012-01-01

    Although the first studies of Zintl ions date between the late 1890's and early 1930's they were not structurally characterized until many years later. Their redox chemistry is even younger, just about ten years old, but despite this short history these deltahedral clusters ions E9(n-) (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; n = 2, 3, 4) have already shown interesting and diverse reactivity and have been at the forefront of rapidly developing and exciting new chemistry. Notable milestones are the oxidative coupling of Ge9(4-) clusters to oligomers and infinite chains, their metallation, capping by transition-metal organometallic fragments, insertion of a transition-metal atom at the center of the cluster which is sometimes combined with capping and oligomerization, addition of main-group organometallic fragments as exo-bonded substituents, and functionalization with various organic residues by reactions with organic halides and alkynes. This latter development of attaching organic fragments directly to the clusters has opened up a new field, namely organo-Zintl chemistry, that is potentially fertile for further synthetic explorations, and it is the step-by-step procedure for the synthesis of germanium-divinyl clusters described herein. The initial steps outline the synthesis of an intermetallic precursor of K4Ge9 from which the Ge9(4-) clusters are extracted later in solution. This involves fused-silica glass blowing, arc-welding of niobium containers, and handling of highly air-sensitive materials in a glove box. The air-sensitive K4Ge9 is then dissolved in ethylenediamine in the box and then alkenylated by a reaction with Me3SiC≡CSiMe3. The reaction is followed by electrospray mass spectrometry while the resulting solution is used for obtaining single crystals containing the functionalized clusters [H2C=CH-Ge9-CH=CH2](2-). For this purpose the solution is centrifuged, filtered, and carefully layered with a toluene solution of 18-crown-6. Left undisturbed for a few days, the so

  18. Synthesis of Nine-atom Deltahedral Zintl Ions of Germanium and their Functionalization with Organic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Gillett-Kunnath, Miriam M.; Sevov, Slavi C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the first studies of Zintl ions date between the late 1890's and early 1930's they were not structurally characterized until many years later.1,2 Their redox chemistry is even younger, just about ten years old, but despite this short history these deltahedral clusters ions E9n- (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; n = 2, 3, 4) have already shown interesting and diverse reactivity and have been at the forefront of rapidly developing and exciting new chemistry.3-6 Notable milestones are the oxidative coupling of Ge94- clusters to oligomers and infinite chains,7-19 their metallation,14-16,20-25 capping by transition-metal organometallic fragments,26-34 insertion of a transition-metal atom at the center of the cluster which is sometimes combined with capping and oligomerization,35-47 addition of main-group organometallic fragments as exo-bonded substituents,48-50 and functionalization with various organic residues by reactions with organic halides and alkynes.51-58 This latter development of attaching organic fragments directly to the clusters has opened up a new field, namely organo-Zintl chemistry, that is potentially fertile for further synthetic explorations, and it is the step-by-step procedure for the synthesis of germanium-divinyl clusters described herein. The initial steps outline the synthesis of an intermetallic precursor of K4Ge9 from which the Ge94- clusters are extracted later in solution. This involves fused-silica glass blowing, arc-welding of niobium containers, and handling of highly air-sensitive materials in a glove box. The air-sensitive K4Ge9 is then dissolved in ethylenediamine in the box and then alkenylated by a reaction with Me3SiC≡CSiMe3. The reaction is followed by electrospray mass spectrometry while the resulting solution is used for obtaining single crystals containing the functionalized clusters [H2C=CH-Ge9-CH=CH2]2-. For this purpose the solution is centrifuged, filtered, and carefully layered with a toluene solution of 18-crown-6. Left

  19. The Utilization of Amide Groups To Expand and Functionalize Metal-Organic Frameworks Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhiyong; Bai, Junfeng; Hang, Cheng; Meng, Fei; Liu, Wenlong; Pan, Yi; You, Xiaozeng

    2016-04-25

    A new stepwise ligand-elongation strategy by amide spacers is utilized to prepare isoreticularly high-porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely, quasi-mesoporous [Cu2 (PDBAD)(H2 O)]n (H4 PDBAD=5,5'-((4,4'-((pyridine-3,5-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))bis(benzoyl))bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid; NJU-Bai22: NJU-Bai for Nanjing University Bai's group), and mesoporous [Cu2 (PABAD)(H2 O)]n (H4 PABAD=5,5'-((4,4'-((4,4'-((pyridine-3,5-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl))bis(benzoyl))bis (azanediyl))bis(benzoyl))bis(azanediyl))diisophthalic acid; NJU-Bai23). Compared with the prototypical MOF of [Cu2 (PDAD)(H2 O)]n (H4 PDAD=5,5'-(pyridine-3,5-dicarbonyl)bis(azanediyl)diisophthalic acid; NJU-Bai21, also termed as PCN-124), both MOFs exhibit almost the same CO2 adsorption enthalpy and CO2 selectivity values, and better capacity for CO2 storage under high pressure; these results make them promising candidate materials for CO2 capture and sequestration. Interestingly, this new method, in comparison with traditional strategies of using phenyl or triple-bond spacers, is easier and cheaper, resulting in a better ability to retain high CO2 affinity and selectivity in MOFs with large pores and high CO2 storage capacity. Additionally, it may lead to the high thermal stability of the MOFs and also their tolerance to water, which is related to the balance between the density of functional groups and pore sizes. Therefore, this strategy could provide new opportunities to explore more functionalized mesoporous MOFs with high performance. PMID:27031809

  20. 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Electron Paramagnetic Spectroscopic Comparison of Hydrophobic Acid, Transphilic Acid, and Reverse Osmosis May 2012 Isolates of Organic Matter from the Suwannee River

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G.; Cook, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is found in most natural waters at concentrations low enough to make DOM isolation methodologies critical to full analytical characterization and preservation. During the last few decades, two major protocols have been developed for the extraction of DOM isolates from natural waters. These methods utilize XAD resins and reverse osmosis (RO). In this work, the hydrophobic acid (May 2012 HPOA) and transphilic acid (May 2012 TPIA) isolates from XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins, respectively, were compared with the RO (May 2012 RO) natural organic matter isolate of the Suwannee River water using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. 13C NMR analysis showed that the May 2012 RO isolate could be viewed as a hybrid of the more hydrophobic May 2012 HPOA isolate and more hydrophilic May 2012 TPIA isolate. The May 2012 HPOA isolate is shown to be higher in alkyl and aromatic moieties, while the May 2012 TPIA isolate is higher in O-alkyl moieties. EPR analysis revealed that the May 2012 TPIA and, in particular, May 2012 HPOA isolates had higher radical concentrations than the May 2012 RO isolate. It is postulated that some of the radical concentrations came from the use of base during the isolation procedures, especially in the XAD method. PMID:25565761

  1. Diversity and biofilm-production ability among isolates of Escherichia coli phylogroup D belonging to ST69, ST393 and ST405 clonal groups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic group D Escherichia coli clones (ST69, ST393, ST405) are increasingly reported as multidrug resistant strains causing extra-intestinal infections. We aim to characterize inter- and intraclonal diversity of a broad sample (isolates from different geographic locations and origins with variable antibiotic resistance profiles, 1980-2010) and their ability to adhere and form biofilm by both a modified quantitative biofilm producing assay and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). Results High virulence scores were observed among ST69 (median 14/range 9–15) and ST393 (median 14/range 8–15) clones, particularly enriched in pap alleles, iha, kpsMTII-K5 and ompT, in contrast with ST405 (median 6/range 2–14) isolates, exhibiting frequently fyuA, malX and traT. All ST69 and ST393 and only two ST405 isolates were classified as ExPEC. Biofilm production was detected in two non-clinical ST69 and three ST393 isolates from different origins showing variable virulence profiles. Within each clonal group, and despite the high diversity of PFGE-types observed, isolates from different countries and recovered over large periods of time were clustered in a few groups sharing common virulence gene profiles among ST69 (n = 10 isolates) and ST393 (n = 9 isolates) (fimH-iha-iutA-kpsMTII-K5-(traT)-sat-(ompT)-papA-papEF-papGII-papC) or ST405 (n = 6 isolates) (fimH-traT-fyuA-malX). Conclusions This study highlights the circulation of highly transmissible ST69, ST393 and ST405 variants among different settings. Biofilm production seems not to be directly correlated with their epidemiological success. PMID:23800205

  2. Organic petrology and coalbed gas content, Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene), northern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, P.C.; Warwick, P.D.; Breland, F.C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Wilcox Group (Paleocene-Eocene) coal and carbonaceous shale samples collected from four coalbed methane test wells in northern Louisiana were characterized through an integrated analytical program. Organic petrographic analyses, gas desorption and adsorption isotherm measurements, and proximate-ultimate analyses were conducted to provide insight into conditions of peat deposition and the relationships between coal composition, rank, and coalbed gas storage characteristics. The results of petrographic analyses indicate that woody precursor materials were more abundant in stratigraphically higher coal zones in one of the CBM wells, consistent with progradation of a deltaic depositional system (Holly Springs delta complex) into the Gulf of Mexico during the Paleocene-Eocene. Comparison of petrographic analyses with gas desorption measurements suggests that there is not a direct relationship between coal type (sensu maceral composition) and coalbed gas storage. Moisture, as a function of coal rank (lignite-subbituminous A), exhibits an inverse relationship with measured gas content. This result may be due to higher moisture content competing for adsorption space with coalbed gas in shallower, lower rank samples. Shallower ( 600??m) coal samples containing less moisture range from under- to oversaturated with respect to their CH4 adsorption capacity.

  3. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous In Vivo Grouping (MORPHING) for Directed Enzyme Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, David; Molina-Espeja, Patricia; Garcia-Ruiz, Eva; Alcalde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Approaches that depend on directed evolution require reliable methods to generate DNA diversity so that mutant libraries can focus on specific target regions. We took advantage of the high frequency of homologous DNA recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to develop a strategy for domain mutagenesis aimed at introducing and in vivo recombining random mutations in defined segments of DNA. Mutagenic Organized Recombination Process by Homologous IN vivo Grouping (MORPHING) is a one-pot random mutagenic method for short protein regions that harnesses the in vivo recombination apparatus of yeast. Using this approach, libraries can be prepared with different mutational loads in DNA segments of less than 30 amino acids so that they can be assembled into the remaining unaltered DNA regions in vivo with high fidelity. As a proof of concept, we present two eukaryotic-ligninolytic enzyme case studies: i) the enhancement of the oxidative stability of a H2O2-sensitive versatile peroxidase by independent evolution of three distinct protein segments (Leu28-Gly57, Leu149-Ala174 and Ile199-Leu268); and ii) the heterologous functional expression of an unspecific peroxygenase by exclusive evolution of its native 43-residue signal sequence. PMID:24614282

  4. Ammonia capture in porous organic polymers densely functionalized with Brønsted acid groups.

    PubMed

    Van Humbeck, Jeffrey F; McDonald, Thomas M; Jing, Xiaofei; Wiers, Brian M; Zhu, Guangshan; Long, Jeffrey R

    2014-02-12

    The elimination of specific environmental and industrial contaminants, which are hazardous at only part per million to part per billion concentrations, poses a significant technological challenge. Adsorptive materials designed for such processes must be engendered with an exceptionally high enthalpy of adsorption for the analyte of interest. Rather than relying on a single strong interaction, the use of multiple chemical interactions is an emerging strategy for achieving this requisite physical parameter. Herein, we describe an efficient, catalytic synthesis of diamondoid porous organic polymers densely functionalized with carboxylic acids. Physical parameters such as pore size distribution, application of these materials to low-pressure ammonia adsorption, and comparison with analogous materials featuring functional groups of varying acidity are presented. In particular, BPP-5, which features a multiply interpenetrated structure dominated by <6 Å pores, is shown to exhibit an uptake of 17.7 mmol/g at 1 bar, the highest capacity yet demonstrated for a readily recyclable material. A complementary framework, BPP-7, features slightly larger pore sizes, and the resulting improvement in uptake kinetics allows for efficient adsorption at low pressure (3.15 mmol/g at 480 ppm). Overall, the data strongly suggest that the spatial arrangement of acidic sites allows for cooperative behavior, which leads to enhanced NH3 adsorption. PMID:24456083

  5. Enterobacteriaceae and related organisms isolated from shell eggs collected during commercial processing.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Northcutt, J K; Jones, D R; Cox, N A; Harrison, M A

    2008-06-01

    In the United States, commercial shell eggs are washed and graded before retail. Since passage of the Egg Products Inspection Act in 1971, processing guidelines have been set to ensure that external and internal characteristics are maintained. However, less is known about how commercial processing affects the safety of shell eggs. To identify enteric bacteria entering plants and persisting throughout processing, eggs were collected from 3 US commercial shell egg-processing plants on 3 separate visits. On each plant visit, 12 eggs were collected from each of 12 sites along the processing line: accumulator, prewash rinse, first washer, second washer, sanitizer rinse, dryer, oiler, check detection/scales, 2 egg grader/packer head lanes, rewash belt entrance, and rewash belt exit. Each egg was sampled by a rinse technique, and the rinsate was plated onto violet red bile glucose agar with overlay for the detection and enumeration of Enterobacteriaceae. From each plate, up to 5 colonies were randomly selected and isolated for identification to genus or species by using biochemical tests. Several genera and species were detected at each of the 3 plants. Sites from which the greatest numbers of isolates were identified were those collected from eggs during preprocessing (accumulator, prewash rinse) or from eggs judged as dirty (rewash belt entrance or exit). Sites yielding the smallest number of isolates were those during or at the end of processing. Escherichia coli and Enterobacter spp. were isolated from each of the 9 plant visits. Other genera isolated from at least 1 of the 3 plants included Cedecea, Citrobacter, Erwinia, Hafnia, Klebsiella, Kluyvera, Leclercia, Morganella, Proteus, Providencia, Rahnella, Salmonella, and Serratia. Non-Enterobacteriaceae isolated and identified included Aeromonas, Chryseomonas, Listonella, Pseudomonas, Sphingobacterium, Vibrio, and Xanthomonas. All of the genera and species were recovered less frequently from fully processed eggs than

  6. Genome organization and host range of a Brazilian isolate of johnsongrass mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Camelo-García, Viviana Marcela; da Silva Andrade, Sónia Cristina; Geering, Andrew D W; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Rezende, Jorge A M

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the complete genome sequence, production of a polyclonal antiserum, and host range of a Brazilian strain of johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) found infecting Panicum maximum in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The complete genome sequence of this potyvirus, comprising 9874 nucleotides, showed 82 % amino acid sequence identity in the polyprotein to that of an isolate of JGMV from Australia. The experimental host range of this virus included mainly fodder species. Cultivated species such as rice, oats, sugarcane, rye, corn and wheat were not infected, suggesting that current isolates of this potyvirus do not represent a threat to these crops in Brazil. PMID:26869279

  7. Characterisation of geographically and temporally diverse Yersinia ruckeri isolates: evidence that UK and mainland European biotype 2 isolates represent different clonal groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been increased reports of outbreaks of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) caused by Yersinia ruckeri in previously-vaccinated salmonids in Europe, with some of these outbreaks attributed to emergent non-motile, Tween 80 negative, biotype 2 isolates. To gain information about their likely orig...

  8. Variations of SSU rDNA group I introns in different isolates of Cordyceps militaris and the loss of an intron during cross-mating.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tiantian; Yang, Tao; Sun, Junde; Guo, Suping; Yang, Huaijun; Dong, Caihong

    2014-08-01

    Cordyceps militaris, the type species of genus Cordyceps, is one of the most popular mushrooms and a nutraceutical in eastern Asia. It is considered a model organism for the study of Cordyceps species because it can complete its life cycle when cultured in vitro. In the present study, the occurrence and sequence variation of SSU rDNA group I introns, Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, among different isolates of C. militaris were analyzed. Based on the secondary structure predictions, the Cmi.S943 intron has been placed in subgroup IC1, and the Cmi.S1199 intron has been placed in subgroup IE. No significant similarity between Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199 suggested different origins. Three genotypes, based on the frequency and distribution of introns, were described to discriminate the 57 surveyed C. militaris strains. It was found that the genotype was related to the stroma characteristics. The stromata of all of the genotype II strains, which possessed only Cmi.S943, could produce perithecium. In contrast, the stromata of all genotype III strains, which had both Cmi.S943 and Cmi.S1199, could not produce perithecium. Cmi.S1199 showed the lowest level of intra-specific variation among the tested strains. Group I introns can be lost during strain cross-mating. Therefore, we presumed that during cross-mating and recombination, intron loss could be driven by positive Darwinian selection due to the energetic cost of transcribing long introns. PMID:24996897

  9. Number of nitrate groups determines reactivity and potency of organic nitrates: a proof of concept study in ALDH-2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, P; Hink, U; Oelze, M; Seeling, A; Isse, T; Bruns, K; Steinhoff, L; Brandt, M; Kleschyov, A L; Schulz, E; Lange, K; Weiner, H; Lehmann, J; Lackner, K J; Kawamoto, T; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) has been shown to provide a pathway for bioactivation of organic nitrates and to be prone to desensitization in response to highly potent, but not to less potent, nitrates. We therefore sought to support the hypothesis that bioactivation by ALDH-2 critically depends on the number of nitrate groups within the nitrovasodilator. Experimental approach: Nitrates with one (PEMN), two (PEDN; GDN), three (PETriN; glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) and four (pentaerithrityl tetranitrate, PETN) nitrate groups were investigated. Vasodilatory potency was measured in isometric tension studies using isolated aortic segments of wild type (WT) and ALDH-2−/− mice. Activity of the cGMP-dependent kinase-I (reflected by levels of phosphorylated VAsodilator Stimulated Phosphoprotein, P-VASP) was quantified by Western blot analysis, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity by HPLC. Following incubation of isolated mitochondria with PETN, PETriN-chromophore and PEDN, metabolites were quantified using chemiluminescence nitrogen detection and mass spectrometry. Key results: Compared to WT, vasorelaxation in response to PETN, PETriN and GTN was attenuated about 10fold in ALDH-2−/− mice, identical to WT vessels preincubated with inhibitors of ALDH-2. Reduced vasodilator potency correlated with reduced P-VASP formation and diminished biotransformation of the tetranitrate- and trinitrate-compounds. None of these findings were observed for PEDN, GDN and PEMN. Conclusions and implications: Our results support the crucial role of ALDH-2 in bioactivating highly reactive nitrates like GTN, PETN and PETriN. ALDH-2-mediated relaxation by organic nitrates therefore depends mainly on the number of nitrate groups. Less potent nitrates like PEDN, GDN and PEMN are apparently biotransformed by other pathways. PMID:17220910

  10. Prevalence and Characteristics of the Epidemic Multiresistant Escherichia coli ST131 Clonal Group among Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing E. coli Isolates in Copenhagen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Dennis S.; Nilsson, Frida; Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Leihof, Rikke Fleron; Struve, Carsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Johnston, Brian; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Johnson, James R.

    2013-01-01

    We report the characteristics of 115 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli clinical isolates, from 115 unique Danish patients, over a 1-year study interval (1 October 2008 to 30 September 2009). Forty-four (38%) of the ESBL isolates represented sequence type 131 (ST13)1, from phylogenetic group B2. The remaining 71 isolates were from phylogenetic groups D (27%), A (22%), B1 (10%), and B2 (3%). Serogroup O25 ST131 isolates (n = 42; 95% of ST131) comprised 7 different K antigens, whereas two ST131 isolates were O16:K100:H5. Compared to non-ST131 isolates, ST131 isolates were associated positively with CTX-M-15 and negatively with CTX-M-1 and CTX-M-14. They also were associated positively with 11 virulence genes, including afa and dra (Dr family adhesins), the F10 papA allele (P fimbria variant), fimH (type 1 fimbriae), fyuA (yersiniabactin receptor), iha (adhesin siderophore), iutA (aerobactin receptor), kpsM II (group 2 capsules), malX (pathogenicity island marker), ompT (outer membrane protease), sat (secreted autotransporter toxin), and usp (uropathogenicity-specific protein) and negatively with hra (heat-resistant agglutinin) and iroN (salmochelin receptor). The consensus virulence gene profile (>90% prevalence) of the ST131 isolates included fimH, fyuA, malX, and usp (100% each), ompT and the F10 papA allele (95% each), and kpsM II and iutA (93% each). ST131 isolates were also positively associated with community acquisition, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) status, and the O25, K100, and H4 antigens. Thus, among ESBL E. coli isolates in Copenhagen, ST131 was the most prevalent clonal group, was community associated, and exhibited distinctive and comparatively extensive virulence profiles, plus a greater variety of capsular antigens than reported previously. PMID:23554186

  11. Complexation of Mercury(II) in Soil Organic Matter: EXAFS Evidence for Linear Two-Coordination with Reduced Sulfur Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Skyllberg,U.; Bloom, P.; Qian, J.; Lin, C.; Bleam, W.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg) is to a great extent controlling biologically mediated processes, such as mercury methylation, in soils, sediments, and surface waters. Of utmost importance are complexation reactions with functional groups of natural organic matter (NOM), indirectly determining concentrations of bioavailable, inorganic Hg species. Two previous extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic studies have revealed that reduced organic sulfur (S) and oxygen/nitrogen (O/N) groups are involved in the complexation of Hg(II) to humic substances extracted from organic soils. In this work, covering intact organic soils and extending to much lower concentrations of Hg than before, we show that Hg is complexed by two reduced organic S groups (likely thiols) at a distance of 2.33 Angstroms in a linear configuration. Furthermore, a third reduced S (likely an organic sulfide) was indicated to contribute with a weaker second shell attraction at a distance of 2.92-3.08 Angstroms. When all high-affinity S sites, corresponding to 20-30% of total reduced organic S, were saturated, a structure involving one carbonyl-O or amino-N at 2.07 Angstroms and one carboxyl-O at 2.84 Angstroms in the first shell, and two second shell C atoms at an average distance of 3.14 Angstroms, gave the best fit to data. Similar results were obtained for humic acid extracted from an organic wetland soil. We conclude that models that are in current use to describe the biogeochemistry of mercury and to calculate thermodynamic processes need to include a two-coordinated complexation of Hg(II) to reduced organic sulfur groups in NOM in soils and waters.

  12. Anion Coordination in Metal-Organic Frameworks Functionalized with Urea Hydrogen-Bonding Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav; Hay, Benjamin P.

    2005-12-15

    A series of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) functionalized with urea hydrogen-bonding groups have been designed, synthesized, and structurally analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction to evaluate the efficacy of anion binding within the structural constraints of the MOFs. We found that urea-based functionalities may be used for anion binding within metal-organic frameworks when the tendency for urea???urea self-association is decreased by strengthening the intramolelcular CH???O hydrogen bonding of N-phenyl substituents to the carbonyl oxygen atom. Theoretical calculations indicate that N,N?-bis(m-pyridyl)urea (BPU) and N,N?-bis(m-cyanophenyl)urea (BCPU) should have enhanced hydrogen-bonding donor abilities toward anions and decreased tendencies to self-associate into hydrogen-bonded chains compared to other disubstituted ureas. Accordingly, BPU and BCPU were incorporated in MOFs as linkers through coordination of various Zn, Cu, and Ag transition metal salts, including Zn(ClO4)2, ZnSO4, Cu(NO3)2, Cu(CF3SO3)2, AgNO3 and AgSO3CH3. Structural analysis by single-crystal X-ray diffraction showed that these linkers are versatile anion binders, capable of chelate hydrogen bonding to all of the oxoanions explored. Anion binding by the urea functionalities was found to successfully compete with urea self-association in all cases except for that of charge-diffuse perchlorate. This research was sponsored by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy, under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (managed by UT-Battelle, LLC), and performed at Oak Ridge National laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (managed by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830). This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences laboratory

  13. Genetic and antigenic analysis of betanodaviruses isolated from aquatic organisms in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chi, S C; Shieh, J R; Lin, S J

    2003-08-01

    Viral nervous necrosis (VNN) is a worldwide disease among marine fishes. In Taiwan, NNN disease was first identified in 2 species of hatchery-reared grouper, Epinephelus fuscogutatus and E. akaaya in 1994. Since then, increasing mortalities have occurred among groupers Epinephelus spp., and also among European eels Anguilla anguilla L., yellow-wax pompano Trachinotus falcatus, firespot snapper Lutaanus erythropterus B., barramundi Lates calcarifer, cobias Rachycentron canadum, humpback groupers Cromileptes altivelis and Chinese catfish Parasilurus asotus. In the present study, samples were collected from affected fishes and processed for reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR amplification and virus isolation in cell culture. Infected cells (GF-1 cell line) exhibited cytopathic-effect characteristics of grouper nervous necrosis virus (GNNV). A RT-PCR product of approximately 830 bp was amplified from the brain homogenate of tested samples and sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the amplified RT-PCR products from all isolates were strongly homologous (> 97 %) with the corresponding region of the published sequence of red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNVV). Therefore, all Taiwan NNV (nervous necrosis virus) isolates studied in this report belong to the RGNNV genotype. We used 5 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against GNNV to analyze the antigenic relationship of Taiwan NNV isolates and striped jack nervous necrosis virus (SJNNV). The results of neutralization tests revealed that all Taiwan NNV isolates were closely related, but antigenically different from SJNNV in 3 neutralizing epitopes. To our knowledge, this is the first description of NNV infection in European eels, yellow-wax pompano, firespot snapper, cobia and Chinese catfish, and the first reported instance of natural NNV infection in freshwater fishes causing high mortality. PMID:13677508

  14. THE ACS LCID PROJECT. IV. DETECTION OF THE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP IN ISOLATED GALAXIES OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Monelli, M.; Hidalgo, S. L; Aparicio, A.; Gallart, C.; Cassisi, S.; Bernard, E. J.; Skillman, E. D. E-mail: carme@iac.e E-mail: shidalgo@iac.e E-mail: ejb@roe.ac.u

    2010-08-01

    We report the detection and analysis of the red giant branch (RGB) luminosity function bump in a sample of isolated dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. We have designed a new analysis approach comparing the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with theoretical best-fit CMDs derived from precise estimates of the star formation histories of each galaxy. This analysis is based on studying the difference between the V magnitude of the RGB bump and the horizontal branch at the level of the RR Lyrae instability strip ({Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB}) and we discuss here a technique for reliably measuring this quantity in complex stellar systems. By using this approach, we find that the difference between the observed and predicted values of {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} is +0.13 {+-} 0.14 mag. This is smaller, by about a factor of 2, than the well-known discrepancy between theory and observation at low metallicity commonly derived for Galactic globular clusters (GCs). This result is confirmed by a comparison between the adopted theoretical framework and empirical estimates of the {Delta}V {sup bump}{sub HB} parameter for both a large database of Galactic GCs and for four other dwarf spheroidal galaxies for which this estimate is available in the literature. We also investigate the strength of the RGB bump feature (R{sub bump}), and find very good agreement between the observed and theoretically predicted R{sub bump} values. This agreement supports the reliability of the evolutionary lifetimes predicted by theoretical models of the evolution of low-mass stars.

  15. Genome sequence of Shimia str. SK013, a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from marine sediment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; Vandieken, Verona; Petersen, Jörn; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans -Peter; et al

    2016-03-12

    Shimia strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the Roseobacter group within the family Rhodobacteraceae. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of Shimia str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (mttB) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that Shimia str. SK013 is able to switchmore » from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (fla1) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated Shimia str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of Shimia str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of Roseobacter-affiliated bacteria to the benthic environment.« less

  16. Absence of a functional erm gene in isolates of Mycobacterium immunogenum and the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group, based on in vitro clarithromycin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Hanson, Kimberly; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Nash, Kevin A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Parodi, Nicholas; Smith, Terry; Gee, Martha; Strong, Anita; Barker, Adam; Cohen, Samuel; Muir, Haleina; Slechta, E Susan; Wallace, Richard J

    2015-03-01

    Macrolide resistance has been linked to the presence of a functional erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) gene in most species of pathogenic rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM). For these Mycobacterium isolates, extended incubation in clarithromycin is necessary to determine macrolide susceptibility. In contrast, the absence of a detectable erm gene in isolates of M. chelonae, M. senegalense, and M. peregrinum and a nonfunctional erm gene in M. abscessus subsp. massiliense and 15% to 20% of M. abscessus subsp. abscessus isolates renders these species intrinsically macrolide susceptible. Not all RGM species have been screened for the presence of an erm gene, including the Mycobacterium mucogenicum group (M. mucogenicum, M. phocaicum, and M. aubagnense) and Mycobacterium immunogenum. A total of 356 isolates of these two pathogenic RGM taxa from two reference laboratories (A.R.U.P. Reference Laboratories and the Mycobacteria/Nocardia Laboratory at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler) underwent clarithromycin susceptibility testing with readings at 3 to 5 days and 14 days. Only 13 of the 356 isolates had resistant clarithromycin MICs at initial extended MIC readings, and repeat values on all available isolates were ≤2 μg/ml. These studies suggest that these two additional RGM groups do not harbor functional erm genes and, like M. chelonae, do not require extended clarithromycin susceptibility testing. We propose to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute that isolates belonging to these above-mentioned six rapidly growing mycobacterial groups based on molecular identification with no known functional erm genes undergo only 3 to 5 days of susceptibility testing (to exclude mutational resistance). PMID:25568437

  17. ANALYTICAL ISOLATION, SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MUTAGENS FROM NONVOLATILE ORGANICS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general procedure has been developed for the concentration/fractionation of mutagenic residue organics from small, <50L, and large, to 1200L, volumes of drinking water obtained from a variety of sources. This procedure features concentration of the residue organics chromatograp...

  18. Social organization of a stable natal group of captive Guyanese squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus sciureus).

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Meredith J; McIntyre, Chelsea; Salenetri, Nicole D

    2011-10-01

    Socioecological models suggest competition for food, foraging efficiency, predation, infanticide risk, and the costs of dispersal regulate primate social structure and organization. Wild populations of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) appear to conform to the predictions of the predation/competition socioecological model (Sterck et al. in Behav Ecol Sociobiol 41:291-309, 1997) and the dispersal/foraging efficiency model (Isbell in Kinship and behavior in primates. Oxford University, New York, pp 71-108, 2004). However, squirrel monkeys in captivity are reported to maintain patterns of social behavior observed in their wild conspecifics despite different food distribution, predation risk, and dispersal options. This behavioral similarity suggests squirrel monkeys' social behavior has limited flexibility to respond to environmental changes. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the flexibility of social behavior within a captive group of S. sciureus. First, we determined whether dominance and affiliative relationships observed under normal laboratory conditions (with abundant, widely distributed, food; no dispersal option; and no predators) better matched published reports of relationships among wild conspecifics or the predictions of the predation/competition model. Second, we made preferred food items defensible to determine whether dominance interactions would become more frequent and linear, as predicted by the model. The model correctly predicted rates of dominance behavior in both conditions and a linear hierarchy in the defensible food condition but did not predict the consistent affiliative relationships and linear dominance hierarchy observed in normal lab conditions. Although hierarchies were linear and male dominant, manipulating food distribution changed the dominant individual within each sex. Our findings suggest interaction rates adapt more rapidly than social structure to environmental changes in Saimiri and recommend caution in interpreting tests

  19. Kenyan isolates of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici from 2008 to 2014: Virulence to SrTmp in the Ug99 race group and implications for breeding programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequent emergence of new variants in the Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt) Ug99 race group in Kenya has made pathogen survey a priority. We analyzed 140 isolates from 78 Pgt samples collected in Kenya between 2008 and 2014 and identified six races, including three not detected prior to 2013. G...

  20. Comparison of the prevalence and genomic characteristics of Clostridium difficile isolated from various production groups in a vertically integrated swine operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the prevalence of Clostridium difficile among different age and production groups of swine in a vertically integrated swine operation in Texas in 2006. Isolation of C. difficile was performed utilizing an enrichment technique and restrictive media. Prelim...

  1. EVALUATION OF THE ADSORPTION PROPERTIES OF SILICALITE FOR POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO ISOLATING POLAR LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT ORGANICS FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of their high affinity for water, low-molecular weight polar organic compounds are difficult to isolate from drinking water as a prelude to their identification and determination. Conventional isolation techniques such as solvent extraction, adsorption, gas purging and re...

  2. Frequency of Factor H-binding Protein Modular Groups and Susceptibility to Cross-reactive Bactericidal Activity in Invasive Meningococcal Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.; Harrison, Lee H.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2010-01-01

    Meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) is a promising vaccine candidate that elicits serum bactericidal antibodies in humans. Based on sequence variability of the entire protein, fHbp has been divided into three variant groups or two sub-families. We recently reported that the fHbp architecture was modular, consisting of five variable segments, each encoded by genes from one of two lineages. Based on combinations of segments from different lineages, all 70 known fHbp sequence variants could be classified into one of six modular groups. In this study, we analyzed sequences of 172 new fHbp variants that were available from public databases. All but three variants could be classified into one of the six previously described modular groups. Among systematically collected invasive group B isolates from the U.S. and Europe, modular group I overall was most common (60%) but group IV (natural chimeras) accounted for 23% of UK isolates and <1% of U.S. isolates (P<0.0001). Mouse antisera to recombinant fHbp from each of the modular groups showed modular group-specific bactericidal activity against strains with low fHbp expression but had broader activity against strains with higher fHbp expression. Thus both modular group and relative expression of fHbp affected strain susceptibility to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. The results confirmed the modular architecture of fHbp and underscored its importance for the design of broadly protective group B vaccines in different regions. PMID:20044056

  3. Prediction Of Organic Aerosol Volatility And Unidentified Functional Group Concentrations From Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Shipley, S.; Henderson, B. H.; Takahama, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to measure the functional group composition of organic aerosols (Russell et al., 2011). However, certain functional groups are not directly detected by FTIR spectroscopy, either due to fundamental limitations of the technique (e.g. tertiary carbons), or specific limitations of commonly employed methods of sample collection and analysis (e.g. ester and ether groups, Takahama et al., 2013). In addition, FTIR does not probe the size of molecules comprising an organic aerosol mixture, which prevents the direct calculation of organic aerosol volatility from FTIR measurements. In this study, primary organic aerosol concentrations in mixtures corresponding to different ambient scenarios have been extracted from previous GC-MS studies (Rogge et al., 1993). Secondary organic aerosol concentrations for different scenarios are simulated with an explicit chemistry model (Master Chemical Mechanism, http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCM ; Jerkin et al. 1997; Saunders et al., 2003; Jerkin et al., 2003) and partitioning model (SIMPOL.1, Pankow et al., 2008). For each of the different scenarios the concentrations of functional groups that are typically accessible by FTIR are calculated and analyzed in relation to the extra information not easily accessible by FTIR (e.g. volatility, tertiary carbons, ester and ether). The ability to predict the unknown quantities from FTIR measurements and thereby reduce the uncertainty in OM concentrations and OM/OC ratios measured by FTIR is examined and discussed.

  4. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Epiphytic and Endophytic Fungi from Marine Organisms: Isolation, Bioassay and Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Feng, Yan; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Gu, Peng-Juan; Wang, Yu; Ma, Li-Fang; Zhu, Yan-Hua

    2009-01-01

    In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata. PMID:19597575

  5. Complete Nucleotide Sequences and Genome Organization of Two Pepper Mild Mottle Virus Isolates from Capsicum annuum in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Kwon, Sun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)-P2 and -P3 were determined by the Sanger sequencing method. Although PMMoV-P2 and PMMoV-P3 have different pathogenicity in some pepper cultivars, the complete genome sequences of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 are composed of 6,356 nucleotides (nt). In this study, we report the complete genome sequences and genome organization of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 isolates from pepper species in South Korea. PMID:27198033

  6. Complete Nucleotide Sequences and Genome Organization of Two Pepper Mild Mottle Virus Isolates from Capsicum annuum in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Yoon, Ju-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV)-P2 and -P3 were determined by the Sanger sequencing method. Although PMMoV-P2 and PMMoV-P3 have different pathogenicity in some pepper cultivars, the complete genome sequences of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 are composed of 6,356 nucleotides (nt). In this study, we report the complete genome sequences and genome organization of PMMoV-P2 and -P3 isolates from pepper species in South Korea. PMID:27198033

  7. The Identification of Complex Organic Molecules in the Interstellar Medium: Using Lasers and Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy to Simulate the Interstellar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1998-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Group at NASA Ames Research Center is interested in the identification of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium Many smaller organic species (e.g. hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) have been previously identified by their radiofrequency signature due to molecular rotations. However, this becomes increasingly difficult to observe as the size of the molecule increases. Our group in interested in the identification of the carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (absorption features observed throughout the visible and near-infrared in the spectra of stars, due to species in the interstellar medium). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules are thought to be good candidates for these carriers. Laboratory experiments am performed at Ames to simulate the interstellar environment, and to compare spectra obtained from molecules in the laboratory to those derived astronomically. We are also interested in PAHs with respect to their possible connection to the UIR (Unidentified infrared) and ERE (Extended Red Emission) bands - emission features found to emanate from particular regions of our galaxy (e.g. Orion nebula, Red Rectangle, etc.). An old, "tried and proven spectroscopic technique, matrix isolation spectroscopy creates molecular conditions ideal for performing laboratory astrophysics.

  8. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from seawater organisms caught in Campania Region: preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental contamination by pharmaceuticals is a public health concern: drugs administered to humans and animals are excreted with urine or faeces and attend the sewage treatment. The main consequences of use and abuse of antibiotics is the development and diffusion of antibiotic resistance that has become a serious global problem. Aim of the study is to evaluate the presence of antimicrobial residues and to assess the antimicrobial resistance in bacteria species isolated from different wild caught seawater fish and fishery products. Results Three antibiotic substances (Oxytetracicline, Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim) were detected (by screening and confirmatory methods) in Octopus vulgaris, Sepia officinalis and Thais haemastoma. All Vibrio strains isolated from fish were resistant to Vancomycin (VA) and Penicillin (P). In Vibrio alginolyticus, isolated in Octopus vulgaris, a resistance against 9 antibiotics was noted. Conclusions Wild caught seawater fish collected in Gulf of Salerno (Campania Region), especially in marine areas including mouths of streams, were contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria strains and that they might play an important role in the spread of antibiotic-resistance. PMID:25027759

  9. Principles of demineralization: modern strategies for the isolation of organic frameworks. Part I. Common definitions and history.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Hermann; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Demadis, Konstantinos D; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2008-12-01

    In contrast to biomineralization phenomena, that are among the most widely studied topics in modern material and earth science and biomedicine, much less is systematized on modern view of demineralization. Biomineralized structures and tissues are composites, containing a biologically produced organic matrix and nano- or microscale amorphous or crystalline minerals. Demineralization is the process of removing the inorganic part, or the biominerals, that takes place in nature via either physiological or pathological pathways in organisms. In vitro demineralization processes, used to obtain mechanistic information, consist in the isolation of the mineral phase of the composite biomaterials from the organic matrix. Physiological and pathological demineralization include, for example, bone resorption mediated by osteoclasts. Bioerosion, a more general term for the process of deterioration of the composite biomaterials represents chemical deterioration of the organic and mineral phase followed by biological attack of the composite by microorganisms and enzymes. Bioerosional organisms are represented by endolithic cyanobacteria, fungi, algae, plants, sponges, phoronids and polychaetes, mollusks, fish and echinoids. In the history of demineralization studies, the driving force was based on problems of human health, mostly dental caries. In this paper we summarize and integrate a number of events, discoveries, milestone papers and books on different aspect of demineralization during the last 400 years. Overall, demineralization is a rapidly growing and challenging aspect of various scientific disciplines such as astrobiology, paleoclimatology, geomedicine, archaeology, geobiology, dentistry, histology, biotechnology, and others to mention just a few. PMID:18403210

  10. Influences on Member Assimilation in Work Groups in High-Reliability Organizations: A Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Karen Kroman; McPhee, Robert D.

    2006-01-01

    This multilevel investigation examined the effect of group interaction and its influence on individual-level membership variables and group assimilation. The study is based on a model of group socialization developed by Moreland and Levine (1982) and was modified in this study to investigate the development and maintenance of highly interdependent…

  11. Inhibition of precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ravichandran, M.; Aiken, G.R.; Ryan, J.N.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (??? x 10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5 x 10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5 x 10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moleties was preferentially removed with the solid. Hydrophobic organic acids (humic and fulvic acids) inhibited aggregation better than hydrophilic organic acids. The presence of chloride, acetate, salicylate, EDTA, and cysteine did not inhibit the precipitation or aggregation of metacinnabar. Calcium enhanced metacinnabar aggregation even in the presence of DOM, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on the concentrations of DOM, Hg, and Ca. Inhibition of metacinnabar precipitation appears to be a result of strong DOM-Hg binding. Prevention of aggregation of colloidal particles appears to be caused by adsorption of DOM and electrostatic repulsion.Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations (???3 mg C/L) of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations (???5??10-8 M), DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations (5??10-5 M), DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar (Hg passed through a 0.1 ??m filter but was removed by centrifugation). At Hg concentrations greater than 5??10-4 M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 ??m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was preferentially

  12. ISOLATING AND EVALUATING ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS: EVALUATION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most solid-phase sediment toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) techniques for organic chemicals have been focused on solid phase sorptive techniques, such as amending contaminated sediments with the carbonaceous resin, Ambersorb, coconut charcoal, or XAD resin to reduce t...

  13. Recovery of an unusual Flavobacterium group IIb-like isolate from a hand infection following pig bite.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Merkin, T E; Pickett, M J

    1990-01-01

    An unusual gram-negative rod (RMA 1571) was isolated from a hand infection following a pig bite. This unclassified isolate was characterized by growth requirements, microscopic examination, biochemical characteristics, antimicrobial susceptibility tests, and cellular fatty acid analysis. It was indole positive and produced yellow-pigmented growth, which placed it in the genus Flavobacterium, but its other features, including cellular fatty acid analysis, did not appear to be those of a named species. PMID:2351726

  14. Synchroma pusillum sp. nov. and other new algal isolates with chloroplast complexes confirm the Synchromophyceae (Ochrophyta) as a widely distributed group of amoeboid algae.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Maria; Horn, Susanne; Flieger, Kerstin; Ehlers, Katrin; Wilhelm, Christian; Schnetter, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Seven new isolates of the heterokont algal class Synchromophyceae are described from coastal habitats of the Atlantic Ocean, including the Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas. All of the new isolates contain chloroplast complexes, a key feature of this group of algae. Morphology, pigments and DNA sequences support a monophyletic grouping of the Synchromophyceae to the exclusion of other Ochrophyta (primarily photosynthetic stramenopiles). Within the Synchromophyceae, two phylogenetic clades based on rbcL and 18S rDNA data were discovered, which differ in cell size and also the number of plastid complexes per cell. Two isolates form a clade with the type species Synchroma grande, while all other isolates form a separate clade, including the newly described species S. pusillum. Further species delineation of the isolates is difficult due to the highly similar morphology and life cycle strategy. Phylogenetic relationships with other genera of the Ochrophyta, such as Leukarachnion and Chlamydomyxa, are apparent and shed light on a heterogeneous branch of heterokont evolution. PMID:22578425

  15. Determination of the etiological organism during acute exacerbations of COPD and efficacy of azithromycin, ampicillin-sulbactam, ciprofloxacin and cefaclor. Turkish Thoracic Society COPD Working Group.

    PubMed

    Umut, S; Tutluoglu, B; Aydin Tosun, G; Müsellim, B; Erk, M; Yildirim, N; Vahapoglu, H; Yilmaz, N; Arseven, O; Türker, H; Erelel, M; Ilvan, A; Göylüsün, V; Yilmaz Kuyucu, T; Koşar, F; Soysal, F; Gür, A; Unutmaz, S; Oztürk, S; Akman, M

    1999-06-01

    Acute exacerbations, most of which are due to lower respiratory tract infections, cause great morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and most of these are due to lower respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the causative organism and the effects of azithromycin, ampicillin sulbactam (sultamicillin), ciprofloxacin and cefaclor monohydrate therapy in COPD. One hundred and six patients with COPD in acute exacerbation were randomized into four groups for empiric antibiotic treatment following lung function tests and sputum examination. The most common strains isolated from sputum were Haemophilus influenzae (30.8%), Streptoccocus pneumoniae (12%) and Moraxella catarrhalis (7.7%). Azithromycin, sultamicillin, ciprofloxacin and cefaclor monohydrate were found to be effective in treating COPD exacerbations. PMID:10435684

  16. Attitudes and beliefs about deceased organ donation in the Arabic-speaking community in Australia: a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Angelique F; Alyami, Ali; Allen, Richard D M; Howard, Kirsten; Craig, Jonathan C; Chadban, Steve J; Irving, Michelle; Tong, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the beliefs and attitudes to organ donation in the Arabic-speaking community. Design Arabic-speaking participants were purposively recruited to participate in 6 focus groups. Transcripts were analysed thematically. Participants 53 participants, aged 19–77 years, and originating from 8 countries, participated in 1 of 6 focus groups. Participants identified as Christian (73%), Islam (26%), Buddhist (2%) or did not identify with any religion (2%). Results 6 themes (with subthemes) were identified; religious conviction; invisibility of organ donation; medical suspicion; owning the decision; and reciprocal benefit. Conclusions Although organ donation is considered a generous life-saving ‘gift’, representative members of the Arabic-speaking community in Australia were unfamiliar with, unnerved by and sceptical about the donation process. Making positive decisions about organ donation would likely require resolving tensions between respecting family, community and religious values versus their individual autonomy. Providing targeted education about the process and benefits of organ donation within the Arabic community may clarify ambiguities surrounding cultural and religious-based views on organ donation, reduce taboos and suspicion towards donation, and in turn, lead to increased organ donation rates. PMID:26787253

  17. Organic facies mapping and modeling of the Viking Group (Middle Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous), northern North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kangas, R.J. )

    1991-03-01

    The organic facies are mapped and modeled here using an exploration-oriented, geological approach where geological and geophysical data are integrated with organic petrological and petroleum geochemical data. The aim is to come up with a comprehensive model/models to explain the observed organic facies distribution patterns and variations both vertically and laterally in relation to the paleoenvironmental changes. The Viking Group is traditionally divided into the Heather Formation and overlying Draupne Formation, the Kimmeridge Clay Formation Eqd tolent, comprising the major oil and gas source rocks in the area and beyond. In this study, the formations are further subdivided into basin-wide correlatable units, the distribution patterns of which, as well as the sedimentation rates for decompacted units calculated, are then mapped in space and time. The vertical and lateral changes in the quantity and quality/type of the organic matter present is studied in selected wells. The organic petrographical techniques, especially the quantitative maceral and tois on whole-rock polished blocks, have turned out to be of irreplaceable significance in identifying and characterizing different organic facies and in integrating geological concepts and observations with geochemical data. Organic facies models are proposed and discussed. The models are basically of two types, where either a physically induced organic matter preservation alone is critical or where the better organic matter preservation is brought about by high primary productivity in the photic zone. In this study, it is realized that more complex combined-type models are often more valid.

  18. Screening for Bacillus subtilis group isolates that degrade cyanogens at pH 4.5-5.0.

    PubMed

    Abban, Stephen; Brimer, Leon; Abdelgadir, Warda S; Jakobsen, Mogens; Thorsen, Line

    2013-01-15

    Cyanogenic food crops abound in nature with important crops like cassava forming the staple food for over half a billion people. Detoxification by hydrolysis of cassava cyanogenic glycosides often involves acid fermentation, and in some of these processes Bacillus species are encountered. Forty Bacillus spp. (20 Bacillus subtilis, 11 Bacillus licheniformis, 7 Bacillus sonorensis, 2 Bacillus cereus) isolated from acid fermented primary starters to produce Gergoush, a Sudanese fermented snack, were screened for their ability to grow and to hydrolyze linamarin, the major cyanogen found in cassava at pH levels below 5.0; also the cyanogen amygdalin was assessed. The B. subtilis isolates grew in both HCl and lactic acid environments from pH 4.5-6.0 while being able to break down the cyanogenic glycosides. The B. licheniformis and B. sonorensis isolates grew and degraded cyanogens at pH 5.0 in a HCl environment, while two B. cereus isolates used in the study showed no breakdown reaction under all conditions tested. One B. subtilis isolate was observed to have substrate specificity between the breakdown of linamarin and amygdalin. We conclude that some Bacillus spp. isolates are important in the microbiological breakdown of cyanogens in cassava fermentations even at pH 4.5-5.0 though further investigations are required. PMID:23261810

  19. FT-IR quantification of the carbonyl functional group in aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol from phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kathryn M.; Ruthenburg, Travis C.; Smith, Jeremy; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort; Dillner, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from aqueous-phase reactions of some organic species, including phenols, contribute significantly to particulate mass in the atmosphere. In this study, we employ a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique to identify and quantify the functional group makeup of phenolic SOA. Solutions containing an oxidant (hydroxyl radical or 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde) and either one phenol (phenol, guaiacol, or syringol) or a mixture of phenols mimicking softwood or hardwood emissions were illuminated to make SOA, atomized, and collected on a filter. We produced laboratory standards of relevant organic compounds in order to develop calibrations for four functional groups: carbonyls (Cdbnd O), saturated C-H, unsaturated C-H and O-H. We analyzed the SOA samples with transmission FT-IR to identify and determine the amounts of the four functional groups. The carbonyl functional group accounts for 3-12% of the SOA sample mass in single phenolic SOA samples and 9-14% of the SOA sample mass in mixture samples. No carbonyl functional groups are present in the initial reactants. Varying amounts of each of the other functional groups are observed. Comparing carbonyls measured by FT-IR (which could include aldehydes, ketones, esters, and carboxylic acids) with eight small carboxylic acids measured by ion chromatography indicates that the acids only account for an average of 20% of the total carbonyl reported by FT-IR.

  20. End-group-directed self-assembly of organic compounds useful for photovoltaic applications

    DOEpatents

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Lee, Olivia P.; Yiu, Alan T.; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2016-05-31

    The present invention provides for an organic compound comprising electron deficient unit covalently linked to two or more electron rich units. The present invention also provides for a device comprising the organic compound, such as a light-emitting diode, thin-film transistor, chemical biosensor, non-emissive electrochromic, memory device, photovoltaic cells, or the like.

  1. Comparative analysis of agr groups and virulence genes among subclinical and clinical mastitis Staphylococcus aureus isolates from sheep flocks of the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Lara M; de Almeida, Mayra Zilta P R B; de Mendonça, Carla L; Mamizuka, Elsa M

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent mastitis causative agents in small ruminants. The expression of most virulence genes of S. aureus is controlled by an accessory gene regulator (agr) locus. This study aimed to ascertain the prevalence of the different agr groups and to evaluate the occurrence of encoding genes for cytotoxin, adhesins and toxins with superantigen activity in S. aureus isolates from milk of ewes with clinical and subclinical mastitis in sheep flocks raised for meat production The agr groups I and II were identified in both cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis. Neither the arg groups III and IV nor negative agr were found. The presence of cflA gene was identified in 100% of the isolates. The frequency of hla and lukE-D genes was high - 77.3 and 82.8%, respectively and all isolates from clinical mastitis presented these genes. The sec gene, either associated to tst gene or not, was identified only in isolates from subclinical mastitis. None of the following genes were identified: bbp, ebpS, cna, fnbB, icaA, icaD, bap, hlg, lukM-lukF-PV and se-a-b-d-e. PMID:24294245

  2. Effects of resource-building group intervention on career management and mental health in work organizations: randomized controlled field trial.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Jukka; Toppinen-Tanner, Salla; Mutanen, Pertti

    2012-03-01

    A resource-building group intervention was developed to enhance career management, mental health, and job retention in work organizations. The in-company training program provided employees with better preparedness to manage their own careers. The program activities were universally implemented using an organization-level, 2-trainer model with trainers from the human resources management and occupational health services. The study was a within-organizations, randomly assigned field experimental study; it investigated the impacts of the intervention on immediate career management preparedness and later mental health and intentions to retire early. A total of 718 eligible individuals returned a questionnaire in 17 organizations and became voluntary participants. The respondents were randomly assigned to either an intervention (N = 369) or a comparison group (N = 349). Those in the intervention group were invited to group intervention workshops, whereas those in the comparison group received printed information about career and health-related issues. The 7-month follow-up results showed that the program significantly decreased depressive symptoms and intentions to retire early and increased mental resources among the group participants compared to the others. The mediation analyses demonstrated that the increase in career management preparedness as a proximal impact of the intervention mediated the longer term mental health effects. Those who benefited most from the intervention as regards their mental health were employees with elevated levels of depression or exhaustion and younger employees, implying additional benefits of a more targeted use of the intervention. The results demonstrated the benefits of the enhancement of individual-level career management and resilience resources as career and health promotion practice in work organizations. PMID:21942405

  3. [Susceptibilities of clinical bacterial isolates to antimicrobial agents. A study mainly focused on imipenem. Reported by the Research Group for Testing Imipenem Susceptibility on Clinical Isolates].

    PubMed

    Igari, J

    1990-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate susceptibilities of clinical bacterial isolates to imipenem (IPM) and other antibacterial agents at 64 hospital laboratories throughout Japan from September to December of 1988. In this study, identification and susceptibility testing were carried out at each laboratory and the tests were performed according to the disk dilution method recommended by NCCLS in which susceptibilities are classified into "S", "MS", "I" and "R". IPM showed markedly high in vitro activities against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus faecalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, Salmonella spp., Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Morganella morganii, Providencia rettgeri, Providencia stuartii, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis, Alcaligenes spp., Peptococcus spp./Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides spp. IPM also had strong activities against Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but less active against Flavobacterium spp., E. faecium, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas cepacia. In a study in which activities of IPM against bacteria isolated from different clinical sources were compared, differences in susceptibilities were observed among S. aureus, CNS, A. calcoaceticus and P. aeruginosa, but such differences were not apparent among S. pneumoniae, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, C. freundii, S. marcescens or P. mirabilis. PMID:2287060

  4. Genetic Relatedness and Superantigen Expression in Group A Streptococcus Serotype M1 Isolates from Patients with Severe and Nonsevere Invasive Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chatellier, Sonia; Ihendyane, Nahla; Kansal, Rita G.; Khambaty, Farukh; Basma, Hesham; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Low, Donald E.; McGeer, Allison; Kotb, Malak

    2000-01-01

    The relatedness of group A streptococcal (GAS) strains isolated from 35 Canadian patients with invasive disease of different severity was investigated by a variety of molecular methods. All patients were infected with M1T1 strains and, based on clinical criteria, were classified as severe (n = 21) and nonsevere (n = 14) invasive GAS infection cases. All the M1 strains studied had the emm1.0 allele and the same streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genotype, speA+ speB+ speC speF+ speG+ speH smeZ+ ssa. All isolates had the same speA allotype, speA2. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA banding pattern with two different primers was identical for all strains, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analysis showed that 33 and 30 isolates had identical banding patterns after DNA digestion with SfiI or SmaI, respectively; the nonidentical isolates differed from the main pattern by only one band. A relatively high degree of polymorphism in specific regions of the sic gene was observed among isolates; however, this polymorphism was not associated with disease severity. Likewise, although the phenotypic expression of SpeA, SpeB, and SpeF proteins varied among the M1T1 isolates, there was no correlation between the amount of Spe expressed and disease severity. Importantly, mitogenic and cytokine responses induced by partially purified bacterial culture supernatants containing a mixture of expressed superantigens were very similar for isolates from severe and nonsevere cases (P > 0.1). Together, the data indicate that highly related invasive M1T1 isolates, some indistinguishable, can cause disease of varying severity in different individuals. These findings underscore the contribution of host factors to the outcome of invasive GAS infections. PMID:10816507

  5. Genetic relatedness and superantigen expression in group A streptococcus serotype M1 isolates from patients with severe and nonsevere invasive diseases.

    PubMed

    Chatellier, S; Ihendyane, N; Kansal, R G; Khambaty, F; Basma, H; Norrby-Teglund, A; Low, D E; McGeer, A; Kotb, M

    2000-06-01

    The relatedness of group A streptococcal (GAS) strains isolated from 35 Canadian patients with invasive disease of different severity was investigated by a variety of molecular methods. All patients were infected with M1T1 strains and, based on clinical criteria, were classified as severe (n = 21) and nonsevere (n = 14) invasive GAS infection cases. All the M1 strains studied had the emm1.0 allele and the same streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (Spe) genotype, speA(+) speB(+) speC speF(+) speG(+) speH smeZ(+) ssa. All isolates had the same speA allotype, speA2. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA banding pattern with two different primers was identical for all strains, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis analysis showed that 33 and 30 isolates had identical banding patterns after DNA digestion with SfiI or SmaI, respectively; the nonidentical isolates differed from the main pattern by only one band. A relatively high degree of polymorphism in specific regions of the sic gene was observed among isolates; however, this polymorphism was not associated with disease severity. Likewise, although the phenotypic expression of SpeA, SpeB, and SpeF proteins varied among the M1T1 isolates, there was no correlation between the amount of Spe expressed and disease severity. Importantly, mitogenic and cytokine responses induced by partially purified bacterial culture supernatants containing a mixture of expressed superantigens were very similar for isolates from severe and nonsevere cases (P > 0.1). Together, the data indicate that highly related invasive M1T1 isolates, some indistinguishable, can cause disease of varying severity in different individuals. These findings underscore the contribution of host factors to the outcome of invasive GAS infections. PMID:10816507

  6. A new sesquiterpene antibiotic, heptelidic acid producing organisms, fermentation, isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Y; Kodama, K; Furuya, K; Takahashi, S; Haneishi, T; Takiguchi, Y; Arai, M

    1980-05-01

    A new sesquiterpene antibiotic, heptelidic acid, was found in the culture filtrate of three different strains of fungi isolated from soil samples. These strains were identified as Gliocladium virens, Chaetomium globosum and Trichoderma viride. Heptelidic acid was produced by conventional submerged culture and purified by successive column chromatography on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 and finally by preparative TLC on silica gel. The molecular formula of heptelidic acid was determined as C15H20O5 on the basis of elementary analysis and high resolution mass spectrometry of its monomethyl ester. The antimicrobial spectrum of the antibiotic revealed its specific activity against anaerobic bacteria, especially against Bacteroides fragilis. PMID:7191847

  7. Use of organic functional group concentrations as a means of screening for energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.; Camaioni, D.M.; Hallen, R.T.; Lerner, B.D.; Scheele, R.D.

    1996-06-01

    One of the safety concerns associated with the waste tanks on the Hanford site is the presence of organics in a highly oxidizing environment that could potentially act as a fuel source to maintain a propagating reaction. To determine this risk, it is necessary to determine the amount of high enthalpy organics present in the tanks. Currently, the primary ways of obtaining this information are to either rely on tank-fill histories, which are often unreliable and do not account for waste-aging processes, or obtain samples from the tank and speciate the organics present through a series of analytical procedures. While organic speciation has been successful in providing very valuable information about organics present in the tanks and the waste aging processes that are occurring in general, it can be costly and time consuming analyzing a large number of waste tanks. Differential scanning calorimetry has previously been used to obtain heat of reaction measurements of Hanford tank waste samples. However, differential scanning calorimetry is shown here to inadequately measure calculated heats of reaction of simulant tank mixtures. Overall, the preliminary results presented here, suggest that indeed Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determination of C-H and COO- organic content in tank waste samples analyzed in a hot cell environment. These techniques however, are not truly quantitative for this application and would be primarily used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that would require further, more detailed confirmatory analysis by organic speciation techniques.

  8. Multifractality to Photonic Crystal & Self-Organization to Metamaterials through Anderson Localizations & Group/Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Widastra

    2015-04-01

    Arthur Cayley at least investigate by creating the theory of permutation group[F:∖∖Group_theory.htm] where in cell elements addressing of the lattice Qmf used a Cayley tree, the self-afine object Qmf is described by the combination of the finite groups of rotation & inversion and the infinite groups of translation & dilation[G Corso & LS Lacena: ``Multifractal lattice and group theory'', Physica A: Statistical Mechanics &Its Applications, 2005, v 357, issue I, h 64-70; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/articel/pii/S0378437105005005 ] hence multifractal can be related to group theory. Many grateful Thanks to HE. Mr. Drs. P. SWANTORO & HE. Mr. Ir. SARWONO KUSUMAATMADJA.

  9. Surface structures, photovoltages, and stability of n-Si(111) electrodes surface modified with metal nanodots and various organic groups.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Susumu; Ohashi, Masato; Mashima, Kazushi; Liu, Yang; Yamazaki, Shoko; Nakato, Yoshihiro

    2005-09-13

    The surface structures, photovoltages, and stability of n-Si(111) electrodes surface-modified with Pt nanodots and organic groups were studied in an I-/I3- redox electrolyte, using alkyls of varied chain length and those having a double bond and ester at the terminal as the organic groups. The n-Si was first modified with the organic groups, and then Pt was electrodeposited on it. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed that, for the modification with alkyls, the overvoltage for the Pt deposition became significantly larger with increasing alkyl chain length, though this does not necessarily hold for the modification with alkyls having a double bond and ester. Scanning electron microscopic inspection showed that the Pt particle density decreased and the particle size increased, with increasing alkyl chain length. The photovoltaic characteristics and stability for the n-Si electrodes modified with the organic groups were much improved by the Pt nanodot coating, though they became somewhat inferior with increasing alkyl chain length. On the basis of these results, it is concluded that surface alkylation at high coverage together with coating with small Pt nanodots gives efficient and stable n-Si electrodes. PMID:16142967

  10. Biomaterial characteristics and application of silicone rubber and PVA hydrogels mimicked in organ groups for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Yan; Yang, Jun; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-01

    It is definite that transparent material with similar structural characteristics and mechanical properties to human tissue is favorable for experimental study of prostate brachytherapy. In this paper, a kind of transparent polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel and silicone rubber are developed as suitable substitutions for human soft tissue. Segmentation and 3D reconstruction of medical image are performed to manufacture the mould of organ groups through rapid prototyping technology. Micro-structure observation, force test and CCD deformation test have been conducted to investigate the structure and mechanical properties of PVA hydrogel used in organ group mockup. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image comparison results show that PVA hydrogel consisting of 3 g PVA, 17 g de-ionized water, 80 g dimethyl-sulfoxide (DMSO), 4 g NaCl, 1.5 g NaOH, 3 g epichlorohydrin (ECH) and 7 freeze/thaw cycles reveals similar micro-structure to human prostate tissue. Through the insertion force comparison between organ group mockup and clinical prostate brachytherapy, PVA hydrogel and silicone rubber are found to have the same mechanical properties as prostate tissue and muscle. CCD deformation test results show that insertion force suffers a sharp decrease and a relaxation of tissue deformation appears when needle punctures the capsule of prostate model. The results exhibit that organ group mockup consisting of PVA hydrogel, silicone rubber, membrane and agarose satisfies the needs of prostate brachytherapy simulation in general and can be used to mimic the soft tissues in pelvic structure. PMID:26042767

  11. What factors influence people's decisions to register for organ donation? The results of a nominal group study.

    PubMed

    Irving, Michelle J; Jan, Stephen; Tong, Allison; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Chadban, Steven; Rose, John; Cass, Alan; Allen, Richard D; Howard, Kirsten

    2014-06-01

    Rates of transplantation from deceased donors remain low, despite high rates of expressed support. We aimed to better understand this mismatch through determining community attitudes regarding willingness to register as organ donors. Participants were recruited from the general public in four Australian states. Using nominal group techniques, participants ranked factors they believed were important when deciding to register as a deceased donor. Thirteen nominal groups with 114 participants were conducted. 24 factors were ranked by three or more groups. The top ten factors were as follows: saving lives, own decision to donate, family opinions, benefit to recipients, process of organ donation, positive media, positive closure, clarity of consent and body dignity. Other factors included: the consent system, religious and cultural beliefs and incentives for donation. Participant age was a potential modifier of responses. Willingness to register as an organ donor is highly influenced by the altruistic motive of saving lives and improving lives for others; this should be harnessed in communication campaigns. Further research on ethical incentives for organ donation and continued efforts to promote support from religious groups may be useful. Many believe the sole right to consent to donation is theirs and not their families; consent policies reflecting this should be explored. PMID:24617320

  12. PREDICTION OF THE ACUTE TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMALAS) USING A GROUP CONTRIBUTION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group contribution method has been developed to correlate the acute toxicity (96 h LC50) to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) for 379 organic chemicals. Multilinear regression and computational neural networks (CNNs) were used for model building. The multilinear linear m...

  13. Environmental Involvement. Sources of Information (Including Directories and Lists) on Organizations, Institutions, Agencies, Groups, Etc., Concerned with Environmental Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinsmore, John

    Sources of information for environmental involvement are presented in this bibliography, designed not only as a single reference work but also to demonstrate the variety of sources which exist. Catalogued are organizations, institutions, agencies, and groups concerned with environmental affairs and providing international, continental, national,…

  14. Impact of Isolated Burns on Major Organs: A Large Animal Model Characterized.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, David M; McIntyre, Matthew K; Baker, Bryan A; Rizzo, Julie A; Brown, Ammon; Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Chung, Kevin K; Christy, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    Severe burn results in systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and multiple organ dysfunction (MOD). Currently, large-animal models of burn-induced SIRS/MOD mostly use secondary insults resulting in a paucity of knowledge on the effect of burn alone on different organ systems. The objective of the current study was to develop and characterize a large animal model of burn-induced SIRS over the course of 2 weeks. Yorkshire swine (n = 16) were randomized to sham controls (n = 4) or 40% total body surface area contact burns (n = 6 at 2 and 14 days post-burn). Blood chemistry and complete blood count analyses were performed at baseline and post-burn days 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, and 14. Upon euthanasia, tissue samples were taken for histopathology. Burns were found to be full thickness and did not re-epithelialize. SIRS was evidenced by increased body temperature, respiration rate, pulse, and white blood cell count for the duration of the experiment. Both acute liver injury and acute kidney injury were induced as determined biochemically and histologically. Histology also revealed atelectasis of the lungs which was associated with increased myeloperoxidase activity. Intestinal structure as well as enterocyte homeostasis was also disrupted. All of these organ abnormalities recovered to varying degrees by 14 days post-burn. We report a unique reproducible large animal model of burn-induced SIRS that can be tailored to specific organ systems for investigation into potential immunomodulatory interventions that prevent organ failure or promote organ recovery after burn injury. PMID:27380531

  15. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; MacDonald, A. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-06-01

    Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 m a.s.l. during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organic functional groups (OFG) and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM) concentrations ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1 μg m-3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m-3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m-3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone / methacrolein, MVK/MACR), were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 21% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups) was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and morphology of single particles

  16. Biogenic oxidized organic functional groups in aerosol particles from a mountain forest site and their similarities to laboratory chamber products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. E.; Russell, L. M.; Sjosted, S. J.; Vlasenko, A.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; MacDonald, A. M.; Li, S. M.; Liggio, J.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2010-02-01

    Submicron particles collected at Whistler, British Columbia, at 1020 masl during May and June 2008 on Teflon filters were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) techniques for organic functional groups (OFG) and elemental composition. Organic mass (OM) ranged from less than 0.5 to 3.1μg m-3, with a project mean and standard deviation of 1.3±1.0 μg m-3 and 0.21±0.16 μg m-3 for OM and sulfate, respectively. On average, organic hydroxyl, alkane, and carboxylic acid groups represented 34%, 33%, and 23% of OM, respectively. Ketone, amine and organosulfate groups constituted 6%, 5%, and <1% of the average organic aerosol composition, respectively. Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC), including isoprene and monoterpenes from biogenic VOC (BVOC) emissions and their oxidation products (methyl-vinylketone/methacrolein, MVK/MACR), were made using co-located proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We present chemically-specific evidence of OFG associated with BVOC emissions. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis attributed 65% of the campaign OM to biogenic sources, based on the correlations of one factor to monoterpenes and MVK/MACR. The remaining fraction was attributed to anthropogenic sources based on a correlation to sulfate. The functional group composition of the biogenic factor (consisting of 32% alkane, 25% carboxylic acid, 2% organic hydroxyl, 16% ketone, and 6% amine groups) was similar to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) reported from the oxidation of BVOCs in laboratory chamber studies, providing evidence that the magnitude and chemical composition of biogenic SOA simulated in the laboratory is similar to that found in actual atmospheric conditions. The biogenic factor OM is also correlated to dust elements, indicating that dust may act as a non-acidic SOA sink. This role is supported by the organic functional group composition and morphology of single particles, which were analyzed

  17. Inhibition of precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (mercuric sulfide) by dissolved organic matter isolated from the Florida Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, M.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.; Reddy, M.M.

    1999-05-01

    Precipitation and aggregation of metacinnabar (black HgS) was inhibited in the presence of low concentrations of humic fractions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated from the Florida Everglades. At low Hg concentrations, DOM prevented the precipitation of metacinnabar. At moderate Hg concentrations, DOM inhibited the aggregation of colloidal metacinnabar At Hg concentrations greater than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M, mercury formed solid metacinnabar particles that were removed from solution by a 0.1 {micro}m filter. Organic matter rich in aromatic moieties was preferentially removed with the solid. Hydrophobic organic acids inhibited aggregation better than hydrophilic organic acids. The presence of chloride, acetate, salicylate, EDTA, and cysteine did not inhibit the precipitation or aggregation of metacinnabar. Calcium enhanced metacinnabar aggregation even in the presence of DOM,m but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on the concentrations of DOM, Hg, and Ca. Inhibition of metacinnabar precipitation appears to be a result of strong DOM-Hg binding. Prevention of aggregation of colloidal particles appears to be caused by adsorption of DOM and electrostatic repulsion.

  18. Genotype analysis of Campylobacter spp. isolated from various internal organs of commercial broiler breeder hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are presently believed to be the leading bacterial etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis in the human population. Evidence implicates poultry as a significant source of the organism for human illness; however, the pathways involved in Campylobacter spp. contamination of poul...

  19. ISOLATION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FROM THE SUWANNEE RIVER USING REVERSE OSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A portable reverse osmosis (RO) system was constructed and used to concentrate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Suwannee River in southeastern Georgia. sing this RO system, 150-180 1/h of river water could be processed with 90% recovery of DOM. fter further cation exchange...

  20. Coupling reverse osmosis with electrodialysis to isolate natural organic matter from fresh waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was undertaken to solve the problem of removal of sulfate and silica from solutions of natural organic matter (NOM) that have been pre-concentrated by reverse osmosis. The goal is the development of a method by which NOM can be concentrated and desalted to obtain a low...

  1. MUTAGEN ISOLATION METHODS: FRACTIONATION OF RESIDUE ORGANICS FROM AQUEOUS ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic assessment of the mutagenic activity of organic residues from water entails application of the Salmonella test to both the parent residue mixture and to major subfractions obtained by reverse phase and/or normal phase HPLC. Such analyses overcome the presence in particula...

  2. CONSTANTS FOR MERCURY BINDING BY DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER ISOLATES FROM THE FLORIDA EVERGLADES. (R827653)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been implicated as an important complexing agent for Hg that can affect its mobility and bioavailability in aquatic ecosystems. However, binding constants for natural Hg-DOM complexes are not well known. We employed a competitive ligand appro...

  3. SEPARATION AND ISOLATION OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS USING VACUUM DISTILLATION WITH GC/MS DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vacuum distillation of water, soil, oil, and fish samples is presented as an alternative technique for determining volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Analyses of samples containing VOCs and non-VOCs at 50ppb concentrations were performed to evaluate method limitations. Analyte re...

  4. Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Cheng, Wei-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Distribution of virulence factors and association with emm polymorphism or isolation site among beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), the dominant human pathogenic species among group G streptococci, is the causative agent of several invasive and non-invasive diseases worldwide. However, limited information is available about the distribution of virulence factors among SDSE isolates, or their association with emm types and the isolation sites. In this study, 246 beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates collected in central Taiwan between February 2007 and August 2011 were under investigation. Of these, 66 isolates were obtained from normally sterile sites and 180 from non-sterile sites. emm typing revealed 32 types, with the most prevalent one being stG10.0 (39.8%), followed by stG245.0 (15.4%), stG840.0 (12.2%), stG6.1 (7.7%), and stG652.0 (4.1%). The virulence genes lmb (encoding laminin-binding protein), gapC (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase), sagA (streptolysin S), and hylB (hyaluronidase) existed in all isolates. Also, 99.2% of the isolates possessed slo (streptolysin O) and scpA (C5a peptidase) genes. In addition, 72.8%, 14.6%, 9.4%, and 2.4% of the isolates possessed the genes ska (streptokinase), cbp (putative collagen-binding protein, SDEG_1781), fbp (putative fibronectin-binding protein, SDEG_0161), and sicG (streptococcal inhibitor of complement), respectively. The only superantigen gene detected was spegg (streptococcus pyrogenic exotoxin G(dys) ), which was possessed by 74.4% of the isolates; these isolates correlated with non-sterile sites. Positive correlations were observed between the following emm types and virulence genes: stG10.0 and stG840.0 with spegg, stG6.1 and stG652.0 with ska, and stG840.0 with cbp. On the other hand, negative correlations were observed between the following: stG245.0, stG6.1, and stG652.0 types with spegg, stG10.0 with ska

  5. 75 FR 69469 - Health Net, Inc., Claims Processing Group and Systems Configuration Organization, Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 34174). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed the certification for... Employment and Training Administration Health Net, Inc., Claims Processing Group and Systems Configuration..., applicable to workers of Health Net, Inc., Claims Processing Group and Systems Configuration...

  6. The Design and Organization of Self-Determining Activity-Oriented, Outreach Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Charlotte Y.; Wynn, Richard E.

    This discussion is concerned with the rationale and method of the Woodard Outreach Group Model. Included is a description of some of the theoretical and strategic matters involved with this method of working with small groups. Examples are presented illustrating ways in which the model has been modified and used with success in a variety of…

  7. 75 FR 28298 - Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2009 (74 FR 57338). At the request of the State Agency, the... Resources Inc., Real Soft, InfoQuest Consulting Group, Ccsi Inc., ICONMA LLC, MGD Consulting, Inc., Case... Ltd., Exceed Resources Inc., Real Soft, InfoQuest Consulting Group, CCSI Inc., ICONMA LLC,...

  8. A Behavior Analysis of Individuals' Use of the Fairness Heuristic when Interacting with Groups and Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present analysis the author utilizes the groups as patches model (Goltz, 2009, 2010) to extend fairness heuristic theory (Lind, 2001) in which the concept of fairness is thought to be a heuristic that allows individuals to match responses to consequences they receive from groups. In this model, individuals who are reviewing possible groups…

  9. Whole-milk feeding duration, calf growth, and profitability of group-fed calves in an organic production system.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, E A; Heins, B J; Chester-Jones, H

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of early-life feeding duration on growth and economics of group-fed organic dairy calves. Heifer calves born during the spring of 2011 (n = 67) and the spring of 2012 (n = 57) were used to evaluate the effect of weaning age, growth, and profitability of group-fed calves fed once per day in an organic dairy production system. Calves were assigned to replicate feeding groups of 10 in super hutches by birth order, and were born at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center, Morris organic dairy. Breed groups were Holsteins (n = 15) selected for high production, Holsteins (n = 23) maintained at 1964 breed-average level, crossbreds (n = 54) including combinations of Holstein, Montbéliarde, and Swedish Red, and crossbreds (n = 32) including combinations of Holstein, New Zealand Friesian, Jersey, and Swedish Red. Groups of calves were weaned at 30 (EW, early weaning), 60 (MW, mid weaning), or 90 (LW, late weaning) d of age, and groups were fed 1.5% of birth weight of 13% total solids organic whole milk once daily and weaned when the group of 10 calves consumed an average of 0.91 kg of organic calf starter per calf per day for 4 consecutive days. Body measurements were recorded at birth, weekly during the preweaning period, at weaning, and monthly thereafter. Profitability was estimated as a function of the total cost for organic milk and organic calf starter for weaning groups to weaning and to the first 90 d of age. Preweaning group performance was weaning age, EW: 47.6d, MW: 64.5d, LW: 93.7d; weaning weight, EW: 61.8 kg, MW: 79.2 kg, LW: 108.1 kg; and gain per day, EW: 0.51 kg/d, MW: 0.63 kg/d, LW: 0.75 kg/d. Body weight (BW) did not differ among weaning groups at 90 d of age; however, MW calves had lower 120-d BW than did LW calves. The EW calves did not differ from either MW or LW calves for 120-d BW. Total feed costs to weaning for groups were $1,092.97 for EW calves, $1,871.24 for MW

  10. Effects of chronic citalopram treatment on 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in group- and isolation-housed mice.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lydia; Liebscher, Sabine; Jähkel, Monika; Oehler, Jochen

    2008-09-28

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are characterized by high clinical effectiveness and good tolerability. A 2-3 week delay in the onset of effects is caused by adaptive mechanisms, probably at the serotonergic (5-HT) receptor level. To analyze this in detail, we measured 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor bindings in vitro after 3 weeks of citalopram treatment (20 mg/kg i.p. daily) in group-housed as well as isolation-housed mice, reflecting neurobiological aspects seen in psychiatric patients. Isolation housing increased somatodendritic (+52%) and postsynaptic (+30-95%) 5-HT(1A) as well as postsynaptic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding (+25-34%), which confirms previous findings. Chronic citalopram treatment did not induce alterations in raphe 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor binding, independent of housing conditions. Housing-dependent citalopram effects on postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were found with increases in group- (+11-42%) but decreases in isolation-housed (-11 to 35%) mice. Forebrain 5-HT(2A) receptor binding decreased between 11 and 38% after chronic citalopram administration, independent of housing conditions. Citalopram's long-term action comprises alterations at the postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding levels. Housing conditions interact with citalopram effects, especially on 5-HT(1A) receptor binding, and should be more strongly considered in pharmacological studies. In general, SSRI-induced alterations were more pronounced and affected more brain regions in isolates, supporting the concept of a higher responsiveness in "stressed" animals. Isolation-induced receptor binding changes were partly normalized by chronic citalopram treatment, suggesting the isolation housing model for further analyses of SSRI effects, especially at the behavioral level. PMID:18657534

  11. Examinations of the matrix isolation fourier transform infrared spectra of organic compounds: Part XII

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, W. M., III; Gordon, B. M.; Lawrence, B. M.

    1989-02-01

    Matrix isolation Fourier transform infrared spectra (MI/FT-IR), massspectra (MS), carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (/sup 13/C-NMR) spectra,condensed-phase infrared spectra, and vapor-phase infrared (IR)spectra are presented for a series of terpene compounds. Subtle differencesin positional and configurational isomers commonly found withterpenes could be easily detected by the MI/FT-IR spectra. The resultsare comparable in some aspects to those obtainable from /sup 13/C-NMR andthin-film IR; however, most importantly, they are acquired at the lownanogram level for MI/FT-IR, as compared to the milligram level forthe other techniques. These results represent an advance in the technologyavailable for the analysis of complex mixtures such as essential oilscontaining terpene-like molecules.

  12. Examinations Of The Matrix Isolation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra Of Organic Compounds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, W. M.

    1989-12-01

    Matrix isolation Fourier transform infrared spectra (MI/FT-IR), mass spectra (MS), carbon-13 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (13C-NMR) spectra, condensed phase infrared spectra and vapor phase infrared (IR) spectra are presented for a series of terpene compounds. Subtle differences in positional and configurational isomers commonly found with terpenes could be easily detected by the. MI/FT-IR spqctra. The results are comparable in some aspects to those obtainable from IJC-NMR and thin film IR, however, most importantly, they are acquired at the low nanogram level for MI/FTIR as compared to the milligram level for the other techniques. These results represent an advance in the technology available for the analysis of complex mixtures such as essential oils containing terpene-like molecules.

  13. Enterobacteriaceae and related organisms isolated from nest run cart shelves in commercial shell egg processing facilities.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, M T; Jones, D R; Shaw, J D; Sheppard, M; Harrison, M A

    2009-10-01

    Enterobacteriaceae, including Salmonella, may be recovered from foods and processing facilities. High levels of Enterobacteriaceae in the processing plant environment can be an indication of inadequate sanitation. This experiment was designed to determine if nest run egg carts serve as reservoirs for Enterobacteriaceae. Eggs that are produced by hens not housed in buildings connected to the processing plant are referred to as nest run. Many of these eggs are transported to the plant on carts to be processed. Two plants in the southeastern United States were sampled. On each of 3 visits, 5 shelves on each of 5 carts were sampled (n=25/visit). A 12x12 cm area on each shelf was swabbed with a sterile gauze pad moistened with PBS and transported on ice back to the laboratory. Enterobacteriaceae were enumerated using violet red bile glucose agar incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. There was 100% prevalence for Enterobacteriaceae at plant A with an average 3.8 log10 cfu/mL swab diluent. Plant B had 90% prevalence for Enterobacteriaceae with an average 3.2 log10 cfu/mL swab diluent. Two randomly selected isolates from each positive sample were recultured 3 times to increase the likelihood of clonality and were then identified biochemically. Of the 124 isolates analyzed, genera identified were Citrobacter spp., Escherichia spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Hafnia spp., Kluyvera spp., Leclercia spp., and Salmonella spp. Pseudomonas spp. was the only non-Enterobacteriaceae identified by our methods. This work demonstrates that nest run egg carts serve as reservoirs for Enterobacteriaceae in the shell egg processing environment. PMID:19762864

  14. Group medical appointments: organization and implementation in the bone marrow transplantation clinic.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Kenneth R; Hill, John M; Root, Lynn; Kimtis, Elizabeth; Patchett, Linda; Noffsinger, Edward B

    2006-01-01

    Group medical appointments provide patients with prompt access to care, greater attention to their psychosocial needs, and increased time with their medical team. Care providers evaluate more patients with similar needs in a shorter period. Eligible patients (between 100 days and 3 years after autologous stem cell transplantation) were contacted to participate. The laboratory and radiographic results of each patient's completed reevaluation were entered into the electronic template office note before their visit. A group medical visit model, called a Physical Shared Medical Appointment (PSMA), was employed because this uses individual patient examinations followed by a group meeting. On the day of the visit, brief physical examinations were performed on each patient. A transplantation physician then met with the group of patients and answered questions. Patient satisfaction surveys were distributed upon completion of the group session. Each PSMA was limited to 10 patients to facilitate patient participation. Questions during the group meeting were general and applicable to all patients. At completion of the 2-hour visit, patient surveys indicated an extremely high level of satisfaction and the preference to attend a future PSMA. Issues discussed during the group meeting were pertinent to all transplant recipients, regardless of diagnosis. The PSMA model allows the patient to spend extended time with their care providers while providing the care providers an opportunity to discuss health issues with numerous patients during 1 appointment. The Dartmouth Transplant PSMA model is expanding to pretransplantation and postallogeneic transplant recipients. PMID:18632444

  15. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013-2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread of

  16. Vegetative compatibility groups and sexual reproduction among Spanish Monilinia fructicola isolates obtained from peach and nectarine orchards, but not Monilinia laxa.

    PubMed

    De Cal, Antonieta; Egüen, Beatriz; Melgarejo, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of occurrence of Monilinia fructicola in the Ebro Valley, Spain has increased since its first appearance in 2006, and M. fructicola has displaced Monilinia laxa, the native species which is the main cause of brown rot in peaches in this valley. In order to determine the characteristics that may be related to the displacement, we studied the capacity to generate new genotypic combinations of M. fructicola under laboratory conditions. The morphology and parasitic ability from ten field isolates of M. fructicola and M. laxa collected from three different orchards in the valley, and sampling from five different lesions were studied. Nitrate-non-utilising (nit) mutants were generated in order to test the isolates for vegetative compatibility which was done by assessing their colony growth when cultured singly or in pairs on media that contained different nitrogen sources. For the M. fructicola isolates, five vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) were identified using the nit mutants and six VCGs were identified when they were grown on potato dextrose agar dishes. In all instances, the vegetatively compatible M. fructicola isolates came mainly from the same orchard. Only one VCG displays the same morphological and competition characteristics. No VCGs were identified among the M. laxa isolates. We did not find any apothecia of M. laxa and M. fructicola isolates in the soil of the three orchards, but we were able to produce apothecia of M. fructicola in the laboratory. Our finding of sexual reproduction and VCGs in the M. fructicola isolates suggests that the genetic variability of M. fructicola could be maintained by sexual and/or parasexual recombination. PMID:24863477

  17. Genomic Analysis Reveals Multi-Drug Resistance Clusters in Group B Streptococcus CC17 Hypervirulent Isolates Causing Neonatal Invasive Disease in Southern Mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Edmondo; Rosini, Roberto; Ji, Wenjing; Guidotti, Silvia; Rojas-López, Maricarmen; Geng, Guozhu; Deng, Qiulian; Zhong, Huamin; Wang, Weidong; Liu, Haiying; Nan, Cassandra; Margarit, Immaculada; Rinaudo, C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal invasive disease caused by group B Streptococcus (GBS) represents a significant public health care concern globally. However, data related to disease burden, serotype distribution, and molecular epidemiology in China and other Asian countries are very few and specifically relative to confined regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from neonates with invasive disease during 2013–2014 at Guangzhou and Changsha hospitals in southern mainland China. We assessed the capsular polysaccharide type, pilus islands (PIs) distribution and hvgA gene presence in a panel of 26 neonatal clinical isolates, of which 8 were recovered from Early Onset Disease and 18 from Late Onset Disease (LOD). Among 26 isolates examined, five serotypes were identified. Type III was the most represented (15 cases), particularly among LOD strains (n = 11), followed by types Ib (n = 5), V (n = 3), Ia (n = 2) and II (n = 1). We performed whole-genome sequencing analysis and antimicrobial susceptibility testing on the 14 serotype III isolates belonging to the hypervirulent Clonal Complex 17 (serotype III-CC17). The presence of PI-2b alone was associated with 13 out of 14 serotype III-CC17 strains. Genome analysis led us to identify two multi-drug resistance gene clusters harbored in two new versions of integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs), carrying five or eight antibiotic resistance genes, respectively. These ICEs replaced the 16 kb-locus that normally contains the PI-1 operon. All isolates harboring the identified ICEs showed multiple resistances to aminoglycoside, macrolide, and tetracycline antibiotic classes. In conclusion, we report the first whole-genome sequence analysis of 14 GBS serotype III-CC17 strains isolated in China, representing the most prevalent lineage causing neonatal invasive disease. The acquisition of newly identified ICEs conferring multiple antibiotic resistance could in part explain the spread

  18. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current enotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández/, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  19. Correlations between major risk factors and closely related Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates grouped by three current genotyping procedures: a population-based study in northeast Mexico.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Molina-Salinas, Gloria María; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Padilla-Rivas, Gerardo Raymundo; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Torres-de-la-Cruz, Víctor Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Yazmin Berenice; Ortega-García, Jorge Luis; Garza-Treviño, Elsa Nancy; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Becerril-Montes, Pola; Said-Fernández, Salvador

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of tuberculosis (TB) patients related to a chain of recent TB transmissions were investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates (120) were genotyped using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-IS6110 (R), spacer oligotyping (S) and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (M) methods. The MTB isolates were clustered and the clusters were grouped according to the similarities of their genotypes. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients between the groups of MTB isolates with similar genotypes and those patient characteristics indicating a risk for a pulmonary TB (PTB) chain transmission were ana- lysed. The isolates showing similar genotypes were distributed as follows: SMR (5%), SM (12.5%), SR (1.67%), MR (0%), S (46.67%), M (5%) and R (0%). The remaining 35 cases were orphans. SMR exhibited a significant correlation (p < 0.05) with visits to clinics, municipalities and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus). S correlated with drug consumption and M with comorbidities. SMR is needed to identify a social network in metropolitan areas for PTB transmission and S and M are able to detect risk factors as secondary components of a transmission chain of TB. PMID:25317710

  20. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-03-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m-3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota.

  1. Feasibility of using an isolated intestinal segment as an artificial organ for enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Shelt, D; Walton, D; Sato, P

    1982-01-01

    Guinea pigs fed an ascorbic acid-deficient diet develop scurvy because of the absence of the enzyme L-gulonolactone oxidase. In theory if this enzyme is provided and its substrate L-gulonolactone is present at adequate concentrations ascorbic acid will be synthesized and the development of scurvy prevented. Using this model we tested whether a viable segment of intestine could be used to contain the administered enzyme and act as an artificial organ for the production of ascorbic acid. A surgical procedure was developed to prepare an externalized pouch of intestine with its circulation left intact. When enzyme is inserted in this intestinal bag it is not toxic and not antigenic in some animals, whereas, enzyme injected intraperitoneally is clearly antigenic. Synthesis of ascorbic acid by this artificial organ could not, however, be detected by elevation of plasma concentrations of the vitamin. PMID:7104431

  2. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K; Fileman, Elaine S; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m(-3). The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  3. Isolation of microplastics in biota-rich seawater samples and marine organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Matthew; Webb, Hannah; Lindeque, Pennie K.; Fileman, Elaine S.; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S.

    2014-01-01

    Microplastic litter is a pervasive pollutant present in aquatic systems across the globe. A range of marine organisms have the capacity to ingest microplastics, resulting in adverse health effects. Developing methods to accurately quantify microplastics in productive marine waters, and those internalized by marine organisms, is of growing importance. Here we investigate the efficacy of using acid, alkaline and enzymatic digestion techniques in mineralizing biological material from marine surface trawls to reveal any microplastics present. Our optimized enzymatic protocol can digest >97% (by weight) of the material present in plankton-rich seawater samples without destroying any microplastic debris present. In applying the method to replicate marine samples from the western English Channel, we identified 0.27 microplastics m−3. The protocol was further used to extract microplastics ingested by marine zooplankton under laboratory conditions. Our findings illustrate that enzymatic digestion can aid the detection of microplastic debris within seawater samples and marine biota. PMID:24681661

  4. Autonomous Pattern Formation of Micro-organic Cell Density with Optical Interlink between Two Isolated Culture Dishes.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Lee, Jeesoo; Song, Simon; Hara, Masahiko; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Artificial linking of two isolated culture dishes is a fascinating means of investigating interactions among multiple groups of microbes or fungi. We examined artificial interaction between two isolated dishes containing Euglena cells, which are photophobic to strong blue light. The spatial distribution of swimming Euglena cells in two micro-aquariums in the dishes was evaluated as a set of new measures: the trace momentums (TMs). The blue light patterns next irradiated onto each dish were deduced from the set of TMs using digital or analogue feedback algorithms. In the digital feedback experiment, one of two different pattern-formation rules was imposed on each feedback system. The resultant cell distribution patterns satisfied the two rules with an and operation, showing that cooperative interaction was realized in the interlink feedback. In the analogue experiment, two dishes A and B were interlinked by a feedback algorithm that illuminated dish A (B) with blue light of intensity proportional to the cell distribution in dish B (A). In this case, a distribution pattern and its reverse were autonomously formed in the two dishes. The autonomous formation of a pair of reversal patterns reflects a type of habitat separation realized by competitive interaction through the interlink feedback. According to this study, interlink feedback between two or more separate culture dishes enables artificial interactions between isolated microbial groups, and autonomous cellular distribution patterns will be achieved by correlating various microbial species, despite environmental and spatial scale incompatibilities. The optical interlink feedback is also useful for enhancing the performance of Euglena-based soft biocomputing. PMID:25622016

  5. On-line electrodialytic matrix isolation for chromatographic determination of organic acids in wine.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Kuhara, Kenta; Shigetomi, Aki; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuko; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Toda, Kei

    2014-10-31

    Chromatographic determination of organic acids is widely performed, but the matrix often calls for lengthy and elaborate sample preparation prior to actual analysis. Matrix components, e.g., proteins, non-ionics, lipids etc. are typically removed by a combination of centrifugation/filtration and solid phase extraction (SPE) that may include the use of ion-exchange media. Here we report the quantitative electrodialytic transfer of organic acids from complex samples to ultrapure water in seconds using cellulose membranes modified with N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, which essentially eliminates the negative ζ-potential of a regenerated cellulose membrane surface. The transfer characteristics of the ion transfer device (ITD) were evaluated with linear carboxylic acids. While the ion transfer efficiencies may be affected by the acid dissociation constants, in most cases it is possible to achieve quantitative transfer under optimized device residence time (solution flow rate) and the applied voltage. In addition, the transfer efficiency was unaffected by the wide natural variation of pH represented in real samples. The approach was applied to organic acids in various samples, including red wine, considered to represent an especially difficult matrix. While quantitative transfer of the organic acids (as judged by agreement with standard pretreatment procedures involving SPE) was achieved, transfer of other matrix components was <5%. The processed samples could then be chromatographically analyzed in a straightforward manner. We used ion exclusion chromatography with direct UV detection; in treated samples; there was a dramatic reduction of the large early peaks observed compared to only 0.45μm membrane filtered samples. PMID:25465003

  6. Drug resistance of organisms isolated from feces of laboratory mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Maejima, K; Urano, T; Tamura, H; Terakado, N

    1980-01-01

    A total of 248 strains of EScherichia coli, 132 of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 137 of Streptococcus faecalis and 89 of STr. faecium were collected from feces of 40 mice and 36 rats of 8 colonies in 1978, and drug resistance were examined by an agar dieution method using 23 antibiotics. The results indicated a positive relation between use of antibiotics and appearance of multiple drug resistant organisms. PMID:6772455

  7. Characterization of Aspergillus section Flavi isolated from organic Brazil nuts using a polyphasic approach.

    PubMed

    Reis, T A; Baquião, A C; Atayde, D D; Grabarz, F; Corrêa, B

    2014-09-01

    Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), an important non-timber forest product from Amazonia, is commercialized in worldwide markets. The main importers of this nut are North America and European countries, where the demand for organic products has grown to meet consumers concerned about food safety. Thus, the precise identification of toxigenic fungi is important because the Brazil nut is susceptible to colonization by these microorganisms. The present study aimed to characterize by polyphasic approach strains of Aspergillus section Flavi from organic Brazil nuts. The results showed Aspergillus flavus as the main species found (74.4%), followed by Aspergillus nomius (12.7%). The potential mycotoxigenic revealed that 80.0% of A. flavus were toxin producers, 14.3% of which produced only aflatoxin B (AFB), 22.85% of which produced only cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), and 42.85% produced both them. All strains of A. nomius were AFB and AFG producers and did not produce CPA. There is no consensus about what Aspergillus species predominates on Brazil nuts. Apparently, the origin, processing, transport and storage conditions of this commodity influence the species that are found. The understanding about population of fungi is essential for the development of viable strategies to control aflatoxins in organic Brazil nuts. PMID:24929714

  8. Triplet photochemistry of effluent and natural organic matter in whole water and isolates from effluent-receiving rivers.

    PubMed

    Bodhipaksha, Laleen C; Sharpless, Charles M; Chin, Yu-Ping; Sander, Michael; Langston, William K; MacKay, Allison A

    2015-03-17

    Effluent organic matter (EfOM), contained in treated municipal wastewater, differs in composition from naturally occurring dissolved organic matter (DOM). The presence of EfOM may thus alter the photochemical production of reactive intermediates in rivers that receive measurable contributions of treated municipal wastewater. Quantum yield coefficients for excited triplet-state OM (3OM*) and apparent quantum yields for singlet oxygen (1O2) were measured for both whole water samples and OM isolated by solid phase extraction from whole water samples collected upstream and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges in three rivers receiving differing effluent contributions: Hockanum R., CT (22% (v/v) effluent flow), E. Fork Little Miami R., OH (11%), and Pomperaug R., CT (6%). While only small differences in production of these reactive intermediates were observed between upstream and downstream whole water samples collected from the same river, yields of 3OM* and 1O2 varied by 30-50% between the rivers. Apparent quantum yields of 1O2 followed similar trends to those of 3OM*, consistent with 3OM* as a precursor to 1O2 formation. Higher 3OM* reactivity was observed for whole water samples than for OM isolates of the same water, suggesting differential recoveries of photoreactive moieties by solid phase extraction. 3OM* and 1O2 yields increased with increasing E2/E3 ratio (A254 nm divided by A365 nm) and decreased with increasing electron donating capacities of the samples, thus exhibiting trends also observed for reference humic and fulvic acid isolates. Mixing experiments with EfOM and DOM isolates showed evidence of quenching of triplet DOM by EfOM when measured yields were compared to theoretical yields. Together, the results suggest that effluent contributions of up to 25% (v/v) to river systems have a negligible influence on photochemical production of 3OM* and 1O2 apparently because of quenching of triplet DOM by EfOM. Furthermore, the results

  9. [Susceptibilities of clinical bacterial isolates to antimicrobial agents. A study mainly focused on imipenem. Research Group for Testing Imipenem Susceptibility on Clinical Isolates].

    PubMed

    Igari, J

    1990-10-01

    We investigated susceptibilities of clinical bacterial isolates to imipenem (IPM) and other antimicrobial agents at 459 hospital laboratories throughout Japan from September to December of 1988. In this study, identification and susceptibility testing were performed at each hospital laboratory and the tests were carried out according to the 1-dilution or 3-dilution disc technique in which susceptibilities are classified into 4 grades: , ++, + and -. IPM had significantly high activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Salmonella spp., Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis, Providencia rettgeri, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Moraxella catarrhalis, Alcaligenes spp., Peptococcus spp./Peptostreptococcus spp., Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides spp. and should slightly lower activities on coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), Enterococcus faecalis, Haemophilus influenzae, Serratia marcescens, Proteus vulgaris, Providencia stuartii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa than on the above mentioned bacteria. In a comparative study on activities of IPM against bacteria from different clinical sources, no remarkable differences were found due to different sources among S. pneumoniae, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, E. cloacae, C. freundii, P. mirabilis or A. calcoaceticus, whereas slight differences were found among Staphylococcus aureus, CNS, S. marcescens and P. aeruginosa. PMID:2086814

  10. Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Detecting and Typing Clostridium botulinum Group III Organisms and Their Mosaic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, Bruna; Woudstra, Cédric; Fach, Patrick; Fiore, Alfonsina; Skarin, Hanna; Bano, Luca; Segerman, Bo; Knutsson, Rickard; De Medici, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Botulism is a neuroparalytic disease that can occur in all warm-blooded animals, birds, and fishes. The disease in animals is mainly caused by toxins produced by Clostridium botulinum strains belonging to group III, although outbreaks due to toxins produced by group I and II organisms have been recognized. Group III strains are capable of producing botulinum toxins of type C, D, and C/D and D/C mosaic variants. Definitive diagnosis of animal botulism is made by combining clinical findings with laboratory investigations. Detection of toxins in clinical specimens and feed is the gold standard for laboratory diagnosis. Since toxins may be degraded by organisms contained in the gastrointestinal tract or may be present at levels below the detection limit, the recovery of C. botulinum from sick animal specimens is consistent for laboratory confirmation. In this article we report the development and in-house validation of a new multiplex real-time PCR for detecting and typing the neurotoxin genes found in C. botulinum group III organisms. Validation procedures have been carried out according to ISO 16140, using strains and samples recovered from cases of animal botulism in Italy and France. PMID:23971808

  11. The Impact of Conservation Management on the Community Composition of Multiple Organism Groups in Eutrophic Interconnected Man-Made Ponds.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A J

    2015-01-01

    Ponds throughout the world are subjected to a variety of management measures for purposes of biodiversity conservation. Current conservation efforts typically comprise a combination of multiple measures that directly and indirectly impact a wide range of organism groups. Knowledge of the relative impact of individual measures on different taxonomic groups is important for the development of effective conservation programs. We conducted a field study of 28 man-made ponds, representing four management types differing in the frequency of periodic pond drainage and the intensity of fish stock management. We disentangled the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of pond management measures on the community composition of phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent vascular plants. With the exception of phytoplankton, pond management had strong effects on the community composition of all investigated biota. Whether management affected communities directly or indirectly through its impact on fish communities or local environmental conditions in the pond varied between organism groups. Overall, the impact of pond drainage regime and fish community characteristics on the community composition of target organism groups were more important than local environmental conditions. The majority of taxa were negatively associated with fish density, whereas multiple emergent plant species and several taxa of aquatic macro-invertebrates were positively affected by increased drainage frequency. The effects of fish community and drainage tended to be largely independent. The present study indicates that pond drainage is an important element for biodiversity conservation in eutrophicated shallow and interconnected man-made ponds. PMID:26422390

  12. The Impact of Conservation Management on the Community Composition of Multiple Organism Groups in Eutrophic Interconnected Man-Made Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ponds throughout the world are subjected to a variety of management measures for purposes of biodiversity conservation. Current conservation efforts typically comprise a combination of multiple measures that directly and indirectly impact a wide range of organism groups. Knowledge of the relative impact of individual measures on different taxonomic groups is important for the development of effective conservation programs. We conducted a field study of 28 man-made ponds, representing four management types differing in the frequency of periodic pond drainage and the intensity of fish stock management. We disentangled the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of pond management measures on the community composition of phytoplankton, zooplankton, aquatic macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent vascular plants. With the exception of phytoplankton, pond management had strong effects on the community composition of all investigated biota. Whether management affected communities directly or indirectly through its impact on fish communities or local environmental conditions in the pond varied between organism groups. Overall, the impact of pond drainage regime and fish community characteristics on the community composition of target organism groups were more important than local environmental conditions. The majority of taxa were negatively associated with fish density, whereas multiple emergent plant species and several taxa of aquatic macro-invertebrates were positively affected by increased drainage frequency. The effects of fish community and drainage tended to be largely independent. The present study indicates that pond drainage is an important element for biodiversity conservation in eutrophicated shallow and interconnected man-made ponds. PMID:26422390

  13. Qualitative Organic Analysis: An Efficient, Safer, and Economical Approach to Preliminary Tests and Functional Group Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhingra, Sunita; Angrish, Chetna

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative organic analysis of an unknown compound is an integral part of the university chemistry laboratory curriculum. This type of training is essential as students learn to approach a problem systematically and to interpret the results logically. However, considerable quantities of waste are generated by using conventional methods of…

  14. The watercolor effect: a new principle of grouping and figure-ground organization.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Werner, John S; Spillmann, Lothar

    2003-01-01

    The watercolor effect is perceived when a dark (e.g., purple) contour is flanked by a lighter chromatic contour (e.g., orange). Under these conditions, the lighter color will assimilate over the entire enclosed area. This filling-in determines figure-ground organization when it is pitted against the classical Gestalt factors of proximity, good continuation, closure, symmetry, convexity, as well as amodal completion, and past experience. When it is combined with a given Gestalt factor, the resulting effect on figure-ground organization is stronger than for each factor alone. When the watercolor effect is induced by a dark red edge instead of an orange edge, its figural strength is reduced, but still stronger than without it. Finally, when a uniform surface is filled physically using the color of the orange fringe, figure-ground organization is not different from that for the purple contour only. These findings show that the watercolor effect induced by the edge could be an independent factor, different from the classical Gestalt factors of figure-ground organization. PMID:12505603

  15. Reading for Change: Social Justice Unionism Book Groups as an Organizing Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Kathleen Riley begins this article by providing quotes from James H. Lytle, and Anissa Weinraub, which were published in "Perspectives on Urban Education" in the summer of 2013. While they hold different professional positions (Lytle is a retired administrator and professor; Weinraub is a teacher and organizer), both wrote as…

  16. 26 CFR 56.4911-10 - Members of a limited affiliated group of organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Grass roots expenditures. A controlling member organization for which the expenditure test election is in effect shall include in its grass roots expenditures for its taxable year the grass roots... name, identification number, and the lobbying expenditures and grass roots expenditures on...

  17. Group Work in a Classroom: An Analogy with Organisms in a Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šorgo, Andrej

    2007-01-01

    There is a large number of relationships between organisms in communities, and these relationships comprise the following types: predation and parasitism, commensalism, protocooperation and mutualism, neutralism, amensalism, and competition. The possible effects of the relationship between two species are that one or the other can benefit (+),…

  18. In vitro effect of antibiotics on biofilm formation by Bacteroides fragilis group strains isolated from intestinal microbiota of dogs and their antimicrobial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Silva, Janice Oliveira; Martins Reis, Ana Catarina; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Pinheiro, Adriana Queiroz; Freire, Rosemary Souza; Oriá, Reinaldo Barreto; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano

    2014-08-01

    The Bacteroides fragilis group strains colonize the intestinal tract of dogs as commensal bacteria. Nevertheless, they can be opportunistic pathogens responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates in dogs, like in oral infections, abscesses and wound infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility in B. fragilis strains isolated from dogs intestinal microbiota and to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of some antimicrobials on biofilm formation. A total of 30 B. fragilis group strains were tested for susceptibility to ten antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution method. Thirteen B. fragilis strains were tested for biofilm formation and the biofilm producer strains were chosen to evaluate the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of six antimicrobials on biofilm formation. The isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, metronidazole, imipenem and chloramphenicol. Tetracycline and clindamycin were active against 50% and 33% of the strains, respectively. When biofilm-forming strains were grown in the presence of sub-MICs of imipenem and metronidazole, the inhibition of biofilm formation was observed. In contrast, enrofloxacin at ½ MIC caused a significant increase in biofilm formation in two of four strains examined. In conclusion, the B. fragilis group strains isolated were susceptible to most of the antimicrobials tested and the sub-MIC concentrations of imipenem, metronidazole and clindamycin were able to inhibit the biofilm formation. PMID:24799339

  19. Why It Is Hard to Support Group Work in Distributed Healthcare Organizations: Empirical Knowledge of the Social-Technical Gap

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua

    2005-01-01

    We used a participatory design process to understand and to support the group work of cancer clinical trial protocol design within a distributed organization, the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG). We also designed a collaborative writing system to facilitate its protocol reviewing and revising processes over the Internet. After a series of iterative prototyping and formative evaluations over the past two years, we identified a social-technical gap in our group work support research at SWOG. This gap consists of technical challenges, expanding user needs, conflicting user needs from different roles, insufficient incentive for using groupware technology by certain members, subtle organizational nuances, and the changing organizational structure. This paper describes our longitudinal evaluations results and elaborates on the social-technical gap. We think this gap may generalize to other healthcare group work settings. PMID:16779151

  20. Why it is hard to support group work in distributed healthcare organizations: empirical knowledge of the social-technical gap.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua

    2005-01-01

    We used a participatory design process to understand and to support the group work of cancer clinical trial protocol design within a distributed organization, the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG). We also designed a collaborative writing system to facilitate its protocol reviewing and revising processes over the Internet. After a series of iterative prototyping and formative evaluations over the past two years, we identified a social-technical gap in our group work support research at SWOG. This gap consists of technical challenges, expanding user needs, conflicting user needs from different roles, insufficient incentive for using groupware technology by certain members, subtle organizational nuances, and the changing organizational structure. This paper describes our longitudinal evaluations results and elaborates on the social-technical gap. We think this gap may generalize to other healthcare group work settings. PMID:16779151